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Sample records for high arch dam

  1. Uncertainty Instability Risk Analysis of High Concrete Arch Dam Abutments

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    Xin Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties associated with concrete arch dams rise with the increased height of dams. Given the uncertainties associated with influencing factors, the stability of high arch dam abutments as a fuzzy random event was studied. In addition, given the randomness and fuzziness of calculation parameters as well as the failure criterion, hazard point and hazard surface uncertainty instability risk ratio models were proposed for high arch dam abutments on the basis of credibility theory. The uncertainty instability failure criterion was derived through the analysis of the progressive instability failure process on the basis of Shannon’s entropy theory. The uncertainties associated with influencing factors were quantized by probability or possibility distribution assignments. Gaussian random theory was used to generate random realizations for influence factors with spatial variability. The uncertainty stability analysis method was proposed by combining the finite element analysis and the limit equilibrium method. The instability risk ratio was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method and fuzzy random postprocessing. Results corroborate that the modeling approach is sound and that the calculation method is feasible.

  2. Optimization design of foundation excavation for Xiluodu super-high arch dam in China

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    Qixiang Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With better understanding of the quality and physico-mechanical properties of rocks of dam foundation, and the physico-mechanical properties and structure design of arch dam in association with the foundation excavation of Xiluodu arch dam, the excavation optimization design was proposed for the foundation surface on the basis of feasibility study. Common analysis and numerical analysis results demonstrated the feasibility of using the weakly weathered rocks III1 and III2 as the foundation surface of super-high arch dam. In view of changes in the geological conditions at the dam foundation along the riverbed direction, the design of extending foundation surface excavation area and using consolidating grouting and optimizing structure of dam bottom was introduced, allowing for harmonization of the arch dam and foundation. Three-dimensional (3D geomechanics model test and finite element analysis results indicated that the dam body and foundation have good overload stability and high bearing capacity. The monitoring data showed that the behaviors of dam and foundation correspond with the designed patterns in the construction period and the initial operation period.

  3. High arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pes cavus; High foot arch ... High foot arches are much less common than flat feet. They are more likely to be caused ... difficult to fit into shoes. People who have high arches most often need foot support. A high ...

  4. Structural Safety Monitoring of High Arch Dam Using Improved ABC-BP Model

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    Yantao Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a structural safety monitoring model of a dam is necessary for the evaluation of the dam’s deformation status. The structural safety monitoring method based on the monitoring data is widely used in traditional research. On the basis of the analysis of the high arch dam’s deformation principles, this study proposes a structural safety monitoring method derived from the dam deformation monitoring data. The method first analyzes and establishes the spatial and temporal distribution of high arch dam’s safety monitoring, overcoming the standard artificial bee colony (ABC algorithm’s shortcoming of easily falling into the local optimum by adopting the adaptive proportion and average Euclidean distance afterwards. The improved ABC algorithm is used to optimize the backpropagation (BP neural network’s initial weight and threshold. The application example proves that ABC-BP model’s improvement method is important for the establishment of a high arch deformation safety monitoring model and can effectively improve the model’s fitting and forecasting ability. This method provides a reference for the establishment of a structural safety monitoring model of dam and provides guidance for the establishment of a forecasting model in other fields.

  5. Deformation Monitoring of Geomechanical Model Test and Its Application in Overall Stability Analysis of a High Arch Dam

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    Baoquan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomechanical model testing is an important method for studying the overall stability of high arch dams. The main task of a geomechanical model test is deformation monitoring. Currently, many types of deformation instruments are used for deformation monitoring of dam models, which provide valuable information on the deformation characteristics of the prototype dams. However, further investigation is required for assessing the overall stability of high arch dams through analyzing deformation monitoring data. First, a relationship for assessing the stability of dams is established based on the comprehensive model test method. Second, a stability evaluation system is presented based on the deformation monitoring data, together with the relationships between the deformation and overloading coefficient. Finally, the comprehensive model test method is applied to study the overall stability of the Jinping-I high arch dam. A three-dimensional destructive test of the geomechanical model dam is conducted under reinforced foundation conditions. The deformation characteristics and failure mechanisms of the dam abutments and foundation were investigated. The test results indicate that the stability safety factors of the dam abutments and foundation range from 5.2 to 6.0. These research results provide an important scientific insight into the design, construction, and operation stages of this project.

  6. Effects of Outlets on Cracking Risk and Integral Stability of Super-High Arch Dams

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    Peng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, case study on outlet cracking is first conducted for the Goupitan and Xiaowan arch dams. A nonlinear FEM method is then implemented to study effects of the outlets on integral stability of the Xiluodu arch dam under two loading conditions, i.e., normal loading and overloading conditions. On the basis of the case study and the numerical modelling, the outlet cracking mechanism, risk, and corresponding reinforcement measures are discussed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation reveals that (1 under the normal loading conditions, the optimal distribution of the outlets will contribute to the tensile stress release in the local zone of the dam stream surface and decrease the outlet cracking risk during the operation period. (2 Under the overloading conditions, the cracks initiate around the outlets, then propagate along the horizontal direction, and finally coalesce with those in adjacent outlets, where the yield zone of the dam has a shape of butterfly. Throughout this study, a dam outlet cracking risk control and reinforcement principle is proposed to optimize the outlet design, select the appropriate concrete material, strengthen the temperature control during construction period, design reasonable impounding scheme, and repair the cracks according to their classification.

  7. Effects of outlets on cracking risk and integral stability of super-high arch dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Hongyuan; Li, Qingbin; Hu, Hang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, case study on outlet cracking is first conducted for the Goupitan and Xiaowan arch dams. A nonlinear FEM method is then implemented to study effects of the outlets on integral stability of the Xiluodu arch dam under two loading conditions, i.e., normal loading and overloading conditions. On the basis of the case study and the numerical modelling, the outlet cracking mechanism, risk, and corresponding reinforcement measures are discussed. Furthermore, the numerical simulation reveals that (1) under the normal loading conditions, the optimal distribution of the outlets will contribute to the tensile stress release in the local zone of the dam stream surface and decrease the outlet cracking risk during the operation period. (2) Under the overloading conditions, the cracks initiate around the outlets, then propagate along the horizontal direction, and finally coalesce with those in adjacent outlets, where the yield zone of the dam has a shape of butterfly. Throughout this study, a dam outlet cracking risk control and reinforcement principle is proposed to optimize the outlet design, select the appropriate concrete material, strengthen the temperature control during construction period, design reasonable impounding scheme, and repair the cracks according to their classification.

  8. Effects of Contraction Joints on Vibrational Characteristics of Arch Dams: Experimental Study

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    S. S. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study experimentally investigates the effects of contraction joints on the vibrational characteristics of high arch dams. Three scale models of the world’s second highest dam, the Xiaowan Arch Dam, are used as experimental specimens identified by zero, one, and two contraction joints. When a scale model vibrates harmonically at a specific frequency, its operating deflection shape is acquired by using a scanning laser vibrometer to scan the side surface of the model. The effects of contraction joints on the vibrational characteristics of arch dams are studied by examining the changes in operating deflection shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that (i contraction joints can significantly affect the vibrational characteristics of arch dams, (ii the operating deflection shape intuitively illustrates the vibrational characteristics of arch dams, and (iii a scanning laser vibrometer has marked advantages over traditional equipment in accurately and efficiently acquiring full-field dynamic responses of a structure.

  9. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  10. Cracking Behavior of a Concrete Arch Dam with Weak Upper Abutment

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    Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cracking behavior and failure mode of a 78 m high concrete double-curvature arch dam with weak upper abutment are investigated through performing cracking analysis. The mechanical behavior of concrete is simulated using a smeared crack model, in which a combination of the compression yield surface and the crack detection surface with a damaged elasticity concept is employed to describe the failure of concrete. The arch dam with practical mechanical properties of the upper and lower abutments is firstly studied with emphasis on its cracking behavior during overloading. Then, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the influence of the ratio of the mechanical properties of upper abutment to those of lower abutment on dam failure with prime attention placed on the failure mode. Simulation results indicate the adopted smeared crack model is well-suited to the crack analysis of concrete arch dam. It is shown that cracking is localized around the interface between upper and lower abutments, which leads to a fast crack growth in the through-thickness direction of dam and finally causes the dam failure. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis presents three types of failure modes corresponding to different ratio value, wherein Modes II and III should be avoided since the weak upper abutment plays a predominant role in the cracking and failure of concrete arch dam.

  11. An Interactive Tool for Automatic Predimensioning and Numerical Modeling of Arch Dams

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    D. J. Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of double-curvature arch dams is an attractive solution from an economic viewpoint due to the reduced volume of concrete necessary for their construction as compared to conventional gravity dams. Due to their complex geometry, many criteria have arisen for their design. However, the most widespread methods are based on recommendations of traditional technical documents without taking into account the possibilities of computer-aided design. In this paper, an innovative software tool to design FEM models of double-curvature arch dams is presented. Several capabilities are allowed: simplified geometry creation (interesting for academic purposes, preliminary geometrical design, high-detailed model construction, and stochastic calculation performance (introducing uncertainty associated with material properties and other parameters. This paper specially focuses on geometrical issues describing the functionalities of the tool and the fundamentals of the design procedure with regard to the following aspects: topography, reference cylinder, excavation depth, crown cantilever thickness and curvature, horizontal arch curvature, excavation and concrete mass volume, and additional elements such as joints or spillways. Examples of application on two Spanish dams are presented and the results obtained analyzed.

  12. Analysis of working behavior of Jinping-I Arch Dam during initial impoundment

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    Shi-yong Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To study the stress, deformation, and seepage pressure during the initial impoundment of the Jinping-I Arch Dam, monitoring analysis and numerical calculation were used in a dam behavior analysis that focused on the working behavior of the dam during the late period of the initial impoundment up to the end of November 2014. The numerical calculation was performed based on feedback analysis of the deformation and stress of the arch dam through inversion of the elastic moduli (E of the dam body and foundation, using a three-dimensional finite element model for the linear elastic material of the arch dam. The main monitoring indices presented insignificant changes in the late period of the initial impoundment, and the results of feedback analysis were consistent with monitoring results. Analysis results also show that the deformations of the dam body and dam foundation were within the design range; the dam stress distributions were normal, with values lower than the design control criteria; and the seepage flows through the dam body and dam foundation were lower than the design drainage capacity of the deep-well pump house, demonstrating that the Jinping-I Arch Dam was in good working condition, and the initial impoundment had been successfully completed. The results of the working behavior analysis of the Jinping-I hydropower project during the initial impoundment can provide references for safe operation of similar projects.

  13. Influence of spatial variations in ground motion on earthquake response of arch dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Wang, J. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Hydraulic Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Ground motion recorded at arch dams demonstrate spatial variation or non-uniformity along the dam-foundation interface. Records obtained at two dams demonstrated this phenomena, notably the Pacoima Dam located in California during the magnitude 4.3 earthquake on January 13, 2001, and the magnitude 6.9 Northridge earthquake on January 17, 1994; and the Mauvoisin Dam located in Switzerland during the magnitude 4.6 Valpelline earthquake on March 31, 1996. These spatial variations in ground motion are hardly ever considered in earthquake analysis of arch dams. When they are included, dam-water-interaction is generally oversimplified. This paper discussed the use of the linear analysis procedure, which includes dam-water-foundation rock interaction effects and recognizes the semi-unbounded extent of the rock and impounded water domains in examining the response of the two arch dams to spatially-varying ground motions recorded during earthquakes. Specifically, the paper discussed the Mauvoisin Dam and earthquake records; system and excitation; influence of spatial variations in ground motion; Pacoima Dam and earthquake records; and influence of spatial variations in excitation. It was concluded that spatial variations in ground motion, typically ignored in dam engineering practice, can have profound influence on the earthquake-induced stresses in the dam. This influence depends on the degree to which ground motion varies spatially along the dam-rock interface. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Nonlinear simulation of arch dam cracking with mixed finite element method

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    Ren Hao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new, simple and efficient method for nonlinear simulation of arch dam cracking from the construction period to the operation period, which takes into account the arch dam construction process and temperature loads. In the calculation mesh, the contact surface of pair nodes is located at places on the arch dam where cracking is possible. A new effective iterative method, the mixed finite element method for friction-contact problems, is improved and used for nonlinear simulation of the cracking process. The forces acting on the structure are divided into two parts: external forces and contact forces. The displacement of the structure is chosen as the basic variable and the nodal contact force in the possible contact region of the local coordinate system is chosen as the iterative variable, so that the nonlinear iterative process is only limited within the possible contact surface and is much more economical. This method was used to simulate the cracking process of the Shuanghe Arch Dam in Southwest China. In order to prove the validity and accuracy of this method and to study the effect of thermal stress on arch dam cracking, three schemes were designed for calculation. Numerical results agree with actual measured data, proving that it is feasible to use this method to simulate the entire process of nonlinear arch dam cracking.

  15. Highly tunable NEMS shallow arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-30

    We report highly tunable nanoelectromechanical systems NEMS shallow arches under dc excitation voltages. Silicon based in-plane doubly clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. By designing the structures to have gap to thickness ratio of more than four, the mid-plane stretching of the nano arches is maximized such that an increase in the dc bias voltage will result into continuous increase in the resonance frequency of the resonators to wide ranges. This is confirmed analytically based on a nonlinear beam model. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with that of the results from developed analytical model. A maximum tunability of 108.14% for a 180 nm thick arch with an initially designed gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes is achieved. Furthermore, a tunable narrow bandpass filter is demonstrated, which opens up opportunities for designing such structures as filtering elements in high frequency ranges.

  16. Ambient Vibration Tests of an Arch Dam with Different Reservoir Water Levels: Experimental Results and Comparison with Finite Element Modelling

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    Sergio Vincenzo Calcina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the ambient vibration tests performed in an arch dam in two different working conditions in order to assess the effect produced by two different reservoir water levels on the structural vibration properties. The study consists of an experimental part and a numerical part. The experimental tests were carried out in two different periods of the year, at the beginning of autumn (October 2012 and at the end of winter (March 2013, respectively. The measurements were performed using a fast technique based on asynchronous records of microtremor time-series. In-contact single-station measurements were done by means of one single high resolution triaxial tromometer and two low-frequency seismometers, placed in different points of the structure. The Standard Spectral Ratio method has been used to evaluate the natural frequencies of vibration of the structure. A 3D finite element model of the arch dam-reservoir-foundation system has been developed to verify analytically determined vibration properties, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes, and their changes linked to water level with the experimental results.

  17. Right circumflex retro-oesophageal aortic arch with coarctation of a high-positioned right arch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kyung-Sik; Yong, Hwan Seok; Woo, Ok Hee; Kang, Eun-Young [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Joo-Won [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-06-15

    We present a rare case of right circumflex retro-oesophageal aortic arch with coarctation of a high-positioned right arch. A 7-month-old boy presented with a cardiac murmur. Cardiac situs was normal and there was no evidence of an intracardiac shunt or patent ductus arteriosus. MR aortography revealed a right aortic arch that was high-positioned, tortuous and narrowed. This right aortic arch crossed the midline behind the oesophagus and continued as a left-sided descending aorta. The left common carotid and subclavian arteries arose from a large branching vascular structure that derived from the top of the left-sided descending aorta. The right common carotid artery arose from the ascending aorta. The proximal portion of the right common carotid artery showed very severe stenosis and poststenotic dilatation. The right subclavian artery originated distal to the narrowed and tortuous segment of the aortic arch. (orig.)

  18. Increased plantar force and impulse in American football players with high arch compared to normal arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Daniel W.; Myer, Gregory D.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Heidt, Robert S.; Ford, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk of overuse injury among athletes is high due in part to repeated loading of the lower extremities. Compared to individuals with normal arch (NA) structure, those with high (HA) or low arch (LA) may be at increased risk of specific overuse injuries, including stress fractures. A high medial longitudinal arch may result in decreased shock absorbing properties due to increased rigidity in foot mechanics. While the effect of arch structure on dynamic function has been examined in straight line walking and running, the relationship between the two during multi-directional movements remains unstudied. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in plantar loading in football players occur during both walking and pivoting movements. Method Plantar loading was examined in 9 regions of the foot for 26 participants (16 NA, 10 HA). Results High arch athletes demonstrated increased maximum force in the lateral rear foot and medial forefoot, and force time integral in the medial forefoot while walking. HA athletes also demonstrated increased maximum force in the medial rear foot and medial and central forefoot during rapid pivoting. Conclusions The current findings demonstrate that loading patterns differ between football players with high and normal arch structure, which could possibly influence injury risk in this population. PMID:23141809

  19. Highly Tunable Electrothermally Actuated Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated MEMS arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. The electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the clamped-clamped MEMS arch beam, generating a current that passes through the MEMS arch beam and controls its axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to increase in its curvature, thereby increases the resonance frequencies of the structure. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electro-thermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators.

  20. Research on Safety Factor of Dam Slope of High Embankment Dam under Seismic Condition

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    Li Bin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the constant development of construction technology of embankment dam, the constructed embankment dam becomes higher and higher, and the embankment dam with its height over 200m will always adopt the current design criteria of embankment dam only suitable for the construction of embankment dam lower than 200m in height. So the design criteria of high embankment dam shall be improved. We shall calculate the stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam under different dam height, slope ratio and different seismic intensity based on ratio of safety margin, and clarify the change rules of stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m. We calculate the ratio of safety margin of traditional and reliable method by taking the stable, allowable and reliability index 4.2 of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m as the standard value, and conduct linear regression for both. As a result, the conditions, where 1.3 is considered as the stability and safety factors of dam slope of high embankment dam with its height over 200m under seismic condition and 4.2 as the allowable and reliability index, are under the same risk control level.

  1. State of the arch dam and foundation of the Inguri Hydroelectric Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronshtein, V.I.

    1994-08-01

    The Inguri hydroelectric station (HES) is a cascade of hydroelectric stations including, in addition to the dam - diversion installation of the Inguri HES proper, the near-dam installation of the Perepad HES-1 and three similar channel installations of the Perepad HESs-2, -3, and -4 located on the tailrace emptying into the Black Sea. The HESs of the cascade use the fall of two rivers, the Inguri and Eristskali, by diverting the waters of the Inguri into the Eristskali.

  2. Dams

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset �is generated from from the Vermont Dam Inventory (VDI). The VDI is managed by the VT DEC's Dam Safety and Hydrology Section and contains information...

  3. Feeding an infant with high arched palate by high flow rate bottle nipple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Abdulkadir; Bilgin, Huseyin; Kara, Semra

    2015-01-01

    For infants with high arched palate, feeding is one of the most immediate challenges faced by parents and caretakers. General suggestions for feeding in infants with cleft palate may be adapted to infants with high arched palate. These include oral feeding facilitation techniques and special feeding tools. Here we present a newborn with a high arched palate and serious feeding problems who was fed easily by a large size and a large hole nipple, ordinarily used for infants older than 6 months, instead of specialized feeding equipment.

  4. Study on dynamic anti-sliding stability of a high gravity dam considering complex dam foundation

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    Deng-hong CHEN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There existed some limitations when analyzing the anti-sliding seismic stability of dam-foundation system by traditional pseudo-static method and response spectrum method. The dynamic strength reduction method was used to study on the deep anti-sliding stability of a high gravity dam considering complex dam foundation under strong earthquake-induced ground action. The static analysis was firstly carried out by reducing the shear strength parameters of the dam foundation’s rock mass with equal proportion. Then, the time-history seismic analysis was carried out based on the static analysis. It was proposed as one of dynamic instability criterions that the peak values of the dynamic displacements and plastic strain energy change suddenly with increasing strength reduction coefficient. The elasto-plastic behavior of the dam foundation was idealized using Drucker–Prager yield criterion based on associated flow rule assumption. Through the static, dynamic strength reduction analysis and dynamic linear elastic analysis of the overflow dam monolith of a high gravity dam, the results’ reliability of elastic-plastic time history analysis was confirmed. The results also showed that the rock mass strength of the high gravity dam foundation has higher strength reserve coefficient. The instability criterions of dynamic strength reduction method proposed were feasible. Although the static anti-slide analysis methods and standards of gravity dam based on the numerical methods are being discussed at present, the dynamic calculation method and instability criterions proposed in this paper would provide some meaningful suggestions for the dynamic analysis of the similar projects.

  5. Quasi-stable Slope-Failure Dams in High Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Collapses of steep mountain slopes in the Himalaya, Karakoram, Pamir, Hindu Kush, and Tibetan Plateau are well known as a result of:(1) generally high seismicity in active tectonic areas; (2) prior deglaciation leaving undercut, unstable cliffs; (3) present-day debuttressing of rock cliffs by glacial down-wasting in conditions of global warming; and (4) degradation of permafrost cohesion and water-ice cementation in high mountain slopes. Landslide dams across mountain rivers are also well known worldwide and generally do not endure for long because of the common landslide-lake outburst floods (LLOF) whose discharge is commonly sufficiently large to remove much of the dam in a short time. A number of massive slope-failure dams in south High Asia, however, have endured for centuries and require explanations for the length of duration, whereas recent examples require robust assessment for better predictive hazard analysis. Three main factors contribute to longevity of slope-failure dams: (1) mega-rocks >15-30 m that inhibit dam failure in overflow breaches; (2) mega-porosity wherein incoming discharge to the landslide lake is balanced by subterranean water through-flow within the landslide dam; (3) impermeable clay fills caused by remobilization of prior lacustrine-dammed sediment that impart dam strength to allow lasting integrity for a time, and (4) climate-change induced lake-level lowering. Several examples of long-lived or unusually stable, slope-failure dams associated with pronounced structural/tectonic associations include: (1) Pangong Tso, Ladakh and Tibet; (2) Lake Shewa, Afghanistan; (3) Sarez Lake, Tajikistan; and (4) Lake Hunza, Pakistan. Pangong Tso and Lake Shewa were emplaced thousands of years ago and only Lake Shewa shows some instability of the dam front where percolating water maintains lake level but may be causing new slumping. Sarez Lake behind the Usoi landslide dam was emplaced by an earthquake in 1911 and maintains its level by seepage. Lake

  6. Application of strength reduction method to dynamic anti-sliding stability analysis of high gravity dam with complex dam foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Deng-hong Chen; Cheng-bin Du

    2011-01-01

    Considering that there are some limitations in analyzing the anti-sliding seismic stability of dam-foundation systems with the traditional pseudo-static method and response spectrum method, the dynamic strength reduction method was used to study the deep anti-sliding stability of a high gravity dam with a complex dam foundation in response to strong earthquake-induced ground action. Based on static anti-sliding stability analysis of the dam foundation undertaken by decreasing the shear streng...

  7. Engineering Geological Assessment of Diversion Tunnel of Bakhtiari Damsite (Biggest Two-Arch Concrete Dam in Southern Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ajalloeian; A. R. Samadi Soofi; M. Salavati

    2012-01-01

    Bakhtiari dam is located on the Bakhtiari river, 120 km away from the north of the Andimeshk city. Upper diversion tunnel of this dam with large cross section (13.7 m excavation diameter) and more than 1 km length is a huge construction. The tunnel is placed in the Sarvak formation carbonate rocks of Bangestan group which passes through seven different geological zones with various specifications (SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV6, and SV7). Joint studies show two main discontinuit including bedd...

  8. Engineering Geological Assessment of Diversion Tunnel of Bakhtiari Damsite (Biggest Two-Arch Concrete Dam in Southern Iran

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    R. Ajalloeian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bakhtiari dam is located on the Bakhtiari river, 120 km away from the north of the Andimeshk city. Upper diversion tunnel of this dam with large cross section (13.7 m excavation diameter and more than 1 km length is a huge construction. The tunnel is placed in the Sarvak formation carbonate rocks of Bangestan group which passes through seven different geological zones with various specifications (SV1, SV2, SV3, SV4, SV5, SV6, and SV7. Joint studies show two main discontinuit including bedding and a main group of joint (J1 together with random joints (faults and fractures. Most of discontinuities have been filled mainly by calcite or calcite and clay. Data deduced from testing and analysis shows good-to-excellent RQD classes with 75 to 90 values. Based on RMR and Q methods, generally rock masses have good to very good quality with 61 to 95 values for RMR and 10 to 35 values for Q. Based on conducted stability analysis, suitable supports were suggested for tunnel by RMR and Q methods. As a result, it can be concluded that all units have a good stability. Therefore, systematic rock bolting with 40–50 mm unreinforced shotcrete has been proposed for some special place. For rock support, according to RMR method, 3 m rock bolts in crown, 2.5 m spacing and with 50 mm shotcrete in crown has been proposed also 3 m rock bolts, based on Q method, 2.3-2.4 m spacing with systematic Bolting without shotcrete or 40 mm unreinforced shotcrete in some units, has been proposed. According to RMR method, for SV5 zone with very good and excellent quality, local 33 bolting without shotcrete and 3m rock bolts, 3 m spacing and spot bolting according to Q method has been proposed.

  9. Dynamic response of arch bridges traversed by high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacarbonara, Walter; Colone, Valerio

    2007-07-01

    A mechanical model describing the planar elasto-dynamics of arch bridges with general arch profiles is presented. The model is amenable to analytical or semi-analytical treatments and is effective for parametric studies, design of control systems or structural optimizations. The Ritz's energy approach is employed to calculate the solutions of the vibration eigenvalue problem—natural frequencies and mode shapes—and the forced responses to external excitations, namely those induced by the passage of trains. A closed-form solution of the bridge dynamic response to the transit of trains with arbitrary load distributions and running speeds is found and the train-induced resonances are accordingly discussed. In particular, three European high-speed trains—the French TGV, the Italian ETR 500, and the German ICE—traversing a lower-deck steel arch bridge are considered and the ensuing responses are investigated.

  10. High- compared to low-arched athletes exhibit smaller knee abduction moments in walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas W; Andrews, Samantha; Stickley, Cris; Williams, D S Blaise

    2016-12-01

    High- (HA) and low-arched athletes (LA) experience distinct injury patterns. These injuries are the result of the interaction of structure and biomechanics. A suggested mechanism of patellofemoral pain pertains to frontal plane knee moments which may be exaggerated in LA athletes. We hypothesize that LA athletes will exhibit greater peak knee abduction moments than high-arched athletes. Twenty healthy female recreational athletes (10HA and 10LA) performed five over-ground barefoot walking and five barefoot running trials at a self-selected velocity while three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. Peak knee abduction moments and time-to-peak knee abduction moments were calculated using Visual 3D. High-arched athletes had smaller peak knee abduction moments compared to low-arched athletes during walking (KAM1: p=0.019; KAM2: p=0.015) and running (p=0.010). No differences were observed in time-to-peak knee abduction moment during walking (KAM1: p=0.360; KAM2: p=0.085) or running (p=0.359). These findings demonstrate that foot type is associated with altered frontal plane knee kinetics which may contribute to patellofemoral pain. Future research should address the efficacy of clinical interventions including orthotics and rehabilitation programs in these athletes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hybrid palliation of interrupted aortic arch in a high-risk neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a high-risk neonate with interrupted aortic arch (IAA and ventricular septal defect who underwent a successful hybrid palliative procedure using a ductal stent and bilateral branch pulmonary artery banding. This case represents not only a successful use of hybrid approach in high-risk neonates with IAA, but also introduces an alternative and safe access for ductal stent insertion through the right ventricular infundibulum.

  12. Evaluation of Dynamic Load Factors for a High-Speed Railway Truss Arch Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Youliang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on dynamic impact of high-speed trains on long-span bridges are important for the design and evaluation of high-speed railway bridges. The use of the dynamic load factor (DLF to account for the impact effect has been widely accepted in bridge engineering. Although the field monitoring studies are the most dependable way to study the actual DLF of the bridge, according to previous studies there are few field monitoring data on high-speed railway truss arch bridges. This paper presents an evaluation of DLF based on field monitoring and finite element simulation of Nanjing DaShengGuan Bridge, which is a high-speed railway truss arch bridge with the longest span throughout the world. The DLFs in different members of steel truss arch are measured using monitoring data and simulated using finite element model, respectively. The effects of lane position, number of train carriages, and speed of trains on DLF are further investigated. By using the accumulative probability function of the Generalized Extreme Value Distribution, the probability distribution model of DLF is proposed, based on which the standard value of DLF within 50-year return period is evaluated and compared with different bridge design codes.

  13. Natural gaits of the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifang Fan

    Full Text Available There has been a controversy as to whether or not the non-pathological flat foot and high-arched foot have an effect on human walking activities. The 3D foot scanning system was employed to obtain static footprints from subjects adopting a half-weight-bearing stance. Based upon their footprints, the subjects were divided into two groups: the flat-footed and the high-arched. The plantar pressure measurement system was used to measure and record the subjects' successive natural gaits. Two indices were proposed: distribution of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF of plantar and the rate of change of footprint areas. Using these two indices to compare the natural gaits of the two subject groups, we found that (1 in stance phase, there is a significant difference (p<0.01 in the distributions of VGRF of plantar; (2 in a stride cycle, there is also a significant difference (p<0.01 in the rate of change of footprint area. Our analysis suggests that when walking, the VGRF of the plantar brings greater muscle tension to the flat-footed while a smaller rate of change of footprint area brings greater stability to the high-arched.

  14. Major Technologies for Safe Construction of High Earth-Rockfill Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqi Ma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The earth-rockfill dam is one of the primary dam types in the selection of high dams to be constructed in Western China, since it is characterized by favorable adaptability of the dam foundation; full utilization of local earth, rock, and building-excavated materials; low construction cost; and low cement consumption. Many major technical issues regarding earth-rockfill dams with a height of over 250 m were studied and solved successfully in the construction of the 261.5 m Nuozhadu earth core rockfill dam. This paper describes research achievements and basic conclusions; systematically summarizes the accumulated experiences from the construction of the Nuozhadu Dam and other high earth-rockfill dams; and discusses major technical issues, such as deformation control, seepage control, dam slope stability, safety and control of flood discharging, safety and quality control of dam construction, safety assessments, early warning, and other key technical difficulties. This study also provides a reference and technological support for the future construction of 300 m high earth-rockfill dams.

  15. Mathematical Modeling in Systems for Operational Evaluation of the Stress-Strain State of the Arch-Gravity Dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellendir, E. N.; Gordon, L. A., E-mail: lev-gordon@mail.ru; Khrapkov, A. A.; Skvortsova, A. E., E-mail: SkvortsovaAE@vniig.ru [B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG) (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Current studies of the stress-strain state of the dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya Hydroelectric Power Plant at VNIIG based on mathematical modeling including full scale and experimental data are described. Applications and programs intended for automatic operational evaluation of the stress-strain state of the dam for optimizing control of the upper race level in the course of the annual filling-drawdown cycle and during seismic events are examined. Improvements in systems for monitoring the stress-strain state of concrete dams are proposed.

  16. Safety Monitoring Index of High Concrete Gravity Dam Based on Failure Mechanism of Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of establishing dam safety monitoring index are mostly based on the observation data. According to the performance of dam-foundation system under the experienced loads, alarm values and extreme values are predicted for monitoring quantities. As for some dams, the potential most unfavorable loads may not yet have appeared, and dam bearing capacity may also decrease over time. Therefore, monitoring index determined by these methods can not reflect whether the dam will break or not. Based on the finite element method, to study the progressive instability failures of high concrete gravity dams under the failure modes of material strength degradation or uncertainty and extreme environmental loads during operation, methods of strength reduction and overloading are, respectively, used. Typical stages in the instability processes are identified by evaluation indicators of dam displacement, the connectivity of yield zones, and the yield volume ratio of dam concretes; then instability safety monitoring indexes are hierarchically determined according to these typical symptoms. At last, a case study is performed to give a more detailed introduction about the process of establishing safety monitoring index for high concrete gravity dams based on the failure mechanism of instability, and three grades of monitoring index related to different safety situations are established for this gravity dam.

  17. Remote Sensing of Deformation of a High Concrete-Faced Rockfill Dam Using InSAR: A Study of the Shuibuya Dam, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Settlement is one of the most important deformation characteristics of high concrete faced rockfill dams (CFRDs, >100 m. High CFRDs safety would pose a great threat to the security of people’s lives and property downstream if this kind of deformation were not to be measured correctly, as traditional monitoring approaches have limitations in terms of durability, coverage, and efficiency. It has become urgent to develop new monitoring techniques to complement or replace traditional monitoring approaches for monitoring the safety and operation status of high CFRDs. This study examines the Shuibuya Dam (up to 233.5 m in height in China, which is currently the highest CFRD in the world. We used space-borne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR time series to monitor the surface deformation of the Shuibuya Dam. Twenty-one ALOS PALSAR images that span the period from 28 February 2007 to 11 March 2011 were used to map the spatial and temporal deformation of the dam. A high correlation of 0.93 between the InSAR and the in-situ monitoring results confirmed the reliability of the InSAR method; the deformation history derived from InSAR is also consistent with the in-situ settlement monitoring system. In addition, the InSAR results allow continuous investigation of dam deformation over a wide area that includes the entire dam surface as well as the surrounding area, offering a clear picture continuously of the dam deformation.

  18. High-Resolution Observations of Flares in an Arch Filament System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Liu, Rui; Li, Shangwei; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We present high-resolution observations of five sequential solar flares occurring in NOAA Active Region (AR) 12396 taken with the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, complemented by IRIS and SDO observations. The main flaring region is an arch filament system (AFS) consisting of multiple bundles of dark filament threads enclosed by scattered flare brightenings. We study the magnetic configuration and evolution of the active region by constructing coronal magnetic field models based on SDO/HMI magnetograms using two independent methods, i.e., the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation and the flux rope insertion method. We are able to identify multiple flux ropes based on magnetic twist derived from the extrapolated NLFFF, which is consistent with the NST observations of multiple filaments. Both models suggest that the filament bundles may posses mixed signs of helicity, i.e., positive (negative) in the north (south). The footprints of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) derived from the extrapolated NLFFF compare favorably with the observed flare ribbons. Moreover, magnetic field lines traced along the semi-circular footprint of a dome-like QSL surrounding the flaring region are connected to the regions of significant helicity and Poynting flux injection. An interesting double-ribbon fine structure located at the east border of the AFS is consistent with the fine structure of the QSL's footprint. The maps of magnetic twist show that positive twist became dominant as time progressed, which is consistent with the injection of positive helicity during a 26 hour interval before the flares. The trigger mechanisms and detailed dynamics of the observed flares are also discussed.

  19. Numerical analysis of earthquake response of an ultra-high earth-rockfill dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W. X.; Xu, W. J.; Yu, Y. Z.; Lv, H.

    2013-05-01

    Failure of high earth dams under earthquake may cause disastrous economic damage and loss of lives. It is necessary to conduct seismic safety assessment, and numerical analysis is an effective way. Solid-fluid interaction has a significant influence on the dynamic responses of geotechnical materials, which should be considered in the seismic analysis of earth dams. The initial stress field needed for dynamic computation is often obtained from postulation, without considering the effects of early construction and reservoir impounding. In this study, coupled static analyses are conducted to simulate the construction and impounding of an ultra-high earth rockfill dam in China. Then based on the initial static stress field, dynamic response of the dam is studied with fully coupled nonlinear method. Results show that excess pore water pressure accumulates gradually with earthquake and the maximum value occurs at the bottom of core. Acceleration amplification reaches the maximum at the crest as a result of whiplash effect. Horizontal and vertical permanent displacements both reach the maximum values at the dam crest.

  20. Origin and mechanisms of high salinity in Hombolo Dam and groundwater in Dodoma municipality Tanzania, revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemsanga, Ceven; Muzuka, Alfred Nzibavuga Nyarubakula; Martz, Lawrance; Komakech, Hans Charles; Elisante, Eliapenda; Kisaka, Marry; Ntuza, Cosmas

    2017-10-01

    The Hombolo dam (HD), in central Tanzania, is a shallow reservoir characterized by high salinity that limits its use for human activities. The origin of the salinity, mechanisms of reaching and concentrating in the dam remain unclear. These were assessed using hydrogeochemical facies, water type evolutions and mapping. The source of HD salinity was identified to be shallow groundwater (SG) and runoff from a seasonal floodplain with NaCl-rich lithological materails, along Little Kinyasungwe River that feeds the dam. The NaCl-rich lithological units, about 5-7 km upstream of the dam, were highly concentrated with NaCl to the extent that the local community was commercially separating table salt from them. The physicochemical parameters from these NaCl-rich lithological materials were well represented in HD and nearby groundwater sources, which suggests active water interactions. Water type evolution and surface hydrology assessments clearly showed that SG in the salty-floodplain was influenced by evaporation (ET) and was periodically carried to the HD. Clearly; HD water had high chemical similarity with the nearby SG. This agrees with previous studies that HD is partly fed by the local aquifer. However, this is the first attempt at mapping its physical origin. The origin of HD salinity was further supported by the spatial distribution of electrical conductivity (EC), where very high EC (up to 21,230 μScm-1) was recorded in SG within the NaCl-rich lithological unit while water sources far away from the NaCl-rich materials had much lower EC values. Thus, the study disagrees with previous conclusions that HD salinity was sorely due to high dam surface ET but is primarily due to geological reasons. Comparisons of HD with a nearby Matumbulu dam (MD), another earthen dam in climatologically similar settings, reveals that MD water was less saline/mineralised. This further shows that HD high salinity is most likely a geologic phenomenon, but local climatic factors, namely

  1. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-03

    We report an analytical and experimental study on the tunability of in-plane doubly-clamped nanomechanical arches under varied DC bias conditions at room temperature. For this purpose, silicon based shallow arches are fabricated using standard e-beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a transduction gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes. The high tunability of shallow arches paves the ways for highly tunable band pass filtering applications in high frequency range.

  2. Clay-cement concrete diaphragm of the type "slurry wall" in the 100 meter high dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzinskiy Aleksandr Vladimirovich

    Full Text Available In the article the authors estimate the possibility of building a high (100 m high stone dam with clay-cement concrete diaphragm. This diaphragm is used as an antifiltering element and it is made of secant piles method of clay-cement concrete (method of "slurry wall". This diaphragm should be constructed in several phases, in our example example in three stages. Numerical studies of the stress-strain state of such a dam show that considerable compressive stresses can appear in the diaphragm. These stresses can be significantly (3...4 times greater than the strength of clay-cement concrete in compression. However it should be taken into consideration that the diaphragm of such a high dam will be crimped by horizontal stresses, i.e. clay-cement concrete will operate in the triaxial compression. Under these conditions the strength of clay-cement concrete will be significantly higher, therefore, the diaphragm reliability might be provided with a margin. For this reason, the most important issue in the engineering of a high dam with such type of diaphragm is to select the required composition of clay-cement concrete. Increasing its strength by extension of the cement fraction could increase modulus of deformation. Therefore it could lead to compressive stress increase and the strength state degradation. Hydrostatic pressure generates the areas of tensile stresses in the clay-cement concrete diaphragm due to the arising bending deformation. It threatens the formation of cracks in the clay-cement concrete, especially in the nodes interface diaphragm queues. It is recommended to match the diaphragm queues using ferroconcrete galleries. This should ensure flexibility of deformation between the gallery and the diaphragm.

