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Sample records for high asthma morbidity

  1. Decreasing asthma morbidity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-12-12

    Dec 12, 1994 ... Table IV. Different morbidity scores as a percentage of total visits. Morbidity score ... to bronchodilators with or without antibiotics (no intravenous therapy or .... admissions needed surgery; almost 50% needed more than one ...

  2. Psychosocial stress and asthma morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A; Lange, Nancy E; Celedón, Juan C

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview and discussion of recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies of stress in relation to asthma incidence and morbidity. Recent findings suggest that stress, whether at the individual (i.e. epigenetics, perceived stress), family (i.e. prenatal maternal stress, early-life exposure, or intimate partner violence) or community (i.e. neighborhood violence; neighborhood disadvantage) level, influences asthma and asthma morbidity. Key recent findings regarding how psychosocial stress may influence asthma through Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, prenatal and postnatal maternal/caregiver stress, and community violence and deprivation are highlighted. New research illustrates the need to further examine, characterize, and address the influence of social and environmental factors (i.e. psychological stress) on asthma. Further, research and innovative methodologies are needed to characterize the relationship and pathways associated with stress at multiple levels to more fully understand and address asthma morbidity, and to design potential interventions, especially to address persistent disparities in asthma in ethnic minorities and economically disadvantaged communities.

  3. Morbid obesity and asthma : co-morbidity or causal relationship?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenburg-van Huisstede, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This thesis consists of three parts. Part A describes in chapter 2 the complex diagnosis of asthma in the morbidly obese, and especially focuses on underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis of asthma in this patient group. Part B investigates bronchial and systemic inflammation. It starts in chapter 3 with a

  4. Urban air pollution, climate and its impact on asthma morbidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyudmila Vasilievna Veremchuk; Vera Innokentievna Yankova; Tatyana Isaakovna Vitkina; Anna Vladimirovna Nazarenko; Kirill Sergeevich Golokhvast

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of formation of air quality and to determine the impact of the studied factors on asthma morbidity in Vladivostok. Methods: The evaluation of air pollution in Vladivostok was done using long-term (2008–2012) monitoring data (temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, etc.). The levels of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, formaldehyde (mg/m3) in six stationary observation posts were assessed. We studied the aerosol suspensions of solid particles, which were collected during snowfall from precipitation (snow) and air in 14 districts with different levels of anthropogenic impact. Melted snow was analyzed on laser granulometry. The impact of air pollution on the distribution of asthma morbidity was evaluated in various age groups by data of federal statistical observation obtained from 8 adults and 7 children municipal clinics in Vladivostok (2008–2012). Results: The content of suspended particulate components of pollution remained more stable, due to the features of atmospheric circulation, rugged terrain and residential development. The nano- and micro-sized particles (0–50 mm), which can absorb highly toxic metals, prevail in dust aerosols. These respirable fractions of particles, even in small doses, can contribute to the increase in asthma morbidity in the city. Conclusions: We determined that asthma morbidity depends from general air pollution (in the range of 18.3%). It was detected that the highest age-specific dependence is associated with the content of particulate matter, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in air.

  5. Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

  6. Individual-level socioeconomic status is associated with worse asthma morbidity in patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Anne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low socioeconomic status (SES has been linked to higher morbidity in patients with chronic diseases, but may be particularly relevant to asthma, as asthmatics of lower SES may have higher exposures to indoor (e.g., cockroaches, tobacco smoke and outdoor (e.g., urban pollution allergens, thus increasing risk for exacerbations. Methods This study assessed associations between adult SES (measured according to educational level and asthma morbidity, including asthma control; asthma-related emergency health service use; asthma self-efficacy, and asthma-related quality of life, in a Canadian cohort of 781 adult asthmatics. All patients underwent a sociodemographic and medical history interview and pulmonary function testing on the day of their asthma clinic visit, and completed a battery of questionnaires (Asthma Control Questionnaire, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale. General Linear Models assessed associations between SES and each morbidity measure. Results Lower SES was associated with worse asthma control (F = 11.63, p Conclusions Results suggest that lower SES (measured according to education level, is associated with several indices of worse asthma morbidity, particularly worse asthma control, in adult asthmatics independent of disease severity. Results are consistent with previous studies linking lower SES to worse asthma in children, and add asthma to the list of chronic diseases affected by individual-level SES.

  7. Obesity and asthma: co-morbidity or causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huisstede, A; Braunstahl, G J

    2010-09-01

    There is substantial evidence that obesity and asthma are related. "Obese asthma" may be a unique phenotype of asthma, characterized by decreased lung volumes, greater symptoms for a given degree of lung function impairment, destabilization or lack of asthma control, lack of eosinophilic inflammation and a different response to controller medication. Whether this relationship between obesity and asthma is causal or represents co-morbidity due to other factors is unclear. In previous reviews concerning the relationship between obesity and asthma, five hypotheses were put forth. One of these hypotheses is that a low grade systemic inflammation caused by adipokines from the fat tissue causes or enhances bronchial inflammation. In animal models, there is an increasing amount of evidence for the role of adipokines derived from fat tissue in the relationship between obesity and asthma. The data are conflicting in humans. Since obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome and the metabolic syndrome is also a form of systemic inflammation, it is to be expected that there is a relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma. The few data that are available show that there is no relationship between metabolic syndrome and asthma, but there is one between the metabolic syndrome and asthma-like symptoms. Further research is needed to confirm the relationship between obesity and asthma in humans, where a rigorous approach in the diagnosis of asthma is essential.

  8. Urban residence, neighborhood poverty, race/ethnicity, and asthma morbidity among children on Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keet, Corinne A; Matsui, Elizabeth C; McCormack, Meredith C; Peng, Roger D

    2017-09-01

    Although poor-urban (inner-city) areas are thought to have high asthma prevalence and morbidity, we recently found that inner cities do not have higher prevalent pediatric asthma. Whether asthma morbidity is higher in inner-city areas across the United States is not known. This study sought to examine relationships between residence in poor and urban areas, race/ethnicity, and asthma morbidity among children with asthma who are enrolled in Medicaid. Children aged 5 to 19 enrolled in Medicaid in 2009 to 2010 were included. Asthma was defined by at least 1 outpatient or emergency department (ED) visit with a primary diagnosis code of asthma over the 2-year period. Urbanization status was defined at the county level and neighborhood poverty at the zip-code level. Among children with asthma, logistic models were created to examine the effects of urbanization, neighborhood poverty, and race/ethnicity on rates of asthma outpatient visits, ED visits, and hospitalizations. This study included 16,860,716 children (1,534,820 with asthma). Among children enrolled in Medicaid, residence in inner-city areas did not confer increased risk of prevalent asthma in either crude or adjusted analyses, but it was associated with significantly more asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations among those with asthma in crude analyses (risk ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.24-1.36; and 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50-1.72, respectively) and when adjusted for race/ethnicity, age, and sex (adjusted risk ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.08-1.15; and 1.62; 95% CI, 1.26-1.43). Residence in urban or poor areas and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity were all independently associated with increased risk of asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations. Residence in poor and urban areas is an important risk factor for asthma morbidity, but not for prevalence, among low-income US children. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Urban air pollution, climate and its impact on asthma morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Vasilievna Veremchuk

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We determined that asthma morbidity depends from general air pollution (in the range of 18.3%. It was detected that the highest age-specific dependence is associated with the content of particulate matter, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in air.

  10. REDUCTION IN ASTHMA MORBIDITY IN CHILDREN AS A RESULT OF HOME REMEDIATION AIMED AT MOISTURE SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Home dampness, presence of mold and allergens have been associated with asthma morbidity. We examined changes in asthma morbidity in children as a result of home remediation aimed at moisture sources.Design: Prospective, randomized controlled trial.Part...

  11. [Descriptive study of morbidity and mortality due to asthma at a Health Sector institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Méndez, N H; Salas Ramírez, M; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the morbidity and mortality rate due to asthma from a Health Institution, which represents the majority of working population. Asthma data were obtained from the National Institute of Informatical, Geography and Statistics (INEGI), Mexican Health Secretary (SS) and Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). The underlying cause of death hospitalization or visit were obtained. Asthma was coded according to the International Classification of Disease (ninth revision). Asthma death rate was adjusted by age using direct method. In the IMSS, asthma death rate increased from 3.24/200,000 in 1980 to 12.76/100,000 in 1990. The asthma letality increased from 0.34 in 1980 to 1.23 in 1990. The average length of hospital stay was 3.96 days in 1990; there was noy significant differences by sex the most affected groups were children under 4 years of age and persons older than 65 years of age. In conclusion, from 1980 to 1990, the morbidity and mortality rate due to asthma in IMSS increased. It suggests that future health policy efforts should be focused to reduce the morbidity, mainly in high risk groups.

  12. Assessing the association of obesity and asthma morbidity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kevin Y; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Martynenko, Melissa; Mhango, Grace; Busse, Paula J; Wolf, Michael S; Holguin, Fernando; Federman, Alex D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a robust predictor of poor asthma control in younger adults. Given the high prevalence of asthma and obesity in older Americans, weight reduction could benefit asthma management in this population. To assess the association between obesity and asthma outcomes among older adults. We recruited from urban primary care clinics a prospective cohort of nonsmoking individuals with asthma who were 60 years or older without a history of other respiratory diseases. At baseline, body mass index (BMI) measurements were classified as normal (BMI, 18-25), overweight (BMI, 25-30), or obese (BMI, >30). Measures of asthma morbidity (Asthma Control Questionnaire [ACQ], and Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire [Mini-AQLQ]) and asthma-related resource utilization (inpatient or outpatient) were taken at baseline and at 3- and 12-month interviews. We used generalized estimating equation models to assess associations between obesity and asthma outcomes after controlling for potential confounders. Of the 437 older adults with asthma in the study, 17% had a normal BMI, 32% were overweight, and 51% were obese. Unadjusted analyses revealed that obesity was associated with lower ACQ scores (odds ratio [OR], 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.31) and poorer Mini-AQLQ scores (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.11-1.33). Adjusted analyses revealed no significant association between obesity and ACQ (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.96-1.15) and Mini-AQLQ (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99-1.19). Our study suggests that obesity is not independently associated with worse asthma outcomes in older adults, reflecting potential differences in the mechanisms that link obesity with asthma control in older vs younger populations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Urban air pollution,climate and its impact on asthma morbidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyudmila Vasilievna Veremchuk; Vera Innokentievna Yankova; Tatyana Isaakovna Vitkina; Anna Vladimirovna Nazarenko; Kirill Sergeevich Golokhvast

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the mechanism of formation of air quality and to determine the impact of the studied factors on asthma morbidity in Vladivostok.Methods:The evaluation of air pollution in Vladivostok was done using long-term(2008-2012) monitoring data(temperature,humidity,atmospheric pressure,wind speed,etc.).The levels of suspended particulate matter,nitrogen and sulfur dioxide,carbon monoxide,ammonia,formaldehyde(mg/m~3) in six stationary observation posts were assessed.We studied the aerosol suspensions of solid particles,which were collected during snowfall from precipitation(snow) and air in 14 districts with different levels of anthropogenic impact.Melted snow was analyzed on laser granulometry.The impact of air pollution on the distribution of asthma morbidity was evaluated in various age groups by data of federal statistical observation obtained from 8 adults and 7 children municipal clinics in Vladivostok(2008-2012).Results:The content of suspended particulate components of pollution remained more stable,due to the features of atmospheric circulation,rugged terrain and residential development.The nano- and micro-sized particles(0-50 μm),which can absorb highly toxic metals,prevail in dust aerosols.These respirable fractions of particles,even in small doses,can contribute to the increase in asthma morbidity in the city.Conclusions:We determined that asthma morbidity depends from general air pollution(in the range of 18.3%).It was detected that the highest age-specific dependence is associated with the content of particulate matter,carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in air.

  14. Ibuprofen and increased morbidity in children with asthma: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Ralph E; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-01-01

    NSAIDs are commonly avoided by patients with aspirin-induced asthma based on the premise that there is a significant cross-reactivity between aspirin and other NSAIDs. However, ibuprofen, a NSAID sold over the counter in most countries, is commonly given to children for relief of fever and mild-to-moderate pain. Consequently, increased risk of acute bronchospasm induced by ibuprofen in children with asthma remains a persistent concern. More recently, the assumption that children with asthma are at a greater risk for exacerbations of their disease if they take ibuprofen has been questioned. There is little evidence to measurably increases morbidity in the great majority of children with asthma. In addition, recent evidence suggest that ibuprofen measurably increases morbidity in the great majority of [corrected] children with asthma. Given the infrequent occurrence of aspirin/NSAID sensitivity in children with asthma, it seems reasonable to allow the use of ibuprofen in this population unless there is a personal or family history of aspirin-induced asthma. In addition, the inflammatory pathogenesis of asthma, anti-inflammatory effect of ibuprofen, and evidence suggesting ibuprofen may reduce morbidity in children with asthma raises the intriguing possibility that ibuprofen might actually have therapeutic benefit for at least some children with asthma.

  15. Asthma morbidity after the short-term use of ibuprofen in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Samuel M; Louik, Carol; Vezina, Richard M; Mitchell, Allen A

    2002-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that short-term use of ibuprofen increases asthma morbidity in children. A randomized, double-blind, acetaminophen-controlled clinical trial was conducted. Children who had asthma and a febrile illness were randomly assigned to receive either acetaminophen suspension or ibuprofen suspension for fever control. Rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits for asthma during follow-up were compared by randomization group. A total of 1879 children receiving asthma medications were studied. Rates of hospitalization for asthma did not vary significantly by antipyretic assignment; compared with children who were randomized to acetaminophen, the relative risk for children who were assigned to ibuprofen was 0.63 (95% confidence interval: 0.25-1.6). However, the risk of an outpatient visit for asthma was significantly lower in the ibuprofen group; compared with children who were randomized to acetaminophen, the relative risk for children who were assigned to ibuprofen was 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.34-0.95). Rather than supporting the hypothesis that ibuprofen increases asthma morbidity among children who are not known to be sensitive to aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, these data suggest that compared with acetaminophen, ibuprofen may reduce such risks. Whether the observed difference in morbidity according to treatment group is attributable to increased risk after acetaminophen use or a decrease after ibuprofen cannot be determined. These data provide evidence of the relative safety of ibuprofen use in children with asthma.

  16. A single intervention for cockroach control reduces cockroach exposure and asthma morbidity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabito, Felicia A; Carlson, John C; He, Hua; Werthmann, Derek; Schal, Coby

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to cockroaches is an important asthma trigger, particularly for children with asthma living in inner cities. Integrated pest management is the recommended approach to cockroach abatement; however, it is costly and difficult to implement. The impact of reducing cockroach exposure on asthma outcomes is not known. We sought to test the use of a single intervention, insecticidal bait, to reduce cockroach exposure in the home of children with asthma in New Orleans and to examine the impact of cockroach reduction on asthma outcomes. One hundred two children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial testing the use of insecticidal bait on cockroach counts and asthma morbidity. Homes were visited 6 times and asthma symptoms were assessed every 2 months. After adjustment, intervention homes had significantly fewer cockroaches than did control homes (mean change in cockroaches trapped, 13.14; 95% CI, 6.88-19.39; P Children in control homes had more asthma symptoms and unscheduled health care utilization in the previous 2 weeks (1.82, 95% CI, 0.14-3.50, P = .03; 1.17, 95% CI, 0.11-2.24, P = .03, respectively) and a higher proportion of children with FEV1 of less than 80% predicted (odds ratio, 5.74; 95% CI, 1.60-20.57; P = .01) compared with children living in intervention homes. Previous research has demonstrated improvement in asthma health outcomes using multifaceted interventions. The strategic placement of insecticidal bait, which is inexpensive, has low toxicity, and is widely available, resulted in sustained cockroach elimination over 12 months and was associated with improved asthma outcomes. This single intervention may be an alternative to multifaceted interventions currently recommended to improve asthma morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens

  18. A model to predict short-time asthma morbidity: what could be the explanatory factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Habibi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increase in the worldwide prevalence, morbidity and mortality of asthma. Therefore, study of the possible factors related to the burden of this disorder could help the health providers to introduce effective initiatives and reduce adverse consequences due to this condition. This study was designed to investigate any relationship between asthma morbidity with inhaler technique and other probable explanatory factors in asthmatic patients.Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was designed in which asthmatic patients referring to the outpatient respiratory clinic of the Shaheed Labbafinezhad hospital were entered the study using a non-probability sampling method. Their demographic, socio-economic, medical and medication history, inhaler technique (using a 10-step check list, as well as short-term morbidity index (in the past 4 weeks using the Jone’s morbidity questionnaire were determined and recorded in organized data collection forms. These data were entered the Excel and SPSS (version 17.0 worksheets and analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. A step-by-step analysis method was used in order to find out any relationship between possible explanatory factors and the morbidity index of the patients. Results: 199 adult asthmatic patients (94 male and 105 female with mean ± SD age of 54.29 ±15.52 years enrolled the study. In the first step of data analysis only 5 factors out of 20 explanatory factors were eligible to be included in the multivariate analysis leading to the final predictive model. In the multivariate regression analysis, 2 out of 5 factors could remain in the final model, which were “history of systemic steroid usage” and “age” (p=0.007, r=0.32. So that, patients with a positive history of systemic steroid use and those with a younger age had higher asthma morbidity rate. Conclusion: The observed positive relationship between history of systemic steroid usage and asthma morbidity

  19. Trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan in a high-risk group of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Burgess, C; Ayson, M; Crane, J; Pearce, N; Beasley, R

    1996-05-01

    The "credit card" asthma self-management plan provides the adult asthmatic patient with simple guidelines for the self-management of asthma, which are based on the self-assessment of peak expiratory flow rate recordings and symptoms. The study was a trial of the clinical efficacy of the credit card plan in a high-risk group of asthmatic patients. In this "before-and-after" trial, patients discharged from the emergency department of Wellington Hospital, after treatment for severe asthma were invited to attend a series of hospital outpatient clinics at which the credit card plan was introduced. Questionnaires were used to compare markers of asthma morbidity, requirement for emergency medical care, and medication use during the 6-month period before and after intervention with the credit card plan. Of the 30 patients with asthma who attended the first outpatient clinic, 26 (17 women and 9 men) completed the program. In these 26 participants, there was a reduction in both morbidity and requirement for acute medical services: specifically, the proportion waking with asthma more than once a week decreased from 65% to 23% (p = 0.005) and the proportion visiting the emergency department for treatment of severe asthma decreased from 58% to 15% (p = 0.004). The patients attending the clinics commented favorably on the plan, in particular on its usefulness as an educational tool for monitoring and treating their asthma. Although the interpretation of this study is limited by the lack of a randomized control group, the findings are consistent with other evidence that the credit card asthma self-management plan can be an effective and acceptable system for improving asthma care in a high-risk group of adult patients with asthma.

  20. Managing co-morbid depression and anxiety in primary care patients with asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Antoinette M; Pouwer, Francois; Denollet, Johan

    2012-01-01

    in the Netherlands. Patients with asthma/COPD and co-morbid anxiety/depression will be included in order to test the effectiveness of a disease management approach to treat these co-morbid disorders. Important elements of this approach are: 1) systematic screening to improve detection of anxiety and depression 2......BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are common chronic diseases that are frequently accompanied by depression and/or anxiety. However, symptoms of depression and anxiety are often not recognized and therefore not treated. Currently, only a few studies have tested new...... clinical approaches that could improve the treatment of co-morbid depression and anxiety in these groups of patients. METHODS/DESIGN: The present randomized controlled study will be conducted within the framework of PoZoB (Praktijk Ondersteuning Zuid-Oost Brabant), a large primary care organization...

  1. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma curriculum…

  2. High parity and fetal morbidity outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Muktar H; Salihu, Hamisu M; Keith, Louis G; Ehiri, John E; Islam, M Aminul; Jolly, Pauline E

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the association between high parity and fetal morbidity outcomes. We analyzed 22,463,141 singleton deliveries at 20 weeks or more of gestation in the United States from 1989 through 2000. Adjusted odds ratios generated from logistic regression models were used to approximate relative risk for neonatal morbidity in women with 1-4 (moderate parity or type I; referent group), 5-9 (high parity or type II), 10-14 (very high parity or type III) and 15 or more (extremely high parity or type IV) prior live births. Main outcome measures included low and very low birth weight, preterm and very preterm birth, and small and large for gestational age delivery. The overall crude rates for low birth weight, very low birth weight, preterm birth, very preterm birth, and small and large for gestational age were 55, 11, 97, 19, 83, and 129 per 1,000 live births, respectively. The adjusted odds ratios for low birth weight, very low birth weight, preterm, and very preterm delivery increased consistently and in a dose-effect fashion with ascending parity (P for trend < .001). In the case of large for gestational age delivery, the adjusted odds ratio showed an inverted-U pattern, being highest among women in the type III parity cluster. The findings with respect to small for gestational age were inconclusive. High parity is a risk factor for adverse fetal outcomes. However, the impact of heightened parity is more manifest as shortened gestation rather than physical size restriction. These findings could prove beneficial for counseling women of high parity.

  3. Clinical Profile, Co-Morbidities and Health Related Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Keya R. Lahiri, Milind S. Tullu* and Rachna Kalra

    2010-01-01

    Background: Co-existence of allergic rhinitis (AR) and bronchial asthma (BA) is well known. We planned to study the clinical profile of patients with AR & BA, the associated co-morbidities and the effect of AR &/ or BA on health related quality of life (HRQOL) in Pediatric patients. Methods: Patients attending the Pediatric out-patients department and Pediatric Chest Clinic of tertiary care center were enrolled. The sample size included 100 subjects with BA & AR (Group 1) with control groups ...

  4. Asthma outcomes in children and adolescents with multiple morbidities: Findings from the National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal R; Leo, Harvey L; Baptist, Alan P; Cao, Yanyun; Brown, Randall W

    2015-06-01

    More Americans are managing multiple chronic conditions (MCCs), and trends are particularly alarming in youth. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and distribution of 9 chronic conditions in children and adolescents with and without asthma, and adverse asthma outcomes associated with having MCCs. Cross-sectional interview data from the National Health Interview Survey were analyzed (N = 66,790) between 2007 and 2012 in youth 0 to 17 years of age. Bivariate analysis methods and multivariate generalized linear regression were used to examine associations. Five percent of children with asthma had 1 or more coexisting health conditions. The prevalence of 1 or more comorbidities was greater among those with asthma than those without (5.07% [95% CI: 4.5-5.6] vs. 2.73% [95% CI: 2.6-2.9]). Those with asthma were twice as likely to have co-occurring hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR] = 2.2 [95% CI: 1.5-3.2]) and arthritis (PR = 2.7 [95% CI: 1.8-4.0]) compared with those without asthma. Every additional chronic condition with asthma was associated with a greater likelihood of an asthma attack (PR = 1.1 [95% CI: 1.0-1.2]), all-cause emergency department visits (PR = 1.3 [95% CI: 1.1-1.5]), and missed school days (PR = 2.3 [95% CI: 1.7-3.2]). Children and adolescents with asthma in the US who suffer from MCCs have increased asthma symptoms, missed school days, and all-cause emergency department visits. Further research on optimal management strategies for this group is needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Paediatric respiratory nursing posts in secondary care reduce asthma morbidity, but provision is variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, M; Furness, J

    2009-08-01

    British guidelines on asthma recommend nurse delivered structured discharges for all children with asthma. This study carried out a postal and telephone survey to investigate the provision of this service. Twenty out of 34 (59%) hospitals in the Northern and Yorkshire regions do not have a recognised paediatric respiratory nurse post to facilitate this aspect of care.

  6. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  7. Effect of Air Pollution, Contamination and High Altitude on Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesriene El margoushy*, Mohamad El Nashar**, Hatem Khairy*, Nihad El Nashar*, Hala Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that the prevalence of asthma has risen dramatically worldwide and evidence suggests that environmental factors have an important role in the etiology of the disease. Most respiratory diseases are caused by airborne agents. Our lungs are uniquely vulnerable to contamination from the air we breathe. Air pollution exposure is associated with increased asthma and allergy morbidity and is a suspected contributor to the increasing prevalence of allergic conditions. Observational studies continue to strengthen the association between air pollution and allergic respiratory disease. The effects of air pollution should be viewed in two different groups: healthy people and people with chronic heart or lung disease. Although the fundamental causes of asthma are not completely understood, the strongest risk factors for developing asthma are inhaled asthma triggers. These include: indoor allergens (for example house dust mites in bedding, carpets and stuffed furniture, pollution and pet dander, outdoor allergens (such as pollens and moulds, tobacco smoke and chemical irritants in the workplace. Other triggers can include cold air, extreme emotional arousal such as anger or fear, and physical exercise. Even certain medications can trigger asthma such as aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, and beta-blockers. Urbanization has also been associated with an increase in asthma; however the exact nature of this relationship is unclear. Medication is not the only way to control asthma. It is also important to avoid asthma triggers - stimuli that irritate and inflame the airways. Prevalence of asthma is generally low within the Middle East, although high rates have been recorded in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Lebanon, and Israel. The prevalence of asthma and asthma-related symptoms is high among 16- to 18-year-old adolescents in Saudi Arabia, and the symptoms are more common in boys than in girls

  8. Clinical Profile, Co-Morbidities and Health Related Quality of Life in Pediatric Patients with Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keya R. Lahiri, Milind S. Tullu* and Rachna Kalra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-existence of allergic rhinitis (AR and bronchial asthma (BA is well known. We planned to study the clinical profile of patients with AR & BA, the associated co-morbidities and the effect of AR &/ or BA on health related quality of life (HRQOL in Pediatric patients. Methods: Patients attending the Pediatric out-patients department and Pediatric Chest Clinic of tertiary care center were enrolled. The sample size included 100 subjects with BA & AR (Group 1 with control groups of 60 asthmatic children (Group 2 & 40 children suffering from AR (Group 3. The patients were subjected to a questionnaire & a through physical examination and the details were recorded in a pre-designed proforma. General medical, environmental, occupational, personal & family history was procured along with examination of respiratory system. The standard heath related quality of life (HRQOL parameters were studied. Findings: The study was conducted over a period of 13 months (February 2004 to March 2005. 200 patients between ages of 3 to 15 years (mean 7.95 years were enrolled (100 patients with BA and AR- group 1, 60 patients with asthma alone- group 2 and 40 patients with AR alone- group 3. Dust, smoke, outdoor dust, holi festival, winter season, exercise, and smoking by father were important exacerbating factors in all the three groups. Additionally, diwali festival and family history of asthma were important in Group 2 (BA; while pollen, weeds, diwali festival and family history of allergic rhinitis were important causes of exacerbation in group 3 (AR. Cough was commonly seen in all three groups. Wheezing, sneezing, itching throat, rhinorrhea, watering, altered taste, and nasal block was common in patients in group 1 while wheezing was important symptom in patients in group 2 (BA. Sneezing, itching throat, rhinorrhea, watering, altered taste, and nasal block were common symptoms in patients in group 3 (AR. Conjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and post-nasal drip

  9. Elevated ACE activity is not associated with asthma, COPD, and COPD co-morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Julie; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Dahl, Morten

    2009-01-01

    with COPD, the odds ratio for ischemic heart disease was 1.1 (0.8-1.6) for ID individuals and 1.2 (0.8-1.7) for DD individuals compared with II individuals; corresponding odds ratios for hypertension were 1.1 (0.7-1.5) and 0.8 (0.5-1.2), and for low physical activity 0.9 (0.5-1.4) and 0.7 (0.......4-1.2). The results were similar upon adjustment for sex, age, smoking status, body mass index, total cholesterol, and ACE inhibitor/angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker use. These data suggest that lifelong genetically elevated ACE activity is not a major risk factor for asthma or COPD, or for ischemic heart...... disease, hypertension, and low physical activity in COPD patients....

  10. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  11. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  12. Significantly Higher Prevalence Rate of Asthma and Bipolar Disorder Co-Morbidity: A Meta-Analysis and Review Under PRISMA Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Kung; Wang, Hung-Yu; Chen, Yen-Wen; Lin, Pao-Yen; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and bipolar disorder (BD) are 2 distinct diseases that share similar pathophysiology. This study aimed to determine their relationship thorough a meta-analysis of articles on their comorbidity rate. The aim of the study is to examine the overall prevalence rate of BD in asthmatic patients and of asthma in BD patients compared to healthy controls. Electronic research of PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov was performed. Articles discussing the prevalence rate of BD in patients with/without asthma and the prevalence rate of asthma in those with/without BD, as well as clinical trials in humans and case-controlled trials or cohort studies, were all included. Case reports or series and nonclinical trials were excluded. Through a random-effects model, a meta-analysis of the results of 4 studies comparing the prevalence rate of BD in patients with/without asthma, and in 6 studies comparing the prevalence rate of asthma in subjects with/without BD were performed. There were significantly higher prevalence rates of BD in asthmatic patients than in healthy controls (P prevalence rate of asthma in BD patients (slope = 0.015, P importance of the significantly high comorbid rate of BD and asthma, and the positive association with age. Special attention must be given to the comorbidity of asthma and BD, especially in older patients.

  13. Childhood Asthma Management and Environmental Triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2015-10-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease among children. It cannot be prevented but can be controlled. Industrialized countries experience high lifetime asthma prevalence that has increased over recent decades. Asthma has a complex interplay of genetic and environmental triggers. Studies have revealed complex interactions of lung structure and function genes with environmental exposures such as environmental tobacco smoke and vitamin D. Home environmental strategies can reduce asthma morbidity in children but should be tailored to specific allergens. Coupled with education and severity-specific asthma therapy, tailored interventions may be the most effective strategy to manage childhood asthma.

  14. Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Harold; Mazza, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) inhalers are pr...

  15. Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Harold; Mazza Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA) inhale...

  16. Screening high-risk children for asthma through a community intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Shahid I; Pitts, Judy; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; McCoy, Karen S; Hayes, Don

    2015-10-01

    Many children, particularly those from inner city neighborhoods, have undiagnosed asthma. This study was done to evaluate the effectiveness of an asthma screening, referral and follow-up intervention in an inner city community setting in early identification of children at risk for undiagnosed asthma. A descriptive longitudinal cohort design was used to assess children at baseline and at a 2-year follow-up. Parents of children in a private day school and a church Sunday school (N = 103) completed a validated Asthma Screening Tool at both time periods. Children with asthma and at risk for asthma were referred to a primary care provider (PCP). At baseline, screening of 103 children, ages 3-17 years (mean=7.7 ± 2.9), were categorized as known asthma diagnosis (n = 22), at-risk for undiagnosed asthma (n = 52) and not at-risk for asthma (n = 29). Sixty-two (60.2%) parents responded to the 2-year follow-up. Referral to PCP was kept by 61.5% from the known asthma group and by 24% of children at-risk for asthma. At 2-year follow-up, among not at-risk group, no one converted to at risk status, but majority of children among known asthma group continued to have uncontrolled asthma symptoms, and very few received daily preventive asthma medications. The asthma screening, referral and follow-up intervention for inner city children in a community setting was successful in early identification of patients at-risk for asthma. More education for PCPs on guidelines for diagnosis and management of asthma is needed to decrease childhood asthma morbidity.

  17. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  18. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  19. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  20. Asthma, sports, and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDario, A Geoffrey; Becker, Jack M

    2005-01-01

    The impact of asthma on the general population has been described in detail in medical literature. However, asthma also has a significant impact on the pediatric and adult athlete. This is rarely reported in either the lay press or the medical literature. In 2003, Becker and coworkers conducted a retrospective analysis of the incidence of asthma as a direct cause of death in competitive athletes across the United States between 1993 and 2000. They sought to raise awareness that severe asthma exacerbations and even death can occur during sports from asthma in athletes, while still supporting the concept of maximal participation in sporting activities. To their knowledge, this remains the only published study looking specifically at this issue. Fortunately, fatal asthma events are infrequent in either the adult or the pediatric populations. Those rare cases involving athletes are commonly highlighted in the lay press when they do occur, e.g., when the victim is a college football player such as Rashidi Wheeler. Wheeler died of a fatal asthma exacerbation on August 3, 2002, during a conditioning drill as a member of the Northwestern University football team. Although he was known to have chronic asthma with no obvious barriers to health care, he nevertheless succumbed to his condition. Here, we report a similar, although less well-known, case of an adolescent who died as a direct result of an asthma exacerbation during a high school physical education class. We also offer a brief review of the literature regarding morbidity and mortality in athletes.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for respiratory morbidity, among high school students of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mathew

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of asthma and other respiratory diseases among children and adolescents has been on the rise in recent years and this can affect the quality of life and scholastic performance of school students. Therefore, it is essential to find out the actual prevalence of respiratory morbidity among high school students so that we can plan early interventions against this problem. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among the students from classes 8 to 10, from a public school in Pathanamthitta district of Kerala state, using a modified American Thoracic Society Questionnaire (ATS-DLD-78-A to assess respiratory symptoms among general population. Results: The prevalence of cough was 40.8% (95% CI 34.8% to 46.9% and that of wheeze was found to be 19.6% (95% CI 15.1% to 24.9%. Among the possible risk factors for developing respiratory diseases, it was found that only family history of respiratory problems had a significant association with symptoms of respiratory disease (P = 0.002. Conclusion: The very high prevalence of respiratory symptoms in the study may be due to the fact that the study was conducted during the rainy season in which there is a higher incidence of respiratory infections. But these findings point towards the need to conduct more comprehensive and objective studies on the subject. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(5.000: 1149-1152

  2. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  3. Asthma in Hispanics. An 8-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Franziska J; Forno, Erick; Cooper, Philip J; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an update on asthma in Hispanics, a diverse group tracing their ancestry to countries previously under Spanish rule. A marked variability in the prevalence and morbidity from asthma remains among Hispanic subgroups in the United States and Hispanic America. In the United States, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans have high and low burdens of asthma, respectively (the "Hispanic Paradox"). This wide divergence in asthma morbidity among Hispanic subgroups is multifactorial, likely reflecting the effects of known (secondhand tobacco smoke, air pollution, psychosocial stress, obesity, inadequate treatment) and potential (genetic variants, urbanization, vitamin D insufficiency, and eradication of parasitic infections) risk factors. Barriers to adequate asthma management in Hispanics include economic and educational disadvantages, lack of health insurance, and no access to or poor adherence with controller medications such as inhaled corticosteroids. Although considerable progress has been made in our understanding of asthma in Hispanic subgroups, many questions remain. Studies of asthma in Hispanic America should focus on environmental or lifestyle factors that are more relevant to asthma in this region (e.g., urbanization, air pollution, parasitism, and stress). In the United States, research studies should focus on risk factors that are known to or may diverge among Hispanic subgroups, including but not limited to epigenetic variation, prematurity, vitamin D level, diet, and stress. Clinical trials of culturally appropriate interventions that address multiple aspects of asthma management in Hispanic subgroups should be prioritized for funding. Ensuring high-quality healthcare for all remains a pillar of eliminating asthma disparities.

  4. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  5. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  6. Phenotype of asthma related with high serum periostin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Matsusaka

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Elevated periostin concentrations in serum were correlated with a specific phenotype of eosinophilic asthma, late-onset and often complicated by obstructive pulmonary dysfunction and nasal disorders.

  7. [Occupational asthma--the case of bakers' asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Hasham; Carel, Rafael S

    2013-08-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is the most common of all occupational lung diseases in industrialized countries and its prevalence has been rising steadily. It is estimated that occupational factors account for one out of six cases of adult asthmatic patients causing significant morbidity, disability and costs. Due to its high prevalence and substantial health and socio-economic impacts OA represents a significant public health concern. OA can be divided into allergic and non allergic asthma. Allergic OA is further divided into IgE mediated and non IgE mediated. Baker's asthma (BA), is the leading cause of IgE mediated OA caused by high molecular weight antgens in industrialized countries. Innovations in the baking industry during the last few decades have led to the introduction of new allergens inducing OA. OA is potentially preventable, through early diagnosis and exposure cessation interventions. Thus, clinicians should consider the occupational history in every adult patient presenting with newly diagnosed asthma.

  8. Asthma phenotypes in inner-city children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoratti, Edward M; Krouse, Rebecca Z; Babineau, Denise C; Pongracic, Jacqueline A; O'Connor, George T; Wood, Robert A; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Kercsmar, Carolyn M; Gruchalla, Rebecca S; Kattan, Meyer; Teach, Stephen J; Sigelman, Steven M; Gergen, Peter J; Togias, Alkis; Visness, Cynthia M; Busse, William W; Liu, Andrew H

    2016-10-01

    Children with asthma in low-income urban areas have high morbidity. Phenotypic analysis in these children is lacking, but may identify characteristics to inform successful tailored management approaches. We sought to identify distinct asthma phenotypes among inner-city children receiving guidelines-based management. Nine inner-city asthma consortium centers enrolled 717 children aged 6 to 17 years. Data were collected at baseline and prospectively every 2 months for 1 year. Participants' asthma and rhinitis were optimally managed by study physicians on the basis of guidelines. Cluster analysis using 50 baseline and 12 longitudinal variables was performed in 616 participants completing 4 or more follow-up visits. Five clusters (designated A through E) were distinguished by indicators of asthma and rhinitis severity, pulmonary physiology, allergy (sensitization and total serum IgE), and allergic inflammation. In comparison to other clusters, cluster A was distinguished by lower allergy/inflammation, minimally symptomatic asthma and rhinitis, and normal pulmonary physiology. Cluster B had highly symptomatic asthma despite high step-level treatment, lower allergy and inflammation, and mildly altered pulmonary physiology. Cluster C had minimally symptomatic asthma and rhinitis, intermediate allergy and inflammation, and mildly impaired pulmonary physiology. Clusters D and E exhibited progressively higher asthma and rhinitis symptoms and allergy/inflammation. Cluster E had the most symptomatic asthma while receiving high step-level treatment and had the highest total serum IgE level (median, 733 kU/L), blood eosinophil count (median, 400 cells/mm(3)), and allergen sensitizations (15 of 22 tested). Allergy distinguishes asthma phenotypes in urban children. Severe asthma often coclusters with highly allergic children. However, a symptomatic phenotype with little allergy or allergic inflammation was identified. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  9. Association between Electronic Cigarette Use and Asthma among High School Students in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Cho

    Full Text Available Little is known about health outcomes related to electronic cigarette (EC use, despite its growing popularity. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between EC use and asthma.The study design is a cross-sectional study. A total of 35,904 high school students were included as the final study population. The presence of asthma was based on a student's self-reported doctor diagnosis of asthma in the past 12 months.Prevalence rates of asthmatics in 'current EC users' (n = 2,513, 'former EC users' (n = 2,078, and 'never EC users' (n = 31,313, were 3.9% (n = 98, 2.2% (n = 46 and 1.7% (n = 530, respectively. Comparing 'current EC' users with 'never EC' users, the unadjusted OR for asthma was 2.36 (95% CI: 1.89-2.94. In order to control for the effect of conventional cigarette (CC smoking, after stratifying the subjects by the three CC smoking categories (never CC, former CC, and current CC, within the 'never CC' category, the unadjusted OR for asthma for 'current EC' users was 3.41 (95% CI: 1.79-6.49, and the adjusted OR was 2.74 (95% CI: 1.30-5.78. Severe asthma was reflected by the number of days absent from school due to asthma symptoms; current EC users had the highest adjusted OR for severe asthma compared to 'never EC' users.When compared to a reference population of high school students in South Korea, EC users have an increased association with asthma and are more likely to have had days absent from school due to severe asthma symptoms. In conclusion, the results indicate that EC use may be a risk factor for asthma. The results may be useful in developing a scientific basis for the evaluation of a potential health hazard by EC.

  10. Effects of secondhand smoke exposure on asthma morbidity and health care utilization in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; May, Sara M; Charoenlap, Suvanee; Pyle, Regan; Ott, Nancy L; Mohammed, Khaled; Joshi, Avni Y

    2015-11-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure can trigger asthma exacerbations in children. Different studies have linked increased asthma symptoms, health care use, and deaths in children exposed to SHS, but the risk has not been quantified uniformly across studies. To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate and quantify asthma severity and health care use from SHS exposure in children. A systematic review was undertaken to assess the association between asthma severity and SHS in children. Inclusion criteria included studies that evaluated children with SHS exposure and reported outcomes of interest with asthma severity including exacerbations. Random effect models were used to combine the outcomes of interest (hospitalization, emergency department or urgent care visits, severe asthma symptoms, wheeze symptoms, and pulmonary function test results) from the included studies. A total of 1,945 studies were identified and 25 studies met the inclusion criteria. Children with asthma and SHS exposure were twice as likely to be hospitalized for asthma (odds ratio [OR] 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.86, P = .01) than children with asthma but without SHS exposure. SHS exposure also was significantly associated with emergency department or urgent care visits (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.02-2.69, P = 0.04), wheeze symptoms (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.24, 1.41, P Children with asthma and SHS exposure are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized with asthma exacerbation and are more likely to have lower pulmonary function test results. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne; Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Sverrild, Asger;

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide affecting more than 300 million people. Symptoms are often non-specific and include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma may be highly variable within the same individual over time. Although asthma results...... in death only in extreme cases, the disease is associated with significant morbidity, reduced quality of life, increased absenteeism, and large costs for society. Asthma can be diagnosed based on report of characteristic symptoms and/or the use of several different diagnostic tests. However......, there is currently no gold standard for making a diagnosis, and some degree of misclassification and inter-observer variation can be expected. This may lead to local and regional differences in the treatment, monitoring, and follow-up of the patients. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA) is slated...

  12. The Danish National Database for Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne; Hoffmann-Petersen, Benjamin; Sverrild, Asger

    2016-01-01

    in death only in extreme cases, the disease is associated with significant morbidity, reduced quality of life, increased absenteeism, and large costs for society. Asthma can be diagnosed based on report of characteristic symptoms and/or the use of several different diagnostic tests. However......Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide affecting more than 300 million people. Symptoms are often non-specific and include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma may be highly variable within the same individual over time. Although asthma results...... control visits, appropriate pharmacological treatment, measurement of lung function, and asthma challenge testing; second, tools used for diagnosis in new cases; and third, annual assessment of smoking status, height, and weight measurements, and the proportion of patients with acute hospital treatment...

  13. Association of asthma with serum IgE and skin test reactivity to allergens among children living at high altitude. Tickling the dragon's breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporik, R; Ingram, J M; Price, W; Sussman, J H; Honsinger, R W; Platts-Mills, T A

    1995-05-01

    Asthma in children and young adults is strongly associated with immediate hypersensitivity to indoor allergens, notably those derived from the house dust mite. In addition, outdoor air pollution is considered to aggravate existing asthma. We investigated the prevalence of asthma and the pattern of allergen sensitization in a mite-free environment with low levels of outdoor air pollution. A total of 567 children aged between 12 and 14 attending Los Alamos Middle School, NM (altitude 7,200 feet) were screened using a respiratory questionnaire; 120 children (53 control children) underwent allergen skin testing and serum IgE measurement, and their bronchial reactivity to histamine was measured. Dust was collected from 111 homes and the level of indoor mite and cat allergen measured. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was high (13%), and from the detailed testing it was estimated that 6.3% of the children had asthma (defined as symptomatic bronchial reactivity). Children with asthma had elevated IgE, 367 (179 to 755) versus 38 (23 to 61), and predominant sensitization to cat, 68 versus 20% (p < 0.001). A high number of households (77%) had a pet cat or dog. The concentration of mite allergen was very low (mean 0.18 micrograms Der p milligrams sieved house dust), whereas that of cat allergen was high in homes with a cat (80.8 micrograms Fel d milligrams) but also in homes with no cat (3.2 micrograms Fel d milligrams). The results show that in a mite-free environment with low levels of outdoor air pollution, asthma was still a major cause of morbidity among schoolchildren.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. High dose of maternal folic acid supplementation is associated to infant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Jiang, Liwen; Bi, Meirong; Jia, Xiaodong; Wang, Youqing; He, Chuan; Yao, Yao; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Maternal folic acid supplementation had a positive effect on preventing neural tube defects (NTDs), but its effects in infant asthma remained unclear. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted with outpatients between March 2010 and March 2011 including 150 onset infant asthma cases and 212 controls, together with a meta-analysis involving 14,438 participants, was performed. The association between maternal folic acid supplementation and the risk of infant asthma was not significant either in the meta-analysis (OR = 1.06, 95% CI =0.99-1.14) or in the case-control study (OR = 0.72, 95% CI =0.37-1.39). However, quantitative analysis of the supplementation dose demonstrated that the risk of infant asthma significantly increased for the infants whose mother were with high-dose supplementation (>72,000 µg•d; OR = 3.16, 95% CI =1.15-8.71) after adjusting for confounding factors in the case-control study. Meanwhile, the risk of infant asthma significantly decreased for the infants whose mother were with low-dose supplementation (folic acid supplementation for mother during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of infant asthma, whereas supplementation with a relatively low-dose was associated with a decreased risk of infant asthma. These findings should be further investigated in a large population.

  15. State of the art: therapeutic controversies in severe acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, M A; Camargo, C A; Rowe, B H; Silverman, R A

    2000-07-01

    This is a transcript of the 1999 SAEM State-of-the-Art session on "Therapeutic Controversies in Severe Acute Asthma," presented at the 1999 SAEM annual meeting in Boston. The aim of this session was to address some of the current controversies in the management of acute asthma exacerbations, a major issue in emergency medicine. Despite many recent advances in asthma management, morbidity and mortality remain high. While many of us have strong feelings on how asthma patients should be treated, many of our assertions are not based on good science, and there are numerous areas of controversy. This discussion focuses on the controversy over beta agonist treatment for acute asthma, the physiology of corticosteroids in asthma, and the emergency use of leukotriene-modifying agents.

  16. Childhood asthma in low income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Marianne Stubbe; Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia has hitherto been considered the key cause of the high respiratory morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age (under-5s) in low-income countries, while asthma has not been stated as a significant reason. This paper explores the definitions and concepts...

  17. High school students with asthma: attitudes about school health, absenteeism, and its impact on academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenitsky-Korn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is the most frequent reason for absence from school; it accounts for one-third of all days of missed instruction, placing students at risk for academic failure and social isolation. This study compared high school students with asthma with those without asthma, and examined the relationship of their attitudes toward school health services, absenteeism, academic achievement, and the supposition that school nurse services play an essential part in the academic process. Surveys were completed by all students who participated in the study. Twenty-eight students with asthma reported levels of illness and school nurse support in an additional survey. Data revealed that students with asthma were absent more frequently, scored lower in mathematics, and participated less in school activities than their peers without asthma. Their level of illness did not predict the number of days absent, which was negatively correlated with achievement and positively correlated with students' permissive attitudes toward absenteeism. Findings indicate that school nurse interventions were sources of physical, social, emotional, and academic support.

  18. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  19. High prevalence of long-term cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial morbidity after treatment for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alberto M; Schmid, Eva M; Schutte, Pieter J; Voormolen, Joan H C; Biermasz, Nienke R; van Thiel, Sjoerd W; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Smit, Jan W A; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Romijn, Johannes A

    2005-02-01

    The treatment of craniopharyngiomas is associated with long-term morbidity. To assess the long-term functional outcome and mortality rates after treatment for craniopharyngiomas, we audited our data with special focus on cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial morbidity. Between 1965 and 2002, 54 consecutive patients underwent surgery for craniopharyngiomas at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC). Fifteen patients (25%) received additional postoperative radiation therapy. The median follow-up period was 10 years (range 1-37 years). Long-term cure rate was 82% and long-term recurrence rate 18%. Visual fields/visual acuity stabilized or improved in 74% of cases. The long-term prevalence rate of hypopituitarism was 89%. In addition, long-term cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial morbidity rates were high: 22% (risk factors 57%), 49% and 47%, respectively. Female sex was an independent predictor of increased cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial morbidity (odds ratio 3.78, P = 0.031). Ten patients (18%) died during an 828 person-year follow-up. The actuarial patient survival rates 5, 10 and 20 years after the initial operation were 95, 85 and 85%, respectively. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 2.88 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-4.99]. Craniopharyngioma is associated with excessive long-term multisystem morbidity and mortality, especially in female patients, despite a high cure rate. These observations indicate that dedicated long-term follow-up of these patients is required. The purpose of the follow-up should be: first, to look for recurrences and to ensure appropriate endocrine replacement, especially oestrogen replacement in premenopausal females; and second, to achieve intensive control of glucose, lipids, blood pressure and weight, as in any other patient with increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Proceedings of a Workshop on Near Fatal Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mark FitzGerald

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed about rising asthma morbidity and mortality, although the latter appears to have declined recently. A reasonable surrogate for fatal asthma is an episode of near fatal asthma (NFA. The etiology of episodes of NFA appears to be multifactorial. Features that would characterize asthma patients at risk of NFA have been difficult to define but have included psychosocial barriers. environmental exposures, inadequate or inappropriate physician and/or patient responses to deteriorating asthma and, in particular, overreliance on symptomatic bronchodilator therapy. The association between fatal asthma and NFA with beta-agonist use has been controversial, with it being argued that high use of beta-agonists reflects severity of asthma as opposed to being causal. Studies in the laboratory and ambulatory care setting suggest that regular compared with as-required use of beta-agonists is associated with worsening in asthma control. Although a reduced perception of dyspnea has been identified in some asthma patients, it is not universally present in those with NFA. Retrospective data suggest that hyperinflation of the thorax, as judged by total lung capacity, may be a useful marker for subjects at risk of NFA. Future studies should better characterize these risk factors and develop management strategies (both therapeutic and educational that might reduce the risk of subjects experiencing episodes of NFA and, by extension, reducing the continued unacceptable mortality associated with asthma.

  1. Regular-soda intake independent of weight status is associated with asthma among US high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Blanck, Heidi M; Sherry, Bettylou; Jones, Sherry Everett; Pan, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Limited research shows an inconclusive association between soda intake and asthma, potentially attributable to certain preservatives in sodas. This cross-sectional study examined the association between regular (nondiet)-soda intake and current asthma among a nationally representative sample of high school students. Analysis was based on the 2009 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey and included 15,960 students (grades 9 through 12) with data for both regular-soda intake and current asthma status. The outcome measure was current asthma (ie, told by doctor/nurse that they had asthma and still have asthma). The main exposure variable was regular-soda intake (ie, drank a can/bottle/glass of soda during the 7 days before the survey). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios for regular-soda intake with current asthma after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, and current cigarette use. Overall, 10.8% of students had current asthma. In addition, 9.7% of students who did not drink regular soda had current asthma, and 14.7% of students who drank regular soda three or more times per day had current asthma. Compared with those who did not drink regular soda, odds of having current asthma were higher among students who drank regular soda two times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.28; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.62) and three or more times per day (adjusted odds ratio=1.64; 95% CI 1.25 to 2.16). The association between high regular-soda intake and current asthma suggests efforts to reduce regular-soda intake among youth might have benefits beyond improving diet quality. However, this association needs additional research, such as a longitudinal examination.

  2. Factors associated with poor controller medication use in children with high asthma emergency department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Arlene; Morphew, Tricia; Lewis-Land, Cassia; Kub, Joan; Bellin, Melissa; Ogborn, Jean; Mudd, Shawna S; Bollinger, Mary Elizabeth; Tsoukleris, Mona

    2017-04-01

    Understanding health and social factors associated with controller medication use in children with high-risk asthma may inform disease management in the home and community. To examine health and social factors associated with the Asthma Medication Ratio (AMR), a measure of guideline-based care and controller medication use, in children with persistent asthma and frequent emergency department (ED) use. Study questionnaires, serum allergen sensitization, salivary cotinine, and pharmacy record data were collected for 222 children enrolled from August 2013 to February 2016 in a randomized clinical trial that tested the efficacy of an ED- and home-based intervention. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with an AMR greater than 0.50, reflecting appropriate controller medication use. Most children were male (64%), African American (93%), Medicaid insured (93%), and classified as having uncontrolled asthma (44%). Almost half (48%) received non-guideline-based care or low controller medication use based on an AMR less than 0.50. The final regression model predicting an AMR greater than 0.50 indicated that children receiving specialty care (odds ratio [OR], 4.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.06-11.50), caregivers reporting minimal worry about medication adverse effects (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-1.00), positive sensitization to ragweed allergen (OR, 3.82; 95% CI, 1.63-8.96), and negative specific IgE for dust mite (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.15-0.76) were significantly associated with achieving an AMR greater than 0.50. Clinical decision making for high-risk children with asthma may be enhanced by identification of sensitization to environmental allergens, ascertaining caregiver's concerns about controller medication adverse effects and increased referral to specialty care. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01981564. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Asthma Basics KidsHealth > For Parents > Asthma Basics A A ... Asthma Categories en español Asma: aspectos fundamentales About Asthma Asthma is a common lung condition in kids ...

  4. Obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    There is a global epidemic of asthma and obesity that is concentrated in Westernized and developed countries. A causal association in some people with asthma is suggested by observations that obesity precedes the onset of asthma and that bariatric surgery for morbid obesity can resolve asthma. The obese asthma phenotype features poor asthma control, limited response to corticosteroids, and an exaggeration of the physiological effects of obesity on lung function, which includes a reduction in expiratory reserve volume and airway closure occurring during tidal breathing. Obesity has important implications for asthma treatment. Increasing corticosteroid doses based on poor asthma control, as currently recommended in guidelines, may lead to overtreatment with corticosteroids in obese asthma. Enhanced bronchodilation, particularly of the small airways, may reduce the component of airway closure due to increased bronchomotor tone and suggests that greater emphasis should be placed on long-acting bronchodilators in obese asthma. The societal implications of this are important: with increasing obesity there will be increasing asthma from obesity, and the need to identify successful individual and societal weight-control strategies becomes a key goal.

  5. Maternal high-dose folic acid during pregnancy and asthma medication in the offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetstra-van der Woude, Priscilla A.; De Walle, Hermien E. K.; Hoek, Annemieke; Bos, H. Jens; Boezen, H. Marike; Koppelman, Gerhard H.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Scholtens, Salome

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Low-dose folic acid supplementation (0.5 mg) taken during pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for childhood asthma. The effect of high-dose folic acid (5 mg) advised to women at risk for having a child with neural tube defect has not been assessed so far. Our aim was to inve

  6. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: coordinating asthma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma: moving toward asthma prevention" concluded that "We are well on our way to creating a pathway around wellness in asthma care and also to utilize new tools to predict the risk for asthma and take steps to not only prevent asthma exacerbations but also to prevent the early manifestations of the disease and thus prevent its evolution to severe asthma." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma on prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding potential therapeutic targets for altering the course of asthma in children, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2013 and early 2014. Recent reports continue to shed light on methods to understand factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. It will now be important to carefully assess risk factors for the development of asthma, as well as the risk for asthma exacerbations, and to improve the way we communicate this information in the health care system. This will allow parents, primary care physicians, specialists, and provider systems to more effectively intervene in altering the course of asthma and to further reduce asthma morbidity and mortality.

  7. The state of pediatric asthma in Chicago's Humboldt Park: a community-based study in two local elementary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Bridget

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric asthma is a serious public health problem in Chicago and has been designated a high priority concern by residents of Chicago's Humboldt Park, a diverse community area with a large number of Puerto Rican, African American, and Mexican American families. Methods In May 2009, following the principles of community-based participatory research, a cross-sectional asthma screening survey was administered to adult caregivers of children attending two Humboldt Park elementary schools. Data were analyzed to determine the prevalence of diagnosed and probable asthma as well as the degree of asthma control among affected children; associations between asthma outcomes and mutable triggers were evaluated. Results Surveys from 494 children were evaluated. Physician-diagnosed asthma was reported for 24.9% of children and probable asthma identified in an additional 16.2% of children. Asthma was poorly or moderately controlled in 60.0% of diagnosed children. Smoking occurred inside 25.0% of households and 75.0% of caregivers reported idling of vehicles in their community. Report of general stress among caregivers, stress due to community crime, and/or an inability to cope with everyday life were significantly and positively associated with poor asthma morbidity and control among affected children. Conclusions Despite high prevalence rates and poor asthma morbidity and control in Humboldt Park, the association of these measures with mutable variables is promising. A community-based asthma intervention to address the issues identified in this study is needed to affect positive change.

  8. The prevalence, management and burden of asthma - a Nigerian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Alexander O; Erhabor, G E; Egbagbe, E E

    2010-03-01

    Inadequate attention given to the management of asthma and ways of improving treatment could be a significant factor for the increase morbidity and mortality from asthma despite major advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. There seems to be paucity of data concerning the management pattern and burden of asthma in Africa. This study was under taken to determine the prevalence, management pattern and the burden of asthma. This study was a cross sectional design involving clinical and lung function assessment. The diagnosis of asthma was made using the clinical features of asthma and lung function parameters (Forced expiratory volume in one second, Peak expiratory flow rate, Reversibility tests). Totally, 120 asthma patients participated in this study. All subjects completed the clinical asthma control questionnaires. All items were rated with the calculation of their mean and percentages. Student t-test was used to calculate the difference between the mean of the lung function tests for subjects and control. The prevalence of asthma among respiratory unit patients was 6.6% and higher in the first three decades of life with female preponderance (F:M=1.5-1).There is a strong family history of asthma(81.7%). Associated allergies include rhinitis (75%), pharyngitis (54%), conjunctivitis (54%) and dermatitis (30%). Percentage of asthma patients treated with bronchodilators alone (70%), combined inhaled bronchodilators and steroid (28.3%). Impaired daily activities include sports (84%), Job career (60%), Physical activity (55%), Social activity (54%), Household chores (61%), Disturbed sleep (53%), Daytime symptoms (51%), Hospitalized(50%). Subjects had significant low lung function values when compared with control (P asthma is very high despite the advanced knowledge of the pathophysiology and management of asthma.

  9. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  10. Asthma in Urban Children: Epidemiology, Environmental Risk Factors, and the Public Health Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Ki Lee; Matsui, Elizabeth; Sharma, Hemant

    2016-04-01

    Asthma is the most commonly reported chronic condition of childhood in developed countries, with 6.5 million children affected in the USA. A disparate burden of childhood asthma is seen among socioeconomically disadvantaged youth, often concentrated in urban areas with high poverty rates. Host factors that predispose a child to asthma include atopy, male gender, parental history of asthma, and also race, ethnicity, and genetic and epigenetic susceptibilities. Environmental factors, such as improved hygiene, ambient air pollution, and early life exposures to microbes and aeroallergens, also influence the development of asthma. With greater than 90% of time spent indoors, home exposures (such as cockroach, rodent, and indoor air pollution) are highly relevant for urban asthma. Morbidity reduction may require focused public health initiatives for environmental intervention in high priority risk groups and the addition of immune modulatory agents in children with poorly controlled disease.

  11. Asthma prevalence among high school students in East Jakarta, 2001, based on ISAAC questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Yunus

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess asthma prevalence in children between 13-14 years of age in East Jakarta. This study is a cross sectional study which surveyed 2234 high school students between the ages of 13 and 14 years in East Jakarta in 2001 using the ISAAC questionnaire. Bronchial challenge test was applied by using methacholine substance to 186 students. Reports based on the ISAAC questionnaire indicate that 7.2% of teenage have had wheezing experience, 4.1% have wheezing within the last 12 months, 1.8% have ever suffered severe asthma attack within the last 12 months, 3.3% have suffered wheezing after exercise, and 6.3% have got night cough while they were not suffering from cold. Prevalence of atopy diseases such as rhinitis and eczema were 14.2% and 3.9%, meanwhile rhinitis and eczema prevalence within the last 12 months according to this study were 10.6% and 2.9% respectively. Statistically, there is a significant correlation between wheezing symptom and atopy (p < 0.05. From indepth questionnaire, a significant value of kappa 0.84 related with wheezing within the last 12 months was found. Bronchial challenge test results indicate that sensitivity was 90%, specificity 83.58%, positive predictive value 68.12% and negative predictive value was 95.73%. Asthma prevalence in East Jakarta at 2001 based on ISAAC questionnaire was 8.9%, and cumulative prevalence 11.5%. The ISAAC questionnaire can be used to study asthma prevalence in children at multicenter in Indonesia. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 178-86Keywords: bronchial challenge, high school student, ISAAC questionnaire, East Jakarta, asthma prevalence

  12. Efficacy of the I Can Control Asthma and Nutrition Now (ICAN) Pilot Program on Health Outcomes in High School Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Joanne; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbarba; Militello, Lisa; Harrison, Patrick R.; Becklenberg, Amy; White, Barb; Surya, Shruti; Ahmed, Avais

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 7 million youth. Many youth with asthma face another risk factor in obesity. Obesity, in turn, increases disorders such as asthma. Studies have recommended that asthma programs also address weight management in youth. Taking this into consideration, the I Can Control Asthma and…

  13. Efficacy of the I Can Control Asthma and Nutrition Now (ICAN) Pilot Program on Health Outcomes in High School Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, Joanne; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbarba; Militello, Lisa; Harrison, Patrick R.; Becklenberg, Amy; White, Barb; Surya, Shruti; Ahmed, Avais

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic illness in childhood affecting 7 million youth. Many youth with asthma face another risk factor in obesity. Obesity, in turn, increases disorders such as asthma. Studies have recommended that asthma programs also address weight management in youth. Taking this into consideration, the I Can Control Asthma and…

  14. Psychiatric morbidity, functioning and quality of life in young people at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Christy; Morcillo, Carmen; Russo, Debra A; Stochl, Jan; Shelley, Gillian F; Painter, Michelle; Jones, Peter B; Perez, Jesus

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that psychotic-like experiences may also act as markers for non-psychotic psychiatric disorders, which may indicate that the focus of research in individuals at high risk (HR) for psychosis needs updating. In this study we thoroughly examined the clinical and functional characteristics of a consecutive cohort of young people at HR for psychosis and compared them to a matched sample of healthy volunteers. Between February 2010 and September 2012 60 help-seeking HR individuals, aged 16-35, were recruited from CAMEO Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Cambridgeshire, UK. Forty-five age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were randomly recruited from the same geographical area. Sociodemographic, psychiatric morbidity, functioning and quality of life measures were compared between both groups. HR individuals suffered a wide range of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, mainly within the affective and anxiety diagnostic spectra. In comparison to healthy volunteers, young people at HR reported more suicidal ideation/intention, depressive and anxiety symptoms and presented with remarkably poor functioning and quality of life. The presence of co-morbid moderate or severe depressive and anxiety symptoms was common in our sample of young people at enhanced risk for psychosis. A HR mental state may be associated not only with an increased risk for psychosis, but also other psychiatric disorders. Our findings may have implications for the future implementation of therapeutic interventions that this population could benefit from. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High-resolution computed tomography findings in elderly patients with asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Sevda [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey)]. E-mail: dryilmazsevda@yahoo.com; Ekici, Aydanur [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey); Ekici, Mehmet [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey); Keles, Hatice [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Kirikkale, 71100 Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2006-08-15

    Objective: Based on the hypothesis that airway remodelling is related to the duration of asthma, HRCT scanning should show greater abnormalities in the early-onset than the late-onset asthmatics. It was, therefore, intended to assess the presence and the frequency of airway and parenchymal abnormalities with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in elderly asthmatic patients, and to determine whether these abnormalities are related to the duration of asthma. Patients and methods: Sixty-eight clinically stable asthmatic patients aged {>=}60 yr were included in this prospective study. The patients were separated into two groups according to the duration of symptoms as late-onset asthma (n = 31) with disease duration of <5 yr, and early-onset asthma (n = 37) with disease duration of {>=}5 yr. All patients were lifelong non-smoker and had been using inhaled beta agonists and inhaled steroids. HRCT-scanning and histamine inhalation test were performed on all patients. Results: In comparison with late-onset asthmatic patients, those with early-onset asthma had significantly higher frequency of emphysema (21.6% versus 0.0%, p = 0.006), bronchial dilatation (13.9% versus 0.0%, p 0.03) and bronchial wall thickness (41.7% versus 12.9%, p = 0.01). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified that early-onset of disease was an independent risk factor for the presence of irreversible HRCT-scan abnormalities in elderly asthmatics [odds ratio (OR): 9.4 (2.7-32.7), p 0.00001]. Conclusion: Present data suggest that HRCT abnormalities in early-onset elderly asthmatics reflect parenchymal and airway changes that become irreversible throughout the long course of the disease.

  16. Weighted road density and allergic disease in children at high risk of developing asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Hansell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence for an association between traffic-related air pollution and allergic disease is inconsistent, possibly because the adverse effects may be limited to susceptible subgroups and these have not been identified. This study examined children in the Childhood Asthma Prevention Study (CAPS, potentially susceptible to air pollution effects because of a family history of asthma. METHODS: We examined cross-sectional associations at age eight years between road density within 75 m and 50 m of home address weighted by road type (traffic density, as a proxy for traffic-related air pollution, on the following allergic and respiratory outcomes: skin prick tests (SPTs, total and specific serum IgE, pre- and post-bronchodilator lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, exhaled NO, and reported asthma and rhinitis. RESULTS: Weighted road density was positively associated with allergic sensitisation and allergic rhinitis. Adjusted relative risk (RR for house dust mite (HDM positive SPT was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.06-1.48, for detectable house dust mite-specific IgE was 1.19 (95% CI: 1.01-1.41 and for allergic rhinitis was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.03-1.63 per 100 m local road or 33.3 m motorway within 50 m of home. Associations were also seen with small decrements of peak and mid-expiratory flows and increased risk of asthma, current wheeze and rhinitis in atopic children. CONCLUSION: Associations between road density and allergic disease were found in a potentially susceptible subgroup of children at high risk of developing atopy and asthma.

  17. Airway remodeling assessed by high-resolution computed tomography in patients with asthma:relationship to biological markers in induced sputum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴世满

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the significance of assessing asthma control by high-resolution computed tomography(HRCT) and biological markers in induced sputum.Methods Forty-eight patients with asthma(asthma group) and 10 healthy subjects(control group) were retrospectively analyzed.

  18. Pesticide Exposure and Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Burak; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2017-01-01

    Exposureto pesticides can trigger or exacerbate asthma, induce bronchospasm, orincrease bronchial hyperreactivity. Pesticides that inhibit cholinesterase canprovoke bronchospasm through increased cholinergic activity. At high doses,certain pesticides can act as airway irritants. Low levels that areinsufficient to cause acute poisoning can trigger severe reactions in thosewithout a previous diagnosis of asthma. Pesticides linked to asthma, wheezing,and hyperreactive airway disease include: 1. ...

  19. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-

  20. What Is the Current Level of Asthma Knowledge in Elementary, Middle, and High School Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teacher asthma knowledge based on three areas including (a) the level of teacher asthma knowledge in the Maury County Public School System, (b) the level of teacher asthma knowledge based on five demographic factors, and (c) the level of teacher asthma knowledge in the Maury County Public School System compared with teacher…

  1. High prevalence of asthma in Danish elite canoe- and kayak athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Svenningsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is common in elite athletes, but our knowledge of asthma in elite canoe and kayak athletes is limited. The aim of the present prospective cross-sectional study was therefore to investigate the prevalence of asthma, including asthma-like symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and airway reactivity...... to mannitol in Danish elite canoe and kayak athletes...

  2. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  3. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Asthma Epidemic Eating with Asthma Helping Your Child Cope With a Medical Condition Nasal Wash Guide Cleaning Dirty Items Impact on Families Asthma & Pets Peak Flow Meter Athletes & Asthma Helpful Tools for ...

  4. Predicting asthma in preschool children at high risk presenting in primary care: Development of a clinical asthma prediction score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.B. Van Der Mark (Lonneke); K.E. Wonderen (Karina); J. Mohrs (Jacob); W.M.C. van Aalderen (Willem); G. ter Riet; P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A setting-specific asthma prediction score for preschool children with wheezing and/or dyspnoea presenting in primary healthcare is needed since existing indices are mainly based on general populations. Aims: To find an optimally informative yet practical set of predictors fo

  5. High Lung Allocation Score Is Associated With Increased Morbidity and Mortality Following Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Mark J.; Iribarne, Alexander; Hong, Kimberly N.; Davies, Ryan R.; Xydas, Steve; Takayama, Hiroo; Ibrahimiye, Ali; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Bacchetta, Matthew D.; D’Ovidio, Frank; Arcasoy, Selim

    2010-01-01

    Background: The lung allocation score (LAS) was initiated in May 2005 to allocate lungs based on medical urgency and posttransplant survival. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between an elevated LAS at the time of transplantation and increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing provided de-identified patient-level data. Analysis included lung transplant recipients aged ≥ 12 years who received transplants between April 5, 2006, and December 31, 2007 (n = 3,836). Recipients were stratified into three groups: LAS < 50 (n = 3,161, 83.87%), LAS 50 to 75 (n = 411, 10.9%), and LAS ≥ 75 (n = 197, 5.23%), referred to as low LAS (LLAS), intermediate LAS (ILAS), and high LAS (HLAS), respectively. The primary outcome was posttransplant graft survival at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay and in-hospital complications. Results: HLAS recipients had significantly worse actuarial survival at 90 days and 1 year compared with LLAS recipients. When transplant recipients were stratified by disease etiology, a trend of decreased survival with elevated LAS was observed across all major causes of lung transplant. HLAS recipients were more likely to require dialysis or to have infections compared with LLAS recipients (P < .001). In addition, length of stay was higher in the HLAS group when compared with the LLAS group (P < .001). Conclusions: HLAS is associated with decreased survival and increased complications during the transplant hospitalization. Whereas the LAS has improved organ allocation through decreased waiting list deaths and waiting list times, lower survival and higher morbidity among HLAS recipients suggests that continued review of LAS scoring is needed to ensure optimal long-term transplant survival. PMID:19820072

  6. Teaching About Better Family–Clinician Partnerships in High-Risk Pediatric Asthma Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Michalopoulou PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Family–clinician partnership including communication, trust, respect, and power leveling is essential in pediatrics. Our case study illustrates elements supporting/hindering partnership in a high-risk urban pediatric asthma clinic. Data from observation of a 100-minute visit were qualitatively analyzed by applying codes to themes, using family-centered principles. Three key categories emerged from examining interactions and their sequencing: (1 partnership supported, (2 partnership missed, and (3 partnership hindered. Practitioners must become more sensitive to families’ lives and skilled in family-centered care delivery. Clinician education about partnership can help with negotiating workable treatment strategies for complex conditions such as asthma and reduce health disparities.

  7. Difficult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Uslu

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  8. Difficult asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Uslu; Tülay Özdemir

    1989-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  9. Clinical characteristics of childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-19

    Jan 19, 1991 ... The failure to recognise the symptoms of asthma in children, particularly ... spread, and sometimes severe, chronic or recurrent morbidity. Treatment ... pharyngitis, tonsillitis or sinusitis); exercise; weather changes; allergens ...

  10. Severe asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Bacharier, Leonard B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2014-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into 2 categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, or poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline-based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting β-agonists and other add-on therapies, such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control, including reviewing the diagnosis and removing causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future.

  11. Severe asthma in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, TW; Bacharier, LB; Fitzpatrick, AM

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is characterized by sustained symptoms despite treatment with high doses of ICS or oral corticosteroids. Children with severe asthma may fall into two categories, difficult-to-treat asthma or severe therapy-resistant asthma. Difficult-to-treat asthma is defined as poor control due to an incorrect diagnosis or comorbidities, poor adherence due to adverse psychological or environmental factors. In contrast, treatment-resistant is defined as difficult asthma despite management of these factors. It is increasingly recognized that severe asthma is a highly heterogeneous disorder associated with a number of clinical and inflammatory phenotypes that have been described in children with severe asthma. Guideline based drug therapy of severe childhood asthma is based primarily on extrapolated data from adult studies. The recommendation is that children with severe asthma be treated with higher-dose inhaled or oral corticosteroids combined with long-acting beta-agonists and other add on therapies such as antileukotrienes and methylxanthines. It is important to identify and address the influences that make asthma difficult to control including reviewing the diagnosis and the removal of causal or aggravating factors. Better definition of the phenotypes and better targeting of therapy based upon individual patient phenotypes is likely to improve asthma treatment in the future. PMID:25213041

  12. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis Stephanie; Badlani Sameer; Dalapathi Vijay; Harris Vanessa; Ridge Alana; Bilderback Andrew; Hatipoğlu Umur; Diette Gregory B; Mahajan Amit K; Charbeneau Jeff T; Naureckas Edward T; Krishnan Jerry A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients receiv...

  13. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation...

  14. Indoor residual spraying of insecticide and malaria morbidity in a high transmission intensity area of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Kigozi

    Full Text Available Recently the use of indoor residual spraying of insecticide (IRS has greatly increased in Africa; however, limited data exist on the quantitative impacts of IRS on health outcomes in highly malaria endemic areas.Routine data were collected on more than 90,000 patient visits at a single health facility over a 56 month period covering five rounds of IRS using three different insecticides. Temporal associations between the timing of IRS and the probability of a patient referred for microscopy having laboratory confirmed malaria were estimated controlling for seasonality and age. Considering patients less than five years of age there was a modest decrease in the odds of malaria following the 1(st round of IRS using DDT (OR = 0.76, p<0.001 and the 2(nd round using alpha-cypermethrin (OR = 0.83, p = 0.002. Following rounds 3-5 using bendiocarb there was a much greater decrease in the odds of malaria (ORs 0.34, 0.16, 0.17 respectively, p<0.001 for all comparisons. Overall, the impact of IRS was less pronounced among patients 5 years or older.IRS was associated with a reduction in malaria morbidity in an area of high transmission intensity in Uganda and the benefits appeared to be greatest after switching to a carbamate class of insecticide.

  15. Severe maternal morbidity associated with maternal birthplace in three high-immigration settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urquia, Marcelo L; Glazier, Richard H; Mortensen, Laust;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal mortality and morbidity vary substantially worldwide. It is unknown if these geographic differences translate into disparities in severe maternal morbidity among immigrants from various world regions. We assessed disparities in severe maternal morbidity between immigrant women...... provided aggregate data according to standardized definitions of the outcome, maternal regions of birth and covariates for pooled analyses. We used random effects and stratified logistic regression to obtain odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), adjusted for maternal age, parity...... and comparability scores. RESULTS: We retrieved 2,322,907 deliveries in all three receiving countries, of which 479,986 (21%) were to immigrant women. Compared with non-immigrants, only Sub-Saharan African women were consistently at higher risk of severe maternal morbidity in all three receiving countries (pooled...

  16. Posttraumatic Stress in Adolescents with Asthma and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Emily Millikan; Kelsay, Kimberly; Wamboldt, Frederick; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms in adolescents with and without asthma and their parents and the relationship between PTS symptoms and asthma morbidity. Method: Three groups of adolescents (12-18 years) participated: adolescents who had experienced a life-threatening asthma episode (n = 49), asthma controls (n = 71), and…

  17. The effects of birthweight and breastfeeding on asthma among children aged 1-5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Dailey, Amy B; Freeman, Natalie C; Curbow, Barbara A; Talbott, Evelyn O

    2009-11-01

    Asthma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children and has steadily increased in prevalence. The combined effect of birthweight and breastfeeding on childhood asthma remains unclear. In this study, we analysed a nationally representative sample of children aged 1-5 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Logistic regression was performed to examine the hypothesis whether birthweight and breastfeeding are independently associated with the prevalence of asthma after accounting for the complex sampling design. In addition, we sought to describe the relationship between birthweight and childhood asthma and to assess the potentially combined effect between birthweight and breastfeeding on asthma among children aged 1-5 years after considering the possible effects of social and environmental factors. We found that birthweight (measured continuously) was inversely and linearly associated with the prevalence of childhood asthma (odds ratio (OR) = 0.80 per 1 kg increase in birthweight, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65-0.98). Using a categorical variable, low birthweight (LBW) was positively associated with childhood asthma (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 0.81-2.68). Furthermore, we detected an interaction between birthweight and breastfeeding on childhood asthma. Breastfeeding had a strong protective effect on asthma among children with high birthweight (OR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.04-0.43) while it had no significant effect on asthma among children with normal birthweight or LBW. The mechanisms underlying these relationships remain uncertain and warrant further explanation.

  18. [Severe asthma--where are we today?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2014-01-13

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors.

  19. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors....

  20. Sublingual immunotherapy for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normansell, Rebecca; Kew, Kayleigh M; Bridgman, Amy-Louise

    2015-08-28

    , Development and Evaluation) and presented results in the 'Summary of findings' table. Fifty-two studies met our inclusion criteria, randomly assigning 5077 participants to comparisons of interest. Most studies were double-blind and placebo-controlled, but studies varied in duration from one day to three years. Most participants had mild or intermittent asthma, often with co-morbid allergic rhinitis. Eighteen studies recruited only adults, 25 recruited only children and several recruited both or did not specify (n = 9).With the exception of adverse events, reporting of outcomes of interest to this review was infrequent, and selective reporting may have had a serious effect on the completeness of the evidence. Allocation procedures generally were not well described, about a quarter of the studies were at high risk of bias for performance or detection bias or both and participant attrition was high or unknown in around half of the studies.One short study reported exacerbations requiring a hospital visit and observed no adverse events. Five studies reported quality of life, but the data were not suitable for meta-analysis. Serious adverse events were infrequent, and analysis using risk differences suggests that no more than 1 in 100 are likely to suffer a serious adverse event as a result of treatment with SLIT (RD 0.0012, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.0077 to 0.0102; participants = 2560; studies = 22; moderate-quality evidence).Within secondary outcomes, wide but varied reporting of largely unvalidated asthma symptom and medication scores precluded meaningful meta-analysis; a general trend suggested SLIT benefit over placebo, but variation in scales meant that results were difficult to interpret.Changes in inhaled corticosteroid use in micrograms per day (MD 35.10 mcg/d, 95% CI -50.21 to 120.42; low-quality evidence), exacerbations requiring oral steroids (studies = 2; no events) and bronchial provocation (SMD 0.69, 95% CI -0.04 to 1.43; very low-quality evidence) were not

  1. Differences in resuscitation in morbidly obese burn patients may contribute to high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Lisa; Pham, Tam N; Carrougher, Gretchen; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S; Arnoldo, Brett D; Gamelli, Richard L; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    The rising number of obese patients poses new challenges for burn care. These may include adjustments in calculations of burn size, resuscitation, ventilator wean, nutritional goals as well as challenges in mobilization. The authors have focused this observational study on resuscitation in the obese patient population in the first 48 hours after burn injury. Previous trauma studies suggest a prolonged time to reach end points of resuscitation in the obese compared to nonobese injured patients. The authors hypothesize that obese patients have worse outcomes after thermal injury and that differences in the response to resuscitation contribute to this disparity. The authors retrospectively analyzed data prospectively collected in a multicenter trial to compare resuscitation and outcomes in patients stratified by National Institutes of Health/World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) classification (BMI: normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25-29.9, obese, 30-39.9; morbidly obese, ≥40). Because of the distribution of body habitus in the obese, total burn size was recalculated for all patients by using the method proposed by Neaman and compared with Lund-Browder estimates. The authors analyzed patients by BMI class for fluids administered and end points of resuscitation at 24 and 48 hours. Multivariate analysis was used to compare morbidity and mortality across BMI groups. The authors identified 296 adult patients with a mean TBSA of 41%. Patient and injury characteristics were similar across BMI categories. No significant differences were observed in burn size calculations by using Neaman vs Lund-Browder formulas. Although resuscitation volumes exceeded the predicted formula in all BMI categories, higher BMI was associated with less fluid administered per actual body weight (P = .001). Base deficit on admission was highest in the morbidly obese group at 24 and 48 hours. Furthermore, the morbidly obese patients did not correct their metabolic acidosis to the

  2. The Danish National Database for Asthma: establishing clinical quality indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Hansen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide affecting more than 300 million people. Symptoms are often non-specific and include coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthma may be highly variable within the same individual over time. Although asthma results in death only in extreme cases, the disease is associated with significant morbidity, reduced quality of life, increased absenteeism, and large costs for society. Asthma can be diagnosed based on report of characteristic symptoms and/or the use of several different diagnostic tests. However, there is currently no gold standard for making a diagnosis, and some degree of misclassification and inter-observer variation can be expected. This may lead to local and regional differences in the treatment, monitoring, and follow-up of the patients. The Danish National Database for Asthma (DNDA is slated to be established with the overall aim of collecting data on all patients treated for asthma in Denmark and systematically monitoring the treatment quality and disease management in both primary and secondary care facilities across the country. The DNDA links information from population-based disease registers in Denmark, including the National Patient Register, the National Prescription Registry, and the National Health Insurance Services register, and potentially includes all asthma patients in Denmark. The following quality indicators have been selected to monitor trends: first, conduction of annual asthma control visits, appropriate pharmacological treatment, measurement of lung function, and asthma challenge testing; second, tools used for diagnosis in new cases; and third, annual assessment of smoking status, height, and weight measurements, and the proportion of patients with acute hospital treatment. The DNDA will be launched in 2016 and will initially include patients treated in secondary care facilities in Denmark. In the nearby future, the database aims

  3. High prevalence of long-term cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial morbidity after treatment for craniopharyngioma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, A.M.; Schmid, E.M.; Schutte, P.J.; Voormolen, J.H.; Biermasz, N.R.; Thiel, S.W. van; Corssmit, E.P.; Smit, J.W.A.; Roelfsema, F.; Romijn, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The treatment of craniopharyngiomas is associated with long-term morbidity. AIM OF THE STUDY: To assess the long-term functional outcome and mortality rates after treatment for craniopharyngiomas, we audited our data with special focus on cardiovascular, neurological and psychosocial

  4. Occupational asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  5. The effectiveness of a pictorial asthma action plan for improving asthma control and the quality of life in illiterate women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pur Ozyigit, Leyla; Ozcelik, Bahar; Ozcan Ciloglu, Seda; Erkan, Feyza

    2014-05-01

    Written asthma action plans are an important part of asthma management, but cannot be used for illiterate people. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of a pictorial asthma action plan on asthma control, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and asthma morbidity in a population of illiterate women with asthma. Forty illiterate women with moderate-severe persistent asthma were assigned alternatively to receive either asthma education alone (control group) or asthma education and a pictorial asthma action plan (study group). Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT), HRQoL was assessed using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the frequency of non-scheduled hospital or emergency visits was monitored. Thirty-four patients completed the study. The ACT and SGRQ scores of both groups improved at every follow-up time point compared with baseline (p plan can be a helpful tool for self-medication.

  6. Longitudinal patterns of predominant asthma disease activity in pediatric patients enrolled in an asthma-specific disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lyne; Nichols, Breck; Choi Kwong, Kenny Yat; Morphew, Tricia; Jones, Craig A

    2008-08-01

    To determine if patterns of predominant asthma disease activity are more closely related than baseline asthma severity to measures of morbidity (acute asthma attack, emergency room visit/hospitalization, missed school days, and/or steroid burst). Retrospective analysis was performed for inner-city Los Angeles asthmatic children (3 to 18 years of age) during their first year of enrollment in an asthma-specific disease management program. All measures of morbidity were more closely related to patterns of predominant disease activity than baseline severity. We conclude that patterns of predominant disease activity are a more significant predictor of asthma morbidity than is baseline severity.

  7. Morbidity from excessive intake of high energy fluids: the 'squash drinking syndrome'.

    OpenAIRE

    Hourihane, J. O.; Rolles, C J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify children suffering morbidity from excessive intake of energy from fluids. DESIGN--Prospective enrolment of outpatients in a supervised reduction of energy rich fluid intake. SETTING--Outpatient paediatric clinic. SUBJECTS--Eight children (four boys, mean age 20.8 months, mean duration of symptoms seven months) who were referred with non-specific symptoms such as poor appetite, poor behaviour at mealtimes, poor weight gain, and loose stools. RESULTS--All children were ab...

  8. Single center experience on talc poudrage morbidity: focus on high talc dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congedo Maria

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a common clinical problem of concern for most of the pneumologists and thoracic surgeons. A general consensus regarding the use of talc poudrage in treatment of MPE exists, but only few studies analyzed in detail talc insufflation related pulmonary morbidity. In particular, ARDS talc-related is caused by physical and chemical effects of the small talc particles (50% particle size

  9. Airway responses and inflammation in subjects with asthma after four days of repeated high-single-dose allergen challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both standard and low-dose allergen provocations are an established tool in asthma research to improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of allergic asthma. However, clinical symptoms are less likely to be induced. Therefore, we designed a protocol for repetitive high-dose bronchial allergen challenges to generate clinical symptoms and airway inflammation. Methods A total of 27 patients aged 18 to 40 years with positive skin-prick tests and mild asthma underwent repetitive high-dose allergen challenges with household dust mites for four consecutive days. Pulmonary function and exhaled NO were measured at every visit. Induced sputum was analysed before and after the allergen challenges for cell counts, ECP, IL-5, INF-γ, IL-8, and the transcription factor Foxp3. Results We found a significant decrease in pulmonary function, an increased use of salbutamol and the development of a late asthmatic response and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, as well as a significant induction of eNO, eosinophils, and Th-2 cytokines. Repeated provocation was feasible in the majority of patients. Two subjects had severe adverse events requiring prednisolone to cope with nocturnal asthma symptoms. Conclusions Repeated high-dose bronchial allergen challenges resulted in severe asthma symptoms and marked Th-2-mediated allergic airway inflammation. The high-dose challenge model is suitable only in an attenuated form in diseased volunteers for proof-of-concept studies and in clinical settings to reduce the risk of severe asthma exacerbations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.govNCT00677209

  10. Severe asthma and the omalizumab option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Chambless

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic diseases and asthma are increasing at a remarkable rate on a global scale. It is now well recognized that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The inflammatory process in many patients is driven by an immunoglobulin E (IgE-dependent process. Mast cell activation and release of mediators, in response to allergen and IgE, results in a cascade response, culminating in B lymphocyte, T lymphocyte, eosinophil, fibroblast, smooth muscle cell and endothelial activation. This complex cellular interaction, release of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors and inflammatory remodeling of the airways leads to chronic asthma. A subset of patients develops severe airway disease which can be extremely morbid and even fatal. While many treatments are available for asthma, it is still a chronic and incurable disease, characterized by exacerbation, hospitalizations and associated adverse effects of medications. Omalizumab is a new option for chronic asthma that acts by binding to and inhibiting the effects of IgE, thereby interfering with one aspect of the asthma cascade reviewed earlier. This is a humanized monoclonal antibody against IgE that has been shown to have many beneficial effects in asthma. Use of omalizumab may be influenced by the cost of the medication and some reported adverse effects including the rare possibility of anaphylaxis. When used in selected cases and carefully, omalizumab provides a very important tool in disease management. It has been shown to have additional effects in urticaria, angioedema, latex allergy and food allergy, but the data is limited and the indications far from clear. In addition to decreasing exacerbations, it has a steroid sparing role and hence may decrease adverse effects in some patients on high-dose glucocorticoids. Studies have shown improvement in quality of life measures in asthma following the administration of omalizumab, but the effects on pulmonary function are

  11. The influence of high versus low sodium intake on blood pressure and haemodynamics in patients with morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, Peter K; Taskiran, Mustafa; Damgaard, Morten

    2013-01-01

    fluid compartments and haemodynamic responses (at rest and during exercise) after 5 days of a low-sodium diet (90 mmol/day) and 5 days of a high-sodium diet (250 mmol/day) in 12 morbidly obese, hypertensive patients; 12 morbidly obese, normotensive patients and 12 nonobese controls. RESULTS: High sodium...... intake as compared to low sodium intake was associated with an increase in plasma volume (obese, hypertensive patients: 5 ± 4%; obese, normotensive patients: 10 ± 11%; nonobese controls: 7 ± 6%), cardiac output (CO) (obese, hypertensive patients: 17 ± 12%; obese, normotensive patients: 20 ± 16%; nonobese...

  12. Asthma in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a common problem with enormous medical and economics impacts. It is an inflammatory disease of the airways associated with intermittent episodes of bronchospasm. Asthma is not uncommon in the elderly patients. Prevalence of asthma is similar in older and younger adults. Asthma in the elderly patient is underdiagnosed because of false perceptions by both patient and physician. The high incidence of comorbid conditions in the elderly patient makes the diagnosis and management more difficult. Correct diagnosis is demonstrated with spirometry. The goals of asthma treatment are to achieve and maintain control of symptoms and to prevent development of irreversible airflow limitation. Asthma drugs are preferably inhaled because this route minimizes systemic absorption and, thus, improves the ratio of the therapeutic benefit to the potential side-effects in elderly patients.

  13. Maternal smoking in pregnancy and its influence on childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Zacharasiewicz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking in pregnancy (MSP is a large modifiable risk factor for pregnancy related mortality and morbidity and also the most important known modifiable risk factor for asthma. This review summarises the effects of MSP throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence with regards to asthma (development and severity. Firstly, the direct damage caused by nicotine on fetal lung development, fetal growth and neuronal differentiation is discussed, as well as the indirect effects of nicotine on placental functioning. Secondly, the effects of MSP on later immune functioning resulting in increased infection rate are summarised and details are given on the effects of MSP modulating airway hyperreactivity, reducing lung function and therefore increasing asthma morbidity. Furthermore, epigenetic effects are increasingly being recognised. These can also result in transgenerational detrimental effects induced by cigarette smoke. In summary, the causal relationship between MSP and asthma development is well documented and presents a major health problem for generations to come. The high prevalence of MSP is alarming and epigenetic effects of nicotine on immune functioning potentiate this danger. A considerable part of the increase in asthma prevalence worldwide is due to MSP.

  14. Vitamin A deficiency decreases and high dietary vitamin A increases disease severity in the mouse model of asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Th1/ Th2 paradigm has become an important issue in the pathogenesis of asthma, characterized by normal Th-1 and elevated Th-2 cytokine expression, resulting in a Th2 predominance. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) produces a significant Th1 bias, while high-level dietary vitamin A supplementation promo...

  15. Cost of asthma in the Asia-Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. W. Lai

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The substantial morbidity caused by asthma suggests that the disease is associated with a large economic burden. The current study analysed the burden of asthma in eight countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Responses to questions regarding resource use from a survey of people with asthma were analysed. Unit costs were obtained for each resource use element. Individual patient costs were estimated and means calculated for each country. A multivariate model was developed to identify potential predictors of resource use. Annual per-patient direct costs ranged from US$108 for Malaysia to US$1,010 for Hong Kong. When productivity costs were included, total per-patient societal costs ranged from US$184 in Vietnam to US$1,189 in Hong Kong. Urgent care costs were responsible for 18–90% of total per-patient direct costs. Overall, total per-patient direct costs were equivalent to 13% of per capita gross domestic product and 300% of per capita healthcare spending. Extremes of age, greater severity of asthma, and poorer general health status were predictive of high cost. The per-patient cost of asthma in these countries is high, particularly when seen in the context of overall per-patient healthcare spending. Strategies to improve asthma control are likely to not only improve patient outcomes, but also to decrease societal costs.

  16. Evidence of High Rates of Undiagnosed Asthma in Central Ohio Elementary School children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda R.; Burkett, S. Amanda; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Buckley, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Ohio, 14.5% of 5- to 9-year-olds and 17.3% of 10- to 17-year-olds have asthma. Moreover, there is concern that these numbers may underestimate the true disease burden. We sought to evaluate variability in asthma rates and respiratory symptoms among central Ohio fourth graders as a means to assess potential undiagnosed and…

  17. Evidence of High Rates of Undiagnosed Asthma in Central Ohio Elementary School children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda R.; Burkett, S. Amanda; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Buckley, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In Ohio, 14.5% of 5- to 9-year-olds and 17.3% of 10- to 17-year-olds have asthma. Moreover, there is concern that these numbers may underestimate the true disease burden. We sought to evaluate variability in asthma rates and respiratory symptoms among central Ohio fourth graders as a means to assess potential undiagnosed and…

  18. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management: Final report of an eight-year program aimed at reducing care gaps in asthma management in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Dorval, Eileen; Labrecque, Manon; Turgeon, Michel; Montague, Terrence; Thivierge, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Asthma care in Canada and around the world persistently falls short of optimal treatment. To optimize care, a systematic approach to identifying such shortfalls or ‘care gaps’, in which all stakeholders of the health care system (including patients) are involved, was proposed. METHODS: Several projects of a multipartner, multidisciplinary disease management program, developed to optimize asthma care in Quebec, was conducted in a period of eight years. First, two population maps were produced to identify regional variations in asthma-related morbidity and to prioritize interventions for improving treatment. Second, current care was evaluated in a physician-patient cohort, confirming the many care gaps in asthma management. Third, two series of peer-reviewed outcome studies, targeting high-risk populations and specific asthma care gaps, were conducted. Finally, a process to integrate the best interventions into the health care system and an agenda for further research on optimal asthma management were proposed. RESULTS: Key observations from these studies included the identification of specific patterns of noncompliance in using inhaled corticosteroids, the failure of increased access to spirometry in asthma education centres to increase the number of education referrals, the transient improvement in educational abilities of nurses involved with an asthma hotline telephone service, and the beneficial effects of practice tools aimed at facilitating the assessment of asthma control and treatment needs by general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: Disease management programs such as Towards Excellence in Asthma Management can provide valuable information on optimal strategies for improving treatment of asthma and other chronic diseases by identifying care gaps, improving guidelines implementation and optimizing care. PMID:18818784

  19. Pharmacogenomics of pediatric asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sarika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Asthma is a complex disease with multiple genetic and environmental factors contributing to it. A component of this complexity is a highly variable response to pharmacological therapy. Pharmacogenomics is the study of the role of genetic determinants in the variable response to therapy. A number of examples of possible pharmacogenomic approaches that may prove of value in the management of asthma are discussed below. Evidence Acquisition: A search of PubMed, Google scholar, E-Medicine, BMJ and Mbase was done using the key words "pharmacogenomics of asthma", "pharmacogenomics of β-agonist, glucocorticoids, leukotriene modifiers, theophylline, muscarinic antagonists in asthma". Results: Presently, there are limited examples of gene polymorphism that can influence response to asthma therapy. Polymorphisms that alter response to asthma therapy include Arg16Gly, Gln27Glu, Thr164Ile for β-agonist receptor, polymorphism of glucocorticoid receptor gene, CRHR1 variants and polymorphism of LTC4S, ALOX5. Polymorphic variants of muscarinic receptors, PDE4 and CYP450 gene variants. Conclusion: It was concluded that genetic variation can improve the response to asthma therapy. However, no gene polymorphism has been associated with consistent results in different populations. Therefore, asthma pharmacogenomic studies in different populations with a large number of subjects are required to make possible tailoring the asthma therapy according to the genetic characteristic of individual patient.

  20. The dark side of the moon: severe therapy-resistant asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Benedictis, F M; Carloni, I; Bush, A

    2012-06-01

    Problematic severe asthma is the term used to describe children whose asthma is not responsive to standard therapy with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and additional controllers. These children need to be assessed by a step-wise systematic protocol in order to confirm the diagnosis, evaluate co-morbidities, assess the adherence to treatment, and finally evaluate the basic management. More than half of these children have "difficult-to-treat asthma", which improves if the basic management is correct. Children whose asthma remains uncontrolled despite resolution of any reversible factors are termed "severe therapy-resistant" asthmatics; for them, an individualised treatment plan is developed after a detailed and invasive protocol of investigation. Therapeutic options for these patients can be divided into medications used in lower doses for children with less severe asthma, and those used in other pediatric diseases but not for asthma. Most treatments are unlicensed and there is a lack of high-quality evidence. Children with recurrent severe exacerbations, in particular in the context of good baseline asthma control, are particularly difficult to treat, and there is no evidence on which therapeutic option to recommend. International collaborations, using standard protocols of investigation, are needed to better understand mechanisms of severe therapy-resistant asthma and to deliver evidence-based treatments in the future.

  1. Population Health Considerations for Pediatric Asthma: Findings from the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Byrd, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a prevalent and costly chronic condition. Optimal management enables secondary and tertiary prevention. The goal was to identify population health considerations for pediatric asthma in California to inform the development of quality improvement interventions. California Health Interview Survey 2011-2012 is a random-digit dial telephone survey conducted in 5 languages. It includes 44,000 households from all 58 counties in California. This study assessed factors related to symptom control and health care use in children ages 2-11 years with asthma. An estimated 492,385 (9.6%) of children in California currently have asthma. Urban and rural residents face comparable asthma disease burdens. School-age male children as well as Asian and African American children are disproportionately affected. Asthma causes significant morbidity, with poorer health status, high utilization of emergency care, and the need for daily medication use. Only 38% of children with asthma have a recent asthma management plan. Half of all children with asthma did not receive influenza immunization in the past year, although this reflects the overall low rate of influenza vaccination. Parents of children with asthma frequently utilize the Internet for health information and communication with their child's health care provider. Children with asthma in California face several population-level challenges, including poor health status, low influenza vaccination rates, high use of emergency care, and suboptimal use of health literacy tools. Focusing on improved care coordination and preventive care for high-risk groups is especially urgent given the expansion of public health insurance and impending shortages in the primary care workforce. (Population Health Management 2016;19:145-151).

  2. Are Slum Children at High Risk of Under Nutrition, Anemia and Childhood Morbidity? Evidence from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natrajan Kavitha

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urban population growth in developing countries especially in India is at a rapid pace in the past few decades. Growth of urban population is always accompanied by the growth of population in urban slums, which poses threat to the health of urban population, particularly, the health of the children. Objective: The present study aims to study whether the slum dwelling affects the child morbidity, low weight at birth, infant mortality, child malnutrition and anemia.  Methods: Until NFHS-3, there was paucity of data on slums to analyze for a larger area and compare it with non-slum population. However, NFHS-3 provides data from slums in eight cities and is used for the present study. The child health aspects considered here are: prevalence of diarrhea among children, prevalence of fever among children, prevalence of cough among children, infant death, low birth weight, malnutrition among children and anemia among children. Results: Slum children belong to lower socioeconomic strata than children from non-slum areas. Children living in slum areas are 1.3 times, 1.5 times and 1.2 times more likely to suffer from diarrhea, cough and fever respectively than children living in non-slum areas. Multivariate results also showed that slum children have higher odds for low weight at birth (1.4 times and child anemia (1.2 times compared to non-slum children. Conclusion: Slum dwelling children are at a disadvantageous side in terms of child morbidity, anemia and weight at the time of birth. 

  3. Persistent cough: is it asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Faniran, A; Peat, J; Woolcock, A

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if children in the community with persistent cough can be considered to have asthma. A validated questionnaire was given to the parents of 1245 randomly selected children aged 6-12 years. Atopy was measured with skin prick tests. Children with persistent cough had less morbidity and less atopy compared with children with wheeze. Although the syndrome commonly referred to as "cough variant asthma" could not be shown in this study, a sign...