  3. Monitoring and maintenance at Kariba dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goguel, B. (Coyne et Bellier, Bureau d' Ingenieurs-Conseils, 75 - Paris (France)); Mpala, A.S. (Zambezi River Authority, Lusaka (Zambia))

    1992-06-01

    The 128 m-high Kariba arch dam, built between 1955 and 1959 on the Zambezi river, is on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. It creates one of the largest man-made lakes in the world, and supplies two power stations with a total capacity of 1266 MW. Safety monitoring of the dam and its foundation is a long-term, continuous and very important function, which guides maintenance efforts. The general behaviour of the work is influenced by the complex geological conditional changes on the right(south) bank, slow long-term dimensional changes in the concrete, and variable hydrological conditions. After a comprehensive study of the instrumentation data amassed up to 1983, additional instrumentation was provided between 1986 and 1989. The new data analysis has begun recently and is expected to allow for interpretation of the long-term phenomena involved. (author).

  4. Examining global electricity supply vulnerability to climate change using a high-fidelity hydropower dam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sean W D; Ng, Jia Yi; Galelli, Stefano

    2017-07-15

    An important and plausible impact of a changing global climate is altered power generation from hydroelectric dams. Here we project 21st century global hydropower production by forcing a coupled, global hydrological and dam model with three General Circulation Model (GCM) projections run under two emissions scenarios. Dams are simulated using a detailed model that accounts for plant specifications, storage dynamics, reservoir bathymetry and realistic, optimized operations. We show that the inclusion of these features can have a non-trivial effect on the simulated response of hydropower production to changes in climate. Simulation results highlight substantial uncertainty in the direction of change in globally aggregated hydropower production (~-5 to +5% change in mean global production by the 2080s under a high emissions scenario, depending on GCM). Several clearly impacted hotspots are identified, the most prominent of which encompasses the Mediterranean countries in southern Europe, northern Africa and the Middle East. In this region, hydropower production is projected to be reduced by approximately 40% on average by the end of the century under a high emissions scenario. After accounting for each country's dependence on hydropower for meeting its current electricity demands, the Balkans countries emerge as the most vulnerable (~5-20% loss in total national electricity generation depending on country). On the flipside, a handful of countries in Scandinavia and central Asia are projected to reap a significant increase in total electrical production (~5-15%) without investing in new power generation facilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dams designed to fail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penman, A. [Geotechnical Engineering Consultants, Harpenden (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    New developments in geotechnical engineering have led to methods for designing and constructing safe embankment dams. Failed dams can be categorized as those designed to fail, and those that have failed unexpectedly. This presentation outlined 3 dam failures: the 61 m high Malpasset Dam in France in 1959 which killed 421; the 71 m high Baldwin Hills Dam in the United States in 1963 which killed 5; and, the Vajont Dam in Italy in 1963 which killed 2,600 people. Following these incidents, the International Commission for Large Dams (ICOLD) reviewed regulations on reservoir safety. The 3 dams were found to have inadequate spillways and their failures were due to faults in their design. Fuse plug spillways, which address this problem, are designed to fail if an existing spillway proves inadequate. They allow additional discharge to prevent overtopping of the embankment dam. This solution can only be used if there is an adjacent valley to take the additional discharge. Examples of fuse gates were presented along with their effect on dam safety. A research program is currently underway in Norway in which high embankment dams are being studied for overtopping failure and failure due to internal erosion. Internal erosion has been the main reason why dams have failed unexpectedly. To prevent failures, designers suggested the use of a clay blanket placed under the upstream shoulder. However, for dams with soft clay cores, these underblankets could provide a route for a slip surface and that could lead to failure of the upstream shoulder. It was concluded that a safe arrangement for embankment dams includes the use of tipping gates or overturning gates which always fail at a required flood water level. Many have been installed in old and new dams around the world. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  6. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring detects a high prevalence of hypertension late after coarctation repair in patients with hypoplastic arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Melissa G Y; Kowalski, Remi; Galati, John C; Cheung, Michael M H; Jones, Bryn; Koleff, Jane; d'Udekem, Yves

    2012-11-01

    To determine by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring the risk of hypertension late after coarctation repair in patients with arch hypoplasia. Sixty-two of 116 consecutive patients (age, ≥10 years) who had coarctation repair and were quoted subjectively by the surgeon or the cardiologist to have arch hypoplasia at the time of the repair underwent a transthoracic echocardiogram and 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. Median age at repair was 11 days (range, 6-48 days). Mean preoperative z score of the proximal transverse arch was -2.43 ± 0.46. Eight patients had a repair via sternotomy (6 end-to-side anastomoses, 2 patch repairs) and 54 had a conventional repair via thoracotomy. After a follow-up of 18 ± 5 years, 27% of the patients (17/62) had resting hypertension and 60% (37/62) had abnormal ambulatory blood pressure. Sensitivity of high resting blood pressure in detecting an abnormal 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure was 41%. Twenty patients had arch obstruction at last follow-up. Eighteen of them (90%) had abnormal ambulatory blood pressure. None of the patients operated on with end-to-side repair via sternotomy had reobstruction compared with 33% (18/54) of those repaired via thoracotomy. Patients with a hypoplastic arch operated via thoracotomy have an alarming prevalence of hypertension. Regular follow-up with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is warranted, especially in patients who have had a smaller aortic arch at the time of the initial operation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Skyscraper dams in Yunnan : China's new electricity generator should step in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryder, G.

    2006-05-12

    The construction of a series of high-head hydroelectric power dams in China's earthquake-prone Yunnan province has raised concerns in China's scientific and environmental communities. The series of skyscraper-high dams are being built to meet Beijing's power production targets without the benefit of market discipline or effective regulatory oversight. Dam building is central to Beijing's plan for tripling the country's hydropower production by 2020. To meet that target, the State Council granted exclusive development rights to Hydrolancang, the Yunnan Huadian Nu River Hydropower Development Company and the Three Gorges Corporation. The Hydrolancang company is building 2 of the world's tallest and most controversial hydro dams on the Lancang River. When completed in 2012, Xiaowan will be the world's tallest arch dam at 292 metres high. Another dam, the 254 metre high Nuozhadu dam is expected to start generating power in 2017. In addition, there are plans for 13 other high dams along the Nu River, one of only 2 major rivers in China that remains free-flowing. This document expressed that China's new electricity regulator should initiate a full-cost review of state dam-building in the earthquake-prone province. It was argued that as state-owned power companies, the dam builders are not market-driven and are shielded from many of the financial risks and environmental liabilities associated with large dams. The author argued that China's electricity regulator should examine the dam builders' projects costs and profits and review the economic implications of the hydro policy for China's power consumers. It was also suggested that the country's modernization goals for the power industry should be reviewed. The immediate concerns are ecological damage and the frequency with which Yunnan province is hit by earthquakes, rock falls and landslides. Experts caution that the extra weight of the high dams and reservoirs

  8. Maternal high-protein or high-prebiotic-fiber diets affect maternal milk composition and gut microbiota in rat dams and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Megan C; Barile, Daniela; Meyrand, Mickael; German, J Bruce; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-11-01

    Maternal gut microbiota and milk composition could modify offspring microbiota and therefore disease susceptibility. The effect of maternal high-protein (HP) or prebiotic diets on maternal milk composition and gut microbiota in rat dams and offspring was examined. Wistar rat dams were fed a control, HP (40% wt/wt), or high-prebiotic-fiber (21.6% wt/wt) (HF) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Pups were challenged with a high-fat/sucrose diet from 14.5 to 22.5 weeks of age. Dam milk was analyzed for fat, protein, and oligosaccharides (OS). Fecal microbiota was analyzed in dams at parturition and 2 weeks post-partum and in offspring at 5 and 22 weeks along with cecal digesta at termination. Maternal milk differed only in OS content, each diet group being distinguishable. HF1 and HP1 offspring had decreased plasma lipopolysaccharide compared with C1. Offspring sex, maternal diet, and time (5 weeks vs. 22 weeks of age) affected the microbial groups examined. Bifidobacteria was higher in HF dams and offspring. Increasing protein or fiber content in maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation modifies milk OS content and gut microbiota of dams which may influence establishment of gut microbiota in offspring. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  9. Reported tailings dam failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, M. [CSIC - Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologia, Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: mayterico@ipe.csic.es; Benito, G. [CSIC - Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Madrid (Spain); Salgueiro, A.R. [CERENA - Centro de Recursos Naturais e Ambiente of IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Diez-Herrero, A. [Geological Hazards Unit, Spanish Geological Survey (IGME), Madrid (Spain); Pereira, H.G. [CERENA - Centro de Recursos Naturais e Ambiente of IST, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2008-04-01

    A detailed search and re-evaluation of the known historical cases of tailings dam failure was carried out. A corpus of 147 cases of worldwide tailings dam disasters, from which 26 located in Europe, was compiled in a database. This contains six sections, including dam location, its physical and constructive characteristics, actual and putative failure cause, sludge hydrodynamics, socio-economical consequences and environmental impacts. Europe ranks in second place in reported accidents (18%), more than one third of them in dams 10-20 m high. In Europe, the most common cause of failure is related to unusual rain, whereas there is a lack of occurrences associated with seismic liquefaction, which is the second cause of tailings dam breakage elsewhere in the world. Moreover, over 90% of incidents occurred in active mines, and only 10% refer to abandoned ponds. The results reached by this preliminary analysis show an urgent need for EU regulations regarding technical standards of tailings disposal.

  10. Accuracy Analysis of a Dam Model from Drone Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffi, Giulia; Venturi, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the accuracy of models obtained by drone surveys. To this end, this work analyzes how the placement of ground control points (GCPs) used to georeference the dense point cloud of a dam affects the resulting three-dimensional (3D) model. Images of a double arch masonry dam upstream face are acquired from drone survey and used to build the 3D model of the dam for vulnerability analysis purposes. However, there still remained the issue of understanding the real impact of a correct GCPs location choice to properly georeference the images and thus, the model. To this end, a high number of GCPs configurations were investigated, building a series of dense point clouds. The accuracy of these resulting dense clouds was estimated comparing the coordinates of check points extracted from the model and their true coordinates measured via traditional topography. The paper aims at providing information about the optimal choice of GCPs placement not only for dams but also for all surveys of high-rise structures. The knowledge a priori of the effect of the GCPs number and location on the model accuracy can increase survey reliability and accuracy and speed up the survey set-up operations. PMID:28771185

  11. Accuracy Analysis of a Dam Model from Drone Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Elena; Buffi, Giulia; Venturi, Sara; Manciola, Piergiorgio

    2017-08-03

    This paper investigates the accuracy of models obtained by drone surveys. To this end, this work analyzes how the placement of ground control points (GCPs) used to georeference the dense point cloud of a dam affects the resulting three-dimensional (3D) model. Images of a double arch masonry dam upstream face are acquired from drone survey and used to build the 3D model of the dam for vulnerability analysis purposes. However, there still remained the issue of understanding the real impact of a correct GCPs location choice to properly georeference the images and thus, the model. To this end, a high number of GCPs configurations were investigated, building a series of dense point clouds. The accuracy of these resulting dense clouds was estimated comparing the coordinates of check points extracted from the model and their true coordinates measured via traditional topography. The paper aims at providing information about the optimal choice of GCPs placement not only for dams but also for all surveys of high-rise structures. The knowledge a priori of the effect of the GCPs number and location on the model accuracy can increase survey reliability and accuracy and speed up the survey set-up operations.

  12. Accuracy Analysis of a Dam Model from Drone Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Ridolfi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the accuracy of models obtained by drone surveys. To this end, this work analyzes how the placement of ground control points (GCPs used to georeference the dense point cloud of a dam affects the resulting three-dimensional (3D model. Images of a double arch masonry dam upstream face are acquired from drone survey and used to build the 3D model of the dam for vulnerability analysis purposes. However, there still remained the issue of understanding the real impact of a correct GCPs location choice to properly georeference the images and thus, the model. To this end, a high number of GCPs configurations were investigated, building a series of dense point clouds. The accuracy of these resulting dense clouds was estimated comparing the coordinates of check points extracted from the model and their true coordinates measured via traditional topography. The paper aims at providing information about the optimal choice of GCPs placement not only for dams but also for all surveys of high-rise structures. The knowledge a priori of the effect of the GCPs number and location on the model accuracy can increase survey reliability and accuracy and speed up the survey set-up operations.

  13. Relationship of Vaal Dam high water flow and water quality from 1995 to 2010

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Sc. The Vaal River is the main source of water supply to the central industrial, mining and metropolitan regions of South Africa, and is, therefore, strictly regulated by small dams and weirs. The Vaal Dam is the main regulator of water to the Vaal River and is of great importance as it supplies water for human consumption and also to the industrial powerhouse of South Africa. Situated at the confluence of its major tributaries, namely the Vaal and Wilge Rivers, and straddling the conver...

  14. Seismic responses of high concrete face rockfill dams: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-shui Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Seismic responses of the Zipingpu concrete face rockfill dam were analyzed using the finite element method. The dynamic behavior of rockfill materials was modeled with a viscoelastic model and an empirical permanent strain model. The relevant parameters were obtained either by back analysis using the field observations or by reference to parameters of similar rockfill materials. The acceleration responses of the dam, the distribution of earthquake-induced settlement, and the gap propagation under the concrete slabs caused by the settlement of the dam were analyzed and compared with site investigations or relevant studies. The mechanism of failure of horizontal construction joints was also analyzed based on numerical results and site observations. Numerical results show that the input accelerations were considerably amplified near the top of the dam, and the strong shaking resulted in considerable settlement of the rockfill materials, with a maximum value exceeding 90 cm at the crest. As a result of the settlement of rockfill materials, the third-stage concrete slabs were separated from the cushion layer. The rotation of the cantilever slabs about the contacting regions, under the combined action of gravity and seismic inertial forces, led to the failure of the construction joints and tensile cracks appeared above the construction joints. The effectiveness and limitations of the so-called equivalent linear method are also discussed.

  15. Effects of three high-flow experiments on the Colorado River ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Three high-flow experiments (HFEs) were conducted by the U.S. Department of the Interior at Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in March 1996, November 2004, and March 2008. These experiments, also known as artificial or controlled floods, were large-volume, scheduled releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam that were designed to mimic some aspects of pre-dam Colorado River seasonal flooding. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether high flows could be used to benefit important physical and biological resources in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park that had been affected by the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. Efforts such as HFEs that seek to maintain and restore downstream resources are undertaken by the U.S. Department of the Interior under the auspices of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 (GCPA; title XVIII, secs. 1801-1809, of Public Law 102-575). Scientists conducted a wide range of monitoring and research activities before, during, and after the experiments. Initially, research efforts focused on whether HFEs could be used to rebuild and maintain Grand Canyon sandbars, which provide camping beaches for hikers and whitewater rafters, create habitats potentially used by native fish and other wildlife, and are the source of windborne sand that may help to protect some archaeological resources from weathering and erosion. As scientists gained a better understanding of how HFEs affect the physical environment, research efforts expanded to include additional investigations about the effects of HFEs on biological resources, such as native fishes, nonnative sports fishes, riverside vegetation, and the aquatic food web. The chapters that follow summarize and synthesize for decisionmakers and the public what has been learned about HFEs to provide a framework for implementing similar future experiments. This report is a product of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP), a Federal initiative authorized to ensure

  16. Glossary to ARCH (GARCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim

    The literature on modeling and forecasting time-varying volatility is ripe with acronyms and abbreviations used to describe the many different parametric models that have been put forth since the original linear ARCH model introduced in the seminal Nobel Prize winning paper by Engle (1982......).  The present paper provides an easy-to-use encyclopedic reference guide to this long list of ARCH acronyms.  In addition to the acronyms associated with specific parametric models, I have also included descriptions of various abbreviations associated with more general statistical procedures and ideas...

  17. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  18. High-resolution imaging spectroscopy of two micro-pores and an arch filament system in a small emerging-flux region

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Manrique, S. J.; Bello González, N.; Denker, C.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Emerging flux regions mark the first stage in the accumulation of magnetic flux eventually leading to pores, sunspots, and (complex) active regions. These flux regions are highly dynamic, show a variety of fine structure, and in many cases live only for a short time (less than a day) before dissolving quickly into the ubiquitous quiet-Sun magnetic field. Aims: The purpose of this investigation is to characterize the temporal evolution of a minute emerging flux region, the associated photospheric and chromospheric flow fields, and the properties of the accompanying arch filament system. We aim to explore flux emergence and decay processes and investigate if they scale with structure size and magnetic flux contents. Methods: This study is based on imaging spectroscopy with the Göttingen Fabry-Pérot Interferometer at the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain on 2008 August 7. Photospheric horizontal proper motions were measured with Local correlation tracking using broadband images restored with multi-object multi-frame blind deconvolution. Cloud model (CM) inversions of line scans in the strong chromospheric absorption Hαλ656.28 nm line yielded CM parameters (Doppler velocity, Doppler width, optical thickness, and source function), which describe the cool plasma contained in the arch filament system. Results: The high-resolution observations cover the decay and convergence of two micro-pores with diameters of less than one arcsecond and provide decay rates for intensity and area. The photospheric horizontal flow speed is suppressed near the two micro-pores indicating that the magnetic field is already sufficiently strong to affect the convective energy transport. The micro-pores are accompanied by a small arch filament system as seen in Hα, where small-scale loops connect two regions with Hα line-core brightenings containing an emerging flux region with opposite polarities. The Doppler width, optical thickness, and source

  19. Dam Safety Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duricic, J.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of dams constructed in the world are dams that can be categorized as embankment dams. Throughout history we can point to many failures of dams, and embankment dams in particular. Nowadays it is clear that the goal to construct stable dams has not been achieved, even with advanced

  20. Paired moraine-dammed lakes: a key landform for glaciated high mountain areas in the tropical Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrizaga, Lasafam

    2016-04-01

    The tropical mountain range of the Cordillera Blanca hosts one of the main concentrations of proglacial lakes in high-mountain settings worldwide, which have formed as a result of the dominant trend of modern glacier retreat. Based on empirical data from field research in over 20 valleys and the analysis of air and satellite images, a genetic classification of major lake types with their barriers and a generalized model for the distribution of the present lakes and paleolakes was set up. The origin of the lakes and their recurrent distribution pattern are associated with the individual stages of the Pleistocene to modern glaciation and their corresponding geomorphological landforms. Characteristic repetitive moraine sequences are found in the upper parts of numerous valleys of the Cordillera Blanca. In terms of the spatial arrangement of the lake types, combined lakes are classified as a distinct composite lake type. These lakes occur at nearly the same elevation or at successively lower elevations, and form characteristic lake sequences of two or more lakes. They may occur as multi-moraine-dammed lakes or mixed combined lakes such as moraine-rock-dammed lakes or multi-debris-dammed lakes. From special interest are in this study the paired moraine-dammed lakes (e.g. Lagunas Qoyllurcochas, Lagunas Safuna Alta and Baja). They are composed of the Great Endmoraine (GEM), primarily formed during the Little Ice Age and earlier, and the pre-GEM, formed during the Holocene. Both moraines are located in rather close vicinity to each other at a distance of 1-3 km. In contrast to the prominent sharp-crested GEM, the pre-GEM is a low-amplitude end-moraine complex, which usually does not exceed a few meters to tens of meters in height. The latter is often composed of several inserted moraine ridges or an irregular hummocky moraine landscape. It is argued here that the process of formation of these combined lakes is mainly controlled by a combination of distinct topographical

  1. To what extent do long-duration high-volume dam releases influence river–aquifer interactions? A case study in New South Wales, Australia

    KAUST Repository

    Graham, Peter W.

    2014-11-20

    Long-duration high-volume dam releases are unique anthropogenic events with no naturally occurring equivalents. The impact from such dam releases on a downstream Quaternary alluvial aquifer in New South Wales, Australia, is assessed. It is observed that long-duration (>26 days), high-volume dam releases (>8,000 ML/day average) result in significant variations in river–aquifer interactions. These variations include a flux from the river to the aquifer up to 6.3 m3/day per metre of bank (at distances of up to 330 m from the river bank), increased extent and volume of recharge/bank storage, and a long-term (>100 days) reversal of river–aquifer fluxes. In contrast, during lower-volume events (<2,000 ML/day average) the flux was directed from the aquifer to the river at rates of up to 1.6 m3/day per metre of bank. A groundwater-head prediction model was constructed and river–aquifer fluxes were calculated; however, predicted fluxes from this method showed poor correlation to fluxes calculated using actual groundwater heads. Long-duration high-volume dam releases have the potential to skew estimates of long-term aquifer resources and detrimentally alter the chemical and physical properties of phreatic aquifers flanking the river. The findings have ramifications for improved integrated management of dam systems and downstream aquifers.

  2. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsun-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ju; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-June; Chieh, Hsiao-Feng; Su, Fong-Chin

    2012-09-25

    The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged from two to six. A total of 44 children aged from two to six years of age were put into five age groups in this study. The navicular height was measured with one leg standing, and both feet were scanned separately in both sitting and one leg standing positions to compute the foot arch volume. The arch volume index, which represents the ratio of the difference in volume between sitting and one leg standing positions to the volume when sitting was calculated to demonstrate the flexibility of the foot arch. The differences of measured parameters between each aged group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The arch volumes when sitting and standing were highly correlated with the navicular height. The navicular height ranged from 15.75 to 27 mm, the arch volume when sitting ranged from 6,223 to 11,630 mm3, and the arch volume when standing from 3,111 to 7,848 mm3 from two to six years of age. The arch volume index showed a declining trend as age increased. This study is the first to describe the foot arch with volume perspective in preschool-aged children. The foot arch volume was highly correlated with the navicular height. Research results show both navicular height index and arch volume index gradually increase with age from two to six. At the same time the arch also becomes rigid with age from two to six. These results could be applied for clinical evaluation of the foot arch and post-treatment evaluation.

  3. Three-dimensional measurement of foot arch in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hsun-Wen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of flexible flatfoot is high among preschool-aged children, but the effects of treatment are inconclusive due to the unclear definitions of normal flatfoot. To date, a universally accepted evaluation method of the foot arch in children has not been completely established. Our aims of this study were to establish a new method to evaluate the foot arch from a three dimensional perspective and to investigate the flexibility of the foot arch among children aged from two to six. Methods A total of 44 children aged from two to six years of age were put into five age groups in this study. The navicular height was measured with one leg standing, and both feet were scanned separately in both sitting and one leg standing positions to compute the foot arch volume. The arch volume index, which represents the ratio of the difference in volume between sitting and one leg standing positions to the volume when sitting was calculated to demonstrate the flexibility of the foot arch. The differences of measured parameters between each aged group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results The arch volumes when sitting and standing were highly correlated with the navicular height. The navicular height ranged from 15.75 to 27 mm, the arch volume when sitting ranged from 6,223 to 11,630 mm3, and the arch volume when standing from 3,111 to 7,848 mm3 from two to six years of age. The arch volume index showed a declining trend as age increased. Conclusion This study is the first to describe the foot arch with volume perspective in preschool-aged children. The foot arch volume was highly correlated with the navicular height. Research results show both navicular height index and arch volume index gradually increase with age from two to six. At the same time the arch also becomes rigid with age from two to six. These results could be applied for clinical evaluation of the foot arch and post-treatment evaluation.

  4. Maternal High-Fat Diet during Pregnancy and Lactation Influences Obestatin and Ghrelin Concentrations in Milk and Plasma of Wistar Rat Dams and Their Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Słupecka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to establish the effect of a maternal high-fat diet on obestatin concentration, total ghrelin, and ghrelin/obestatin ratio during pregnancy and lactation of Wistar rats and their offspring in the first 21 days of life. On the mating day, females were randomly allocated and fed either a high-fat diet (30% of fat; HF or breeding diet (5% fat; BD till the 21st day of lactation. Hormones were analyzed in the blood plasma and milk of rat dams as well as in the blood plasma of their offspring. HF resulted in a significant decrease in obestatin level on the 14th day of lactation and elevation on the 21st day. Plasma obestatin in HFD offspring was significantly higher than in BD ones. HF diet did not significantly affect dam plasma ghrelin until the 21st day of lactation. The ghrelin concentrations in milk after both diets were significantly lower than in blood plasma. Milk ghrelin in HF dams was significantly higher than in the BD ones. Plasma ghrelin from HF offspring was significantly higher than that from BD dams. Our results demonstrate that a maternal HF diet during pregnancy and lactation influences ghrelin and obestatin level in both dams and their offspring.

  5. Miniscrew supported Burstone intrusion arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Shilpa; Tripathi, Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Miniscrew supported Burstone intrusion arch is a novel method for achieving maxillary incisor intrusion. It offers the advantage of true incisor intrusion without causing reciprocal effects on the posterior teeth. In this article, we present an intrusion arch which is a modification of Burstone Intrusion arch taking posterior anchorage from buccal interradicular mini-screws instead of molar teeth and detailed description of the advantages offered by this technique.

  6. Double arch mirror study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  7. High saturated fat diet alters the lipid composition of triacylglycerol and polar lipids in the femur of dam and offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Paula M; Castelli, Laura M; Amoye, Foyinsola; Ward, Wendy E; LeBlanc, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    Previous work has shown that dietary lipids alter femur lipid composition. Specifically, we have shown that exposure to high saturated fatty acid (SFA) diets in utero, during suckling, or post-weaning alters femur total lipid composition, resulting in higher percent bone mass in males and females and bone mineral density (BMD) in female offspring with no effect on bone mineral outcomes in dams. Comparatively, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diets increase femur polar (PL) lipid n-3 content, which has been associated with increased bone mineral content and strength. However, the extent that PL or triacylglycerol (TAG) lipids change with high SFA diets is unknown. The current investigation examined the influence of a high SFA diet (20 % lard by weight) on femur PL and TAG lipid composition in 5-month old female Wistar rats (fed high SFA diet from age 28 days onwards; dams) and their 19-day old offspring (exposed to high SFA in utero and during suckling; pups). High SFA exposure resulted in increased monounsaturates and decreased n-3 and n-6 PUFA in the TAG fraction in both dams and pups, and higher SFA and n-6:n-3 ratio in dams only. The PL fraction showed decreased n-6 PUFA in both dams and pups. The magnitude of the diet-mediated responses, specifically TAG 18:1 and PL n-6 PUFA, may have contributed to the previously reported altered BMD, which was supported with correlation analysis. Future research should investigate the relationship of diet-induced changes in bone lipids on bone structure, as quantified through micro-computed tomography.

  8. Zygomatic arch reduction and malarplasty with multiple osteotomies: its geometric considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fushun; Tang, Shengjian

    2014-12-01

    The midfacial width is dominated by the lateral protruding degree of the zygomatic arch. The best way of narrowing the midface is to reduce the arch height and the arc length for patients with an overly curved lateral protruding zygomatic arch. The existing techniques for reduction malarplasty cannot change the degree of curvature of the zygomatic arch. We provide a new technique for efficient midfacial width reduction by multiple osteotomies at different sites on the zygomatic complex and bone resection at the most protruding middle part of the zygomatic arch. The amount of bone resection can be calculated with a simplified geometrical solution according to the desired reduction rate of the arch height. A digitalized CT image was used to estimate the arch height and the length of bone for removal from the zygomatic arch. A specific piece of bone was removed from the most protruding point of each zygomatic arch. Greenstick fractures were made at the anterior and posterior roots of the zygomatic arch. The open arches were rotated inwardly until both ends met. The arch heights of 1,020 sides of the zygomatic arch were reduced in a range from 3 to 11 mm. All the reduced zygomatic arches were reunited properly and healed solidly. The overall satisfaction rate was high. This technique reduces the width of the midface by changing the degree of curvature of the zygomatic arch. The simplified geometrical calculation solutions are helpful in assuring the reunion of the zygomatic arch at a pre-designed lower arc height level after a calculated shortening of the arc length. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  9. An unusual case of left aberrant innominate artery with right aortic arch: evaluation with high-resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Giulio [University Rene Descartes-Paris 5, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Gesualdo, Francesco; Brunelle, Francis; Ou, Phalla [University Rene Descartes-Paris 5, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2008-01-15

    A left aberrant innominate (brachiocephalic) artery is an angiographically well-known entity that may cause tracheal compression. We report a male newborn who was admitted for further investigation of a prenatally suspected major vessel anomaly. High-resolution CT was used to completely assess the abnormal anatomy and the relationship with the airway, as well as to guide the surgical approach for its correction. (orig.)

  10. A ravenous river reclaims its true course: the tale of Marmot Dam''s demise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen Parks; Gordon Grant

    2009-01-01

    Removing dams that are outdated, unsafe, or pose significant economic or environmental costs has emerged in the last 10 years as a major river restoration strategy. The removal of the 45-foot-high Marmot Dam on the Sandy River in 2007 resulted in the biggest sediment release accompanying any dam removal to date. It also provided an unprecedented opportunity...

  11. Calcaneocuboid joint and stability of the longitudinal arch of the foot at high and low gear push off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojsen-Møller, F

    1979-08-01

    The calcaneocuboid joint was studied in ligamentous specimens of ten human feet, and in skeletons of two gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei), six chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), three orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and 25 human feet. The movement of the transverse tarsal joint was further studied in a living foot on a walk-way with a glass plate inserted, and with an underlying mirror. In man the joint is shaped as an asymmetrical sector of one end of an hour-glass shaped surface of revolution with its main axis oriented longitudinally in the foot. The calcaneocuboid joint becomes close packed by a pronation of the forefoot in relation to the hind foot because of a congruency between the joint surfaces obtained in this position and because the calcaneus overhangs the cuboid dorsally and stops the movement. At low gear push off the foot is inverted and the calcaneocuboid joint loose packed. The stresses are absorbed across the fibular, postaxial border of the foot. At high high gear push off there is a functional pronation of the forefoot with a stabilization of the transverse tarsal joint and a more effective tightening of the plantar aponeurosis. The foot becomes a rigid lever for propulsion. In contrast to the human condition, the anthropoid calcaneus has an anteromedial extension associated with symmetry of the calcaneocuboid joint. The calcaneus does not overhang the cuboid and there appears to be no close packed position. Correspondingly, the anthropoid foot has a mid-tarsal break at each push off in addition to the metatarsophalangeal break.

  12. Comparative Study on Interface Elements, Thin-Layer Elements, and Contact Analysis Methods in the Analysis of High Concrete-Faced Rockfill Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xiang Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the numerical performance of three contact simulation methods, namely, the interface element, thin-layer element, and contact analysis methods, through the analysis of the contact behavior between the concrete face slab and the dam body of a high concrete-faced rockfill dam named Tianshengqiao-I in China. To investigate the accuracy and limitations of each method, the simulation results are compared in terms of the dam deformation, contact stress along the interface, stresses in the concrete face slab, and separation of the concrete face slab from the cushion layer. In particular, the predicted dam deformation and slab separation are compared with the in-situ observation data to classify these methods according to their agreement with the in-situ observations. It is revealed that the interface element and thin-layer element methods have their limitations in predicting contact stress, slab separation, and stresses in the concrete face slab if a large slip occurs. The contact analysis method seems to be the best choice whether the separation is finite or not.

  13. Comparative study on the mechanical mechanism of confined concrete supporting arches in underground engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhijin; Qin, Qian; Jiang, Bei; Luan, Yingcheng; Yu, Hengchang

    2018-01-01

    In order to solve the supporting problem in underground engineering with high stress, square steel confined concrete (SQCC) supporting method is adopted to enhance the control on surrounding rocks, and the control effect is remarkable. The commonly used cross section shapes of confined concrete arch are square and circular. At present, designers have no consensus on which kind is more proper. To search for the answer, this paper makes an analysis on the mechanical properties of the two shapes of the cross-sections. A full-scale indoor comparative test was carried out on the commonly used straight-wall semi-circular SQCC arch and circular steel confined concrete arch (CCC arch). This test is based on self-developed full-scale test system for confined concrete arch. Our research, combining with the numerical analysis, shows: (1) SQCC arch is consistent with CCC arch in the deformation and failure mode. The largest damages parts are at the legs of both of them. (2) The SQCC arch's bearing capability is 1286.9 kN, and the CCC arch's ultimate bearing capability is 1072.4kN. Thus, the SQCC arch's bearing capability is 1.2 times that of the CCC arch. (3) The arches are subjected to combined compression and bending, bending moment is the main reason for the arch failure. The section moment of inertia of SQCC arch is 1.26 times of that of CCC arch, and the former is better than the latter in bending performance. The ultimate bearing capacity is positively correlated with the size of the moment of inertia. Based on the above research, the engineering suggestions are as follows: (1) To improve the bearing capacity of the arch, the cross-sectional shape of the chamber should be optimized and the arch bearing mode changed accordingly. (2) The key damaged positions, such as the arch leg, should be reinforced, optimizing the state of force on the arch. SQCC arches should be used for supporting in underground engineering, which is under stronger influence of the bending moment and

  14. Evaluation of age of dam effects on maternal performance of multilactation daughters from high- and low-milk EPD sires at three locations in the southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J F; Boyd, M E

    2003-07-01

    Angus bulls (n = 16) selected for either high- or low-milk EPD but similar growth EPD were mated within location at random to Angus cows. Daughters were bred to calve at 2 yr of age and annually until 6 yr of age. Milk yield was measured four times during lactation with a portable milking machine to estimate 12-h milk yield. Milk was collected for analysis of the percentage of fat and protein. A mixed model procedure was used to analyze the weaning weight, milk yield, and milk component data. The model for weaning weight included location, genetic line of sire, gender of calf, and age of dam. Calf age at weaning was used as a covariate. The model for the milk yield and components included location, genetic line of sire, gender of calf, period, and age of dam. Random effects for all models included sire of dam nested within line, sire of calf, and year. Genetic line was a significant source of variation for milk yield (P EPD (19 kg). Weaning weights from high-milk EPD line daughters were heavier (P EPD line daughters at each age of dam evaluated. Cows nursed by males had higher milk yields (4.33 kg/12 h) than cows nursed by heifers (4.0 kg/12 h). The difference in yields for gender was significant for 2-, 3-, and 5-yr-old cows, but not for 4- (P EPD, milk EPD, and total maternal EPD were greater than zero (P EPD produced more milk at each age and weaned heavier calves than daughters of sires with low-milk EPD. These results confirm the value of milk EPD for improvement of weaning weights in beef cattle and also validate age of dam effects on milk yield and the associated effects on weaning weights.

  15. Renal Development and Blood Pressure in Offspring from Dams Submitted to High-Sodium Intake during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezila M. Coimbra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to an adverse environment in utero appears to programme physiology and metabolism permanently, with long-term consequences for health of the fetus or offspring. It was observed that the offspring from dams submitted to high-sodium intake during pregnancy present disturbances in renal development and in blood pressure. These alterations were associated with lower plasma levels of angiotensin II (AII and changes in renal AII receptor I (AT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK expressions during post natal kidney development. Clinical and experimental evidence show that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS participates in renal development. Many effects of AII are mediated through MAPK pathways. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERKs play a pivotal role in cellular proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, high-sodium intake during pregnancy and lactation can provoke disturbances in renal development in offspring leading to functional and structural alterations that persist in adult life. These changes can be related at least in part with the decrease in RAS activity considering that this system has an important role in renal development.

  16. Semi- and Nonparametric ARCH Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver B. Linton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available ARCH/GARCH modelling has been successfully applied in empirical finance for many years. This paper surveys the semiparametric and nonparametric methods in univariate and multivariate ARCH/GARCH models. First, we introduce some specific semiparametric models and investigate the semiparametric and nonparametrics estimation techniques applied to: the error density, the functional form of the volatility function, the relationship between mean and variance, long memory processes, locally stationary processes, continuous time processes and multivariate models. The second part of the paper is about the general properties of such processes, including stationary conditions, ergodic conditions and mixing conditions. The last part is on the estimation methods in ARCH/GARCH processes.

  17. Motion planning and synchronized control of the dental arch generator of the tooth-arrangement robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Gang; Zhang, Yong-De

    2013-03-01

    The traditional, manual method of reproducing the dental arch form is prone to numerous random errors caused by human factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the automatic acquisition of the dental arch and implement the motion planning and synchronized control of the dental arch generator of the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot for use in full denture manufacture. First, the mathematical model of the dental arch generator was derived. Then the kinematics and control point position of the dental arch generator of the tooth arrangement robot were calculated and motion planning of each control point was analysed. A hardware control scheme is presented, based on the industrial personal computer and control card PC6401. In order to gain single-axis, precise control of the dental arch generator, we studied the control pulse realization of high-resolution timing. Real-time, closed-loop, synchronous control was applied to the dental arch generator. Experimental control of the dental arch generator and preliminary tooth arrangement were gained by using the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robotic system. The dental arch generator can automatically generate a dental arch to fit a patient according to the patient's arch parameters. Repeated positioning accuracy is 0.12 mm for the slipways that drive the dental arch generator. The maximum value of single-point error is 1.83 mm, while the arc-width direction (x axis) is -33.29 mm. A novel system that generates the dental arch has been developed. The traditional method of manually determining the dental arch may soon be replaced by a robot to assist in generating a more individual dental arch. The system can be used to fabricate full dentures and bend orthodontic wires. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. High performance ZIF-8/6FDA-DAM mixed matrix membrane for propylene/propane separations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2012-02-01

    We report significantly enhanced propylene/propane (C 3H 6/C 3H 8) selectivity in mixed matrix membranes fabricated using 6FDA-DAM polyimide and a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8). Equilibrium isotherms and sorption kinetics of C 3H 6 and C 3H 8 at 35°C were studied on a 200nm commercially available ZIF-8 sample produced by BASF. Mixed matrix dense films were formed with 6FDA-DAM and 200nm BASF ZIF-8 particles. SEM imaging showed generally good adhesion between the ZIF-8 and 6FDA-DAM without the need for surface-treating ZIF-8. Pure gas permeation showed significantly enhanced mixed matrix ZIF-8/6FDA-DAM membrane C 3H 6/C 3H 8 separation performance over the pure 6FDA-DAM membrane performance. A C 3H 6 permeability of 56.2Barrer and C 3H 6/C 3H 8 ideal selectivity of 31.0 was found in ZIF-8/6FDA-DAM mixed matrix membrane with 48.0wt% ZIF-8 loading, which are 258% and 150% higher than the pure 6FDA-DAM membrane, respectively for permeability and selectivity. Permeation properties of C 3H 6 and C 3H 8 in ZIF-8 were back-calculated by the Maxwell model for composite permeability using pure gas permeation data, leading to a C 3H 6 permeability of 277Barrer and C 3H 6/C 3H 8 selectivity of 122. Mixed gas permeation also verified that selectivity enhancements were achievable in mixed gas environment by ZIF-8. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. DAM Safety and Deformation Monitoring in Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.; Potts, L.; Miiama, J.; Mahgoub, M.; Rahman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water is the life and necessity to water is increasing day by day with respect to the World population, rising of living standards and destruction of nature. Thus, the importance of water and water structures have been increasing gradually. Dams are among the most important engineering structures used for water supplies, flood controls, agricultural purposes as well as drinking and hydroelectric power. There are about 150.000 large size dams in the World. Especially after the Second World War, higher and larger capacity dams have been constructed. Dams create certain risks like the other manmade structures. No one knows precisely how many dam failures have occurred in the World, whereas hundreds of dam failures have occurred throughout the U.S. history. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. These physical data are measured and monitored by the instruments and equipment. Dams and their surroundings have to be monitored by using essential methods at periodic time intervals in order to determine the possible changes that may occur over the time. Monitoring programs typically consist of; surveillance or visual observation. These programs on dams provide information for evaluating the dam's performance related to the design intent and expected changes that could affect the safety performance of the dam. Additionally, these programs are used for investigating and evaluating the abnormal or degrading performance where any remedial action is necessary. Geodetic and non-geodetic methods are used for monitoring. Monitoring the performance of the dams is critical for producing and maintaining the safe dams. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the

  20. Probabilistic analysis for the response of nonlinear base isolation system under the ground excitation induced by high dam flood discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chao; Zhang, Jinliang; Lian, Jijian; Liu, Fang; Li, Xinyao

    2017-10-01

    According to theoretical analysis, a general characteristic of the ground vibration induced by high dam flood discharge is that the dominant frequency ranges over several narrow frequency bands, which is verified by observations from the Xiangjiaba Hydropower Station. Nonlinear base isolation is used to reduce the structure vibration under ground excitation and the advantage of the isolation application is that the low-frequency resonance problem does not need to be considered due to its excitation characteristics, which significantly facilitate the isolation design. In order to obtain the response probabilistic distribution of a nonlinear system, the state space split technique is modified. As only a few degrees of freedom are subjected to the random noise, the probabilistic distribution of the response without involving stochastic excitation is represented by the δ function. Then, the sampling property of the δ function is employed to reduce the dimension of the Fokker-Planck- Kolmogorov (FPK) equation and the low-dimensional FPK equation is solvable with existing methods. Numerical results indicate that the proposed approach is effective and accurate. Moreover, the response probabilistic distributions are more reasonable and scientific than the peak responses calculated by conventional time and frequency domain methods.