  4. Indoor Environmental Control Practices and Asthma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Elizabeth C; Abramson, Stuart L; Sandel, Megan T

    2016-11-01

    Indoor environmental exposures, particularly allergens and pollutants, are major contributors to asthma morbidity in children; environmental control practices aimed at reducing these exposures are an integral component of asthma management. Some individually tailored environmental control practices that have been shown to reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations are similar in efficacy and cost to controller medications. As a part of developing tailored strategies regarding environmental control measures, an environmental history can be obtained to evaluate the key indoor environmental exposures that are known to trigger asthma symptoms and exacerbations, including both indoor pollutants and allergens. An environmental history includes questions regarding the presence of pets or pests or evidence of pests in the home, as well as knowledge regarding whether the climatic characteristics in the community favor dust mites. In addition, the history focuses on sources of indoor air pollution, including the presence of smokers who live in the home or care for children and the use of gas stoves and appliances in the home. Serum allergen-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests can be performed or the patient can be referred for allergy skin testing to identify indoor allergens that are most likely to be clinically relevant. Environmental control strategies are tailored to each potentially relevant indoor exposure and are based on knowledge of the sources and underlying characteristics of the exposure. Strategies include source removal, source control, and mitigation strategies, such as high-efficiency particulate air purifiers and allergen-proof mattress and pillow encasements, as well as education, which can be delivered by primary care pediatricians, allergists, pediatric pulmonologists, other health care workers, or community health workers trained in asthma environmental control and asthma education.

  5. Recent developments in the role of reactive oxygen species in allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jingjing; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma has a global prevalence, morbidity, and mortality. Many environmental factors, such as pollutants and allergens, are highly relevant to allergic asthma. The most important pathological symptom of allergic asthma is airway inflammation. Accordingly, the unique role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) had been identified as a main reason for this respiratory inflammation. Many studies have shown that inhalation of different allergens can promote ROS generation. Recent studies have demonstrated that several pro-inflammatory mediators are responsible for the development of allergic asthma. Among these mediators, endogenous or exogenous ROS are responsible for the airway inflammation of allergic asthma. Furthermore, several inflammatory cells induce ROS and allergic asthma development. Airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, tissue injury, and remodeling can be induced by excessive ROS production in animal models. Based on investigations of allergic asthma and ROS formation mechanisms, we have identified several novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic treatments. This review describes the recent data linking ROS to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. PMID:28203435

  6. Benefits of high altitude allergen avoidance in atopic adolescents with moderate to severe asthma, over and above treatment with high dose inhaled steroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootendorst, DC; Dahlen, SE; Van den Bos, JW; Duiverman, EJ; Veselic-Charvat, M; Vrijlandt, EJLE; O'Sullivan, S; Kumlin, M; Sterk, PJ; Roldaan, AC

    2001-01-01

    Background Some patients with severe asthma cannot be controlled with high doses of inhaled steroids (ICS), which may be related to ongoing environmental allergen exposure. Objective We investigated whether 10 weeks of high altitude allergen avoidance leads to sustained benefits regarding clinical a

  7. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and collected saliva samples for cotinine analysis. A trigger behavior summary score was created. The housing inspected was old with multiple units and obvious structural deficiencies. Many allergic and irritant triggers were observed. Having a controller medicine or private insurance was associated with lower trigger behavior summary scores; caregiver depression, caregiver perceived stress, and child negative life events were associated with high trigger scores. The final multivariate model retained had a controller medicine, private insurance, and caregiver perceived stress. The data from this high-risk cohort identified modifiable areas where environmental interventions could reduce morbidity in Puerto Rican children and adolescents.

  8. Exposure to gun violence and asthma among children in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramratnam, Sima K; Han, Yueh-Ying; Rosas-Salazar, Christian; Forno, Erick; Brehm, John M; Rosser, Franziska; Marsland, Anna L; Colón-Semidey, Angel; Alvarez, María; Miller, Gregory E; Acosta-Pérez, Edna; Canino, Glorisa; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-08-01

    Although community violence may influence asthma morbidity by increasing stress, no study has assessed exposure to gun violence and childhood asthma. We examined whether exposure to gun violence is associated with asthma in children, particularly in those reporting fear of leaving their home. Case-control study of 466 children aged 9-14 years with (n = 234) and without (n = 232) asthma in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Lifetime exposure to gun violence was defined as hearing a gunshot more than once. We also assessed whether the child was afraid to leave his/her home because of violence. Asthma was defined as physician-diagnosed asthma and wheeze in the prior year. We used logistic regression for the statistical analysis. All multivariate models were adjusted for age, gender, household income, parental asthma, environmental tobacco smoke, prematurity and residential distance from a major road. Cases were more likely to have heard a gunshot more than once than control subjects (n = 156 or 67.2% vs. n = 122 or 52.1%, P analysis, hearing a gunshot more than once was associated with asthma (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-1.7, P = 0.01). Compared with children who had heard a gunshot not more than once and were not afraid to leave their home because of violence, those who had heard a gunshot more than once and were afraid to leave their home due to violence had 3.2 times greater odds of asthma (95% CI for OR = 2.2-4.4, P violence is associated with asthma in Puerto Rican children, particularly in those afraid to leave their home. Stress from such violence may contribute to the high burden of asthma in Puerto Ricans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Occupational irritants and asthma: an Estonian cross-sectional study of 34,000 adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Laurent, Emeline; Bousquet, Jean; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Kauffmann, Francine; Le Moual, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    Occupational exposures make important contributions to asthma morbidity. The role of low/moderate level irritant exposures remains unclear. We aimed to determine which occupational exposures are associated with asthma in an eastern European country with low asthma prevalence. The Estonian Genome Center of University of Tartu collected data from 50 077 adults in 2002-2011. Asthma was assessed through a questionnaire regarding diagnosed diseases, current health status and medication. Exposures to 22 agents during the current and longest held jobs were estimated using an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix. Analyses included 34 015 subjects (aged 18-65 years, 67.0% females), of which 1209 (3.6%) reported asthma (608 with physician-confirmed diagnosis). After adjusting for age, sex and smoking habits, lifetime occupational exposure to known asthmagens (20.4%) was significantly associated with physician-diagnosed asthma (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.03-1.59), especially high molecular weight agents (flour: OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.31-4.27; animals: OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.00-2.60). Exposure to low/moderate levels of irritants (17.4%) was associated with physician-diagnosed asthma (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.48-2.37). More pronounced associations were observed in subjects reporting current treated asthma. Beyond confirming the effect of known asthmagens (which are well-known, mostly from observations in western countries), the results provide evidence for a role of low/moderate exposure to irritants. This finding, observed in a country with a low prevalence of asthma and atopy, provides new insight into the understanding of asthma heterogeneity.

  10. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause an intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, while the number of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.7 per 100,000 patients in 2009. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a healthy life without any symptoms. A partnership between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with agents and elimination of causes and risk factors are fundamental to asthma treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate mild to intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS, varying from low to high doses. Long-acting β2 agonists (LABA, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and theophylline sustained-release preparation are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-IgE antibody therapy is a new choice for the most severe and persistent asthma. Inhaled β2 agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, etc., are used as needed against acute exacerbations. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, aspirin induced asthma, pregnancy, and cough variant asthma are also important factors that need to be considered.

  11. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  12. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health-car......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors.......Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health...

  13. Asthma Prevalence, Management, and Education in New York State Elementary Schools: A Survey of School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao; Hwang, Syni-an

    2007-01-01

    A survey of school nurses was conducted in New York State elementary schools to assess asthma and asthma management in students. The survey contained questions about asthma morbidity, management and education, obstacles to management, and school indoor air quality. The reported prevalence of asthma among students was 8.5%. Of the students with…

  14. Serum Fructosamine, Total Cholesterol, and High-Density Lipoprotein in Children with Asthma during Glucocorticoid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, A J; Wolthers, O D

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims. Glucocorticoids may have adverse effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The present study was conducted to investigate possible effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of inhaled and oral glucocorticoids in children with asthma. Methods. Two randomised controlled trials with blinded crossover designs were performed. Active treatment was 400  μ g inhaled budesonide or 5 mg prednisolone orally daily during one week. The budesonide trial included 17 and the prednisolone trial 20 school children. Serum fructosamine, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein were assessed. Results. Serum fructosamine was increased during active treatment (prednisolone 252.3  μ M versus placebo 247.3  μ M; P = 0.03 and budesonide 228.1  μ M versus no treatment 223.1  μ M; P = 0.02). Total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein were not statistically significantly increased. Conclusion. Short-term treatment with oral prednisolone and inhaled budesonide may adversely affect mean blood glucose concentration. Possible long-term consequences require further investigations.

  15. The impact of food allergy on asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Kewalramani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Anupama Kewalramani, Mary E BollingerDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Allergy/Pulmonology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Food allergy is a potentially severe immune response to a food or food additive. Although a majority of children will outgrow their food allergies, some may have lifelong issues. Food allergies and other atopic conditions, such as asthma, are increasing in prevalence in Western countries. As such, it is not uncommon to note the co-existence of food allergy and asthma in the same patient. As part of the atopic march, many food allergic patients may develop asthma later in life. Each can adversely affect the other. Food allergic patients with asthma have a higher risk of developing life-threatening food-induced reactions. Although food allergy is not typically an etiology of asthma, an asthmatic patient with food allergy may have higher rates of morbidity and mortality associated with the asthma. Asthma is rarely a manifestation of food allergy alone, but the symptoms can be seen with allergic reactions to foods. There may be evidence to suggest that early childhood environmental factors, such as the mother’s and child’s diets, factor in the development of asthma; however, the evidence continues to be conflicting. All food allergic patients and their families should be counseled on the management of food allergy and the risk of developing co-morbid asthma.Keywords: food allergy, diagnosis, treatment, asthma

  16. High Rates of All-cause and Gastroenteritis-related Hospitalization Morbidity and Mortality among HIV-exposed Indian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy Srikanth

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-infected and HIV-exposed, uninfected infants experience a high burden of infectious morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization is an important metric for morbidity and is associated with high mortality, yet, little is known about rates and causes of hospitalization among these infants in the first 12 months of life. Methods Using data from a prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT trial (India SWEN, where HIV-exposed breastfed infants were given extended nevirapine, we measured 12-month infant all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization rates and hospitalization risk factors. Results Among 737 HIV-exposed Indian infants, 93 (13% were HIV-infected, 15 (16% were on HAART, and 260 (35% were hospitalized 381 times by 12 months of life. Fifty-six percent of the hospitalizations were attributed to infections; gastroenteritis was most common accounting for 31% of infectious hospitalizations. Gastrointestinal-related hospitalizations steadily increased over time, peaking around 9 months. The 12-month all-cause hospitalization, gastroenteritis-related hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality rates were 906/1000 PY, 229/1000 PY, and 35/1000 PY respectively among HIV-infected infants and 497/1000 PY, 107/1000 PY, and 3/1000 PY respectively among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Advanced maternal age, infant HIV infection, gestational age, and male sex were associated with higher all-cause hospitalization risk while shorter duration of breastfeeding and abrupt weaning were associated with gastroenteritis-related hospitalization. Conclusions HIV-exposed Indian infants experience high rates of all-cause and infectious hospitalization (particularly gastroenteritis and in-hospital mortality. HIV-infected infants are nearly 2-fold more likely to experience hospitalization and 10-fold more likely to die compared to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. The combination of scaling up HIV PMTCT programs and implementing proven health

  17. Highly active antiretroviral therapy per se decreased mortality and morbidity of advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Chi-wai; CHENG Lai-sim; CHAN Wai-kit; WONG Ka-hing

    2005-01-01

    Background Morbidity and mortality of advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) have declined in Western industrialized countries since the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). It is unclear if this has also happened in Hong Kong.Methods We studied a retrospective cohort of patients with advanced HIV disease in Hong Kong, China. First, the mortality of advanced HIV disease per year was calculated for the decade 1993 to 2002, both annually and according to patient observation before and after 1997. Second, the event rates were estimated for the clinical end points of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and death. Univariate and multivariate analyses were then performed to identify associated factors. Results The crude mortality of advanced HIV disease declined from 10.8-30.4 per 100 patients during 1993-1996, to 0.8-6.9 per 100 patients during 1997-2002. A rate ratio of 4.04 (95% CI, 2.52-6.47) was evident for those observed in 1993-1996, compared to those in 1997-2002. In a multivariate analysis where calendar period was adjusted, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy was associated with rate ratios of 0.13 (95% CI, 0.05-0.33) for death after AIDS, 0.08 (95% CI, 0.04-0.19) for AIDS after a CD4 cell count <200/μl, and 0.21 (95% CI, 0.07-0.67) for death after CD4 cell count <200/μl. In the same analysis, calendar period ceased to be a significant factor after adjustment for use of HAART.Conclusions The mortality and morbidity of advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease have declined in Hong Kong. This improved prognosis was attributable to the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  18. The Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS: characterising patients with high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niemi Mari

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS is to construct a risk profile – using genetic, haemodynamic and electrocardiographic (ECG markers – of individuals at high risk of cardiovascular diseases, events and deaths. Methods and design All patients scheduled for an exercise stress test at Tampere University Hospital and willing to participate have been and will be recruited between October 2001 and December 2007. The final number of participants is estimated to reach 5,000. Technically successful data on exercise tests using a bicycle ergometer have been collected of 2,212 patients (1,400 men and 812 women by the end of 2004. In addition to repeated measurement of heart rate and blood pressure, digital high-resolution ECG at 500 Hz is recorded continuously during the entire exercise test, including the resting and recovery phases. About 20% of the patients are examined with coronary angiography. Genetic variations known or suspected to alter cardiovascular function or pathophysiology are analysed to elucidate the effects and interactions of these candidate genes, exercise and commonly used cardiovascular medications. Discussion FINCAVAS compiles an extensive set of data on patient history, genetic variation, cardiovascular parameters, ECG markers as well as follow-up data on clinical events, hospitalisations and deaths. The data enables the development of new diagnostic and prognostic tools as well as assessments of the importance of existing markers.

  19. Malaria morbidity in high and seasonal malaria transmission area of Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonse Ouédraogo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malariometric parameters are often primary endpoints of efficacy trials of malaria vaccine candidates. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of malaria prior to the conduct of a series of drug and vaccine trials in a rural area of Burkina Faso. METHODS: Malaria incidence was prospectively evaluated over one year follow-up among two cohorts of children aged 0-5 years living in the Saponé health district. The parents of 1089 children comprising a passive case detection cohort were encouraged to seek care from the local health clinic at any time their child felt sick. Among this cohort, 555 children were randomly selected for inclusion in an active surveillance sub-cohort evaluated for clinical malaria during twice weekly home visits. Malaria prevalence was evaluated by cross-sectional survey during the low and high transmission seasons. RESULTS: Number of episodes per child ranged from 0 to 6 per year. Cumulative incidence was 67.4% in the passive and 86.2% in the active cohort and was highest among children 0-1 years. Clinical malaria prevalence was 9.8% in the low and 13.0% in the high season (p>0.05. Median days to first malaria episode ranged from 187 (95% CI 180-193 among children 0-1 years to 228 (95% CI 212, 242 among children 4-5 years. The alternative parasite thresholds for the malaria case definition that achieved optimal sensitivity and specificity (70-80% were 3150 parasites/µl in the high and 1350 parasites/µl in the low season. CONCLUSION: Clinical malaria burden was highest among the youngest age group children, who may represent the most appropriate target population for malaria vaccine candidate development. The pyrogenic threshold of parasitaemia varied markedly by season, suggesting a value for alternative parasitaemia levels in the malaria case defintion. Regional epidemiology of malaria described, Sapone area field centers are positioned for future conduct of malaria vaccine trials.

  20. Nationwide review of hormonally active adrenal tumors highlights high morbidity in pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Punam P; Rubio, Gustavo A; Farra, Josefina C; Lew, John I

    2017-07-01

    Adrenal adenomas are benign tumors often discovered incidentally, and >70% are hormonally inactive. The remaining subset may produce excess aldosterone, cortisol, or catecholamine. Perioperative outcomes after adrenalectomy for such "hormonally active" tumors remain unclear. This study examines in-hospital outcomes after unilateral adrenalectomy for hormonally active tumors. A retrospective review was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2006-2011) to identify patients undergoing unilateral adrenalectomy for hormonally active or inactive tumors. Malignant adrenal tumors were excluded. Demographics, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were evaluated by univariate analysis, using two-tailed Chi-square and t-tests and multivariate logistic regression. Of 27,312 patients who underwent adrenalectomy, 78% (n = 21,279) had hormonally inactive and 22% (n = 6033) had hormonally active adrenal tumors. Among the latter, 65% (n = 4000) had primary hyperaldosteronism (Conn's syndrome), 33% (n = 1996) had hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), and 1.4% (n = 85) had pheochromocytoma. Patients with pheochromocytoma had higher rate of comorbidities including congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, and malignant hypertension compared with remaining hormonally active tumors (12% versus 4%, 18% versus 11%, 6% versus 2%; P pheochromocytoma versus other hormonally active tumors, mean length of stay was 5 versus 3 d and total in-hospital cost was $50,000 versus $41,000 (P pheochromocytoma had an independently higher risk for intraoperative blood transfusion (4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4-7.2), postoperative cardiac (7.6, 95% CI 2.8-20.2), and respiratory (1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.3) complications. Patients with pheochromocytoma have high rates of preoperative comorbidities, postoperative cardiopulmonary complications, and longer and more costly hospitalizations. Such high-risk patients should undergo appropriate preoperative medical

  1. High inhaled corticosteroids adherence in childhood asthma : the role of medication beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Brand, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to study determinants of adherence in young asthmatic children over a 3-month period, including the role of parental illness and medication perceptions as determinants of adherence. Consecutive 2-6-yr-old children with asthma, using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), followed-up at our

  2. A Low Mortality, High Morbidity Reduced Intensity Status Epilepticus (RISE) Model of Epilepsy and Epileptogenesis in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérès, Isabelle A. A.; Hadid, Rebecca D.; Amada, Naoki; Hill, Charlotte; Williams, Claire; Stanford, Ian M.; Morris, Christopher M.; Jones, Roland S. G.; Whalley, Benjamin J.; Woodhall, Gavin L.

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of acquired epilepsies aim to provide researchers with tools for use in understanding the processes underlying the acquisition, development and establishment of the disorder. Typically, following a systemic or local insult, vulnerable brain regions undergo a process leading to the development, over time, of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Many such models make use of a period of intense seizure activity or status epilepticus, and this may be associated with high mortality and/or global damage to large areas of the brain. These undesirable elements have driven improvements in the design of chronic epilepsy models, for example the lithium-pilocarpine epileptogenesis model. Here, we present an optimised model of chronic epilepsy that reduces mortality to 1% whilst retaining features of high epileptogenicity and development of spontaneous seizures. Using local field potential recordings from hippocampus in vitro as a probe, we show that the model does not result in significant loss of neuronal network function in area CA3 and, instead, subtle alterations in network dynamics appear during a process of epileptogenesis, which eventually leads to a chronic seizure state. The model’s features of very low mortality and high morbidity in the absence of global neuronal damage offer the chance to explore the processes underlying epileptogenesis in detail, in a population of animals not defined by their resistance to seizures, whilst acknowledging and being driven by the 3Rs (Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of animal use in scientific procedures) principles. PMID:26909803

  3. PILL Series. The ‘problematic’ asthma patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kui, Swee Leng; How, Choon How; Koh, Jansen

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a reversible chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that can be effectively controlled without causing any lifestyle limitation or burden on the quality of life of the majority of asthma patients. However, persistently uncontrolled asthma can be frustrating for both the patient and the managing physician. Patients who fail to respond to high-intensity asthma treatment fall into the category of ‘problematic’ asthma, which is further subdivided into ‘difficult’ asthma and ‘sever...

  4. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Stephanie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients received active or sham treatment for 15 minutes three times a day for four treatments. Medical management was standardized across groups. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to therapy after four treatments (minutes used/60 minutes prescribed and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included change in Borg dyspnea score (≥ 1 unit indicates a clinically significant change, spontaneously expectorated sputum volume, and forced expired volume in 1 second. Results Fifty-two participants were randomized to active (n = 25 or sham (n = 27 treatment. Patient adherence was similarly high in both groups (91% vs. 93%; p = 0.70. Patient satisfaction was also similarly high in both groups. After four treatments, a higher proportion of patients in the active treatment group had a clinically significant improvement in dyspnea (70.8% vs. 42.3%, p = 0.04. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes. Conclusions HFCWO is well tolerated in adults hospitalized for acute asthma or COPD and significantly improves dyspnea. The high levels of patient satisfaction in both treatment groups justify the need for sham controls when evaluating the use of HFCWO on patient-reported outcomes. Additional studies are needed to more fully evaluate the role of HFCWO in improving in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00181285

  5. MORBIDITY AGENTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Neelesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discuss on clinical representation of morbid jealousy which often termed delusional jealousy or ‘Othello Syndrome’ is a psychiatric condition where a lover believes against all reason and their beloved is being sexually unfaithful. Patients will be preoccupied with their partner’s perceived lack of sexual fidelity and will often behave in an unacceptable or extreme way as they endeavor to prove their ideas. Misuse of any psychomotor is an important association cause morbidity jealousy agents, like CNS stimulants that release the catecholamine, particularly dopamine, from pre synaptic terminals substance should be treated as a priority. Where higher levels of violence are reported Sildenafil may be useful as a diagnostic as well as therapeutic test in such cases .Many studies have shown an association between high alcohol consumption and developing morbid jealousy. Amphetamine-induced psychosis has been extensively studied because of its close resemblance to schizophrenia.

  6. Japanese Guideline for Adult Asthma 2014

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    Ken Ohta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult bronchial asthma (hereinafter, asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, reversible airway narrowing, and airway hyperresponsiveness. Long-standing asthma induces airway remodeling to cause intractable asthma. The number of patients with asthma has increased, and that of patients who die from asthma has decreased (1.5 per 100,000 patients in 2012. The aim of asthma treatment is to enable patients with asthma to lead a normal life without any symptoms. A good relationship between physicians and patients is indispensable for appropriate treatment. Long-term management with antiasthmatic agents and elimination of the causes and risk factors of asthma are fundamental to its treatment. Four steps in pharmacotherapy differentiate between mild and intensive treatments; each step includes an appropriate daily dose of an inhaled corticosteroid, varying from low to high. Long-acting 02-agonists, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and sustained-release theophylline are recommended as concomitant drugs, while anti-immunoglobulin E antibody therapy has been recently developed for the most severe and persistent asthma involving allergic reactions. Inhaled 02-agonists, aminophylline, corticosteroids, adrenaline, oxygen therapy, and others are used as needed in acute exacerbations by choosing treatment steps for asthma exacerbations depending on the severity of attacks. Allergic rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aspirin-induced asthma, pregnancy, asthma in athletes, and coughvariant asthma are also important issues that need to be considered.

  7. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanta, Christopher H; Long, Aidan A

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma have considerable morbidity related to their asthma and are at risk for serious, life-threatening exacerbations. Their management requires an intensive and comprehensive approach, including attention to reducing exposure to environmental inciters of airway inflammation and triggers of symptoms, patient education (including an asthma action plan), and opportunity for close patient-provider communication. Approved medical options include the lipoxygenase inhibitor, zileuton; the anti-immunoglobulin E monoclonal antibody, omalizumab; and bronchial thermoplasty. Nonapproved interventions of potential benefit are ultrahigh-dose inhaled corticosteroids, anticholinergic bronchodilators (tiotropium), macrolide antibiotics, and vitamin D supplementation for the vitamin D-deficient patient. Potentially toxic, "steroid-sparing" therapies such as methotrexate, cyclosporine, and etanercept are best reserved for patients participating in clinical trials. Recognition of specific subtypes of patients with therapy-resistant asthma permits more targeted treatment approaches, such as for aspirin-sensitive asthma, persistent eosinophilic asthma, asthma complicated by allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, asthma with persistent airflow obstruction, and asthma with life-threatening (near fatal) asthmatic attacks. Novel therapies based on an improved understanding of the pathobiology of therapy-resistant asthma are greatly needed.

  8. Management of asthma in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani AS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrea S Melani Fisiopatologia e Riabilitazione Respiratoria, Dipartimento Vasi, Cuore e Torace, Policlinico Le Scotte, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy Abstract: A significant number of older asthmatics, more often than in previous ages, have poorly controlled asthma, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, current guidelines suggest that most asthmatics can obtain achievement and maintenance of disease control and do not include sections specific to the management of asthma in the elderly so that it is more evident the contrast between poor control of asthma in the elderly and the lack of specific guidance from guidelines on asthma management in older asthmatics. Inhaled corticosteroids are the cornerstone for older asthmatics, eventually with add-on inhaled long-acting beta-agonists; inhaled short acting beta-agonists can be used as rescue medications. Triggers exacerbating asthma are similar for all ages, but inhaled viruses and drug interactions have greater clinical significance in the elderly. Older asthmatics have an increased likelihood of comorbidities and polypharmacy, with possible worsening of asthma control and reduced treatment adherence. Physicians and older asthmatics probably either do not perceive or accept a poor asthma control. We conclude that specific instruments addressed to evaluate asthma control in the elderly with concomitant comorbidities and measurements for improving self-management and adherence could assure better disease control in older asthmatics. Keywords: asthma, beta2-agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, asthma control, elderly

  9. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Metabolic Syndrome and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulaganathan Mabalirajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though severe or refractory asthma merely affects less than 10% of asthma population, it consumes significant health resources and contributes significant morbidity and mortality. Severe asthma does not fell in the routine definition of asthma and requires alternative treatment strategies. It has been observed that asthma severity increases with higher body mass index. The obese-asthmatics, in general, have the features of metabolic syndrome and are progressively causing a significant burden for both developed and developing countries thanks to the westernization of the world. As most of the features of metabolic syndrome seem to be originated from central obesity, the underlying mechanisms for metabolic syndrome could help us to understand the pathobiology of obese-asthma condition. While mitochondrial dysfunction is the common factor for most of the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, such as central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, the involvement of mitochondria in obese-asthma pathogenesis seems to be important as mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been shown to be involved in airway epithelial injury and asthma pathogenesis. This review discusses current understanding of the overlapping features between metabolic syndrome and asthma in relation to mitochondrial structural and functional alterations with an aim to uncover mechanisms for obese-asthma.

  10. Managing Asthma in the Early Childhood Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graville, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Asthma, one of the most common chronic disorders in childhood, affects more than seven million children in the United States, and is the third leading cause of hospitalization for children. Statistics like these make planning and preparing for asthma in the early childhood setting a high priority. With the high rates of asthma in the U.S. today,…

  11. Violence and Asthma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research shows that exposure to community violence is, directly and indirectly, associated with asthma. This article reviews the findings on the impact of violence on asthma, and the pathways for the association of violence and asthma are suggested: 1 exposure to violence is directly associated with asthma, mainly through dysregulation of sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, 2 exposure to violence is associated with the change of susceptibility of outdoor air pollution on asthma, probably through the change of an immune response, and 3 behavioral change due to exposure to violence (e.g. keeping children indoors leads to more exposure to indoor pollutants. The suggested framework may be useful to develop health policy on asthma in high-violence communities.

  12. A very high infection intensity of Schistosoma mansoni in a Ugandan Lake Victoria Fishing Community is required for association with highly prevalent organ related morbidity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edridah M Tukahebwa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In schistosomiasis control programmes using mass chemotherapy, epidemiological and morbidity aspects of the disease need to be studied so as to monitor the impact of treatment, and make recommendations accordingly. These aspects were examined in the community of Musoli village along Lake Victoria in Mayuge district, highly endemic for Schistosoma mansoni infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross sectional descriptive study was undertaken in a randomly selected sample of 217 females and 229 males, with a mean age of 26 years (SD ± 16, range 7-76 years. The prevalence of S. mansoni was 88.6% (95% CI: 85.6-91.5. The geometric mean intensity (GMI of S. mansoni was 236.2 (95% CI: 198.5-460.9 eggs per gram (epg faeces. Males had significantly higher GMI (370.2 epg than females (132.6 epg and age was also significantly associated with intensity of infection. Levels of water contact activities significantly influenced intensity of infection and the highest intensity of infection was found among people involved in fishing. However, organomegaly was not significantly associated with S. mansoni except for very heavy infection (>2000 epg. Liver image patterns C and D indicative of fibrosis were found in only 2.2% and 0.2%, respectively. S. mansoni intensity of infection was associated with portal vein dilation and abnormal spleen length. Anaemia was observed in 36.4% of the participants but it was not associated with S. mansoni infection intensity. Considering growth in children as one of the morbidity indicators of schistosomiasis, intensity of S. mansoni was significantly associated with stunting. CONCLUSION: Although organ-related morbidity, with the exception of periportal fibrosis, and S. mansoni infections were highly prevalent, the two were only associated for individuals with very high infection intensities. These results contrast starkly with reports from Ugandan Lake Albert fishing communities in which periportal fibrosis

  13. A Very High Infection Intensity of Schistosoma mansoni in a Ugandan Lake Victoria Fishing Community Is Required for Association with Highly Prevalent Organ Related Morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Magnussen, Pascal; Madsen, Henry; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Nuwaha, Fred; Wilson, Shona; Vennervald, Birgitte J.

    2013-01-01

    Background In schistosomiasis control programmes using mass chemotherapy, epidemiological and morbidity aspects of the disease need to be studied so as to monitor the impact of treatment, and make recommendations accordingly. These aspects were examined in the community of Musoli village along Lake Victoria in Mayuge district, highly endemic for Schistosoma mansoni infection. Methodology and Principal Findings A cross sectional descriptive study was undertaken in a randomly selected sample of 217 females and 229 males, with a mean age of 26 years (SD ±16, range 7–76 years). The prevalence of S. mansoni was 88.6% (95% CI: 85.6–91.5). The geometric mean intensity (GMI) of S. mansoni was 236.2 (95% CI: 198.5–460.9) eggs per gram (epg) faeces. Males had significantly higher GMI (370.2 epg) than females (132.6 epg) and age was also significantly associated with intensity of infection. Levels of water contact activities significantly influenced intensity of infection and the highest intensity of infection was found among people involved in fishing. However, organomegaly was not significantly associated with S. mansoni except for very heavy infection (>2000 epg). Liver image patterns C and D indicative of fibrosis were found in only 2.2% and 0.2%, respectively. S. mansoni intensity of infection was associated with portal vein dilation and abnormal spleen length. Anaemia was observed in 36.4% of the participants but it was not associated with S. mansoni infection intensity. Considering growth in children as one of the morbidity indicators of schistosomiasis, intensity of S. mansoni was significantly associated with stunting. Conclusion Although organ-related morbidity, with the exception of periportal fibrosis, and S. mansoni infections were highly prevalent, the two were only associated for individuals with very high infection intensities. These results contrast starkly with reports from Ugandan Lake Albert fishing communities in which periportal fibrosis is more

  14. A population based time series analysis of asthma hospitalisations in Ontario, Canada: 1988 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a common yet incompletely understood health problem associated with a high morbidity burden. A wide variety of seasonally variable environmental stimuli such as viruses and air pollution are believed to influence asthma morbidity. This study set out to examine the seasonal patterns of asthma hospitalisations in relation to age and gender for the province of Ontario over a period of 12 years. Methods A retrospective, population-based study design was used to assess temporal patterns in hospitalisations for asthma from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 2000. Approximately 14 million residents of Ontario eligible for universal healthcare coverage during this time were included for analysis. Time series analyses were conducted on monthly aggregations of hospitalisations. Results There is strong evidence of an autumn peak and summer trough seasonal pattern occurring every year over the 12-year period (Fisher-Kappa (FK = 23.93, p > 0.01; Bartlett Kolmogorov Smirnov (BKS = 0.459, p Conclusions A clear and consistent seasonal pattern was observed in this study for asthma hospitalisations. These findings have important implications for the development of effective management and prevention strategies.

  15. Feto-maternal outcomes in obstetric patients with near miss morbidity: an audit of obstetric high dependency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murki, Anuradha; Dhope, Sheetal; Kamineni, Vasundhara

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the feto-maternal outcomes of pregnant women with potentially life-threatening complications (PLTC) and near miss events admitted to the obstetric high dependency units (OHDU). Pregnant women with PLTC admitted to the OHDU were enrolled. Feto-maternal outcomes, need for NICU admission and neonatal mortality, were compared between women without near miss events (controls) and those with near miss events. Of the 1505 admissions to the obstetric department during the study period, 1127 delivered at our hospital. Among the deliveries 125 (11%) women were admitted to the OHDU and 19 (15%) of them were referred to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the hospital. The incidence of near miss morbidity (n = 46) was 37% among the mothers admitted to OHDU and 4.1% among the deliveries. The outcomes were similar in both groups for mean birth weight (among live births), neonatal death and still birth or intra-uterine deaths. The mean duration of ICU stay, proportion of ICU admission, and the mean duration of hospital stay were significantly higher for women with near miss events. In the presence of standardized OHDU and an ICU, the feto-maternal outcomes of women with PLTC and near miss event are similar to those without near miss events.

  16. Phenotypes and endotypes of severe asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Yoo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe childhood asthma is a complicated and heterogeneous disorder with distinct phenotypes. Children with severe asthma have more persistent symptoms despite receiving treatment, more atopy, greater airway obstruction, and more air trapping than those with mild-to-moderate asthma. They also have higher morbidity and substantial airflow limitations that persist throughout adulthood. Identification of the phenotype clusters and endotypes of severe asthma can allow further modulation of the natural history of severe asthma and may provide the pathophysiologic rationale for appropriate management strategies.

  17. Associations between criteria air pollutants and asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, H.S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The evidence that asthma is increasing in prevalence is becoming increasingly compelling. This trend has been demonstrated in the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, and several other Western countries. In the US, the increase is largest in the group under 18 years of age. There is mounting evidence that certain environmental air pollutants are involved in exacerbating asthma. This is based primarily on epidemiologic studies and more recent clinical studies. The U.S. Clean Air Act of 1970 provides special consideration to the class of outdoor air pollutants referred to as criteria pollutants, including O{sub 3}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), particulate matter (PM), NO{sub x}, CO, and Pb. Standards for these pollutants are set by the US EPA with particular concern for populations at risk. Current evidence suggests that asthmatics are more sensitive to the effects of O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} PM, and NO{sub 2}, and are therefore at risk. High SO{sub 2} and particulate concentrations have been associated with short-term increases in morbidity and mortality in the general population during dramatic air pollution episodes in the past. Controlled exposure studies have clearly shown that asthmatics are sensitive to low levels of SO{sub 2}. Exercising asthmatics exposed to SO{sub 2} develop bronchoconstriction within minutes, even at levels of 0.25 ppm. Responses are modified by air temperature, humidity, and exercise level. Recent epidemiologic studies have suggested that exposure to Pm is strongly associated with morbidity and mortality in the general population and that hospital admissions for bronchitis and asthma were associated with PM{sub 10} levels. In controlled clinical studies, asthmatics appear to be no more reactive to aerosols than healthy subjects. Consequently, it is difficult to attribute the increased mortality observed in epidemiologic studies to specific effects demonstrated in controlled human studies. 106 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Morbidity Profile of Employees Working in a Thermal Power Station Parali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U G Kawalkar; V A Kakrani; A S Nagaonkar; V L Vedpathak; P L Dahire; P G Kogade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health is multi factorial. An individual’s biological makeup influences health through interaction with social and physical environments as well as behavior. In Thermal power station different groups of employees are exposed to different working conditions and environmental factors at their work place; so an attempt has been made to conduct a study on the morbid conditions in employees of Thermal power station. Material and Method: Cross- sectional descriptive study was done. Total 400 employees were studied. History taking included personal and socio-demographic details occupational history, presenting complaints, past history, family history and history of accidents. Interview was followed by thorough clinical examination. Result: Majority of employees worked in Coal Handling Plant 90(22.5%. Respiratory system morbidities were maximum i.e. chronic bronchitis in 53 (13.25% study subjects. Digestive system morbidities were observed in the form of acid peptic disease in 39 (9.75% employees. Morbidities of circulatory system were hypertension was diagnosed in 55 (13.75% study subjects. Under musculoskeletal system, common morbidities present were back pain i.e. in 22 (5.50%, followed by arthritis in 19 (4.75%. Respiratory morbidity viz. chronic bronchitis and bronchial asthma was most common morbidity. Conclusion: For employee working in a power plant, it is highly advised that they must have regular health checkups.

  19. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Newaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has increased that asthma predisposes to complications of sickle cell disease (SCD, such as pain crises, acute chest syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and stroke, and is associated with increased mortality. An obstructive pattern of pulmonary function, along with a higher-than-expected prevalence of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR when compared to the general population, has led some researchers to suspect that underlying hemolysis may contribute to the development of a pulmonary disease similar to asthma in patients with SCD. While the pathophysiologic mechanism in atopic asthma involves up-regulation of Th2 cytokines, mast cell– and eosinophil-driven inflammation, plus increased activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and arginase in airway epithelium resulting in obstructive changes and AHR, the exact mechanisms of AHR, obstructive and restrictive lung disease in SCD is unclear. It is known that SCD is associated with a proinflammatory state and an enhanced inflammatory response is seen during vaso-occlusive events (VOE. Hemolysis-driven acute-on-chronic inflammation and dysregulated arginines–nitric oxide metabolism are potential mechanisms by which pulmonary dysfunction could occur in patients with SCD. In patients with a genetic predisposition of atopic asthma, these changes are probably more severe and result in increased susceptibility to sickle cell complications. Early recognition and aggressive management of asthma based on established National Institutes of Health asthma guidelines is recommended in order to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  20. Childhood Asthma: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim M. van Aalderen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  1. Childhood asthma: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalderen, Wim M

    2012-01-01

    Many children suffer from recurrent coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. In preschool children one third of all children have these symptoms before the age of six, but only 40% of these wheezing preschoolers will continue to have asthma. In older school-aged children the majority of the children have asthma. Quality of life is affected by asthma control. Sleep disruption and exercised induced airflow limitation have a negative impact on participation in sports and social activities, and may influence family life. The goal of asthma therapy is to achieve asthma control, but only a limited number of patients are able to reach total control. This may be due to an incorrect diagnosis, co-morbidities or poor inhalation technique, but in the majority of cases non-adherence is the main reason for therapy failures. However, partnership with the parents and the child is important in order to set individually chosen goals of therapy and may be of help to improve control. Non-pharmacological measures aim at avoiding tobacco smoke, and when a child is sensitised, to avoid allergens. In pharmacological management international guidelines such as the GINA guideline and the British Guideline on the Management of Asthma are leading.

  2. School variation in asthma: compositional or contextual?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K Richmond

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity have been shown to vary by neighborhood. Less is known about between-school variation in asthma prevalence and whether it exists beyond what one might expect due to students at higher risk of asthma clustering within different schools. Our objective was to determine whether between-school variation in asthma prevalence exists and if so, if it is related to the differential distribution of individual risk factors for and correlates of asthma or to contextual influences of schools. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of 16,640 teens in grades 7-12 in Wave 1 (data collected in 1994-5 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Outcome was current diagnosis of asthma as reported by respondents' parents. Two-level random effects models were used to assess the contribution of schools to the variance in asthma prevalence before and after controlling for individual attributes. RESULTS: The highest quartile schools had mean asthma prevalence of 21.9% compared to the lowest quartile schools with mean asthma prevalence of 7.1%. In our null model, the school contributed significantly to the variance in asthma (sigma(u0(2 = 0.27, CI: 0.20, 0.35. Controlling for individual, school and neighborhood attributes reduced the between-school variance modestly (sigma(u0(2 = 0.19 CI: 0.13-0.29. CONCLUSION: Significant between-school variation in current asthma prevalence exists even after controlling for the individual, school and neighborhood factors. This provides evidence for school level contextual influences on asthma. Further research is needed to determine potential mechanisms through which schools may influence asthma outcomes.

  3. Asthma pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Minka L

    2014-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway that leads to airway obstruction via bronchoconstriction, edema, and mucus hypersecretion. The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program has outlined evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma therapy and improve outcomes. The initial recommendation of choice for persistent asthmatic patients is an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS). Long-acting beta-2 agonists in combination with ICS, oral corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, and anti-IgE therapeutic options can be considered for patients with persistent or worsening symptoms. Many novel therapies are being developed, with an emphasis on anti-inflammatory mechanisms, gene expression, and cytokine modification.

  4. Environmental Public Health Tracking of Childhood Asthma Using California Health Interview Survey, Traffic, and Outdoor Air Pollution Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Michelle; Meng, Ying-Ying; Rull, Rudolph P.; English, Paul; Balmes, John; Ritz, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite extensive evidence that air pollution affects childhood asthma, state-level and national-level tracking of asthma outcomes in relation to air pollution is limited. Objectives Our goals were to evaluate the feasibility of linking the 2001 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), air monitoring, and traffic data; estimate associations between traffic density (TD) or outdoor air pollutant concentrations and childhood asthma morbidity; and evaluate the usefulness of such databases, linkages, and analyses to Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT). Methods We estimated TD within 500 feet of residential cross-streets of respondents and annual average pollutant concentrations based on monitoring station measurements. We used logistic regression to examine associations with reported asthma symptoms and emergency department (ED) visits/hospitalizations. Results Assignment of TD and air pollution exposures for cross-streets was successful for 82% of children with asthma in Los Angeles and San Diego, California, Counties. Children with asthma living in high ozone areas and areas with high concentrations of particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter experienced symptoms more frequently, and those living close to heavy traffic reported more ED visits/hospitalizations. The advantages of the CHIS for asthma EPHT include a large and representative sample, biennial data collection, and ascertainment of important socio-demographic and residential address information. Disadvantages are its cross-sectional design, reliance on parental reports of diagnoses and symptoms, and lack of information on some potential confounders. Conclusions Despite limitations, the CHIS provides a useful framework for examining air pollution and childhood asthma morbidity in support of EPHT, especially because later surveys address some noted gaps. We plan to employ CHIS 2003 and 2005 data and novel exposure assessment methods to re-examine the questions raised here. PMID

  5. Asthma care for children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among young children and adolescents. With high quality health care, most children and adolescents with asthma can live an active and normal life. Yet, many children and adolescents have uncontrolled asthma, with symptoms and exacerbations which may affect their daily life. Adolescence is a sensitive period and asthma may be difficult to treat due to poor adherence to treatment. Little is known about health care professionals’ adhe...

  6. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  7. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Asthma Contact Us Share Asthma Triggers: Gain Control Breathing Freely: Controlling Asthma Triggers This video features ... Air Quality: Biological Pollutants Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma Top of Page Molds About Molds ...

  8. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  9. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  10. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  11. Asthma Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  12. Childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of their lives. Definition. Asthma is clinically defined as a disease with symptoms of ... and seasonal variation in symptoms. ... “Western lifestyle” has commonly been used to explain ... influencing airway narrowing is smooth muscle contraction.

  13. Expression of surface markers on peripheral CD4+CD25high T cells in patients with atopic asthma: role of inhaled corticosteroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediate immune suppression through cell-cell contact with surface molecules,particularly cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4),glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein (GITR),and transforming growth factor β(TGF-β),but little is known about the exact role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of asthma.This study sought to characterize the expression of surface markers on peripheral blood mononuclear cells-derived Tregs in patients with atopic asthma and healthy subjects,and to investigate the effect of inhaled corticosteroid on them.Methods The expression of surface molecules on CD4+CD25hign Tregs was detected by flow cytometry.The effect of inhaled corticosteroid on expression of the surface molecules on Tregs was determined in vivo and in vitro.Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and latex enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay,respectively.Results Equivalent numbers of peripheral Tregs were found in patients with atopic asthma (stable and acute) and healthy subjects.Tregs preferentially expressed CTLA-4, GITR,toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4),latency-associated peptide (LAP/TGF-β1),and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3).Patients with acute asthma had decreased numbers of CD4+CD25high LAP+ T cells compared to healthy subjects and stable asthmatics.Inhaled corticosteroid enhanced the percentage of Tregs expressing LAP in vivo and in vitro dose-dependently.Furthermore,the percentages of Tregs expressing LAP were negatively correlated with total serum IgE levels and severity of asthma,but positively correlated with forced expiratory volume in one second percentage of the predicted value in patients with asthma.Concluslons The results suggest that membrane-bound TGF-β1 is a potential candidate for predicting the severity of asthma,and may contribute to the sustained remission of asthma,Strategies targeting

  14. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  15. Household smoking behavior: effects on indoor air quality and health of urban children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Arlene M; Breysse, Patrick; Rand, Cynthia; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; Eggleston, Peyton; Diette, Gregory B; Williams, D'Ann; Bernert, John T; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2011-05-01

    The goal of the study was to examine the association between biomarkers and environmental measures of second hand smoke (SHS) with caregiver, i.e. parent or legal guardian, report of household smoking behavior and morbidity measures among children with asthma. Baseline data were drawn from a longitudinal intervention for 126 inner city children with asthma, residing with a smoker. Most children met criteria for moderate to severe persistent asthma (63%) versus mild intermittent (20%) or mild persistent (17%). Household smoking behavior and asthma morbidity were compared with child urine cotinine and indoor measures of air quality including fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) and air nicotine (AN). Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon rank-sum and Spearman rho correlation tests were used to determine the level of association between biomarkers of SHS exposure and household smoking behavior and asthma morbidity. Most children had uncontrolled asthma (62%). The primary household smoker was the child's caregiver (86/126, 68%) of which 66 (77%) were the child's mother. Significantly higher mean PM(2.5), AN and cotinine concentrations were detected in households where the caregiver was the smoker (caregiver smoker: PM(2.5) μg/m(3): 44.16, AN: 1.79 μg/m(3), cotinine: 27.39 ng/ml; caregiver non-smoker: PM(2.5): 28.88 μg/m(3), AN: 0.71 μg/m(3), cotinine:10.78 ng/ml, all P ≤ 0.01). Urine cotinine concentrations trended higher in children who reported 5 or more symptom days within the past 2 weeks (>5 days/past 2 weeks, cotinine: 28.1 ng/ml vs. children with persistent asthma, residing with a smoker are exposed to high levels of SHS predominantly from their primary caregiver. Because cotinine was more strongly associated with asthma symptoms than environmental measures of SHS exposure and is independent of the site of exposure, it remains the gold standard for SHS exposure assessment in children with asthma.

  16. Acute bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Ramuscello

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the main causes of morbidity worldwide. It affects some 300 million individuals and has risen over the past 20 years, especially in the paediatric population. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways, subject to periodic exacerbations, characterised by coughing and progressive dyspnoea. Clinical conditions may vary greatly, ranging from moderate exacerbation with an increase in nocturnal awakening and a less than 20% reduction in the flow peak, through to severe respiratory insufficiency that requires immediate intubation of the airways. Pharmacological treatment envisages a step approach that aims to obtain and maintain control over the symptoms, taking into consideration the effectiveness of the treatment available, potential side effects and cost. β2-agonists and corticosteroids are the drugs of election for both maintenance therapy and for treating exacerbations. Other therapeutic devices may prove useful in particular cases. One fundamental key point in treatment over time is the cooperation between patient and attending doctor. The latest review of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA guidelines was published in 2006.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni antigens alter activation markers and cytokine profile in lymphocytes of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Tarcísio Vila Verde Santana; Fernandes, Jamille Souza; Lopes, Diego Mota; Andrade, Lorena Santana; Oliveira, Sérgio Costa; Carvalho, Edgar M; Araujo, Maria Ilma; Cruz, Álvaro A; Cardoso, Luciana Santos

    2017-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway inflammation, obstruction and hyperresponsiveness. Severe asthma affects a small proportion of subjects but results in most of the morbidity, costs and mortality associated with the disease. Studies have suggested that Schistosoma mansoni infection reduces the severity of asthma and prevent atopy.

  18. A note on twin-singleton differences in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon Francis; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Backer, Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Twins constitute a valuable resource for genetic studies of asthma. However, critics argue that twins are 'special' in terms of prenatal environment and upbringing and therefore nonrepresentative. In respect to asthma a small range of studies report differential morbidity in twins compared with s...

  19. Can Schools Promote the Health of Children with Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jenny; McCann, Donna; Coleman, Helen; Calvert, Marguerite; Warner, John

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a whole-school intervention to improve morbidity and psychosocial well-being in pupils with asthma. In all, 193 children with asthma (7-9 years) from 23 primary/junior schools in the south of England participated. Schools (n = 12) randomly assigned to the intervention group (IV) received a staff asthma…

  20. Comparison of guidelines and self-management plans in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, RJ; Kerstjens, HAM; Postma, DS

    1997-01-01

    Since the rise in asthma mortality and morbidity, many guidelines and self-management plans have been published Many of these guidelines and selfmanagement plans are not, however, based on results of previous studies but on the opinion of experts. We compared the five most frequently cited asthma gu

  1. Can Schools Promote the Health of Children with Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jenny; McCann, Donna; Coleman, Helen; Calvert, Marguerite; Warner, John

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the evaluation of a whole-school intervention to improve morbidity and psychosocial well-being in pupils with asthma. In all, 193 children with asthma (7-9 years) from 23 primary/junior schools in the south of England participated. Schools (n = 12) randomly assigned to the intervention group (IV) received a staff asthma…

  2. Comparison of guidelines and self-management plans in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, RJ; Kerstjens, HAM; Postma, DS

    Since the rise in asthma mortality and morbidity, many guidelines and self-management plans have been published Many of these guidelines and selfmanagement plans are not, however, based on results of previous studies but on the opinion of experts. We compared the five most frequently cited asthma

  3. Pet dander and difficult-to-control asthma: The burden of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, Dennis R

    2010-01-01

    There is evidence that allergy to common indoor pets, particularly cats and dogs, is closely associated with symptomatic asthma in the United States. Because the presence of pets in a home is a potentially modifiable factor, it is important to consider how much asthma morbidity and health care cost might be alleviated by the removal of pets from the homes of all persons with pet-allergic asthma. The percentage of pet-associated excess asthma morbidity was estimated as a proportion of all asthma-related health care costs for the United States.