  1. The form of the human dental arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Hnat, W P; Fender, D E; Legan, H L

    1998-02-01

    The human dental arch form is shown to be accurately represented mathematically by the beta function. The average correlation coefficient between measured arch-shape data and the mathematical arch shape, expressed by the beta function, is 0.98 with a standard deviation of 0.02. Forty sets of casts--15 Class I, 16 Class II, and 9 Class III--were examined. A precision machine tool device was used to record the X-, Y-, and Z-coordinates of selected dental landmarks on all casts to 0.001 mm accuracy. The coordinates were processed through a computer curve-fitting program. The Class III mandibular arches had smaller arch depth and greater arch width (beginning in the premolar area) than the Class I arches. The Class II mandibular arches exhibited generalized reduced arch width and depth compared with the Class I arches. Maxillary arch depths were similar in all three groups. However, the Class III maxillary arch widths were greater from the lateral incisor-canine area distally compared with the Class I maxillary arch, and the Class II maxillary arch form was narrower than the Class I arch form from the lateral incisor-canine area distally. The beta function more accurately described the dental arch form than representations previously reported.

  2. Unexpected long-term protection of adult offspring born to high-fat fed dams against obesity induced by a sucrose-rich diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Couvreur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabolic and endocrine environment during early life is crucial for metabolic imprinting. When dams were fed a high fat diet (HF diet, rat offspring developed hypothalamic leptin resistance with lean phenotype when weaned on a normal diet. Interestingly, when grown on the HF diet, they appeared to be protected against the effects of HF diet as compared to offspring of normally fed dams. The mechanisms involved in the protective effect of maternal HF diet are unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We thus investigated the impact of maternal high fat diet on offspring subjected to normal or high palatable diet (P diet on metabolic and endocrine parameters. We compared offspring born to dams fed P or HF diet. Offspring born to dams fed control or P diet, when fed P diet exhibited a higher body weight, altered hypothalamic leptin sensitivity and metabolic parameters suggesting that maternal P diet has no protective effect on offspring. Whereas, maternal HF diet reduces body weight gain and circulating triglycerides, and ameliorates corpulence index of offspring, even when subjected to P diet. Interestingly, this protective effect is differently expressed in male and female offspring. Male offspring exhibited higher energy expenditure as mirrored by increased hypothalamic UCP-2 and liver AdipoR1/R2 expression, and a profound change in the arcuate nucleus astrocytic organization. In female offspring, the most striking impact of maternal HF diet is the reduced hypothalamic expression of NPY and POMC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HF diet given during gestation and lactation protects, at least partially, offspring from excessive weight gain through several mechanisms depending upon gender including changes in arcuate nucleus astrocytic organization and increased hypothalamic UCP-2 and liver AdipoR1/2 expression in males and reduced hypothalamic expression of NPY and POMC in females. Taken together our results reveal new mechanisms involved in

  3. Unexpected Long-Term Protection of Adult Offspring Born to High-Fat Fed Dams against Obesity Induced by a Sucrose-Rich Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Odile; Ferezou, Jacqueline; Gripois, Daniel; Serougne, Colette; Crépin, Delphine; Aubourg, Alain; Gertler, Arieh; Vacher, Claire-Marie; Taouis, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    Background Metabolic and endocrine environment during early life is crucial for metabolic imprinting. When dams were fed a high fat diet (HF diet), rat offspring developed hypothalamic leptin resistance with lean phenotype when weaned on a normal diet. Interestingly, when grown on the HF diet, they appeared to be protected against the effects of HF diet as compared to offspring of normally fed dams. The mechanisms involved in the protective effect of maternal HF diet are unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings We thus investigated the impact of maternal high fat diet on offspring subjected to normal or high palatable diet (P diet) on metabolic and endocrine parameters. We compared offspring born to dams fed P or HF diet. Offspring born to dams fed control or P diet, when fed P diet exhibited a higher body weight, altered hypothalamic leptin sensitivity and metabolic parameters suggesting that maternal P diet has no protective effect on offspring. Whereas, maternal HF diet reduces body weight gain and circulating triglycerides, and ameliorates corpulence index of offspring, even when subjected to P diet. Interestingly, this protective effect is differently expressed in male and female offspring. Male offspring exhibited higher energy expenditure as mirrored by increased hypothalamic UCP-2 and liver AdipoR1/R2 expression, and a profound change in the arcuate nucleus astrocytic organization. In female offspring, the most striking impact of maternal HF diet is the reduced hypothalamic expression of NPY and POMC. Conclusions/Significance HF diet given during gestation and lactation protects, at least partially, offspring from excessive weight gain through several mechanisms depending upon gender including changes in arcuate nucleus astrocytic organization and increased hypothalamic UCP-2 and liver AdipoR1/2 expression in males and reduced hypothalamic expression of NPY and POMC in females. Taken together our results reveal new mechanisms involved in the protective

  4. PATTERNS OF MORPHOLOGICAL INTEGRATION IN THE DENTAL ARCHES OF INDIVIDUALS WITH MALOCCLUSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven F.; Vela, Kaci; Levy, Steven M.; Southard, Thomas E.; Gratton, David; Moreno Uribe, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In humans, there is a large range of variation in the form of the maxillary and mandibular dental arches. This variation can manifest as either prognathism or retrognathism in either or both arches, which can cause malocclusion and lead to abnormal masticatory function. This study aims to identify aspects of variation and morphological integration existing in the dental arches of individuals with different types of malocclusion. Methods Coordinate landmark data were collected along the gingival margins of 397 scanned dental casts and then analyzed using geometric morphometric techniques to explore arch form variation and patterns of morphological integration within each malocclusion type. Results Significant differences were identified between Class II forms (increased projection of upper arch relative to the lower arch) and Class III forms (lower arch projection beyond the upper arch) in symmetrical shape variation, including anteroposterior arch discrepancies and abnormal anterior arch divergence or convergence. Partial least squares analysis demonstrated that Class III dental arches have higher levels of covariance between upper and lower arches (RV=0.91) compared to the dental arches of Class II (RV=0.78) and Class I (RV=0.73. These high levels of covariance, however, are on the lower end of the overall range of possible masticatory blocks, indicating weaker than expected levels of integration. Conclusions This study provides evidence for patterns of variation in dental arch shape found in individuals with Class II and Class III malocclusions. Moreover, differences in integration found between malocclusion types have ramifications for how such pathologies should be studied and treated. PMID:27292446

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Temperature Control Parameters and Study of the Simultaneous Cooling Zone during Dam Construction in High-Altitude Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are unprecedented difficulties in building concrete gravity dams in the high altitude province Tibet with problems induced by lack of experience and technologies and unique weather conditions, as well as the adoption of construction materials that are disadvantageous to temperature control and crack prevention. Based on the understandings of the mentioned problems and leveraging the need of building gravity dam in Tibet, 3D finite element method is used to study the temperature control and crack prevention of the dam during construction. The calculation under recommend temperature control measures and standards shows that the height and number of simultaneous cooling zone have the more obvious influencers on concrete stress; therefore, it is suggested to increase the height of simultaneous cooling zone to decrease the stress caused by temperature gradient of adjoin layers so as to raise the safety level of the whole project. The research methods and ideas used on this project have significant values and can be taken as references in similar projects in high altitude regions.

  6. The Total Risk Analysis of Large Dams under Flood Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dams and reservoirs are useful systems in water conservancy projects; however, they also pose a high-risk potential for large downstream areas. Flood, as the driving force of dam overtopping, is the main cause of dam failure. Dam floods and their risks are of interest to researchers and managers. In hydraulic engineering, there is a growing tendency to evaluate dam flood risk based on statistical and probabilistic methods that are unsuitable for the situations with rare historical data or low flood probability, so a more reasonable dam flood risk analysis method with fewer application restrictions is needed. Therefore, different from previous studies, this study develops a flood risk analysis method for large dams based on the concept of total risk factor (TRF used initially in dam seismic risk analysis. The proposed method is not affected by the adequacy of historical data or the low probability of flood and is capable of analyzing the dam structure influence, the flood vulnerability of the dam site, and downstream risk as well as estimating the TRF of each dam and assigning corresponding risk classes to each dam. Application to large dams in the Dadu River Basin, Southwestern China, demonstrates that the proposed method provides quick risk estimation and comparison, which can help local management officials perform more detailed dam safety evaluations for useful risk management information.

  7. Dam removal: Listening in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Melissa M.; Bellmore, James; O'Connor, James E.; Duda, Jeff; East, Amy E.; Grant, Gordon G.; Anderson, Chauncey; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Collins, Mathias J.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Craig, Laura S.; Evans, James E.; Greene, Samantha; Magilligan, Francis J.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Major, Jon J.; Pess, George R.; Randle, Timothy J.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Torgersen, Christian; Tullos, Desiree D.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Dam removal is widely used as an approach for river restoration in the United States. The increase in dam removals—particularly large dams—and associated dam-removal studies over the last few decades motivated a working group at the USGS John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis to review and synthesize available studies of dam removals and their findings. Based on dam removals thus far, some general conclusions have emerged: (1) physical responses are typically fast, with the rate of sediment erosion largely dependent on sediment characteristics and dam-removal strategy; (2) ecological responses to dam removal differ among the affected upstream, downstream, and reservoir reaches; (3) dam removal tends to quickly reestablish connectivity, restoring the movement of material and organisms between upstream and downstream river reaches; (4) geographic context, river history, and land use significantly influence river restoration trajectories and recovery potential because they control broader physical and ecological processes and conditions; and (5) quantitative modeling capability is improving, particularly for physical and broad-scale ecological effects, and gives managers information needed to understand and predict long-term effects of dam removal on riverine ecosystems. Although these studies collectively enhance our understanding of how riverine ecosystems respond to dam removal, knowledge gaps remain because most studies have been short (< 5 years) and do not adequately represent the diversity of dam types, watershed conditions, and dam-removal methods in the U.S.

  8. Hoover Dam Learning Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Reclamation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This learning packet provides background information about Hoover Dam (Nevada) and the surrounding area. Since the dam was built at the height of the Depression in 1931, people came from all over the country to work on it. Because of Hoover Dam, the Colorado River was controlled for the first time in history and farmers in Nevada, California, and…

  9. Hypoplastic right cervical aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Shah, Amee; Langley, Stephen M; Quaegebeur, Jan M

    2012-12-01

    We describe a neonate with a rare congenital anomaly of the aorta. The anomaly included a hypoplastic aortic arch that was cervical and right sided. This complex combination was treated by a Norwood type procedure reconstructing a right-sided arch and, in a later stage, a Rastelli procedure. These 2 procedures achieved a 2 ventricular repair. The diagnostic and surgical challenges of this rare anomaly are described in this case report. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. National Dam Safety Program. Potters Falls Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 378), Oswego River Basin, Tompkins County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-23

    feature is the arched curva - ture of the dam which would resist lateral pressures from the reservoir. It is also known that the structure has...I U I * I . * Io- Iq [. I * * -- *---- .- ~.- -. - -. . -~ * ~ - ~ .--- * -: L? u o 4 Idf W dI- f V f W00 go a AW~d " be fn - 04 02 01 In on a~ A.IO

  11. Theory of Arched Structures Strength, Stability, Vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Karnovsky, Igor A

    2012-01-01

    Theory of Arched Structures: Strength, Stability, Vibration presents detailed procedures for analytical analysis of the strength, stability, and vibration of arched structures of different types, using exact analytical methods of classical structural analysis. The material discussed is divided into four parts. Part I covers stress and strain with a particular emphasis on analysis; Part II discusses stability and gives an in-depth analysis of elastic stability of arches and the role that matrix methods play in the stability of the arches; Part III presents a comprehensive tutorial on dynamics and free vibration of arches, and forced vibration of arches; and Part IV offers a section on special topics which contains a unique discussion of plastic analysis of arches and the optimal design of arches.

  12. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with pre- and post-treatment digital models from 240 patients. ... this distance was maintained in calculating posttreatment measurements (T2). Mandibular and maxillary arch ... Arch width changes after different treatment modalities or posterior arch width ...

  13. Three-dimensional optical high-resolution profiler with a large observation field: foot arch behavior under low static charge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Cornu, Jean Yves

    2002-09-01

    Our aim is to describe a method for detecting small deformations from a three-dimensional (3D) shape of large lateral dimensions. For this purpose the measurement method is based on the simultaneous utilization of several 3D optical systems and the phase-shifting technique. In this way, the following problems appear: optical distortion due to the large field observed, nonlinear phase-to-height conversion, conversion of image coordinates into object coordinates for each 3D optical system, and coordinate unification of all optical systems. The resolution is 50 mum with a field of view of 320 mm x 150 mm. We used this system to study the 3D human foot arch deformation under low loads in vivo. First results indicate the hysteresis behavior of the human foot under a low load (50 to 450 N).

  14. Multi-Source Generation Mechanisms for Low Frequency Noise Induced by Flood Discharge and Energy Dissipation from a High Dam with a Ski-Jump Type Spillway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jijian; Wang, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Wenjiao; Ma, Bin; Liu, Dongming

    2017-11-30

    As excess water is discharged from a high dam, low frequency noise (air pulsation lower than 10 Hz, LFN) is generated and propagated in the surrounding areas, causing environmental hazards such as the vibration of windows and doors and the discomfort of local residents. To study the generation mechanisms and key influencing factors of LFN induced by flood discharge and energy dissipation from a high dam with a ski-jump type spillway, detailed prototype observations and analyses of LFN are carried out. The discharge flow field is simulated and analyzed using a gas-liquid turbulent flow model. The acoustic response characteristics of the air cavity, which is formed between the discharge nappe and dam body, are analyzed using an acoustic numerical model. The multi-sources generation mechanisms are first proposed basing on the prototype observation results, vortex sound model, turbulent flow model and acoustic numerical model. Two kinds of sources of LFN are studied. One comes from the energy dissipation of submerged jets in the plunge pool, the other comes from nappe-cavity coupled vibration. The results of the analyses reveal that the submerged jets in the plunge pool only contribute to an on-site LFN energy of 0-1.0 Hz, and the strong shear layers around the high-velocity submerged jets and wall jet development areas are the main acoustic source regions of LFN in the plunge pool. In addition, the nappe-cavity coupled vibration, which is induced when the discharge nappe vibrates with close frequency to the model frequency of the cavity, can induce on-site LFN energy with wider frequency spectrum energy within 0-4.0 Hz. By contrast, the contribution degrees to LFN energy from two acoustic sources are almost same, while the contribution degree from nappe-cavity coupled vibration is slightly higher.

  15. Relationship among Lower Arch Length, Arch Width and Arch Perimeter in Crowding and Non-Crowding Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmani Mimoza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crowding is one of the causes of class I malocclusion. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between arch length, arch width and arch perimeter in crowded and non-crowded arches, as well as to made comparison of the right and left sides between them and to find out the contributing factor in lower arch crowding. The study groups consisted of 60 subjects aged 16 to 21 years. First group consisted of 30 pairs of dental study models with class I normal occlusion. The second group consisted of 30 pairs of study models with class I crowding. Measurements of arch length and width were made as defined by Lavelle and Foster, using Korkhaus callipers. Arch perimeter was measured by Lundstrom method’s using manual calliper with sharp points. Differences between these measurements were made by Mann-Whitney U test (Z/U.

  16. Generation Mechanism and Prediction Model for Low Frequency Noise Induced by Energy Dissipating Submerged Jets during Flood Discharge from a High Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jijian; Zhang, Wenjiao; Guo, Qizhong; Liu, Fang

    2016-06-15

    As flood water is discharged from a high dam, low frequency (i.e., lower than 10 Hz) noise (LFN) associated with air pulsation is generated and propagated in the surrounding areas, causing environmental problems such as vibrations of windows and doors and discomfort of residents and construction workers. To study the generation mechanisms and key influencing factors of LFN induced by energy dissipation through submerged jets at a high dam, detailed prototype observations and analyses of LFN are conducted. The discharge flow field is simulated using a gas-liquid turbulent flow model, and the vorticity fluctuation characteristics are then analyzed. The mathematical model for the LFN intensity is developed based on vortex sound theory and a turbulent flow model, verified by prototype observations. The model results reveal that the vorticity fluctuation in strong shear layers around the high-velocity submerged jets is highly correlated with the on-site LFN, and the strong shear layers are the main regions of acoustic source for the LFN. In addition, the predicted and observed magnitudes of LFN intensity agree quite well. This is the first time that the LFN intensity has been shown to be able to be predicted quantitatively.

  17. Mathematical ratio in defining arch form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan A Budiman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The treatment of Class I malocclusion aims to arrange teeth position in a good arch form. The arch form consists of tooth size and arch dimension (intercanine width, canine depth, intermolar width, molar depth. Numerous methods have been used to describe the arch form quantitatively. The aim of this study was to develop a mathematical ratio for identifying arch form (square, oval, tapered using arch dimension variables (intercanine width, canine depth, intermolar width, molar depth. Materials and Methods: Dental cast pre and post-orthodontic treatments from 190 Indonesian patients were scanned to obtain digital data. All data were measured using “Image Tool.” The measured data (tooth size, intercanine width, intercanine depth, intermolar width, intermolar depth, and arch perimeter were analyzed statistically using ordered logistic to find out determining variables to the arch form. Results: The validity, reliability, and normality of all the data were analyzed using Stata. From analyzing the data using ordered logistic, intercanine width and intermolar depth showed a reverse relation to the arch form. The shape of the arch form (square, oval, and tapered can be described quantitatively by using ratio (CD/CW/(MD/MW; a ratio less than 45.30% indicates square, 45.30–53.37% indicates oval, and more than 53.37% indicates tapered. Conclusions: (CD/CW/(MD/MW ratio can be used to describe arch form quantitatively.

  18. Serotonin is required for pharyngeal arch morphogenesis in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Bashammakh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT is not only a neurotransmitter but also a mediator of developmental processes in vertebrates. In this study, we analyzed the importance of 5-HT during zebrafish development. The expression patterns of three zebrafish tryptophan hydroxylase isoforms (Tph1A, Tph1B, Tph2, the rate-limiting enzymes in 5-HT synthesis, were analyzed and compared to the appearance and distribution of 5-HT. 5-HT was found in the raphe nuclei correlating with tph2 expression and in the pineal gland correlating with tph1a and tph2 expressions. Tph2-deficient fish generated with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides exhibited morphogenesis defects during pharyngeal arch development. The correct specification of neural crest (NC cells was not affected in tph2 morphants as shown by the expression of early markers, but the survival and differentiation of pharyngeal arch progenitor cells were impaired. An organizing role of 5-HT in pharyngeal arch morphogenesis was suggested by a highly regular pattern of 5-HT positive cells in this tissue. Moreover, the 5-HT2B receptor was expressed in the pharyngeal arches and its pharmacological inhibition also induced defects in pharyngeal arch morphogenesis. These results support an important role of Tph2-derived serotonin as a morphogenetic factor in the development of NC-derived tissues.

  19. Cephalic arch stenosis in autogenous brachiocephalic hemodialysis fistulas: results of cutting balloon angioplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, Søren Thorup; Lönn, Lars; Schroeder, Torben V

    2010-01-01

    Cephalic arch stenosis is a known cause of hemodialysis access failure in patients with brachiocephalic fistulas (BCFs). Outcomes of endovascular treatment are affected by resistance of the stenosis to balloon dilation, a high vein rupture rate and the development of early restenosis. The purpose...... of this retrospective study was to report outcomes after cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) of cephalic arch stenosis....

  20. Dam break analysis and flood inundation map of Krisak dam for emergency action plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliastuti, Setyandito, Oki

    2017-11-01

    The Indonesian Regulation which refers to the ICOLD Regulation (International Committee on Large Dam required have the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) guidelines because of the dams have potential failure. In EAP guidelines there is a management of evacuation where the determination of the inundation map based on flood modeling. The purpose of the EAP is to minimize the risk of loss of life and property in downstream which caused by dam failure. This paper will describe about develop flood modeling and inundation map in Krisak dam using numerical methods through dam break analysis (DBA) using hydraulic model Zhong Xing HY-21. The approaches of dam failure simulation are overtopping and piping. Overtopping simulation based on quadrangular, triangular and trapezium fracture. Piping simulation based on cracks of orifice. Using results of DBA, hazard classification of Krisak dam is very high. The nearest village affected dam failure is Singodutan village (distance is 1.45 kilometer from dam) with inundation depth is 1.85 meter. This result can be used by stakeholders such as emergency responders and the community at risk in formulating evacuation procedure.

  1. [Double aortic arch: prenatal case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budziszewska, Patrycja; Kuka, Dorota; Sodowski, Marcin; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Jeanty, Philippe; Skrzypulec, Violetta

    2009-09-01

    We have presented a case of prenatal double aortic arch, diagnosed by ultrasound, to demonstrate the importance of 3-vessel view by detecting aortic arch abnormalities. Double aortic arch is one the most common types of the vascular ring. The suspicion of a double aortic arch is raised by detecting the U-sign which is formed by the combination of both aortic arches and the left ductus arteriosus. In the 3-vessel view the ascending aorta and aortic arch are pointing to the right, whereas the left arch points to the left, and the trachea is seen between. The 4-chamber view appears normal, but the descending aorta is deviated medially. Literature review revealed an association between double aortic arch and congenital heart diseases in approximately 20% of cases; most often tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of great vessels, ventricular septal defects. Rarely there can be atresia of the segment of the aortic arch, which can be difficult to differentiate from other aortic arch anomalies associated with chromosomal abnormalities such as microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.

  2. Strengthening Masonry Arches with Lime-Based Mortar Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Alecci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, many strengthening interventions on masonry elements were performed by using fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs. These advanced materials proved to be effective to increase the load-carrying capacity of masonry elements and to improve their structural behavior, avoiding the most critical failure modes. Despite the advantages of this technique compared to more traditional methods, FRP systems have disadvantages related to their low resistance to high temperatures, impossibility of application on wet surfaces, low permeability, and poor compatibility with masonry supports. Therefore, composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in an inorganic matrix were recently proposed as alternatives to FRPs for strengthening historic masonry constructions. These composite materials are easier to install, have higher resistance to high temperatures, and permit higher vapor permeability than FRPs. The inorganic matrix is frequently a cement-based mortar, and the composite materials made of a fiber textile embedded in a cement-based mortar are usually identified as FRCM (fabric reinforced cementitious matrix composites. More recently, the use of natural lime mortar as an inorganic matrix has been proposed as an alternative to cement-based mortars when historic compatibility with the substrate is strictly required, as in case of restoration of historic buildings. In this paper, the effectiveness of a fabric made of basalt fibers embedded in lime mortar matrix (Basalt-FRLM for the strengthening of masonry arches is investigated. An experimental investigation was performed on 1:2 scaled brick masonry arches strengthened at the extrados with a layer of Basalt-FRLM and tested under vertical load. The results obtained are compared with previous results obtained by the authors by testing masonry arches strengthened at their extrados with FRCM and FRP composites. This investigation highlights the effectiveness of Basalt-FRLM in increasing load

  3. Clinical Advantages and Limitations of Monolithic Zirconia Restorations Full Arch Implant Supported Reconstruction: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Carames

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this retrospective case series is to evaluate the clinical advantages and limitations of monolithic zirconia restorations for full arch implant supported restorations and report the rate of complications up to 2 years after insertion. Materials and Methods. Fourteen patients received implant placement for monolithic zirconia full arch reconstructions. Four implants were placed in seven arches, eleven arches received six implants, two arches received seven implants, two arches received eight implants, and one arch received nine implants. Results. No implant failures or complications were reported for an implant survival rate of 100% with follow-up ranging from 3 to 24 months. Conclusions. Monolithic zirconia CAD-/CAM-milled framework restorations are a treatment option for full arch restorations over implants, showing a 96% success rate in the present study. Some of the benefits are accuracy, reduced veneering porcelain, and minimal occlusal adjustments. The outcome of the present study showed high success in function, aesthetics, phonetics, and high patient satisfaction.

  4. Evaluation of the fit of preformed nickel titanium arch wires on normal occlusion dental arches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhn G. Al-Barakati

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Using an archwire form with the best fit to the dental arch should produce minimal changes in the dental arch form when NiTi wires are used and require less customization when stainless-steel wires are used.

  5. The Biomechanics of Zygomatic Arch Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda L; Grosse, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian zygomatic arch shape is remarkably variable, ranging from nearly cylindrical to blade-like in cross section. Based on geometry, the arch can be hypothesized to be a sub-structural beam whose ability to resist deformation is related to cross sectional shape. We expect zygomatic arches with different cross sectional shapes to vary in the degree to which they resist local bending and torsion due to the contraction of the masseter muscle. A stiffer arch may lead to an increase in the relative proportion of applied muscle load being transmitted through the arch to other cranial regions, resulting in elevated cranial stress (and thus, strain). Here, we examine the mechanics of the zygomatic arch using a series of finite element modeling experiments in which the cross section of the arch of Pan troglodytes has been modified to conform to idealized shapes (cylindrical, elliptical, blade-like). We find that the shape of the zygomatic arch has local effects on stain that do not conform to beam theory. One exception is that possessing a blade-like arch leads to elevated strains at the postorbital zygomatic junction and just below the orbits. Furthermore, although modeling the arch as solid cortical bone did not have the effect of elevating strains in other parts of the face, as had been expected, it does have a small effect on stress associated with masseter contraction. These results are counterintuitive. Even though the arch has simple beam-like geometry, we fail to find a simple mechanical explanation for the diversity of arch shape. Anat Rec, 299:1734-1752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Zygomatic Arch Cortical Area and Diet in Haplorhines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Hallie

    2016-12-01

    The influence that various types of ingested foods have on the form (size and shape) of specific features of the masticatory system is an area in which many questions remain unanswered. The bony zygomatic arch, the focus of this study, is directly linked to the masticatory system because it serves as the anchor for the masseter muscle, a primary muscle of chewing and source of masticatory force. However, the influence of diet and the forces associated with different diet types on the arch's internal bone architecture is not well understood. Despite the breadth of work centered around the craniofacial complex and biomechanics of mastication, there is a need for further investigations into the functional relationships between specific bony features that experience high strains, (e.g., the zygomatic arch), and the masticatory forces generated by different diets (e.g., mechanically resistant versus non- mechanically resistant) across non-human primates. A hypothesis and series of predictions assessing diet in relation to variability in cortical area distributions and values of section moduli (measures of bone strength) throughout the zygomatic arch were tested in a sample of haplorhine primates. Cortical area and measures of section moduli appear to track with the known masticatory strain distribution along the zygomatic arch. Pairwise comparisons between closely related taxa of different diets reveal significant differences in anterior cortical area and section moduli values. These results imply that differences in masticatory loading due to diet manifest in the zygomatic arch's internal bone structure. Anat Rec, 299:1789-1800, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. TYPOLOGY OF LARGE DAMS. A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe ROMANESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The dams represent hydrotechnical constructions meant to ensure a judicious use of water resources. The international literature is extremely rich in data regarding the large dams on Earth. In this context, a hierarchy of the main dams is attempted and the role they play in the economic development of the regions they were built in is underlined. The largest dams are built on the big rivers in Asia, North America, South America and Africa. The reservoirs have multiple roles: electricity production, drinking or industrial water supply, irrigations, recreation, etc. High costs and land fragility do not allow the construction of dams in the places most affected by drought or flood. This is why they are usually built in mountainous areas, at great distance from the populated centres. On the Romanian territory, there are 246 large dams, built in the hydrographical basins of Siret, Olt, Arges, Somes, etc. The largest rivers on Earth, by discharge, (Amazon and Zair do not also include the largest dams because the landform and the type of flow have not allowed such constructions.

  8. Study of environmental isotope distribution in the Aswan High Dam Lake (Egypt) for estimation of evaporation of lake water and its recharge to adjacent groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, A I; Froehlich, K; Nada, A; Awad, M; Hamza, M; Salem, W M

    1993-03-01

    Oxygen-18 ((18)0) and deuterium isotopes were used to estimate the evaporation from the Aswan High Dam Lake and to investigate the inter-relation between the lake water and adjacent groundwater.According to stable isotopic analysis of samples taken in 1988 and 1989, the lake can be divided into two sections. In the first section extending between Abu Simbel and a point between EI-Alaki and Krosko, a remarkable vertical gradient of (18)0 and deuterium isotopic composition was observed. The second northern sector extending to the High Dam is characterised by a lower vertical isotopic gradient. In this sector in general, higher values of (18)O and deuterium contents were found at the top and lower values at the bottom. Also a strong horizontal increase of the heavy isotope content was observed. Thus, in the northern section evaporation is of dominating influence on the isotopic composition of the lake water.With the help of an evaporation pan experiment it was possible to calibrate the evaporative isotope enrichment in the lake and to facilitate a preliminary estimate of evaporative losses of lake water. The evaporation from the lake was estimated to be about 19% of the input water flow rate.The groundwater around the lake was investigated and samples from production wells and piezometers were subjected to isotopic analysis. The results indicate that recent recharge to the groundwater aquifer is limited to wells near to the lake and up to a maximum distance of about 10 km. The contribution of recent Nile water to the groundwater in these wells was estimated to range between 23 and 70%. Beyond this distance, palaeowater was observed with highly depleted deuterium and (18)0 contents, which was also confirmed by 14c dating. The age of palaeo groundwater in this area can reach values of more than 26,000 years.Recommendations are given for efficient water management of the lake water.

  9. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-09-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches.

  10. Two-dimensional, high-resolution modeling of urban dam-break flooding: A case study of Baldwin Hills, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Humberto A.; Schubert, Jochen E.; Sanders, Brett F.

    2009-08-01

    Modeling of dam-break flooding in an urban residential area in southern California is presented. Modeling is performed using BreZo, an unstructured grid, Godunov-type, finite volume model that solves the shallow-water equations. The model uses terrain data from a 1.5 m Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and contour data depicting the reservoir and breach geometry. A spatially distributed Manning coefficient based on a landcover classification derived from digital orthophotos and vector data (e.g., parcel outlines) is also used, and the interception of flow by storm drains is modeled with sink terms in the 2D continuity equation. The model is validated with flood extent and stream flow measurements, and a sensitivity analysis is completed to identify the necessary level of data and model complexity for accuracy purposes. Results show street depressions in the land surface should be resolved by the computational mesh for flood extent and stream flow accuracy. A ca. 5 m resolution mesh that spans streets by approximately 3 cells achieves a good balance between accuracy and computational effort. Results also show that heterogeneous resistance is important for stream flow accuracy, and the interception of overland flow by storm sewers is important for flood extent accuracy. The sensitivity of predictions to several additional factors such as the reservoir level, breach geometry and DTM source (LiDAR, National Elevation Data, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Data) is also reported.

  11. Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for selected dams in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and near Atoka, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Molly J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Grout, Trevor S.; Lewis, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Dams provide beneficial functions such as flood control, recreation, and storage of water supplies, but they also entail risk; dam breaches and resultant floods can cause substantial property damage and loss of life. The State of Oklahoma requires each owner of a high-hazard dam, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency defines as dams for which failure or improper operation probably will cause loss of human life, to develop an emergency action plan specific to that dam. Components of an emergency action plan are to simulate a flood resulting from a possible dam breach and map the resulting downstream flood-inundation areas. The resulting flood-inundation maps can provide valuable information to city officials, emergency managers, and local residents for planning an emergency response if a dam breach occurs.

  12. Sustainability of dams-an evaluation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, E.

    2003-04-01

    Situated in the stream bed of a river, dams and reservoirs interrupt the natural hydrological cycle. They are very sensitive to all kinds of changes in the catchment, among others global impacts on land use, climate, settlement structures or living standards. Vice versa dams strongly affect the spatially distributed, complex system of ecology, economy and society in the catchment both up- and downstream of the reservoir. The occurrence of negative impacts due to large dams led to serious conflicts about future dams. Nevertheless, water shortages due to climatic conditions and their changes, that are faced by enormous water and energy demands due to rising living standards of a growing world population, seem to require further dam construction, even if both supply and demand management are optimised. Although environmental impact assessments are compulsory for dams financed by any of the international funding agencies, it has to be assumed that the projects lack sustainability. Starting from an inventory of today's environmental impact assessments as an integral part of a feasibility study the presentation will identify their inadequacies with regard to the sustainability of dams. To improve the sustainability of future dams and avoid the mistakes of the past, the planning procedures for dams have to be adapted. The highly complex and dynamical system of interrelated physical and non-physical processes, that involves many different groups of stakeholders, constitutes the need for a model-oriented decision support system. In line with the report of the World Commission of Dams an integrated analysis and structure of the complex interrelations between dams, ecology, economy and society will be presented. Thus the system, that a respective tool will be based on, is analysed. Furthermore an outlook will be given on the needs of the potential users of a DSS and how it has to be embedded in the overall planning process. The limits of computer-based decision-support in the

  13. Análise do arco longitudinal medial em adolescentes usuárias de calçados de salto alto Analysis of the medial longitudinal arch in adolescents users of high heeled shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Maria Amado João

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi analisar a influência do calçado de salto alto no arco longitudinal medial (ALM do pé de adolescentes. Fizeram parte do estudo 82 adolescentes entre 13 e 20 anos, sendo 54 não usuárias (grupo controle - GC e 28 usuárias (grupo experimental - GE de calçado de salto alto. Foram obtidas as impressões plantares de ambos os pés para análise do ALM, antes e depois do uso de um calçado de salto alto padronizado por um período de 30 minutos. As impressões plantares foram avaliadas pelo índice de Chippaux-Smirak (ICS e pelo arco de Cavanagh & Rodgers (ICR. O teste de Shapiro-Wilks foi utilizado para a verificação da normalidade dos dados. Variáveis paramétricas pareadas foram tratadas com o Teste t de Student pareado e as não-paramétricas com o teste de Wilcoxon. As comparações não-pareadas foram realizadas com o teste t de Student para as variáveis paramétricas e o de Mann-Withney para as não-paramétricas, com nível de significância de 0,05. Houve diferença no ALM entre os lados direito e esquerdo apenas no GC antes do uso do calçado. Na comparação entre antes e depois do uso do sapato, notou-se diferença apenas no pé esquerdo do GC pelo ICS. Já entre GC e GE, não houve diferença. Apesar dos resultados não evidenciarem alterações no ALM, deve-se lembrar que esta é uma medida estática, sendo necessários estudos do componente dinâmico e do uso do calçado de salto crônico para correlacionar com os achados deste trabalho.The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of high heeled shoes in foot´s medial longitudinal arch in adolescents. Eighty two female adolescents between 13 and 20 years old participated, being 54 non-users of high heleed shoes (control group - GC and 28 usuaries (experimental group - GE. The footprints of both feet were collected to analyse the medial longitudinal arch (ALM, before and after 30 minutes using a shoe with heel high given by the examiner, an then

  14. Variants of the left aortic arch branches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Variants of the left aortic arch branches. N Z Makhanya. MB ChB. R T Mamogale. MB 0113. N Khan. FCRaD (0). Department of Diagnostic Radiology. Medical University of Southern Africa. Abstract. The normal aorta has three branches from its arch, but variations in this pattern are not uncommon. Our.

  15. FEATURES OF DESIGN OF TIED-ARCH BRIDGES WITH FLEXIBLE INCLINED SUSPENSION HANGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Samosvat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Investigation and analysis of the hanger arrangement and the structural stability of a Network arch bridge – a tied-arch bridge with inclined hangers that cross each other at least twice. It is also necessary to make a comparative analysis with other types of hanger arrangements. Methodology. The authors in their research investigated a large number of parameters to determine their influence in the force distribution in the arch. Eventually they determined optimal values for all parameters. These optimal values allowed developing a design guide that leads to optimal arch design. When solving this problem, the authors used three-dimensional finite element models and the objective was to determine the most suitable solution for a road bridge, with a span of 100 meters, consisting of two inclined steel arches, located on a road with two traffic lanes, subjected to medium traffic. The virtual prototype of the model is performed by finite element simulator Midas Civil. Findings. In this study, for the bridge deck, a concrete tie appears to be the best solution considering the structural behavior of network arches, but economic advantages caused by easier erection may lead to steel or a composite bridge deck as better alternatives. Design requirements and local conditions of each particular bridge project will decide the most economic deck design.Originality. To ensure passenger comfort and the stability and continuity of the track, deformations of bridges are constricted. A network arch is a stiff structure with small deflections and therefore suitable to comply with such demands even for high speed railway traffic.
A network arch bridge with a concrete tie usually saves more than half the steel required for tied arches with vertical hangers and concrete ties. Practical value. Following the study design advice given in this article leads to savings of about 60 % of structural steel compared with conventional tied arch bridges with

  16. Allegheny County Dam Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the point locations of dams in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  17. Isolated Zygomatic Arch Fracture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Şimşek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zygomatic bone is situated at the lateral part of the facial triangle, and is frequently exposed to maxillofacial traumas, since it forms the most prominent region of the facial skeleton. Isolated zygomatic arch fractures comprise 5% of all facial fractures and 10% of zygomatic bone fractures. In this case report, the clinical and radiological characteristics, and the treatment options of isolated zygomatic arch fractures have been discussed. The traumatic zygomatic arch fracture of the left zygomatic arch region of a 35-year-old male patient and its treatment have been reported in this case report. The Gillies method should be considered as an effective treatment method in isolated zygomatic arch fracture cases due to its feasibility and esthetic properties.