  4. Natural Killer Cells in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil eKarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma have dramatically increased over the last few decades and there is a clear need to identify new, effective, therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Despite high numbers of NK cells in the lung and their ability to and generate a variety of immunomodulatory mediators the potential of these cells as therapeutic targets in allergic airway disease has been largely overlooked. The fact that IgE, acting through FcγRIII can activate NK cells resulting in cytokine/chemokine production implies that NK cells may contribute to IgE-mediated allergic responses. Indeed, current evidence suggests that NK cells can promote allergic airway responses during sensitization and ongoing inflammation. In animals models increased NK cells are observed in the lung following antigen challenge, while depletion of NK cells before immunization inhibits allergic airway inflammation. Moreover, in asthmatics NK cell phenotype is altered, and may contribute to promotion of the pro-inflammatory Th2-type environment. Conversely, driving NK cells towards an IFN-γ-secreting phenotype can reduce features of the allergic airway response in animal models. However, we have limited knowledge of the signals that drive the development of distinct subsets and functional phenotypes of NK cells in the lung and thus the role and therapeutic potential of NK cells in the allergic airway remains unclear. Here we review the potentially diverse roles of NK cells in allergic airway disease, identify gaps in current knowledge and discuss the potential of modulating NK cell function as a treatment strategy in asthma

  5. The Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA birth cohort study: design, methods, and study population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandel Megan T

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and morbidity of wheezing illnesses and childhood asthma is especially high in poor urban areas. This paper describes the study design, methods, and population of the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA study, which was established to investigate the immunologic causes of asthma among inner-city children. Methods and Results URECA is an observational prospective study that enrolled pregnant women in central urban areas of Baltimore, Boston, New York City, and St. Louis and is following their offspring from birth through age 7 years. The birth cohort consists of 560 inner-city children who have at least one parent with an allergic disease or asthma, and all families live in areas in which at least 20% of the population has incomes below the poverty line. In addition, 49 inner-city children with no parental history of allergies or asthma were enrolled. The primary hypothesis is that specific urban exposures in early life promote a unique pattern of immune development (impaired antiviral and increased Th2 responses that increases the risk of recurrent wheezing and allergic sensitization in early childhood, and of asthma by age 7 years. To track immune development, cytokine responses of blood mononuclear cells stimulated ex vivo are measured at birth and then annually. Environmental assessments include allergen and endotoxin levels in house dust, pre- and postnatal maternal stress, and indoor air nicotine and nitrogen dioxide. Nasal mucous samples are collected from the children during respiratory illnesses and analyzed for respiratory viruses. The complex interactions between environmental exposures and immune development will be assessed with respect to recurrent wheeze at age 3 years and asthma at age 7 years. Conclusion The overall goal of the URECA study is to develop a better understanding of how specific urban exposures affect immune development to promote wheezing illnesses and asthma.

  6. Exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, C S

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is common among pregnant women, and the incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is high. This literature review provides an overview of the impact of exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy on pregnancy-related complications. The majority of published retrospective studies reveal...... that asthma exacerbations during pregnancy increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, placental abruption and placenta praevia. Furthermore, these women also have higher risk for breech presentation, haemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, caesarean delivery, maternal admission to the intensive care...... unit and longer postpartum hospital stay. Asthma has been associated with increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation, small-for-gestational age, low birth weight, infant hypoglycaemia and preterm birth, but more recent prospective studies have not revealed significant associations with regard...

  7. Asthma and obesity: does weight loss improve asthma control? a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel CTB

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Trunk-Black Juel,1 Zarqa Ali,1 Lisbeth Nilas,2 Charlotte Suppli Ulrik11Respiratory Section, Internal Medicine Unit, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkAim and methods: Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma.Results: Weight loss in obese individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma is associated with a 48%–100% remission of asthma symptoms and use of asthma medication. Published studies, furthermore, reveal that weight loss in obese asthmatics improves asthma control, and that especially surgically induced weight loss results in significant improvements in asthma severity, use of asthma medication, dyspnoea, exercise tolerance, and acute exacerbations, including hospitalizations due to asthma. Furthermore, weight loss in obese asthmatics is associated with improvements in level of lung function and airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine, whereas no significant improvements have been observed in exhaled nitric oxide or other markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation.Conclusion: Overweight and obese adults with asthma experience a high symptomatic remission rate and significant improvements in asthma control, including objective measures of disease activity, after weight loss. Although these positive effects of weight loss on asthma-related health outcomes seem not to be accompanied by remission or improvements in markers of eosinophilic airway inflammation, it has potentially important implications for the future burden of asthma.Keywords: asthma, weight loss, diet, bariatric surgery, asthma control

  8. Longitudinal assessment of high versus low levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide among children with asthma and atopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmasri, Mary; Romero, Karina M; Gilman, Robert H; Hansel, Nadia N; Robinson, Colin L; Baumann, Lauren M; Cabrera, Lilia; Hamilton, Robert G; Checkley, William

    2014-04-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has emerged as an important biomarker in asthma. Increasing evidence points to atopy as a confounding factor in the interpretation of elevated FeNO. We conducted a longitudinal study to understand the clinical significance of FeNO as an inflammatory biomarker. We identified 19 children aged 13-15 years at baseline with a significant elevation in FeNO ≥ 80 parts per billion (ppb) and randomly selected a group of children of similar age with a moderate elevation (40-79 ppb) and normal-to-low FeNO (ppb). Between November 2010 and July 2011, three additional study visits were conducted. Ninety-three children participated in the study. There were 16, 24, and 53 participants in the high, mid, and low FeNO groups. During 1.5 years of follow-up, mean FeNO levels were 82.6 ppb (standard deviation [SD] = 65.9) for atopic asthmatics, 50.6 ppb (SD = 42.6) for nonasthmatic atopics, 17.0 ppb (SD = 10.8) for nonatopic asthmatics, and 17.8 ppb (SD = 13.9) for nonatopic nonasthmatics (p group had a FeNO ≥ 80 across all 4 measurements and 87 % of the normal-to-low FeNO group had a FeNO of group also was found to have an elevation in IL-5 (p = 0.04), IL-6 (p = 0.003), IL-10 (p = 0.002), and total serum IgE (p < 0.001), after adjustment by age, sex, height, body mass index, and atopy and asthma status. An elevation of FeNO appears to indicate an atopic phenotype regardless of an asthma diagnosis, clinical symptoms, or corticosteroid use. An elevation of FeNO also is associated with a systemic elevation in inflammatory cytokines.

  9. Epidemiology of asthma in western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpin, D; Vervloet, D; Charpin, J

    1988-10-01

    Asthma deaths are uncommon, but have recently increased in some countries due to problems in the management of the disease. Morbidity rates show large variations, which can be attributed to differences in defining the disease, but also to genuine variations, with a trend towards less asthma in northern Europe. It has been suggested that allergic diseases as a whole, and asthma in particular, may exhibit an upward secular trend. Risk factors include a genetic background and environmental triggering factors. The importance of genetic factors is illustrated by family studies and by extreme prevalence rates observed in some communities. Environmental factors include rapid air pollution variations which act as a trigger for asthma attacks. However, at levels currently prevailing in western Europe, air pollutants do not induce a higher incidence of asthma. Altitude generates a gradual decrease in Dermatophagoides, thus explaining both the clinical improvement in asthmatics living in altitude and a lower prevalence of asthma in populations born and living there. Among the other aero-allergens, grass pollens plays a major role in spring, elicitating asthma attacks. Some natural allergens transformed by man (castor bean, soja) can be responsible for asthma epidemics.

  10. Bronchial asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008049 Activation ralated genes of memory CD+4 T cells in asthma patients. PI Weifeng(皮卫峰),et al. Dept Respir Med, Xinhua Hosp, Sch Med, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200092. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2007;30(12):932-935. Objective To screen and identify the genes of activated memory CD+4 T cells in asthma. Methods Differential display polymerase chain reaction(DDPCR) was utilized to identify genes of memory CD+4 T cells after activation from asthmatic patients and normal individuals,

  11. Living with asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease: Using technology to support self-management - An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Deborah; Mair, Frances S; Yardley, Lucy; Kirby, Sarah; Thomas, Mike

    2016-08-10

    Long-term respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common, and cause high levels of morbidity and mortality. Supporting self-management is advocated for both asthma and increasingly so for COPD, and there is growing interest in the potential role of a range of new technologies, such as smartphone apps, the web or telehealth to facilitate and promote self-management in these conditions. Treatment goals for both asthma and COPD include aiming to control symptoms, maintain activities, achieve the best possible quality of life and minimize risks of exacerbation. To do this, health professionals should be (a) helping patients to recognize deteriorating symptoms and act appropriately; (b) promoting adherence to maintenance therapy; (c) promoting a regular review where triggers can be established, and strategies for managing such triggers discussed; and (d) promoting healthy lifestyles and positive self-management of symptoms. In particular, low uptake of asthma action plans is a modifiable contributor to morbidity and possibly also to mortality in those with asthma and should be addressed as a priority. Using technology to support self-management is an evolving strategy that shows promise. This review provides an overview of self-management support and discusses how newer technologies may help patients and health professionals to meet key treatment goals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. 上海城郊儿童婴幼儿期多因素暴露与日后哮喘发病相关性研究%Relationship of multiple risk factors in infancy with asthma morbidity at age 7 to 8 years in suburb and urban of Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董蔚; 周莹; 苏雯; 盛军; 李云珠; 俞善昌; 邵洁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the early exposure to multiple environmental factors and asthma prevalence at the age of 7 and 8 years in suburb and urban of Shanghai. Methods A total of 1 511 subjects aged 7 to 8 years from primary schools in the suburb areas and urban areas of Shanghai were included in the study. The cohort of the suburb children was divided into the early-migrated group who migrated with their family to Shanghai in their first year of life, and the late-migrated group who migrated after 3 years old. The aeroallergen sensitization and onset of asthma in these two groups of children and in the urban children were evaluated, and the results were further analyzed upon the correlation against their different early-life environmental exposures. Results The rate of asthma detection was significantly lower (5.7%) in the suburb children than that in the urban children (9.8%) (x2=8.63, P<0.01). Interestingly, in the suburb children, the rate of asthma detection in the early-migrated group (8.0%) was significantly much higher than that in the late-migrated group (3.8%) (x2=6.51, P=0.011). The analysis of early-life environmental exposures indicated that the atopic status of the children and their parents, and the passive smoking were predominantly the risk factors for asthma in the early-migrated group and the urban children. The exposure to poultry, domestic animals and/or pets was shown to be a protective factor in the suburb, but not in the urban. The only-child and a complete vaccination were not identified to be either risk or protective factors in both suburb and urban children. Conclusions The children lived in suburb in very early life and those in urban have the same morbidity. However, the asthma morbidity is lower in the late migrated group than in the early-migrated group. The early-life environmental exposure may be related to the incidence of asthma. Exposures to domestic poultry and pets are two of those factors.%目的

  13. Evolution of Asthma Concept and Effect of Current Asthma Management Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Concept of asthma has changed from symptom-complex or airway hypersensitivity to airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Based on this concept asthma management guidelines (JGL) has been developed in Japan. Death from asthma has decreased drastically since the publication of the guidelines, although it is still high in elderly population. Further works are expected for "zero-death" from asthma and for tighter control of airway inflammation and resultant airway remodeling.

  14. Overlap of obstructive sleep apnea and bronchial asthma: Effect on asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zidan

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is warranted for the overlap of OSA and asthma, particularly in the presence of obesity, GERD, and in patients with severe asthma. Individualized therapy addressing these moderating factors is warranted for optimal health outcomes. Recognition and treatment of OSA in asthmatics is an important element in improving asthma control.

  15. Reconsidering Co-Morbid Traits in Explanatory Models of High Dental Anxiety Using a Comparison of Psychiatric and Normal Patient Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Jensen, Christina Gundlev; Andersen, Line Bæk

    2016-01-01

    .) versus lower or no anxiety. Patients with psychiatric diagnoses were three times more likely to have high DA and nearly two times more likely to have avoided dental treatment >2 yr.; 25.9% reported extreme DA, compared to 9.3% of controls. Models of high general fear levels, predisposing anxiety......Explanatory models of co-morbid traits related to dental anxiety (DA) as described in the literature were tested and relative strengths analyzed in two groups of Danish adults, one with psychiatric diagnoses (n = 108) and the other healthy incoming patients at a large dental school teaching clinic...... (n = 151). Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and self-report measures representing three co-morbidity explanatory models, 1) presence of other fears; 2) anxiety sensitivity and 3) feelings of vulnerability specific to dental treatment, were collected in subscales of a 53-item questionnaire. Other items...

  16. Guideline-Defining Asthma Clinical Trials of the NHLBI ACRN and CARE Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Loren C Denlinger; Sorkness, Christine A.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Lemanske, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Due to an increasing prevalence, morbidity and mortality associated with asthma, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute created the Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) and the Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network to improve public health. The objectives of these clinical research networks are to conduct multiple, well designed clinical trials for rapid evaluation of new and existing therapeutic approaches to asthma and to disseminate laboratory and clinical finding...

  17. Interventional pulmonology for asthma and emphysema: bronchial thermoplasty and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell J; Murgu, Septimiu D

    2014-12-01

    Emphysema and asthma are responsible for economic and social burden. Altering the natural course of these diseases is a field of intense research. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial showed that lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) could significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality in properly selected patients. LVRS is seldom performed, however, due to the high morbidity associated with the surgery. Numerous bronchoscopic interventions have been introduced with the goal of providing the clinical benefits of LVRS without the surgical complications. Thus far, these modalities have not produced the results once hoped. However, through active modification of both technique and patient selection, the role of minimally invasive modalities in the treatment of emphysema continues to evolve. Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a method of delivering controlled heat to airway mucosa with the goal of reducing airway smooth muscle mass and hence bronchoconstriction. In patients suffering from asthma who cannot achieve control with standard medical care, BT has been shown to be safe and improves symptoms, with long lasting benefit. BT does not seem to affect traditional markers of asthma severity such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second and questions remain regarding proper patient selection for this therapy and its true physiologic effects. This article is a review of bronchoscopic modalities for emphysema and asthma.

  18. The relationship between the severity of asthma and comorbidites with anxiety and depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valença Alexandre M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There is evidence that asthma is associated with increased frequency of psychiatric symptoms and mental disorders. Our aim was to assess the frequency of anxiety and depressive disorders in a sample of asthmatic outpatients and observe if there is any relationship between this comorbidity and the severity of asthma. METHOD: Sixty-two consecutive patients of two outpatient asthma clinics located in university hospitals were evaluated. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview 4.4 Version. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients (43.5% met criteria for at least one psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were major depression (24%, generalized anxiety disorder (20.9% and panic disorder/agoraphobia spectrum disorders (17.7%. We found no significant differences in the prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression between the groups with mild/moderate and severe asthma. Despite the high frequency of depression and anxiety disorders, only 4 (6.5% patients were under psychiatric treatment and 13 (20.9% patients were taking benzodiazepines. Twelve of 15 (80% patients who reported present use of psychotropic medication were not under psychiatric treatment at the moment of the study. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the high morbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders in asthmatic patients, independent of the severity of asthma.

  19. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  20. A multilevel analysis on the relationship between neighbourhood poverty and public hospital utilization: is the high Indigenous morbidity avoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthridge Steven L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The estimated life expectancy at birth for Indigenous Australians is 10-11 years less than the general Australian population. The mean family income for Indigenous people is also significantly lower than for non-Indigenous people. In this paper we examine poverty or socioeconomic disadvantage as an explanation for the Indigenous health gap in hospital morbidity in Australia. Methods We utilised a cross-sectional and ecological design using the Northern Territory public hospitalisation data from 1 July 2004 to 30 June 2008 and socio-economic indexes for areas (SEIFA from the 2006 census. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and confidence intervals. Both total and potentially avoidable hospitalisations were investigated. Results This study indicated that lifting SEIFA scores for family income and education/occupation by two quintile categories for low socio-economic Indigenous groups was sufficient to overcome the excess hospital utilisation among the Indigenous population compared with the non-Indigenous population. The results support a reframing of the Indigenous health gap as being a consequence of poverty and not simplistically of ethnicity. Conclusions Socio-economic disadvantage is a likely explanation for a substantial proportion of the hospital morbidity gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. Efforts to improve Indigenous health outcomes should recognise poverty as an underlying determinant of the health gap.

  1. Co-morbidities in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Damman, Kevin; van der Meer, Peter; Wijkstra, Peter J.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; van Beek, Andre; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome characterized by poor quality of life and high morbidity and mortality. Co-morbidities frequently accompany heart failure and further decrease in both quality of life and clinical outcome. We describe that the prevalence of co-morbidities in patients with heart f

  2. Childhood asthma prediction models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Henriette A; Pinart, Mariona; Antó, Josep M; Keil, Thomas; Bousquet, Jean; Carlsen, Kai H; Moons, Karel G M; Hooft, Lotty; Carlsen, Karin C Lødrup

    2015-12-01

    Early identification of children at risk of developing asthma at school age is crucial, but the usefulness of childhood asthma prediction models in clinical practice is still unclear. We systematically reviewed all existing prediction models to identify preschool children with asthma-like symptoms at risk of developing asthma at school age. Studies were included if they developed a new prediction model or updated an existing model in children aged 4 years or younger with asthma-like symptoms, with assessment of asthma done between 6 and 12 years of age. 12 prediction models were identified in four types of cohorts of preschool children: those with health-care visits, those with parent-reported symptoms, those at high risk of asthma, or children in the general population. Four basic models included non-invasive, easy-to-obtain predictors only, notably family history, allergic disease comorbidities or precursors of asthma, and severity of early symptoms. Eight extended models included additional clinical tests, mostly specific IgE determination. Some models could better predict asthma development and other models could better rule out asthma development, but the predictive performance of no single model stood out in both aspects simultaneously. This finding suggests that there is a large proportion of preschool children with wheeze for which prediction of asthma development is difficult.

  3. Pediatric asthma self-management: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L. D.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of asthma self-management began in asthma camps in the 1970s. Today all asthma camps are required to provide an educational asthma self-management program. The interaction between children and educators is brief, and if the children do not continue in an associated program after camp, the benefits may be lost. Open Airways, the first program developed specifically for minority children, has been the prototype for community asthma self-management. School-based intervention programs have incorporated asthma education into the health curriculum. Some asthma education programs include an emphasis on the environment. Another approach is to develop intervention projects with parents, as in the Head Start program. This program has been very effective in increasing early recognition of asthma and decreasing recidivism in a high-risk population. Another type of project addressed the reading ability and reading comprehension of asthmatic children. Improvement in reading skills resulted in a 47% decrease in asthma recidivism. After 18 months, there were only two hospitalizations among the enrolled participants. Asthma self-management programs that are most effective for inner-city children provide an interactive, culturally relevant form of asthma education and address issues such as literacy and continuity. PMID:12653391

  4. [Severe asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  5. Alexithymia and posttraumatic stress disorder following asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Wall, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following asthma attack (post-asthma attack PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity among college students. It also investigated the association between these variables and alexithymia. One hundred and six college students participated in the study and completed an on-line survey comprising the Asthma Symptom Checklist, PTSD Checklist, General Health Questionnaire-28 and Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Ninety-one students without asthma and major illness formed the control group. 2 % met the diagnostic criteria for full-PTSD, while 42 and 56 % met the partial and no-PTSD criteria respectively. Compared with the control, the asthma group reported significantly more somatic problems, social dysfunction and depression and was five times more likely to have an elevated risk of developing a general psychiatric disorder. After adjusting age, marital status, asthma experience and symptoms, alexithymia did not predict PTSD, while difficulty identifying feelings predicted psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediational analyses showed that asthma symptoms partially mediated the link between difficulty identifying feelings and psychiatric co-morbidity. People can develop PTSD symptoms and other psychological difficulties following asthma attack. Alexithymia influenced general psychological difficulties independently of PTSD symptoms.

  6. The efficacy of single-high dose inhaled corticosteroid versus oral prednisone treatment on exhaled leukotriene and 8-isoprostane levels in mild to moderate asthmatic children with asthma exacerbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, O; Uluca, U; Keskin, M; Gogebakan, B; Kucukosmanoglu, E; Ozkars, M Y; Kul, S; Bayram, H; Coskun, Y

    2016-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in children with asthma exacerbation is unknown. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of single-high dose ICS versus oral prednisone treatment followed by a course of six day high-dose ICS or oral prednisone (P) treatment on the concentrations of Cys-LTs and 8-isoprostane levels in the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of children with asthma exacerbation. Ninety-four children with moderate-severe asthma exacerbation were evaluated with asthma scores, peak expiratory flow rate (PEF), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1) and exhaled Cys-LT and 8-isoprostane levels before and after treatment. EBC was collected from 52 patients before and four hours after treatment with inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) (4000 μg) or P and after six days of treatment with FP-1000 μg/day or P. Cys-LTs and 8-isoprostane concentrations were determined using a specific immunoassay kit. Both single high-dose FP (n=59) and p (n=35) treatment resulted in a significant improvement in asthma score (pchildren with asthma exacerbation. High-dose ICS treatment may be useful in the treatment of children with asthma exacerbation. The effects start as early as after four hours. The suppression of Cys-LTs production contributes to the early effects. Suppression of both Cys-LTs and oxidants may favourably contribute to the effects observed later. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Influenza vaccination in children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Bueving (Herman)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractEvery year, outbreaks of in.uenza appear across the world and cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the general population, particularly in persons with underlying conditions including asthma. Because the in.uenza virus changes constantly, man’s acquired immunity is usually only p

  8. Salmeterol in the treatment of childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.P.H. Vaessen-Verberne (Anja)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAsthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Although mortality rates in the Netherlands and other Western European countries are low, astlmm causes a great deal of morbidity and school absence. Incidence rates in our country are about 10% and recent epidemiologic studies show

  9. Influenza vaccination in children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Bueving (Herman)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractEvery year, outbreaks of in.uenza appear across the world and cause substantial morbidity and mortality in the general population, particularly in persons with underlying conditions including asthma. Because the in.uenza virus changes constantly, man’s acquired immunity is usually only

  10. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  11. Asthma in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  12. Asthma triggers (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... things make your asthma worse. These are called asthma "triggers". Avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. The most common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors ...

  13. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  14. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  15. Asthma: Basic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Treated? Select a Language Español (Spanish) What Is Asthma? Asthma is a disease that affects your lungs. ...

  16. Obesity and asthma: impact on severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-05-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese, compared with normal weight, subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy. Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma and impaired quality of life, compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy, with regard to symptoms, level of FEV1, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide, and airway responsiveness. Some studies suggest that asthma in the obese patient might be more responsive to leukotriene modifiers, orchestrated by leptin and/or adiponectin derived from adipose tissue, than to inhaled corticosteroids, possibly reflecting differences in the underlying airway inflammation in obese versus non-obese asthmatics. In conclusion, overweight and obesity is associated with poorer asthma control and, very importantly, overall poorer response to asthma therapy, compared with normal weight individuals.

  17. The link between soda intake and asthma: science points to the high-fructose corn syrup, not the preservatives: a commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeChristopher, L R; Uribarri, J; Tucker, K L

    2016-01-01

    Recent research conducted by investigators at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion—a division of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—found that 'Regular-Soda Intake, Independent of Weight Status, is Associated with Asthma among US High School Students.' On the basis of their review of prior studies, researchers hypothesized that the association may be due to high intake of sodium benzoate, a commonly used preservative in US soft drinks. But a closer look at these prior research studies suggests that there is no strong scientific evidence that the preservatives in US soft drinks are associated with asthma. Importantly, other recent research suggests that the association may be with the unpaired (excess free) fructose in high fructose corn syrup. PMID:27892935

  18. Mortality, morbidity and occupational exposure to airway-irritating agents among men with a respiratory diagnosis in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebert, P; Svartengren, M; Lindberg, M; Hemmingsson, T; Lundberg, I; Nise, G

    2008-02-01

    To examine the influence of an airway diagnosis in adolescence on future health and occupation in Swedish men. Data were collected from the linkage of four Swedish national registers: the Military Service Conscription Register, the Population and Housing Censuses, the Inpatient Care Register and the National Cause of Death Register. A job-exposure matrix for airway-irritating substances was developed for application on the conscription cohort. The cohort included 49 321 Swedish men born 1949-51. Three groups-(1) healthy, (2) asthmatics (mild and severe asthma) and (3) subjects with allergic rhinitis without concurrent asthma-were identified at conscription and analysed for mortality, in-patient care and strategies for choice of occupation with emphasis on airway-irritating job exposure. Analyses were adjusted for smoking and childhood socioeconomic position. The prevalence of total asthma was 1.8%, severe asthma 0.45% and allergic rhinitis 2.7%. Mortality for all causes was significantly higher in total asthma, hazard ratio (HR) 1.49 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.23), and lower in allergic rhinitis, HR 0.52 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.91). Asthma was a risk factor for inpatient care while allergic rhinitis was associated with less in-patient care (odds ratio (OR) for total asthma 1.16 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.34), severe asthma 1.38 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.85), allergic rhinitis 0.92 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.03)). Those with asthma tended to avoid jobs with a high probability for airway-irritating exposure (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.09), but not to the same extent as subjects with allergic rhinitis (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.70) (ORs from 1990). Subjects with asthma did not change their exposure situation to the same extent as subjects with allergic rhinitis. Further, asthmatics had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality compared to healthy subjects and subjects with allergic rhinitis.

  19. Guideline-defining asthma clinical trials of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Asthma Clinical Research Network and Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Loren C; Sorkness, Christine A; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Lemanske, Robert F

    2007-01-01

    Because of an increasing prevalence, morbidity, and mortality associated with asthma, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute created the Asthma Clinical Research Network and the Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network to improve public health. The objectives of these clinical research networks are to conduct multiple, well-designed clinical trials for rapid evaluation of new and existing therapeutic approaches to asthma and to disseminate laboratory and clinical findings to the health care community. These trials comprise a large proportion of the data driving the treatment guidelines established and reviewed by the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. This article will review the basic design and major findings of selected Asthma Clinical Research Network and Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network trials involving both adults and children with asthma. Collectively, these studies have helped refine the therapeutic role of existing controller medications, establish standard models for side-effect evaluation and risk-benefit models, validate symptom-based assessments for asthma control, and identify baseline characteristics that might predict individual patient responses. Remaining challenges include shaping the role of novel therapeutics in future guidelines, incorporating pharmacogenomic data in treatment decisions, and establishing better implementation strategies for translation to community settings, all with the goal of reducing the asthma burden on society.

  20. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Clarisse; Charpin, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs), molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Since avoidance is not easy to achieve, clean air policies remain the most effective strategy. Indoor air is also affected by air pollutants, such as cigarette smoke and

  1. Asthma essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Greene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic, reversible obstructive disease that when in exacerbation can present to the emergency department in a spectrum of severity. Prompt recognition of the potentially severely ill asthmatic requires a careful history and physical exam while considering alternative diagnoses for the presenting symptoms. Early administration of salbutamol and corticosteroids is indicated in almost all patients with other medications such as ipratropium and magnesium and supportive modalities like BiPAP reserved for sicker patients. The global impact of asthma is increasing, especially amongst children. While the benign clinical presentation is most common and mortality has decreased in recent decades due to improved recognition and care, the ubiquity of the condition and frequent lack of regular outpatient management contribute to the disease claiming 250,000 lives worldwide annually. The emergency physician must be prepared to assess and appropriately manage both the young child with a mild wheeze and the adult in respiratory failure.

  2. National and regional asthma programmes in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Selroos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review presents seven national asthma programmes to support the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership in developing strategies to reduce asthma mortality and morbidity across Europe. From published data it appears that in order to influence asthma care, national/regional asthma programmes are more effective than conventional treatment guidelines. An asthma programme should start with the universal commitments of stakeholders at all levels and the programme has to be endorsed by political and governmental bodies. When the national problems have been identified, the goals of the programme have to be clearly defined with measures to evaluate progress. An action plan has to be developed, including defined re-allocation of patients and existing resources, if necessary, between primary care and specialised healthcare units or hospital centres. Patients should be involved in guided self-management education and structured follow-up in relation to disease severity. The three evaluated programmes show that, thanks to rigorous efforts, it is possible to improve patients' quality of life and reduce hospitalisation, asthma mortality, sick leave and disability pensions. The direct and indirect costs, both for the individual patient and for society, can be significantly reduced. The results can form the basis for development of further programme activities in Europe.

  3. Health care resource use and costs associated with possible side effects of high oral corticosteroid use in asthma: a claims-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luskin AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Allan T Luskin,1 Evgeniya N Antonova,2 Michael S Broder,3 Eunice Y Chang,3 Theodore A Omachi,2 Dennis K Ledford4 1HealthyAirways, Madison, WI, 2Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, 3Partnership for Health Analytic Research, LLC, Beverly Hills, CA, 4Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA Background: The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of possible oral corticosteroid (OCS-related side effects and health care resource use and costs in patients with asthma.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, matched-cohort, retrospective study using a commercial claims database. Adults with asthma diagnosis codes and evidence of asthma medication use were studied. Patients with high OCS use (≥30 days of OCS annually were divided into those who did versus those who did not experience OCS-related possible side effects. Their health care resource use and costs were compared using linear regression or negative binomial regression models, adjusting for age, sex, geographic region, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease status.Results: After adjustment, high OCS users with possible side effects were more likely to have office visits (23.0 vs 19.6; P<0.001 and hospitalizations (0.44 vs 0.22; P<0.001 than those without possible side effects. Emergency department visits were similar between the groups. High OCS users with possible side effects had higher adjusted total annual mean health care costs ($25,168 than those without such side effects ($21,882; P=0.009.Conclusion: Among high OCS users, patients with possible OCS-related side effects are more likely to use health care services than those without such side effects. Although OCS may help control asthma and manage exacerbations, OCS side effects may result in additional health care resource use and costs, highlighting the need

  4. Dupilumab in the management of moderate-to-severe asthma: the data so far

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barranco P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Barranco,1 Elsa Phillips-Angles,2 Javier Dominguez-Ortega,1 Santiago Quirce1 1Department of Allergy, Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research (IdiPAZ, CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Allergy, Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research (IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Severe asthma constitutes illness in a relatively small proportion of all patients with asthma, but it is a major public health problem – with considerable effect on morbidity, mortality, as well as a high burden on health care resources. Regardless of effective treatments being widely available and the existence of treatment guidelines, a large population of severe asthma cases remain uncontrolled. Achieving and maintaining asthma control in this group of patients is, therefore, of utmost importance. The recognition of distinct inflammatory phenotypes within this population has driven the development of targeted biological therapies – particularly, selective targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. It is noteworthy that in approximately 50% of these patients, there is strong evidence of the pathogenic role of T helper type-2 (Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13, orchestrating the eosinophilic and allergic inflammatory processes. Among the recently developed antiasthma biologic drugs, the mAb dupilumab is very promising given its ability to inhibit the biological effects of both IL-4 and IL-13. In this review, we focused on IL-4 and IL-13, as these interleukins are considered to play a key role in the pathophysiology of asthma, and on dupilumab, an anti-IL-4 receptor human mAb, as a forthcoming treatment for uncontrolled severe asthma in the near future. Keywords: dupilumab, asthma, interleukin-4, interleukin-13, monoclonal antibodies, treatment

  5. Estimating Benzathine Penicillin Need for the Treatment of Pregnant Women Diagnosed with Syphilis during Antenatal Care in High-Morbidity Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie M Taylor

    Full Text Available Congenital syphilis continues to be a preventable cause of global stillbirth and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Shortages of injectable penicillin, the only recommended treatment for pregnant women and infants with syphilis, have been reported by high-morbidity countries. We sought to estimate current and projected annual needs for benzathine penicillin in antenatal care settings for 30 high morbidity countries that account for approximately 33% of the global burden of congenital syphilis.Proportions of antenatal care attendance, syphilis screening coverage in pregnancy, syphilis prevalence among pregnant women, and adverse pregnancy outcomes due to untreated maternal syphilis reported to WHO were applied to 2012 birth estimates for 30 high syphilis burden countries to estimate current and projected benzathine penicillin need for prevention of congenital syphilis.Using current antenatal care syphilis screening coverage and seroprevalence, we estimated the total number of women requiring treatment with at least one injection of 2.4 MU of benzathine penicillin in these 30 countries to be 351,016. Syphilis screening coverage at or above 95% for all 30 countries would increase the number of women requiring treatment with benzathine penicillin to 712,030. Based on WHO management guidelines, 351,016 doses of weight-based benzathine penicillin would also be needed for the live-born infants of mothers who test positive and are treated for syphilis in pregnancy. Assuming availability of penicillin and provision of treatment for all mothers diagnosed with syphilis, an estimated 95,938 adverse birth outcomes overall would be prevented including 37,822 stillbirths, 15,814 neonatal deaths, and 34,088 other congenital syphilis cases.Penicillin need for maternal and infant syphilis treatment is high among this group of syphilis burdened countries. Initiatives to ensure a stable and adequate supply of benzathine penicillin for treatment of maternal syphilis

  6. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem in children with well-controlled asthma : case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letitre, Sarah L.; de Groot, Eric P.; Draaisma, Eelco; Brand, Paulus

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although asthma has been linked to psychological morbidity, this relationship may be confounded by poor asthma control. We aimed to compare the prevalence of anxiety, depression and low level of self-esteem in children with well-controlled asthma with that of healthy peers. Setting Dedicat

  7. Pediatric Obesity-Related Asthma: The Role of Metabolic Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Greally, John M; Rastogi, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    The burden of obesity-related asthma among children, particularly among ethnic minorities, necessitates an improved understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. Although obesity is an independent risk factor for asthma, not all obese children develop asthma. Several recent studies have elucidated mechanisms, including the role of diet, sedentary lifestyle, mechanical fat load, and adiposity-mediated inflammation that may underlie the obese asthma pathophysiology. Here, we review these recent studies and emerging scientific evidence that suggest metabolic dysregulation may play a role in pediatric obesity-related asthma. We also review the genetic and epigenetic factors that may underlie susceptibility to metabolic dysregulation and associated pulmonary morbidity among children. Lastly, we identify knowledge gaps that need further exploration to better define pathways that will allow development of primary preventive strategies for obesity-related asthma in children.

  8. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma.

  9. Community Asthma Initiative to Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Disparities Among Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Elizabeth R; Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Chan, Elaine; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Fleegler, Eric W; Lorenzi, Margarita; Klements, Elizabeth M; Dickerson, Deborah U; Nethersole, Shari; Dulin, Rick

    2016-02-12

    Black and Hispanic children are hospitalized with complications of asthma at much higher rates than white children. The Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) provides asthma case management and home visits for children from low-income neighborhoods in Boston, Massachusetts, to address racial/ethnic health disparities in pediatric asthma outcomes. CAI objectives were to evaluate 1) case management data by parent/guardian report for health outcomes and 2) hospital administrative data for comparison between intervention and comparison groups. Data from parent/guardian reports indicate that CAI decreased the number of children with any (one or more) asthma-related hospitalizations (decrease of 79% at 12 months) and any asthma-related emergency department visits (decrease of 56% at 12 months) among children served, most of whom were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic. Hospital administrative data also indicate that the number of asthma-related hospitalizations per child significantly decreased among CAI participants compared with a comparison group. The CAI model has been replicated in other cities and states with adaptations to local cultural and systems variations. Health outcome and cost data have been used to contribute to a business case to educate legislators and insurers about outcomes and costs for this enhanced approach to care. Strong partnerships with public health, community, and housing agencies have allowed CAI to leverage its outcomes to expand systemic changes locally and statewide to reduce asthma morbidity.

  10. Frequency of vascular and pregnancy morbidity in patients with low vs. moderate-to-high titers of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofer-Shiber, Shachaf; Molad, Yair

    2015-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) is an autoimmune hypercoagulable syndrome characterized by thrombotic and obstetric manifestations. We sought to determine the rate of APLS feature in patients tested positive for antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) regardless of the serum level of anticardiolipin (ACL) and/or anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) antibodies. An inception cohort of individuals who were tested positive for ACL and/or β2GPI IgG/IgM antibody, and/or lupus anticoagulant (LAC) on two occasions of at least 12 weeks apart. A total of 243 patients were included; their mean age was 40.1 ± 15.9 years. Thrombotic vascular events occurred in 118 patients (48.5%) of the entire cohort, of which 62 patients (25.5%) suffered from an arterial event and 56 patients (23%) from thrombotic venous events. Obstetrical morbidity occurred in 106 female patients (43.6%). In our cohort, we found no difference in the frequency of thrombotic or obstetric manifestations of APLS between patients with ACL IgG/IgM of low serum antibody level (20 U). We suggest that in 'real life' the diagnosis of APLS should not be excluded because of low titer of APLA.

  11. Severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with high systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and low serum interleukin 10 in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Turrubiarte, Gabriela; González-Chávez, Antonio; Pérez-Tamayo, Ruy; Salazar-Vázquez, Beatriz Y; Hernández, Vito S; Garibay-Nieto, Nayeli; Fragoso, José Manuel; Escobedo, Galileo

    2016-05-01

    Morbid obesity has been shown to increase the risk to develop hepatic steatosis, also referred to as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Emerging evidence suggests that the severity of NAFLD may associate with increased serum levels of inflammatory markers as well as decreased concentration of mediators with anti-inflammatory actions, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL) 10, respectively. We thus examined the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10 in 102 morbidly obese women and men (body mass index > 40 kg/m(2)), exhibiting different grades of NAFLD. Blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, insulin, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoproteins, parameters of liver function, TNF-α, and IL-10 were measured in each subject. The stage of NAFLD was estimated by abdominal ultrasound imaging. In comparison with morbidly obese subjects without steatosis, morbidly obese patients with NAFLD showed increased age (39.23 ± 9.80 years), HOMA-IR (6.74 ± 1.62), total cholesterol (219.7 ± 9.58 mg/dl), aspartate aminotransferase (36.25 ± 3.24 UI/l), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (37.12 ± 3.41 UI/l), and TNF-α (37.41 ± 1.72 pg/ml) as well as decreased serum levels of IL-10 (61.05 ± 2.43 pg/ml). Interestingly, the systemic levels of TNF-α increased, while IL-10 decreased in accordance with the severity of NAFLD, which supports a role for systemic inflammatory mediators in promoting steatosis progression. Further clinical prospective studies need to be addressed to elucidate the role of TNF-α and IL-10 in the development of NAFLD while also establishing their clinical utility in the assessment of morbidly obese patients at higher risk to develop severe steatosis.

  12. Race and asthma control in the pediatric population of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brian H; Cabana, Michael D; Hilton, Joan F; Ly, Ngoc P

    2011-05-01

    The racially unique population of Hawaii has one of the highest prevalences of childhood asthma in America. We estimate the prevalence of impaired asthma control among asthmatic children in Hawaii and determine which factors are associated with impaired control. We analyzed data from 477 asthmatic children living in Hawaii participating in the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Surveys. Impaired asthma control was modeled after 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with impaired asthma control. Children (53.8%) with asthma were either part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. While 35.6% of asthmatic children met criteria for impaired asthma control, being part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander was not associated with impaired control. Only 31.1% of children with impaired control reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids despite >80% having had a routine checkup for asthma in the past year and receipt of asthma education from a healthcare provider. A large proportion of asthmatic children in Hawaii have impaired asthma control that does not appear to be associated with race but may be associated with inadequate pharmacologic therapy. While a significant percentage reported receiving routine asthma care and asthma education, a minority reported using inhaled corticosteroids. Reasons for this discrepancy between asthma assessment and treatment are unclear. However, additional education on part of the physician, community, and healthcare system are likely to improve management and reduce morbidity in this population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Asthma in elite athletes: how do we manage asthma-like symptoms and asthma in elite athletes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Thomas Kromann

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Asthma is frequent in elite athletes and the high prevalence of asthma might be associated with specific types of sport. It has been suggested that chronic endurance training might increase the number of neutrophils in the airways, and this may reflect airway injury. The use of anti......-asthmatic medication in elite athletes is also currently under scrutiny in order to reduce the risk of under-treatment or over treatment. OBJECTIVES: Determine the use of anti-asthmatic medication and the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma in Danish elite athletes. Further, to determine whether elite...... survey of elite athletes (N = 418); and (iii) a clinical study of elite athletes. A total of 54 elite athletes (19 with physician-diagnosed asthma) participated together with two control groups: (i) 22 non-athletes with physician-diagnosed asthma (steroid naïve for 4 weeks before the examination) and (ii...

  14. Treatment of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia by photodynamic therapy using hexylaminolevulinate may be costeffective compared to conisation procedures due to decreased pregnancy-related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soergel, Philipp; Makowski, Lars; Makowski, Efthimia; Schippert, Cordula; Hertel, Hermann; Hillemanns, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Standard treatments of high-grade Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are conisation procedures. Theses methods have proven effectiveness but are associated with an increased risk of subsequent pregnancy complications. Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) of CIN using hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) may represent an alternative treatment without the risk of cervical insufficiency or scaring. This study aims to evaluate the economical aspect of CIN treatment including associated pregnancy complications by comparing both methods. We developed model treatment pathways for both conisation procedures and PDT using HAL. Thereafter, we calculated total costs for both treatment pathways including necessary re-treatments or alternative treatments. The estimated impact of conisation-related cervical insufficiency, prematurity, perinatal morbidity and life-long disability were determined. The total additional costs per conisation due to perinatal morbidity were calculated. The total cost of treatment for CIN with a conisation procedure alone was 1,473 €, whereas the PDT procedure alone accounted for 1,386 €, based of assumptions of a 50% re-PDT rate, a 70% response rate and costs of 500 € for the PDT intervention itself. We computed 71, 144 and 545 newborns born prematurely due to conisation procedures treatment with PDT given the above-mentioned assumptions were 1,558 €. For Germany, PDT has the potential to be a cost-effective treatment for high-grade CIN compared to conisation procedure. Most important, the increased perinatal morbidity, perinatal mortality and associated costs after conisation procedures are significant and may be reduced by the implementation of PDT in CIN treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Persistent asthma in adults: comparison of high resolution computed tomography of the lungs after one year of follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cukier, Alberto; Stelmach, Rafael; Kavakama, Jorge Issamu; Terra Filho, Mario; Vargas, Francisco [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao (InCor). Div. de Doencas Respiratorias

    2001-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of high resolution computed tomography of the thorax in detecting abnormalities in chronic asthmatic patients and to determine the behavior of these lesions after at least one year. Fourteen persistent asthmatic patients with a mean forced expiratory volume in 1-second that was 63% of predicted and a mean forced expiratory volume in 1-second /forced vital capacity of 60% had two high resolution computed tomography separated by an interval of at least one year. All 14 patients had abnormalities on both scans. The most common abnormality was bronchial wall thickening, which was present in all patients on both computed tomography. Bronchiectasis was suggested on the first computed tomography in 5 of the 14 (36%) patients, but on follow-up, the bronchial dilatation had disappeared in 2 and diminished in a third. Only one patient had any emphysematous changes; a minimal persistent area of para septal emphysema was present on both scans. In 3 patients, a 'mosaic' appearance was observed on the first scan, and this persisted on the follow-up computed tomography. Two patients had persistent areas of mucoid impaction. In a third patient, mucus plugging was detected only on the second computed tomography. We conclude that there are many abnormalities on the high resolution computed tomography of patients with persistent asthma. Changes suggestive of bronchiectasis, namely bronchial dilatation, frequently resolve spontaneously. Therefore, the diagnosis of bronchiectasis by high resolution computed tomography in asthmatic patients must be made with caution, since bronchial dilatation can be reversible or can represent false dilatation. Non smoking chronic asthmatic subjects in this study had no evidence of centrilobular or panacinar emphysema. (author)

  16. A very high infection intensity of Schistosoma mansoni in a Ugandan Lake Victoria fishing community is required for association with highly prevalent organ related morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Magnussen, Pascal; Madsen, Henry;

    2013-01-01

    In schistosomiasis control programmes using mass chemotherapy, epidemiological and morbidity aspects of the disease need to be studied so as to monitor the impact of treatment, and make recommendations accordingly. These aspects were examined in the community of Musoli village along Lake Victoria...

  17. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2011: moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2012-01-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma" concluded with the following statement: "Perhaps new directions in personalized medicine and improved health care access and communication will help maintain steady progress in alleviating the burden of this disease in children, especially young children." This year's summary will focus on recent advances in pediatric asthma that show significant accomplishments in reducing asthma morbidity and mortality over the last 10 years and discuss some pathways to further reduce asthma burden, as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2011. Some of the recent reports continue to shed light on methods to improve asthma management through steps to reduce asthma exacerbations, identify features of the disease in early childhood, alter asthma progression, intervene with nutrition, and more effectively implement the asthma guidelines. As new information evolves, it is also time to consider a revision of the asthma guidelines based on key studies that affect our management of the disease since the last revision in 2007. Now is also the time to use information recorded in electronic medical records to develop innovative disease management plans that will track asthma over time and enable timely decisions on interventions to maintain control that can lead to disease remission and prevention.

  18. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to incorporate environmental management into clinical practices and standards of care for asthma patients. Top of Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality Home Page Asthma Home Take the Asthma Quiz ...

  19. Current asthma control predicts future risk of asthma exacerbation: a 12-month prospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hua-hua; ZHOU Ting; WANG Lan; ZHANG Hong-ping; FU Juan-juan; WANG Lei; JI Yu-lin; WANG Gang

    2012-01-01

    Background The performance of asthma control test (ACT) at baseline for predicting future risk of asthma exacerbation has not been previously demonstrated.This study was designed to explore the ability of the baseline ACT score to predict future risk of asthma exacerbation during a 12-month follow-up.Methods This post hoc analysis included data from a 12-month prospective cohort study in patients with asthma (n=290).The time to the first asthma exacerbation was analyzed and the association between baseline ACT scores and future risk of asthma exacerbation was calculated as adjusted odds ratio (OR) using Logistic regression models.Further,sensitivity and specificity were estimated at each cut-point of ACT scores for predicting asthma exacerbations.Results The subjects were divided into three groups,which were uncontrolled (U,n=128),partly-controlled (PC,n=111),and well controlled (C,n=51) asthma.After adjustment,the decreased ACT scores at baseline in the U and PC groups were associated with an increased probability of asthma exacerbations (OR 3.65 and OR 5.75,respectively),unplanned visits (OR 8.03 and OR 8.21,respectively) and emergency visits (OR 20.00 and OR 22.60,respectively) over a 12-month follow-up period.The time to the first asthma exacerbation was shorter in the groups with U and PC asthma (all P<0.05).The baseline ACT of 20 identified as the cut-point for screening the patients at high risk of asthma exacerbations had an increased sensitivity of over 90.0% but a lower specificity of about 30.0%.Conclusion Our findings indicate that the baseline ACT score with a high sensitivity could rule out patients at low risk of asthma exacerbations and oredict future risk of asthma exacerbations in clinical practice.