  18. Coordinated control and experimentation of the dental arch generator of the tooth-arrangement robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-de; Jiang, Jin-gang; Lv, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2010-12-01

    The traditional way of acquiring the dental arch curve form is based on manual operation, which will randomly bring numerous errors caused by human factors. The purpose of this paper is to automatically acquire the dental arch curve and implement the coordinated control of the dental arch generator of the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot, which can be used in full denture manufacturing. Based on the arc length constant theory, kinematics on dental arch generator is analyzed. The control pulse realization methods of high-resolution timing and CPU time-stamp timing are studied, and testing and comparative analysis of the control precision and stability of the two methods is carried out. Control experimentation of the dental arch generator and preliminary tooth-arrangement experimentation are performed using the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot system. The dental arch generator can automatically generate a dental arch curve that fits a patient according to the patient's jaw arch parameters. Repeated positioning accuracy is 0.12 mm for the slipways which drive the dental arch generator. The maximum value of single point error is 1.64 mm when the arc width direction (x-axis) is 37.25 mm. The experimental results indicate that the method of control pulse realized by high-resolution timing to achieve high precision coordinated motion control of dental arch generator of tooth-arrangement robot is feasible. The error analysis results indicate that the control strategy and technical route can fulfill the requirements for motion speed and location precision. A novel system to generate the tooth arch curve has been developed. The traditional method of manually determining the dental arch may soon become obsolete in favour of the use of a robot to assist in generating a more standard tooth arch curve. The system can be used to manufacture a full denture. It will lay an important theoretical foundation for quantitative research of oral restoration, and also

  19. Persistent fifth arch anomalies - broadening the spectrum to include a variation of double aortic arch vascular ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Chan, Frandics [Stanford Children' s Hospital and Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Hanneman, Kate [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Fifth arch anomalies are rare and complex and frequently misdiagnosed or mistaken for other entities. We report a double arch vascular ring that is thought to consist of right fourth arch and left fifth arch components, a previously undescribed persistent fifth arch variant. The currently recognized spectrum and classification of fifth arch vascular anomalies are expanded along with illustrative images to justify the proposed changes. Reviewing and expanding the classification of fifth arch anomalies to include a double arch ring variant will promote recognition, correct diagnosis and appropriate management of these anomalies. (orig.)

  20. Will Dam Removal Increase Nitrogen Flux to Estuaries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur J. Gold

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available To advance the science of dam removal, analyses of functions and benefits need to be linked to individual dam attributes and effects on downstream receiving waters. We examined 7550 dams in the New England (USA region for possible tradeoffs associated with dam removal. Dam removal often generates improvements for safety or migratory fish passage but might increase nitrogen (N flux and eutrophication in coastal watersheds. We estimated N loading and removal with algorithms using geospatial data on land use, stream flow and hydrography. We focused on dams with reservoirs that increase retention time at specific points of river reaches, creating localized hotspots of elevated N removal. Approximately 2200 dams with reservoirs had potential benefits for N removal based on N loading, retention time and depth. Across stream orders, safety concerns on these N removal dams ranged between 28% and 44%. First order streams constituted the majority of N removal dams (70%, but only 3% of those were classified as high value for fish passage. In cases where dam removal might eliminate N removal function from a particular reservoir, site-specific analyses are warranted to improve N delivery estimates and examine alternatives that retain the reservoir while enhancing fish passage and safety.

  1. Crosshole seismic tomography across a masonry dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Joe

    1995-05-01

    An intensive crosshole seismic survey was done across a 700-foot-long stone-masonry dam. It involved measurements on six connected panels each approximately 100 feet in width extending completely across the dam from abutment to abutment. The objective was to provide tomographic images of P-wave velocity and dynamic elastic moduli of the dam and foundation materials along the axis of the dam. Field seismograms were recorded with an airgun source and hydrophone detectors. Data analysis included interactive time-picking, plotting of common source gathers, and tomographic imaging using an iterative back-propagation technique. Color-coded tomograms of velocity and dynamic Young's modulus were produced and correlated with geological and geophysical data measured on drill core samples. Low values of velocity and dynamic elastic modulus correlated with low RQD and high fracture frequency. The tomograms showed significant variations of mechanical properties in the stone masonry dam and its foundation. The colored tomograms were useful in highlighting zones of weak rock possibly requiring remedial action. They also assisted engineering evaluation of the dam by providing a detailed two-dimensional distribution of mechanical properties which can be used as ground truth data for numerical modeling of stress-strain fields.

  2. Geodetic deformation monitoring at Pendidikan Diponegoro Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwono, Bambang Darmo; Awaluddin, Moehammad; Yusuf, M. A.; Fadillah, Rizki

    2017-07-01

    Deformation monitoring is one indicator to assess the feasibility of Dam. In order to get the correct result of the deformation, it is necessary to determine appropriate deformation monitoring network and the observation data should be analyse and evaluated carefully. Measurement and analysis of deformation requires relatively accurate data and the precision is high enough, one of the observation method that used is GPS (Global Positioning System). The research was conducted at Pendidikan Undip Dams is Dam which is located in Tembang. Diponegoro Dam was built in 2013 and a volume of 50.86 m3 of water, inundation normal width of up to 13,500 m2. The main purpose of these building is not only for drainage but also for education and micro hydro power plant etc. The main goal of this reasearch was to monitor and analyze the deformation at Pendidikan Undip Dam and to determaine whether GPS measurement could meet accuracy requirement for dam deformation measurements. Measurements were made 2 times over 2 years, 2015 and 2016 using dual frequency GPS receivers with static methods and processed by Scientific Software GAMIT 10.6

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Al Hennawi, Qais M.

    2015-05-01

    In this thesis, we present theoretical and experimental investigation into the nonlinear statics and dynamics of clamped-clamped in-plane MEMS arches when excited by an electrostatic force. Theoretically, we first solve the equation of motion using a multi- mode Galarkin Reduced Order Model (ROM). We investigate the static response of the arch experimentally where we show several jumps due to the snap-through instability. Experimentally, a case study of in-plane silicon micromachined arch is studied and its mechanical behavior is measured using optical techniques. We develop an algorithm to extract various parameters that are needed to model the arch, such as the induced axial force, the modulus of elasticity, and the initially induced initial rise. After that, we excite the arch by a DC electrostatic force superimposed to an AC harmonic load. A softening spring behavior is observed when the excitation is close to the first resonance frequency due to the quadratic nonlinearity coming from the arch geometry and the electrostatic force. Also, a hardening spring behavior is observed when the excitation is close to the third (second symmetric) resonance frequency due to the cubic nonlinearity coming from mid-plane stretching. Then, we excite the arch by an electric load of two AC frequency components, where we report a combination resonance of the summed type. Agreement is reported among the theoretical and experimental work.

  4. Brief research on arch hinge of the steel truss arch bridge by contact problem under local stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Zhu, Yinqiao; Chen, Renlong

    2017-06-01

    Because of its wide deck, elegant design and reasonable stress, the steel truss arch bridge is suitable for urban bridges. In the steel truss arch bridge, the main arch hinge is an important structure, the local structure and the stress is complex, and it is necessary to analyze the local stress state of the arch hinge. Arch hinge problem belongs to the contact problem, this paper based on Chengdu Tianfu District Shenyang Lu Xi Duan Jin Jiang in bearing steel truss arch bridge design, take the finite element software ANSYS on the main arch hinge is locally analyzed, the arch at the junction of reliable performance test. Studies have shown that half through steel truss arch bridge should be adopted by reasonable cylindrical arch hinge, and Hertz theory is in the analysis of the arch hinge contact does not apply.

  5. Mycotic Aneurysm of the Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Seo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is rare. We report a case of mycotic aneurysm that developed in the aortic arch. An 86-year-old man was admitted with fever and general weakness. Blood culture yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged aortic arch, and computed tomography scan revealed an aneurysm in the aortic arch. The patient was treated only with antibiotics and not surgically. The size of the aneurysm increased rapidly, resulting in bronchial obstruction and superimposed pneumonia. The patient died of respiratory failure.

  6. Adding an arch support to a heel lift improves stability and comfort during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianyi; Li, Bo; Hu, Kun; Wan, Qiufeng; Ding, Yuhao; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-10-01

    Heel lifts have been widely used as a conservative treatment for some musculoskeletal problems and complaints. However, the heel rise caused by heel lifts may also affect the plantar pressure distribution and stability during walking. This study aimed to test whether adding an arch support to a heel lift would improve its stability and comfort through comparing the center of pressure (COP) during walking and subjective ratings between heel lifts with and without an arch support. Fifteen healthy male participants were asked to walk along an 8m walkway while wearing high-cut footwear with the control heel lifts and the heel lifts with an arch support. A Footscan pressure plate was used to measure the COP during walking. Subjective ratings including medial-lateral control, dynamic foot/shoe fitting and overall comfort were assessed for each participant. The results showed that compared to the control condition, the COP trajectory was medially shifted during stance phase of gait in the arch support condition. The maximum displacements and velocity of medial-lateral COP in the forefoot contact phase were smaller in the arch support condition than in the control condition. Adding an arch support to a heel lift also significantly improved the subjective ratings in terms of the medial-lateral control, dynamic foot/shoe fitting and overall comfort. The findings of this study suggest that adding an arch support to a heel lift could improve its stability and comfort during walking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of arch width changes following orthodontic treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of arch width changes following orthodontic treatment with and without extraction using three-dimensional models. ... Conclusion: Extraction treatment mechanics did not cause narrow dental arches, but nonextraction treatment increased arch width in all 3 measurements. Treatments with only upper arch ...

  8. Short-Term Effects of the 2008 High-Flow Experiment on Macroinvertebrates in Colorado River Below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Kincaid, Dustin W.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Kelly, Holly A.W.; Behn, Kathrine A.; White, Tyler; Hall, Robert O.; Baxter, Colden V.

    2010-01-01

    Glen Canyon Dam has dramatically altered the physical environment (especially discharge regime, water temperatures, and sediment inputs) of the Colorado River. High-flow experiments (HFE) that mimic one aspect of the natural hydrograph (floods) were implemented in 1996, 2004, and 2008. The primary goal of these experiments was to increase the size and total area of sandbar habitats that provide both camping sites for recreational users and create backwaters (areas of stagnant flow in the lee of return-current eddies) that may be important as rearing habitat for native fish. Experimental flows might also positively or negatively alter the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) sport fishery in the clear tailwater reach below Glen Canyon Dam, Ariz., and native fish populations in downstream reaches (for example, endangered humpback chub, Gila cypha) through changes in available food resources. We examined the short-term response of benthic macroinvertebrates to the March 2008 HFE at three sites [river mile 0 (RM 0, 15.7 miles downriver from the dam), RM 62, and RM 225] along the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam by sampling immediately before and then 1, 7, 14, and 30 days after the HFE. We selected these sites because of their importance to management; RM 0 has a valuable trout fishery, and RM 62 is the location of the largest population of the endangered humpback chub in the Grand Canyon. In addition to the short-term collection of samples, as part of parallel investigations, we collected 3 years of monthly (quarterly for RM 62) benthic macroinvertebrate samples that included 15 months of post-HFE data for all three sites, but processing of the samples is only complete for one site (RM 0). At RM 0, the HFE caused an immediate 1.75 g AFDM/m2 (expressed as grams ash-free dry mass, or AFDM) reduction of macroinvertebrate biomass that was driven by significant reductions in the biomass of the two dominant taxa in this reach-Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New

  9. 5. decennial inspection of Tignes dam. Draining of the higher french dam; 5. inspection decennale du barrage de Tignes. Vidange du plus haut barrage de France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This document deals with the 5. decennial inspection of the Tignes dam. The Tignes dam has been drained to allow EDF and the public authorities to verify the dam wall, of 180 m high, in order to validate the next decade. The four steps of the drainage are described as the maintenance policy of such building. (A.L.B.)

  10. Non extraction short-term arch changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, F; Perillo, L; Ferro, A

    2004-01-01

    to examine the Cetlin protocol for short-term dentoalveolar changes in the sagittal and transversal planes in non-extraction treatment. eighty patients with Class II, div.1 malocclusion treated with the Cetlin protocol, comprising upper distalizing plate, extraoral traction, and lower lip bumper. Dental study models were examined before treatment and after molar Class II correction during which upper molars were mechanically distalized, distobuccally rotated and expanded. the upper arch perimeter increased significantly. The lip bumper produced functional expansion of the lower arch, especially in the transverse plane, with an important increase in the arch perimeter. in the short-term, the Cetlin protocol made the following improvements: 1) molar correction, 2) resolution or improvement of crowding, 3) space recovery in both arches for leveling the curve of Spee and final adjustments. Further improvements in intercuspation can be made, if necessary, by fixed appliance therapy.

  11. Determinant factors of Yemeni maxillary arch dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Muhsen Al-Zubair

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Measurements of palatal depth and relationships of the canines to one another and to other teeth thus had the widest ranges, implying that these dimensions are the strongest determinants of maxillary arch size.

  12. Limnology of hartbeespoort dam

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashton, PJ

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available consequences, for example the proliferation of filter clogging algae. Pilot or full-scale experimentation will be necessary to establish the true poten tial of this technique as a in-dam method for dealing with eutrophied waters. (d) Protein harvesting... essential amino-acids and is therefore of little practical use. If the conditions in the dam could be changed to result in a more palatable algae, this will have definite advantages (vi) for its protein production potential. Unfortunately, the factors...

  13. Histological and Metabolic State of Dams Suckling Small Litter or MSG-Treated Pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Regina Capriglioni Cancian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactation is an important function that is dependent on changes in the maternal homeostasis and sustained by histological maternal adjustments. We evaluated how offspring manipulations during the lactational phase can modulate maternal morphologic aspects in the mammary gland, adipose tissue, and pancreatic islets of lactating dams. Two different models of litter-manipulation-during-lactation were used: litter sizes, small litters (SL or normal litters (NL and subcutaneous injections in the puppies of monosodium glutamate (MSG, or saline (CON. SL Dams and MSG Dams presented an increase in WAT content and higher plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, and insulin, in relation to NL Dams and CON Dams, respectively. The MG of SL Dams and MSG Dams presented a high adipocyte content and reduced alveoli development and the milk of the SL Dams presented a higher calorie and triglyceride content, compared to that of the NL Dams. SL Dams presented a reduction in islet size and greater lipid droplet accumulation in BAT, in relation to NL Dams. SL Dams and MSG Dams present similar responses to offspring manipulation during lactation, resulting in changes in metabolic parameters. These alterations were associated with higher fat accumulation in BAT and changes in milk composition only in SL Dams.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Chung Hun Wha Dam Tang (CHWDT on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity via AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jamal Uddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chung Hun Wha Dam Tang (CHWDT herbal combination was reported to cease dizziness and phlegm. However, the effect of CHWDT in obesity has not yet been known mechanically. Therefore, we investigated whether this CHWDT could protect the cells from lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and inflammation in both in vivo and in vitro. CHWDT significantly decreased body weight, epididymal and perirenal fat content without affecting feed intake in high-fat diet-induced obese mice model. Additionally, CHWDT inhibited obesity-induced SREBP1, FAS, PGC1α, G6Pase, PEPCK and increased CPT1, ACO, and LCAD genes expression in vivo and in vitro. Proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-α and iNOS expression were reduced by CHWDT in both Raw264.7 macrophages and HepG2 cells. In addition, NO production was also significantly decreased by CHWDT in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, AMPKα activation by CHWDT was involved in inhibition of obesity by reducing triglycerides production and increasing CPT1 expression. Based on all of the results, we suggest that CHWDT has inhibitory effects on obesity-induced lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and inflammation via AMPKα activation.

  15. Pneumatic impression: Improving dental arch impression with an inflatable balloon

    OpenAIRE

    Lokendra Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this impression technique is to overcome the problem associated with restricted mouth opening in association with high arched palate by employing pneumatic impression technique using latex balloon. Methods: A stock tray was modified with auto polymerizing acrylic resin. On the modified tray, a latex balloon was attached with aid of cyanoacrylate. The outlet of the balloon was then connected to a clinical sphygmomanometer bulb with the rubber pipe for air passage whi...

  16. Dam health diagnosis and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongru; Su, Huaizhi

    2005-06-01

    Based on the bionics principle in the life sciences field, we regard a dam as a vital and intelligent system. A bionics model is constructed to observe, diagnose and evaluate dam health. The model is composed of a sensing system (nerve), central processing unit (cerebrum) and decision-making implement (organism). In addition, the model, index system and engineering method on dam health assessment are presented. The proposed theories and methods are applied to evaluate dynamically the health of one concrete dam.

  17. Dam Design can Impede Adaptive Management of Environmental Flows: A Case Study from the Opuha Dam, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, JoAnna; Murray Hicks, D.; Snelder, Ton H.; Arscott, David B.; Larned, Scott T.; Booker, Doug; Suren, Alastair M.

    2013-02-01

    The Opuha Dam was designed for water storage, hydropower, and to augment summer low flows. Following its commissioning in 1999, algal blooms (dominated first by Phormidium and later Didymosphenia geminata) downstream of the dam were attributed to the reduced frequency and magnitude of high-flow events. In this study, we used a 20-year monitoring dataset to quantify changes associated with the dam. We also studied the effectiveness of flushing flows to remove periphyton from the river bed. Following the completion of the dam, daily maximum flows downstream have exceeded 100 m3 s-1 only three times; two of these floods exceeded the pre-dam mean annual flood of 203 m3 s-1 (compared to 19 times >100 m3 s-1 and 6 times >203 m3 s-1 in the 8 years of record before the dam). Other changes downstream included increases in water temperature, bed armoring, frequency of algal blooms, and changes to the aquatic invertebrate community. Seven experimental flushing flows resulted in limited periphyton reductions. Flood wave attenuation, bed armoring, and a shortage of surface sand and gravel, likely limited the effectiveness of these moderate floods. Floods similar to pre-dam levels may be effective for control of periphyton downstream; however, flushing flows of that magnitude are not possible with the existing dam infrastructure. These results highlight the need for dams to be planned and built with the capacity to provide the natural range of flows for adaptive management, particularly high flows.

  18. Early Results of Ascending Aorta and Aortic Arch Surgery in Albania

    OpenAIRE

    Likaj E; Kacani A; Dumani S; Refatllari A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of aneurysms of the ascending aorta, arch aorta, or both are surgically challenging and has traditionally carried a high hospital mortality rate. The use of refined operative techniques has resulted in reduced hospital mortality rates. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent 74 surgical procedures between January 2011 and January 2014, for graft replacement of the ascending aorta or transverse aortic arch. There ...

  19. The Initial Mass Function of the Arches Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, Matthew; Lu, Jessica; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea; Morris, Mark; Do, Tuan; Clarkson, William; Albers, Saundra; Weisz, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The Arches star cluster is only 26 pc (in projection) from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. This young massive cluster allows us to examine the impact of the extreme Galactic Center environment on the stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF). However, measuring the IMF of the Arches is challenging due to the highly variable extinction along the line of sight, which makes it difficult to separate cluster members from the field stars. We use high-precision proper motion and photometric measurements obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope to calculate cluster membership probabilities for stars down to ~2 M_sun out to the outskirts of the cluster (3 pc). In addition, we measure the effective temperatures of a small sample of cluster members in order to calibrate the mass-luminosity relationship using using Keck OSIRS K-band spectroscopy. We forward model these observations to simultaneously constrain the cluster IMF, age, distance, and extinction. We obtain an IMF that is shallower than what is observed locally, with a higher fraction of high-mass stars to low mass stars (i.e., “top-heavy”). We will compare the IMF of the Arches to similar clusters in the Galactic disk and quantify the effect of the GC environment on the star formation process.

  20. Mandibular arch perimeter changes with lip bumper treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, W S; Nanda, R S; Currier, G F

    1991-06-01

    The effects of lip bumper treatment on the mandibular arch were observed in 32 patients with late transitional and early permanent dentitions. Dental cast measurements were made for arch perimeter, arch length, and arch width. Cephalometric radiographs were used to determine labial tipping of the incisors and distal movement of the molars. Arch circumference increased in all patients, ranging from 0.7 mm to 8.8 mm, with an average of 4.1 mm. The mean increase in arch length was 1.2 mm and was largely attributed to anterior tipping of the mandibular incisors. Change in arch length was the most predictive variable for the increase in arch circumference. Passive changes in arch width were recorded, with a mean increase of 2.0 mm in the intercanine distance and 2.5 mm in the first premolar distance. Arch width increments contributed to the increase in arch circumference, but the increases in arch width were not found to be predictive of the change in arch circumference. Changes in either arch circumference or arch length were not related to the duration of treatment, age and sex of the patient, or the eruption status of the permanent second molars.

  1. The medial longitudinal arch as a possible risk factor for ankle sprains: a prospective study in 83 female infantry recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Kahn, Gadi; Zeev, Aviva; Rubin, Amir; Constantini, Naama; Even, Adi; Nyska, Meir; Mann, Gideon

    2005-02-01

    Ankle sprains are frequent, especially in athletes, soldiers, or others who perform high levels of physical activity. Although prevention is a primary goal, little is known about the risk factors. We evaluated the association of the structure of the medial arch of the foot to the occurrence of acute and recurrent ankle sprains in 83 female infantry recruits. We found no previous studies on ankle sprains in women in the English literature. Arch height was quantified using the Chippaux-Smirak index, and each arch was classified as high, normal, or low. Retrospective data were obtained from questionnaires in which the soldiers noted whether or not they had had ankle sprains in the past, the grade of the sprain, and recurrence. Prospective data were accumulated in the 4 months of basic training, during which time every ankle sprain was documented and classified according to its grade and cause. The retrospective data showed more frequent ankle sprains in the low arch group than in the normal arch group, mainly in the right foot (RR of 2.9, p sprains studied retrospectively also showed that more sprains occurred in the low arch group than in the normal arch and high arch groups (RR of 10.3, p sprains. However, our study consisted of a relatively small population, and further studies are needed.

  2. Dam of Ksob (Algeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stucky, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Design of a sediment by-pass. The Ksob dam was heightened in 1977 in order to increase its storage capacity. A sediment derivation tunnel by-passing the reservoir was designed for a second stage. It will be operated during floods and is expected to delay significantly important storage losses due to reservoir sedimentation.

  3. Association of arch height with ankle muscle strength and physical performance in adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in arch height may have a certain impact on lower extremity muscle strength and physical performance. However, there is little evidence from investigation of the possible correlation of arch height with ankle muscle strength and physical performance measures. Sixty-seven participants took part in this study. Arch height index (AHI was assessed and categorized using a 3-dimension foot scanner. Ankle muscle strength was measured employing a dynamometer. Physical performance measures including agility, force and proprioception were randomly tested. Compared to the medium AHI, the high AHI had lower plantarflexion and inversion peak torque. The high AHI also had lower peak torque per body weight value for plantarflexion and inversion at 120°/s (P = 0.026 and 0.006, respectively, and dorsiflexion at 30°/s (P = 0.042. No significant ankle muscle strength difference was observed between the low and medium AHI. Additionally, AHI was negatively correlated with eversion and inversion peak torque at 120°/s, and negatively associated with plantarflexion, eversion and inversion peak torque per body weight at both 30°/s and 120°/s (r ranged from -0.26 to -0.36, P values < 0.050. However, no significant relationship was found between arch height and physical performance measures. The results showed that high arches had lower ankle muscle strength while low arches exhibited greater ankle muscle strength. Arch height was negatively associated with ankle muscle strength but not related to physical performance. We suggest that the lower arch with greater ankle muscle strength may be an adaptation to weight support and shock absorption.

  4. Estimation of permanent displacements of the Tehri dam in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this paper is to estimate permanent displacements of Tehri dam due to an earthquake of magnitude M w = 8 · 5 , the occurrence of which has a high probability in the region, and for an earthquake of magnitude M w = 7 · 0 , for which the dam has been currently designed. A two-dimensional finite element ...

  5. Physical Modeling of Landslide Generated Tsunamis and the 50th Anniversary of the Vajont Dam Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Mohammed, Fahad; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2013-04-01

    The Vajont river is an affluent of the Piave River located in the Dolomite Alps of the Veneto Region, about 100km north of Venice. A 265.5 m high double curved arch dam was built across a V-shaped gorge creating a reservoir with a maximum storage capacity of 0.169 km3. A maximum water depth of 250 m was reached by early September 1963 during the third filling attempt of the reservoir, but as creeping on the southern flank increased the third reservoir draw down was initiated. By October 9, 1963 the water depth was lowered to 240m as the southern flank of Vajont reservoir catastrophically collapsed on a length of more than 2km. Collapse occurred during reservoir drawdown in a final attempt to reduce flank creeping and the reservoir was only about two-thirds full. The partially submerged rockslide with a volume of 0.24 km3 penetrated into the reservoir at velocities up to 30 m/s. The wave runup in direct prolongation of slide axis reached the lowest houses of Casso 270m above reservoir level before impact corresponding to 245m above dam crest (Müller, 1964). The rockslide deposit came within 50m of the left abutment and towers up to 140m above the dam crest. The lateral spreading of the surge overtopped the dam crest by more than 100m. The thin arch dam withstood the overtopping and sustained no damage to the structural shell and the abutments. The flood wave dropped more than 500m down the Vajont gorge and into the Piave Valley causing utter destruction to the villages of Longarone, Pirago, Villanova, Rivalta and Fae. More than 2000 persons perished. The Vajont disaster highlights an extreme landslide tsunami event in the narrowly confined water body of a reservoir. Landslide tsunami hazards exist even in areas not exposed to tectonic tsunamis. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU). A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was

  6. Right-left propensity of cardiogenic cerebral embolism in standard versus bovine aortic arch variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Menachem; Khamesi, Mojdeh; Sivakumar, Mangaiyarkkarasi; Natarajan, Vijaya; Motahari, Hooman; Caputo, Nicholas

    2018-01-12

    Left-hemispheric ischemic strokes are more frequent overall and often have a worse outcome than their right-hemispheric counterparts. We hypothesized that the right-left propensity of CE cerebral infarcts differs between patients with standard and bovine arch variants. We retrospectively identified all patients with acute stroke of the anterior circulation admitted to our primary stroke center between January 2011 and June 2017 who had moderate- to high-risk cardio-embolic sources according to the SSS-TOAST classification. From amongst these patients, only those with available cross-sectional imaging of the aortic arch were included. Lesion side and patterns on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were determined blinded to the aortic arch imaging. One hundred and nineteen patients met the TOAST criteria for moderate- or high-risk cardio-embolic source. Of these, 58 (49%) were men and the median age was 71.9 years; 33% of the patients had a bovine arch. The most common etiologies of CE were atrial fibrillation (n = 80 [67%]) and congestive heart failure with ejection fraction right- or left-sided infarct. Although there was a trend towards right-sided lesions in patients with standard arches, this did not reach statistical significance. No statistically significant difference in embolic stroke laterality was demonstrated in our relatively small sample. Bovine arch could be an independent risk factor for cardio-embolic embolism. Clin. Anat., 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The relationship of arch length to alterations in dental arch width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, W P; Braun, S; Chinhara, A; Legan, H L

    2000-08-01

    An accurate method is presented for forecasting alterations in arch length related to various width increases in each dental arch. It is based on combined beta and hyperbolic cosine functions which express the expanded dental arches with correlation coefficients of r = 0.98, between measured data and representations of the dental arch. When the midpalatal suture is expanded, canine width and molar width alterations are not equal because the line of action of the expanding force is anterior to the center of resistance of the dentomaxillary complex. Therefore, canine to molar width ratio alterations of 1:1, 1.25:1, and 1.5:1 are examined, and simple linear functions are presented for purposes of predicting changes in arch length.

  8. Design of tailing dam using red mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Subrat; Sahoo, Tapaswini; Das, Sarat

    2013-06-01

    Red mud, waste industrial product from aluminum industries produced approximately 75 million tonnes every year with less than half of this is used. Storage of this unutilized red mud takes vast tracts of usable land and pollutes, land, air and water. Construction of high embankments, under passes, flyovers, tailing dams uses vast tract of natural resources (top soil) is also matter of concern as its takes thousands of years to form the natural soil. This paper discusses use of red mud for construction of tailing dam based on laboratory findings and finite element analysis. The geotechnical properties such as plasticity, compaction, permeability, shear strength characteristics and dispersion of red mud are presented. Stability and seepage analysis of tailing dams as per finite element analysis using the above geotechnical parameters is presented.

  9. Tubular Steel Arch Stabilized by Textile Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Svoboda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tubular steel arch supporting textile membrane roofing is investigated experimentally and numerically. The stabilization effects of the textile membrane on in-plane and out-of-plane behavior of the arch is of primary interest. First a model of a large membrane structure tested in laboratory is described. Prestressed membranes of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S were used as a currently standard and excellent material. The test arrangement, loading and resulting load/deflection values are presented. The supporting structure consisted of two steel arch tubes, outer at edge of the membrane and inner supporting interior of the membrane roofing. The stability and strength behavior of the inner tube under both symmetrical and asymmetrical loading was monitored and is shown in some details. Second the SOFiSTiK software was employed to analyze the structural behavior in 3D, using geometrically nonlinear analysis with imperfections (GNIA. The numerical analysis, FE mesh sensitivity, the membrane prestressing and common boundary conditions are validated by test results. Finally a parametrical study concerning stability of mid arch with various geometries in a membrane structure with several supporting arches is presented, with recommendations for a practical design.

  10. A continous Bayesian network for earth dams' risk assessment: methodology and quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Napoles, O.; Delgado-Hernadez-D.J.; De-Leon-Escobedo, D.; Arteaga-Arcos, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dams’ safety is highly important for authorities around the world. The impacts of a dam failure can be enormous. Models for investigating dam safety are required for helping decision-makers to mitigate the possible adverse consequences of flooding. A model for earth dam safety must specify clearly

  11. Edentulism and shortened dental arch in Brazilian elderly from the National Survey of Oral Health 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio Freitas Ribeiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the distribution of edentulism and estimate the prevalence of functional dentition and shortened dental arch among elderly population. METHODS: A population-based epidemiological study was carried out with a sample of 5,349 respondents aged 65 to 74 years obtained from the 2002 and 2003 Brazilian Ministry of Health/Division of Oral Health survey database. The following variables were studied: gender; macroregion of residence; missing teeth; percentage that met the World Health Organization goal for oral health in the age group 65 to 74 years (50% having at least 20 natural teeth; presence of shortened dental arch; number of posterior occluding pairs of teeth. The Chi-square test assessed the association between categorical variables. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to assess differences of mean between number of posterior occluding pairs teeth, macro-region and gender. RESULTS: The elderly population had an average of 5.49 teeth (SD: 7.93 with a median of 0. The proportion of completely edentulous respondents was 54.7%. Complete edentulism was 18.2% in the upper arch and 1.9% in the lower arch. The World Health Organization goal was achieved in 10% of all respondents studied. However, only 2.7% had acceptable masticatory function and aesthetics (having at least shortened dental arch and a mean number of posterior occluding pairs of 6.94 (SD=2.97. There were significant differences of the percentage of respondents that met the World Health Organization goal and presence of shortened dental arch between men and women. There were differences in shortened dental arch between macroregions. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian epidemiological oral health survey showed high rate of edentulism and low rate of shortened dental arch in the elderly population studied, thus suggesting significant functional and aesthetic impairment in all Brazilian macroregions especially among women.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of the Dynamic Behavior of an In-Plane MEMS Shallow Arch Under Electrostatic Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-01-20

    We present experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of a clamped-clamped in-plane MEMS shallow arch when excited by an electrostatic force. We explore the dynamic behaviors of the in-plane motion of the shallow arches via frequency sweeps in the neighborhood of the first resonance frequency. The shallow arch response is video microscopy recorded and analyzed by means of digital imaging. The experimental data show local softening behavior for small DC and AC loads. For high voltages, the experimental investigation reveals interesting dynamics, where the arch exhibits a dynamic snap-Through behavior. These attractive experimental results verify the previously reported complex behavior of in-plane MEMS arches and show promising results to implement these structures for variety of sensing and actuation applications. © Copyright 2015 by ASME.

  13. Mathematical beta function formulation for maxillary arch form prediction in normal occlusion population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Morteza; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tehranchi, Azita; Nouri, Mahtab; Younessian, Farnaz

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dental arch curvature in subjects with normal occlusion in an Iranian population and propose a beta function formula to predict maxillary arch form using the mandibular intermolar widths (IMW) and intermolar depths (IMD). The materials used were study casts of 54 adolescents with normal occlusion and mean age of 14.1 years (25 males, 29 females, age range 12-16 years). Curve-fitting analyses were carried out and the curves passing through the facial-axis point of the canines, premolars, first molars, and the incisal edges of the anterior teeth were studied using a 3D laser scanner. Using the measured IMW and IMD of the dental arches at the maxillary and mandibular first molar region, a beta function formula proposed for predicting maxillary arch form. The accuracy of the proposed formula was assessed on 10 randomly selected dental casts. The mean (SD) of the maxillary and mandibular IMW and IMD were 57.92 (4.75), 54.19 (5.31), and 31.59 (2.90) and 28.10 (2.59) mm, respectively. There was no gender dimorphism (P > 0.05) for both variables (IMW, IMD). There was a strong positive association (n = 10, Pearson r = 0.98, P < 0.05) between the measured (actual) maxillary arch length and proposed arch length derived from generated formula. The goodness of fit (whole arch) for the proposed beta function formula, using adjusted r square measure and root mean square in 10 patients averaged 0.97 and 1.49 mm, respectively. The corresponding figures for the maxillary anterior arch (canine to canine) were 0.90 and 0.92 mm, respectively. The proposed beta function formula used for predicting maxillary arch form based on two mandibular measures (IMW, IMD) was found to have a high accuracy for maxillary arch prediction in the Iranian population and may be used as a guide to fabricate customized arch wires or as an aid in maxillary reconstructive surgery.

  14. Three Gorges Dam, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This ASTER image shows a 60 km stretch of the Yangtze River in China, including the Xiling Gorge, the eastern of the three gorges. In the left part of the image is the construction site of the Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest.This image was acquired on July 20, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Size: 60 x 24 km (36 x 15 miles) Location: 30.6 deg. North lat., 111.2 deg. East long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3

  15. Early postweaning exercise improves central leptin sensitivity in offspring of rat dams fed high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Liang, Nu-Chu; Ewald, Erin R; Purcell, Ryan H; Boersma, Gretha J; Yan, Jianqun; Moran, Timothy H; Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2013-11-01

    Maternal high-fat (HF) diet has long-term consequences on the metabolic phenotype of the offspring. Here, we determined the effects of postweaning exercise in offspring of rat dams fed HF diet during gestation and lactation. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on chow or HF diet throughout gestation and lactation. All pups were weaned onto chow diet on postnatal day (PND) 21. At 4 wk of age, male pups were given free access to running wheels (RW) or remained sedentary (SED) for 3 wk, after which all rats remained sedentary, resulting in four groups: CHOW-SED, CHOW-RW, HF-SED, and HF-RW. Male HF offspring gained more body weight by PND7 compared with CHOW pups and maintained this weight difference through the entire experiment. Three weeks of postweaning exercise did not affect body weight gain in either CHOW or HF offspring, but reduced adiposity in HF offspring. Plasma leptin was decreased at the end of the 3-wk running period in HF-RW rats but was not different from HF-SED 9 wk after the exercise period ended. At 14 wk of age, intracerebroventricular injection of leptin suppressed food intake in CHOW-SED, CHOW-RW, and HF-RW, while it did not affect food intake in HF-SED group. At death, HF-RW rats also had higher leptin-induced phospho-STAT3 level in the arcuate nucleus than HF-SED rats. Both maternal HF diet and postweaning exercise had effects on hypothalamic neuropeptide and receptor mRNA expression in adult offspring. Our data suggest that postweaning exercise improves central leptin sensitivity and signaling in this model.

  16. GIS inundation mapping and dam breach analysis of Woolwich Dam using HEC-geoRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocan, N. [Crozier and Associates Inc., Collingwood, ON (Canada); Joy, D.M. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada); Rungis, G. [Grand River Conservation Authority, Cambridge, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the extent of flood inundation given a hypothetical dam breach scenario of the Woolwich Dam located in the Grand River Watershed, 2.5 km north of the Town of Elmira, Ontario. The dam is operated by the Grand River Conservation Authority and was constructed to provide low-flow augmentation to Canagagigue Creek. Advances in the computational capabilities of numerical models along with the availability of fine resolution geospatial data has lead to significant advances in the evaluation of catastrophic consequences due to the ensuing flood waters when dams fail. The hydraulic models HEC-RAS and HEC-GeoRAS were used in this study along with GIS to produce high resolution spatial and temporal flood inundation mapping. Given the proximity to the Town of Elmira, the dam is classified as having a high hazard potential. The large size and high hazard potential of the dam suggests that the Inflow Design Flood (IDF) is the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) event. The outlet structure of the spillway consists of 4 ogee-type concrete spillways equipped with radial gates. A low-level concrete pipe located within the spillway structure provides spillage for maintenance purposes. The full flow capacity of the spillway structure is 297 cubic metres per second at the full supply level of 364.8 metres. In addition to GIS flood inundation maps, this paper included the results of flood hydrographs, water surface profiles and peak flow data. It was concluded that techniques used in this analysis should be considered for use in the development of emergency management planning and dam safety assessments across Canada. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  17. Free vibration of arches flexible in shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, W. J.; Veletsos, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis reported by Veletsos et al. (1972) concerning the free vibrational characteristics of circular arches vibrating in their own planes is considered. The analysis was based on a theory which neglects the effects of rotatory inertia and shearing deformation. A supplementary investigation is conducted to assess the effects of the previously neglected factors and to identify the conditions under which these effects are of practical significance or may be neglected. A simple approximate procedure is developed for estimating the natural frequencies of arches, giving due consideration to the effects of the previously neglected factors.

  18. Thermal effects of dams in the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.

    2010-01-01

    where the annual maximum temperature typically occurred in September or October. Without-dam temperatures also tended to have more daily variation than with-dam temperatures. Examination of the without-dam temperature estimates indicated that dam sites could be grouped according to the amount of streamflow derived from high-elevation, spring-fed, and snowmelt-driven areas high in the Cascade Mountains (Cougar, Big Cliff/Detroit, River Mill, and Hills Creek Dams: Group A), as opposed to flow primarily derived from lower-elevation rainfall-driven drainages (Group B). Annual maximum temperatures for Group A ranged from 15 to 20 degree(s)C, expressed as the 7-day average of the daily maximum (7dADM), whereas annual maximum 7dADM temperatures for Group B ranged from 21 to 25 degrees C. Because summertime stream temperature is at least somewhat dependent on the upstream water source, it was important when estimating without-dam temperatures to use correlations to sites with similar upstream characteristics. For that reason, it also is important to maintain long-term, year-round temperature measurement stations at representative sites in each of the Willamette River basin's physiographic regions. Streamflow and temperature estimates downstream of the major dam sites and throughout the Willamette River were generated using existing CE-QUAL-W2 flow and temperature models. These models, originally developed for the Willamette River water-temperature Total Maximum Daily Load process, required only a few modifications to allow them to run under the greatly reduced without-dam flow conditions. Model scenarios both with and without upstream dams were run. Results showed that Willamette River streamflow without upstream dams was reduced to levels much closer to historical pre-dam conditions, with annual minimum streamflows approximately one-half or less of dam-augmented levels. Thermal effects of the dams varied according to the time of year, from cooling in mid-summer to warm

  19. Walden North Dam overtopping : emergency response and rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, S. [FortisBC Inc., South Slocan, BC (Canada); McCreanor, J. [Acres International Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Cronin, D.L.R.; Daw, D. [Acres International Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    This paper described the events that led to the overtopping of the Walden North Dam during a heavy rainfall in June 2002, resulting in a breach around an abutment wall. The dam is part of a run-of-river hydro development on Cayoosh Creek near Lillooet, British Columbia. The Walden North Dam was a low, 46 meter wide concrete dam with a single radial gate. The dam overtopping was attributed to failure of the radial gate hoist. Prior to this event, the dam had been classified by the British Columbia Dam Safety Authorities as a high and then a low consequence category of failure. As facility managers, Aquila Networks Canada Ltd. established an immediate action plan to stabilize the situation and resume normal power production by applying the following priorities: (1) ensure safety of workers and the public, (2) limit further damage to the dam and other facilities, (3) ensure environmental protection, and (4) continue to operate the generation units. Local authorities were informed to evacuate a downstream campsite and environmental agencies were contacted along with safety regulators. Repairs included demolition of the damaged portion of the structure and construction a new two-bay gate/stoplog spillway and bridge. Construction was completed by September 2003 according to the requirements of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans for minimum flow, accurate control of fish flows and environmental monitoring of the stream area. 10 figs.

  20. ARCHES: Advancing Research & Capacity in Hydrologic Education and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, A.; Fryar, A. E.; Durham, M. C.; Schroeder, P.; Agouridis, C.; Hanley, C.; Rotz, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Educating young scientists and building capacity on a global scale is pivotal towards better understanding and managing our water resources. Based on this premise the ARCHES (Advancing Research & Capacity in Hydrologic Education and Science) program has been established. This abstract provides an overview of the program, links to access information, and describes the activities and outcomes of student participants from the Middle East and North Africa. The ARCHES program (http://arches.wrrs.uga.edu) is an integrated hydrologic education approach using online courses, field programs, and various hands-on workshops. The program aims to enable young scientists to effectively perform the high level research that will ultimately improve quality of life, enhance science-based decision making, and facilitate collaboration. Three broad, interlinked sets of activities are incorporated into the ARCHES program: (A1) the development of technical expertise, (A2) the development of professional contacts and skills, and (A3) outreach and long-term sustainability. The development of technical expertise (A1) is implemented through three progressive instructional sections. Section 1: Students were guided through a series of online lectures and exercises (Moodle: http://wrrs.uga.edu/moodle) covering three main topics (Remote Sensing, GIS, and Hydrologic Modeling). Section 2: Students participated in a hands-on workshop hosted at the University of Georgia's Water Resources and Remote Sensing Laboratory (WRRSL). Using ENVI, ArcGIS, and ArcSWAT, students completed a series of lectures and real-world applications (e.g., Development of Hydrologic Models). Section 3: Students participated in field studies (e.g., measurements of infiltration, recharge, streamflow, and water-quality parameters) conducted by U.S. partners and international collaborators in the participating countries. The development of professional contacts and skills (A2) was achieved through the promotion of networking

  1. The Political Ecology of Chinese Large Dams in Cambodia: Implications, Challenges and Lessons Learnt from the Kamchay Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Siciliano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the opportunities offered by foreign investment in energy infrastructure mostly by Chinese firms, the Government of Cambodia is giving high priority to developing hydropower resources for reducing energy poverty and powering economic growth. Using a “Political ecology of the Asian drivers” framework, this paper assesses China’s involvement in the development of large dams’ in Cambodia and its impacts on the access of natural resources such as water and energy by dam builders, local communities and the government. This analysis is based on 61 interviews and 10 focus group discussions with affected communities, institutional actors, Chinese dam builders and financiers in relation to the first large Chinese dam built in Cambodia: the Kamchay dam. Based on the results of the analysis this paper makes recommendations on how to improve the planning, implementation and governance of future large dams in Cambodia.

  2. Association of arch height with ankle muscle strength and physical performance in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Tsujimoto, T; Kim, B; Tanaka, K

    2017-06-01

    Differences in arch height may have a certain impact on lower extremity muscle strength and physical performance. However, there is little evidence from investigation of the possible correlation of arch height with ankle muscle strength and physical performance measures. Sixty-seven participants took part in this study. Arch height index (AHI) was assessed and categorized using a 3-dimension foot scanner. Ankle muscle strength was measured employing a dynamometer. Physical performance measures including agility, force and proprioception were randomly tested. Compared to the medium AHI, the high AHI had lower plantarflexion and inversion peak torque. The high AHI also had lower peak torque per body weight value for plantarflexion and inversion at 120°/s (P = 0.026 and 0.006, respectively), and dorsiflexion at 30°/s (P = 0.042). No significant ankle muscle strength difference was observed between the low and medium AHI. Additionally, AHI was negatively correlated with eversion and inversion peak torque at 120°/s, and negatively associated with plantarflexion, eversion and inversion peak torque per body weight at both 30°/s and 120°/s (r ranged from -0.26 to -0.36, P values height and physical performance measures. The results showed that high arches had lower ankle muscle strength while low arches exhibited greater ankle muscle strength. Arch height was negatively associated with ankle muscle strength but not related to physical performance. We suggest that the lower arch with greater ankle muscle strength may be an adaptation to weight support and shock absorption.

  3. Dam Seepage Investigation of an Earthfill Dam in Warren County, Missouri Using Geophysical Methods

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    Stanley C. Nwokebuihe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT, induced polarization (IP and spontaneous potential (SP data were acquired across and in proximity to a leaking earth-fill dam (Wolf Creek dam in Warren County, Missouri. The objectives were to identify and map probable seepage pathways through the dam and to determine if the outlet works drainage pipe used in the construction of the dam was leaking. On the basis of the integrated interpretation of the acquired geophysical data two probable seepage pathways through the leaking earth-fill dam were identified and mapped. These two pathways are referred to as the Groin Leak and Water Fall Leak, respectively. The Groin Leak and Water Fall Leak seepage pathways are both characterized by relatively low resistivity and low chargeability. It is also concluded that there is high probability that water is leaking from the downstream end of the outlet works drainage pipe. The interpreted drainage pipe leak (Outlet works Leak is characterized by relatively low resistivity, high chargeability and negative self-potential values.

  4. Sediment Transport in the Bill Williams River and Turbidity in Lake Havasu During and Following Two High Releases from Alamo Dam, Arizona, in 2005 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiele, Stephen M.; Hart, Robert J.; Darling, Hugh L.; Hautzinger, Andrew B.

    2009-01-01

    Discharges higher than are typically released from Alamo Dam in west-central Arizona were planned and released in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 to study the effects of these releases on the Bill Williams River and Lake Havasu, into which the river debouches. Sediment concentrations and water discharges were measured in the Bill Williams River, and turbidity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured in Lake Havasu during and after experimental releases in 2005 and 2006 from Alamo Dam. Data from such releases will support ongoing ecological studies, improve environmentally sensitive management of the river corridor, and support the development of a predictive relationship between the operation of Alamo Dam and downstream flows and their impact on Lake Havasu and the Colorado River. Elevated discharges in the Bill Williams River mobilize more sediment than during more typical dam operation and can generate a turbidity plume in Lake Havasu. The intakes for the Central Arizona Project, which transfers Colorado River water to central and southern Arizona, are near the mouth of the Bill Williams River. Measurement of the turbidity and the development of the plume over time consequently were important components of the study. In this report, the measurements of suspended sediment concentration and discharges in the Bill Williams River and of turbidity in Lake Havasu are presented along with calculations of silt and sand loads in the Bill Williams River. Sediment concentrations were varied and likely dependent on a variable supply. Sediment loads were calculated at the mouth of the river and near Planet, about 10 km upstream from the mouth for the 2005 release, and they indicate that a net increase in transport of silt and a net decrease in the transport of sand occurred in the reach between the two sites.

  5. Precast Pearl-Chain concrete arch bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    A Pearl-Chain Bridge is a closed-spandrel arch bridge consisting of a number of straight pre-fabricated so called Super-Light Deck elements put together in an arch shape by post-tensioning cables. Several Pearl-Chain arches can be positioned adjacent to each other by a crane to achieve a bridge...... the technology was used. We also study other important components and details in the Pearl-Chain Bridge concept and review the effects of different types of loads. A theoretical case study of a circular 30 m span Pearl-Chain Bridge is presented showing the influence of a number of parameters: The number of post......-tensioning cables, the rise to span ratio, the height of the filling, and the height of the Super-Light Decks. We find that Pearl-Chain Bridges can be adjusted to resist specific moment loads by changing the normal force in the arch cross section by altering the above parameters. It is also found that the negative...

  6. Design of the New Arch Bridge at Mioveni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Dima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Road bridges with steel arches are used efficiently for medium and large spans. These solutions show advantages determined by the arches geometry, by the number and distributions of hangers and by the form and type of the arches bracing system.

  7. Normative Values of Aortic Arch Structures in Premature Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkema, Elles J; Molenschot, Mirella C; Breur, JMPJ; de Vries, WB; Slieker, Martijn G

    BACKGROUND: Aortic arch abnormalities represent 5% to 8% of all congenital heart disease. Measurements of the aortic arch dimensions on two-dimensional echocardiographic images remain of critical importance in the diagnosis of aortic arch pathology. To define aortic hypoplasia or coarctation,

  8. Assembly and lifting of Pearl-Chain arches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Viebæk, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    in buildings and bridges. The assembly and lifting of two Pearl-Chain arches, with a span of 13 m and rise of 1 m, is considered in this paper. Precast “Super-Light Deck” elements were used for the arches, which had a thickness of 22 cm. Both arches were successfully lifted, rotated in mid-air, and placed...

  9. Stability of earth dam with a vertical core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth dam with impervious element in the form of asphaltic concrete core is currently the most promising type of earth dams (due to simple construction technology and universal service properties of asphaltic concrete and is widely used in the world. However, experience in the construction and operation of high dams (above 160 m is not available, and their work is scarcely explored. In this regard, the paper discusses the results of computational prediction of the stress-strain state and stability of a high earth dam (256 m high with the core. The authors considered asphaltic concrete containing 7 % of bitumen as the material of the core. Gravel was considered as the material of resistant prisms. Design characteristics of the rolled asphaltic concrete and gravel were obtained from the processing of the results of triaxial tests. The calculations were performed using finite element method in elastoplastic formulation and basing on the phased construction of the dam and reservoir filling. The research shows, that the work of embankment dam with vertical core during filling of the reservoir is characterized by horizontal displacement of the lower resistant prism in the tailrace and the formation of a hard wedge prism descending along the core in the upper resistant prism. The key issue of the safety assessment is to determine the safety factor of the overall stability of the dam, for calculation of which the destruction of the earth dam is necessary, which can be done by reducing the strength properties of the dam materials. As a results of the calculations, the destruction of the dam occurs with a decrease in the strength characteristics of the materials of the dam by 2.5 times. The dam stability depends on the stability of the lower resistant prism. The destruction of its slope occurs on the classical circular-cylindrical surface. The presence of a potential collapse surface in the upper resistant prism (on the edges of the descending wedge does

  10. In situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms with penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kenji; Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Inoue, Takeshi; Matsumori, Masamichi; Kawakami, Fumi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    We present a series of patients who underwent in situ total aortic arch replacement for infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Between 2002 and 2013, 9 patients with infected distal aortic arch aneurysms underwent total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion. There were 4 male and 5 female patients with a mean age of 72.7±9.0 years. All patients had penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer in the distal aortic arch, which formed saccular aneurysms. Four patients had preoperative hoarseness. Maximum preoperative white blood cell count was 10,211±4375/μL, and mean serum C-reactive protein concentration was 12.7±7.2 mg/dL. Causative microorganisms were identified by blood culture or aortic wall culture and were as follows: Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (2 cases), and unknown (2 cases). Radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement was performed in all patients, followed by the omental flap grafting in 7 patients. All surgery was performed on an urgent or emergency basis. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time and lower body circulatory arrest time were 199.7±50.7 minutes and 66.6±13.8 minutes, respectively. There was no in-hospital mortality, but 1 patient died of asphyxia 5 months after hospital discharge. Freedom from recurrence of infection was 100%. Surgical treatment with the combination of radical debridement with in situ total aortic arch replacement using antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and omental flap grafting was a reliable procedure for the treatment of infected distal aortic arch aneurysms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Subtalar joint kinematic correlations with footprint arch index in race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, J L L; Vera-García, F J; Meana, M

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the paper was to analyze the relationship between footprint arch index and subtalar joint movement in race walkers. Thirteen young, highly skilled race walkers volunteered to participate. We obtained dominant-foot footprints in a bipedal stance. The arch index was measured to classify arch height. We also conducted a photogrammetric video-3D study on a running track. The support phase was recorded while subjects race walked at their individual competition speed. We calculated 4 angle time series describing the ankle joint kinematics during the support phase. Five specific step instants were calculated for each angle and correlated with the arch index. Race walkers were grouped according to arch height to compare. We also correlated the arch index with the time in medial support, and time to change from lateral to medial support during the stance phase. In the calcaneal angle we found correlations with the footprint (r=0.81; Prace walkers adopt a characteristic propulsion technique in the end of the support. No statistical differences were found in the rearfoot angle, which has been previously associated to specific injuries in running. In conclusion, race walkers with higher arches exhibit a more pronounced support with the lateral side of the foot and they do so for a longer time. Conversely, subjects with flatter feet support with the medial side of the foot. The footprint has been found to be a good predictor for the technique employed with respect to the medial and lateral strike of the foot reflected by the calcaneal angle. Coaches should keep this in mind from both performance and injury prevention viewpoints.

  12. Further Exploration of Post-Flare Giant Arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Matthew; Seaton, Daniel B.; Dennis, Brian R.; feng, Li

    2017-08-01

    Recent observations from the SWAP EUV imager on-board PROBA2 and SXI X-ray observations from the GOES satellite have shown that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are one and the same thing. However, it is still not clear how certain loop systems are able to sustain prolonged growth to heights of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). In this presentation we further explore the energy deposition rate above post-flare loop systems through high-energy RHESSI observations. We also explore the difference between the loop systems through a multi-wavelength epoch analysis.

  13. Correlations Among Foot Arching, Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion, and Obesity Level in Primary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowicz-Szymanska, Agnieszka; Mikolajczyk, Edyta; Wodka, Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    This study sought to assess the prevalence of flat feet in primary school children and to find correlations among arch height, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), and obesity level. The 400 children aged 10 to 12 years who took part in the study had their body height, weight, and fat percentage measured. Based on these measurements, body mass index was calculated and weight status was categorized for all of the participants. The height of the longitudinal arch of the foot was measured on a computerized podoscope and given in Clarke's angles. Dorsiflexion ROM was assessed with the child in the nonweightbearing sitting position with the knees 90° flexed. The arithmetic mean and standard deviation were implemented to analyze the data. Intergroup differences were assessed by Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc Tukey tests. Significance was accepted at P = .05. Flat feet were found in 36% of participants; limited ROM was found in both feet in 25% of participants and in one foot in 12%. No significant differences in dorsiflexion ROM in children with high-arched, normal, and flat feet were revealed. Excessive body weight was disclosed in 21% of participants. Overweight and obese children had significantly lower foot arches and notably smaller ankle dorsiflexion ROM than those with normal weight. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM is similar in children with high-arched, normal, and flat feet. However, limited dorsiflexion ROM is more often found in children with excessive weight.

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-09-01

    Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors.

  15. Damming evidence : Canada and the World Commission on Dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vert, P.; Parkinson, B.

    2003-06-01

    Large hydroelectric projects have been met with strong resistance from affected communities, particularly indigenous groups who have been displaced from their flooded communities following the damming of a river. The World Commission on Dams (WCD) was formed in 1998 to review the effectiveness of large dams and develop internationally acceptable guidelines and standards for large dams or hydro energy projects. The Canadian government, through the Canadian International Development Agency, was one of many governments to fund the WCD. However, the authors argue that despite the financial support, the Canadian government was absent from any effort to follow-up on the recommendations of the WCD. The seven strategic priorities in the decision making process include: (1) gaining public acceptance, (2) comprehensive option assessment of water, energy, food and development needs, (3) addressing existing dams to improve the benefits that can be derived from them, (4) sustaining livelihoods, (5) recognizing the entitlements and sharing benefits, (6) ensuring compliance, and (7) sharing rivers for peace, development and security. This report offers a means to assess planned or existing dams and presents a set of guidelines for good practices linked to the seven strategic priorities. Ten case studies from around the world were presented, including the Three Gorges Dam in China. 154 refs., 3 figs., 3 appendices.

  16. Application of thermodynamics-based rate-dependent constitutive models of concrete in the seismic analysis of concrete dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Fei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the seismic analysis of concrete dams with consideration of material nonlinearity. Based on a consistent rate-dependent model and two thermodynamics-based models, two thermodynamics-based rate-dependent constitutive models were developed with consideration of the influence of the strain rate. They can describe the dynamic behavior of concrete and be applied to nonlinear seismic analysis of concrete dams taking into account the rate sensitivity of concrete. With the two models, a nonlinear analysis of the seismic response of the Koyna Gravity Dam and the Dagangshan Arch Dam was conducted. The results were compared with those of a linear elastic model and two rate-independent thermodynamics-based constitutive models, and the influences of constitutive models and strain rate on the seismic response of concrete dams were discussed. It can be concluded from the analysis that, during seismic response, the tensile stress is the control stress in the design and seismic safety evaluation of concrete dams. In different models, the plastic strain and plastic strain rate of concrete dams show a similar distribution. When the influence of the strain rate is considered, the maximum plastic strain and plastic strain rate decrease.

  17. Building problem solving environments with the arches framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debardeleben, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sass, Ron [U NORTH CAROLINA; Stanzione, Jr., Daniel [ASU; Ligon, Ill, Walter [CLEMSON UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The computational problems that scientists face are rapidly escalating in size and scope. Moreover, the computer systems used to solve these problems are becoming significantly more complex than the familiar, well-understood sequential model on their desktops. While it is possible to re-train scientists to use emerging high-performance computing (HPC) models, it is much more effective to provide them with a higher-level programming environment that has been specialized to their particular domain. By fostering interaction between HPC specialists and the domain scientists, problem-solving environments (PSEs) provide a collaborative environment. A PSE environment allows scientists to focus on expressing their computational problem while the PSE and associated tools support mapping that domain-specific problem to a high-performance computing system. This article describes Arches, an object-oriented framework for building domain-specific PSEs. The framework was designed to support a wide range of problem domains and to be extensible to support very different high-performance computing targets. To demonstrate this flexibility, two PSEs have been developed from the Arches framework to solve problem in two different domains and target very different computing platforms. The Coven PSE supports parallel applications that require large-scale parallelism found in cost-effective Beowulf clusters. In contrast, RCADE targets FPGA-based reconfigurable computing and was originally designed to aid NASA Earth scientists studying satellite instrument data.

  18. THE EFFECT OF RESERVOIR WATER LEVEL FLUCTUATION TO THE SEEPAGE ON EARTH DAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sudardja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of earth dam was carried out in a drainage and seepage tank to analyze the seepage resulting from water level fluctuation in the upstream of the dam. The dam models were made of the mixture of Mt. Merapi sand deposit with the soil of sandy-silt from Wonosari area. The variations of sand content in the mixture were 100%; 90% and 80% and the upstream slope inclinations were 1:1; 1:1.5 and 1:2. The result showed that the dams with more sandy-silt in the mixture have smaller seepage and the dams with steeper upstream slope have greater seepage. During rapid rising of water level, the dams with steeper upstream slope have a high rising rate of upstream water level and higher height of downstream slope failure. Moreover, during rapid drawdown, the dams with gentler upstream slope have a smaller rate of upstream drawdown and lower height of upstream slope failure. The dams with more sandy-silt in the mixture have a higher value of rising rate and drawdown of upstream water level but lower height of downstream and upstream slope failure. In the dam management, continuous monitoring of the seepage resulting from reservoir water level fluctuation is required to avoid dam failure. Keywords: Earth dam, rapid rising, rapid drawdown, seepage, slope failure.

  19. Anteroposterior spondyloschisis of atlas with incurving of the posterior arch causing compressive myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Bong; Yoon, Sang Hoon; Jin, Yong Jun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2010-01-15

    A case report of a patient with a combined anterior and posterior arch anomaly of atlas leading to compressive myelopathy. To describe a rare presentation of cervical stenosis at the atlas where congenital defects of the posterior arch with an incurving portion exists. This report includes a feasible hypothesis for the development of this anomaly on the basis of previous hypotheses and surgical findings. Congenital defects of the posterior arch of atlas are uncommon and congenital symptomatic cervical stenosis is very rarely seen at this level. The congenital midline cleft of the posterior arch of an atlas has been described in patients with progressive motor symptoms and sensory deficit in extremities. An 11-year-old boy suffered from right side weakness for 1 year. His mother witnessed his awkward walking and clumsiness in using chopsticks and writing. His medical history was unremarkable, and there was no history of significant trauma. Right upper limb weakness of Grade IV/V and difficulty in hopping on right leg was checked on neurologic examination. The magnetic resonance image showed cervical canal stenosis at atlas level and high signal intensity change in the spinal cord. The computed tomography demonstrated partial defect at anterior and posterior arch of the atlas with incurving at defect site leading to cord compression. Suspecting one of craniovertebral junction anomalies, we performed a surgical resection of the posterior arch of the atlas (decompressive laminectomy). The laminectomy was done. The defect site of the posterior arch was substituted with a cartilage and there was no dural adhesion. After surgery, right lower limb weakness was improved and no instability has been observed during 1-year follow-up. We describe the association between compressive myelopathy and combined anteroposterior spondyloschisis of an atlas with incurving of the arch at defect site. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance image were required to demonstrate the

  20. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  1. Recurrent Pneumonia due to Double Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sedighi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumonia is one of the most common infections during childhood. In children with recurrent bacterial pneumonia complete evaluation for underlying factors is necessary. The most common underlying diseases include: antibody deficiencies , cystic fibrosis , tracheoesophageal fistula and increased pulmonary blood flow. Vascular ring and its pressure effect is a less common cause of stridor and recurrent pneumonia. Congenital abnormalities in aortic arch and main branches which form vascular ring around esophagus and trachea with variable pressure effect cause respiratory symptoms such as stridor , wheezing and recurrent pneumoniaCase Report: A 2 year old boy was admitted in our hospital with respiratory distress and cough . Chest x-Ray demonstrated right lobar pneumonia. He had history of stridor and wheezing from neonatal period and hospitalization due to pneumonia for four times. The patient received appropriate antibiotics. Despite fever and respiratory distress improvement, wheezing continued. Review of his medical documents showed fixed pressure effect on posterior aspect of esophagus in barium swallow. In CT angiography we confirmed double aortic arch.Conclusion: Double aortic arch is one of the causes of persistant respiratory symptom and recurrent pneumonia in children for which fluoroscopic barium swallow is the first non-invasive diagnostic method.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:70-74

  2. Interrelationships between dental occlusion and plantar arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different jaw relationships on the plantar arch during gait. 168 subjects, participating in this study, were distributed into two groups: a control (32 males and 52 females, ranging from 18 to 36 years of age) and a Temporomandibular joint disorders group (28 males and 56 females, ranging from 19 to 42 years of age). Five baropodometric variables were evaluated using a baropodometric platform: the mean load pressure on the plantar surface, the total surface of feet, forefoot vs rearfoot loading, forefoot vs rearfoot surface, and the percentage of body weight on each limb. The tests were performed in three dental occlusion conditions: mandibular rest position (REST); voluntary teeth clenching (VTC); and cotton rolls placed between the upper and the lower dental arches without clenching (CR). The variables were analyzed through repeated measures ANOVA. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the postural parameters of the two groups. The level of significance was p dental arches can be considered as a possible indicator of a pathological condition of the stomatognathic system (SS) which could influence posture. Therefore the use of posture monitoring systems during the treatment of stomatognathic system is justified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seepage safety monitoring model for an earth rock dam under influence of high-impact typhoons based on particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme hydrological events induced by typhoons in reservoir areas have presented severe challenges to the safe operation of hydraulic structures. Based on analysis of the seepage characteristics of an earth rock dam, a novel seepage safety monitoring model was constructed in this study. The nonlinear influence processes of the antecedent reservoir water level and rainfall were assumed to follow normal distributions. The particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm was used to optimize the model parameters so as to raise the fitting accuracy. In addition, a mutation factor was introduced to simulate the sudden increase in the piezometric level induced by short-duration heavy rainfall and the possible historical extreme reservoir water level during a typhoon. In order to verify the efficacy of this model, the earth rock dam of the Siminghu Reservoir was used as an example. The piezometric level at the SW1-2 measuring point during Typhoon Fitow in 2013 was fitted with the present model, and a corresponding theoretical expression was established. Comparison of fitting results of the piezometric level obtained from the present statistical model and traditional statistical model with monitored values during the typhoon shows that the present model has a higher fitting accuracy and can simulate the uprush feature of the seepage pressure during the typhoon perfectly.

  4. Pneumatic impression: Improving dental arch impression with an inflatable balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this impression technique is to overcome the problem associated with restricted mouth opening in association with high arched palate by employing pneumatic impression technique using latex balloon. A stock tray was modified with auto polymerizing acrylic resin. On the modified tray, a latex balloon was attached with aid of cyanoacrylate. The outlet of the balloon was then connected to a clinical sphygmomanometer bulb with the rubber pipe for air passage which would aid in inflating the balloon. The prepared tray assembly was then equipped for recording the impression. An adequate amount of addition polysiloxane impression material, sufficient to cover the entire area of the balloon was loaded onto the tray. The balloon was then inflated with the help of a sphygmomanometer bulb which transferred the air only in one direction. On completion of setting time of the impression material, the air pressure was relieved by deflating of balloon which helped in the easy removal of the impression. The impression was subsequently removed from the oral cavity and disinfected. This novel technique was helpful for recording impression in patients presenting with restricted mouth opening and high arched palate.

  5. Landscape Evolution Modelling of naturally dammed rivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, Wouter; Temme, Arnaud J. A. M.; Baartman, Jantiene E. M.; Schoorl, Jeroen M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural damming of upland river systems, such as landslide or lava damming, occurs worldwide. Many dams fail shortly after their creation, while other dams are long-lived and therefore have a long-term impact on fluvial and landscape evolution. This long-term impact is still poorly understood and

  6. 7 CFR 1724.55 - Dam safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dam safety. 1724.55 Section 1724.55 Agriculture... § 1724.55 Dam safety. (a) The provisions of this section apply only to RUS financed electric system... for Dam Safety,”(Guidelines), as applicable. A dam, as more fully defined in the Guidelines, is...

  7. Risk Perception Analysis Related To Existing Dams In Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimene, Pellegrino

    2013-04-01

    In the first part of this work, the progress of Italian National Rules about dams design, construction and operation are presented to highlight the strong connection existing between the promulgation of new decrees, as a consequence of a dam accidents, and the necessity to prevent further loss of lives and goods downstream. Following the Gleno Dam failure (1923), a special Ministerial Committee wrote out the first Regulations and made the proposal to establish, within the High Council of Public Works, a special department that become soon the "Dam Service", with the tasks of control and supervision about construction and operation phases of the dams and their reservoirs. A different definition of tasks and the structure of Dam Service were provided in accordance with law n° 183/1989, which transferred all the technical services to the Office of the Prime Minister; the aim was to join the Dam Office with the Department for National Technical Services, with the objective of increasing the knowledge of the territory and promoting the study on flood propagation downstream in case of operations on bottom outlet or hypothetical dam-break. In fact, population living downstream is not ready to accept any amount of risk because has not a good knowledge of the efforts of experts involved in dam safety, both from the operators and from the safety Authority. So it's important to optimize all the activities usually performed in a dam safety program and improve the emergency planning as a response to people's primary needs and feeling about safety from Civil Protection Authority. In the second part of the work, a definition of risk is provided as the relationship existing between probability of occurrence and loss, setting out the range within to plan for prevention (risk mitigation), thanks to the qualitative assessment of the minimum safety level that is suited to assign funds to plan for Civil Protection (loss mitigation). The basic meaning of the reliability of a zoned

  8. Postura do pé e classificação do arco plantar de adolescentes usuárias e não usuárias de calçados de salto alto Foot posture and classification of the plantar arch among adolescent wearers and non-wearers of high-heeled shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. O. Pezzan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Correlacionar a postura dos pés com o arco plantar de adolescentes usuárias e não usuárias de calçados de salto alto. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionadas 36 adolescentes, 16 no grupo de não usuárias e 20 no grupo de usuárias, com idade entre 13 e 20 anos. A postura do pé foi analisada por fotos nas condições descalça e com calçado de salto alto tipo Anabella, previamente padronizado, após terem permanecido com ele por uma hora. Sua análise foi realizada pelo software SAPO. A impressão plantar foi realizada descalça e, a partir dela, calculado o Índice de Chipaux - Smirak para classificação do arco plantar. Para análise estatística, utilizou-se o teste t pareado para verificar igualdade entre lados direito e esquerdo. Foi realizado o teste de aderência Shapiro Wilk e, então, a análise inferencial por meio dos testes não paramétricos de Wilcoxon, o teste de Mann-Whitney e a correlação de Spearman. O nível de significância adotado foi de 0,05. RESULTADOS: Não foi encontrada correlação entre o tipo de arco plantar e a postura do pé das adolescentes estudadas. Porém, o ângulo do retropé se mostrou significativamente diferente, apresentando varo de retropé após a colocação do calçado em ambos os grupos, e o arco plantar do grupo de usuárias apresentou valores menores quanto ao Índice Chipaux - Smirak. CONCLUSÕES: Não existe correlação entre a postura do pé e o tipo de arco plantar, embora essas variáveis tenham sofrido influência do calçado de salto alto. Artigo registrado na Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR sob o número ACTRN12608000300370.OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between foot posture and plantar arch among adolescent wearers and non-wearers of high-heeled shoes. METHODS: Thirty-six female adolescents aged 13 to 20 years were selected and grouped as 16 high-heel non-wearers and 20 high-heel wearers. Foot posture was analyzed using photos, firstly

  9. Off-Pump Debranching and Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Aortic Arch Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Tamer; Mashhour, Ahmed; Schmidt, Torsten; Mahlmann, Adrian; Ouda, Ahmed; Florek, Hans-Joachim; Matschke, Klaus; Kappert, Utz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to simplify an until-now complex procedure for the treatment of proximal aortic arch pathology (zones 0 and 1), where a deep hypothermic circulatory arrest even with selective cerebral perfusion is still a high-risk procedure with accompanying splanchnic and spinal cord ischemia. From June 2012 until March 2013, 106 patients underwent aortic surgery in our institution, of whom, 20 patients underwent aortic arch surgery. Of the 20 patients, 7 with multiple comorbidities and a high operative risk and no other indication for a cardiopulmonary bypass were selected to undergo an off-pump aortic arch debranching and thoracic endovascular aortic repair: 4 patients had chronic dissections, and 3 patients had arch aneurysms. The procedure was performed through median sternotomy. The supraaortic branches were rerouted to the ascending aorta, and this process was followed by thoracic endovascular aortic repair of the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta. Transaortic antegrade stenting was performed in 5 cases. Cerebral protection and perfusion monitoring were achieved by biradial pressure monitoring, electroencephalogram, and online transcranial duplex sonography. The preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. All procedures were successful. There were no conversions to cardiopulmonary bypass support. The mean operative time was 184 ± 24 minutes. Postoperatively, there was 1 rethoracotomy for bleeding and 1 cerebrovascular insult. The 30-day mortality was 1 patient. Off-pump aortic debranching with arch stenting is a reproducible procedure that could be favorable in certain situations, such as in patients with a higher operative risk profile, thereby reducing the risks associated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and also yielding favorable outcomes, even in an older patient cohort with more comorbidities.

  10. Cephalic arch stenosis in dialysis patients: review of clinical relevance, anatomy, current theories on etiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivananthan, Gajan; Menashe, Leo; Halin, Neil J

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas (AVFs) serve as a lifeline for many individuals with end-stage renal failure. A common cause of AVF failure is cephalic arch stenosis. Its high prevalence compounded with its resistance to treatment makes cephalic arch stenosis important to understand. Proposed etiologies include altered flow in a fistulized cephalic vein, external compression by fascia, the unique morphology of the cephalic arch, large number of valves in the cephalic outflow tract and biochemical changes that accompany renal failure. Management options are also in debate and include angioplasty, cutting balloon angioplasty, bare metal stents, stent grafts and surgical techniques including flow reduction with minimally invasive banding as well as more invasive venovenostomy with transposition surgeries for refractory cases. In this review, the evidence for the clinical relevance of cephalic arch stenosis, its etiology and management are summarized.

  11. The Impact of Subject Age, Gender, and Arch Length on Attitudes of Syrian Dentists towards Shortened Dental Arches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zakaria Nassani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to investigate the impact of subject age, gender, and arch length on dentists’ attitudes towards unrestored shortened dental arches. Materials and Methods. 93 Syrian dentists were interviewed and presented with 24 scenarios for male and female subjects of different ages and shortened dental arches of varying length. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized visual analogue scale how they would value the health of the mouth if the posterior space was left unrestored. Results. A value of 0.0 represented the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 represented the best. The highest mean value (0.73 was assigned to a shortened dental arch with missing second molar teeth in the mouth of a 70-year-old subject. A 35-year-old female subject with an extremely shortened dental arch (all molar and premolar teeth are missing attracted the lowest mean value (0.26. The statistical analysis indicated a significant decrease in the value placed on unrestored shortened dental arches as the number of remaining teeth decreased (p<0.008. While subject gender had almost no impact on dentists’ attitudes towards shortened dental arches, the scenarios for the older shortened dental arch subjects attracted significantly higher values compared to the scenarios for the younger subjects (p<0.017. Conclusion. Subject age and arch length affect dentists’ attitudes towards shortened dental arches, but subject gender does not.

  12. Big Lake Dam Inspection Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes an inspection of the Big Lake Dam that was done in September of 1983. The inspection did not reveal any conditions that constitute and...

  13. Ririe Dam Release Test Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes 1420 Ririe Dam Ririe Dam 119,880 Gates opened and initial release started. 1455 115th St...16°F air temperature. Table A2. Observations made on 11 February 2013. Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes...ERDC/CRREL TR-13-10 52 Time Location Notes HEC - RAS Location Station (ft) Observation Notes Travel Time* (sec) Vel.** (fps) 1224 5th

  14. Cephalic arch stenosis in autogenous brachiocephalic hemodialysis fistulas: results of cutting balloon angioplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, Søren Thorup; Lönn, Lars; Schroeder, Torben V

    2010-01-01

    Cephalic arch stenosis is a known cause of hemodialysis access failure in patients with brachiocephalic fistulas (BCFs). Outcomes of endovascular treatment are affected by resistance of the stenosis to balloon dilation, a high vein rupture rate and the development of early restenosis. The purpose...

  15. Nonstationary ARCH and GARCH with t-distributed Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Søndergaard; Rahbek, Anders

    Consistency and asymptotic normality are established for the maximum likelihood estimators in the nonstationary ARCH and GARCH models with general t-distributed innovations. The results hold for joint estimation of (G)ARCH effects and the degrees of freedom parameter parametrizing the t-distribut......Consistency and asymptotic normality are established for the maximum likelihood estimators in the nonstationary ARCH and GARCH models with general t-distributed innovations. The results hold for joint estimation of (G)ARCH effects and the degrees of freedom parameter parametrizing the t...

  16. Is Surgical Navigation Useful for Treating Zygomatic Arch Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Min Kwan; Jung, Joo Hyun; Kim, Seon Tae; Oh, Na Rae; Bang, Yu Jin; Kang, Il Gyu

    2017-07-01

    To report the case of a 58-year-old man with a zygomatic arch fracture, which was well localized and reduced using a surgical navigation system. In this clinical report, the authors suggest intraoperative surgical navigation systems are useful diagnostically and for localizing sites of zygomatic arch fractures. The patient underwent successful closed reduction of zygomatic arch fractures using a surgical navigation system. Surgical navigation is a useful tool for identifying the locations of zygomatic arch fractures and for guiding closed reduction. Surgical navigation is recommended for localizing the sites of zygomatic fractures.

  17. Modified complete-arch impression technique for facilitating esthetic and biomechanical precision in complete-arch rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Basil

    2011-08-01

    Treating complex cases is clinically and technically challenging, yet highly rewarding to both patient and clinician when successfully completed. Precision in the fit of the restorations, the definitive occlusal scheme, and the esthetic result are the key elements to long-term success. Clinicians should aim to achieve the same level of precision when treating these cases as they do when treating simple cases; however, with the numerous stages and increased complexity involved comes the potential for errors to compound and magnify as treatment progresses. Areas particularly prone to difficulties are the making of a complete-arch impression and the ability to maintain patient comfort and eliminate unwanted dental emergencies throughout the time-consuming treatment. This report illustrates the techniques and concepts used to achieve esthetic and biomechanical precision when treating complex cases. Specific emphasis is placed on the importance of an accurate complete-arch impression technique, the detail of which is described in the article. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. VARIANT OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF KATUN (ALTAI HYDROELECTRIC COMPLEX WITH COMBINED DAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainov Mikhail Petrovich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors give the description of an alternative construction variant of high-head Katun HPP where a reinforced-concrete faced rockfill dam will be the main water retaining structure. At the present moment it is doubtful that at the particular site a high-head complex will be constructed; the discussions are related only to the possibility of a medium-head project construction (to be called Altai HPP. Therefore, it is necessary to design Altai HPP in such a way that its concrete spillway dam will be further able to become a part of a high-head embankment dam. Therefore, we considered the alternative, where Katun HPP dam would be a combined dam by its structure; a high-head em-bankment dam will rest on a less high concrete dam. All the structures were designed for this variant as well as river diversion scheme and the diversion layout at all construction stages were developed. For this purpose “drops in wells” are proposed to be used. The combined dam structure was validated by the stress-strain state analysis under static and seismic loads. In order to improve shear strength of the concrete part of the dam it was proposed to arrange an upstream apron for decreasing seepage uplift.

  19. Evaluation of behaviors of earth and rockfill dams during construction and initial impounding using instrumentation data and numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rashidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the behavior of Gavoshan dam was evaluated during construction and the first impounding. A two-dimensional (2D numerical analysis was conducted based on a finite difference method on the largest cross-section of the dam using the results of instrument measurements and back analysis. These evaluations will be completed in the case that back analysis is carried out in order to control the degree of the accuracy and the level of confidence of the measured behavior since each of the measurements could be controlled by comparing it to the result obtained from the numerical model. Following that, by comparing the results of the numerical analysis with the measured values, it is indicated that there is a proper consistency between these two values. Moreover, it was observed that the dam performance was suitable regarding the induced pore water pressure, the pore water pressure ratio ru, settlement, induced stresses, arching degree, and hydraulic fracturing probability during the construction and initial impounding periods. The results demonstrated that the maximum settlement of the core was 238 cm at the end of construction. In the following 6 years after construction (initial impounding and exploitation period, the accumulative settlement of the dam was 270 cm. It is clear that 88% of the total settlement of the dam took place during dam construction. The reason is that the clay core was smashed in the wet side, i.e. the optimum moisture content. Whereas the average curving ratio was 0.64 during dam construction; at the end of the initial impounding, the maximum amount of curving ratio in the upstream was 0.81, and the minimum (critical amount in the downstream was 0.52. It was also concluded that this dam is safe in comparison with the behaviors of other similar dams in the world.