  20. Do high radiation doses in locally advanced prostate cancer patients treated with 103Pd implant plus external beam irradiation cause increased urinary, rectal, and sexual morbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nelson N; Cesaretti, Jamie A; Rosenstein, Barry; Stock, Richard G

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the morbidity of higher radiation doses in prostate cancer patients. Five hundred eighty-five men treated with seed implantation and external beam irradiation were followed a median of 5 years (range, 2-11). Hormonal therapy (HT) of 9 months duration was used in 504 (86.2%) patients. The biologic effective dose (BED) was calculated using an alpha/beta of 2. Urinary incontinence (UI) and symptoms (IPSS) were prospectively collected. Rectal morbidity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. Two BED dose groups of 220 Gy (n=136) were used. Comparisons of means were made by Student's t test, and the associations were tested by chi-square analysis (Pearson). Urinary retention developed in 36 (6.2%) and was not associated with BED or IPSS. Retention occurred more often with prostate volume >50 cc (17%, p=0.001). The median change in urinary symptoms (IPSS) was 1. Sixty-one percent with high BED were more likely to have increased postimplant symptoms compared with 39% with lower BED (p=0.025; odds ratio [OR], 1.107; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.21). UI occurred in 25 patients (4.3%) and was only associated with a postimplant transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (n=25), 16% vs. 2.3% for no TURP (p=0.001; OR, 8; 95% CI, 2.4-27). Of the 373 patients initially potent, 204 (54.7%) maintained potency. Impotence was only associated with age at implant (p=0.001) and HT (p=0.004). Sixty-two (10.6%) patients had Grade 1-2 and 4 patients had Grade 3-4 (0.7%, 2 ulcers and 2 fistulas) rectal complications. Three of the Grade 3/4 complications occurred with a dose 220 Gy does not seem to increase morbidity. (c) 2010 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is associated with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halmøy Anne

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is increasingly recognized as a common disorder not only in children, but also in the adult population. Similarly, asthma also has a substantial prevalence among adults. Previous studies concerning a potential relationship between ADHD and asthma have not presented consistent results. Methods A cross-sectional study of 594 adult patients diagnosed with ADHD, compared with 719 persons from the general population. Information was collected between 1997 and 2005 using auto-questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, co-morbid conditions, including asthma, and work status. Results The prevalence of asthma was significantly higher in the ADHD patient group compared to the controls, 24.4% vs. 11.3% respectively (OR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.89-3.44, and controls with asthma scored higher on ratings of both past and present symptoms of ADHD. Female ADHD patients had a significantly higher prevalence of asthma compared to male ADHD patients (30.9% vs. 18.2%, OR = 2.01, CI 1.36-2.95, but in controls a slight female preponderance was not statistically significant. In both ADHD patients and controls, having asthma was associated with an increased prevalence of symptoms of mood- and anxiety disorders. Conclusions The present findings point to a co-morbidity of ADHD and asthma, and these patients may represent a clinical and biological subgroup of adult patients with ADHD.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eTsukagoshi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory illness (ARI due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human rhinovirus (HRV, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, and human enterovirus (HEV infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  3. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xian Qiao; Yi Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology,pathophysiology,and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment.Data Sources:Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and “asthma'" as the main keywords.Highly regarded older publications were also included.Study Selection:Information about the features of the two diseases in common,the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified,retrieved,and summarized.Results:Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions.The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years.Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea,and OSA often combines with asthma,as well.They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common.Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects,intermittent hypoxia,nerve reflex,inflammation,leptin,etc.Indirect mechanistic links include medication,nose diseases,smoking,obesity,and gastroesophageal reflux disease.Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma,some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome "alternative overlap syndrome,"and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure.Conclusions:OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis,symptoms,and therapies.With the growing awareness of the relationship between them,we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients.Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  4. [Difficult to control severe asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Antoine; Pipet, Anaïs

    2011-03-01

    Difficult to control severe asthma is characterized by the persistence of inacceptable symptoms of asthma despite a continuous treatment with at least high doses of inhaled steroids and long acting bronchodilators. The diagnosis is done after a period of observation and some investigations that will allow confirm the diagnosis of asthma, eliminate alternative diagnosis and etiological forms that would be difficult to treat intrinsically (allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis, Churg and Strauss disease, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, occupational asthma). At the end of this period devoted to diagnosis a systematic approach is set up to take care of these patients. Therapeutic education includes action plans and measures for triggering factors avoidance in order to prevent exacerbations. Comorbidities such as rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastro-oesophageal reflux and obesity are taken into account. Lastly, the treatment must be adapted according to the patient's preferences and aims, and to the asthma severity. Ultimately in steroid-dependent asthma, the lowest efficient dose is tracked continuously. For these patients, new molecules are needed.

  5. Indoor Air Quality and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Golden

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous contaminants in indoor air and their potential to cause or exacerbate asthma continue to be a subject of public health concern. Many agents are causally associated with or can exacerbate asthma, particularly in children. For formaldehyde, an established respiratory irritant based on numerous studies, the evidence for an association with asthma is still considered only limited or suggestive. However, there is no evidence that indicates increased sensitivity to sensory irritation to formaldehyde in people often regarded as susceptible such as asthmatics. Acrolein, but not formaldehyde, was significantly associated with asthma in a large cohort of children. This prompted an evaluation of this highly irritating chemical that had never previously been considered in the context of the indoor air/childhood asthma issue. Because acrolein is more potent than formaldehyde as a respiratory irritant and ubiquitous in indoor air, it is plausible that previous studies on potential risk factors and childhood asthma may be confounded by formaldehyde acting as an unrecognized proxy for acrolein.

  6. Yoga for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zu-Yao; Zhong, Hui-Bin; Mao, Chen; Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Xin-Yin; Gao, Yuan-Mei; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    across studies, we used standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI. For dichotomous outcomes, we used risk ratio (RR) with 95% CI to measure the treatment effects. We performed meta-analysis with Review Manager 5.3. We used the fixed-effect model to pool the data, unless there was substantial heterogeneity among studies, in which case we used the random-effects model instead. For outcomes inappropriate or impossible to pool quantitatively, we conducted a descriptive analysis and summarized the findings narratively. We included 15 RCTs with a total of 1048 participants. Most of the trials were conducted in India, followed by Europe and the United States. The majority of participants were adults of both sexes with mild to moderate asthma for six months to more than 23 years. Five studies included yoga breathing alone, while the other studies assessed yoga interventions that included breathing, posture, and meditation. Interventions lasted from two weeks to 54 months, for no more than six months in the majority of studies. The risk of bias was low across all domains in one study and unclear or high in at least one domain for the remainder.There was some evidence that yoga may improve quality of life (MD in Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) score per item 0.57 units on a 7-point scale, 95% CI 0.37 to 0.77; 5 studies; 375 participants), improve symptoms (SMD 0.37, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.65; 3 studies; 243 participants), and reduce medication usage (RR 5.35, 95% CI 1.29 to 22.11; 2 studies) in people with asthma. The MD for AQLQ score exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of 0.5, but whether the mean changes exceeded the MCID for asthma symptoms is uncertain due to the lack of an established MCID in the severity scores used in the included studies. The effects of yoga on change from baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (MD 0.04 liters, 95% CI -0.10 to 0.19; 7 studies; 340 participants; I2 = 68%) were not statistically significant. Two

  7. Occupational asthma in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Dobashi, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to adva...

  8. Lung function, asthma symptoms, and quality of life for children in public housing in Boston: a case-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbach Suzanne

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in urban public housing are at high risk for asthma, given elevated environmental and social exposures and suboptimal medical care. For a multifactorial disease like asthma, design of intervention studies can be influenced by the relative prevalence of key risk factors. To better understand risk factors for asthma morbidity in the context of an environmental intervention study, we conducted a detailed baseline evaluation of 78 children (aged 4–17 years from three public housing developments in Boston. Methods Asthmatic children and their caregivers were recruited between April 2002 and January 2003. We conducted intake interviews that captured a detailed family and medical history, including questions regarding asthma symptom severity, access to health care, medication usage, and psychological stress. Quality of life was evaluated for both the child and caregiver with an asthma-specific scale. Pulmonary function was measured with a portable spirometer, and allergy testing for common indoor and outdoor allergens was conducted with skin testing using the prick puncture method. Exploratory linear and logistic regression models evaluating predictors of respiratory symptoms, quality of life, and pulmonary function were conducted using SAS. Results We found high rates of obesity (56% and allergies to indoor contaminants such as cockroaches (59% and dust mites (59%. Only 36% of children with persistent asthma reported being prescribed any daily controller medication, and most did not have an asthma action plan or a peak flow meter. One-time lung function measures were poorly correlated with respiratory symptoms or quality of life, which were significantly correlated with each other. In multivariate regression models, household size, body mass index, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were positively associated with respiratory symptom severity (p Conclusion Given the elevated prevalence of multiple risk factors

  9. Pulmonary hyperinflation and respiratory distress following solvent aspiration in a patient with asthma: expectoration of bronchial casts and clinical improvement with high-frequency chest wall oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshihiko; Kawazu, Taketoshi; Iwashita, Kazuo; Yahata, Ritsuko

    2004-11-01

    An 18-year-old student with a history of asthma accidentally inhaled organic solvent during a class, with immediate cough and dyspnea that worsened over several hours. He presented in severe respiratory distress, with hypoxemia and marked pulmonary hyperinflation. Administration of inhaled bronchodilator was ineffective because of agitation, and the patient could not be positioned for chest physiotherapy to treat presumed widespread mucus plugging. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in the sitting position initially caused increased distress but was subsequently tolerated when noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) via nasal mask was initiated. Almost immediately, the patient began expectorating bronchial mucus casts, with concomitant clinical improvement. Endotracheal intubation was avoided, and with aggressive pharmacologic treatment for acute severe asthma and continuation of intermittent HFCWO-NPPV, the patient made a full recovery over the next several days. This case suggests that the combination of HFCWO and NPPV may be helpful in the presence of mucus plugging as a complication of acute inhalation injury or acute severe asthma.

  10. Predicting asthma in preschool children with asthma symptoms: study rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafkamp-de Groen Esther

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In well-child care it is difficult to determine whether preschool children with asthma symptoms actually have or will develop asthma at school age. The PIAMA (Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Risk Score has been proposed as an instrument that predicts asthma at school age, using eight easy obtainable parameters, assessed at the time of first asthma symptoms at preschool age. The aim of this study is to present the rationale and design of a study 1 to externally validate and update the PIAMA Risk Score, 2 to develop an Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool to predict asthma at school age in (specific subgroups of preschool children with asthma symptoms and 3 to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Methods and design The study will be performed within the framework of Generation R, a prospective multi-ethnic cohort study. In total, consent for postnatal follow-up was obtained from 7893 children, born between 2002 and 2006. At preschool age the PIAMA Risk Score will be assessed and used to predict asthma at school age. Discrimination (C-index and calibration will be assessed for the external validation. We will study whether the predictive ability of the PIAMA Risk Score can be improved by removing or adding predictors (e.g. preterm birth. The (updated PIAMA Risk Score will be converted to the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool- to predict asthma at school age in preschool children with asthma symptoms. Additionally, we will conduct a pilot study to test implementation of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care. Discussion Application of the Asthma Risk Appraisal Tool in well-child care will help to distinguish preschool children at high- and low-risk of developing asthma at school age when asthma symptoms appear. This study will increase knowledge about the validity of the PIAMA risk score and might improve risk assessment of developing asthma at school age in (specific subgroups

  11. Prematurity and prescription asthma medication from childhood to young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anne Louise; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Mathiasen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preterm birth is associated with increased risk of asthma-like symptoms and purchase of prescription asthma medication in childhood. We investigated whether this association persists into adulthood and whether it is affected by accounting for neonatal respiratory morbidity (acute...... respiratory disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia). METHODS: A national cohort of all infants born in Denmark in the period 1980-2009 was included in this register study. Data on purchase of asthma medication (combination of inhaled β-2 agonists and other drugs for obstructive airway disease) in 2010......-2011 were obtained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Associations between gestational age (GA), neonatal respiratory morbidity and a cross-sectional evaluation of asthma medication purchase were explored by multivariate logistic regressions. RESULTS: A full dataset was obtained on 1...

  12. Genetics of asthma: a molecular biologist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Balaram

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma belongs to the category of classical allergic diseases which generally arise due to IgE mediated hypersensitivity to environmental triggers. Since its prevalence is very high in developed or urbanized societies it is also referred to as "disease of civilizations". Due to its increased prevalence among related individuals, it was understood quite long back that it is a genetic disorder. Well designed epidemiological studies reinforced these views. The advent of modern biological technology saw further refinements in our understanding of genetics of asthma and led to the realization that asthma is not a disorder with simple Mendelian mode of inheritance but a multifactorial disorder of the airways brought about by complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Current asthma research has witnessed evidences that are compelling researchers to redefine asthma altogether. Although no consensus exists among workers regarding its definition, it seems obvious that several pathologies, all affecting the airways, have been clubbed into one common category called asthma. Needless to say, genetic studies have led from the front in bringing about these transformations. Genomics, molecular biology, immunology and other interrelated disciplines have unearthed data that has changed the way we think about asthma now. In this review, we center our discussions on genetic basis of asthma; the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Taking cue from the existing data we would briefly ponder over the future directions that should improve our understanding of asthma pathogenesis.

  13. Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Serafini, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is about 9,7 % in women and 5,5 % in men. Asthma can deteriorate during the perimenstrual period, a phenomenon known as perimenstrual asthma (PMA), which represents a unique, highly symptomatic asthma phenotype. It is distinguished from traditional allergic asthma by aspirin sensitivity, less atopy, and lower lung capacity. PMA incidence is reported to vary between 19 and 40 % of asthmatic women. The presence of PMA has been related to increases in asthma-related emergency department visits, hospitalizations and emergency treatment including intubations. It is hypothesized that hormonal status may influence asthma in women, focusing on the role of sex hormones, and specifically on the impact of estrogens' fluctuations at ovulation and before periods. This paper will focus on the pathophysiology of hormone triggered cycle related inflammatory/allergic events and their relation with asthma. We reviewed the scientific literature on Pubmed database for studies on PMA. Key word were PMA, mastcells, estrogens, inflammation, oral contraception, hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and hormone free interval (HFI). Special attention will be devoted to the possibility of reducing the perimenstrual worsening of asthma and associated symptoms by reducing estrogens fluctuations, with appropriate hormonal contraception and reduced HFI. This novel therapeutical approach will be finally discussed.

  14. Guidelines for the management of work-related asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, X.; Sigsgaard, T.; Aasen, T.B.; Burge, P.S.; Heederik, D.; Henneberger, P.; Maestrelli, P.; Rooyackers, J.M.; Schlünssen, V.; Vandenplas, O.; Wilken, D.

    2012-01-01

    Work-related asthma, which includes occupational asthma and work-aggravated asthma, has become one of the most prevalent occupational lung diseases. These guidelines aim to upgrade occupational health standards, contribute importantly to transnational legal harmonisation and reduce the high socio-ec

  15. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... normal everyday activities without having asthma symptoms. Action Plans Are Unique Each person's experience with asthma is ...

  16. The prevalence of severe refractory asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekking, Pieter-Paul W; Wener, Reinier R; Amelink, Marijke; Zwinderman, Aelko H; Bouvy, Marcel L; Bel, Elisabeth H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe asthma is characterized by difficulty to achieve disease control despite high-intensity treatment. However, prevalence figures of severe asthma are lacking, whereas longstanding estimates vary between 5% and 10% of all asthmatic patients. Knowing the exact prevalence of severe ref

  17. Asthma and obesity: a known association but unknown mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Claude S; Salome, Cheryl M

    2012-04-01

    The obese asthma phenotype is an increasingly common encounter in our clinical practice. Epidemiological data indicate that obesity increases the prevalence and incidence of asthma, and evidence that obesity precedes the development of asthma raises the possibility of a causal association. Obese patients with asthma experience more symptoms and increased morbidity compared with non-obese asthma patients. Despite more than a decade of research into this association, the exact mechanisms that underlie the interaction of obesity with asthma remain unclear. It is unlikely that the asthma-obesity association is simply due to comorbidities such as obstructive sleep apnoea or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although inflammatory pathways are purported to play a role, there is scant direct evidence in humans that systemic inflammation modulates the behaviour of the asthmatic airway or the expression of symptoms in the obese. The role of non-eosinophilic airway inflammation also requires further study. Obesity results in important changes to the mechanical properties of the respiratory system, and these obesity-related factors appear to exert an additive effect to the asthma-related changes seen in the airways. An understanding of the various physiological perturbations that might be contributing to symptoms in obese patients with asthma will allow for a more targeted and rational treatment approach for these patients.

  18. Epigenetics: The New Frontier in the Landscape of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Chogtu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, on a global scale, asthma has continued to remain one of the leading causes of morbidity, irrespective of age, sex, or social bearings. This is despite the prevalence of varied therapeutic options to counter the pathogenesis of asthma. Asthma, as a disease per se, is a very complex one. Scientists all over the world have been trying to obtain a lucid understanding of the machinations behind asthma. This has led to many theories and conjectures. However, none of the scientific disciplines have been able to provide the missing links in the chain of asthma pathogenesis. This was until epigenetics stepped into the picture. Though epigenetic research in asthma is in its nascent stages, it has led to very exciting results, especially with regard to explaining the massive influence of environment on development of asthma and its varied phenotypes. However, there remains a lot of work to be done, especially with regard to understanding how the interactions between immune system, epigenome, and environment lead to asthma. But introduction of epigenetics has infused a fresh lease of life in research into asthma and the mood among the scientific community is that of cautious optimism.

  19. Asthma as a disruption in iron homeostasis | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over several decades, asthma has evolved from being recognized as a single disease to include a diverse group of phenotypes with dissimilar natural histories, pathophysiologies, responses to treatment, and distinctive molecular pathways. With the application of Occam’s razor to asthma, it is proposed that there is one cause underlying the numerous phenotypes of this disease and that the responsible molecular pathway is a deficiency of iron in the lung tissues. This deficiency can be either absolute (e.g. asthma in the neonate and during both pregnancy and menstruation) or functional (e.g. asthma associated with infections, smoking, and obesity). Comparable associations between asthma co-morbidity (e.g. eczema, urticaria, restless leg syndrome, and pulmonary hypertension) with iron deficiency support such a shared mechanistic pathway. Therapies directed at asthma demonstrate a capacity to impact iron homeostasis, further strengthening the relationship. Finally, pathophysiologic events producing asthma, including inflammation, increases in Th2 cells, and muscle contraction, can correlate with iron availability. Recognition of a potential association between asthma and an absolute and/or functional iron deficiency suggests specific therapeutic interventions including inhaled iron. Asthma is a public health issue that has environmental triggers. Iron homeostasis is an essential mechanism whereby the body manages the impact of environmental agents on overall

  20. Translating evidence-based interventions into practice: the design and development of the Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Meera; Lux, Linda; Lohr, Kathleen N; Evans, Tammeka Swinson; Smith, Lucia Rojas; Woodell, Carol; Mansfield, Carol; Darcy, Niamh; Ohadike, Yvonne U; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric asthma is a multifactorial disease, requiring complex, interrelated interventions addressing children, families, schools, and communities. The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN) is a nonprofit organization that provides support to translate evidence-based interventions from research to practice. MCAN developed the rationale and vision for the program through a phased approach, including an extensive literature review, stakeholder engagement, and evaluation of funding gaps. The analysis pointed to the need to identify pediatric asthma interventions implemented in urban U.S. settings that have demonstrated efficacy and materials for replication and to translate the interventions into wider practice. In addition to this overall MCAN objective, specific goals included service and system integration through linkages among health care providers, schools, community-based organizations, patients, parents, and other caregivers. MCAN selected sites based on demonstrated ability to implement effective interventions and to address multiple contexts of pediatric asthma prevention and management. Selected MCAN program sites were mature institutions or organizations with significant infrastructure, existing funding, and the ability to provide services without requiring a lengthy planning period. Program sites were located in communities with high asthma morbidity and intended to integrate new elements into existing programs to create comprehensive care approaches.

  1. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action ... helping people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action ...

  3. Immunosuppression in early postnatal days induces persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory condition with high morbidity, and effective treatments for asthma are limited. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can only induce peripheral immune tolerance and is not sustainable. Exploring new therapeutic strategies is of great clinical importance. Recombinant adenovirus (rAdV was used as a vector to make cells expressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig a soluble CTLA4 immunoglobulin fusion protein. Dendritic cells (DCs were modified using the rAdVs together with allergens. Then these modified DCs were transplanted to mice before allergen sensitization. The persistence and specificity of immune tolerance were evaluated in mice challenged with asthma allergens at 3 and 7 months. DCs modified by CTLA4Ig showed increased IL-10 secretion, decreased IL-12 secretion, and T cell stimulation in vitro. Mice treated with these DCs in the early neonatal period developed tolerance against the allergens that were used to induce asthma in the adult stage. Asthma symptoms, lung damage, airway reactivity, and inflammatory response all improved. Humoral immunity indices showed that this therapeutic strategy strongly suppressed mice immune responses and was maintained for as long as 7 months. Furthermore, allergen cross-sensitization and challenge experiments demonstrated that this immune tolerance was allergen-specific. Treatment with CTLA4Ig modified DCs in the early neonatal period, inducing persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice. Our results suggest that it may be possible to develop a vaccine for asthma.

  4. Asthma and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, L-P

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of asthma have increased among obese children and adults, particularly among women. Obesity seems to be a predisposing factor for the development of asthma, but the underlying mechanisms of its influence are still uncertain. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between obesity and asthma such as a common genetic predisposition, developmental changes, altered lung mechanics, the presence of a systemic inflammatory process, and an increased prevalence of associated comorbid conditions. Over-diagnosis of asthma does not seem to be more frequent in obese compared to non-obese subjects, but the added effects of obesity on respiratory symptoms can affect asthma control assessment. Obesity can make asthma more difficult to control and is associated with a reduced beneficial effect of asthma medications. This could be due to a change in asthma phenotype, particularly evidenced as a less eosinophilic type of airway inflammation combined to the added effects of changes in lung mechanics. Weight loss is associated with a universal improvement of asthma and should be part of asthma management in the obese patient. Additional research should be conducted to better determine how obesity influences the development and clinical expression of asthma, establish the optimal management of asthma in this population and determine how obesity affects long-term asthma outcomes in these patients.

  5. A review of the value of innovation in inhalers for COPD and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virchow, Johann Christian; Akdis, Cezmi A; Darba, Josep; Dekhuijzen, Richard; Hartl, Sylvia; Kobelt, Gisela; Roger, Albert; Simoens, Steven; Toumi, Mondher; Woodhouse, Ben; Plich, Adam; Torvinen, Saku

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate use of inhaled therapies for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to ensuring good patient outcomes, efficient use of healthcare resources and limiting the effects of high-morbidity. The appropriate choice of inhaler and active therapy, incorporating patient preferences, can help improve treatment adherence and long-term outcomes. Despite this, many current inhalers are non-intuitive to use, and require extensive training. In this review, an expert panel considers the evidence for the use of inhaler devices in management of COPD and asthma. The panel also evaluates the value of innovation in inhaler technologies, which optimise the use of existing molecules from a clinical, economic and societal perspective. The panel conclusion is that there remains a substantial unmet need in inhaler technology and that innovation in inhaler devices can provide real-world health benefits to patients. Furthermore, we recommend that these innovations should be supported by healthcare systems through appropriate pricing and reimbursement mechanisms.

  6. Unawareness and undertreatment of asthma: follow-up in a different geographic area in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V.; Nolte, H.; Pedersen, L.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Early detection and treatment of asthma is important to minimize morbidity and healthcare costs. The objective of this study was to investigate asthma awareness and management in a western society. Methods: In a random sample of 10 400 subjects aged 14-44 years, 686 (6.6%) reported...

  7. Motivating Latino Caregivers of Children with Asthma to Quit Smoking: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Belinda; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Novak, Scott P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Becker, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Secondhand smoke exposure is associated with asthma onset and exacerbation. Latino children have higher rates of asthma morbidity than other groups. The current study compared the effectiveness of a newly developed smoking cessation treatment with existing clinical guidelines for smoking cessation. Method: Latino caregivers who smoked…

  8. Asthma, Smoking and BMI in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Community-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, L.; Naqvi, H.; Russ, L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent research evidence from the general population has shown that tobacco smoking and raised body mass index (BMI) are associated with worse asthma outcomes. There are indications that asthma morbidity and mortality may be higher among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) than the general population, but the reason for this is…

  9. Motivating Latino Caregivers of Children with Asthma to Quit Smoking: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Belinda; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Novak, Scott P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Becker, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Secondhand smoke exposure is associated with asthma onset and exacerbation. Latino children have higher rates of asthma morbidity than other groups. The current study compared the effectiveness of a newly developed smoking cessation treatment with existing clinical guidelines for smoking cessation. Method: Latino caregivers who smoked…

  10. Perioperative pharmacology in morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Hendrikus J m

    2010-08-01

    Morbid obesity alters drug dose requirement and time course of drug response. In addition, morbid obesity's impact on many organ systems decreases the margin of safety of anesthetic drugs. Consequently, incorrect dosing will increase the rate of perioperative complications. In this review, we will discuss factors that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anesthetic agents in the obese population, we specify certain dosing scalars, and we relate our current knowledge of obesity's effects on the clinical pharmacology of anesthetic drugs. A morbidly obese individual's increased cardiac output requires administration of higher drug doses than would be required for a standard-size person to attain the same peak-plasma concentration. Lean body weight (LBW) is highly correlated with the increased cardiac output, more so than fat mass or other variables. For most drugs, clearance increases nonlinearly with total body weight but linearly with LBW. Morbid obesity has no clinically significant impact on the uptake of the inhalation anesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane when used in routine clinical practice. Total body weight dosing of neuromuscular blocking agents will result in a prolonged effect. For the induction dose of hypnotics and the initial dose of other drugs that have a fast onset of effect, cardiac output or LBW are relevant dosing scalars. For maintenance dosing, LBW seems to be a more appropriate dosing scalar than total body weight.

  11. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on ... your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger for many people who have ...

  12. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  13. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2010;105:S1. Krafczyk ... up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma ...

  14. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  15. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... narrowing of the bronchi. This can make breathing difficult, particularly expiration (exhaling) and can cause a feeling of tightness in the chest. Answer: D. All of these can make asthma worse. But some things that make asthma worse ...

  16. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  17. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  18. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  19. Common Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Common Asthma Triggers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... t avoid the triggers. Some of the most common triggers are: Tobacco Smoke Tobacco smoke is unhealthy ...

  20. Work stress, asthma control and asthma-specific quality of life: Initial evidence from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Bettina; Leucht, Verena; Loerbroks, Adrian

    2017-03-01

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is positively associated with asthma morbidity. One major source of stress in adulthood is one's occupation. However, to date, potential links of work stress with asthma control or asthma-specific quality of life have not been examined. We aimed to address this knowledge gap. In 2014/2015, we conducted a cross-sectional study among adults with asthma in Germany (n = 362). For the current analyses that sample was restricted to participants in employment and reporting to have never been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 94). Work stress was operationalized by the 16-item effort-reward-imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, which measures the subcomponents "effort", "reward" and "overcommitment." Participants further completed the Asthma Control Test and the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire-Sydney. Multivariable associations were quantified by linear regression and logistic regression. Effort, reward and their ratio (i.e. ERI ratio) did not show meaningful associations with asthma morbidity. By contrast, increasing levels of overcommitment were associated with poorer asthma control and worse quality of life in both linear regression (ß = -0.26, p = 0.01 and ß = 0.44, p < 0.01, respectively) and logistic regression (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-3.07 and OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.32-4.15, respectively). The present study provides initial evidence of a positive relationship of work-related overcommitment with asthma control and asthma-specific quality of life. Longitudinal studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our findings and to disentangle the potential causality of associations.

  1. Fatal asthma or anaphylaxis?

    OpenAIRE

    Rainbow, J; Browne, G

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of anaphylaxis is under-reported. Children with asthma are frequently atopic and prone to allergic reactions. Parents and clinicians may attribute wheeze of rapid onset to acute severe asthma, rather than recognising an anaphylactic event. Two cases of fatal anaphylaxis are reported who were initially diagnosed as acute severe asthma, and responded poorly to bronchodilator treatment. Survivors of "acute asphyxic asthma" should be screened for reactions to common allergens that p...

  2. Identifying asthma triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  3. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  4. Asthma and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA): facts and hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja

    2010-10-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is considered as an important immunomodulating and anti-inflammatory hormone. Despite the continuing interest in DHEA replacement therapy, our knowledge of its effects upon asthma is very limited. DHEA is able to reverse cytokine imbalances associated with asthma, may prevent and attenuate allergic inflammation in airways, and does not possess the undesirable side effects of glucocorticoids; therefore, it may be potentially applied in the treatment of asthma. The steroid-sparing effect observed with DHEA clinically could appear especially favorable in asthmatic patients receiving oral treatment and those inhaling high doses of glucocorticoids. In addition, DHEA and its analogs might prove useful in reversing relative glucocorticoids insensitivity in patients with corticosteroid-resistant asthma. In this review we have focused specifically on DHEA's role in asthma.

  5. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    -line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti......Inflammation is an essential component of asthma pathophysiology. While beta(2)-agonists are often used for short-term relief of acute bronchospasm, anti-inflammatory agents are required for the long-term management of chronic inflammation in this disease. Corticosteroids have emerged as the first......-inflammatory, steroid-sparing agents in asthma therapy. Several inflammatory mediators have been targeted in an attempt to thwart this inflammatory process, but so far with little success. The cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT), LTC(4), LTD(4), and LTE(4), have been shown to be essential mediators in asthma, making them...

  6. Antifungals in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parulekar, Amit D.; Diamant, Zuzana; Hanania, Nicola A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite guideline-based treatment, many patients with severe asthma continue to have uncontrolled disease. Fungal allergy is being increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis of severe asthma. Limited data exist on the approach to treatment of fungal asthma. This review summarizes

  7. Asthma and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack occurs, it is difficult for air to pass through the lungs which ... others have not. In these studies, it is difficult to determine whether the problems noted were due to the mother’s asthma, the medicines needed to control the asthma, or ...

  8. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? School and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > School and Asthma A A A What's in this article? Have ... La escuela y el asma If you have asthma , you probably have a routine at home for ...

  9. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma A A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  10. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this article? Pack ... Or how about sleepover camp? If you have asthma , you'll be packing more than your clothes ...

  11. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan ... kinds of allergies are more likely to have asthma. Do you have allergies that affect your nose ...

  12. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  13. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: A tangled web.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014; 49:205-213. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    . This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas......Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy...... in high-risk infants reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis, while there is for now not enough evidence to recommend other dietary modifications, pre-biotics, probiotics, or other microbial products. Pharmacologic agents used until now for prevention have not proved useful, while there is hope...

  15. Sodium cromoglycate in nocturnal asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A D; Connaughton, J J; Catterall, J R; Shapiro, C M; Douglas, N J; Flenley, D C

    1986-01-01

    To investigate whether mast cell degranulation was important in producing nocturnal asthma, the effect of a single high dose of nebulised sodium cromoglycate on overnight bronchoconstriction, oxygen saturation, and breathing patterns in eight patients with nocturnal wheeze was examined. The study took the form of a double blind placebo controlled crossover comparison. Treatment with cromoglycate did not reduce the overnight fall in FEV1 or FVC, although it was associated with improved nocturnal oxygenation. This study suggests that mast cell degranulation may not be important in the pathogenesis of nocturnal asthma. PMID:3085257

  16. International Consensus On (ICON) Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N. G.; Arakawa, H.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Custovic, A.; Gern, J.; Lemanske, R.; Le Souef, P.; Makela, M.; Roberts, G.; Wong, G.; Zar, H.; Akdis, C. A.; Bacharier, L. B.; Baraldi, E.; van Bever, H. P.; de Blic, J.; Boner, A.; Burks, W.; Casale, T. B.; Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Chen, Y. Z.; El-Gamal, Y. M.; Everard, M. L.; Frischer, T.; Geller, M.; Gereda, J.; Goh, D. Y.; Guilbert, T. W.; Hedlin, G.; Heymann, P. W.; Hong, S. J.; Hossny, E. M.; Huang, J. L.; Jackson, D. J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Khaled, N.; Kling, S.; Kuna, P.; Lau, S.; Ledford, D. K.; Lee, S. I.; Liu, A. H.; Lockey, R. F.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Lotvall, J.; Morikawa, A.; Nieto, A.; Paramesh, H.; Pawankar, R.; Pohunek, P.; Pongracic, J.; Price, D.; Robertson, C.; Rosario, N.; Rossenwasser, L. J.; Sly, P. D.; Stein, R.; Stick, S.; Szefler, S.; Taussig, L. M.; Valovirta, E.; Vichyanond, P.; Wallace, D.; Weinberg, E.; Wennergren, G.; Wildhaber, J.; Zeiger, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. In order to achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with health care professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent from chronic treatment. There is a trend towards considering phenotype specific treatment choices; however this goal has not yet been achieved. PMID:22702533

  17. International consensus on (ICON) pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N G; Arakawa, H; Carlsen, K-H; Custovic, A; Gern, J; Lemanske, R; Le Souef, P; Mäkelä, M; Roberts, G; Wong, G; Zar, H; Akdis, C A; Bacharier, L B; Baraldi, E; van Bever, H P; de Blic, J; Boner, A; Burks, W; Casale, T B; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Chen, Y Z; El-Gamal, Y M; Everard, M L; Frischer, T; Geller, M; Gereda, J; Goh, D Y; Guilbert, T W; Hedlin, G; Heymann, P W; Hong, S J; Hossny, E M; Huang, J L; Jackson, D J; de Jongste, J C; Kalayci, O; Aït-Khaled, N; Kling, S; Kuna, P; Lau, S; Ledford, D K; Lee, S I; Liu, A H; Lockey, R F; Lødrup-Carlsen, K; Lötvall, J; Morikawa, A; Nieto, A; Paramesh, H; Pawankar, R; Pohunek, P; Pongracic, J; Price, D; Robertson, C; Rosario, N; Rossenwasser, L J; Sly, P D; Stein, R; Stick, S; Szefler, S; Taussig, L M; Valovirta, E; Vichyanond, P; Wallace, D; Weinberg, E; Wennergren, G; Wildhaber, J; Zeiger, R S

    2012-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. To achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with healthcare professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent of chronic treatment. There is a trend toward considering phenotype-specific treatment choices; however, this goal has not yet been achieved.

  18. Asthma. A summary of first-choice treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    First identify and avoid factors that trigger or aggravate asthma attacks First-line treatment for asthma is inhaled salbutamol: used on demand to relieve respiratory discomfort or to prevent attacks due to a known trigger; or on a daily basis if necessary, in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid such as beclometasone, for patients with persistent asthma. Treatment of severe persistent asthma is based on daily use of a high-dose inhaled corticosteroid, or possibly an oral corticosteroid, for as short a period as possible. To limit adverse effects and drug interactions, the dose should be reduced, or the treatment gradually withdrawn, once asthma is under control.

  19. The effect of Varenicline on smoking cessation in a group of young asthma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Christian G; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco use causes long-term morbidity and mortality. In patients with asthma, the frequency of smokers is high; however, asthmatic smokers experience more pronounced symptoms, accelerated loss of lung function and treatment resistance. Varenicline is an effective drug in smoking...... cessation, when investigated in COPD patients and general populations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Varenicline on tobacco cessation in young asthmatics. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial, 52 asthmatic current smokers (age 19-40) ≥ 10 cigarettes...

  20. Obesity and Airway Dysanapsis in Children with and without Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forno, Erick; Weiner, Daniel J; Mullen, James; Sawicki, Gregory; Kurland, Geoffrey; Han, Yueh Ying; Cloutier, Michelle M; Canino, Glorisa; Weiss, Scott T; Litonjua, Augusto A; Celedón, Juan C

    2017-02-01

    For unclear reasons, obese children with asthma have higher morbidity and reduced response to inhaled corticosteroids. To assess whether childhood obesity is associated with airway dysanapsis (an incongruence between the growth of the lungs and the airways) and whether dysanapsis is associated with asthma morbidity. We examined the relationship between obesity and dysanapsis in six cohorts of children with and without asthma, as well as the relationship between dysanapsis and clinical outcomes in children with asthma. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each cohort and in a combined analysis of all cohorts; longitudinal analyses were also performed for cohorts with available data. Hazard ratios (HRs) for clinical outcomes were calculated for children with asthma in the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Being overweight or obese was associated with dysanapsis in both the cross-sectional (OR, 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62-2.35 [for overweight/obese compared with normal weight children]) and the longitudinal (OR, 4.31; 95% CI, 2.99-6.22 [for children who were overweight/obese at all visits compared with normal weight children]) analyses. Dysanapsis was associated with greater lung volumes (FVC, vital capacity, and total lung capacity) and lesser flows (FEV1 and forced expiratory flow, midexpiratory phase), and with indicators of ventilation inhomogeneity and anisotropic lung and airway growth. Among overweight/obese children with asthma, dysanapsis was associated with severe disease exacerbations (HR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.38-2.75) and use of systemic steroids (HR, 3.22; 95% CI, 2.02-5.14). Obesity is associated with airway dysanapsis in children. Dysanapsis is associated with increased morbidity among obese children with asthma and may partly explain their reduced response to inhaled corticosteroids.

  1. Asthma in the Elderly: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Nicola A.; King, Monroe J.; Braman, Sidney S.; Saltoun, Carol; Wise, Robert A.; Enright, Paul; Falsey, Ann A; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Rogers, Linda; Stempel, David A.; Lima, John J.; Fish, James E.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Boyd, Cynthia; Patel, Kushang V.; Irvin, Charles G.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Halm, Ethan A; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Sands, Mark F.; Ershler, William B.; Ledford, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly (AIE) is under diagnosed and under treated and there is a paucity of knowledge. The National Institute on Aging convened this workshop to identify what is known, what gaps in knowledge remain and suggest research directions needed to improve the understanding and care of AIE. Asthma presenting at an advanced age often has similar clinical and physiologic consequences as seen with younger individuals but co-morbid illnesses and the psychosocial effects of aging may affect the diagnosis, clinical presentation and care of asthma in this population. At least two phenotypes exist among elderly asthma; those with long-standing asthma have more severe airflow limitation and less complete reversibility than those with late-onset asthma. Many challenges exist in the recognition and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms of AIE are likely to be different from those seen in young asthmatics and these differences may influence the clinical course and outcomes of asthma in this population. PMID:21872730

  2. Antinuclear Antibodies in Asthma Patients- A Special Asthma Phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agache Ioana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies reported the appearance of asthma and autoimmune conditions in the same patient, but the clinical significance of this association was not yet assessed. One hundred asthmatic patients were observed for one year evolution with death, severe exacerbations, intake of > 1000 micrograms of beclometasone or equivalent (high ICS and FEV1 decline >100 ml, in relation with ANA (ELISA, sputum and blood eosinophilia (EO, NSAID intolerance, BMI >25, chronic rhinosinusitis, smoking status and FEV1 After 1 year of observation, there were 5 deaths, 28 severe asthma exacerbations requiring hospitalisations, 24 cases requiring high inhaled corticosteroid intake, and 19 patients with fast FEV1 decline (>100 ml/year. Multiple regression analysis pointed out several different independent risk factors for severe asthma evolution: for death presence of ANA (P=0.037, NSAID intolerance (P100 ml ANA (P=0.006, sputum EO (P=0.037, BMI>25 (P=0.046 and NSAID intolerance (P=0.017The presence of ANA is an independent risk factor in asthma for evolution with death, severe exacerbations, high inhaled corticosteroid intake and FEV1 decline >100 ml.

  3. Comprehensive environmental management of asthma and pediatric preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Angkana; Downes, Martin J; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2011-05-01

    Indoor environmental triggers can increase asthma morbidity. National guidelines recommend comprehensive use of environmental control practices (ECPs) as a component of asthma management. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between preventive asthma care and comprehensive ECP use among children with asthma. We used data from the National Asthma Survey, including 1,921 children with asthma. Comprehensive use was defined as using at least five of eight ECPs: (i) air filter, (ii) dehumidifier, (iii) mattress cover, (iv) pillow cover, (v) pet avoidance, (vi) smoke avoidance, (vii) removing carpets, and (viii) washing sheets in hot water. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between comprehensive use of ECPs and receipt of preventive asthma care, as measured by number of routine asthma visits in the prior year and physician advice to modify the environment. Overall, 17% (95% CI: 14-19%) of participants had comprehensive ECP use. The most commonly used practices were 'smoke avoidance' (85%), 'pet avoidance' (59%), and 'washing sheets in hot water' (46%). Comprehensive use of ECPs was associated with having received physician advice [odds ratio (OR) 3.1, 95% CI: 2.2-4.4] and increased asthma visits (1-2 visits: OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.4; 3-4 visits: OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3-3.8; ≥5 visits: OR 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8). Only a minority of parents implement comprehensive ECPs, and receipt of preventive asthma care is associated with comprehensive use. Further research is needed to determine the factors mediating these associations in order to inform more effective asthma counseling.

  4. Environmental triggers and avoidance in the management of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clarisse Gautier,1 Denis Charpin1,2 1Department of Pulmonology and Allergy, North Hospital, 2Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Abstract: Identifying asthma triggers forms the basis of environmental secondary prevention. These triggers may be allergenic or nonallergenic. Allergenic triggers include indoor allergens, such as house dust mites (HDMs, molds, pets, cockroaches, and rodents, and outdoor allergens, such as pollens and molds. Clinical observations provide support for the role of HDM exposure as a trigger, although avoidance studies provide conflicting results. Molds and their metabolic products are now considered to be triggers of asthma attacks. Pets, dogs, and especially cats can undoubtedly trigger asthmatic symptoms in sensitized subjects. Avoidance is difficult and rarely adhered to by families. Cockroach allergens contribute to asthma morbidity, and avoidance strategies can lead to clinical benefit. Mouse allergens are mostly found in inner-city dwellings, but their implication in asthma morbidity is debated. In the outdoors, pollens can induce seasonal asthma in sensitized individuals. Avoidance relies on preventing pollens from getting into the house and on minimizing seasonal outdoor exposure. Outdoor molds may lead to severe asthma exacerbations. Nonallergenic triggers include viral infections, active and passive smoking, meteorological changes, occupational exposures, and other triggers that are less commonly involved. Viral infection is the main asthma trigger in children. Active smoking is associated with higher asthma morbidity, and smoking cessation interventions should be personalized. Passive smoking is also a risk factor for asthma exacerbation. The implementation of public smoking bans has led to a reduction in the hospitalization of asthmatic children. Air pollution levels have been linked with asthmatic symptoms, a decrease in lung function, and increased emergency room visits and

  5. Obese individuals experience wheezing without asthma but not asthma without wheezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Çolak, Yunus; Shoaib, Afzal; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    and asthma, and that the association between high BMI and asthma is explained by wheezing. METHODS: We genotyped 85 437 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Copenhagen General Population Study for FTO (rs9939609), MC4R (rs17782313), TMEM18 (rs6548238) GNPDA2 (rs10938397) and BDNF (rs10767664); 14 500...

  6. [Cytokines and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  7. Morbidity from parotid sialography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Vissink, A; Spijkervet, FKL; Moller, JM; Roodenburg, JLN

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Sialography is commonly used for the diagnosis of Sjogren's syndrome, although its invasive nature is often regarded as a serious drawback for routine usage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morbidity and acceptability of parotid sialography using oil-based contrast fluid. Study

  8. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  9. Epigenetics of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andrew L; Wiegman, Coen; Adcock, Ian M

    2011-11-01

    Asthma is caused by both heritable and environmental factors. It has become clear that genetic studies do not adequately explain the heritability and susceptibility to asthma. The study of epigenetics, heritable non-coding changes to DNA may help to explain the heritable component of asthma. Additionally, epigenetic modifications can be influenced by the environment, including pollution and cigarette smoking, which are known asthma risk factors. These environmental trigger-induced epigenetic changes may be involved in skewing the immune system towards a Th2 phenotype following in utero exposure and thereby enhancing the risk of asthma. Alternatively, they may directly or indirectly modulate the immune and inflammatory processes in asthmatics via effects on treatment responsiveness. The study of epigenetics may therefore play an important role in our understanding and possible treatment of asthma and other allergic diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biochemistry of Asthma.

  10. Self-reported skin morbidity in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Iben Marie; Zarchi, Kian; Ellervik, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Skin diseases are thought to be common in the general population. In 2004, a cross-sectional study in Norway, using a validated questionnaire for 18,770 individuals, revealed a high prevalence of skin diseases in the general population. To describe the prevalence of self-reported skin morbidities...... questionnaire. In total, 17.2% self-reported skin complaints. The most prominent self-reported skin complaint was itch with an overall prevalence of 6.5%. The skin morbidity most influenced by age was pimples. There was a uniform pattern showing fewer skin complaints with increasing education. Women reported...... skin morbidities more frequently than men. Participants in employment reported fewer skin morbidities compared to unemployed participants. Skin morbidities in Denmark are common, and the distribution of prevalence estimates in the Danish population parallel those of the Norwegian population, although...

  11. Cause-specific mortality and cancer morbidity in 390 male workers exposed to high purity talc, a six-decade follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergeland, Ebba; Gjertsen, Finn; Vos, Linda; Grimsrud, Tom K

    2017-09-01

    This study updates information on mortality and cancer morbidity in a cohort of Norwegian talc workers. Follow-up was extended with 24 years, covering 1953-2011. Comparisons were made with the general population and between subgroups within the cohort. Standardized mortality ratio for non-malignant respiratory disease (NMRD) was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.18, 0.69) and for diseases of the circulatory system (CVD) 0.98 (95%CI: 0.82, 1.16). A non-significantly increased NMRD risk was observed at high dust exposures. There were no deaths from pneumoconiosis. With the clear limitations of a small cohort, our results do hint at an effect of talc dust on mortality from NMRD other than pneumoconiosis, covered by a strong and persisting healthy worker effect. Also, an effect on CVD mortality, masked by a healthy worker selection into the cohort cannot be ruled out. Excess mortality from pneumoconiosis seen in other studies, may reflect exposure to quartz and, possibly, bias due to comparability problems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Management of an acute exacerbation of asthma and COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuppi, Jörg D; Ott, Sebastian R

    2014-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease are chronic pulmonary diseases which have a high prevalence world-wide. Both conditions can deteriorate acutely and potentially put patients into life-threatening situations. Management of an acute exacerbation starts in the emergency consultation-setting and ends only once the longterm management has been thoroughly assessed and optimised in order to prevent future exacerbations. Exacerbation frequency is strongly associated with long-term morbidity and mortality in both diseases. Recent data have shown that short-course systemic steroids (5 days) for the treatment of an acute exacerbation of COPD are as successful as long-course treatments (14 days) in preventing exacerbations during the subsequent 6 months. Similarly the targeted use of antibiotics is discussed in this review.

  13. Severe Asthma in Children: Lessons Learned and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    Severe asthma in children is a complicated and heterogeneous disorder that is extremely challenging to treat. Although most children with asthma derive clinical benefit from daily administration of low-to-medium-dose inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy, a small subset of children with "severe" or "refractory" asthma require high doses of ICS and even systemic corticosteroids to maintain symptom control. These children with severe asthma are at increased risk for adverse outcomes including medication-related side effects and recurrent and life-threatening exacerbations that significantly impair quality of life. This review highlights findings on severe asthma in school-age children (age 6-17 years) from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) over a 10-year period, between 2001 and 2011. Although SARP has advanced knowledge of the unique clinical, biological, and molecular attributes of severe asthma in children, considerable gaps remain for which additional studies are needed.

  14. Maternal complications and the management of asthma in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanders, Rebecca L; Murphy, Vanessa E

    2015-03-01

    Pregnancy is a unique state requiring alterations in maternal physiology to accommodate the growing fetus. Whilst the maternal immune system is normally well adept at performing this task, the presence of immune disorders, such as asthma, often lead to pregnancy-related complications affecting both mother and baby. Australia has a high prevalence of asthma; with approximately 12% of pregnant women reported to have current asthma. Poor control of asthma is of far greater risk than the use of asthma medications. Being able to identify complications associated with asthma during pregnancy is of great importance in providing appropriate asthma management and medical care to these pregnant women, which may have lifelong consequences for their offspring.

  15. Genetic factors and asthma in aluminum smelter workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Nilo O; Kaufman, Joel D; Daroowalla, Feroza M; Quigley, Sean; Farin, Federico; Checkoway, Harvey

    2003-04-01

    An asthma-like condition has been reported among aluminum smelter potroom workers. The pathophysiologic mechanisms and the causative agent involved are unknown. Inasmuch as gene polymorphisms are associated with asthma in the general population, the authors of this case-control study examined whether polymorphisms were associated with the development of potroom asthma. Genotyping was performed for the beta2-adrenoreceptor, high-affinity Ig (immunoglobulin) E receptor, and Tumor Necrosis Factor on potroom workers who developed a new asthma-like condition and on individuals who did not develop respiratory problems. No associations were found between potroom asthma case status and genotype. The asthma-like condition associated with potroom work remains poorly understood. Future investigations of genetic susceptibility and occupational asthma may provide pathophysiologic insights into these work-related conditions, but larger numbers of subjects will be required.

  16. Asthma in elite athletes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Elers, Jimmi; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Elite athletes have a high prevalence of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Although respiratory symptoms can be suggestive of asthma, the diagnosis of asthma in elite athletes cannot be based solely on the presence or absence of symptoms; diagnosis should be based on objective...... measurements, such as the eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test or exercise test. When considering that not all respiratory symptoms are due to asthma, other diagnoses should be considered. Certain regulations apply to elite athletes who require asthma medication for asthma. Knowledge of these regulations...... is essential when treating elite athletes. This article is aimed at physicians who diagnose and treat athletes with respiratory symptoms. It focuses on the pathogenesis of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes and how the diagnosis can be made. Furthermore, treatment of elite...

  17. The Prevention of Early Asthma in Kids study: design, rationale and methods for the Childhood Asthma Research and Education network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Morgan, Wayne J; Krawiec, Marzena; Lemanske, Robert F; Sorkness, Chris; Szefler, Stanley J; Larsen, Gary; Spahn, Joseph D; Zeiger, Robert S; Heldt, Gregory; Strunk, Robert C; Bacharier, Leonard B; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Boehmer, Susan J; Mauger, Elizabeth A; Mauger, David T; Taussig, Lynn M; Martinez, Fernando D

    2004-06-01

    Pediatric asthma remains an important public health concern as its prevalence and cost to the health care system is rising. In order to promote innovative research in asthma therapies, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute created the Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network in 1999. As its first study, the steering committee of the Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network designed a randomized clinical trial to determine if persistent asthma could be prevented in children at a high risk to develop the disease. This communication presents the design of its first clinical trial, the Prevention of Asthma in Kids (PEAK) trial and the organization of the Childhood Asthma Research and Education Network that developed and implemented this trial. Studies of the natural history of asthma have shown that, in persistent asthma, the initial asthma-like symptoms and loss of lung function occur predominately during the first years of life. Therefore, in the Prevention of Asthma in Kids study, children 2 and 3 years old with a positive asthma predictive index were randomized to twice daily treatment with fluticasone 88 microg or placebo via metered-dose inhaler and Aerochamber for 2 years. The double blind treatment period was followed by a 1-year observational period. Lung function was measured by spirometry and oscillometry technique at 4-month intervals throughout the study. Bronchodilator reversibility and exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) studies were performed at the end of the treatment and observation periods. The primary outcome measure was the number of asthma-free days. Other secondary outcomes included number of exacerbations, use of asthma medications and lung function. These measures were chosen to reflect the progression of the disease from intermittent wheezing to persistent asthma and measurement of the extent of airflow limitation and airway reactivity.

  18. Pediatric asthma control in Asia: phase 2 of the Asthma Insights and Reality in Asia-Pacific (AIRIAP 2) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G W K; Kwon, N; Hong, J G; Hsu, J-Y; Gunasekera, K D

    2013-04-01

    We conducted Phase 2 of the Asthma Insights and Reality in the Asia-Pacific (AIRIAP 2) survey in 2006 to determine the level of asthma control in this region and the validity of the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and childhood ACT (C-ACT) in relation to asthma control. Pediatric participants (0 to Asia. The survey consisted of the AIRIAP 2 questionnaire (asthma symptoms, use of urgent healthcare services and anti-asthma medication) and the ACT or C-ACT (English or Chinese translations only), both administered in the participant's preferred language. A symptom control index based on the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria (except lung function) was used to classify asthma control status. Most participants had inadequately controlled asthma ('uncontrolled' = 53.4%, 528/988; 'partly controlled' = 44.0%, 435/988). Only 2.5% (25/988) had 'controlled' asthma. Demand for urgent healthcare services (51.7%, 511/988) and use of short-acting beta-agonists (55.2%, 545/988) was high. The optimal ACT and C-ACT cutoff score for detecting uncontrolled asthma (compared with controlled or partly controlled asthma) was determined to be ≤19 (receiver operating characteristic analysis) with good agreement between the ACT and C-ACT and the symptom control index. Findings from this survey show that asthma control is suboptimal in many children in the Asia-Pacific region. Practical tools, such as the ACT or C-ACT, may help clinicians assess asthma control and facilitate adjustment of asthma medication. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Association between obesity and asthma - epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muc, Magdalena; Mota-Pinto, Anabela; Padez, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, and obese asthmatics have lower disease control and increased symptom severity. Several putative links have been proposed, including genetics, mechanical restriction of the chest and the intake of corticosteroids. The most consistent evidence, however, comes from studies of cytokines produced by the adipose tissue called adipokines. Adipokine imbalance is associated with both proinflammatory status and asthma. Although reverse causation has been proposed, it is now acknowledged that obesity precedes asthma symptoms. Nevertheless, prenatal origins of both conditions complicate the search for causality. There is a confirmed role of neuro-immune cross-talk mediating obesity-induced asthma, with leptin playing a key role in these processes. Obesity-induced asthma is now considered a distinct asthma phenotype. In fact, it is one of the most important determinants of asthma phenotypes. Two main subphenotypes have been distinguished. The first phenotype, which affects adult women, is characterised by later onset and is more likely to be non-atopic. The childhood obesity-induced asthma phenotype is characterised by primary and predominantly atopic asthma. In obesity-induced asthma, the immune responses are shifted towards T helper (Th) 1 polarisation rather than the typical atopic Th2 immunological profile. Moreover, obese asthmatics might respond differently to environmental triggers. The high cost of treatment of obesity-related asthma, and the burden it causes for the patients and their families call for urgent intervention. Phenotype-specific approaches seem to be crucial for the success of prevention and treatment.

  20. Stress and asthma: novel insights on genetic, epigenetic, and immunologic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stacy L; Miller, Gregory E; Brehm, John M; Celedón, Juan C

    2014-11-01

    In the United States the economically disadvantaged and some ethnic minorities are often exposed to chronic psychosocial stressors and disproportionately affected by asthma. Current evidence suggests a causal association between chronic psychosocial stress and asthma or asthma morbidity. Recent findings suggest potential mechanisms underlying this association, including changes in the methylation and expression of genes that regulate behavioral, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immunologic responses to stress. There is also evidence suggesting the existence of susceptibility genes that predispose chronically stressed youth to both post-traumatic stress disorder and asthma. In this review we critically examine published evidence and suggest future directions for research in this field.

  1. Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Robert; Laskowski, Dan; McCarthy, Kevin; Mattox, Emmea; Comhair, Suzy A. A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are synthesized at high levels in asthmatic airways. NO can oxidize hemoglobin (Hb) to methemoglobin (MetHb). CO binds to heme to produce carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). We hypothesized that MetHb and COHb may be increased in asthma. COHb, MetHb, and Hb were measured in venous blood of healthy controls (n=32) and asthmatics (n=31). Arterial COHb and oxyhemoglobin were measured by pulse CO-oximeter. Hb, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin were similar among groups, but arterial COHb was higher in asthmatics than controls (p=0.04). Venous COHb was similar among groups, and thus arteriovenous COHb (a-v COHb) concentration difference was greater in asthma compared with controls. Venous MetHb was lower in asthma compared to controls (p=0.01) and correlated to venous NO (p=0.009). The greater a-v COHb in asthma suggests CO offloading to tissues, but lower than normal MetHb suggests countermeasures to avoid adverse effects of high NO on gas transfer. PMID:25680415

  2. Occupational and environmental lung disease: occupational asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenton, S C

    2010-01-01

    Occupational exposures cause 10-15% of new-onset asthma in adults, and that represents a considerable health and economic burden. Exposure to many causative agents is now well controlled but workplace practices are constantly evolving and new hazards being introduced. Overall, there is no good evidence that the incidence of occupational asthma is decreasing. Evidence-based guidelines such as those published by the British Occupational Health research Foundation and Standards of Care documents should help raise awareness of the problem and improve management. Key targets include the control of occupational exposures, a high index of suspicion in any adult with new onset asthma, and early detailed investigation.

  3. Happiness to be gained in paediatric asthma care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flapper, B.C.T.; Duiverman, E.J.; Gerritsen, J.; Postema, K.; Van Der Schans, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the efficacy in terms of morbidity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of a group asthma education-exercise programme to children with low (below 10th percentile value) quality-of-life scores. A controlled, randomised, open, clinical trial was con

  4. Factors influencing asthma control: results of a real-life prospective observational asthma inhaler treatment (ASIT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldız

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Füsun Yildiz, On behalf of the ASIT Study Group Department of Pulmonary Disease, Kocaeli University School of Medicine, Kocaeli, Turkey Background: Despite the availability of new pharmacological options and novel combinations of existing drug therapies, the rate of suboptimal asthma control is still high. Therefore, early identification of the clinical and behavioral factors responsible for poor asthma control, and interventions during routine outpatient visits to improve asthma trigger management, are strongly recommended. This study was designed to evaluate the profiles of asthmatic patients and their inhaler treatment devices in relation to asthma control in Turkey. Methods: A total of 572 patients with persistent asthma (mean [standard deviation] age: 42.7 [12.1] years; 76% female were included in this prospective observational study. A baseline visit (0 month, visit 1 and three follow-up visits (1, 3 and 6 months after enrolment were conducted to collect data on demographics, past medical and asthma history, and inhaler device use. Results: Asthma control was identified in 61.5% of patients at visit 1 and increased to 87.3% at visit 4 (P < 0.001, regardless of sociodemographics, asthma duration, body mass index or smoking status. The presence of asthma-related comorbidity had a significantly negative effect on asthma control (P = 0.004. A significant decrease was determined, in the rate of uncontrolled asthma, upon follow-up among patients who were using a variety of fixed dose combination inhalers (P < 0.001 for each. Logistic regression analysis was used to show that the presence of asthma-related comorbidity (odds ratio [OR], 0.602; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.419; 0.863, P = 0.006 and active smoking (OR, 0.522; 95% CI, 0.330; 0.825, P = 0.005 were significant predictors of asthma control. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that, despite ongoing treatment, asthma control rate was 61.5% at visit 1 in adult outpatients with persistent

  5. Maternal morbid obesity and obstetric outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farah, Nadine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to review pregnancy outcomes in morbidly obese women who delivered a baby weighing 500 g or more in a large tertiary referral university hospital in Europe. METHODS: Morbid obesity was defined as a BMI > or =40.0 kg\\/m2 (WHO). Only women whose BMI was calculated at their first antenatal visit were included. The obstetric out-comes were obtained from the hospital\\'s computerised database. RESULTS: The incidence of morbid obesity was 0.6% in 5,824 women. Morbidly obese women were older and were more likely to be multigravidas than women with a normal BMI. The pregnancy was complicated by hypertension in 35.8% and diabetes mellitus in 20.0% of women. Obstetric interventions were high, with an induction rate of 42.1% and a caesarean section rate of 45.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show that maternal morbid obesity is associated with an alarmingly high incidence of medical complications and an increased level of obstetric interventions. Consideration should be given to developing specialised antenatal services for morbidly obese women. The results also highlight the need to evaluate the effectiveness of prepregnancy interventions in morbidly obese women.

  6. A study of neonatal and maternal outcomes of asthma during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Lal Meena

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma is a common problem all around the world with variable prevalence ranging from 1%–18% in different age and geographical distribution. There are proximately 300 million affected individuals. There are growing prevalence and morbidity, due to asthma associated with pregnancy. The course of asthma in pregnancy is unpredictable. Methods: 2400 consecutive pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of S.P. Medical College and AG of Hospitals, Bikaner, were screened using asthma questionnaire translated in Hindi based on the questionnaire developed for International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. 52 patients diagnosed as asthma were subjected for PFT and classified according to clinical severity as per GINA guidelines, 2006. All subjects were followed till delivery and postpartum charts reviewed to see neonate and maternal outcome. Results: The prevalence of asthma during pregnancy was 2.1%, among them, 25 (48.1% were categorized as having intermittent asthma, 6 (11.5% with mild persistent asthma, 10 (19.2% with moderate persistent asthma and 11 (21.2% having severe persistent asthma. During the course of pregnancy, 36% had no change in the symptomatology, while (32.5% experienced improvement and (32.5% of worsening of asthma. 22 (42.31% women were newly diagnosed during our study. There was no significant adverse maternal and fetal outcome in asthmatic group compared to control. Conclusions: Asthma is an under diagnosed and under treated disorder, especially during pregnancy and overall morbidity of asthma among women & neonates does not change during pregnancy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(1.000: 23-27

  7. Uncontrolled asthma and its risk factors in Chinese children: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Li; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Yuejie; Liu, Hanmin; Hong, Jianguo; Bao, Yixiao; Chen, Aihuan; Deng, Li; Ji, Wei; Zhong, Nanshan; Shen, Kunling

    2016-09-01

    Asthma afflicts many children in China but information about asthma management among Chinese pediatric asthma patients is limited. This study aims to evaluate asthma control among Chinese pediatric patients and identify risk factors associated with uncontrolled asthma. A total of 4223 patients with persistent asthma aged 2-16 years from 42 tertiary hospitals across all regions of mainland China except Tibet were surveyed. Asthma Control Test (ACT), Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) and Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria were used to assess asthma control for children aged 12-16 years, 4-11 years and 2-3 years, respectively. Uncontrolled asthma was defined as ACT or C-ACT score ≤19 or GINA-defined uncontrolled asthma. Risk factors associated with uncontrolled asthma were identified using multivariate logistic regression models. Asthma was uncontrolled in 19.9% of the subjects. High rates of uncontrolled asthma were found in subjects with treatment non-adherence (44.1%), concomitant allergic rhinitis (AR) (23.3%), disease duration ≥ 1.5 years (22.8%), and first-degree relatives with AR (21.5%). The risk of uncontrolled asthma was much higher in the treatment non-adherence group compared to the complete adherence group (OR = 5.79, p asthma. About 20% of Chinese pediatric asthma patients had uncontrolled asthma. Treatment adherence and AR were the most significant risk factors. Tailored measures aimed at improving treatment adherence and diagnosis and treatment of AR should be adopted to improve the level of asthma control in Chinese children.

  8. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  9. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  10. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  11. Advances in pediatric asthma in 2014: Moving toward a population health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefler, Stanley J

    2015-03-01

    Last year's "Advances in pediatric asthma in 2013: Coordinating asthma care" concluded that, "Enhanced communication systems will be necessary among parents, clinicians, health care providers and the pharmaceutical industry so that we continue the pathway of understanding the disease and developing new treatments that address the unmet needs of patients who are at risk for severe consequences of unchecked disease persistence or progression." This year's summary will focus on further advances in pediatric asthma related to prenatal and postnatal factors altering the natural history of asthma, assessment of asthma control, and new insights regarding the management of asthma in children as indicated in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology publications in 2014. A major theme of this review is how new research reports can be integrated into medical communication in a population health perspective to assist clinicians in asthma management. The asthma specialist is in a unique position to convey important messages to the medical community related to factors that influence the course of asthma, methods to assess and communicate levels of control, and new targets for intervention, as well as new immunomodulators. By enhancing communication among patients, parents, primary care physicians, and specialists within provider systems, the asthma specialist can provide timely information that can help to reduce asthma morbidity and mortality.

  12. Monosodium glutamate intake, dietary patterns and asthma in Chinese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumin Shi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Emerging evidence shows that diet is related to asthma. The aim of this analysis was to investigate the association between monosodium glutamate (MSG intake, overall dietary patterns and asthma. METHODS: Data from 1486 Chinese men and women who participated in the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN were analyzed. In this study, MSG intake and dietary patterns were quantitatively assessed in 2002. Information on asthma history was collected during followed-up in 2007. RESULTS: Of the sample, 1.4% reported ever having asthma. MSG intake was not positively associated with asthma. There was a significant positive association between 'traditional' (high loadings on rice, wheat flour, and vegetable food pattern and asthma. No association between 'macho' (rich in meat and alcohol, 'sweet tooth' (high loadings on cake, milk, and yoghurt 'vegetable rich' (high loadings on whole grain, fruit, and vegetable food patterns and asthma was found. Smoking and overweight were not associated with asthma in the sample. CONCLUSION: While a 'Traditional' food pattern was positively associated with asthma among Chinese adults, there was no significant association between MSG intake and asthma.

  13. Asthma in Rhinosinusitis: A Survey from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The coexistence of asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is more common than expected given their individual prevalence in the general population and may affect patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of asthma in chronic rhinosinusitis in Mashhad, Northeast Iran.  Materials and Methods: This study was performed in two university hospital from November 2012 for 12 months. In total, 153 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were enrolled and referred to a particular pulmonologist for asthma evaluation.  Results: The mean age of participants was 40.54±13.11 years, and 41.8% were male. In total, 63.4% of patients had the polypoid form of CRS. The proportion of patients in this study with asthma was 41.8%, compared with a general asthma prevalence in this region of 13.5%.  Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of asthma among patients with CRS, but it often remains undiagnosed. Asthma in CRS patients should be diagnosed and treated in order to improve patient’s quality of life. We recommend an evaluation of the lower airways in all of these patients as well as further studies in this field.

  14. Examining the association between childhood asthma and parent and grandparent asthma status: Implications for Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Valerio, Melissa A.; Andreski, Patricia M.; Schoeni, Robert F.; McGonagle, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of intergenerational asthma beyond maternal asthma has been limited. The association between childhood asthma and intergenerational asthma status among a national cohort of children was examined.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic asthma Merck Manual Consumer Version: Asthma Merck Manual Consumer Version: Asthma in Children TeensHealth from Nemours: Allergy Center World Allergy Organization World Allergy Organization: The Allergic March Patient Support ...

  16. Attentional Bias in Children with Asthma with and without Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeney, Joanne; Sharpe, Louise; Sicouri, Gemma; Lorimer, Sarah; Dear, Blake F; Jaffe, Adam; Selvadurai, Hiran; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-01-09

    Children with asthma have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders, however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confer vulnerability for anxiety in this population. This study investigated whether children with asthma and anxiety disorders display attentional biases towards threatening stimuli, similar to what has been seen in children with anxiety disorders more generally. We also examined the relationships between attentional biases and anxiety symptomatology and asthma control for children with asthma. Ninety-three children, aged 8-13, took part in the study and were recruited into one of four conditions (asthma/anxiety, asthma, anxiety, control). Asthma was medically confirmed and anxiety was assessed through clinical interview. We used self- and parent-report questionnaires to measure child asthma (ATAQ) and anxiety (SCAS, CASI) variables. Participants completed a visual dot-probe task designed to measure attentional bias towards two types of stimuli: asthma related words and general threat words, as well as tasks to assess reading ability and attentional control. Results showed that attentional biases did not differ between the groups, although children with anxiety disorders displayed poorer attentional control. A significant correlation was found between poor asthma control and an attentional bias of asthma stimuli. While we found no evidence that anxiety disorders in children with asthma were associated with threat- or asthma-related attentional biases, preliminary evidence suggested that children with poor asthma control displayed biases towards asthma-specific stimuli. Future research is needed to explore whether these attentional biases are adaptive.

  17. Risk factors for asthma among children in Maputo (Mozambique).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavale-Manuel, S; Alexandre, F; Duarte, N; Albuquerque, O; Scheinmann, P; Poisson-Salomon, A S; de Blic, J

    2004-04-01

    Few studies have looked at risk factors for asthma in African children. We aimed to identify the risk factors associated with childhood asthma in Maputo (Mozambique). This case-control study included 199 age-matched children (100 asthmatic and 99 nonasthmatic) who attended Maputo Central Hospital between January 1999 and July 2000. We collected information concerning their familial history of atopy, birth weight, environment and breast-feeding. Detailed information about morbidity and treatment was obtained for each asthmatic child. The children were aged between 18 months and 8 years; 60% were male. The asthmatic children were hospitalized more frequently than the nonasthmatic children (P history of asthma (OR = 26.8, CI = 10.8-68.2, P history of asthma and rhinitis, the place of residence, having smokers as parents and early weaning from maternal breast milk. These results highlight the need to reassess the management of asthmatic children in Maputo.

  18. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  19. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    Late-onset asthma is common, associated with poor outcome, underdiagnosed and undertreated, possibly due to the modifying effect of ageing on disease expression. Although the diagnostic work-up in elderly individuals suspected of having asthma follows the same steps as in younger individuals (case......, to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...

  20. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  1. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  2. Morbidity and Mortality Among Community-Based People Who Inject Drugs With a High Hepatitis C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Burden in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shruti H; McFall, Allison M; Srikrishnan, Aylur K; Kumar, M Suresh; Nandagopal, Paneerselvam; Cepeda, Javier; Thomas, David L; Sulkowski, Mark S; Solomon, Sunil S

    2016-09-01

    Background.  There are limited data on clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from low- and middle-income countries. We characterize mortality and liver disease progression in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) with high HCV burden. Methods.  In a cohort of PWID in Chennai, India, 851 persons were observed semiannually. Information on death was obtained through verbal autopsy and liver disease progression, which was defined as an incident liver stiffness measurement of ≥12.3 kPa if it was <12.3 at baseline. Poisson and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with mortality and disease progression, respectively. Results.  At baseline, 36.9% of cases were infected with HCV, 16.7% were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 71.6% had no or mild stiffness, 14.9% had moderate stiffness, and 13.5% had severe stiffness or cirrhosis. Mortality was significantly higher among those with moderate (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 2.31) and severe stiffness (MRR = 4.86) at baseline, those with ongoing substance use, those who were HIV monoinfected and not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) (MRR = 6.59), and those who were HIV/HCV coinfected regardless of ART status (MRR for no ART = 5.34; MRR for ART = 4.51). Of those with no or mild stiffness, 25.9% and 6.4% had evidence of progression to moderate and severe stiffness or cirrhosis, respectively; 38.3% of those with moderate stiffness had evidence of progression to severe stiffness or cirrhosis. Factors associated with progression included age, alcohol use, body mass index, and chronic HCV infection. Conclusions.  We observed significant morbidity and mortality primarily driven by untreated HIV, HIV/HCV coinfection, and alcohol use. Even with improved access to HIV treatment, in the absence of HCV treatment, outcomes are unlikely to improve for HIV/HCV-coinfected persons.

  3. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht; Eigenmann, Philippe; Halken, Susanne; Hedlin, Gunilla; Høst, Arne; Hourihane, Jonathan; Just, Jocelyne; Lack, Gideon; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria; Muraro, Antonella; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Roberts, Graham; Simpson, Angela; Valovirta, Erkka; Weidinger, Stephan; Wickman, Magnus; Mazon, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy. This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas in high-risk infants reduces the incidence of atopic dermatitis, while there is for now not enough evidence to recommend other dietary modifications, prebiotics, probiotics, or other microbial products. Pharmacologic agents used until now for prevention have not proved useful, while there is hope that antiviral vaccines could be useful in the future. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is effective for the treatment of allergic patients with symptoms; the study of its value for primary and secondary prevention of asthma and allergy is in its very preliminary phases. The lack of success in the prevention of these disorders lies on their complexity, which involves many genetic, epigenetic, and environmental interactions. There is a need to identify target populations, involved mechanisms and interactions, and the best interventions. These must be effective, feasible, implementable, and affordable.

  4. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Brashier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC. Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma.

  5. Maternal asthma, diabetes, and high blood pressure are associated with low birth weight and increased hospital birth and delivery charges; Hawai'i hospital discharge data 2003-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Donald K; Feigal, David W; Smith, Ruben A; Fuddy, Loretta J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma, diabetes, and high blood pressure are common maternal conditions that can impact birth outcomes. Data from hospital discharges in Hawai'i were analyzed for 107,034 singleton births from 2003-2008. Categories were determined using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, ninth revision (ICD-9) from linked delivery records of mother and infant. Prevalence estimates of asthma (ICD-9: 493), diabetes (ICD-9: 250,648.0, 648.8), high blood pressure (ICD-9: 401-405,642) as coded on the delivery record, low birth weight (high birth weight (>4500 grams), Cesarean delivery, and median hospital charges were calculated. Median regression analysis assessed total hospital charges adjusting for maternal age, maternal race, insurance, and Cesarean delivery. Maternal asthma was present in 4.3% (95% confidence interval=4.1-4.4%), maternal diabetes was present in 7.7% (95% CI=7.6-7.9%), and maternal high blood pressure was present in 9.2% (95% CI=9.0-9.3%) of births. In the adjusted median regression analysis, mothers with asthma had $999 (95% CI: $886 to $1,112) higher hospital charges compared to those without; mothers with diabetes had $743 (95% CI: $636 to $850) higher charges compared to those without; and mothers with high blood pressure had $2,314 (95% CI: $2,194 to $2,434) higher charges compared to those without. Asthma, diabetes, and high blood pressure are associated with higher hospital delivery charges and low birth weight. Diabetes and high blood pressure were also associated with Cesarean delivery. An increased awareness of the impact of these conditions on both adverse birth outcomes and the development of chronic disease is needed.

  6. Improving outcomes for underserved adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Maria T; Vockell, Anna-Liisa B; Munafo, Jennifer Knopf; Schoettker, Pamela J; Wimberg, Janet A; Pruett, Raymond; Yi, Michael S; Byczkowski, Terri L

    2014-02-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Treatment adherence by adolescents is often poor, and their outcomes are worse than those of younger patients. We conducted a quality improvement initiative to improve asthma control and outcomes for high-risk adolescents treated in a primary care setting. Interventions were guided by the Chronic Care Model and focused on standardized and evidence-based care, care coordination and active outreach, self-management support, and community connections. Patients with optimally well-controlled asthma increased from ∼10% to 30%. Patients receiving the evidence-based care bundle (condition/severity characterized in chart and, for patients with persistent asthma, an action plan and controller medications at the most recent visit) increased from 38% to at or near 100%. Patients receiving the required self-management bundle (patient self-assessment, stage-of-readiness tool, and personal action plan) increased from 0% to ∼90%. Patients and parents who were confident in their ability to manage their or their adolescent's asthma increased from 70% to ∼85%. Patient satisfaction and the mean proportion of patients with asthma-related emergency department visits or hospitalizations remained stable at desirable levels. Implementing interventions focused on standardized and evidence-based care, self-management support, care coordination and active outreach, linkage to community resources, and enhanced follow-up for patients with chronically not-well-controlled asthma resulted in sustained improvement in asthma control in adolescent patients. Additional interventions are likely needed for patients with chronically poor asthma control.

  7. A pilot study describing local residents' perceptions of asthma and knowledge of asthma care in selected Chicago communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, T; Hu, T C; Bennett, S; Niedos, M

    1999-10-01

    To understand inner-city Chicago residents' perception of the prevalence and severity of asthma as well as their knowledge of asthma control and management. Cross-sectional survey using a random digital telephone dialing method. Five inner-city Chicago communities where a high prevalence and mortality of asthma have been recognized. All the residents in the selected communities with a residential telephone had an equal opportunity to be surveyed. The unit of measurement was the household. Only one adult member (age 18 or older) in any randomly selected household was interviewed. The survey included questions modified from the Chicago Asthma Surveillance Initiative study. A total of 2,322 phone calls with 527 successful contacts were made over 1,938 distinct phone lines, resulting in a response rate of 175 of 527 calls (33.2%). Seventy-nine of the participants (45.1%) reported that at least one of their family members (including themselves) has asthma. Eight persons (4.6%) reported asthma as one of the top three health concerns in their community. Of the top three health reasons mentioned for children's being absent from school, only seven persons (4%) mentioned asthma. Participants were unlikely to perceive that the problems with access to asthma care and environmental triggers for asthma in their communities were any worse compared with other communities. Participants having family members with diagnosed asthma scored no better when asked general-knowledge questions about asthma or its signs and triggers than those without a family member having asthma. The participants' knowledge and beliefs about the seriousness of asthma revealed in this study appeared unlikely to enhance or support compliance with the challenging requirements of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Panel guidelines. The study was conducted with a small sample, and the results should be carefully interpreted.

  8. Going beyond the disability-based morbidity definition in the compression of morbidity framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: As originally proposed by Fries, conceptualizing morbidity solely through associated functional limitation/disability (FL/D remains the most widely accepted metric to assess whether increases in longevity have been accompanied by a compression of morbidity. Objective: To propose a departure from a highly restrictive FL/D-based definition of “morbidity” to a broader view that considers the burden of chronic diseases even when no overt FL/D occur. Design: We outline three reasons why the current framework of compression of morbidity should be broadened to also consider morbidity to be present even when there are no overtly measurable FL/D. We discuss various scenarios of morbidity compression and morbidity expansion under this broader rubric of morbidity. Conclusion: The rationale to go beyond a purely FL/D-based definition of morbidity includes: (1 substantial damage from chronic disease that can develop prior to overt FL/D symptoms occurring; (2 multiple costs to the individual and society that extend beyond FL/D, including medication costs, health care visits, and opportunity costs of lifelong treatment; and (3 psychosocial and stress burden of being labeled as diseased and the consequence for overall well-being. Adopting this broader definition of morbidity suggests that increases in longevity have been possibly accompanied by an expansion of morbidity, in contrast to Fries' original hypothesis that morbidity onset (based on only FL/D would be delayed to a greater extent than increases in survival. There is an urgent need for better data and more research to document morbidity onset and its link with increases in longevity and assess the important question on whether populations while living longer are also healthier.

  9. Linking obesity and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand

    2014-04-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that obesity has a significant impact on asthma risk, phenotype, and prognosis. Epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that asthma is more likely to occur in obese patients, and health status is impaired in obese individuals with asthma, with obese asthmatics experiencing more symptoms, worse quality of life, increased healthcare use, and increased asthma severity. However, obesity has well-described effects on lung function and mechanics that can lead to symptoms of dyspnea without causing the pathophysiologic changes of asthma. Adding to the challenges of evaluating this association, some studies have failed to demonstrate a robust relationship between obesity and traditional biomarkers of airway inflammation in adult asthmatics, leading to the conclusion that obesity does not necessarily worsen airway inflammation in asthma. In this regard, emerging data suggest that nonatopic mechanisms may be relevant in obese asthmatics, and that these mechanisms may have a direct impact on the response of obese asthmatics to asthma therapies, most notably inhaled glucocorticoids. This article will review selected aspects of the contributions of obesity-related airway and systemic inflammation to asthma, with a focus on the impact of obesity as a modifier of risk, prognosis, and therapeutic response in asthma.

  10. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  11. Incidence of GP-diagnosed respiratory tract infections according to age, gender and high-risk co-morbidity: the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E.; Rovers, M.M.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Figures on GP-diagnosed respiratory tract infections (RTI) are outdated because of demographic changes and increase in co-morbid conditions, respiratory vaccination programmes and change in illness behaviour. Objective. To determine the incidence of RTI in patients presenting to the GP a

  12. Incidence of GP-diagnosed respiratory tract infections according to age, gender and high-risk co-morbidity : the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; Rovers, M M; Kuyvenhoven, M M; Schellevis, F G; Verheij, T J M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Figures on GP-diagnosed respiratory tract infections (RTI) are outdated because of demographic changes and increase in co-morbid conditions, respiratory vaccination programmes and change in illness behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of RTI in patients presenting to the GP a

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  14. Is the global rise of asthma an early impact of anthropogenic climate change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul John Beggs

    Full Text Available The increase in asthma incidence, prevalence, and morbidity over recent decades presents a significant challenge to public health. Pollen is an important trigger of some types of asthma, and both pollen quantity and season depend on climatic and meteorological variables. Over the same period as the global rise in asthma, there have been considerable increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and global average surface temperature. We hypothesize anthropogenic climate change as a plausible contributor to the rise in asthma. Greater concentrations of carbon dioxide and higher temperatures may increase pollen quantity and induce longer pollen seasons. Pollen allergenicity can also increase as a result of these changes in climate. Exposure in early life to a more allergenic environment may also provoke the development of other atopic conditions, such as eczema and allergic rhinitis. Although the etiology of asthma is complex, the recent global rise in asthma could be an early health effect of anthropogenic climate change.

  15. The level of specialist assessment of adult asthma is influenced by patient age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, C; Sverrild, A; Stensen, L;

    2014-01-01

    is sparse. AIM: To examine the impact of patient age on the type and proportion of diagnostic tests performed in patients undergoing specialist assessment for asthma. METHODS: Data from a clinical population consisting of all patients consecutively referred over a 12 months period to a specialist clinic...... adults, and were more frequently smokers. However, a regression analysis showed that older age was associated with a lower likelihood of diagnostic assessment with a reversibility test, a bronchial challenge test, or measurement of exhaled NO, independently of a known diagnosis of asthma, smoking habits......BACKGROUND: Late onset asthma is associated with more severe disease and higher morbidity than in younger asthma patients. This may in part relate to under recognition of asthma in older adults, but evidence on the impact of patient age on diagnostic assessment of asthma in a specialist setting...

  16. [Morbidity among forestry workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalski, H; Bernacki, K

    1981-01-01

    The past and presently diagnosed diseases (excluding vibration disease and occupational hearing impairment) were analysed in 1105 sawers operating combustion drive mechanic saws and in 295 controls. The greatest rate, both in the sawers and controls, was that of the diseases of respiratory tract, circulatory system and osseo -- articulo -- muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. These constituted 86% of all diseases that afflicted sawers and controls. No specific general morbidity accompanying vibration disease or occupational hearing impairment was found in the sawers exposed to noise and vibration.

  17. Asthma and the achievement gap among urban minority youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Charles E

    2011-10-01

    To outline the prevalence and disparities of asthma among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which poorly controlled asthma adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address these problems. Literature review. Asthma is the most common chronic disease affecting youth in the United States; almost 10 million youth under 18 (14%) have received a diagnosis and 6.8 million (9%) have active asthma. Average annual prevalence estimates were approximately 45% higher for Black versus White children (12.8% vs. 8.8%), as were average annual estimates of asthma attacks (8.4% vs. 5.8%). Urban minority youth have highly elevated prevalence of poorly controlled asthma as evidenced by overuse of emergency departments and under-use of efficacious medications. Poorly controlled asthma has functional consequences on cognition, connectedness with school, and absenteeism. Exemplary asthma programs include management and support systems, school health and mental health services, asthma education, healthy school environments, physical education and activity, and coordination of school, family, and community efforts. Asthma and, more importantly, poorly controlled asthma are highly and disproportionately prevalent among school-aged urban minority youth, has a negative impact on academic achievement through its effects on cognition, school connectedness, and absenteeism, and effective practices are available for schools to address this problem. To reduce the adverse effects of poorly controlled asthma on learning, a multifaceted approach to asthma control and prevention in which schools can and must play a central role is essential. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  18. ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bousquet (Jean); P.W. Hellings (P.); I. Agache; A. Bedbrook (A.); C. Bachert (Claus); K.-C. Bergmann (Karl-Christian); Bewick, M.; C. Bindslev-Jensen; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D.P.; P. Camargos; G. Canonica (Gwalter); T.B. Casale (Thomas); N.H. Chavannes (Nicolas); A.A. Cruz; De Carlo, G.; R. Dahl; P. Demoly; Devillier, P.; J. Fonseca; W.J. Fokkens (Wytske); Guldemond, N.A.; T. Haahtela; Illario, M.; P.M. Just; M. Keil (Mark); L. Klimek (Ludger); P. Kuna; D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); M. Morais-Almeida; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; R. Naclerio; R.E. O'hehir; N. Papadopoulos; R. Pawankar (Ruby); Potter, P.; D. Ryan (Dermot); Samolinski, B.; H.J. Schünemann (Holger); A. Sheikh (Aziz); F.E.R. Simons; Stellato, C.; A. Todo Bom; Tomazic, P.V.; A. Valiulis (Arunas); E. Valovirta (Erkka); Ventura, M.T.; M. Wickman (Magnus); Young, I.; A. Yorgancioglu; T. Zuberbier (Torsten); W. Aberer (W.); C.A. Akdis; C.A. Akdis; I. Annesi-Maesano; Ankri, J.; I.J. Ansotegui (I.); J.M. Antó (Josep M.); Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; I. Baiardini (Ilaria); Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; E.D. Bateman (Eric); B. Beghe; E.H. Bel; K.S. Bennoor (K.); Benson, M.; Białoszewski, A.Z.; T. Bieber (Thomas); L. Bjermer (Leif); Blain, H.; F. Blasi (Francesco); A.L. Boner; M. Bonini (Matteo); S. Bonini (Sergio); Bosse, I.; J. Bouchard (Jacques); L.P. Boulet; Bourret, R.; J. Bousquet (Jean); F. Braido (Fulvio); A. Briggs (Andrew); C.E. Brightling (C.); J. Brozek; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; A. Bush (Andrew); Caballero-Fonseca, F.; M. Calderon (Moises); Camuzat, T.; D. Cardona (Doris); Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A.M.; K.H. Carlsen (Karin); W.W. Carr (Warner); Cepeda Sarabia, A.M.; Cesari, M.; L. Chatzi (Leda); Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; A.G. Chuchalin; Chung, K.F.; G. Ciprandi (G.); De Sousa, J.C. (J. Correia); L. Cox (Linda); Crooks, G.; A. Custovic; S.E. Dahlen; U. Darsow (U.); Dedeu, T.; D. Deleanu (D.); J. Denburg; De Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A.T.; D. Dokic (D.); H. Douagui; Dray, G.; R. Dubakiene (R.); S.R. Durham (Stephen); G. Du Toit (George); Dykewicz, M.S.; Eklund, P.; Y. El-Gamal (Y.); Ellers, E.; R. Emuzyte; Farrell, J.; A. Fink-Wagner (A.); A. Fiocchi (Alessandro); M. Fletcher (M.); Forastiere, F.; M. Gaga (Mina); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); Gemicioǧlu, B.; J.E. Gereda (J.); Van Wick, R.G. (R. Gerth); S. González Diaz (S.); Grisle, I.; L. Grouse; Gutter, Z.; M.A. Guzmán (M.); B. Hellquist-Dahl (B.); J. Heinrich (Joachim); Horak, F.; J.O.B. Hourihane; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E.J.; Jeandel, C.; S.L. Johnston; G.F. Joos (Guy); Jonquet, O.; Jung, K.S.; M. Jutel (M.); Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; O. Kalayci; A.F. Kalyoncu (A.); Kardas, P.; P.K. Keith; M. Kerkhof (Marjan); H.A.M. Kerstjens (Huib); N. Khaltaev; M. Kogevinas (Manolis); Kolek, V.; G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); M.L. Kowalski; Kuitunen, M.; C.A. Kull (Christian); V. Kvedariene (V.); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); S. Lau (Susanne); Laune, D.; L.T. Le; A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); B. Lipworth; J. Li (J.); K.C. Lødrup Carlsen (K. C.); R. Louis (Renaud); Lupinek, C.; W. MacNee; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; B. Mahboub; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; G.D. Marshall; M.R. Masjedi (M.); Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; S. Mavale-Manuel; E. Melén (Erik); Melo-Gomes, E.; E.O. Meltzer; Mercier, J.; J. Merk (Jeroen); Miculinic, N.; F. Mihaltan (F.); B. Milenkovic (Branislava); Millot-Keurinck, J.; Y. Mohammad; I. Momas (I.); R. Mösges; Muraro, A.; L. Namazova-Baranova (L.); R. Nadif (Rachel); Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; A. Nieto (Antonio); B. Niggemann; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; T.D. Nyembue (T.); K. Ohta; Y. Okamoto; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; S. Ouedraogo; P. Paggiaro (Pierluigi); I. Pali-Schöll (I.); S. Palkonen; P. Panzner (P.); Papi, A.; Park, H.S.; G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); S.E. Pedersen (Soren E.); Pereira, A.M.; O. Pfaar (Oliver); Picard, R.; B. Pigearias (B.); I. Pin (Isabelle); Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; T.A. Popov; Portejoie, F.; D.S. Postma (Dirkje); L.K. Poulsen; D. Price (David); K.F. Rabe (Klaus F.); Raciborski, F.; G. Roberts; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; L. Rodríguez-Mañas (Leocadio); Rolland, C.; M. Roman Rodriguez (M.); A. Romano; J. Rosado-Pinto; K. Rosario (Karyna); Rottem, M.; M. Sanchez-Borges; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; G.K. Scadding; Scichilone, N.; P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); Serrano, E.; M.D. Shields; V. Siroux (V.); J.C. Sisul (J.); Skrindo, I.; H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); D. Solé (D.); Sooronbaev, T.; O. Spranger; Stelmach, R.; P.J. Sterk (Peter); Strandberg, T.; J. Sunyer (Jordi); C. Thijs (Carel); M. Triggiani (M.); R. Valenta; A.L. Valero (A.); Van Eerd, M.; Van Ganse, E.; Van Hague, M.; O. Vandenplas (Olivier); Varona, L.L.; Vellas, B.; Vezzani, G.; Vazankari, T.; G. Viegi; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; D.Y. Wang (De Yun); U. Wahn (Ulrich); Werfel, T.; Whalley, B.; D. Williams; Williams, S.; Wilson, N.; J. Wright (Juliet); B.P. Yawn (Barbara); P.K. Yiallouros (P.); O.M. Yusuf (Osman); Zaidi, A.; H.J. Zar; M. Zernotti; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; M. Zidarn (M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to de

  19. ARIA 2016 : Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Hellings, P W; Agache, I; Bedbrook, A; Bachert, C; Bergmann, K C; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Bucca, C; Caimmi, D P; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Casale, T; Chavannes, N H; Cruz, A A; De Carlo, G; Dahl, R; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Guldemond, N A; Haahtela, T; Illario, M; Just, J; Keil, T; Klimek, L; Kuna, P; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Morais-Almeida, M; Mullol, J; Murray, R; Naclerio, R; O'Hehir, R E; Papadopoulos, N G; Pawankar, R; Potter, P; Samolinski, B; Schunemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Simons, F E R; Stellato, C; Todo-Bom, A; Tomazic, P V; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Ventura, M T; Wickman, M; Young, I; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Aberer, W; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ankri, J; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Asarnoj, A; Arshad, H; Avolio, F; Baiardini, I; Barbara, C; Barbagallo, M; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Bel, E H; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Białoszewski, A Z; Bieber, T; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosse, I; Bouchard, J; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bunu, C; Burte, E; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Calderon, M A; Camuzat, T; Cardona, V; Carreiro-Martins, P; Carriazo, A M; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesari, M; Chatzi, L; Chiron, R; Chivato, T; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; de Sousa, J Correia; Crooks, G; Custovic, A; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Denburg, J A; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Du Toit, G; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Ellers, E; Emuzyte, R; Farrell, J; Fink Wagner, A; Fiocchi, A; Fletcher, M; Forastiere, F; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; van Wick, R Gerth; González Diaz, S; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Johnston, S L; Joos, G; Jonquet, O; Jung, K S; Jutel, M; Kaidashev, I; Khaitov, M; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Kardas, P; Keith, P K; Kerkhof, M; Kerstjens, H A M; Khaltaev, N; Kogevinas, M; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kuitunen, M; Kull, I; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; Lupinek, C; MacNee, W; Magar, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Maier, D; Majer, I; Malva, J; Manning, P; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Mathieu-Dupas, E; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Mercier, J; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Millot-Keurinck, J; Mohammad, Y; Momas, I; Mösges, R; Muraro, A; Namazova-Baranova, L; Nadif, R; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Nieto, A; Niggemann, B; Nogueira-Silva, L; Nogues, M; Nyembue, T D; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Olive-Elias, M; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Palkonen, S; Panzner, P; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pedersen, S; Pereira, A M; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Rodenas, F; Rodriguez-Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rottem, M; Sanchez-Borges, M; Sastre-Dominguez, J; Scadding, G K; Scichilone, N; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Serrano, E; Shields, M; Siroux, V; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Strandberg, T; Sunyer, J; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A; van Eerd, M; van Ganse, E; van Hague, M; Vandenplas, O; Varona, L L; Vellas, B; Vezzani, G; Vazankari, T; Viegi, G; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Walker, S; Wahn, U; Werfel, T; Whalley, B; Wilson, N; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M

    2016-01-01

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop guidel

  20. A daily SMS reminder increases adherence to asthma treatment: a three-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Ulla; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to asthma treatment is a well-recognised challenge and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and consumption of health care resources. This study examined the impact of receiving a daily text message reminder on one's cell phone on adherence to asthma treatment....

  1. ARIA 2016 : Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Agache, I.; Bedbrook, A.; Bachert, C.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D. P.; Camargos, P. A. M.; Canonica, G. W.; Casale, T.; Chavannes, N. H.; Cruz, A. A.; De Carlo, G.; Dahl, R.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Fonseca, J.; Fokkens, W. J.; Guldemond, N. A.; Haahtela, T.; Illario, M.; Just, J.; Keil, T.; Klimek, L.; Kuna, P.; Larenas-Linnemann, D.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; Naclerio, R.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Pawankar, R.; Potter, P.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Simons, F. E. R.; Stellato, C.; Todo-Bom, A.; Tomazic, P. V.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Ventura, M. T.; Wickman, M.; Young, I.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zuberbier, T.; Aberer, W.; Akdis, C. A.; Akdis, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Ankri, J.; Ansotegui, I. J.; Anto, J. M.; Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; Baiardini, I.; Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; Bateman, E. D.; Beghe, B.; Bel, E. H.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bialoszewski, A. Z.; Bieber, T.; Bjermer, L.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Boner, A. L.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Bosse, I.; Bouchard, J.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Braido, F.; Briggs, A. H.; Brightling, C. E.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; Bush, A.; Caballero-Fonseca, F.; Calderon, M. A.; Camuzat, T.; Cardona, V.; Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A. M.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carr, W.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Cesari, M.; Chatzi, L.; Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A. G.; Chung, K. F.; Ciprandi, G.; Correia de Sousa, J.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Custovic, A.; Dahlen, S. E.; Darsow, U.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Denburg, J. A.; de Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dray, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Durham, S. R.; Du Toit, G.; Dykewicz, M. S.; Eklund, P.; El-Gamal, Y.; Ellers, E.; Emuzyte, R.; Farrell, J.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fiocchi, A.; Fletcher, M.; Forastiere, F.; Gaga, M.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gereda, J. E.; van Wick, R. Gerth; Gonzalez Diaz, S.; Grisle, I.; Grouse, L.; Gutter, Z.; Guzman, M. A.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Heinrich, J.; Horak, F.; Hourihane, J. O'. B.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E. J.; Jeandel, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Joos, G.; Jonquet, O.; Jung, K. S.; Jutel, M.; Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Kardas, P.; Keith, P. K.; Kerkhof, M.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Khaltaev, N.; Kogevinas, M.; Kolek, V.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kuitunen, M.; Kull, I.; Kvedariene, V.; Lambrecht, B.; Lau, S.; Laune, D.; Le, L. T. T.; Lieberman, P.; Lipworth, B.; Li, Jiuyi; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; Lupinek, C.; MacNee, W.; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; Mahboub, B.; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; Marshall, G. D.; Masjedi, M. R.; Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mercier, J.; Merk, H.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Mohammad, Y.; Momas, I.; Mosges, R.; Muraro, A.; Namazova-Baranova, L.; Nadif, R.; Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; Nieto, A.; Niggemann, B.; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; Nyembue, T. D.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; Ouedraogo, S.; Paggiaro, P.; Pali-Schoell, I.; Palkonen, S.; Panzner, P.; Papi, A.; Park, H. S.; Passalacqua, G.; Pedersen, S.; Pereira, A. M.; Pfaar, O.; Picard, R.; Pigearias, B.; Pin, I.; Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; Popov, T. A.; Portejoie, F.; Postma, D.; Poulsen, L. K.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Raciborski, F.; Roberts, G.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Rolland, C.; Roman-Rodriguez, Miguel; Romano, A.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Rosario, N.; Rottem, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; Scadding, G. K.; Scichilone, N.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Serrano, E.; Shields, M.; Siroux, V.; Sisul, J. C.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sole, D.; Sooronbaev, T.; Spranger, O.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Strandberg, T.; Sunyer, J.; Thijs, C.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A.; van Eerd, M.; van Ganse, E.; van Hague, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Varona, L. L.; Vellas, B.; Vezzani, G.; Vazankari, T.; Viegi, G.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagenmann, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U.; Werfel, T.; Whalley, B.; Williams, D. M.; Williams, Sian; Wilson, N.; Wright, J.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zaidi, A.; Zar, H. J.; Zernotti, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to develop

  2. ARIA 2016: Care pathways implementing emerging technologies for predictive medicine in rhinitis and asthma across the life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bousquet (Jean); P.W. Hellings (P.); I. Agache; A. Bedbrook (A.); C. Bachert (Claus); K.-C. Bergmann (Karl-Christian); Bewick, M.; C. Bindslev-Jensen; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S.; Bucca, C.; Caimmi, D.P.; P. Camargos; G. Canonica (Gwalter); T.B. Casale (Thomas); N.H. Chavannes (Nicolas); A.A. Cruz; De Carlo, G.; R. Dahl; P. Demoly; Devillier, P.; J. Fonseca; W.J. Fokkens (Wytske); Guldemond, N.A.; T. Haahtela; Illario, M.; P.M. Just; M. Keil (Mark); L. Klimek (Ludger); P. Kuna; D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); M. Morais-Almeida; Mullol, J.; Murray, R.; R. Naclerio; R.E. O'hehir; N. Papadopoulos; R. Pawankar (Ruby); Potter, P.; D. Ryan (Dermot); Samolinski, B.; H.J. Schünemann (Holger); A. Sheikh (Aziz); F.E.R. Simons; Stellato, C.; A. Todo Bom; Tomazic, P.V.; A. Valiulis (Arunas); E. Valovirta (Erkka); Ventura, M.T.; M. Wickman (Magnus); Young, I.; A. Yorgancioglu; T. Zuberbier (Torsten); W. Aberer (W.); C.A. Akdis; C.A. Akdis; I. Annesi-Maesano; Ankri, J.; I.J. Ansotegui (I.); J.M. Antó (Josep M.); Arnavielhe, S.; Asarnoj, A.; Arshad, H.; Avolio, F.; I. Baiardini (Ilaria); Barbara, C.; Barbagallo, M.; E.D. Bateman (Eric); B. Beghe; E.H. Bel; K.S. Bennoor (K.); Benson, M.; Białoszewski, A.Z.; T. Bieber (Thomas); L. Bjermer (Leif); Blain, H.; F. Blasi (Francesco); A.L. Boner; M. Bonini (Matteo); S. Bonini (Sergio); Bosse, I.; J. Bouchard (Jacques); L.P. Boulet; Bourret, R.; J. Bousquet (Jean); F. Braido (Fulvio); A. Briggs (Andrew); C.E. Brightling (C.); J. Brozek; Buhl, R.; Bunu, C.; Burte, E.; A. Bush (Andrew); Caballero-Fonseca, F.; M. Calderon (Moises); Camuzat, T.; D. Cardona (Doris); Carreiro-Martins, P.; Carriazo, A.M.; K.H. Carlsen (Karin); W.W. Carr (Warner); Cepeda Sarabia, A.M.; Cesari, M.; L. Chatzi (Leda); Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chkhartishvili, E.; A.G. Chuchalin; Chung, K.F.; G. Ciprandi (G.); De Sousa, J.C. (J. Correia); L. Cox (Linda); Crooks, G.; A. Custovic; S.E. Dahlen; U. Darsow (U.); Dedeu, T.; D. Deleanu (D.); J. Denburg; De Vries, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A.T.; D. Dokic (D.); H. Douagui; Dray, G.; R. Dubakiene (R.); S.R. Durham (Stephen); G. Du Toit (George); Dykewicz, M.S.; Eklund, P.; Y. El-Gamal (Y.); Ellers, E.; R. Emuzyte; Farrell, J.; A. Fink-Wagner (A.); A. Fiocchi (Alessandro); M. Fletcher (M.); Forastiere, F.; M. Gaga (Mina); A. Gamkrelidze (Amiran); Gemicioǧlu, B.; J.E. Gereda (J.); Van Wick, R.G. (R. Gerth); S. González Diaz (S.); Grisle, I.; L. Grouse; Gutter, Z.; M.A. Guzmán (M.); B. Hellquist-Dahl (B.); J. Heinrich (Joachim); Horak, F.; J.O.B. Hourihane; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jares, E.J.; Jeandel, C.; S.L. Johnston; G.F. Joos (Guy); Jonquet, O.; Jung, K.S.; M. Jutel (M.); Kaidashev, I.; Khaitov, M.; O. Kalayci; A.F. Kalyoncu (A.); Kardas, P.; P.K. Keith; M. Kerkhof (Marjan); H.A.M. Kerstjens (Huib); N. Khaltaev; M. Kogevinas (Manolis); Kolek, V.; G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); M.L. Kowalski; Kuitunen, M.; C.A. Kull (Christian); V. Kvedariene (V.); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); S. Lau (Susanne); Laune, D.; L.T. Le; A.P. Lieberman (Andrew); B. Lipworth; J. Li (J.); K.C. Lødrup Carlsen (K. C.); R. Louis (Renaud); Lupinek, C.; W. MacNee; Magar, Y.; Magnan, A.; B. Mahboub; Maier, D.; Majer, I.; Malva, J.; Manning, P.; De Manuel Keenoy, E.; G.D. Marshall; M.R. Masjedi (M.); Mathieu-Dupas, E.; Maurer, M.; S. Mavale-Manuel; E. Melén (Erik); Melo-Gomes, E.; E.O. Meltzer; Mercier, J.; J. Merk (Jeroen); Miculinic, N.; F. Mihaltan (F.); B. Milenkovic (Branislava); Millot-Keurinck, J.; Y. Mohammad; I. Momas (I.); R. Mösges; Muraro, A.; L. Namazova-Baranova (L.); R. Nadif (Rachel); Neffen, H.; Nekam, K.; A. Nieto (Antonio); B. Niggemann; Nogueira-Silva, L.; Nogues, M.; T.D. Nyembue (T.); K. Ohta; Y. Okamoto; Okubo, K.; Olive-Elias, M.; S. Ouedraogo; P. Paggiaro (Pierluigi); I. Pali-Schöll (I.); S. Palkonen; P. Panzner (P.); Papi, A.; Park, H.S.; G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); S.E. Pedersen (Soren E.); Pereira, A.M.; O. Pfaar (Oliver); Picard, R.; B. Pigearias (B.); I. Pin (Isabelle); Plavec, D.; Pohl, W.; T.A. Popov; Portejoie, F.; D.S. Postma (Dirkje); L.K. Poulsen; D. Price (David); K.F. Rabe (Klaus F.); Raciborski, F.; G. Roberts; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Rodenas, F.; L. Rodríguez-Mañas (Leocadio); Rolland, C.; M. Roman Rodriguez (M.); A. Romano; J. Rosado-Pinto; K. Rosario (Karyna); Rottem, M.; M. Sanchez-Borges; Sastre-Dominguez, J.; G.K. Scadding; Scichilone, N.; P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); Serrano, E.; M.D. Shields; V. Siroux (V.); J.C. Sisul (J.); Skrindo, I.; H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); D. Solé (D.); Sooronbaev, T.; O. Spranger; Stelmach, R.; P.J. Sterk (Peter); Strandberg, T.; J. Sunyer (Jordi); C. Thijs (Carel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative commenced during a World Health Organization workshop in 1999. The initial goals were (1) to propose a new allergic rhinitis classification, (2) to promote the concept of multi-morbidity in asthma and rhinitis and (3) to

  3. [Epidemiologic aspects of bronchial asthma in the Mexican Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S; Salas-Ramírez, M; Segura-Méndez, N H

    1995-01-01

    This work was done to determine the mortality and morbidity rates secondary to asthma in Mexico, for age, gender, state of the country and time. Data were obtained from the Instituto Nacional de Estadística. Geografía e Informática. We calculated morbidity and mortality rates adjusting for age, by a direct method. In the results, there was a reduction in mortality rate in both genders, from 1960 to 1987. Age groups up to 4 years and older than 50 were the mainly affected. From 1960 to the present time, the state with highest mortality is Tlaxcala. The states with highest hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango and Tamaulipas. In conclusion, mortality rates secondary to asthma in Mexico show a decreasing trend, with a considerable rise in morbidity, especially in the adolescent group.