  20. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Qu'Appelle River Dam, dam break analysis using advanced GIS tools for rapid modelling and inundation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, D. [Hatch Energy, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Campbell, C. [Saskatchewan Watershed Authority, Moose Jaw, SK (Canada); Groeneveld, J. [Hatch Energy, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The South Saskatchewan River Project (SSRP) comprises a multi-purpose reservoir that provides water for conservation and irrigation, flood control, power generation, recreation, and municipal and industrial water supply. In addition to the 64 m high Gardiner Dam, the 27 m high Qu'Appelle River Dam and the 22 km long Lake Diefenbaker Reservoir, the SSRP also includes ancillary works. The Qu'Appelle River valley extends for 458 km before connecting to the Assiniboine River. The valley is incised up to 90 m in depth and is a popular cottaging and recreational area with several major communities located in the flood plain. In the event of a breach of the Qu'Appelle Dam, the discharge will increase from a normal maximum discharge of under 60 m{sup 3} per second to over 50,000 m{sup 3} per second. The Saskatchewan Watershed Authority (SWA) is responsible for ensuring safe development of the Province's water resources, without affecting reservoir or lake operations, and preventing damage from flooding, erosion or land slides. It is in the process of developing Hazard Assessments and emergency preparedness plans for each of their dams in accordance with the Canadian Dam Safety Guidelines. Studies using GIS technology and the hydrodynamic routing model HEC-RAS have been completed to evaluate the potential inundation that may result in the event of failure of the Qu'Appelle River Dam. These studies involved the development of a breach parameter model using a breach data set revised to better reflect the Qu'Appelle River Dam; the development of a dam break model for the Qu'Appelle River Dam and downstream river and flood plain; and, the use of this model to simulate two potential dam failure scenarios for the Qu'Appelle River Dam, notably failure during passage of the PMF and failure during fair weather conditions. Inundation maps have been prepared for the downstream Qu'Appelle River valley for each of the above events. 3 refs., 4

  2. The Politics, Development and Problems of Small Irrigation Dams in Malawi: Experiences from Mzuzu ADD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryson Gwiyani Nkhoma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the progress made regarding the development of small irrigation dams in Malawi with the view of establishing their significance in improving rural livelihoods in the country. The paper adopts a political economy theory and a qualitative research approach. Evidence from Mzuzu Agricultural Development Division (ADD, where small reservoirs acquire specific relevance, shows that despite the efforts made, the development of small dams is making little progress. The paper highlights that problems of top-down planning, high investment costs, negligence of national and local interests, over-dependency on donors, and conflicts over the use of dams – which made large-scale dams unpopular in the 1990s – continue to affect the development of small irrigation dams in Malawi. The paper argues that small irrigation dams should not be simplistically seen as a panacea to the problems of large-scale irrigation dams. Like any other projects, small dams are historically and socially constructed through interests of different actors in the local settings, and can only succeed if actors, especially those from formal institutions, develop adaptive learning towards apparent conflicting relations that develop among them in the process of implementation. In the case of Mzuzu ADD, it was the failure of the government to develop this adaptive learning to the contestations and conflicts among these actors that undermined successful implementation of small irrigation dams. The paper recommends the need to consider local circumstances, politics, interests, rights and institutions when investing in small irrigation dams.

  3. Adult Class III treatment using a J-hook headgear to the mandibular arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yasuko; Kuroda, Shingo; Alexander, Richard G; Tanaka, Eiji

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the treatment effects of high-pull J-hook headgear on the lower dental arch in nongrowing Class III patients. Fourteen nongrowing Class III patients having an Angle Class III malocclusion and ANB angle of less than 1.0 degree, were treated with high-pull J-hook headgear to the lower arch. Using lateral cephalograms and plaster models obtained before treatment (T1), after active treatment (T2), and after the retention period (T3), the treatment outcome was analyzed. The incisal edge of the lower central incisor moved a mean of 1.2 mm to the lingual and 1.7 mm to the occlusal between T1 and T2. The axis of the lower incisor inclined 4.0 degrees to the lingual. The lower first molar cusp moved 1.5 mm to the distal and the root apex moved 2.0 mm to the mesial. Molar angulations were tipped 9.8 degrees to the distal. The occlusal plane showed 4.5 degrees counterclockwise rotation. The mean intermolar width increased 1.5 mm on average. Comparison of the records between T2 and T3 showed minimal changes. Distal movement of the lower dental arch using J-hook headgear was clearly demonstrated, confirming that the application of high-pull J-hook headgear to the lower arch was effective for improvement of the Class III occlusion.

  4. Conflicts Associated with Dam Removal in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna G. C. Lejon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of deteriorating old dams that need renovation or have lost their function make dam removal a viable management option. There are at least four major reasons for dam removal: safety, law and policy, economy, and ecology. Here we discuss 17 Swedish dams that were recently considered for removal. Because dam removal usually causes controversy, dam removal initiatives may succeed, fail, or result in a compromise such as a bypass channel for migrating fish. We identify and discuss three major obstructions to dam removal: funding, cultural-historical values, and threatened species. To facilitate dam removal, the reasons for, and the effects of, dam removal must be carefully explained, and the public and stakeholders must be kept informed. In complicated cases in which compromise solutions may be the most feasible outcome, the integration of the knowledge of different stakeholders is crucial. The involvement of diverse stakeholders increases their willingness to find compromises, thus avoiding conflicts and failures.

  5. Mandibular arch changes following nonextraction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, David T; Pender, Neil; Counihan, Dan

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate mandibular tooth position changes following treatment with a lip bumper and fixed appliance. Specifically, we aimed to determine how space was obtained to align crowded lower incisors. Thirty-four consecutively treated children with a mean age of 10.6 years (SD: 1.14 years) were selected from a specialist orthodontic practice in Eire. All subjects were treated with a lip bumper followed by a fixed appliance. The positions and angulations of the lower first molars and most proclined lower incisor were measured on the pretreatment and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs and study models with a reflex metrograph. The changes were also compared with published growth data. After lip bumper and fixed appliance treatment the mandibular arch depth decreased (Mean difference: 1.2 mm; p lip bumper followed by fixed appliance treatment were to maintain the leeway space, expand the mandibular arch and 'upright' the lower molars. The treatment had no effect on the position of the lower incisors.

  6. Damming the rivers of the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrubesse, Edgardo M.; Arima, Eugenio Y.; Dunne, Thomas; Park, Edward; Baker, Victor R.; D'Horta, Fernando M.; Wight, Charles; Wittmann, Florian; Zuanon, Jansen; Baker, Paul A.; Ribas, Camila C.; Norgaard, Richard B.; Filizola, Naziano; Ansar, Atif; Flyvbjerg, Bent; Stevaux, Jose C.

    2017-06-01

    More than a hundred hydropower dams have already been built in the Amazon basin and numerous proposals for further dam constructions are under consideration. The accumulated negative environmental effects of existing dams and proposed dams, if constructed, will trigger massive hydrophysical and biotic disturbances that will affect the Amazon basin’s floodplains, estuary and sediment plume. We introduce a Dam Environmental Vulnerability Index to quantify the current and potential impacts of dams in the basin. The scale of foreseeable environmental degradation indicates the need for collective action among nations and states to avoid cumulative, far-reaching impacts. We suggest institutional innovations to assess and avoid the likely impoverishment of Amazon rivers.

  7. Overhead spine arch analysis of dairy cows from three-dimensional video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jabbar, K.; Hansen, M. F.; Smith, M. L.; Smith, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    We present a spine arch analysis method in dairy cows using overhead 3D video data. This method is aimed for early stage lameness detection. That is important in order to allow early treatment; and thus, reduce the animal suffering and minimize the high forecasted financial losses, caused by lameness. Our physical data collection setup is non-intrusive, covert and designed to allow full automation; therefore, it could be implemented on a large scale or daily basis with high accuracy. We track the animal's spine using shape index and curvedness measure from the 3D surface as she walks freely under the 3D camera. Our spinal analysis focuses on the thoracic vertebrae region, where we found most of the arching caused by lameness. A cubic polynomial is fitted to analyze the arch and estimate the locomotion soundness. We have found more accurate results by eliminating the regular neck/head movements' effect from the arch. Using 22-cow data set, we are able to achieve an early stage lameness detection accuracy of 95.4%.

  8. Construction of a Dry Ash Dam with Soilbags and Slope Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Song, Yingjun; Gao, Jiaorong; Li, Longhua; Zhou, Yuqi; Qi, Hui

    2017-12-01

    In thermal power plants, it is necessary to build ash dams to store fly ash, which is the by-product after the combustion of coals. To solve the problem of lacking rockfill materials in Africa, A new technology of constructing ash dams using solibags filled with local sands is proposed and the method of analyzing its slope stability is suggested. The design of the ash dam using soilbags in Lamb Thermal Power Plant of Kenya is introduced in detail. The slope stability of the soilbags-constructed ash dam was analyzed by adopting the suggested method. The results show that the soilbags filled with ash or sands have high compressive strength, and the primary dam constructed with soilbags can effectively retain the backfill ash and the stacking dam reinforced with soilbags can stand stable even with the slope of 1:1.5.

  9. Testing of highly stressed floor anchoring bolts in river dams for unterwater cracks; Pruefung hochbeanspruchter Sohlverankerungslaschen in Wehranlagen auf Rissanzeigen unter Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimche, Wilfried; Bruchwald, Oliver; Zwoch, Stefan; Bach, F. Wilhelm [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Kolbusch, Rudolf [KWE Ingenieurbuero, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In the context of tests of floor anchoring bolts of the Petershagen and Drakenburg Weser river dams that were ordered by the Verden water and river transport authority, an eddy current test method was developed and tested successfully in the specific test conditions. The test unit comprised two hermetically sealed, miniaturized eddy current difference probes with premagnetisation for surface and radius testing in orthogonal tracks in order to ensure 100 percent inspection of all floor anchoring bold surfaces accessible from outside. The underwater inspection was carried out in the form of manual scans with hand-held units operated by a diver-engineer, while coordination, data recording and analysis were carried out by another inspection engineer on board a river barge. [German] Im Zuge der vom Wasser- und Schifffahrtsamt Verden in Auftrag gegeben Pruefung von Sohlverankerungslaschen unter Wasser auf Rissanzeigen in den Weserwehren Petershagen und Drakenburg wurde ein an die Pruefbedingungen angepasstes Wirbelstrom-Pruefsystem entwickelt und erfolgreich eingesetzt. Zum Einsatz kamen dabei zwei hermetisch geschlossene, miniaturisierte Wirbelstromdifferenzsensoren mit Vormagnetisierung fuer die Flaechen- und Radienpruefung in orthogonalen Spuren um die geforderte 100%-Pruefung aller von aussen zugaenglichen Oberflaechen der Sohlverankerungslaschen zu gewaehrleisten. Die Pruefung unter Wasser erfolgte handgefuehrt in Scantechnik, ausgefuehrt durch einen Pruefingenieur als Taucher, waehrend die Koordination, Messwertaufnahme und erste Bewertung durch einen weiteren Pruefingenieur an Bord einer Barke ueber Wasser erfolgte.

  10. Visualization of soil arching in flexible piled embankments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Visual inspection of the soil settlement and soil-reinforcement interaction is important to explain the mechanism of arching. In this study, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) method was used as a non-destructive technique. The arching of soil between the piles was observed in the case of rigid piles and in the case of flexible ...

  11. Visualization of soil arching in flexible piled embankments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Piled embankments rely on soil arching, but, when geogrid reinforce- ments are used, membrane action within the reinforcement contributes to load distribution. The arching of soil in unreinforced and reinforced piled embankments is evaluated in this study. A small-scale test apparatus is used to model the ...

  12. Maxillary arch and combined incisor dimensions of Urhobos in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tooth morphometry is known to be influenced by cultural, environment and racial or ethnic factors. The purpose of this study was to assess the maxillary arch and combined incisor widths; to determine if there is sexual dimorphism in the maxillary arch and combined incisor dimensions; to verify the reliability of Pont's Index ...

  13. Lateral testing of glued laminated timber tudor arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas R. Rammer; Philip Line

    2016-01-01

    Glued laminated timber Tudor arches have been in wide use in the United States since the 1930s, but detailed knowledge related to seismic design in modern U.S. building codes is lacking. FEMA P-695 (P-695) is a methodology to determine seismic performance factors for a seismic force resisting system. A limited P-695 study for glued laminated timber arch structures...

  14. Defect in Posterior Arch of Atlas in Myelomeningocele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Blaauw (Gerhard)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractThe posterior arches of the cervical vertebrae of 30 children who died with a myelomeningocele in the lower thoracic, lumbar or sacral region were examined; in 70 per cent of these cases a defect was found in the posterior arch of the atlas, which was bridged by a firm fibrous band.

  15. Phase transitions in coated nickel titanium arch wires: A differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on seventeen commercial varieties of conventional NiTi arch wires. In addition, the enthalpy values of the two groups did not show any statistically significant difference in the forward and backward cycles. It suggested that the shape memory and super-elasticity properties of coated arch wire did not suffer any depreciation at ...

  16. Twin - Arch technique. Revival of the "edgewise -Technique"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Karp

    2012-01-01

    The SNB – Bracket brings a new dimension into the orthodontic world which is most apparent in extraction cases. Its Teflon – like material has a very low friction coefficient thus, reducing the treatment time considerably. Through the use of low dimensioned arch wires, the Twin – Arch Technique becomes a Light – wire system and simultaneously provides good anchorage and torque control.

  17. Economic Efficiency and Equity in Dams Removal: Case studies in Northeastern Massachusetts Doina Oglavie, Ellen Douglas, David Terkla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglavie, D. R.; Douglas, E. M.; Terkla, D.

    2009-12-01

    According to American Rivers (www.americanrivers.org), Massachusetts has almost 3,000 dams under state regulation, 296 of which have been classified as high hazard, meaning they pose a serious threat to human life if they should fail. Most of these dams, however, are low head, “run-of-the-river” dams that no longer serve the purpose for which they were built. The presence of these dams has fragmented aquatic and riparian ecosystems, impeded fish passage and generally impacted the natural ecological and hydrological functioning of the streams in which they reside. Dam removal should be considered when a dam no longer serves its function. Although in many cases, the removal of a dam is environmentally beneficial (at least over the long term), sometimes the removal of a dam can incur environmental costs, such as release of contaminants that were sequestered behind the dam. Dam removal is a complex issue especially with respect to privately owned dams. In many cases, dam removal is less costly than dam maintenance or upgrade, hence dam removal decisions tend to be based on purely monetary considerations, and the environmental costs or benefits associated with the dam are not considered. Typically, the main objective for the dam owner is to incur the lowest possible cost (private cost), whether it be operating and maintenance or removal; external costs (environmental degradation) are rarely, if ever, considered, hence the true cost to society is not included in the economic analysis. If dam operation and removal decisions are to be economically efficient, then they have to include both the private costs as well as the external (environmental) costs. The purpose of this work is to 1) attempt to quantify the externalities associated with the maintenance and the removal of dams, 2) assess whether or not the current dam removal evaluation process maximizes social welfare (efficiency and equity) and 3) suggest ways in which this process can be improved by including the

  18. Measuring medial longitudinal arch deformation during gait. A reliability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bencke, Jesper; Christiansen, Ditte; Jensen, Anne Kathrine Bendrup

    2012-01-01

    during gait and to compare this method with a static measure and a 2D dynamic method. Fifty-two feet (26 healthy male participants) were tested twice 4-9 days apart in a biomechanical gait analysis laboratory using a 3D three-marker foot model, a 2D video-based model for the measurement of MLAD during......Clinical evaluation of medial longitudinal arch deformation (MLAD) during walking gait is often estimated from static measures of e.g. navicular drop (ND) measured during quiet standing. The aim of the present study was to test the reliability of a new three-dimensional method of measuring the MLAD...... gait, and ND for measurements of MLAD during quiet standing. The 3D method showed the highest test-retest reliability among the measurements of MLAD. Furthermore, the ND showed only moderate correlation with both measurements of MLAD during gait. The new 3D method was found to be highly reliable...

  19. Effect of lip bumpers on mandibular arch dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashish, Dena Ibrahim; Mostafa, Yehya Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to examine the effects of lip bumper therapy on mandibular arch dimensions. A literature survey of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (www.cochrane.org) was conducted from December 1968 to January 2007. Human studies, randomized clinical trials, prospective and retrospective studies, and studies discussing the effect of lip bumpers on the arch and teeth were included. Two reviewers independently selected and extracted the data. Of the 52 studies found in the search, only 1 met the inclusion criteria. The results showed increases in arch dimensions that included an increase in arch length. This was attributed to incisor proclination, distalization, and distal tipping of the molars. There was also an increase in the arch width seen in the intercanine and deciduous intermolar and premolar distances. The long-term stability of the effects of the lip bumper need to be elucidated.

  20. Effect of Obesity on Arch Index in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Sameer Ganu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive increases in weight bearing forces caused by obesity may negatively affect the lower limbs and feet but minimal research has examined the long-term loading effects of obesity on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in reference to the feet. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of obesity on medial longitudinal arch of foot in young adults. Method: 60 subjects, 30 obese & 30 non obese were assessed for height & weight using standard technique. Radiographic images under static condition were used for calculating the arch index. Result: The arch index of obese subjects was significantly lower than the non obese subjects & there is a negative correlation between the BMI & the arch index. Conclusion: These results suggests that obesity lowers the medial longitudinal arch of foot.

  1. Global experience with an inner branched arch endograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haulon, Stéphan; Greenberg, Roy K; Spear, Rafaëlle; Eagleton, Matt; Abraham, Cherrie; Lioupis, Christos; Verhoeven, Eric; Ivancev, Krassi; Kölbel, Tilo; Stanley, Brendan; Resch, Timothy; Desgranges, Pascal; Maurel, Blandine; Roeder, Blayne; Chuter, Timothy; Mastracci, Tara

    2014-10-01

    Branched endografts are a new option to treat arch aneurysm in high-risk patients. We performed a retrospective multicenter analysis of all patients with arch aneurysms treated with a new branched endograft designed with 2 inner branches to perfuse the supra aortic trunks. Thirty-eight patients were included. The median age was 71 years (range, 64-74 years). An American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or 4 was reported in 89.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79.7-99.3) of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 13.2% (95% CI, 2.2-24.2). Technical success was obtained in 32 patients (84.2% [95% CI, 72.4-95.9]). Early secondary procedures were performed in 4 patients (10.5% [95% CI, 0.7-20.3]). Early cerebrovascular complications were diagnosed in 6 patients (15.8% [95% CI, 4.0-27.6]), including 4 transient ischemic attacks, 1 stroke, and 1 subarachnoid hemorrhage. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 6-12 months). During follow-up, no aneurysm-related death was detected. Secondary procedures during follow-up were performed in 3 patients (9.1% [95% CI, 0.0-19.1]), including 1 conversion to open surgery. We compared the first 10 patients (early experience group) with the subsequent 28 patients. Intraoperative complications and secondary procedures were significantly higher in the early experience group. Although not statistically significant, the early mortality was higher in the early experience group (30% [95% CI, 0.0-60.0]) versus the remainder (7.1% [95% CI, 0.0-16.9]; P=.066). Being part of the early experience group and ascending aortic diameter≥38 mm were found to be associated to higher rates of combined early mortality and neurologic complications. Our preliminary study confirms the feasibility and safety of the endovascular repair of arch aneurysms in selected patients who may not have other conventional options. Thoracic IDE NCT00583817, FDA IDE# 000101. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  2. Hybrid Palliation for Interrupted Aortic Arch With Small Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshimasa; Masuoka, Ayumu; Hotoda, Kentarou; Katogi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Takaaki

    2017-05-01

    Open heart surgery for interrupted aortic arch in the neonatal period is still a high-risk procedure related in part to patient factors such as low birth weight, other morphologic anomalies, and, especially, small aortic valve size. Recently, we performed hybrid palliation with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting as the first-stage palliation for such cases. In this study, the outcomes of this procedure were examined. Six cases of interrupted aortic arch with a small aortic valve underwent the hybrid procedure in the neonatal period in our institute from 2010 to 2015 (mean age: 6.8 days, mean body weight: 3.2 kg, mean z score of the aortic valve annulus: -8.3). Their postoperative clinical courses and results of the second-stage surgery were evaluated. No mortality or severe morbidity was seen in association with initial hybrid palliation. Five of six patients were discharged from the hospital; the one exception had a significant urinary tract anomaly. None needed an additional catheter intervention or surgical procedure postoperatively. All surviving patients underwent second-stage surgery; three had biventricular repair by the conventional method or Damus-Kaye-Stansel anastomosis with the Rastelli procedure and the other three proceeded toward staged Fontan reconstruction. Growth of the aortic valve was seen in four patients, and increased indexed left ventricle volume was recognized in one after the palliation. Hybrid palliation could be useful not only to avoid high-risk neonatal surgery but also to allow for eventual selection of the second-stage surgery based on the observations of potential interval development of left ventricular structures.

  3. Individual tooth macrowear pattern guides the reconstruction of Sts 52 (Australopithecus africanus) dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzi, Stefano; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schulz, Dieter; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Weber, Gerhard W

    2013-02-01

    The functional restoration of the occlusal relationship between maxillary and mandibular tooth rows is a major challenge in modern dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Similar technical challenges are present in paleoanthropology when considering fragmented and deformed mandibular and maxillary fossils. Sts 52, an Australopithecus africanus specimen from Sterkfontein Member 4, represents a typical case where the original shape of the dental arches is no longer preserved. It includes a partial lower face (Sts 52a) and a fragmented mandible (Sts 52b), both incomplete and damaged to such an extent to thwart attempts at matching upper and lower dentitions. We show how the preserved macro wear pattern of the tooth crowns can be used to functionally reconstruct Sts 52's dental arches. High-resolution dental stone casts of Sts 52 maxillary and mandibular dentition were mounted and repositioned in a dental articulator. The occlusal relationship between antagonists was restored based on the analysis of the occlusal wear pattern of each preserved tooth, considering all dental contact movements represented in the occlusal compass. The reconstructed dental arches were three-dimensional surface scanned and their occlusal kinematics tested in a simulation. The outcome of this contribution is the first functional restoration of A. africanus dental arches providing new morphometric data for specimen Sts 52. It is noteworthy that the method described in this case study might be applied to several other fossil specimens. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hybrid Strategy for Residual Arch and Thoracic Aortic Dissection following Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive dilatation of the false lumen in the arch and descending aorta has been encountered in one-third of survivors as a late sequelae following repair of ascending aortic dissection. Conventional treatment for the same requiring cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly cohort of patients. Herein we report a case of symptomatic progressive aneurysmal dilatation of residual arch and descending thoracic aortic dissection following repair of type A aortic dissection, successfully treated by total arch debranching and ascending aortic prosthesis to bicarotid and left subclavian bypass followed by staged retrograde aortic stent-graft deployment. This case report with relevant review of the literature highlights this clinical entity and the present evidence on its appropriate management strategies. Close surveillance is mandatory following surgical repair of type A aortic dissection and hybrid endovascular procedures seem to be the most dependable modality for salvage of patients detected to have progression of residual arch dissection.

  5. Douglas County Dam Breach Inundation Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Dam breach analysis provides a prediction of the extent and timing of flooding from a catastrophic breach of the dams. These results are sufficient for developing...

  6. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Allegrini Kairalla

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25% - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%. T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed.

  7. Evaluation of Maxillary Interpremolar, Molar Width by DRNA Indices and Arch Dimension, Arch Form in Maratha Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Dungarwal

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Significant correlation was found between the sum of maxillary incisors and interpremolar width but not with the intermolar width while sum of mandibular incisors showed significant correlation with the interpremolar and intermolar arch width. There is no single arch form unique to any of the ethnic groups. A new formula is proposed to determine the premolar and molar index.

  8. Lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatoglossus arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanice Maria Marçal Vieira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe a case of a lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatoglossus arch. A 16-years-old black man said that he was observed a lesion in his mouth. On the physical exam, a pedicled, consistent, smooth surface 1.5 x 1 cm lesion, similar in color to the adjacent mucosa, was found. The lesion was surgically removed and the microscopic exam showed mucosal fragments with pedicled lesion; the cystic cavity sometimes lined with pseudostratified cylindrical epithelium and others with stratified squamous flat interface of the epithelium. Around the cyst, a well-delimited mass of lymphoid tissue, presenting lymphoid follicles, was also seen. Lymphoepithelial cyst has clinical characteristics similar to those of others lesions that occur in the oral cavity. The diagnosis should be based on conservative biopsy, with total removal of lesion.

  9. Arching in three-dimensional clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, János; Lévay, Sára; Szabó, Balázs; Somfai, Ellák; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf; Börzsönyi, Tamás

    2017-06-01

    Arching in dry granular material is a long established concept, however it remains still an open question how three-dimensional orifices clog. We investigate by means of numerical simulations and experimental data how the outflow creates a blocked configuration of particles. We define the concave surface of the clogged dome by two independent methods (geometric and density based). The average shape of the cupola for spheres is almost a hemisphere but individual samples have large holes in the structure indicating a blocked state composed of two-dimensional force chains rather than three-dimensional objects. The force chain structure justifies this assumption. For long particles the clogged configurations display large variations, and in certain cases the empty region reaches a height of 5 hole diameters. These structures involve vertical walls consisting of horizontally placed stable stacking of particles.

  10. Impact of dams on flood occurrence of selected rivers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xuefei; Van Gelder, P. H. A. J. M.; Dai, Zhijun; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-10-01

    A significant large number of dams have been constructed in the past two centuries in the United States. These dams' ability to regulate downstream flooding has received world-wide attention. In this study, data from 38 rivers distributed over the entire conterminous Untied States with extensive pre- and post-dam annual peak discharge records, were collected to research the impacts of various dams on the flood behaviors at a national scale. The results indicate that dams have led to significant reductions in flood magnitude for nearly all of the sites; the decrease rate in the mean of annual peak discharge varies between 7.4% and 95.14%, except for the Dead River, which increased by 1.46%. Because of dams' effectiveness, the probability density curve of annual peak flow changes from a flat to peaked shape because both the range and magnitude of high discharges are decreased. Moreover, the potential impact of dams on flood characteristics were closely related to the dam's geographic location and function, the ratio of the storage capacity of the dam to the mean annual runoff of the river (C/R), and the ratio of reservoir storage capacity to the area of its drainage (C/D). Specifically, the effects of dams on annual peak flows were more related to latitude than longitude. Compared with dams built for other purposes, the dam exclusively used for flood management cut off more flood peaks. Increases in the ratios of C/R and C/D increased the degree of modification of annual maximum discharge.

  11. Dams life; La vie des barrages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The paper reports on the conclusions of decennial and annual inspections of French dams. Dams surveillance is performed by the operators and consists in visual examinations and measurements. Concrete dams, in particular, always have more or less developed fissures with water sweating threw the concrete mass or the foundations. Old concrete often show low swelling phenomena which are measured too. (J.S.)

  12. Dam, Prof. Carl Peter Henrik

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1965 Honorary. Dam, Prof. Carl Peter Henrik Nobel Laureate (Medicine) - 1943. Date of birth: 21 February 1895. Date of death: 17 April 1976. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  13. Valorization of mud from Fergoug dam in manufacturing mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laoufi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of calcined mud, with pozzolanic properties, from the large quantities of sediments dredged from Algerian dams, could be a good opportunity for the formulation of high performance mortars and pozzolanic concretes, with lower costs and less greenhouse gas (CO2 emissions. The optimal temperatures selected for calcination were 750, 850 and 950 °C. The burning operation was continuous over a period of 3 h. Therefore, a series of physical, chemical, mechanical and microstructural analyses were conducted on sediment samples, collected from the waters of Fergoug dam. The results obtained from the analyses of the calcined mud, from the dam, allowed saying that mortars with different percentages of that mud represent a potential source of high reactivity pozzolanic materials.

  14. Correlation of Loaded and Unloaded Foot Area With Arch Index in Younger Flatfoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Dwi Basuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Harris & Beath claimed 23% of human kind population is indicated flatfoot. Identifying flatfoot is by using wet foot test. This footprint is not accurate because of the difficulty to make sure the patient stand upright. Another way is using x-ray to determine height of arch which is a distance from medial longitudinal foot arch to the ground. If the distance is less than certain level, so the foot type is included as flatfoot. Other method proposed by Kulkarni et al. using the footprint index (FPI which is the ratio of B intercept to A intercept, where the footprint was obtained from pedobarography image. If FPI is lower than 0.63, it is categorized as flatfoot. Another method to determine arch type which is widely used is Cavanagh’s Arch Index (AI from division of mid foot area to entire footprint area (excluding the toes. If AI>0.26, then the foot type is flatfoot. This study is to learn the correlation between entire loaded and unloaded foot area with Cavanag’s AI. The entire loaded foot and footprint area for evaluating AI derived from a digital footprint modified from document scanner, while the entire unloaded foot area derived from a 3D scanner for foot orthotic. One hundred and two healthy asked voluntarily for doing footprint. From 102 subjects found 63 participants identified as flatfoot, 31 subjects are normal feet and 8 subjects identified as high arch. A series of 3 x 3 repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine statistical differences (α<0.05. A significant interaction existed between ratio of entire loaded and unloaded foot area (RFA subject to all categories of AI (p<0.05 also a correlation coefficient of r=0.67 has found between RFA and AI on foot type of flatfoot which means that flatfoot can be indicated by RFA.

  15. Force systems in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment -- a comparison of different leveling arch wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Drescher, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The determination of orthodontically-effective forces and moments places great demands on the technical equipment. Many patients report severe pain after fixed appliance insertion. Since it is assumed that pain from orthodontic appliances is associated with the force and moment levels applied to the teeth and since the occurrence of root resorption is a common therapeutic side effect, it would seem important to know the actual magnitudes of the components of the active orthodontic force systems. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure initial force systems produced by different leveling arch-wires in a complete multi-bracket appliance and to assess whether force and moment levels can be regarded as biologically acceptable or not. The actual bracket position in 42 patients was transferred onto a measurement model. Forces and moments produced by a super-elastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire, a 6-strand stainless steel archwire, and a 7-strand super-elastic NiTi archwire were determined experimentally on different teeth. Average forces and moments produced by the super-elastic NiTi arch wires were found to be the highest. In spite if their larger diameter, the stranded arch wires' average force and moment levels were lower, especially that of the stranded super-elastic archwire. Nevertheless, maximum force levels sometimes exceeded recommended values in the literature and must be considered as too high. The measured arch wires' initial force systems differed significantly depending on the type of archwire and its material structure. Stranded arch wires produced lower force and moment levels, and we recommend their use in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment.

  16. A pre-dam-removal assessment of sediment transport for four dams on the Kalamazoo River between Plainwell and Allegan, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Atiq U.; Bennett, James P.; Rachol, Cynthia M.

    2005-01-01

    sediment deposition occurs during low to average flows (monthly mean flows between 25.49 m3/s and 50.97 m3/s) after a high-flow event. If the flow continues to stay in the low to average range the system shifts towards equilibrium, resulting in a balancing effect between sediment deposition and erosion rates. The 1947 flood-flow simulations show approximately 30,000 m3 more instream sediments erosion for the first 21 days of the dams removed scenario than for the existing-dams scenario, with the same initial conditions for both scenarios. Application of a locally weighted regression smoothing (LOWESS) function to simulation results of the dams removed scenario indicates a steep downtrend with high sediment transport rates during the first 21 days. In comparison, the LOWESS curve for the existing-dams scenario shows a smooth transition of sediment transport rates in response to the change in streamflow. The high erosion rates during the dams-removed scenario are due to the absence of the dams; in contrast, the presence of dams in the existing-dams scenario helps reduce sediment erosion to some extent. The overall results of 60-day simulations for the 1947 flood show no significant difference in total volume of eroded sediment between the two scenarios, because the dams in the study reach have low heads and no control gates. It is important to note that the existing-dams and dams-removed scenarios simulations are run for only 60 days; therefore, the simulations take into account the changes in sediment erosion and deposition rates only during that time period. Over an extended period, more erosion of instream sediments would be expected to occur if the dams are not properly removed than under the existing conditions. On the basis of model simulations, removal of dams would further lower the head in all the channels. This lowering of head could produce higher flow velocities in the study reach, which ultimately would result in accelerated erosion rates.

  17. Aqua splint suture technique in isolated zygomatic arch fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Seung Kyun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chan Hum

    2014-04-01

    Various methods have been used to treat zygomatic arch fractures, but no optimal modality exists for reducing these fractures and supporting the depressed bone fragments without causing esthetic problems and discomfort for life. We developed a novel aqua splint and suture technique for stabilizing isolated zygomatic arch fractures. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of novel aqua splint and suture technique in isolated zygomatic arch fractures. Patients with isolated zygomatic arch fractures were treated by a single surgeon in a single center from January 2000 through December 2012. Classic Gillies approach without external fixation was performed from January 2000 to December 2003, while the novel technique has been performed since 2004. 67 consecutive patients were included (Classic method, n = 32 and Novel method, n = 35). An informed consent was obtained from all patients. The novel aqua splint and suture technique was performed by the following fashion: first, we evaluated intraoperatively the bony alignment by ultrasonography and then, reduced the depressed fracture surgically using the Gillies approach. Thereafter, to stabilize the fracture and obtain the smooth facial figure, we made an aqua splint that fit the facial contour and placed monofilament nonabsorbable sutures around the fractured zygomatic arch. The novel aqua splint and suture technique showed significantly correlated with better cosmetic and functional results. In conclusion, the aqua splint suture technique is very simple, quick, safe, and effective for stabilizing repositioned zygomatic arch fractures. The aqua splint suture technique can be a good alternative procedure in isolated zygomatic arch fractures.

  18. Putting Roman Dams in Context: a Virtual Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, M. J.; Du Vernay, J. P.; Mcleod, J. B.

    2017-08-01

    Water resources and management have become a critical global issue. During the half-millennium of its existence, the Roman Empire developed numerous strategies to cope with water management, from large-scale urban aqueduct systems, to industrial-scale water mills designed to cope with feeding growing city populations. Roman engineers encountered, adopted, and adapted indigenous hydraulic systems, and left lasting imprints on the landscape of the Mediterranean and temperate Western Europe by employing a range of water technologies. A recent academic study has enabled the identification of remains of and references to seventy-two dams from the Roman era, constructed in Spain between the 1st and 4th century AD. Such unique heritage, without comparisons in the Mediterranean makes Spain an emblematic case study for the analysis of Roman hydraulic engineering and water management policies. Fifty dams have been located and detailed. The twenty-two outstanding, although identified on the ground, have not been able to be acceptably characterized, due in some cases to their being ruins in a highly degraded state, others due to their being masked by repairs and reconstructions subsequent to the Roman era. A good example of such neglected dams is the buttress dam of Consuegra , in Toledo province (Castilla-La Mancha). Dating to the 3rd - 4th century AD, the Dam of Consuegra, on the basin of the Guadiana, with its over 600 metres length and 4,80 metres height, is a remarkable case of Roman engineering mastery. It had a retaining wall upstream, numerous buttresses and perhaps an embankment downstream, of which no remains are left. The application of 3D digital imaging technique to create a high quality virtual model of such monuments has proved to be successful especially for the study of the technological aspects related its construction. The case study of the Roman dam of Muel (Zaragoza) has shown, in fact, as best practices in digital archaeology can provide an original and

  19. PUTTING ROMAN DAMS IN CONTEXT: A VIRTUAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Decker

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Water resources and management have become a critical global issue. During the half-millennium of its existence, the Roman Empire developed numerous strategies to cope with water management, from large-scale urban aqueduct systems, to industrial-scale water mills designed to cope with feeding growing city populations. Roman engineers encountered, adopted, and adapted indigenous hydraulic systems, and left lasting imprints on the landscape of the Mediterranean and temperate Western Europe by employing a range of water technologies. A recent academic study has enabled the identification of remains of and references to seventy-two dams from the Roman era, constructed in Spain between the 1st and 4th century AD. Such unique heritage, without comparisons in the Mediterranean makes Spain an emblematic case study for the analysis of Roman hydraulic engineering and water management policies. Fifty dams have been located and detailed. The twenty-two outstanding, although identified on the ground, have not been able to be acceptably characterized, due in some cases to their being ruins in a highly degraded state, others due to their being masked by repairs and reconstructions subsequent to the Roman era. A good example of such neglected dams is the buttress dam of Consuegra , in Toledo province (Castilla-La Mancha. Dating to the 3rd - 4th century AD, the Dam of Consuegra, on the basin of the Guadiana, with its over 600 metres length and 4,80 metres height, is a remarkable case of Roman engineering mastery. It had a retaining wall upstream, numerous buttresses and perhaps an embankment downstream, of which no remains are left. The application of 3D digital imaging technique to create a high quality virtual model of such monuments has proved to be successful especially for the study of the technological aspects related its construction. The case study of the Roman dam of Muel (Zaragoza has shown, in fact, as best practices in digital archaeology can provide

  20. Morphological Analysis of Healthy Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufi, M; Guivier-Curien, C; Loundou, A D; Deplano, V; Boiron, O; Chaumoitre, K; Gariboldi, V; Alimi, Y S

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to describe an arch morphology protocol in a healthy population, and to assess the impact of age and sex. A retrospective morphology evaluation was conducted in a population with no personal history of thoracic aorta surgery or pathology, through computed tomography (CT) imaging analysis, using a standardised protocol. Based on centreline three dimensional coordinates, a single investigator calculated a series of parameters in the arch zones and in the total arch, using Matlab scripts. These were categorized as: (i) morphometric data: diameter, length and aortic angle of each zone, total arch angle, and length; (ii) geometric data: tortuosity index (TI), arch width, assimilated curvature radius (CRi), and attachment zone angles. Student or Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare parameter means. Their variability with age and sex was assessed through univariate and multivariate regression analysis. CT images from 123 subjects (mean ± SD age 53 ± 19 years) were reviewed. Significant correlation between age and morphology was found. The aorta expanded homogeneously and stretched heterogeneously with age because of posterior arch elongation. TI decrease, CRi, and attachment zone angle increase were also observed with aging. Age remained significantly associated with these morphological parameters, independently of body surface area and hypertension. Sex also affected morphology: longer total arch length and higher CRarch in men; lower zone 3 attachment angle in women CONCLUSION: Using mathematical algorithms, and with a view to improving endovascular arch treatment, this study provides a standardised arch morphology protocol and objectively identifies both age related evolution and sex related variation in the different zones. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. First Branchial Arch Fistula: A Rarity and a Surgical Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, J S; Ganesh, Deepa; Anirudh, J R; Akbar, S; Joshi, Niraj

    2016-06-01

    Although 2(nd) Branchial arch fistulae (from incomplete closure of Cervical sinus of His) are well known, 1(st) arch fistulae are much rarer (<10%) and are usually not tackled comprehensively. We present a case of a rare first branchial arch fistula of the type II Arnot classification, which presented with two external openings of more than 20 years duration. Patient had a successful resection of all the concerned fistulous tract. Review of literature and the surgical challenges of the procedure are presented herewith.

  2. Large Dam Effects on Flow Regime and Hydraulic Parameters of river (Case study: Karkheh River, Downstream of Reservoir Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Azarang

    2017-06-01

    HEC-RAS model were obtained for the conditions before and after the construction of the Karkheh Reservoir Dam and then it was reviewed and analyzed. Results and Discussion: By exploiting the Karkheh Reservoir Dam, the river flow was changed from the natural condition to the regulatory situation. The results indicate that the river flow was considerably declined because the regulatory effect of the reservoir dam which has contributed to the great alternations at hydraulic parameters of the river. For example, the mean annual discharge of the Karkheh River shows 44pecent reduction during the time period of simulating (after the dam construction in comparison with the natural river flow before construction of reservoir dam in PayePol hydrometric station. Flow velocity of Karkheh River is influenced by discharge, slope of the river channel and geometry of cross section. By increasing the river flow, the flow velocity has increased and there is a significant difference between pre and post-dam condition at the mean velocity of river flow in different sections. The flow area is directly influenced by river discharge and there is a significant difference in the maximum defined discharge before and after dam construction. The width of water surface is a parameter of the geometric situation of the river cross section that also shows the maximum width of the cross sections, passing discharge through the desired cross section. Since Karkheh River has a relatively large water surface width, it has a high wetted perimeter. For this reason, the Karkheh river hydraulic radius is usually low. The significant reduction of all these quantities is for reduction of flow rate by construction of Karkheh Reservoir Dam. Studying the water surface profiles represents reduction of water level in the longitudinal profile of Karkheh River and water level of hydrometric stations by construction of the Karkheh Reservoir Dam. Also, due to the reduction of the discharge in the downstream of Karkheh

  3. Do foot orthoses change lower limb muscle activity in flat-arched feet towards a pattern observed in normal-arched feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murley, George S; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-08-01

    One of the hypothesised mechanisms by which foot orthoses obtain their clinical effect is by influencing muscle activity, however previous studies have reported highly variable findings. The aim of this study was to determine whether orthoses change muscle activity in people with flat-arched feet towards a pattern observed in people with normal-arched feet. Thirty young asymptomatic adults with flat-arched feet were recruited. Foot posture was classified using two clinical measurements and four skeletal alignment measurements from weight-bearing foot x-rays. Electromyographic activity was recorded while walking from tibialis posterior and peroneus longus via in-dwelling wire electrodes, and from tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius via surface electrodes. Four experimental conditions were assessed: (i) barefoot, (ii) shoe only, (iii) a heat-moulded (modified) prefabricated foot orthosis, and (iv) a 20-degree inverted-style customised foot orthosis. During the contact phase of gait, tibialis posterior electromyographic amplitude decreased significantly with the prefabricated orthosis (peak amplitude - 19% decrease, P=0.007; RMS amplitude--22% decrease, P=0.002) and the customised orthosis (peak amplitude--12% decrease, Pfeet. Otherwise, few differences were found between the modified prefabricated and customised orthoses. Further research is required to determine whether these changes in muscle function are associated with clinical outcomes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research on shape optimization of CSG dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The multi-objective optimization method was used for shape optimization of cement sand and gravel (CSG dams in this study. The economic efficiency, the sensitivities of maximum horizontal displacement and maximum settlement of the dam to water level changes, the overall stability, and the overall strength security were taken into account during the optimization process. Three weight coefficient selection schemes were adopted to conduct shape optimization of a dam, and the case studies lead to the conclusion that both the upstream and downstream dam slope ratios for the optimal cross-section equal 1:0.7, which is consistent with the empirically observed range of 1:0.6 to 1:0.8 for the upstream and downstream dam slope ratios of CSG dams. Therefore, the present study is of certain reference value for designing CSG dams.

  5. Expressional regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6, peach (Prunus persica) dormancy-associated MADS-box genes, by low temperature and dormancy-breaking reagent treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Hisayo; Ooka, Tomomi; Jotatsu, Hiroaki; Hosaka, Yukari; Sasaki, Ryuta; Tao, Ryutaro

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated the expressional regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6, two of the six peach (Prunus persica) dormancy-associated MADS-box genes, in relation to lateral bud endodormancy. PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 were originally identified as homologues of Arabidopsis SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE/AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 identified in the EVERGROWING locus of peach. Furthermore, PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 have recently been suggested to be involved in terminal bud dormancy. In this study, seasonal expression analyses using leaves, stems, and lateral buds of high-chill and low-chill peaches in field conditions indicated that both genes were up-regulated during the endodormancy period and down-regulated with endodormancy release. Controlled environment experiments showed that the expression of both PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 were up-regulated by ambient cool temperatures in autumn, while they were down-regulated by the prolonged period of cold temperatures in winter. A negative correlation between expression levels of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 and bud burst percentage was found in the prolonged cold temperature treatment. Application of the dormancy-breaking reagent cyanamide to endo/ecodormant lateral buds induced early bud break and down-regulation of PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 expression at the same time. These results collectively suggest that PpDAM5 and PpDAM6 may function in the chilling requirement of peach lateral buds through growth-inhibiting functions for bud break.

  6. Increasing vitamin A in post-weaning diets reduces food intake and body weight and modifies gene expression in brains of male rats born to dams fed a high multivitamin diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Diana; Cho, Clara E; Kubant, Ruslan; Reza-López, Sandra A; Poon, Abraham N; Wang, Jingzhou; Huot, Pedro S P; Smith, Christopher E; Anderson, G Harvey

    2014-10-01

    High multivitamin gestational diets (HV, 10-fold AIN-93G levels) increase body weight (BW) and food intake (FI) in rat offspring weaned to a recommended multivitamin (RV), but not to a HV diet. We hypothesized that high vitamin A (HA) alone, similar to HV, in post-weaning diets would prevent these effects of the HV maternal diet consistent with gene expression in FI and reward pathways. Male offspring from dams fed HV diets were weaned to a high vitamin A (HA, 10-fold AIN-93G levels), HV or RV diet for 29 weeks. BW, FI, expression of genes involved in regulation of FI and reward and global and gene-specific DNA methylation of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the hypothalamus were measured. Both HV and HA diets slowed post-weaning weight gain and modified gene expression in offspring compared to offspring fed an RV post-weaning diet. Hypothalamic POMC expression in HA offspring was not different from either HV or RV, and dopamine receptor 1 was 30% (Pweight gain and FI and modifies gene expression in FI and reward pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of dam-building on marine life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, T. J.

    1980-03-01

    Dam-building across naturally flowing rivers tends to decrease discharge of surplus water into the sea, reduce nutrient concentration in estuaries and coastal waters, and diminish plankton blooms as well as fish landings. Depletion of nutrients and organic matter along with reduced mud and silt deposition affect benthic life on the continental shelf. Reduced mud and silt deposition leads to coastal retreat. Dams, especially those constructed for hydro-electric purposes, hinder migration of fishes and decapods. Discharge from dams can create barriers at high or low flows, cause delays, disrupt normal behavioural routine and change the travel speed of migratory animals. Where all spawners of a given population are frequently kept away from the breeding site, the population faces extinction.

  8. Sediment trapping by dams creates methane emission hot spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeck, A.; Delsontro, T.; McGinnis, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Inland waters transport and transform substantial amounts of carbon and account for similar to 18% of global methane emissions. Large reservoirs with higher areal methane release rates than natural waters contribute significantly to freshwater emissions. However, there are millions of small dams...... worldwide that receive and trap high loads of organic carbon and can therefore potentially emit significant amounts of methane to the atmosphere. We evaluated the effect of damming on methane emissions in a central European impounded river. Direct comparison of riverine and reservoir reaches, where...... reservoirs or rivers. We show that sediment accumulation correlates with methane production and subsequent ebullitive release rates and may therefore be an excellent proxy for estimating methane emissions from small reservoirs. Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river...

  9. Social Discounting of Large Dams with Climate Change Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Jeuland

    2010-06-01

    This paper reviews the recent discounting controversy and examines its implications for the appraisal of an illustrative hydropower project in Ethiopia. The analysis uses an integrated hydro-economic model that accounts for how the dam’s transboundary impacts vary with climate change. The real value of the dam is found to be highly sensitive to assumptions about future economic growth. The argument for investment is weakest under conditions of robust global economic growth, particularly if these coincide with unfavourable hydrological or development factors related to the project. If however long-term growth is reduced, the value of the dam tends to increase. There may also be distributional or local arguments favouring investment, if growth in the investment region lags behind that of the rest of the globe. In such circumstances, a large dam can be seen as a form of insurance that protects future vulnerable generations against the possibility of macroeconomic instability or climate shocks.

  10. Dental Arch Form Analysis in Gujarati Males and Females having Normal Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Jagdishbhai Patel

    2012-01-01

    Results: As moving from anterior to posterior, both the arches diverge proportionally, except in second molar area where slight convergence toward midline was noted. Females had proportionally narrower arch dimensions than those for males. Five arch forms were determined according to relative deviations of various ratio combinations, and all subjects were classified for mandibular arch form by nonhierarchical stepwise method.

  11. Study of Dam-break Due to Overtopping of Four Small Dams in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaraya Alhasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dam-break due to overtopping is one of the most common types of embankment dam failures. During the floods in August 2002 in the Czech Republic, several small dams collapsed due to overtopping. In this paper, an analysis of the dam break process at the Luh, Velký Bělčický, Melín, and Metelský dams breached during the 2002 flood is presented. Comprehensive identification and analysis of the dam shape, properties of dam material and failure scenarios were carried out after the flood event to assemble data for the calibration of a numerical dam break model. A simple one-dimensional mathematical model was proposed for use in dam breach simulation, and a computer code was compiled. The model was calibrated using the field data mentioned above. Comparison of the erodibility parameters gained from the model showed reasonable agreement with the results of other authors.

  12. Proceedings of the 2010 Canadian Dam Association's public safety around dams workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Nearly 30 people have drowned in dam-related incidents over the last 10 years in Canada. The Canadian public is now calling for improved safety guidelines. Public interaction with dams is increasing as a result of interest in extreme sports and perceived rights of access. However, many members of the public are not aware of the dangers posed by dams. This workshop provided a forum to discuss proposals for a draft publication of the Canadian Dam Association (CDA) guidelines for public safety and security around dams. Issues related to current legislation and liability were discussed. Methods of increasing public awareness of the hazards posed by dams included increased signage in dam locations, the use of audible and visual alert systems, and the use of booms and buoys. The responsibilities of dam owners in ensuring the safety of dams were also discussed. The conference featured 5 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  13. The neonatal hypoplastic aortic arch: decisions and more decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Stephen M; Sunstrom, Rachel E; Reed, Richard D; Rekito, Andrew J; Gerrah, Rabin

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal patients with hypoplasia of the aortic arch constitute a heterogeneous group with a wide spectrum of severity. The milder end of the spectrum comprises patients with aortic coarctation and isthmus hypoplasia. At the other end of the spectrum are patients with severe transverse arch hypoplasia or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. The aim of this paper is to discuss the various strategies and surgical approaches available for this group of patients, focusing on the surgical decisions that influence individual patient management. Many of the things discussed are applicable to any neonatal arch problem. We also describe and discuss in detail our surgical technique for patients who undergo neonatal repair of a hypoplastic aortic arch via median sternotomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Langer's axillary arch: a rare variant, and prevalence among Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, M A; Adds, P J

    2017-01-01

    During the dissection of a 79-year-old Caucasian female cadaver, a variant of Langer's axillary arch was found unilaterally in the left axilla. While Langer's axillary arches are not uncommon, this particular variant, attaching to the biceps brachii, is much rarer with a reported prevalence of only 0.25%. The case reported here, however, is only the third example of a Langer's axillary arch that has been found in the last 14 years in the Dissecting Room at St. George's, University of London, giving it an overall prevalence of approximately 1.0% amongst a population of around 280 Caucasian cadavers, much lower than the reported frequency of 7%. Langer's axillary arches can be completely asymptomatic in life, but may also cause a variety of issues both clinically and surgically.

  15. [T-Scan tracing of the arches. Computerized analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collesano, V; de Rysky, C; Bernasconi, G; Magenes, G

    1989-12-15

    This work deals with a quality control of the dental arch reconstructing software developed for T-Scan. We have developed an original system that employs computer controlled optical acquisition of data. This system behaves satisfactorily following our metodology.

  16. Gateway Arch Circulator Conceptual Feasibility Study : Jefferson National Expansion Memorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (JEFF) is undergoing major design changes as part of the City Arch River 2015 project (CAR) that will impact access for park visitors. The park and stakeholders are considering a circulator system to facilita...

  17. Assessment of Soil Arching Factor for Retaining Wall Pile Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Despite the prevalence of the soldier piles retaining wall systems as temporary and even permanent shoring systems along state highways, relatively little is known on the effect of the foreslope bench width and the slope inclination on the arching ca...

  18. The impact of kiddy dentures on maxillary arch growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Shih

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Kiddy dentures do interfere with the transverse growth of the dental arch over the abutment tooth area during a 1-year follow-up period. However the teeth adjacent to the confined abutments still show transverse growth.

  19. Flows along arch filaments observed in the GRIS `very fast spectroscopic mode'

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Manrique, S. J.; Denker, C.; Kuckein, C.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Collados, M.; Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Diercke, A.; Fischer, C. E.; Gömöry, P.; Bello González, N.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Cubas Armas, M.; Berkefeld, T.; Feller, A.; Hoch, S.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the `very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the `very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.

  20. The Performance Evaluation of Concrete Filled Steel Tubular Arch Bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Wei-long

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the system assessment theory of he concrete filled steel tubular arch bridge which is based on the theory of the reliability of system reliability is researched through the finite element analysis software ANSYS. Because the concrete filled steel tube arch bridge has the characteristics, such as the components numerous, complex forces, unable to list the of the explicit limit state equation, so use the probability design module of ANSYS (PDS) technology for the perf...

  1. Brokenness / Transformation: Reflections on Academic Critiques of L'Arche

    OpenAIRE

    Madeline Burghardt

    2016-01-01

    L'Arche, an international federation of communities for adults with intellectual disabilities, has been critiqued by disability studies scholars throughout its fifty-year history due to its religiosity, its apparent lack of a rigorous stance on the need to address policy concerning people with disabilities, its philosophy concerning disability's meanings, and features of its language and discourse.  I address these concerns as someone who is both an academic and a long-term member of a L'Arch...

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL LOADING AND GROWTH OF THE ZYGOMATIC ARCH

    OpenAIRE

    RAFFERTY, KATHERINE L.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; ARTESE, FLAVIA

    2000-01-01

    Despite a number of previous biomechanical studies on the zygomatic arch, unanswered questions remain about its three-dimensional loading and growth. Using young miniature swine, we have for the first time recorded strains from both the medial and lateral aspects of the squamosal bone during mastication and masseter muscle stimulation. Strains from the zygomatic bone flange and zygomatic arch growth data were also obtained from the same animals. A second study on a younger group of animals ex...

  3. Comparison of arch forms between Turkish and North American

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A. Celebi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological differences in the mandibular arches of Turkish and North American white subjects. Methods: The sample included 132 Turkish (34 Class I, 58 Class II, and 40 Class III and 160 North American (60 Class I, 50 Class II, and 50 Class III subjects. The most facial portion of 13 proximal contact areas was digitized from photocopied images of patients' mandibular dental arches. Clinical bracket points were calculated for each tooth based on mandibular tooth thickness data. Four linear and two proportional measurements were taken. The subjects were grouped according to arch form types (tapered, ovoid and square in order to have frequency distribution compared between ethnic groups in each Angle classification. Results: The Turkish group showed significantly lower molar depth and more significant molar width-depth (W/D ratio in all three Angle classifications. On the other hand, the Turkish group also showed a significantly larger intercanine width in Class III malocclusion and intermolar width in Class II malocclusion. The most frequent arch forms seen were the ovoid arch form in the Turkish group and the tapered form in the white group. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that when treating Turkish patients, one should expect to use preformed ovoid arch form orthodontic wires in a significant percentage of patients.

  4. Management of a case of double aortic arch with tracheal compression complicated with postoperative tracheal restenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemang Gandhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal stenosis in association with the double aortic arch (DAA is uncommon; however, it carries a high risk of morbidity, mortality, and restenosis. Although surgery is the mainstay of managing a case of the DAA with tracheal stenosis, management of tracheal restenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. In this case report, we present our successful experience in managing a child of DAA with tracheal stenosis who developed tracheal restenosis after sliding tracheoplasty of trachea.

  5. Relationship between Dental Arch Dimensions and Vertical Facial Morphology in Class I Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Khera

    2012-01-01

    Results: The results showed that, for both males and females, there was a trend that as vertical facial height increased, arch width, arch perimeter and overbite decreased but palatal height and curve of Spee increased and males have significantly larger arch dimensions than those of females. Conclusion: It was concluded that dental arch dimensions were associated with facial vertical morphology and gender. Thus, using individualized archwires according to each patient′s pretreatment arch form and width is suggested during orthodontic treatment.

  6. Stabilisation of the Unstable Fractured Zygomatic Arch with a Ballooned Foley Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    The zygomatic arch fracture is one of the most common facial bone fractures. Especially the isolated zygomatic arch fracture is usually repaired via Gillies’ approach. But in the case of unstable zygomatic arch fracture, we need an additional step for stabilising the unstable zygomatic arch segment after repositioning the fractured segment. For the stabilising method we use the ballooned Foley catheter on the medial side of the zygomatic arch in the zygomaticotemporal fossa. This method is of...

  7. Brazil's Amazonian dams: Ecological and socioeconomic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnside, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Brazil's 2015-2024 Energy Expansion Plan calls for 11 hydroelectric dams with installed capacity ≥ 30 MW in the country's Amazon region. Dozens of other large dams are planned beyond this time horizon, and dams with consumers. Population displacement is a major impact; for example, the Marabá Dam would displace 40,000 people, mostly traditional riverside dwellers (ribeirinhos). Various dams impact indigenous peoples, such as the Xingu River dams (beginning with Belo Monte) and the São Luiz do Tapajós and Chacorão Dams on the Tapajós River. Brazil has many energy options other than dams. Much energy use has little benefit for the country, such as exporting aluminum. Electric showerheads use 5% of the country's power. Losses in transmission lines (20%) are far above global averages and can be expected to increase as Amazonian hydroelectric dams far from consumer centers come on line. Brazil has tremendous wind and solar potential, but these do not have the same priority as dams. At the root of many questionable policies is a decision-making process in need of reform.

  8. 77 FR 50493 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    .... Procedures for Public Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions of the Power... transmission facilities, which consist of 1,380 miles of high-voltage transmission lines, 25 substations, and 46 microwave and VHF radio sites. Costs associated ] with the Sam Rayburn and Robert D. Willis Dams...

  9. The Three Gorges Dam Affects Regional Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liguang; Zhang, Qiang; Jiang, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    Issues regarding building large-scale dams as a solution to power generation and flood control problems have been widely discussed by both natural and social scientists from various disciplines, as well as the policy-makers and public. Since the Chinese government officially approved the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) projects, this largest hydroelectric project in the world has drawn a lot of debates ranging from its social and economic to climatic impacts. The TGD has been partially in use since June 2003. The impact of the TGD is examined through analysis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) rainfall rate and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature and high-resolution simulation using the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). The independent satellite data sets and numerical simulation clearly indicate that the land use change associated with the TGD construction has increased the precipitation in the region between Daba and Qinling mountains and reduced the precipitation in the vicinity of the TGD after the TGD water level abruptly rose from 66 to 135 m in June 2003. This study suggests that the climatic effect of the TGD is on the regional scale (approx.100 km) rather than on the local scale (approx.10 km) as projected in previous studies.

  10. Using causal maps to support ex-post assessment of social impacts of dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aledo, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio.Aledo@ua.es [Departamento de Sociología 1, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante 03080 (Spain); García-Andreu, Hugo, E-mail: Hugo.Andreu@ua.es [Departamento de Sociología 1, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante 03080 (Spain); Pinese, José, E-mail: pinese@uel.br [Centro de Ciências Exatas, UEL, Rodovia Celso Cid, Km 380, Campus Universitário, Londrina, PR 86057-970 (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    - Highlights: • We defend the usefulness of causal maps (CM) for ex-post impact assessment of dams. • Political decisions are presented as unavoidable technical measures. • CM enable the identification of multiple causes involved in the dam impacts. • An alternative management of the dams is shown from the precise tracking of the causes. • Participatory CM better the quality of information and the governance of the research. This paper presents the results of an ex-post assessment of two important dams in Brazil. The study follows the principles of Social Impact Management, which offer a suitable framework for analyzing the complex social transformations triggered by hydroelectric dams. In the implementation of this approach, participative causal maps were used to identify the ex-post social impacts of the Porto Primavera and Rosana dams on the community of Porto Rico, located along the High Paraná River. We found that in the operation of dams there are intermediate causes of a political nature, stemming from decisions based on values and interests not determined by neutral, exclusively technical reasons; and this insight opens up an area of action for managing the negative impacts of dams.

  11. Seismic risk assessment for Poiana Uzului (Romania) buttress dam on Uz river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Toma-Danila, Dragos; Paerele, Cosmin Marian; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Ghita, Cristian

    2017-04-01

    The most important specific requirements towards dams' safety is the seismic risk assessment. This objective will be accomplished by rating the dams into seismic risk classes using the theory of Bureau and Ballentine, 2002, and Bureau (2003), taking into account the maximum expected peak ground motions at dams' site, the structures vulnerability and the downstream risk characteristics. The maximum expected values for ground motions at dams' site have been obtained using probabilistic seismic hazard assessment approaches. The structural vulnerability was obtained from dams' characteristics (age, high, water volume) and the downstream risk was assessed using human, economical, touristic, historic and cultural heritage information from the areas that might be flooded in the case of a dam failure. A couple of flooding scenarios have been performed. The results of the work consist of local and regional seismic information, specific characteristics of dam, seismic hazard values for different return periods and risk classes. The studies realized in this paper have as final goal to provide in the near future the local emergency services with warnings of a potential dam failure and ensuing flood as a result of a large earthquake occurrence, allowing further public training for evacuation. Acknowledgments This work was partially supported by the Partnership in Priority Areas Program - PNII, under MEN-UEFISCDI, DARING Project no. 69/2014 and the Nucleu Program - PN 16-35, Project no. 03 01 and 01 06.

  12. Static and Dynamic Behaviour Assessment of the Trajan Arch by Means of New Monitoring Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, L.; Barone, F.; Mammone, A.; Giordano, G.

    2017-08-01

    An effective assessment of the static and dynamic structural behavior of historical monuments requires the development and validation of suitable adaptive structural models using high-quality experimental data acquired with an effectively continuous and distributed monitoring. Furthermore, the adaptive strategy allows an efficient evaluation of the health status and of the evolution along the time of a historical monument, providing relevant information to plan appropriate actions for its long-term preservation. The Trajan Arch in Benevento chosen as a case of study to develop and apply this new adaptive strategy in cultural heritage conservation. The paper, after a description of the innovative monitoring system, based on state-of-the-art mechanical sensors, presents and discusses the results of two tests, comparing the measurements with the predictions of an adaptive structural FEM model developed for the dynamical simulation of the Trajan Arch.

  13. Dinosaur tracks from the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Arches National Park, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, M.G.; White, D.; Kirkland, J.; Santucci, V.

    2004-01-01

    The seventh and largest known dinosaur tracksite from the Cedar Mountain Formation is reported from two important stratigraphic levels in the Ruby Ranch Member within the boundaries of Arches National Park. Previous reports of sites with a few isolated tracks are of limited utility in indicating the fauna represented by track makers. The Arches site reveals evidence of several theropod morphotypes, including a possible match for the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia and an apparently didactyl Utahraptor-like dromeosaurid. Sauropod tracks indicate a wide-gauge morphotype (cf. Brontopodus). Ornithischian tracks suggest the presence of an iguandontid-like ornithopod and a large ankylosaur. Dinosaur track diversity is high in comparison with other early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofaunas, and it correlates well with faunal lists derived from skeletal remains, thus providing a convincing census of the known fauna. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  14. Alteration of DNA adenine methylase (Dam) activity in Pasteurella multocida causes increased spontaneous mutation frequency and attenuation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Paulsen, Daniel B; Scruggs, Daniel W; Banes, Michelle M; Reeks, Brenda Y; Lawrence, Mark L

    2003-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida is one of the primary bacterial pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex. Relatively few virulence factors of P. multocida have been characterized, and there is a need for improved vaccines for prevention of BRD. In other Gram-negative species, DNA adenine methylase (Dam) regulates the expression of virulence genes, and appropriate expression of Dam is required for virulence. In this study, the authors cloned and sequenced the P. multocida A1 dam gene and demonstrated that it is able to restore Dam function in an Escherichia coli dam mutant. When P. multocida dam was placed under the control of a constitutively expressed promoter on a plasmid, it caused an increased spontaneous mutation rate in P. multocida. In addition, the plasmid-mediated alteration of Dam production in P. multocida caused it to be highly attenuated in mice. These findings indicate that appropriate expression of Dam is required for virulence of P. multocida, which is believed to be the first report that Dam is required for virulence of a species in the Pasteurellaceae. Therefore, Dam may function as a virulence gene regulator in the Pasteurellaceae, similar to previously reported findings from other Gram-negative species.

  15. Exporting dams: China's hydropower industry goes global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kristen; Bosshard, Peter; Brewer, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    In line with China's "going out" strategy, China's dam industry has in recent years significantly expanded its involvement in overseas markets. The Chinese Export-Import Bank and other Chinese financial institutions, state-owned enterprises, and private firms are now involved in at least 93 major dam projects overseas. The Chinese government sees the new global role played by China's dam industry as a "win-win" situation for China and host countries involved. But evidence from project sites such as the Merowe Dam in Sudan demonstrates that these dams have unrecognized social and environmental costs for host communities. Chinese dam builders have yet to adopt internationally accepted social and environmental standards for large infrastructure development that can assure these costs are adequately taken into account. But the Chinese government is becoming increasingly aware of the challenge and the necessity of promoting environmentally and socially sound investments overseas.

  16. Measurement of Dam Deformations: Case Study of Obruk Dam (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulal, V. Engin; Alkan, R. Metin; Alkan, M. Nurullah; İlci, Veli; Ozulu, I. Murat; Tombus, F. Engin; Kose, Zafer; Aladogan, Kayhan; Sahin, Murat; Yavasoglu, Hakan; Oku, Guldane

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, there is information regarding the first deformation and displacement measurements in dams that were conducted in 1920s Switzerland. Todays, deformation measurements in the dams have gained very different functions with improvements in both measurement equipment and evaluation of measurements. Deformation measurements and analysis are among the main topics studied by scientists who take interest in the engineering measurement sciences. The Working group of Deformation Measurements and Analysis, which was established under the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), carries out its studies and activities with regard to this subject. At the end of the 1970s, the subject of the determination of fixed points in the deformation monitoring network was one of the main subjects extensively studied. Many theories arose from this inquiry, as different institutes came to differing conclusions. In 1978, a special commission with representatives of universities has been established within the FIG 6.1 working group; this commission worked on the issue of determining a general approach to geometric deformation analysis. The results gleaned from the commission were discussed at symposiums organized by the FIG. In accordance with these studies, scientists interested in the subject have begun to work on models that investigate cause and effect relations between the effects that cause deformation and deformation. As of the scientist who interest with the issue focused on different deformation methods, another special commission was established within the FIG engineering measurements commission in order to classify deformation models and study terminology. After studying this material for a long time, the official commission report was published in 2001. In this prepared report, studies have been carried out by considering the FIG Engineering Surveying Commission's report entitled, 'MODELS AND TERMINOLOGY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF GEODETIC MONITORING OBSERVATIONS

  17. Global Reservoir and Dam Database, Version 1 (GRanDv1): Dams, Revision 01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Reservoir and Dam Database, Version 1 (Revision 01) contains 6,862 records of reservoirs and their associated dams with a cumulative storage capacity of...

  18. Global Reservoir and Dam Database, Version 1 (GRanDv1): Dams, Revision 01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Reservoir and Dam Database, Version 1, Revision 01 (v1.01) contains 6,862 records of reservoirs and their associated dams with a cumulative storage...

  19. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  20. Why dentists don't use rubber dam during endodontics and how to promote its usage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarati, Ahmad A

    2016-02-25

    patterns of using rubber dam during undergraduate study were the most influencing factors. Better undergraduate education was the most important proposed measure to increase its usage. The combination of cotton rolls and saliva high-volume ejector or gauze was the most common alternative to rubber dam isolation.

  1. Dental dam clamp adaptation method on carved gypsum cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazacu, N C E

    2014-01-01

    Dental Dam is the safest and most efficient isolation technique in endodontics and restorative dentistry, but it also used in esthetics, orthodontics, prosthetics, pedodontics and periodontology (for teeth immobilization). While in most cases the standard clamps are efficient, in some clinical situations clamp adaptation is mandatory in order to assure a tight contact on the tooth. The purpose of this study is to list the elements of the clamp, which should be modified in order to assure a secure constriction of the clamp on the anchor tooth, by using the carved gypsum cast method. 100 patients were examined, diagnosed and treated for various diagnoses like simple decay, gangrene, chronic apical periodontitis, and endodontic retreatments. The clamps used in this study were produced by Hu-Friedy, Hygenic, KKD, SDI, Hager & Werken. In 10 cases, the anchor tooth did not provide enough stability to the standard clamp--as provided by the producer. Therefore, we have done some adjustments to some of the elements of the clamp: the arch, the wings, the plateau, the active area, and the contact points. In 6 cases, major clamp adaptations on carved gypsum cast were imperative. The classic clamps cannot provide a grip to be enough in all the clinical cases due to the huge variety and position and implantation of the anchor teeth. Therefore, in such situations, the clamps should be adapted in order to provide stability and assure the safe isolation during the treatment. The modified clamps will be useful in similar cases, so they must be kept.

  2. An evaluation of the shape of some popular nickel titanium alloy preformed arch wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Hnat, W P; Leschinsky, R; Legan, H L

    1999-07-01

    The mathematical Beta function is shown to be an accurate planar representation of the natural human arch form defined by the spatial coordinates of the labial and buccal dental/bracket interfacing surfaces in the maxillary and mandibular arches. Graphic planar representations of the corresponding bracket base spatial coordinates of 33 popular preformed nickel titanium arch wires and bracket assemblies were superimposed on each of the relevant maxillary and mandibular natural forms. The arch forms of the preformed nickel titanium arch wires and bracket assemblies did not emulate the natural human arch form. The average mandibular natural human arch form first molar/canine width ratio is 2.38/1; the same preformed arch wire/bracket ratio is 1.87/1. These ratios for the maxillary arch are 1.92/1 and 1.54/1, respectively. The average canine width exceeded the natural canine width by 5.95 mm in the mandibular arch and 8.23 mm in the maxillary arch. The corresponding mandibular first molar and maxillary first molar widths exceeded the natural human first molar arch width by 0.84 mm and 2.68 mm, respectively. These findings have implications with respect to posttreatment stability and facial esthetics. "Round tripping" teeth resulting from subsequent change to stainless steel arch wires to restore a more natural human arch form and size may result in deleterious tissue effects.

  3. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Curran Upper Reservoir Dam (RI 00702), Pawtuxet River Basin, Cranston, Rhode Island. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    pool dam is equal to 9 feet. This failure discharge will cause flooding, high velo - cities, and carry large quantities of debris from the wooded...RETAIN 2OO,o0o,0o GALA . Of WATER FOR PAruUXET VALLEY WATER COMPANY. WELL BUILT EARTH DAM VIZN rJLL R IPRAPPEC SLOPE ON pOND SIDE AND GRASSED SLOPES ON

  4. Climate change impact on operation of dams and hydroelectricity generation in the Northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    We are using a large-scale, high-resolution, fully integrated hydrological/reservoir/hydroelectricity model to investigate the impact of climate change on the operation of 11037 dams and generation of electricity from 375 hydroelectric power plants in the Northeastern United States. Moreover, we estimate the hydropower potential of the region by energizing the existing non-powered dams and then studying the impact of climate change on the hydropower potential. We show that climate change increases the impact of dams on the hydrology of the region. Warmer temperatures produce shorter frozen periods, earlier snowmelt and elevated evapotranspiration rates, which when combined with changes in precipitation, are projected to increase water availability in winter but reduce it during summer. As a result, the water that is stored by dams will be more than ever a necessary part of the routine water systems operations to compensate for these seasonal imbalances. The function of dams as emergency water storage for creating drought resiliency will mostly diminish in the future. Building more dams to cope with the local impacts of climate change on water resources and to offset the increased drought vulnerability may thus be inevitable. Annual hydroelectricity generation in the region is 41 Twh. Our estimate of the annual hydropower potential of non-powered dams adds up to 350 Twh. Climate change may reduce hydropower potential from non-powered dams by up to 13% and reduce current hydroelectricity generation by up to 8% annually. Hydroelectricity generation and hydropower potential may increase in winter months and decline in months of summer and fall. These changes call for recalibration of dam operations and may raise conflict of interests in multipurpose dams.

  5. Patients' attitudes to rubber dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D A; McHugh, E S

    2002-10-01

    The aims of this study were to record patients' views of their experience of RD use in an objective manner, and to evaluate the influence of some personal and clinical factors on patients' opinion. A questionnaire was designed which was then distributed to patients receiving dental treatment under RD by (a) final-year dental students at Birmingham Dental School, and (b) general dental practitioners. Patients completed the confidential questionnaire anonymously after treatment, outside the treatment room. After 100 correctly completed forms were collected from group (a) and 106 from group (b), data were entered into a database and subsequently analyzed using SPSS. Analyses were confined to simple cross-tabulations of the patients' responses and potential associated factors, with chi-square analysis and appropriate follow-up comparisons wherever necessary. In both groups, the majority of patients said they would prefer RD to be used at their next appointment, and most had a positive opinion of the experience. No statistically significant association between age, sex, procedure, application time or duration of use and preference for rubber dam was found. Prolonged RD use showed some association with a negative opinion of the experience of RD. Compared with the dentists, students took longer to apply rubber dam and it was in place for longer. Fewer student patients preferred RD next time, and were less positive about its use than the dentists' patients. Further evidence is presented that (i) Patients generally are not averse to RD. (ii) Placement of rubber dam does not take long. (iii) Operator experience improves patient compliance.

  6. An engineering geological appraisal of the Chamshir dam foundation using DMR classification and kinematic analysis, southwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torabi Kaveh Mehdi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of engineering geological  investigations and rock mechanics studies carried out at the proposed Chamshir dam site. It is proposed that a 155 m high solid concrete gravity-arc dam be built across the Zuhreh River to the southeast of the city of Gachsaran in south-western Iran. The dam and its associated structures are mainly located on the Mishan formation. Analysis consisted of rock mass classification and a kinematic
    analysis of the dam foundation's rock masses. The studies were carried out in the field and the laboratory. The field studies included geological mapping, intensive discontinuity surveying, core drilling and sampling for laboratory testing. Rock mass classifications were made in line with RMR and DMR classification for the dam foundation. Dam foundation analysis regarding stability using DMR classification and kinematic analysis indicated that the left abutment's rock foundation (area 2 was unstable for planar, wedge and toppling failure modes.

  7. Three-dimensional Aquila Rift: magnetized H I arch anchored by molecular complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional structure of the Aquila Rift of magnetized neutral gas is investigated by analysing H I and CO line data. The projected distance on the Galactic plane of the H I arch of the Aquila Rift is r⊥ ˜ 250 pc from the Sun. The H I arch emerges at l ˜ 30°, reaches to altitudes as high as ˜500 pc above the plane at l ˜ 350°, and returns to the disc at l ˜ 270°. The extent of arch at positive latitudes is ˜1 kpc and the width is ˜100 pc. The eastern root is associated with the giant molecular cloud complex, which is the main body of the optically defined Aquila Rift. The H I and molecular masses of the Rift are estimated to be M_{H I}˜ 1.4{×} 10^5 M_{⊙} and M_H_2˜ 3{×} 10^5 M_{⊙}. Gravitational energies to lift the gases to their heights are E_{grav: H I}˜ 1.4{×} 10^{51} erg and E_{grav: H_2}˜ 0.3{×} 10^{51} erg, respectively. Magnetic field is aligned along the H I arch of the Rift, and the strength is measured to be B ˜ 10 μG using Faraday rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources. The magnetic energy is estimated to be Emag ˜ 1.2 × 1051 erg. A possible mechanism of formation of the Aquila Rift is proposed in terms of interstellar magnetic inflation by a sinusoidal Parker instability of wavelength of ˜2.5 kpc and amplitude ˜500 pc.

  8. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options.

  9. Does maxillary arch remodeling exist in nasal polyposis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunhan, Kivanc; Can, Fatma; Uz, Uzdan; Serter, Selim; Unlu, Halis

    2010-01-01

    The potential transformation in the maxillary complex morphology is mostly complete during childhood. Recent studies suggest a nasal tissue remodeling both in the overlying mucosa and in the underlying sinus bone in nasal polyposis (NP). Our evaluation of computed tomography (CT) revealed that the maxillary arch is more flat and shallow in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with NP. The purpose of this study was to determine the possible effects of NP to the maxillary arch morphology in adulthood and to investigate a possible remodeling of the maxillary bone during the course of NP. A prospective study was performed on 25 patients. Grading of the polyps, acoustic rhinometry and rhinomanometry assessments, and CT scans were documented initially, 1 year after diagnosis, and 2 years postoperatively. Twenty-five subjects' CT scans randomly selected from our CT database formed the comparison group. The plane angle between the maxillary alveolar processes (MAP) and the palatine process of the maxillary bone (MPP), and the depth of the maxillary arch of both groups were compared. The results pointed out that the maxillary arch was shallower and the bilateral angles between MAP and MPP were significantly greater than those of the comparison group in all evaluation periods. This difference was less at the end of the postoperative follow-up period. Although it is a common belief that maxillofacial formation expires in childhood, this may not be the case under some special conditions such as NP in adulthood. NP might cause maxillary arch remodeling in adults.