  4. Asthma control cost-utility randomized trial evaluation (ACCURATE: the goals of asthma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honkoop Persijn J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the availability of effective therapies, asthma remains a source of significant morbidity and use of health care resources. The central research question of the ACCURATE trial is whether maximal doses of (combination therapy should be used for long periods in an attempt to achieve complete control of all features of asthma. An additional question is whether patients and society value the potential incremental benefit, if any, sufficiently to concur with such a treatment approach. We assessed patient preferences and cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies aimed at achieving different levels of clinical control: 1. sufficiently controlled asthma 2. strictly controlled asthma 3. strictly controlled asthma based on exhaled nitric oxide as an additional disease marker Design 720 Patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma from general practices with a practice nurse, age 18-50 yr, daily treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (more then 3 months usage of inhaled corticosteroids in the previous year, will be identified via patient registries of general practices in the Leiden, Nijmegen, and Amsterdam areas in The Netherlands. The design is a 12-month cluster-randomised parallel trial with 40 general practices in each of the three arms. The patients will visit the general practice at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At each planned and unplanned visit to the general practice treatment will be adjusted with support of an internet-based asthma monitoring system supervised by a central coordinating specialist nurse. Patient preferences and utilities will be assessed by questionnaire and interview. Data on asthma control, treatment step, adherence to treatment, utilities and costs will be obtained every 3 months and at each unplanned visit. Differences in societal costs (medication, other (health care and productivity will be compared to differences in the number of limited activity days and in quality adjusted

  5. Nutrition and Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the asthma prevalence in many countries over the recent decades, highlights the need for a greater understanding of the risk factors for asthma. Be-cause asthma is the result of interaction between genetic and environmental fac-tors, increasing prevalence is certainly the result of changes in environmental fac-tors because of process of wesernization. That is the reason for higher prevalence in countries where a traditional to a westernized lifestyle occurred earlier. This increasing prevalence has affected both rural and urban communities, suggesting that local environmental factors such as exposure to allergens or industrial air pol-lutions are not the sole cause. In the last few years, nutrition has represented an important conditioning factor of many cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and chronic pulmonary diseases. So it has been hypothesized that dietary constituents influence the immune system and thus, may also be actively involved in the onset of asthma and other allergic diseases. Dietary constituents can play beneficial as well as det-rimental role in asthma. The possible role of diet in the development of asthma can be described as follows: first, a food allergen can cause asthma. Second, there is role of breast-feeding for prevention of asthma later in life. Third, a low intake of antioxidative dietary constituents might be a risk factor for asthma. Moreover, role of cations such as sodium, potassium and magnesium has been described in development of asthma. Finally, intake of fatty acids specially the role of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids play important role in cause of asthma.

  6. [Prevalence of asthma and determination of symptoms as risk indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Hernández, Eleazar; Medina-Ávalos, Miguel Alejandro; Barnica-Alvarado, Raúl Humberto; Soto-Candia, Diego; Guerrero-Venegas, Rosario; Zecua-Nájera, Yahvéh

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease whose prevalence has increased, especially in developed countries; the results of studies of asthma prevalence vary in different populations and even within the same country; in Mexico we observed fluctuations in prevalence of asthma from 7% to 33%. To determine the prevalence of asthma and severity of symptoms as risk indicators in school population in cities in various states of Mexico. A descriptive study of detection of asthma prevalence and analytical-comparative observational study of determination of symptoms of asthma. The surveys were applied to preschool, elementary, middle and high school population, in the cities of Puebla, Puebla; Tulancingo, Hidalgo; Tlaxcala, Tlaxcala, and Cancún, Quintana Roo; new validated questionnaire was used as instrument: Asthma Diagnostic Questionnaire for Epidemiologic Studies, consisting of eight questions with summation value for diagnosis. 8,754 surveys showed a 14% prevalence in Puebla, 17% in Tulancingo, 7% in Tlaxcala, and 14% in Cancún; average in four cities surveyed was 13%; the strength of association with asthma symptoms in descending order with significant odds ratio were: recurrent wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, recurrent cough, cough cold, recurrent cold symptoms, predominantly nocturnal cough, cough that increases with exercise. The average prevalence of asthma in the surveyed cities was 13% and the main symptoms indicators of risk of asthma in school children were: recurrent wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and recurrent cough.

  7. Savings associated with high-dose hypoallergenic house dust mite immunotherapy in rhinitis and/or asthma patients in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Robaina JC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available José Carlos García Robaina,1 Carlos Polanco Sánchez,2 Elvira Estella Pérez,2 1Allergy Department, University Hospital Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 2Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Corporate Affairs, Merck S.L., Madrid, Spain Objectives: To quantify the cost difference between conventional symptomatic treatment of mite allergy and specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT. Methods: Observational, retrospective, and multicenter study was carried out in Spain in 2013. The medical records of 419 patients diagnosed with rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma for mite allergy were retrieved. Mean age was 24.9 years (standard deviation 14.4. The use of symptomatic medication (rescue and daily, diagnostic tests, unscheduled medical care, and sick leave days associated with SCIT treatment versus no-SCIT treatment was compared. Also measured was the SCIT treatment to no-SCIT treatment costs ratio: used resources (symptomatic medication, unscheduled medical care, diagnostic tests, and 3 years SCIT treatment and sick leave days were quantified in euros. Efficacy (decreased resource usage of first-year treatment was assumed during the remaining 2 years and also during the 3-year follow-up period. Results: After a single year of SCIT, all quantified resources diminished significantly (P<0.05 from baseline. Estimated reduction in cost items included hospital resources (100% in hospitalizations, 82% in visits to the allergist, and 79% in emergency room visits, therapies (56% in rescue medication and 63% in daily medication, diagnostic tests (77%, and sick leave days (94%. Ratio of comparative calculation described as SCIT treatment versus non-SCIT treatment (or conventional symptomatic treatment is 0.8. Conclusion: Direct costs are reduced by 64% and indirect costs by 94%. SCIT of hypoallergenic preparation of dust mite (Acaroid® allows cost savings versus conventional treatment. Estimated savings for the public National Health

  8. Analysis of epidemiological investigation and prevention of childhood asthma%儿童哮喘流行病学及防治现状探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the epidemiology, distribution feature and influencing factors of asthma in order to provide epidemiology evidence for asthma management. Methods 5600 children aged 0~14 years old with bronchial asthma in Laiwu City were investigated in order to explore the risk factors of childhood asthma. Results: The incidence rate of asthma was 4.4%. The incidence rate in male was obviously higher than that of female.The first age of onset of asthma before 3 yeas old was 61.8%.With multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that 11 risk factors for children asthma included premature birth, cesarean section,a family history of allergy, et al. Breastfeeding is the protective factor. Conclusion: The morbidity rate of asthma in Laiwu City is relatively high. We must control and correct the risk factors of children asthma,which has great significance to prevent and control childhood asthma.%目的:对儿童哮喘的患病情况及其相关影响因素进行流行病学调查,为儿童哮喘的防治策略提供依据。方法:对莱芜市5600名0~14岁的儿童进行儿童哮喘的流行病学调查,分析疾病发生的危险因素。结果:儿童哮喘的患病率为4.4%;其中男孩患病率高于女孩;在哮喘患儿中,首次发病以3岁以内为最多(61.8%);经多因素 Logistic 回归分析,儿童哮喘发病的危险因素有剖宫产,早产,家族过敏史等11个因素,而母乳喂养为哮喘的保护因素。结论:莱芜市儿童哮喘的发病率较高,积极控制发生儿童哮喘的相关危险因素,对儿童哮喘防治有重要意义。

  9. Use motion games in exercise with children with bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Polkovnyk-Markova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze the possibility of using moving games in the rehabilitation of children with bronchial asthma. Material & Methods: the modern scientific literature on integrated prevention and treatment of children with asthma. Results: A high frequency of morphological and functional deviations at children with asthma. Classification and examples of mobile games, which can be used for this group of children. Conclusions: the results of modern research that show the effectiveness the use of physical rehabilitation, including moving games.

  10. Leveraging Mobile Technology in a School-Based Participatory Asthma Intervention: Findings from the Student Media-Based Asthma Research Team (SMART) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher M.; Dyer, Ashley; Blumenstock, Jesse; Gupta, Ruchi S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asthma places a heavy burden on Chicago's schoolchildren, particularly in low-income, minority communities. Recently, our group developed a 10-week afterschool program, the Student Asthma Research Team (START), which successfully engaged high school youth in a Photovoice investigation of factors impacting their asthma at school and in…

  11. Impact of Goal Setting and Goal Attainment Methods on Asthma Outcomes: Findings From an Asthma Self-Management Intervention for African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Micah; Nelson, Belinda W.; Kaltsas, Elena; Brown, Randall W.; Thomas, Lara J.; Patel, Minal R.

    2017-01-01

    Optimal use of goal-setting strategies in self-management efforts with high-risk individuals with asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to describe factors associated with goal attainment in an asthma self-management intervention for African American women with asthma and determine whether goal attainment methods proved beneficial to…

  12. Impact of Goal Setting and Goal Attainment Methods on Asthma Outcomes: Findings From an Asthma Self-Management Intervention for African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Micah; Nelson, Belinda W.; Kaltsas, Elena; Brown, Randall W.; Thomas, Lara J.; Patel, Minal R.

    2017-01-01

    Optimal use of goal-setting strategies in self-management efforts with high-risk individuals with asthma is not well understood. This study aimed to describe factors associated with goal attainment in an asthma self-management intervention for African American women with asthma and determine whether goal attainment methods proved beneficial to…

  13. Morbid obesity and tracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B; Lemmens, Harry J M; Brock-Utne, John G; Vierra, Mark; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2002-03-01

    The tracheas of obese patients may be more difficult to intubate than those of normal-weight patients. We studied 100 morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40 kg/m(2)) to identify which factors complicate direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Preoperative measurements (height, weight, neck circumference, width of mouth opening, sternomental distance, and thyromental distance) and Mallampati score were recorded. The view during direct laryngoscopy was graded, and the number of attempts at tracheal intubation was recorded. Neither absolute obesity nor body mass index was associated with intubation difficulties. Large neck circumference and high Mallampati score were the only predictors of potential intubation problems. Because in all but one patient the trachea was intubated successfully by direct laryngoscopy, the neck circumference that requires an intervention such as fiberoptic bronchoscopy to establish an airway remains unknown. We conclude that obesity alone is not predictive of tracheal intubation difficulties. In 100 morbidly obese patients, neither obesity nor body mass index predicted problems with tracheal intubation. However, a high Mallampati score (greater-than-or-equal to 3) and large neck circumference may increase the potential for difficult laryngoscopy and intubation.

  14. Undiagnosed asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gent, R.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic disease in childhood. To study the actual prevalence and impact of undiagnosed childhood asthma in daily life (i.e. quality of life, participation in physical and school activities) we performed a survey in schoolchildren (aged 7-10 years) in the southern part of

  15. Asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Attanasi, Marina

    2016-03-01

    Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  16. Asthma in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Maria de Benedictis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  17. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.25 million of those individuals have severe asthma, a condition that can be difficult to control and treat. Learn more about his research by visiting the NHLBI Laboratory of Asthma and Lung Inflammation website: http://www.nhlbi.nih. ...

  18. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this ... t have to get in the way of travel fun. Let's find out how to be prepared ...

  19. Asthma Medicines: Quick Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Allergies & Asthma > Asthma Medicines: Quick ...

  20. Asthma in goldminers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -term and fy this stered, cturnal hort-. Asthma in goldminers. Robert L Cowie, Salmon K. Mabena. Objectives. ... family history of asthma were compared in the two groups. The age of onset ... mines, and the disease had developed 13.4 ± 8.22 years ..... Chan-Yeung M, lam S, Koener S. Clinical features and natural history of.

  1. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...

  2. Obesity, low levels of physical activity and smoking present opportunities for primary care asthma interventions: an analysis of baseline data from The Asthma Tools Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Rank, Matthew A; Bertram, Susan L; Wollan, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Asthma prevalence, severity and outcomes are associated with various patient characteristics and lifestyle choices. To identify potentially modifiable factors associated with poor asthma outcomes among US primary care patients. Using baseline data from the Asthma Tools Study, we calculated cross-sectional frequencies of activity levels, smoking, secondhand smoke exposure and the presence of obesity, as well as rates of out-of-control asthma and asthma exacerbations. Frequencies were stratified by sex, and into three age groups: 5-11 years, 12-18 years and 19 years and older. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with each of the asthma outcomes. In the 901 individuals enrolled in this asthma study, tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, low activity levels, poverty, inadequately controlled asthma and high asthma-related health-care utilisation were common. Across all age groups, obesity was associated with poorer asthma outcomes: either poor asthma control (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.7 in 5- to 11-year-olds and OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.2 in adults) or asthma exacerbations (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.1 in 12- to 18-year-olds and OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.5 in adults). Among adults, smoking was associated with both measures of poorer asthma outcomes; inadequate asthma control (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.5-3.5), and asthma exacerbations (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6), and low physical activity were associated with poor asthma control (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.2). Obesity, low levels of physical activity and smoking are common, and they are associated with poor asthma outcomes in a sample of primary care patients, suggesting important targets for intervention.

  3. NAC Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (NACMAAS): risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, B M; Custovic, A; Simpson, A; Hallam, C L; Walsh, D; Marolia, H; Campbell, J; Woodcock, A

    2001-03-01

    Asthma and atopic disorders are the most common chronic diseases in the developed countries. Knowledge of the risk factors for these disorders may facilitate the development of preventive strategies aimed at reducing prevalence rates. To investigate the risk factors for asthma and allergic diseases in a large number of adults who are the parents of children in the National Asthma Campaign Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study. All pregnant women and their partners attending "Booking" antenatal clinics were invited to take part in the study. Questionnaire data were collected including the history of asthma and other atopic diseases, pet ownership and smoking habits, and skin prick tests were performed. The prevalence of atopy and the risk factors for asthma and allergic disorders were investigated in all subjects who completed the questionnaire and underwent skin testing. Statistical analysis was carried out using logistic regression. Initially, risk factors were assessed by univariate analysis to see how each potential explanatory variable affected the probability of having allergic disease. Variables were then tested in a forward stepwise multivariate analysis. In 5687 adult subjects there was a very high (48.2%) prevalence of atopy, and 9.7% of subjects had a diagnosis of asthma. In a multivariate regression analysis sensitization to dust mite, cat, dog and mixed grasses were all independently associated with asthma. The odds ratios for current asthma increased with the increasing number of positive skin tests (any two allergens - OR 4.3, 95% CI 3.3-5.5; any three allergens - OR 7.0 95% CI 5.3-9.3; all four allergens - OR 10.4, 95% CI 7.7-14; P Dog ownership (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.57; P = 0.003) and current smoking (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.15-1.62; P = 0.0004) were significantly and directly associated with "asthma ever". Thirteen per cent of participants reported a history of eczema. In the multivariate analysis the strongest independent associate of eczema was

  4. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  5. Morbilidad en los servicios primarios de urgencias Morbidity in the emergency primary services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz Novás

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio observacional, descriptivo y retrospectivo sobre la morbilidad en los servicios de urgencias del Policlínico "Lawton", durante el año 2005. Encontramos una elevada asistencia de los pacientes a los servicios de urgencias, sobre todo, las mujeres. El chequeo de la presión arterial, las infecciones respiratorias agudas, las crisis de asma, la hipertensión arterial y las enfermedades diarreicas agudas, constituyeron las principales causas de consulta por ese orden. Las causas más frecuentes de observación estuvieron representadas por las crisis de asma, las hipertensivas y el dolor precordial.An observational, descriptive and retrospective study was conducted on morbidity in the emergency services of "Lawton" Polyclinic during 2005. A high attendance of the patients to the emergency services, mainly among females, was found. The arterial pressure check-up, the acute respiratory infections, asthma, arterial hypertension and acute diarrheal diseases were the main causes of their visits. The most frequent causes of observation were represented by asthma, hypertensive crises, and precordial pain.

  6. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... studies have added new information about the effects of poorly controlled asthma on a range of important, but less studied outcomes, including risk of obesity, daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, stress, concentration and focused attention, learning disabilities and risk of depression. From...... these studies it seems that poor asthma control may have a greater impact on the child than previously thought. This may have important long-term consequences for the child such as an increased risk of life-style associated diseases and poorer school performance. The level of control seems to be the most...

  7. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is increasing of an association between asthma and aspects of female reproduction. However, current knowledge is limited and furthermore relies on questionnaire studies or small populations. In a prospective observational cohort study to investigate whether time to pregnancy, the number...... of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...

  8. [Distinguishing asthma from COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Kouhei; Samukawa, Takuya; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway narrowing with reversibility, and hyperresponsiveness of airways. COPD has been associated with smoking and exposure to environmental fumes, which typically characterized by persistent airflow limitation and chronic inflammation of the airways. These differences are most apparent when young non-smoker with asthma and older smokers with COPD are compared. However, it would be difficult to differentiate asthma from COPD, especially in elderly who currently smoke or have a significant history of smoking. Furthermore, some patients exhibit characteristics of both diseases, this may represent a phenotype known as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Therefore, the precise understanding of these diseases is important.

  9. The effectiveness of school-based family asthma educational programs on the quality of life and number of asthma exacerbations of children aged five to 18 years diagnosed with asthma: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Helen; Sadeque-Iqbal, Fatema; Ulysse, Rose; Castillo, Doreen; Fitzpatrick, Aileen; Singleton, Joanne

    2015-10-01

    child is able to manage symptoms of the disease and lead a normal healthy life. Caregiver refers to the primary person who takes care of a child with asthma. Family refers to the caregiver and the child.According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), epidemiologists and clinical researchers concur that the burden of asthma is higher among children compared to adults. Asthma prevalence in children varies within and across countries. Asthma disparities also exist along ethnic and racial lines. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) quantified the prevalence of asthma symptoms of children from around the world. In the United States, non-Hispanic Black and Puerto Rican children have higher asthma prevalence compared to Caucasian children. Children from the Ivory Coast, Costa Rica and Wales have higher asthma prevalence compared to children from Kenya, Brazil and England respectively. Indigenous Australians, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian children have a higher prevalence of asthma compared to non-Indigenous Australian children. The international prevalence of asthma prompted governments and communities to create initiatives and strategies to address this public health issue.The global burden of asthma led to the development of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Formed in 1993, in collaboration with theNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, United States of America and the WHO, GINA's goals include working with healthcare providers and public health officials worldwide to reduce asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality. In an effort to increase public awareness of the global burden of asthma, GINA created World Asthma Day, which is held annually on the first Tuesday in May. The burden of asthma in the United States fostered the creation of the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP). This program is designed to raise awareness about

  10. The role of ozone exposure in the epidemiology of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmes, J.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Asthma is a clinical condition characterized by intermittent respiratory symptoms, nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness, and reversible airway obstruction. Although the pathogenesis of asthma is incompletely understood, it is clear that airway inflammation is a paramount feature of the condition. Because inhalation of ozone by normal, healthy subjects causes increased airway responsiveness and inflammation, it is somewhat surprising that most controlled human exposure studies that have involved asthmatic subjects have not shown them to be especially sensitive to ozone. The acute decrement in lung function that is the end point traditionally used to define sensitivity to ozone in these studies may be due more to neuromuscular mechanisms limiting deep inspiration than to bronchoconstriction. The frequency of asthma attacks following ozone exposures may be a more relevant end point. Epidemiologic studies, rather than controlled human exposure studies, are required to determine whether ozone pollution increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Asthma affects approximately 10 million people in the United States and, thus, the answer to this question is of considerable public health importance. Both the prevalence and severity of asthma appear to be increasing in many countries. Although increased asthma morbidity and mortality are probably of multifactorial etiology, a contributory role of urban air pollution is plausible. The epidemiologic database to support an association between asthma and ozone exposure is limited, but the results of several studies suggest such an association. Some potential approaches to further investigation of the relationship between asthma and ozone, including those that would link controlled human exposures to population-based studies, are considered. 57 refs.

  11. Novel genetic risk factors for asthma in African American children: Precision Medicine and the SAGE II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M J; Risse-Adams, O; Goddard, P; Contreras, M G; Adams, J; Hu, D; Eng, C; Oh, S S; Davis, A; Meade, K; Brigino-Buenaventura, E; LeNoir, M A; Bibbins-Domingo, K; Pino-Yanes, M; Burchard, E

    2016-07-01

    Asthma, an inflammatory disorder of the airways, is the most common chronic disease of children worldwide. There are significant racial/ethnic disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity, and mortality among US children. This trend is mirrored in obesity, which may share genetic and environmental risk factors with asthma. The majority of asthma biomedical research has been performed in populations of European decent. We sought to identify genetic risk factors for asthma in African American children. We also assessed the generalizability of genetic variants associated with asthma in European and Asian populations to African American children. Our study population consisted of 1227 (812 asthma cases, 415 controls) African American children with genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Logistic regression was used to identify associations between SNP genotype and asthma status. We identified a novel variant in the PTCHD3 gene that is significantly associated with asthma (rs660498, p = 2.2 × 10(-7)) independent of obesity status. Approximately 5 % of previously reported asthma genetic associations identified in European populations replicated in African Americans. Our identification of novel variants associated with asthma in African American children, coupled with our inability to replicate the majority of findings reported in European Americans, underscores the necessity for including diverse populations in biomedical studies of asthma.

  12. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  13. Sodium cromoglycate in nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    To investigate whether mast cell degranulation was important in producing nocturnal asthma, the effect of a single high dose of nebulised sodium cromoglycate on overnight bronchoconstriction, oxygen saturation, and breathing patterns in eight patients with nocturnal wheeze was examined. The study took the form of a double blind placebo controlled crossover comparison. Treatment with cromoglycate did not reduce the overnight fall in FEV1 or FVC, although it was associated with improved nocturn...

  14. Factors associated with asthma control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.P. de; Bemt, E.A.J.M. van den; Lince, S.; Muris, J.W.M.; Thoonen, B.P.A.; Schayck, C.P. van

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate which factors are associated with asthma control experienced by asthma patients. In a cross-sectional study patients aged 16-60 years with mild to moderate asthma were selected. The influence of the following factors on asthma control was studied in a multivaria

  15. Asthma control: Patient and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, L.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Control of asthma, the goal of asthma treatment, seems hard to obtain. However, it is largely unknown why control of asthma remains difficult in many patients in spite of available powerful medication. In this thesis we studied non-pharmacological factors influencing asthma control: patient related

  16. Comparing high altitude treatment with current best care in Dutch children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (and asthma): study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (DAVOS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Karin B; Zijlstra, Wieneke T; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Meijer, Yolanda; Venema, Monica Uniken; Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, Lous; l'Hoir, Monique P; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2014-03-26

    About 10 to 20% of children in West European countries have atopic dermatitis (AD), often as part of the atopic syndrome. The full atopic syndrome also consists of allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Treatment approaches for atopic dermatitis and asthma include intermittent anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids, health education and self-management training. However, symptoms persist in a subgroup of patients. Several observational studies have shown significant improvement in clinical symptoms in children and adults with atopic dermatitis or asthma after treatment at high altitude, but evidence on the efficacy when compared to treatment at sea level is still lacking. This study is a pragmatic randomized controlled trial for children with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome. Patients are eligible for enrolment in the study if they are: diagnosed with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome, aged between 8 and 18 years, fluent in the Dutch language, have internet access at home, able to use the digital patient system Digital Eczema Center Utrecht (DECU), willing and able to stay in Davos for a six week treatment period. All data are collected at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and DECU. Patients are randomized over two groups. The first group receives multidisciplinary inpatient treatment during six weeks at the Dutch Asthma Center in Davos, Switzerland. The second group receives multidisciplinary treatment during six weeks at the outpatient clinic of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The trial is not conducted as a blind trial. The trial is designed with three components: psychosocial, clinical and translational. Primary outcomes are coping with itch, quality of life and disease activity. Secondary outcomes include asthma control, medication use, parental quality of life, social and emotional wellbeing of the child and translational parameters. The results of this trial will provide

  17. Long-term maintenance of pediatric asthma: focus on budesonide/formoterol inhalation aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Huynh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Peter N Huynh1, Lyne G Scott1, Kenny YC Kwong21Division of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles County, University of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Division of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USAAbstract: Current national and international asthma guidelines recommend treatment of children with asthma towards achieving and maintaining asthma control. These guidelines provide more stringent recommendations to increase therapy for patients with uncontrolled asthma in order to reduce asthma-related morbidity and mortality. Newer combination agents such as budesonide and formoterol have been shown to be safe and effective in treatment of asthma in children. Use of long-term controller agents like this in combination with improved compliance and treatment of co-morbid conditions have been successful in this endeavor. This review discusses control of pediatric asthma with focus on the use of budesonide in combination with formoterol.Keywords: asthma, control, children, budesonide, formoterol, long-term

  18. Occupational Asthma in a Cable Manufacturing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Dehghan, Faezeh; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Mohammadi, Saber; Golchin, Mahdie; Sadeghi, Zargham; Moafi, Masoud; Seyed Mehdi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the past decade, incidence of asthma has increased, which might have been due to environmental exposures. Objectives: Considering the expansion of cable manufacturing industry in Iran, the present study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of occupational asthma in a cable manufacturing company in Iran as well as its related factors. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on employees of a cable manufacturing company in Yazd, Iran, in 2012. The workers were divided into two groups of exposure (to toluene diisocyanate, polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene or polypropylene) and without exposure. Diagnosis of occupational asthma was made based on the subjects’ medical history, spirometry and peak flowmetry, and its frequency was compared between the two groups. Results: The overall prevalence of occupational asthma was 9.7%. This rate was 13.8% in the exposed group. Logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjustment for confounding factors, a significant correlation existed between the frequency of occupational asthma and exposure to the produced dust particles (P < 0.05). In addition, age, work experience, body mass index, cigarette smoking and shift work had significant correlations with the prevalence of occupational asthma (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of occupational asthma among cable manufacturing company workers in Iran, this issue needs to be addressed immediately in addition to reduction of exposure among subjects. Reduction in work shift duration, implementation of tobacco control and cessation programs for the personnel, and performing spirometry tests and respiratory examinations in shorter periods may be among effective measures for reducing the incidence of occupational asthma in this industry. PMID:25558389

  19. The influence of leptin on Th1/Th2 balance in obese children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In individuals with asthma, obesity induces the production of leptin and is associated with disease severity. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of serum leptin and their effect on Th1/Th2 balance in obese and non-obese children with asthma, as well as to investigate the association between serum leptin levels and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We evaluated 50 atopic children with physician-diagnosed moderate-to-severe persistent asthma and 20 controls. The children with asthma were divided into two groups, by body mass index percentile: obese (n = 25 and non-obese (n = 25. From all subjects, we collected peripheral blood samples in order to determine the levels of leptin, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Asthma severity was assessed by an asthma symptom score, and the results were correlated with the parameters studied. RESULTS: Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group, as well as being significantly higher in the children with asthma than in the controls, whereas IFN-γ levels were significantly higher and IL-4 levels were significantly lower in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group. In addition, the obese asthma group showed higher asthma symptom scores and significantly lower FEV1 (% of predicted than did the non-obese asthma group. There was a significant positive correlation between leptin and IFN-γ levels only in the obese asthma group. CONCLUSIONS: Although leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma in obese and non-obese children, its effect is more pronounced in the former. In the presence of high leptin levels, only obese children with asthma exhibited Th1 polarization, with higher IFN-γ levels and greater asthma severity.

  20. Difficult-to-treat asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alexandra; Saglani, Sejal

    2013-06-01

    Asthma continues to be one of the greatest burdens to healthcare resources throughout the developed world. In most cases, good symptom control can be achieved with low-dose inhaled corticosteroids, and can be cared for in the primary and secondary healthcare systems. However, there is a group in whom control is not achieved despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and maximal add-on therapies; these are children with problematic severe asthma that should be referred to a specialist team for further investigation and management. In this review we aimed to provide an evidence-based guide for pediatricians providing care for children with asthma in secondary healthcare settings. The review focuses on a proposed investigation and management strategy for children aged between 6 and 16 years with problematic severe asthma, and is supported as far as possible by evidence from the literature. We first address recent advances in nomenclature and then discuss our proposed course of investigation and management of these children. Distinction of children with true, severe, therapy-resistant asthma from those with asthma that is difficult to treat because of unaddressed underlying modifiable factors is critical and is discussed in detail.

  1. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Florence; Demarche, Sophie; Louis, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is timeconsuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma.

  2. Current and future biomarkers in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zissler, U M; Esser-von Bieren, J; Jakwerth, C A; Chaker, A M; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis early in life, sensitization, asthma endotypes, monitoring of disease and treatment progression are key motivations for the exploration of biomarkers for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. The number of genes related to allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma increases steadily; however, prognostic genes have not yet entered clinical application. We hypothesize that the combination of multiple genes may generate biomarkers with prognostic potential. The current review attempts to group more than 161 different potential biomarkers involved in respiratory inflammation to pave the way for future classifiers. The potential biomarkers are categorized into either epithelial or infiltrate-derived or mixed origin, epithelial biomarkers. Furthermore, surface markers were grouped into cell-type-specific categories. The current literature provides multiple biomarkers for potential asthma endotypes that are related to T-cell phenotypes such as Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and Tregs and their lead cytokines. Eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma endotypes are also classified by epithelium-derived CCL-26 and osteopontin, respectively. There are currently about 20 epithelium-derived biomarkers exclusively derived from epithelium, which are likely to innovate biomarker panels as they are easy to sample. This article systematically reviews and categorizes genes and collects current evidence that may promote these biomarkers to become part of allergic rhinitis or allergic asthma classifiers with high prognostic value.

  3. Incidence and risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zarqa Ali, Charlotte Suppli UlrikDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases among pregnant women. Acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy have an unfavorable impact on pregnancy outcome. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of incidence, mechanisms, and risk factors for acute exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy.Methods: A narrative literature review was carried out using the PubMed database.Results: During pregnancy, up to 6% of women with asthma are hospitalized for an acute exacerbation. The maternal immune system is characterized by a very high T-helper-2:T-helper-1 cytokine ratio during pregnancy and thereby provides an environment essential for fetal survival but one that may aggravate asthma. Cells of the innate immune system such as monocytes and neutrophils are also increased during pregnancy, and this too can exacerbate maternal asthma. Severe or difficult-to-control asthma appears to be the major risk factor for exacerbations during pregnancy, but studies also suggest that nonadherence with controller medication and viral infections are important triggers of exacerbations during pregnancy. So far, inconsistent findings have been reported regarding the effect of fetal sex on exacerbations during pregnancy. Other risk factors for exacerbation during pregnancy include obesity, ethnicity, and reflux, whereas atopy does not appear to be a risk factor.Discussion: The incidence of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy is disturbingly high. Severe asthma – better described as difficult-to-control asthma – nonadherence with controller therapy, viral infections, obesity, and ethnicity are likely to be important risk factors for exacerbations of asthma during pregnancy, whereas inconsistent findings have been reported with regard to the importance of sex of the fetus.Keywords: acute exacerbations

  4. Savings associated with high-dose hypoallergenic house dust mite immunotherapy in rhinitis and/or asthma patients in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Robaina, José Carlos; Polanco Sánchez, Carlos; Estella Pérez, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the cost difference between conventional symptomatic treatment of mite allergy and specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). Methods Observational, retrospective, and multicenter study was carried out in Spain in 2013. The medical records of 419 patients diagnosed with rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma for mite allergy were retrieved. Mean age was 24.9 years (standard deviation 14.4). The use of symptomatic medication (rescue and daily), diagnostic tests, unscheduled medical care, and sick leave days associated with SCIT treatment versus no-SCIT treatment was compared. Also measured was the SCIT treatment to no-SCIT treatment costs ratio: used resources (symptomatic medication, unscheduled medical care, diagnostic tests, and 3 years SCIT treatment and sick leave days) were quantified in euros. Efficacy (decreased resource usage) of first-year treatment was assumed during the remaining 2 years and also during the 3-year follow-up period. Results After a single year of SCIT, all quantified resources diminished significantly (P<0.05) from baseline. Estimated reduction in cost items included hospital resources (100% in hospitalizations, 82% in visits to the allergist, and 79% in emergency room visits), therapies (56% in rescue medication and 63% in daily medication), diagnostic tests (77%), and sick leave days (94%). Ratio of comparative calculation described as SCIT treatment versus non-SCIT treatment (or conventional symptomatic treatment) is 0.8. Conclusion Direct costs are reduced by 64% and indirect costs by 94%. SCIT of hypoallergenic preparation of dust mite (Acaroid®) allows cost savings versus conventional treatment. Estimated savings for the public National Health System are 5.7 times the cost of immunotherapy. PMID:27366098

  5. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pasthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma.

  6. Low-dose budesonide treatment reduces severe asthma-related events in patients with infrequent asthma symptoms at baseline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, H. K.; Busse, W. W.; Pedersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective in low doses for reducing asthma-related exacerbation risk and mortality. Previously, ICS treatment was recommended for patients with 'persistent' asthma, defined by symptoms >2 days/week.1 However, for patients with less frequent...... symptoms, evidence is lacking for the benefit of ICS and safety of bronchodilator-only treatment. We investigated asthma outcomes by baseline symptom frequency in a post-hoc analysis of the multinational inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in early asthma (START) study.2 METHODS: Patients aged 4...

  7. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  8. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  9. Indications for the use of bronchial thermoplasty in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheda, Keertan; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N; Esmail, Aliasgar; Irusen, Elvis; Wechsler, Michael E; Niven, Rob M; Chung, Kian Fan; Bateman, Eric D

    2015-09-18

    Approximately 5% of the ~3 million asthmatics in South Africa have severe asthma that is associated with substantial morbidity, cost, absenteeism, preventable mortality, and the requirement for costly chronic medication that may be associated with significant adverse events. There is an unmet need for alternative safer and more effective interventions for severe asthma. A recently introduced option, bronchial thermoplasty (BT), imparts radiofrequency-generated heat energy to the airways to cause regression of airway smooth muscle. The effectiveness of this technique has been confirmed in randomised control trials and is now endorsed by several international guidelines, including the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline, the British Asthma Guideline, and the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline. We recommend BT as a potential therapeutic intervention for severe uncontrolled asthma, provided that it is performed by an experienced pulmonologist at an accredited centre and done within the broader context of appropriate management of the disease by doctors experienced in treating difficult-to-control asthma.

  10. Outcome results of a school-based screening program for undertreated asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Scanlon, Paul D; Kurland, Margary

    2003-05-01

    Undertreatment of asthma is associated with significant potentially preventable morbidity, including frequent school absences. Guideline dissemination and clinician education have met with variable success. School-based identification of children with potentially undertreated asthma may provide an alternative strategy for improving asthma management in children. To evaluate the effectiveness of school-based identification of potentially undertreated asthma. A controlled trial of school-based identification of children with known but symptomatic asthma using mailed parent surveys, letters recommending medical follow-up, and medical record review to evaluate changes in asthma treatment after referral. Most parents (79.9%, n = 5,116 respondents) responded to the survey and 19.4% (n = 994) of children were reported to have a physician diagnosis of asthma or reactive airway disease. Letters of referral were sent to 489 children with parent-reported asthma who were identified as having potentially undertreated asthma. Approximately one-third (31.2%, n = 153) of these children had physician visits, and 92 (18.8% of all referred) had documented medication changes. In addition, there were 20 new physician diagnoses in this group of children. In the control group of 604 children with asthma, there were significantly fewer children with asthma-related visits (131, 21.7%, P = 0.0004) and children with medication changes (74, 12.3%, P = 0.002) in a comparable 6-month window. School-based screening or case identification increased the number of physician asthma-related visits and changes in asthma therapy.

  11. Pediatric asthma disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, T R; Chatburn, R L

    2000-03-01

    The prevalence of asthma in children in the United States is estimated at more than 5% of the population, and it has risen more than 40% in the previous decade. Several guidelines for the management of acute and chronic asthma exist, and they all emphasize several basic components including state-of-the-art pharmacologic treatment, trigger avoidance, and patient self-management skills. This Article highlights the necessary components for pediatric asthma disease management to insure a smooth continuum of care across all disciplines and settings.

  12. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice.

  13. Co-morbidity in psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, Lone

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disorder. The disease is associated with several co-morbidities including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. It is important to identify and treat these co-morbidities because they have...... a strongly negative effect on the overall health of patients with psoriasis. Unfortunately, these co-morbidities are often overlooked and/or left untreated. Therefore, the aim of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of how co-morbidities are associated with psoriasis as well as implications...... for the clinic to be able to recognize such co-morbidities. AREAS COVERED: This is a review of studies investigating and discussing co-morbidities of psoriasis and screening. Literature was retrieved by searching on the PubMed database using individual and combined search terms related to relevant co...

  14. Red wine asthma: a controlled challenge study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, R; Henriksen, J M; Harving, H

    1986-12-01

    Drinking red wine may provoke bronchospasm in subjects with asthma. In order to reveal some of the possible agents involved in this reaction, 18 patients with a history of red wine-induced asthma were studied. They received, in a double-blind fashion, red wine with low sulfur dioxide (SO2) and high amine, high SO2 and high amine and low SO2 and low amine content. In each challenge, the wine was administered in stepwise increasing quantities until a total of 385 ml or a fall in peak expiratory flow of greater than 15% was reached. Nine subjects demonstrated a significant fall in peak flow in one or more challenges. In all cases the most severe reaction was observed after the wine with high SO2 content. The study suggests that SO2 is the most important factor in red wine-induced asthma. It is recommended that wine labels provide information on the SO2 content.

  15. [Morbidity and mortality related to gastroenteroanastomosis in advanced gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrospi, F; Ruiz, E; Morante, C; Celis, J; Montalbelti, J A

    1995-01-01

    Determination of the postoperative morbidity and mortality after gastroenterostomy in patients with unresectable gastric cancer. Retrospective review of clinical records of all patients with obstructive distal gastric cancer who underwent gastroenterostomy at the Instituto de Enfermedades Neoplásicas between 1980 and 1993. The following factors were analyzed: age, sex, hemoglobin, albumin, preoperative risk, ascites, extent of disease, operative time, hospital stay, morbidity and mortality. 198 gastroenterostomy were done with a morbidity and mortality rates of 20% and 10%, respectively. Pneumonia was the principal cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. High operative risk, adjacent organ invasion by the tumor and peritoneal metastasis were factors associated with increased postoperative morbidity (p > 0.05). High operative risk was the only prognostic factor for postoperative mortality (p < 0.01). Because of high postoperative morbidity and mortality, gastroenterostomy should not be done in patients with unresectable gastric cancer and high preoperative risk.

  16. Self-Management Behaviors among Older Adults with Asthma: Associations with Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, Alex D.; Wolf, Michael S.; Sofianou, Anastasia; Martynenko, Melissa; O’Connor, Rachel; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Older adults asthmatics experience high rates of morbidity and mortality yet little is known about their self-management behaviors. We examined self-management behaviors, including medication adherence and inhaler technique, among older adults and their association with health literacy. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Primary care and pulmonary specialty practices in two tertiary academic medical centers and three Federally Qualified Health Centers in New York City, NY and Chicago, IL. Participants: Adults with moderate or severe persistent asthma, ages 60 years and older (n=433). Measurements: Outcomes were adherence to asthma controller medications, metered dose inhaler (MDI) and dry powder inhaler (DPI) techniques, having a usual asthma physician, and avoidance of four common triggers. Health literacy was assessed with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Results: The mean age was 67 years and 36% had marginal or low health literacy. Adherence was low (38%) overall and worse among individuals with low health literacy (22% vs. 47%, p<0.0001) and after adjusting for demographic factors and health status (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence [CI] 0.31-0.73). Similarly, inhaler technique was poor: only 38% and 54% had good MDI and DPI technique, respectively. Technique was worse among those with low health literacy (MDI technique: OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.85; DPI technique: OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.71). Asthma self-monitoring and avoidance of triggers occurred infrequently but were less consistently associated with low health literacy. Conclusion: Adherence to medications and inhaler technique are poor among older asthmatics, and worse among those with low health literacy. Clinicians should routinely assess controller medication adherence and inhaler technique, and use low-literacy communication strategies to support self-management in older asthmatics. PMID:24779482

  17. The impact of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in patients with asthma exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Majda Drnovšek Kaljanac

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide measurements (FENO) is accessible, a fast, non- invasive, highly repeatable test for determining eosinophilic airway inflammation.PURPOSEThe objective of this prospective study is to determine the structure of FENO measurements in patients with asthma exacerbation and characteristics of asthma with FENO as a good indicator of asthma exacerbation.METHODSThis study included 92 patients with asthma exacerbation, aged from 17 to 83 years. Patients were ...

  18. Men with asthma since youth : Prognosis, impact of work and effect on work ability

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Irmeli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a significant and increasing health problem among the working aged population and is associated with decreased work ability. The aim was to study the asthma prognosis and the work ability of men with asthma since youth as well as the risk factors for poor asthma outcome and decreased work ability. The current goal to extend careers makes this study highly relevant. We used the Finnish Defence Force registers to select the two different study populations. Initially, in 2007 a po...

  19. Self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and bronchodilator response in African American youth with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Sonia; Borrell, Luisa N.; Eng, Celeste; Nguyen, Myngoc; Thyne, Shannon; LeNoir, Michael A; Burke-Harris, Nadine; Burchard, Esteban G.; Thakur, Neeta

    2017-01-01

    Importance Asthma is a multifactorial disease composed of endotypes with varying risk profiles and outcomes. African Americans experience a high burden of asthma and of psychosocial stress, including racial discrimination. It is unknown which endotypes of asthma are vulnerable to racial/ethnic discrimination. Objective We examined the association between self-reported racial/ethnic discrimination and bronchodilator response (BDR) among African American youth with asthma ages 8 to 21 years (n ...

  20. Evaluation of a pilot national online asthma e-learning program for secondary school students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Ireland has the fourth highest incidence of asthma in the world, with Irish children losing on average 10 days of school per annum due to their asthma. It is highly probable that a large percentage of students in each class in Irish schools have asthma and are required to manage symptoms during the out-of-home period. Young people with chronic illnesses such as asthma find themselves labelled and marginalized due to a lack of awareness of others about their condition.

  1. Applying the Social Ecological Model to Creating Asthma-Friendly Schools in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Henry J.; Hester, Laura L.; Perry, Mark A.; Stewart-Briley, Collette; Reagon, Valamar M.; Collins, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2010, the Louisiana Asthma Management and Prevention Program (LAMP) implemented the Asthma-Friendly Schools Initiative in high-risk Louisiana populations. The social ecological model (SEM) was used as a framework for an asthma program implemented in 70 state K-12 public schools over 2 years. Methods: Activities included a needs…

  2. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective [Astmasymptomen bij jonge kinderen: een volksgezondheids perspectief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafkam-de Groen, E.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high risk of developing asthma. The

  3. Four of a kind: asthma control, FEV1, FeNO, and psychosocial problems in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibosch, M.M.; Ridder, J. de; Landstra, A.; Hugen, C.A.; Brouwer, M.; Gerrits, P.; Gent, R. van; Roukema, J.; Verhaak, C.M.; Merkus, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many adolescents have poor asthma control and are at high risk for psychosocial problems. However, structured assessment of asthma control or psychosocial problems is still not implemented in routine asthma care. Pediatricians typically rely on their clinical view and physiological measu

  4. Asthma Control and Care Among Malaysian Primary School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Azainorsuzila; Ming Khoo, Ee

    2017-07-01

    Children with uncontrolled asthma have high risk of poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess asthma control and care in primary school children with reported asthma. A total of 6441 primary school children were first screened for parent-reported physician-diagnosed asthma and 448 (8.9%) children were reported to have asthma. Of these, 311 (69.4%) parents agreed to participate in assessment of asthma control study using Global Initiative for Asthma 2009 guidelines. Only 161 (51.8%) children were found to have good asthma control, 99 (31.8%) had partly controlled asthma, and 51 (16.4%) had uncontrolled asthma in the past one week. In the past 1 year, 157 (50.5%) children had asthma exacerbations, 21 (6.8%) had hospitalizations, and 104 (33.4%) had received emergency asthma care. Only 108 (34.7%) asthmatic children received regular follow-up care. Controller medications were underutilized (12.2%) compared to reliever medications (35.0%). Asthma control among primary school children was poor indicating suboptimal care.

  5. Fast food consumption counters the protective effect of breastfeeding on asthma in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, X-M; Becker, A B; Liem, J J; Kozyrskyj, A L

    2009-04-01

    Fast food consumption and childhood asthma have rapidly increased in recent decades. During the same period there has been an increased rate of prolonged breastfeeding. To evaluate if fast food consumption was associated with asthma in children, and if the proposed protective effect of breastfeeding on asthma was altered by fast food consumption. This case-control study included 246 children with allergist-diagnosed asthma and 477 non-asthmatic controls at age 8-10 years. Information on fast food consumption and exclusive breastfeeding was obtained from questionnaire data. The association between asthma and fast food consumption was evaluated. Asthma in relation to exclusive breastfeeding was also evaluated, taking into account fast food consumption as a modifying factor. Children with asthma were more likely to consume fast food than children without asthma [crude odds ratio (OR) 1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-2.34]. In comparison to prolonged exclusive breastfeeding (> or =12 weeks), asthma was positively associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (asthma compared with infants who had been exclusively breastfed for a longer time period and who did not become high consumers of fast food in later childhood. These findings were not affected after final adjustment of confounders and covariates. Fast food consumption is associated with asthma in children and potentially counteracts the protective effect of prolonged breastfeeding on asthma. This may explain the paradoxical phenomenon of parallel increased rates of prolonged breastfeeding and asthma in children. 556-561.

  6. Association between common asthma therapies and recurrent asthma exacerbations in children enrolled in a state Medicaid plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Carlos A; Ramachandran, Sulabha; Ryskina, Kira L; Lewis, Barbara Edelman; Legorreta, Antonio P

    2007-05-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of budesonide inhalation suspension relative to other common asthma therapies in a high-risk population, a study was conducted to compare the risk of having a repeat asthma-related hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visit in a Medicaid population of children; the relationship between asthma medication adherence level and repeat asthma hospitalizations or ED visits was also evaluated. Children eight years of age or younger, with a hospitalization or ED visit for asthma between January 1999 and June 2001 (index event), were identified in a Florida Medicaid database. Claims data for each child were examined 12 months before and after the index event. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the risk of subsequent asthma exacerbation according to the asthma medication received during the first 30 days after the index event. Logistic regression was used to model the relationship between medication adherence as measured by the medication possession ratio (MPR) and the likelihood of a subsequent asthma exacerbation. There were 10,976 children in the study. Patients who had a claim for budesonide inhalation suspension had a lower risk of a subsequent hospitalization or ED visit (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.76; p < 0.001) than patients who did not have budesonide inhalation suspension claims. Other controller medications were not associated with a reduction in the risk of subsequent asthma exacerbations. Adherence to medication was poor (a median MPR of 0.08 for budesonide inhalation suspension and a median MPR of 0.16 for any asthma controller medication). The odds of a repeat hospitalization or ED visit were significantly lower for children who were adherent to their asthma controller medication. Children with asthma and insured by Medicaid were at a high risk of repeat exacerbations leading to increased hospitalizations and ED visits. Treatment with budesonide inhalation suspension in the first

  7. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  8. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir You can control your asthma and avoid an attack by taking ... people with asthma live healthier lives by gaining control over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan ...

  9. TCM Differential Treatment of Cough Variant Asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-de; DENG Yi-qi; ZHANG Yu; HAN Yun; LIN Lin; CHAO En-xiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cough variant asthma (CVA), also called latent asthma or cough asthma, is a special type of asthma. With gradually deepened understanding of CVA in recent years, good curative effect has been achieved in TCM treatment of CVA.

  10. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  11. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among Persons with ...

  12. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gov . Asthma Learn How to Control Asthma Brochures Facts Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma ... Publications, and Links Asthma’s Impact on the Nation Fact Sheet State Data Profiles (2011) Work-related Asthma ...

  13. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children with Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among ...

  14. Assessment of Serum Vitamin D in Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham E. Abd El Aaty

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was highly prevalent in asthmatic patients, there was a strong correlation between asthma severity and 25(OH vitamin D concentrations and there was a direct and a positive significant correlation between vitamin D levels and pulmonary function tests in asthmatic patients, so the measurement of serum vitamin D levels in patients with bronchial asthma is very useful.

  15. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high r

  16. Internet-based self-management in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Victor van der

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of internet-based support in the delivery of an asthma self management program. First, the compliance and reliability of home lung function monitoring, one of the key features of asthma self-management, was studied and appeared to be high over a 4-week period. Second,

  17. Asthma Symptoms in Early Childhood: A public health perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.D. Hafkamp-De Groen (Esther)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on asthma symptoms in early childhood. From a public health perspective, we aim to improve health and health-related quality of life through the prevention of asthma symptoms and by signaling, counselling or management of children who are at a high r

  18. Vitamin D Modulates Expression of the Airway Smooth Muscle Transcriptome in Fatal Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca E Himes

    Full Text Available Globally, asthma is a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease affecting over 300 million people. Some asthma patients remain poorly controlled by conventional therapies and experience more life-threatening exacerbations. Vitamin D, as an adjunct therapy, may improve disease control in severe asthma patients since vitamin D enhances glucocorticoid responsiveness and mitigates airway smooth muscle (ASM hyperplasia. We sought to characterize differences in transcriptome responsiveness to vitamin D between fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM by using RNA-Seq to measure ASM transcript expression in five donors with fatal asthma and ten non-asthma-derived donors at baseline and with vitamin D treatment. Based on a Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p-value <0.05, 838 genes were differentially expressed in fatal asthma vs. non-asthma-derived ASM at baseline, and vitamin D treatment compared to baseline conditions induced differential expression of 711 and 867 genes in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM, respectively. Functional gene categories that were highly represented in all groups included extracellular matrix, and responses to steroid hormone stimuli and wounding. Genes differentially expressed by vitamin D also included cytokine and chemokine activity categories. Follow-up qPCR and individual analyte ELISA experiments were conducted for four cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL13, CXCL12, IL8 to measure TNFα-induced changes by asthma status and vitamin D treatment. Vitamin D inhibited TNFα-induced IL8 protein secretion levels to a comparable degree in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM even though IL8 had significantly higher baseline levels in fatal asthma-derived ASM. Our findings identify vitamin D-specific gene targets and provide transcriptomic data to explore differences in the ASM of fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived donors.

  19. Are we ready for universal school-based asthma screening?: An outcomes evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter; Scanlon, Paul; Kurland, Margary

    2002-12-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic condition of childhood and a common reason for school absenteeism and use of school health services. Unrecognized but symptomatic childhood asthma may be adding to this school burden. To evaluate the effectiveness of school-based asthma screening in identifying children at high risk for unrecognized asthma and facilitating new asthma diagnoses. A controlled trial of school-based asthma screening using mailed parent surveys and medical record review to estimate outcomes of interest, specifically numbers of new asthma diagnoses. Most parents (80%, N = 5116) responded to the asthma screening survey. About 1 in 5 (19.4%, n = 994) parents reported that their children had previously been diagnosed with asthma or reactive airway disease. Letters recommending further evaluation for symptoms suggestive of possible asthma were sent to the parents of 388 children (7.6% of respondents) without known asthma. About half of parents returned postcards stating their intended reaction to the referral recommendation including 52 parents (13.4% of those referred) who thought no further action was necessary. Parent-initiated physician visits occurred in 45 (11.6%) of the 388 referred children. Overall, there were 57 (0.9%, 57/6401) new physician diagnoses of asthma among the screened children in the 6 months following screening: 16 in the referred group and 41 in the group not referred, including 20 in the group whose parents said they had known that their child had asthma, but had no medical record documentation of an asthma diagnosis. The incident asthma diagnosis rate was 1.2% (34/2906; P =.25) in a comparable control group that did not participate in screening. School-based asthma screening did not increase the incident rate of asthma diagnoses in this community. Parents participated in the screening process, but the percentage of referred children with follow-up medical visits was low.

  20. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they inherit. Allergies : Most people with asthma have allergies. Your response to allergens—proteins from common materials like house dust mites, cockroaches, and pollens—may cause the inflammation that ...

  1. Asthma and Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental ... prepared food. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Nutrition: What Every Parent Needs to Know (Copyright © American ...

  2. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  3. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) The annual flu shot is recommended for ... second or third trimester. Read more about the flu vaccine . Immunotherapy (allergy shots) Allergy shots should not be ...

  4. Inhaled Asthma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  5. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  6. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation and Referral Guidelines Practice Financial Survey Practice Tools Running a Practice Statements and Practice Parameters About AAAAI Advocacy Allergist / Immunologists: ...

  7. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  8. Interleukin-16 in asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Jing-min; SHI Huan-zhong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that is characterized by lymphocyte, eosinophil, and mast cell infiltration of the submucosa along with mucous gland hyperplasia and subepithelial fibrosis.

  9. [Primary-care morbidity and true morbidity due to acute respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rodríguez, A E; González Ochoa, E; Bravo González, J R; Carlos Silva, L; Linton, T

    1992-01-01

    The present work presents the study of morbidity due to acute respiratory infections (ARI) in areas of the town of Lisa in Ciudad Habana, and Isla Juventud (Cuba), to characterize different aspects of morbidity measured by health care attendance and to measure true morbidity. About 90% of consultations for ARI were first-time consultations, while their ratio to further consultations was 5.3. True morbidity rates (TMR), obtained trough active research, ranged from 110.4 to 163.4 cases per 1000 inhabitants, considerably higher than morbidity rates measured by primary care consultations (MRPCC) in the same time period. The true morbidity index (TMI), as measured by the ratio of the two previous rates, ranged from 5 to 15. A high proportion (47.6%) of cases reported no medical care attendance. These results provide approximate estimates of true morbidity in the study area, and allow the establishment of a new control program, also improving epidemiologic surveillance within primary care activities.

  10. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – Differences and Similarities

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan; Ustamujic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are obstructive pulmonary diseases that affected millions of people all over the world. Asthma is a serious global health problem with an estimated 300 million affected individuals. COPD is one of the major causes of chronic morbidity and mortality and one of the major public health problems worldwide. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the world and further increases in its prevalence and mortality can be predicted. ...

  11. Preliminary studies: differences in microRNA expression in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrusińska, Małgorzata; Pająk, Aneta; Górski, Paweł; Kuna, Piotr; Szemraj, Janusz; Goździńska-Nielepkowicz, Agnieszka; Pietras, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The asthma- and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related morbidity has been increasing during the recent years. Both asthma and COPD are diseases of inflammatory etiology. The increasing interest in the pathomechanisms involved in the development of obstructive pulmonary diseases seems to be fully justified. Recent research has attempted to determine the associations of microRNA with the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases. Aim To assess the expression of microRNA in t...

  12. Impact of self-reported symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma on sleep disordered breathing and sleep disturbances in the elderly with polysomnography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Won, Ha-Kyeong; Moon, Sung-Do; Kim, Byung-Keun; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Ki-Woong; Yoon, In-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and sleep disturbances have been reported to be associated with allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, population-based studies of this issue in the elderly are rare. Objective To investigate the impact of self-reported rhinitis and asthma on sleep apnea and sleep quality using polysomnography in an elderly Korean population. Methods A total of 348 elderly subjects who underwent one-night polysomnography study among a randomly selected sample were enrolled. Study subjects underwent anthropometric and clinical evaluations. Simultaneously, the prevalence and co-morbid status of asthma and allergic rhinitis, and subjective sleep quality were evaluated using a self-reported questionnaire. Results Ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis was significantly more prevalent in subjects with SDB compared with those without SDB. Subjects with an ever-diagnosis of allergic rhinitis showed a higher O2 desaturation index and mean apnea duration. Indices regarding sleep efficiency were affected in subjects with a recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Waking after sleep onset was longer and sleep efficiency was lower in subjects who had received allergic rhinitis treatment within the past 12 months. Subjects who had received asthma treatment within the past 12 months showed significantly lower sleep efficiency than others. Conclusion Our study indicates that a history of allergic rhinitis is associated with increased risk of SDB in the elderly. Sleep disturbance and impaired sleep efficiency were found in the subjects who had received recent treatment of allergic rhinitis or asthma. Physicians should be aware of the high risk of sleep disorders in older patients with respiratory allergic diseases. PMID:28245272

  13. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic ß2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  14. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  15. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  16. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report: Evaluation and Management of Asthma in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skloot, Gwen S; Busse, Paula J; Braman, Sidney S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Dixon, Anne E; Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Scichilone, Nicola; Prakash, Y S; Pabelick, Christina M; Mathur, Sameer K; Hanania, Nicola A; Moore, Wendy C; Gibson, Peter G; Zieman, Susan; Ragless, Betina B

    2016-11-01

    Asthma in the elderly (>65 yr old) is common and associated with higher morbidity and mortality than asthma in younger patients. The poor outcomes in this group are due, in part, to underdiagnosis and undertreatment. There are a variety of factors related to aging itself that affect the presentation of asthma in the elderly and influence diagnosis and management. Structural changes in the aging lung superimposed on structural changes due to asthma itself can worsen the disease and physiologic function. Changes in the aging immune system influence the cellular composition and function in asthmatic airways. These processes and differences from younger individuals with asthma are not well understood. Phenotypes of asthma in the elderly have not been clearly delineated, but it is likely that age of onset and overlap with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impact disease characteristics. Physiologic tests and biomarkers used to diagnose and follow asthma in the elderly are generally similar to testing in younger individuals; however, whether they should be modified in aging has not been established. Confounding influences, such as comorbidities (increasing the risk of polypharmacy), impaired cognition and motor skills, psychosocial effects of aging, and age-related adverse effects of medications, impact both diagnosis and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Future efforts to understand asthma in the elderly must include geriatric-specific methodology to diagnose, characterize, monitor, and treat their disease.

  17. Twelve-week efficacy and safety study of mometasone furoate/formoterol 200/10 microg and 400/10 microg combination treatments in patients with persistent asthma previously receiving high-dose inhaled corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinstein, Steven F; Corren, Jonathan; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    with asthma uncontrolled on high-dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). In a 12-week, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study, patients (>or=12 years of age) were randomized to MF/F 200/10 microg, MF/F 400/10 microg, or MF 400 microg, b.i.d. after a 2- to 3-week open-label run in with MF 400...

  18. [Asthma, obesity and diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, P; Delgado, J; Gallego, L T; Bobolea, I; Pedrosa, Ma; García de Lorenzo, A; Quirce, S

    2012-01-01

    Asthma and obesity have a considerable impact on public health and their prevalence has increased in recent years. Numerous studies have linked both disorders. Most prospective studies show that obesity is a risk factor for asthma and have found a positive correlation between baseline body mass index (BMI) and the subsequent development of asthma, although these results are not conclusive when studying the association between airway hyperresponsiveness with BMI. Furthermore, several studies suggest that whereas weight gain increases the risk of asthma, weight loss improves the course of the illness. Different factors could explain this association. Obesity is capable of reducing pulmonary compliance, lung volumes and the diameter of peripheral respiratory airways as well as affecting the volume of blood in the lungs and the ventilation-perfusion relationship. Furthermore, the increase in the normal functioning of adipose tissue in obese subjects leads to a systemic proinflammatory state, which produces a rise in the serum concentrations of several cytokines, the soluble fractions of their receptors and chemokines. Many of these mediators are synthesized and secreted by cells from adipose tissue and receive the generic name of adipokines, including IL-6, IL-10, eotaxin, TNF-α, TGF- 1, PCR, leptin y adiponectin. Finally, specific regions of the human genome which are related to both asthma and obesity have been identified. Most studies point out that obesity is capable of increasing the prevalence and incidence of asthma, although this effect appears to be modest. The treatment of obese asthmatics must include a weight control program.

  19. Serum resistin as an asthma marker and predictor of inhaled corticosteroid response in bronchial asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Al-Asy

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: From these results we can conclude that resistin can be considered as a marker of asthma and its severity and high resistin levels can predict favourable anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled glucocorticoids suggesting that resistin may be a marker of steroid-sensitive genotype in asthma in children.

  20. Morbidity Pattern Among Elderly Population In A Rural Area Of Dehradun In Uttaranchal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Negi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : What is the morbidity pattern among elderly people in rural area of Dehradun?Objectives :(1     To assess the morbidity pattern among elderly population.(2     To assess the psycho-social problems among elderly people.(3     To assess the relationship between addiction and hypertension among them.Study design : Cross-Sectional.Setting : Atturwala - a rural area of district Dehradun in Uttaranchal.Participants : 332 elderly people aged 60 years and above.Statistical Analysis : Proportions, Chi-Square test.Results ; It was observed that 78.3% elderly had ophthalmic problem, 69.3% elderly had psycho-social problems followed by hypertension (49.1%, Chronic bronchitis (22% and asthma (12%. A significant relation was found between hypertention and addiction i. e. smoking and / or alcohol (p<.001. Respiratory diseases were found in 47.3% elderly persons. Depression was highly dominating problem among elderly (59.6%.

  1. High-flow nasal cannula therapy versus non-invasive ventilation in children with severe acute asthma exacerbation: An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilar, J; Modesto I Alapont, V; Lopez-Fernandez, Y M; Lopez-Macias, O; Garcia-Urabayen, D; Amores-Hernandez, I

    2017-10-01

    The present study describes our experience with the high-flow humidified nasal cannula (HFNC) versus non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in children with severe acute asthma exacerbation (SA). An observational study of a retrospective cohort of 42 children with SA admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) for non-invasive respiratory support was made. The primary outcome measure was failure of initial respiratory support (need to escalate from HFNC to NIV or from NIV to invasive ventilation). Secondary outcome measures were the duration of respiratory support and PICU length of stay (LOS). Forty-two children met the inclusion criteria. Twenty (47.6%) received HFNC and 22 (52.3%) NIV as initial respiratory support. There were no treatment failures in the NIV group. However, 8 children (40%) in the HFNC group required escalation to NIV. The PICU LOS was similar in both the NIV and HFNC groups. However, on considering the HFNC failure subgroup, the median length of respiratory support was 3-fold longer (63h) and the PICU LOS was also longer compared with the rest of subjects exhibiting treatment success. Despite its obvious limitations, this observational study could suggest that HFNC in some subjects with SA may delay NIV support and potentially cause longer respiratory support, and longer PICU LOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  2. Asthma Education, Action Plans, Psychosocial Issues and Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kolbe

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with four separate but not disparate topics. The first section discusses asthma education, reviews the current literature and attempts to challenge some of the dogma that is associated with this area. Knowledge alone does not guarantee appropriate behaviour, due to a variety of adverse socioeconomic and psychological factors that need to be considered for each patient. Action plans and peak flow monitoring have both been disappointing in terms of reducing asthma morbidity; the former needs to be individualized, and the latter may be useful in specific situations. Space precludes an in-depth discussion of psychological issues and adherence, but an attempt has been made to address salient issues, particularly related to the first two topics. Psychological factors, especially anxiety, play an important role in asthma outcome. Adherence to medication prescriptions and other management strategies need to be taken into account when an individual’s treatment program is planned.

  3. Effect of a home intervention program on pediatric asthma in an environmental justice community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shani, Zalika; Scott, Richard G; Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Johnson, John H; Williams, Ellen R; Hampton, Janiene; Ramprasad, Vatsala

    2015-03-01

    Asthma prevalence rates are at an all-time high in the United States with over 25 million persons diagnosed with asthma. African Americans and other minorities have higher asthma prevalence and higher exposure to environmental factors that worsen asthma as compared to Caucasians. This article describes the evaluation of an inner-city home-based asthma education and environmental remediation program that addressed both indoor and outdoor triggers through collaboration between a health system and local environmental justice organization. The program enrolled 132 children older than 2.5 years and centers on a 4- to 6-week intervention with peer counselors using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Asthma Home Environment Checklist and the You Can Control Asthma curriculum. Families receive asthma-friendly environmental home kits. Peer counselors reinforce key asthma management messages and facilitate the completion of Asthma Action Plans. The environmental justice community partner organized block cleanups to reduce outdoor triggers. The evaluation used a pretest-posttest design to assess changes in client behavior and asthma symptoms. Data were collected at baseline and during a 6-month postintervention period. Participants saw enhanced conditions on asthma severity and control. The improvement was greatest for children whose asthma was considered "severe" based on the validated Asthma Control Test. Other positive results include the following: greater completion of Asthma Action Plans, significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits (p = .006), and substantial decreases in school absenteeism (p = .008) and use of rescue medications (p = .049). The evaluation suggests that the program was effective in improving asthma self-management in a high-risk population living within an environmental justice community.

  4. Pattern of liver function tests in morbidly obese Saudi patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al Akwaa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Morbidly obese patients have a high prevalence of fatty liver disease and its serious complications, and high prevalence of abnormal liver function tests (LFT. The LFT can give a clue to the liver damage and correlate with activity. We aim to study the pattern of LFT in morbidly obese Saudi patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Eastern region. Patients and Methods: Medical records of patients undergoing bariatric surgery were reviewed. Demographic data, comorbid conditions, and medications taken were recorded. Intraoperative liver appearance was noted. Patients with alcohol intake or without LFT were excluded. Results: Out of 113 patients, 15 patients were excluded, and of the remaining 98 patients analyzed, 58.2% were females. Mean age was 33.1 ± 8.87 years. Mean body mass index (BMI was 53.7 ± 1.27 kg/m 2 . Abnormal LFT (alanine aminotransaminase (ALT, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST alkaline phosphatase (ALK, and Gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GTT were observed in 17.3%, with 1.5 to 2 times the upper limit of normal. ALT was most elevated in 12.2%. Abdominal ultrasonography was done in 67 (68.4% patients, of whom 51 (76% had fatty liver. Comorbid conditions including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, bronchial asthma, and obstructive sleep apnea were observed in 51 (51.50% patients, eight of them (16.3% had abnormal LFT. No intraoperative changes of cirrhosis were observed. Conclusion: The prevalence of abnormal LFT is low in morbidly obese patients from the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. A prospective study with a larger sample and liver biopsy, is needed to clarify the findings.

  5. Role of Asthma Education in the Management of Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Côté

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available When a patient is newly diagnosed as having asthma, he or she is often prescribed new medication without getting much information on the disease and its treatment. This article emphasizes the need to educate asthmatics. Asthma treatment should begin with a proper adjustment of the medication, allowing asthmatics to lead a normal life. All asthmatics should be shown how to use their inhalation device properly. They should he knowledgeable about the basic aspects of asthma, airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction, use or medication and early symptoms heralding an asthma attack. Environmental factors that may trigger an asthma attack should be explained. Patients should be able to self-monitor asthma using either symptom severity or a peak flow meter. Because asthma is an unpredictable disease, patients should have a self-action plan to implement when their asthma deteriorates.

  6. Perinatal and early childhood environmental factors influencing allergic asthma immunopathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffin, Jonathan M; Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased dramatically over the past several decades. While hereditary factors are highly important, the rapid rise outstrips the pace of genomic variation. Great emphasis has been placed on potential modifiable early life exposures leading to childhood asthma. We reviewed the recent medical literature for important studies discussing the role of the perinatal and early childhood exposures and the inception of childhood asthma. Early life exposure to allergens (house dust mite (HDM), furred pets, cockroach, rodent and mold), air pollution (nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), ozone (O(3)), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM)) and viral respiratory tract infections (Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (hRV)) has been implicated in the development of asthma in high risk children. Conversely, exposure to microbial diversity in the perinatal period may diminish the development of atopy and asthma symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric asthma controller therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The treatment of children with asthma has historically relied upon expert opinion using data extrapolated from adult studies. Over the past few years, landmark studies have been completed providing healthcare professionals with evidence on which a reasonable approach can be made for children suffering from this common and serious disease. Asthmatic phenotype in children, unlike adults, tends to differ according to age, which must be taken into account as well as triggers, severity, and level of control. The care of the child with asthma is complex, but accumulating data have demonstrated that we are on the right path for optimizing control while reducing the burden of side effects. The newest Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines, as well as recent updates from the landmark CAMP (Childhood Asthma Management Program) study and information from the PACT (Pediatric Asthma Control Trial) and budesonide/formoterol controller and reliever studies, along with recent comparisons of higher dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), and ICS/long-acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination and leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) therapies in children have clarified a few of the big questions in pediatric asthma. For children with asthma aged 5 years and older, the CAMP trial demonstrated that regular use of ICS reduces the frequency of symptoms; however, height was adversely affected and there is no evidence for altering the natural history of asthma. In patients aged 6 years and over whose asthma is uncontrolled on ICS alone, combination therapy with ICS and a LABA has been recently compared with the use of higher dose ICS and the addition of an LTRA in pediatric patients. The addition of a LABA statistically will be of most benefit; however, some children will have optimal control with doubling the baseline dose of ICS or addition of an LTRA. Use of budesonide/formoterol as a controller and reliever therapy extends the time to first exacerbation versus

  8. The Significance of Asthma Follow-Up Consultations for Adherence to Asthma Medication, Asthma Medication Beliefs, and Asthma Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Axelsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim was to investigate adherence to asthma medication treatment, medication beliefs, and asthma control in relation to asthma follow-up consultations in asthmatics in the general population. A further aim was to describe associations between adherence, medication beliefs, and asthma control. Method. In the population-based West Sweden Asthma Study, data allowing calculation of adherence for 4.5 years based on pharmacy records were obtained from 165 adult asthmatics. Additional data were collected through questionnaires and structured interviews. Results. The mean adherence value for filled prescriptions for regular asthma medication was 68% (median 55.3% but varied over the year under study. Adherence to combination inhalers with corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 agonists was higher than adherence to single inhalers with corticosteroids only. More than one-third of participants reported not having seen an asthma nurse or physician for several years. Regular asthma follow-up consultations were associated with both higher adherence and the belief that asthma medication was necessary but were not associated with asthma control. Conclusions. Adherence to asthma medication treatment was low and varied over the year under study. The current study suggests that quality improvements in asthma care are needed if adherence to asthma medication is to be improved.

  9. Biomarkers and childhood asthma: improving control today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Andrew H

    2005-01-01

    Although we aim to normalize the lives of children with asthma by controlling their day and night symptoms and preventing exacerbations and morbidity, optimal childhood asthma management may result when the assessment and monitoring of asthma includes measured biomarkers--meaning objective, biological measures of lung dysfunction and inflammation. Precedence for such an approach to optimizing disease control and outcomes can be appreciated in comparing asthma with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) management in children. Optimal management of these chronic conditions shares the fundamental goals to eliminate day and night symptoms and prevent exacerbations and morbidity. However, IDDM management focuses primarily on peripheral blood biomarkers of tight control (i.e., daily serum glucose levels) and predictors of long-term morbidity (i.e., hemoglobin A1C, or hemoglobin "remodeling" due to chronically poor control of glucose) for optimal assessment and monitoring and to best achieve these clinical objectives (Alemzadeh R, et al. Diabetes mellitus in children. In Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th ed. Behrman RE, Kliegman RM, and Jenson HB (Eds). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Co., 1947-1972, 2004). The improved outcomes in IDDM have resulted primarily from the progress to a biomarker-based assessment to achieve tight, optimal control and not, presently, as a dramatic change in therapy. The progress in IDDM management provides a compelling paradigm to consider for improving childhood asthma management. Indeed, the time is good to not only consider some newly available biomarkers, but also to reconsider some biomarkers of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy that could be broadly used today. This article reconsiders the use of current and emerging measures of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy in assessing tight control and long-term risk. Concluding emphasis will be placed on what can be implemented today.

  10. Towards excellence in asthma management (TEAM): a populational disease-management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Thivierge, Robert L; Amesse, André; Nunes, Fatima; Francoeur, Suzanne; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2002-06-01

    Asthma management is not always optimal, and deficiencies such as inadequate treatment and insufficient patient education are often reported. Towards Excellence in Asthma Management (TEAM) is a four-phase disease management program of the Quebec Asthma Education Network (QAEN), to be carried out over a 5-year period. The program aims to achieve a continuous improvement of asthma management by caregivers and patients. The first phase, completed in January 2000, consisted of determining the actual level of asthma-associated morbidity and mortality in various Quebec regions. The second phase, which began in September 1999, included three parts: 1. Definition of the burden of asthma, taking into account the socioeconomic consequences of the disease and the quality of life of the patients, 2. Comparison of current medical practices with the Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines for adult and pediatric populations, 3. Evaluation of the level of compliance with medical treatment and with the environmental changes recommended to asthmatic patients. This phase is carried out via a cohort study of physicians, mainly general practitioners and pediatricians, generating a patient cohort study, in addition to substudies evaluating specific aspects of asthma care. Once the care gap is identified, it will be possible to define, apply, and evaluate a series of interventions for physicians, other health professionals, and patients. The interventions will be particularly targeted at regions where asthma incidence and morbidity are higher. We hope that this model of disease management will progressively reduce the burden associated with asthma, and potentially other chronic diseases, and will result in the more effective use of health services.

  11. Swimming and Asthma: Differences between Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Kristiina Päivinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Asthma is common in endurance athletes including swimmers. Our aim was to study gender differences in asthma, allergy, and asthmatic symptoms in swimmers and investigate the effects of varying intensities of physical exercise on competitive swimmers with asthma. Methods. Three hundred highly trained swimmers (156 females and 144 males were studied by a questionnaire. Their mean (±SD ages were 17±3 and 19±3 years, and they had training history of 7±2 and 7±3 years in females and males, respectively. Gender differences in asthma, allergy, and respiratory symptoms were examined. Special attention was focused on asthmatic swimmers, their allergies and respiratory symptoms during swimming at different intensities. Results. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 19% for females and males. No gender differences in asthma or respiratory symptoms were found. Males reported allergies significantly more often than females (P=0.007. Gender difference was found in respiratory symptoms among swimmers with physician-diagnosed asthma because females reported symptoms significantly more often (P=0.017 than males. Asthmatic females also reported symptoms significantly more often at moderate intensity swimming (P=0.003 than males especially for coughing. Discussion. Gender difference in prevalence of asthma was not found in swimmers. However, allergy was reported significantly more by male swimmers. Male swimmers with asthma reported significantly more cases having family history of asthma, which may be a sign of selection of asthma-friendly sport. Moderate intensity swimming seemed to induce significantly more symptoms especially coughing in asthmatic females.

  12. Impact of nasal symptoms on the evaluation of asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Chia; Chang, Po-Hung; Wu, Pei-Wen; Wang, Chun-Hua; Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Chi-Che; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-02-01

    The united airways concept suggests that patients with asthma typically exhibit parallel inflammation in the upper airway. The resulting nasal symptoms should reduce quality of life and substantially affect the evaluation of asthma control among these patients. This study aimed to assess the association of nasal symptoms with the evaluation of asthma control.Fifty-eight patients with asthma and persistent nasal symptoms were prospectively recruited for evaluations of their sinonasal symptoms and asthma control in a cross-sectional study from August 2013 to June 2016. Participants underwent thorough nasal endoscopy, sinus computed tomography, pulmonary function testing, the asthma control test (ACT), and the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22) questionnaires to evaluate their asthma control and sinonasal symptoms.There was a significant association between ACT and SNOT-22 scores. Among patients with asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis, ACT scores were closely related to the symptoms of cough, post-nasal discharge, dizziness, waking up at night, absence of a good night's sleep, and waking up tired. Among patients with asthma and chronic rhinitis, the forced expiratory volume in 1 second was closely related to the symptoms of needing to blow nose, runny nose, and cough. Patients with emergency clinic visits during the previous 3 months had relatively high SNOT-22 scores, especially for the symptoms of sneezing, runny nose, nasal blockage, cough, and dizziness.Sinonasal symptom severity was closely associated with measured asthma control status among patients with asthma and persistent nasal symptoms. Therefore, upper and lower airway inflammations should be considered and treated simultaneously.

  13. Detection of human coronavirus strain HKU1 in a 2 years old girl with asthma exacerbation caused by acute pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Razieh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory viral infections can trigger asthma attack which may lead to sever morbidity. In this report, using molecular methods, we show the chronological association between human coronavirus - HKU1 infection and asthma exacerbation in a two years and seven months old asthmatic girl who was not under treatment and was otherwise healthy.

  14. The Breathmobile Program: structure, implementation, and evolution of a large-scale, urban, pediatric asthma disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Craig A; Clement, Loran T; Hanley-Lopez, Jean; Morphew, Tricia; Kwong, Kenny Yat Choi; Lifson, Francene; Opas, Lawrence; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of education and research-oriented intervention programs, inner city children with asthma continue to engage in episodic "rescue" patterns of healthcare and experience a disproportionate level of morbidity. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a sustainable community-wide pediatric asthma disease management program designed to shift inner city children in Los Angeles from acute episodic care to regular preventive care in accordance with national standards. In 1995 the Southern California Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), and the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) established an agreement to initiate and sustain the Breathmobile Program. This program includes automated case identification, mobile school-based clinics, and highly structured clinical encounters supported by an advanced information technology solution. Interdisciplinary teams of asthma care specialists provide regular and ongoing care to children at school and county clinic sites over a wide geographic area of urban Los Angeles. Each team operates in a specially equipped mobile clinic (Breathmobile), efficiently moving a structured healthcare process to school and county clinic sites with large numbers of children. Demographic, clinical, and participation data is tracked carefully in an electronic medical record system. Program operations, clinical oversight, and patient tracking are centralized at a care coordination center. Clinical operations and methods have been replicated in fixed specialty clinic sites at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Clinical and process measures are regularly evaluated to assure quality, plan iterative improvement, and support evidence-based care. Four Breathmobiles deliver ongoing care at more than 90 school sites. The program has engaged over five thousand patients and their families in a

  15. Parental stress and the onset and course of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Noriko; Nagano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a caregiver's stress on the development of childhood asthma is an important aspect of the treatment and prevention of illness. Many cross-sectional studies have investigated the association between parenting attitude and/or caregiver's stress and childhood asthma morbidity, but prospective studies are more advantageous than cross-sectional studies in interpreting a causal relationship from the results. We here present an overview of prospective studies that have reported a relationship between parental stress and the morbidity or course of childhood asthma and discuss the role of parental mental health in its prevention and treatment. Almost all of the studies referred to in this paper show that caregiver (mostly mothers) stress contributed to the onset and to a poor prognosis, while only a few studies have examined the adverse effect of paternal stress on childhood asthma. Their results are inconsistent, and there is insufficient data examining specific stress-related properties that can be targeted in intervention studies. Not only maternal but also paternal influence should be considered in future studies, and it will be important to assess specific stress-related properties that can be the foundation of specific intervention methods.

  16. Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Of Age Older Adults Allergy and Asthma Health Magazine Women Infant, Children and Teenagers Living With Lung ... written by Respiratory Experts Like no other health magazine, Allergy & Asthma Health Magazine is published by people ...

  17. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get absorbed into upholstery, clothing, and carpeting, leaving carcinogens that can't be washed away with soap ... asthma, let friends, relatives, and caregivers know that tobacco smoke may cause an asthma flare-up. To ...

  18. Psychopathology in difficult asthma : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.J.; van Son, M.A.C.; van Keimpema, A.R.J.; van Ranst, D.; Antonissen-Pommer, A.M.; Meijer, J.W.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  19. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causesof childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood.Methods: This cross-sectionalstudy recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group and 98 healthy (control group individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and H. pyloriinfection was compared between the two groups according to the urea breath test results.Results:Urea breath test was positive in 18 asthmatic (18.36 and 23 (23.36 healthy subjects but was not significantly different between the case and controls(p=0.380.Furtheranalysis in the asthmatic group revealed association ofH. pyloriinfection withage (p<0.001 and duration of asthma (p=0.010. However, no significant correlation was found between sex, severity of asthma, controledasthma or abnormal pulmonary function testswith H. pyloriinfection (p= 0.804, 0.512 ,0.854 and 0.292, respectively.Conclusion:Given the results of the study, H. pylori infection was not significantly differentbetween asthmatic and healthy children.In asthmatic patients, there wasnosignificant association between H.pyloriinfection andsex,severity of disease, control status of disease andnormal or abnormal pulmonary function tests.H. Pylori infection had a significant association withincreasing age and duration of asthma.

  20. The association between phthalate exposure and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airway, characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness. It is a disabling disease with an increasing prevalence, resulting in heavy social and economic burdens worldwide. Humans are extensively exposed to phthalates, and many epidemiological studies have shown a relationship between phthalate exposure and asthma in recent decades. Earlier experimental studies focused on inflammatory cells, demonstrating the adjuvant effects, immunomodulatory effects, or immunosuppressive effects related to phthalate exposure. Recent studies have shown that phthalates may have a direct effect on airway epithelial cells and contribute to airway remodeling, which is the cardinal pathologic characteristic of chronic asthma, with a high correlation with disease severity. Through these efforts, phthalates have been recognized as important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of asthma, but further studies are still required to elucidate the detailed mechanism. This review discusses the current status of human exposure to phthalates in Taiwan and summarizes the epidemiological and experimental evidence related to the roles of phthalate exposure in the development of asthma and associated diseases.

  1. Defining localities of inadequate treatment for childhood asthma: A GIS approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pliskin Joseph S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS has great potential for the management of chronic disease and the analysis of clinical and administrative health care data. Asthma is a chronic disease associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and health care use. Epidemiologic data from all over the world show an increasing prevalence of asthma morbidity and mortality despite the availability of effective treatment. These facts led to the emergence of strategies developed to improve the quality of asthma care. The objective To develop an efficient tool for quality assurance and chronic disease management using a Geographic Information System (GIS. Geographic location The southern region of Israel. January 1998 – October 2000. Databases Administrative claims data of the largest HMO in Israel: drug dispensing registry, demographic data, Emergency Room visits, and hospitalization data bases. Methods We created a list of six markers for inadequate pharmaceutical treatment of childhood asthma from the Israeli clinical guidelines. We used this list to search the drug dispensing registry to identify asthmatic children who received inadequate treatment and to assess their health care utilization and bad outcomes: emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Using GIS we created thematic maps on which we located the clinics with a high percentage of children for whom the treatment provided was not in adherence with the clinical guidelines. Results 81% of the children were found to have at least one marker for inadequate treatment; 17.5% were found to have more than one marker. Children with markers were found to have statistically significant higher rates of Emergency Room visits, hospitalizations and longer length of stay in hospital compared with children without markers. The maps show in a robust way which clinics provided treatment not in accord with the clinical guidelines. Those clinics have high rates of Emergency Room

  2. The talking card: Randomized controlled trial of a novel audio-recording tool for asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowden, John D; Wilkerson-Amendell, Sharon; Weathers, Laura; Gonzalez, Emma D; Dinakar, Chitra; Westbrook, David H; Williams, Arthur R

    2015-01-01

    Asthma care plans typically include complicated written instructions. Customized, audio-recorded instructions may bridge health literacy gaps and improve treatment plan understanding. To measure the effects of a recordable greeting card-style tool (Talking Card) on asthma control and parental care of children with asthma. Multisite randomized trial in two primary care clinics, including children 4-11 years old with uncontrolled asthma and their parents. Parent-child dyads were randomized to usual care of asthma or usual care plus the Talking Card. Dyads completed three asthma-focused visits over 3 months. At the visit, card recipients received customized instructions recorded by the pediatrician onto an audio chip in the card. Asthma control was measured by using the Childhood Asthma Control Test. Card use and parental satisfaction were measured by parental survey (card arm only). Outcomes were analyzed by using generalized estimating equations and frequency distributions. Sixty-four dyads participated and attended 166 clinic visits. Card use was associated with a 1.6-point increase in Childhood Asthma Control Test score (p = 0.02) and a clinic visit regardless of card use with a three-point increase (p asthma. The Talking Card, a novel audio communication tool, was associated with improved asthma control and deemed highly desirable by parents and children struggling to control asthma. This inexpensive portable tool may be useful in other chronic disorders and in locales with low literacy and poor access to digital technology.

  3. Association between Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Control in Peruvian School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justo Padilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Asthma and allergic rhinitis are highly prevalent conditions that cause major illness worldwide. This study aimed to assess the association between allergic rhinitis and asthma control in Peruvian school children. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 256 children with asthma recruited in 5 schools from Lima and Callao cities. The outcome was asthma control assessed by the asthma control test. A score test for trend of odds was used to evaluate the association between allergic rhinitis severity and the prevalence of inadequate asthma control. A generalized linear regression model was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence ratios of inadequate asthma control. Results. Allergic rhinitis was present in 66.4% of the population with asthma. The trend analysis showed a positive association between allergic rhinitis and the probability of inadequate asthma control (. It was associated with an increased prevalence of inadequate asthma control, with adjusted prevalence ratios of 1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.19−1.98. Conclusion. This study indicates that allergic rhinitis is associated with an inadequate level of asthma control, giving support to the recommendation of evaluating rhinitis to improve asthma control in children.

  4. Recent perspectives on global epidemiology of asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, M I

    2010-01-01

    New research in asthma epidemiology in children includes the development of the ISAAC programme, which has shown large variations globally in the prevalence of asthma symptoms. Time trends in the prevalence of asthma symptoms have shown a mixed picture of increases in low prevalence centres, and a plateau or even a decrease in high prevalence centres. A range of environmental factors have been studied and some potentially protective associations have been found, as well as potentially aggravating factors. Atopy has less influence on the prevalence of symptoms of asthma in low and middle income countries. Breast feeding exerts a protective effect only on non-atopic asthma in non-affluent countries. Future research should explore these areas further.

  5. Mycobacterium bovis-Bacillus Calmette-Guerin and asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hua-hao; ZHANG Gen-sheng; WANG Ping-li

    2005-01-01

    @@ In recent decades, the prevalence of asthma over the world has risen steadily especially in high-income countries.1 The underlying mechanisms for this phenomenon remain largely unknow, but environmental factors are thought to play an important role. Some epidemiology studies2-8 suggested that the increase in asthma inversely correlated with a steady decline exposition to some human diseases, such as tuberculosis and influenza. One of the general features of these infectious agents is that they induce characteristic Th1 type immune response which suppresses the Th2 response predominate in individuals suffering from asthma. Bacille Calmette-Guerin(BCG) is a strong inducer of Th1 type immune response. This review will focus on recent findings related to the interaction between BCG and asthma, and the main mechanisms of BCG in modulating asthma development.

  6. Genetics of onset of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F. Nicole; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Most asthma starts early in life. Defining phenotypes of asthma at this age is difficult as many preschool children have asthma-like respiratory symptoms. This review discusses progress in defining early wheezing phenotypes and describes genetic factors associated with the age of o

  7. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  8. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  9. Rhinitis: a complication to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J W; Thomsen, S F; Nolte, H

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis often co-occur, and this potentially increases the disease severity and impacts negatively on the quality of life. We studied disease severity, airway responsiveness, atopy, quality of life and treatment in subjects with both asthma and rhinitis compared to patients with asthma...

  10. How Do Asthma Medicines Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? How Do Asthma Medicines Work? KidsHealth > For Kids > How Do Asthma Medicines Work? A A A en español ¿Cómo funcionan los medicamentos para el asma? People with asthma have what is called a chronic (say: KRAH- ...

  11. Genetics of onset of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F. Nicole; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    Purpose of review Most asthma starts early in life. Defining phenotypes of asthma at this age is difficult as many preschool children have asthma-like respiratory symptoms. This review discusses progress in defining early wheezing phenotypes and describes genetic factors associated with the age of

  12. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made.

  13. Optimising the management of patients with difficult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Evelyn; Higgins, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Asthma affects 5.4 million people in the UK, around 1 in 12 of the population. Between 5 and 10% of asthma (depending on the definition used) is categorised as difficult asthma, a term which generally refers to patients who continue to experience symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite the prescription of high-dose asthma therapy. Difficult asthma is an indication for specialist review by an appropriate respiratory physician, but close liaison between primary, secondary and tertiary care is critical and it is therefore important that primary care health professionals should be aware of the principles of management. One of the most important questions to ask is whether the individual with difficult asthma is taking their treatment Identifying this, however, is not easy. GPs could assess prescription uptake, looking for low use of preventers and excess use of short-acting bronchodilators. Newer means of assessing adherence have been developed. Inhaler devices that can monitor completion and timing of actuations have been produced. Meters that measure FeNO are available. A recent UK study found that 12 out of 100 patients referred for difficult asthma did not have reversible airflow obstruction or a history suggestive of asthma. Diagnoses included COPD, cystic fibrosis, cardiomyopathy, respiratory muscle dysfunction and severe anxiety with vocal cord dysfunction.

  14. Community violence and urban childhood asthma: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternthal, M J; Jun, H-J; Earls, F; Wright, R J

    2010-12-01

    We examined the association between community violence exposure and childhood asthma risk in a multilevel, multimethod, longitudinal study controlling for individual- and neighbourhood-level confounders and pathway variables. Analyses included 2,071 children aged 0-9 yrs at enrolment from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models estimated the likelihood of asthma, controlling for individual-level (child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal asthma, socioeconomic status and family violence in the home) and neighbourhood-level confounders (concentrated disadvantage, collective efficacy and social disorder), and pathway variables (maternal smoking, breastfeeding). In adjusted analyses, medium (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.17-2.19) and high levels (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.12-2.18) of community violence were associated with increased asthma risk, relative to low levels. The increased asthma risk remained for African Americans when models included community violence and all other individual-level covariates, but attenuated to borderline nonsignificance when further adjusting for collective efficacy. Community violence is associated with asthma risk when controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level confounders. Neither community violence, nor the other individual-level factors, fully accounted for the excess asthma burden among African Americans. These data suggest that public health interventions outside the biomedical model may be needed to reduce asthma in disadvantaged populations.

  15. Airway dysbiosis: Haemophilus influenzae and Tropheryma in poorly controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jodie L; Daly, Joshua; Baines, Katherine J; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John W; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra; James, Alan L; Hugenholtz, Philip; Willner, Dana; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways where bacteria may act as protagonists of chronic inflammation. Little is known about the relation of airway inflammation to the presence of specific bacterial taxa. We sought to describe the sputum microbiome in adults with poorly controlled asthma.DNA was extracted from induced sputum and microbial communities were profiled using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial species were characterised, and the relationship between microbial populations, asthma inflammatory subtypes and other covariates was explored. Real-time PCR was used to identify Tropheryma whipplei and Haemophilus influenzae in sputum.Adults with neutrophilic asthma had reduced bacterial diversity and species richness. Tropheryma was identified and confirmed with real-time PCR in 12 (40%) participants. Haemophilus occurred most often in a group of younger atopic males with an increased proportion of neutrophils. PCR confirmed the presence of H. influenzae in 35 (76%) participants with poorly controlled asthma.There are phenotype-specific alterations to the airway microbiome in asthma. Reduced bacterial diversity combined with a high prevalence of H. influenzae was observed in neutrophilic asthma, whereas eosinophilic asthma had abundant T. whipplei.

  16. The role of vitamin D in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Khanh vinh quoc; Nguyen, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-04-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are important immune-modulatory hormones and are able to suppress Th2-mediated allergic airway disease. Some genetic factors that may contribute to asthma are regulated by vitamin D, such as vitamin D receptor (VDR), human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA), human Toll-like receptors (TLR), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a disintegrin and metalloprotein-33 (ADAM-33), and poly(ADP-ribosyl) polymerase- 1 (PARP-1). Vitamin D has also been implicated in asthma through its effects on the obesity, bacillus Calmettee Guérin (BCG) vaccination and high vitamin D level, vitamin D supplement, checkpoint protein kinase 1 (Chk1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and gamma delta T cells (gdT). Vitamin D plays a role in asthma and exerts its action through either genomic and/or non-genomic ways.

  17. Invited commentary: Does breastfeeding protect against "asthma"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Michael S

    2014-05-15

    Dogaru et al. have provided the best systematic review and meta-analysis to date of published studies of the association between breastfeeding and childhood asthma. Despite careful analysis of the reviewed studies' designs and methodological quality features, the authors are unable to explain the enormous heterogeneity (I(2) = 71%-92%) among the reported findings. This heterogeneity likely stems from the fact that "asthma" is a term used to denote a highly variable phenotype. The reasons for the protective association between breastfeeding and such a heterogeneous phenotype remain unclear, but may reflect nonblinding of feeding histories among observers who assess the outcome, as well as residual confounding, particularly by daycare attendance. The absence of a dose-response relationship based on breastfeeding duration or exclusivity also raises questions about the causal nature of the observed association. Future epidemiologic studies of asthma will require better and finer phenotyping to understand its etiology, including the potential protective effect of breastfeeding.

  18. The effect of various breathing exercises (pranayama in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Tarun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The incidence of bronchial asthma is on increase. Chemotherapy is helpful during early course of the disease, but later on morbidity and mortality increases. The efficacy of yoga therapy though appreciated is yet to be defined and modified. Aim: To study the effect of breathing exercises ( pranayama in patients with bronchial asthma of mild to moderate severity. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of bronchial asthma (Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1 > 70% were studied for 12 weeks. Patients were allocated to two groups: group A and group B (control group. Patients in group A were treated with breathing exercises (deep breathing, Brahmari , and Omkara , etc. for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Patients were trained to perform Omkara at high pitch (forceful with prolonged exhalation as compared to normal Omkara . Group B was treated with meditation for 20 minutes twice daily for a period of 12 weeks. Subjective assessment, FEV1%, and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR were done in each case initially and after 12 weeks. Results: After 12 weeks, group A subjects had significant improvement in symptoms, FEV1, and PEFR as compared to group B subjects. Conclusion: Breathing exercises ( pranayama , mainly expiratory exercises, improved lung function subjectively and objectively and should be regular part of therapy.

  19. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  20. Liver morphology in morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T; Gluud, C

    1984-01-01

    methods including a computerized survey. Forty-one original articles were included, comprising information on liver morphology in 1515 morbidly obese patients. Liver biopsy was considered normal in 12 per cent of the cases. The most frequent abnormality reported was fatty change, present in 80 per cent...... of obesity, age, sex, alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus) does not point towards a single causal factor. Co-influence of additional pathogenetic factors are likely in the development of liver changes in morbid obesity....