  10. Approaches for treatment of aortic arch aneurysm, a numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Asaph; Avrahami, Idit

    2017-01-04

    Aortic arch aneurysm is a complex pathology which requires coverage of one or more aortic arch vessels. In this study we explore the hemodynamic behavior of the aortic arch in aneurysmatic and treated cases with three currently available treatment approaches: Surgery Graft, hybrid Stent-Graft and chimney Stent Graft. The analysis included four models of the time-dependent fluid domains of aneurysmatic arch and of the surgery, hybrid and chimney endovascular techniques. Dimensions of the models are based on typical anatomy, and boundary conditions are based on typical physiological flow. The simulations used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to delineate the time-dependent flow dynamics in the four geometric models. Results of velocity vectors, flow patterns, blood pressure and wall shear stress distributions are presented. The results delineate disturbed and recirculating flow in the aortic arch aneurysm accompanied with low wall shear stress and velocities, compared to a uniformly directed flow and nominal wall shear stress (WSS) in the model of Surgery graft. Out of the two endograft procedures, the hybrid procedure clearly exhibits better hemodynamic performances over the chimney model, with lower WSS, lower pressure drop and less disturbed and vortical flow regions. Although the chimney procedure requires less manufacturing time and cost, it is associated with higher risk rates, and therefore, it is recommended only for emergency cases. This study may shed light on the hemodynamic factors for these complications and provide insight into ways to improve the procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics of breaking arches under a constant vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Bruno; Lozano, Celia; Zuriguel, Iker; Garcimartín, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Granular flow through an orifice can be suddenly halted by the formation of arches in the vicinity of the outlet, which are stable under the action of gravity. They may be broken when an external driving (for instance, vibration) is applied. With the aim of shedding light on the dynamics of arch destruction, we built an experiment consisting of a vertical two-dimensional silo filled with monodisperse beads, to which a constant vibration is applied. It was previously found that an important parameter to predict the robustness of the arch is the angle between consecutive beads. We focus on long-enduring arches and study the angles among the beads along time. We have found that in many cases the dynamics of the largest angle determines the breaking of the arch; it does not only determine where the "weakest link" is, but also the process that leads to the final destabilization. This is interesting because it can provide information about whether the flow will resume in a well-defined time or not, which is especially useful for industrial processes that have to constantly deal with the possible emergence of clogs.

  12. Alternative complete-arch cement-retained implant-supported fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, T M; Ercoli, C; Hagan, M E

    1999-07-01

    Early implant prostheses designs, which used screw-retained metal and acrylic resin structures, frequently left a space between the prosthesis and the soft tissue. Common deficiencies of this design included phonetic and esthetic problems and screw loosening. Cement-retained implant prostheses are also used in partially and completely edentulous patients, and are thought to have optimal occlusion and esthetics. Moreover, cement-retained prostheses may induce less stress on the implant, thereby maximizing the possibility of a passive fit. Porcelain fused to metal prostheses have been used mostly in partially edentulous situations. Recently, complete-arch porcelain fused to metal prostheses that replace hard and soft tissue have been used and, although this restoration can have excellent esthetics, there are disadvantages such as high cost, potential framework distortion during fabrication, and difficulty in repairing fractures of in-service porcelain. This article describes an alternative technique for the fabrication of a complete-arch, cement-retained, metal-acrylic resin implant-supported fixed partial denture. When compared with porcelain fused to metal complete-arch restorations, this prostheses is esthetic, has excellent retention and stability, yet is relatively inexpensive to fabricate, and requires less laboratory skill.

  13. Immediate loading of immediate mandibular implants with a full-arch fixed prosthesis: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Boronat, Araceli; Garcia, Berta

    2009-06-01

    To determine the survival of immediate dental implants with immediate loading in the partially edentulous mandible, by use of a full-arch screw-retained provisional restoration. Patients who were partially edentulous in the mandible with indications for extraction of the remaining teeth and with a minimum follow-up of 12 months after implant placement were included in the study. They were treated in chronologic order by the insertion of 6 Defcon dental implants (Impladent, Sentmenat, Spain) subjected to immediate loading (4 interforaminal and 2 posterior placements). Implants with a minimum primary stability of 60 implant stability quotient were loaded. All resin screw-retained prostheses were inserted and loaded with fully functional occlusion within 24 hours of implant placement. Eleven patients were treated with immediate implants, although 2 patients were excluded from the study for having an implant stability quotient value below 60 in at least one of the implants after surgery and did not undergo restoration with immediate loading. Fifty-four implants were placed in 9 partially edentulous patients with immediate loading with a full-arch screw-fixed prosthesis. The patients wore this provisional prosthesis during the healing period (2 months) without complication and with a high level of comfort. The survival rate of the implants was 100% at 12 months of follow-up. Immediate mandibular loading with immediate full-arch implant-supported and screw-retained restorations is a viable treatment alternative, yielding a 100% success rate in this small series of patients.

  14. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality.

  15. Interfragmentary screw fixation of the zygomatic arch in complex midface and zygomaticomaxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Ribeiro, André Luis; Rodrigues, Tânia Maria de Souza; Alves-Junior, Sérgio de Melo; Pinheiro, João de Jesus Viana

    2015-03-01

    Zygomatic arch reduction and fixation is a key point in the treatment of complex midface and zygomaticomaxillary fractures. High-impact frontal trauma can cause posterior displacement of zygomatic bone, with a sagittal fracture of the root of the zygomatic arch extending posteriorly to the glenoid fossa. Miniplate and screw fixation of this fracture requires a large detachment of soft tissue, thus being technically more difficult for proper fixation and increasing the risk of soft tissue damage. This report describes an operative approach for fixation of this type of fracture using an adaptation of the lag screw technique. After the initial reduction of zygomatic bone, the proximal segment of the zygomatic arch containing the sagittal fracture is anatomically reduced and a 2.0-mm titanium screw is placed with an inferior inclination of 10° to 15° into the mastoid cells of the temporal bone, thus avoiding intracranial screw placement. This technique showed excellent results in reduction and long-term stability. It facilitates the surgical procedure, decreases the risk of soft tissue damage, and can lower costs compared with conventional miniplate and screw fixation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety Aspects of Sustainable Storage Dams and Earthquake Safety of Existing Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wieland

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The basic element in any sustainable dam project is safety, which includes the following safety elements: ① structural safety, ② dam safety monitoring, ③ operational safety and maintenance, and ④ emergency planning. Long-term safety primarily includes the analysis of all hazards affecting the project; that is, hazards from the natural environment, hazards from the man-made environment, and project-specific and site-specific hazards. The special features of the seismic safety of dams are discussed. Large dams were the first structures to be systematically designed against earthquakes, starting in the 1930s. However, the seismic safety of older dams is unknown, as most were designed using seismic design criteria and methods of dynamic analysis that are considered obsolete today. Therefore, we need to reevaluate the seismic safety of existing dams based on current state-of-the-art practices and rehabilitate deficient dams. For large dams, a site-specific seismic hazard analysis is usually recommended. Today, large dams and the safety-relevant elements used for controlling the reservoir after a strong earthquake must be able to withstand the ground motions of a safety evaluation earthquake. The ground motion parameters can be determined either by a probabilistic or a deterministic seismic hazard analysis. During strong earthquakes, inelastic deformations may occur in a dam; therefore, the seismic analysis has to be carried out in the time domain. Furthermore, earthquakes create multiple seismic hazards for dams such as ground shaking, fault movements, mass movements, and others. The ground motions needed by the dam engineer are not real earthquake ground motions but models of the ground motion, which allow the safe design of dams. It must also be kept in mind that dam safety evaluations must be carried out several times during the long life of large storage dams. These features are discussed in this paper.

  17. Key Impact Factors on Dam Break Fatalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D.; Yu, Z.; Song, Y.; Han, D.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Dam failures can lead to catastrophes on human society. However, there is a lack of research about dam break fatalities, especially on the key factors that affect fatalities. Based on the analysis of historical dam break cases, most studies have used the regression analysis to explore the correlation between those factors and fatalities, but without implementing optimization to find the dominating factors. In order to understand and reduce the risk of fatalities, this study has proposed a new method to select the impact factors on the fatality. It employs an improved ANN (Artificial Neural Network) combined with LOOCV (Leave-one-out cross-validation) and SFS (Stepwise Forward Selection) approach to explore the nonlinear relationship between impact factors and life losses. It not only considers the factors that have been widely used in the literature but also introduces new factors closely involved with fatalities. Dam break cases occurred in China from 1954 to 2013 are summarized, within which twenty-five cases are selected with a comprehensive coverage of geographic position and temporal variation. Twelve impact factors are taken into account as the inputs, i.e., severity of dam break flood (SF), population at risk (PR), public understanding of dam break (UB), warning time (TW), evacuation condition (EC), weather condition during dam break (WB), dam break mode (MB), water storage (SW), building vulnerability (VB), dam break time (TB), average distance from the affected area to the dam (DD) and preventive measures by government (PG).From those, three key factors of SF, MB and TB are chosen. The proposed method is able to extract the key factors, and the derived fatality model performs well in various types of dam break conditions.

  18. [Shape of dental arches and their dimensions in children without malocclusion aged 3 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarczyk, B; Winiarska-Majczyno, M; Pietrzak-Bilińska, B; Zadurska, M

    1989-01-01

    The dental arches were analysed in 3-year-old children without malocclusion evaluating the shape of arches, measuring their with, length and depth. The index of the dental arch and the palatal index were calculated. In children aged 3 years the shape of the upper dental arch was in most cases similar to a semi-ellipse and that of the lower arch approached parabole. This suggests that the semicircular shape of dental arches is not characteristic of this period of occlusion development.

  19. Impacts of dams on the geomorphodynamics of fluvial systems - Complex system response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöppl, Ronald E.; Keiler, Margreth; Glade, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    In Europe, for more than 5.000 years humans impact fluvial systems in various ways, e.g. also through building dams. These constructions change the interdependencies between the components of the fluvial system. 'Natural (fluvial) systems' are scarce and humans play an active and major role in changing river systems. In return the geomorphic response of fluvial systems like channel bed degradation downstream or sedimentation upstream of dams also affects the human system which again leads to 'human responses' such as building (or abandoning) river engineering structures. Geomorphic response or geomorphic system behavior can change and feature linear or nonlinear/complex behavior depending on the internal systemic structure and system history. The study area, the 'Kaja' River watershed is located in the Eastern part of the Bohemian Massif in Austria (Europe) and drains into the 'Thaya' River which builds the northern border to the Czech Republic in Lower Austria. Furthermore it is eponymous for the local National Park 'Nationalpark Thayatal'. In the study area 14 dams are located in total, 13 along the Kaja River, and one along a tributary river. The study area influenced by dams amounts 1.615 ha. All dams are embankment dams whose cross-sections show hill-shaped forms. They are made of various compositions of soil, sand, clay, and rock. Four dams are currently active, ten are abandoned. The main objectives of this study are to identify if nonlinear/complex geomorphic system behavior occurs in this small and highly dam-affected watershed and to investigate geomorphic effects on fluvial systems due to dams. In order to find nonlinear/complex system behavior those sites are probed in which geomorphic effects due to dams are highly expected: reservoirs, channels, and floodplains. Sedimentary records, numerical modeling and mapping techniques will be used to reveal geomorphic changes and perturbations within the fluvial system. Spatial and temporal reconstructions and

  20. Sediment trapping by dams creates methane emission hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeck, Andreas; Delsontro, Tonya; McGinnis, Daniel F; Fischer, Helmut; Flury, Sabine; Schmidt, Mark; Fietzek, Peer; Lorke, Andreas

    2013-08-06

    Inland waters transport and transform substantial amounts of carbon and account for ∼18% of global methane emissions. Large reservoirs with higher areal methane release rates than natural waters contribute significantly to freshwater emissions. However, there are millions of small dams worldwide that receive and trap high loads of organic carbon and can therefore potentially emit significant amounts of methane to the atmosphere. We evaluated the effect of damming on methane emissions in a central European impounded river. Direct comparison of riverine and reservoir reaches, where sedimentation in the latter is increased due to trapping by dams, revealed that the reservoir reaches are the major source of methane emissions (∼0.23 mmol CH4 m(-2) d(-1) vs ∼19.7 mmol CH4 m(-2) d(-1), respectively) and that areal emission rates far exceed previous estimates for temperate reservoirs or rivers. We show that sediment accumulation correlates with methane production and subsequent ebullitive release rates and may therefore be an excellent proxy for estimating methane emissions from small reservoirs. Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river hot spot sites can potentially increase global freshwater emissions by up to 7%.

  1. Downstream migration and multiple dam passage by Atlantic Salmon smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, D.; McCormick, Stephen; Greenberg, L.; Ardren, W.R.; Bergman, E.; Calles, O.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate behavior and survival of radio-tagged wild and hatchery-reared landlocked Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar smolts as they migrated past three hydropower dams equipped with fish bypass solutions in the Winooski River, Vermont. Among hatchery-reared smolts, those released early were more likely to initiate migration and did so after less delay than those released late. Once migration was initiated, however, the late-released hatchery smolts migrated at greater speeds. Throughout the river system, hatchery-reared fish performed similarly to wild fish. Dam passage rates varied between the three dams and was highest at the dam where unusually high spill levels occurred throughout the study period. Of the 50 fish that did migrate downstream, only 10% managed to reach the lake. Migration success was low despite the presence of bypass solutions, underscoring the need for evaluations of remedial measures; simply constructing a fishway is not synonymous with providing fish passage.

  2. Neotectonics of the Vajont dam site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Franco; Vita-Finzi, Claudio

    2003-08-01

    The disastrous Vajont landslide (NE Italy) of 9 October 1963 is generally thought to have occurred on an existing failure surface. Reassessment of the morphological and structural evidence suggests that movement was on a normal fault plane which had juxtaposed Cretaceous limestone and highly fractured rock debris, thus rendering the dam site unusually susceptible to massive sliding. The proposed fault is consistent in strike with the regional lineament pattern. Although movement was triggered by the combined effects of heavy rainfall and changes in reservoir level, there is circumstantial evidence that seismicity played a contributory part in mobilising the slide by increasing pore pressure at the base of the slide as well as by any associated shaking.

  3. McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1997-07-01

    The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

  4. Novel Method to Assess the Risk of Dam Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinli Yang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new flexible, rapid and affordable risk assessment procedure was developed and verified for dams based on case studies in Scotland (UK and the region of Baden (Germany. A database of six different sustainable flood retention basin (SFRB types with varying flood control potential has been developed. In Scotland, there are a relatively high number of current and former large drinking water reservoirs which could contribute to flood management control. In comparison, purpose-built and relatively small SFRB, which are predominantly used for flood control, dominate the landscape in Baden. Moreover, 13 out of 149 SFRB have recently been upgraded, and 11 new SFRB have been built since 2006. Both the estimated hazard and risk are small in comparison to those found in the flood infrastructure in Scotland. The study assesses a rapid screening tool developed to estimate the Dam Condition and the corresponding Dam Failure Hazard and Dam Failure Risk. Most SFRB in Baden have a relatively poor Dam Condition, high Dam Failure Hazard but low Dam Failure Risk compared to those in Scotland. Findings show that Baden is more advanced in flood defence management as well as adaptation to climate change.Deutscher Titel: Neue Methode zur Beurteilung des Risikos eines DammbruchesZusammenfassung: Eine neue, flexible, schnelle und preisgünstige Methode zur Risokobeurteilung von Dämmen wurde entwickelt und getestet, die auf Fallbeispielen in Schottland (Vereinigtes Königreich und der Region Baden (Deutschland basiert. Eine Datenbank von sechs verschiedenen Typen nachhaltiger Hochwasserrückhaltebecken (NHRB mit unterschiedlichem Hochwasserrückhaltevermögen wurde entwickelt. Eine relativ hohe Anzahl von gegenwärtigen und ehemaligen großen Trinkwassertalsperren, die zur Hochwasserschutzkontolle verwandt werden könnten, befinden sich in Schottland. Zweckmäßig gebaute und relativ kleine NHRB, die hauptsächlich für den Hochwasserschutz verwendet werden, dominieren

  5. Rubber dam may increase the survival time of dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, William; Carson, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health's Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, LILACS, SciELO, Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, VIP, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, OpenGrey and Sciencepaper Online databases. Handsearches in a number of journals.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials, including split-mouth studies assessing the effects of rubber dam isolation for restorative treatments in dental patients.Data extraction and synthesisTwo review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.ResultsFour studies involving a total of 1,270 patients were included. The studies were at high risk of bias. One trial was excluded from the analysis due to inconsistencies in the presented data. Restorations had a significantly higher survival rate in the rubber dam isolation group compared to the cotton roll isolation group at six months in participants receiving composite restorative treatment of non-carious cervical lesions (risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.37, very low-quality evidence). The rubber dam group had a lower risk of failure at two years in children undergoing proximal atraumatic restorative treatment in primary molars (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, very low-quality evidence). One trial reported limited data showing that rubber dam usage during fissure sealing might shorten the treatment time. None of the included studies mentioned adverse effects or reported the direct cost of the treatment, or the level of patient acceptance/satisfaction. There was also no evidence evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on the quality of the restorations.ConclusionsWe found some very low-quality evidence, from single studies, suggesting that rubber dam usage in dental direct

  6. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  7. Simulation of Laboratory Tests of Steel Arch Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horyl, Petr; Šňupárek, Richard; Maršálek, Pavel; Pacześniowski, Krzysztof

    2017-03-01

    The total load-bearing capacity of steel arch yielding roadways supports is among their most important characteristics. These values can be obtained in two ways: experimental measurements in a specialized laboratory or computer modelling by FEM. Experimental measurements are significantly more expensive and more time-consuming. However, for proper tuning, a computer model is very valuable and can provide the necessary verification by experiment. In the cooperating workplaces of GIG Katowice, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava and the Institute of Geonics ASCR this verification was successful. The present article discusses the conditions and results of this verification for static problems. The output is a tuned computer model, which may be used for other calculations to obtain the load-bearing capacity of other types of steel arch supports. Changes in other parameters such as the material properties of steel, size torques, friction coefficient values etc. can be determined relatively quickly by changing the properties of the investigated steel arch supports.

  8. IDIOPATHIC NEONATAL AORTIC ARCH THROMBOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignazio Lofù

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal aortic arch thrombosis is a rare but life threatening condition. A correct diagnosis and an appropriate therapeutic approach are fundamental to prevent death or severe injuries. Case presentation: we report a case of spontaneous aortic arch thrombosis in a term newborn, who presented with suggestive signs of aortic coarctation immediately after birth. Despite the initiation of anticoagulant therapy, a massive increase in size of thrombus with evidence of coronary involvement was noted. Thrombolytic treatment was performed with thrombus resolution. Death occurred after a few days due to widespread brain haemorrhage. Conclusion: To date, no definitive guidelines have been published for the treatment of neonatal aortic arch thrombosis, and only anecdotal reports are available. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in order to evaluate the risk:benefit ratio of proposed medical and surgical interventions. Further studies are needed to improve consensus evidence based guidelines and ensure appropriate approaches to this condition.

  9. In-Plane MEMS Shallow Arch Beam for Mechanical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abdullah Al Hafiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an in-plane microelectromechanical systems (MEMS clamped–clamped beam resonator, which is deliberately fabricated as a shallow arch. The arch beam is made of silicon, and is electrostatically actuated. The concept relies on the inherent quadratic nonlinearity originating from the arch curvature, which results in a softening behavior that creates hysteresis and co-existing states of motion. Since it is independent of the electrostatic force, this nonlinearity gives more flexibility in the operating conditions and allows for lower actuation voltages. Experimental results are generated through electrical characterization setup. Results are shown demonstrating the switching between the two vibrational states with the change of the direct current (DC bias voltage, thereby proving the memory concept.

  10. In-Plane MEMS Shallow Arch Beam for Mechanical Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2016-10-18

    We demonstrate a memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an in-plane microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped–clamped beam resonator, which is deliberately fabricated as a shallow arch. The arch beam is made of silicon, and is electrostatically actuated. The concept relies on the inherent quadratic nonlinearity originating from the arch curvature, which results in a softening behavior that creates hysteresis and co-existing states of motion. Since it is independent of the electrostatic force, this nonlinearity gives more flexibility in the operating conditions and allows for lower actuation voltages. Experimental results are generated through electrical characterization setup. Results are shown demonstrating the switching between the two vibrational states with the change of the direct current (DC) bias voltage, thereby proving the memory concept.

  11. SUITABILITY OF DAM SITES IN MAURITIUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cistvr

    Sites where dams/reservoirs have been proposed in Mauritius are listed in Table 1. In many of these places, detailed investigations have been carried out, only to be shelved for some reason or other. Other dams have been constructed, sometimes after a sketchy desk study investigation, simply because of the urgency of ...

  12. 75 FR 62024 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Parts 56 and 57 RIN 1219-AB70 Metal and Nonmetal Dams AGENCY... measures to assure that metal and nonmetal mine operators design, construct, operate and maintain dams in a...

  13. SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT IN FLOOD CONTROL DAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanapanchai, Maneechit; Shah, Farhed A.; Annandale, George

    2002-01-01

    Reservoir sedimentation reduces economic value and longevity of flood control dams. Periodic sediment removal allows extension of reservoir life. An optimal control model is developed to evaluate alternative sediment management strategies for flood control dams. An illustrative empirical analysis shows that sustainable management is economically desirable for a wide range of parameter values.

  14. Supplementation with methyl donors during lactation to high-fat-sucrose-fed dams protects offspring against liver fat accumulation when consuming an obesogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, P; Milagro, F I; Campion, J; Martinez, J A

    2014-10-01

    Methyl donor supplementation has been reported to prevent obesity-induced liver fat accumulation in adult rats. We hypothesized that this protection could be mediated by perinatal nutrition. For this purpose, we assessed the response to an obesogenic diet (high-fat-sucrose, HFS) during adulthood depending on maternal diet during lactation. Female Wistar rats fed control diet during pregnancy were assigned to four postpartum dietary groups: control, control supplemented with methyl donors (choline, betaine, folic acid, vitamin B12), HFS and HFS supplemented with methyl donors. At weaning, the male offspring was transferred to a chow diet and at week 12th assigned to a control or a HFS diet during 8 weeks. The offspring whose mothers were fed HFS during lactation showed increased adiposity (19%, Pobesogenic diet in the adult progeny. Interestingly, dietary methyl donor supplementation in lactating mothers fed an obesogenic diet reduced liver fat accumulation, but increased adipose tissue storage in adult HFS-fed offspring.

  15. Fish condition factor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptors and biotransformation responses in Sarotherodon melanotheron from a contaminated freshwater dam (Awba Dam) in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Onoja, Anyebe B; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between condition factor (CF), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), phase 1 biotransformation (CYP1A isoforms) and contaminant burden has been studied in Sarotherodon melanotheron from a contaminated tropical freshwater dam (Awba Dam) and compared to a reference site (Modete Dam) in Southwest, Nigeria. A total of 89 fish (57 males and 32 females) was collected from Awba Dam and 95 fish (48 males and 47 females) from the reference site. In general, fish sampled from Awba Dam were bigger than reference site. Sediment samples were also collected from both sites for contaminant analysis. Expression of ppar and cyp1 isoforms was analyzed using validated real-time PCR, while CYP1A and PPAR protein levels were analyzed using immunochemical method with specific antibodies. CYP-mediated catalytic responses (EROD, MROD and BROD) were performed by biochemical methods. We observed significant increases in ppar and cyp1 isoforms mRNA in both male and female fish from Awba Dam, compared to the reference site. Catalytic activities of EROD, MROD and BROD paralleled cyp1 transcript levels. Sex-related differences in PPAR and CYP1A protein levels were also observed, showing higher CYP1A proteins in males, compared with females, and higher PPAR proteins in females compared with males. Principal component analysis (PCA) biplot showed positive relationships between biological responses (ppar isoforms), condition factor (CF) and sediment PCBs, PAHs, OCPs and heavy metal concentrations. The present study shows that S. melanotheron inhabiting Awba Dam are severely affected by different classes of environmental contaminants that target metabolic processes (PPAR) and biotransformation pathways (CYP1A) in male and female fish, compared to a reference site. Interestingly, fish from Awba Dam were exhibiting good growth (evidence by high CF values) that paralleled increases in the transcriptional activation of ppar and cyp1 isoforms, despite the high

  16. Restoring Environmental Flows by Modifying Dam Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Richter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of new dams has become one of the most controversial issues in global efforts to alleviate poverty, improve human health, and strengthen regional economies. Unfortunately, this controversy has overshadowed the tremendous opportunity that exists for modifying the operations of existing dams to recover many of the environmental and social benefits of healthy ecosystems that have been compromised by present modes of dam operation. The potential benefits of dam "re-operation" include recovery of fish, shellfish, and other wildlife populations valued both commercially and recreationally, including estuarine species; reactivation of the flood storage and water purification benefits that occur when floods are allowed to flow into floodplain forests and wetlands; regaining some semblance of the naturally dynamic balance between river erosion and sedimentation that shapes physical habitat complexity, and arresting problems associated with geomorphic imbalances; cultural and spiritual uses of rivers; and many other socially valued products and services. This paper describes an assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the benefits that might be restored through dam re-operation. Assessing the potential benefits of dam re-operation begins by characterizing the dam's effects on the river flow regime, and formulating hypotheses about the ecological and social benefits that might be restored by releasing water from the dam in a manner that more closely resembles natural flow patterns. These hypotheses can be tested by implementing a re-operation plan, tracking the response of the ecosystem, and continually refining dam operations through adaptive management. The paper highlights a number of land and water management strategies useful in implementing a dam re-operation plan, with reference to a variety of management contexts ranging from individual dams to cascades of dams along a river to regional energy grids. Because many of the

  17. Optical silencing of C. elegans cells with arch proton pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Okazaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optogenetic techniques using light-driven ion channels or ion pumps for controlling excitable cells have greatly facilitated the investigation of nervous systems in vivo. A model organism, C. elegans, with its small transparent body and well-characterized neural circuits, is especially suitable for optogenetic analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the application of archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch, a recently reported optical neuronal silencer, to C. elegans. Arch::GFP expressed either in all neurons or body wall muscles of the entire body by means of transgenes were localized, at least partially, to the cell membrane without adverse effects, and caused locomotory paralysis of worms when illuminated by green light (550 nm. Pan-neuronal expression of Arch endowed worms with quick and sustained responsiveness to such light. Worms reliably responded to repeated periods of illumination and non-illumination, and remained paralyzed under continuous illumination for 30 seconds. Worms expressing Arch in different subsets of motor neurons exhibited distinct defects in the locomotory behavior under green light: selective silencing of A-type motor neurons affected backward movement while silencing of B-type motor neurons affected forward movement more severely. Our experiments using a heat-shock-mediated induction system also indicate that Arch becomes fully functional only 12 hours after induction and remains functional for more than 24 hour. CONCLUSIONS/SGNIFICANCE: Arch can be used for silencing neurons and muscles, and may be a useful alternative to currently widely used halorhodopsin (NpHR in optogenetic studies of C. elegans.

  18. Photoelastic analysis of stress generated by Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertner, Alessandro; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Gonini, Alcides; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The present in vitro study evaluated, by means of the photoelastic technique, the effects generated by the Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA), with a 90o bend on the distal surface of molar tubes and using the 4 x 2 appliance on the anterior and posterior regions of the upper dental arch. Methods: Five models were manufactured, in which two different clinical situations were correlated: 1) use of intrusion arch not cinched back and transpalatal bar for anchorage (Group 1); 2) use of intrusion arch cinched back and transpalatal bar for anchorage (Group 2). Stress generated in the apical and middle regions of tooth roots of maxillary anterior teeth and maxillary first molars was evaluated. Results: Taking a reference value of 1.0 MPa = 100%, qualitative descriptive analysis was performed, which showed uniformity between stress values in the apical region of anterior teeth of both groups (G1 and G2). In the posterior region, for models with the arch cinched back (G2), stress remained within 100%. As for G1 models (with the arch not cinched back), variations in the mesial surface of first molars were observed, with an increase of 20% in the generated stress. The apical region did not undergo any changes, while in the distal region of molars there was a decrease of 20% in stress. Conclusion: Laboratory results revealed differences in stress between Groups 1 and 2 in the molar region, thereby indicating that there was a tendency towards mesial root tipping of first molars when the distal end of the CIA was not cinched back. PMID:28444014

  19. Research progress on dam-break floods

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jiansong

    2011-08-01

    Because of the catastrophic effects downstream of dam-break failure, more and more researchers around the world have been working on the study of dam-break flows to accurately forecast the downstream inundation mapping. With the rapid development of computer hardware and computing techniques, numerical study on dam-break flows has been a popular research subject. In the paper, the numerical methodologies used to solve the governing partial differential equations of dam-break flows are classified and summarized, and their characteristics and applications are discussed respectively. Furthermore, the fully-developed mathematical models developed in recent decades are reviewed, and also introduced the authors\\' on-going work. Finally, some possible future developments on modeling the dam-break flows and some solutions are presented and discussed. © 2011 IEEE.

  20. Powder avalanche and catching dam interaction : influence of upstream dam slope ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccamo, Paolo; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Faug, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    The influence of an obstacle on the dynamics of a finite-volume density current modelling a powder-snow avalanche was investigated. A constant volume of a dyed salt solution reproduced the small-scale aerosol flowing down an inclined channel immersed in a water tank. Reference tests in the absence of the obstacle characterized the dynamics parameters of the flow and then the influence of two different types of obstacles on these parameters was studied. Both of the obstacles represent a catching dam one with a vertical uphill face (OBS1) and the second one with an inclined uphill face 32° (OBS2). A high resolution acoustic velocimeter allows measurements on the 3D Flow velocity. For the reference avalanche, it was shown that the maximum velocity norm can be up to 18% greater than the maximum horizontal contribution (parallel to the slope) and that the ratio maximum velocity norm over front velocity varies between 1.75 and 2.2. THis ratio varies between 1.7 and 2.8 for the obstacles situation. In terms of protection effectiveness, laboratory tests showed that a catching dam with the upstream vertical to the slope is more efficient than a dam with an inclined upstream face. In presence of OBS2 the flow does not hit the obstacle but it rather passes smoothly over it, without any visible detachment from the surface. The ramp effect is remarkable and the avalanche reaches faster (in terms of time) a given point downstream from the obstacle. On the contrary, in the OBS1 configuration, the incoming flow hits the vertical wall and bursts. The flow is subjected to a strong deflection with the formation of a vertical jet.

  1. Rubber dam isolation for restorative treatment in dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Chunjie; Yuan, He; Wong, May Cm; Zou, Jing; Shi, Zongdao; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-09-20

    that analysed 1270 participants (among which 233 participants were lost to follow-up). All the included studies were at high risk of bias. We excluded one trial from the analysis due to inconsistencies in the presented data.The results indicated that dental restorations had a significantly higher survival rate in the rubber dam isolation group compared to the cotton roll isolation group at six months in participants receiving composite restorative treatment of non-carious cervical lesions (risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.37, very low-quality evidence). It also showed that the rubber dam group had a lower risk of failure at two years in children undergoing proximal atraumatic restorative treatment in primary molars (hazard ratio (HR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.97, very low-quality evidence). One trial reported limited data showing that rubber dam usage during fissure sealing might shorten the treatment time. None of the included studies mentioned adverse effects or reported the direct cost of the treatment, or the level of patient acceptance/satisfaction. There was also no evidence evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on the quality of the restorations. We found some very low-quality evidence, from single studies, suggesting that rubber dam usage in dental direct restorative treatments may lead to a lower failure rate of the restorations, compared with the failure rate for cotton roll usage. Further high quality research evaluating the effects of rubber dam usage on different types of restorative treatments is required.

  2. Full-arch milled titanium implant bridge: technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peché, Wendy-Ann; Van Vuuren, Ludwig Jansen; Park, Chae

    2011-09-01

    The manufacturing of full-arch fixed implant-supported bridges with the use of the traditional lost wax technique remains a technical challenge. Distortion of the alloy during casting and subsequent heating cycles during porcelain build-up causes numerous problems. Fracturing of porcelain on large restorations is difficult and costly to restore. The fitting problems can be eliminated by utilising CAD/CAM technology in the manufacturing of long-span or full-arch titanium bridges. Repair of damaged porcelain can be simplified with the use of discrete, individually-removable crowns on the bridge.

  3. Preoperative Use of Radiopaque Materials on Fractured Zygomatic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hong Jin; Jung, Sung Won; Lim, Hyoseob

    2016-09-01

    Fractures of the zygoma are relatively frequent and their management has been extensively described. Above all, isolated zygomatic arch fractures comprise about 10% of all zygomatic fractures. Temporal approach is common surgical method, Gillies approach, but it has the limitation of blinded surgical approach. So, the mobile intraoperative fluoroscan is used famously for more suitable reduction, but it needs an additional man to control the machine and increases irradiation doses. The authors got the simple idea, but so helpful tool, and it has been performed since 2012. The authors have gotten good surgical results, so introduce this idea that favors the surgery on isolated zygomatic arch fracture.

  4. Do we need construct more dams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Shi, H.

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews global dam development in association with the growths of global population, economy, and energy consumption in the past several decades, and also evaluates contributions of dam development to future world sustainable development. Eventually, this paper answers whether we need more dams in the future or not. The world population has rapidly increased from 1.6 billion in 1900, 2.5 billion in 1950, 6.1 billion in 2000, to 7.0 billion in 2011, and is projected to reach 9.5 billion in 2050; similarly, the world economy has dramatically expanded. To maintain socioeconomic development, the consumption of water, food and energy has increased rapidly as well. However, the total volume of available water resource over the world is limited, the food production largely depends on water supply, and the main energy sources are still oil, coal and gas at present, which are regarded as non-renewable resources. Accordingly, it is expected that we will face serious problems to deal with the challenges of water crisis, food security and energy shortage in the near future. In order to enhance the capability of regulating water resource, a great number of global dams (and related reservoirs) have been constructed in the last one hundred years; currently, almost all large rivers over the world have been regulated by dams. The reservoirs can supply sufficient water for irrigated land to ensure food production, and the associated hydropower stations can generate electricity. This article collects the dam data from the ICOLD (International Commission on Large Dams) and GRanD (Global Reservoir and Dam) databases, and some socioeconomic data, including population, economy, and consumptions of water, food and energy over the world. Analysis of these data reveals that global dam development has a great impact on the world sustainable development. Further, it is concluded that we need further dam development to maintain our future development.

  5. Environmental risk index: a tool to assess the safety of dams for leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer Mendoza, Francisco J; Gallardo Izquierdo, Antonio

    2009-02-15

    Dams for leachate store very toxic substances that contain a large amount of organic material and, probably, heavy metals; they therefore constitute an important threat to the environment. Existing models of environmental risk assessment for landfills do not take into consideration the specific risk that leachate dams may represent for the environment. In this paper a methodology to improve the environmental safety is presented according to the parameters used in their construction and management. In order to do that, the following characteristics of the dam must be known: (1) geotechnical stability, (2) erosion of downstream slope, (3) type of sealing of the dam, (4) overtopping probability, (5) volume of leachate stored inside the dam and (6) pollution load of leachate. Once these parameters have been calculated, they are transformed by means of rating curves into homogeneous units, so as to make it possible to operate between them. From the study and analysis of these parameters an environmental risk index for a dam for leachate can be calculated. If the environmental risk index exceeds an established value then it involves a dam for leachate with high environmental risk, therefore preventive measures in its design, construction and management would be necessary.

  6. A simplified water temperature model for the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.A.; Anderson, C.R.; Voichick, N.

    2009-01-01

    Glen Canyon Dam, located on the Colorado River in northern Arizona, has affected the physical, biological and cultural resources of the river downstream in Grand Canyon. One of the impacts to the downstream physical environment that has important implications for the aquatic ecosystem is the transformation of the thermal regime from highly variable seasonally to relatively constant year-round, owing to hypolimnetic releases from the upstream reservoir, Lake Powell. Because of the perceived impacts on the downstream aquatic ecosystem and native fish communities, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has considered modifications to flow releases and release temperatures designed to increase downstream temperatures. Here, we present a new model of monthly average water temperatures below Glen Canyon Dam designed for first-order, relatively simple evaluation of various alternative dam operations. The model is based on a simplified heat-exchange equation, and model parameters are estimated empirically. The model predicts monthly average temperatures at locations up to 421 km downstream from the dam with average absolute errors less than 0.58C for the dataset considered. The modelling approach used here may also prove useful for other systems, particularly below large dams where release temperatures are substantially out of equilibrium with meteorological conditions. We also present some examples of how the model can be used to evaluate scenarios for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam.

  7. Measurement of Creep on the Calaveras Fault at Coyote Dam using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.; Cassotto, R.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Werner, C. L.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Calaveras fault in central California is part of the San Andreas fault system. Coyote Dam, an earthen dam that straddles the fault ~13km northeast of Gilroy, experiences creep style deformation that ranges from 10 to 15 mm/yr. Uncertainty in the location of the fault, coupled with the historic rate of deformation, affect the dam's safety factor. Assessing the impact of fault creep on the dam's stability is paramount to its safety evaluation, but is difficult to resolve due to limited spatial and temporal sampling of conventional methods. Terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI), like satellite-based observations, produces high spatial resolution maps of ground deformation. Unlike space-based sensors, TRI can be readily deployed and the observation geometry selected to get the maximum line of sight (LOS) signal. TRI also benefits from high temporal sampling which can be used to reduce errors related to atmospheric phase delays and high temporal sampling also facilitates tracking rapidly moving features such as landslides and glaciers. GAMMA Portable Radar Interferometer (GPRI) measurements of Coyote Dam rock faces were made from concrete piers built upstream and downstream of the dam. The GPRI operates at a radar frequency of 17.2 GHz with a spatial resolution at the dam of approximately 0.9 m x 2.0 m. Changes in LOS path length smaller than 0.1mm can be measured. Data were acquired approximately every 2 to 3 weeks over a 7-month period to map the fault trace through the dam faces. Our study exploits the dense record of observations obtained, and the relatively short distance of the radar to the dam to minimize atmospheric affects. We investigate how the deformation evolves in time and the orientation of fault through the dam, including the strike and dip as measured along the dam surface. Our results show rates consistent with GPS data and regional satellite observations, but produce a much more detailed map of the fault on the dam than possible with GPS or

  8. Evaluation of Arching Action Generated in the Backfill between Outlet Conduit and Existing Embankment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOBAYASHI, Noriyuki; MOCHIDA, Junya; SUMIDA, Yutaro; YOSHITAKE, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    .... This phenomenon is called arching action and causes a large reduction of stress. Consequently, the backfill under the arch becomes a weak point in the structure and poses a risk of hydraulic fracturing...

  9. The surgical importance of an axillary arch in sentinel node biopsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridgway, P F

    2011-03-01

    When Carl Langer described the aberrant axillary arch in 1846 its relevance in sentinel node biopsy (SNB) surgery could not have been contemplated. The authors define an incidence and elucidate relevance of the arch in SNB of the axilla.

  10. Endocrine-disruptor molecular responses, occurrence of intersex and gonado-histopathological changes in tilapia species from a tropical freshwater dam (Awba Dam) in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeogun, Aina O.; Onibonoje, Kolawole; Ibor, Oju R.; Omiwole, Roseline A.; Chukwuka, Azubuike V.; Ugwumba, Alex O.; Ugwumba, Adiaha A.A. [Department of Zoology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Arukwe, Augustine, E-mail: arukwe@bio.ntnu.no [Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-05-15

    showed a high prevalence of intersex (34.8%), involving phenotypic males and females of both species. Analysis of sediment contaminant levels revealed that As, Cd, Pb, Hg and Ni (heavy metals), monobutyltin cation, 4-iso-nonyphenol and PCB congeners (138, 153 and 180) were significantly higher in Awba Dam, compared to the reference site. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that fish variables were positively correlated with sediment contaminant burden at Awba Dam, indicating that the observed endocrine disruptive responses are associated with contaminant concentrations. Overall, the occurrence of intersex and elevated expressions of Vtg and Zrp in male fish, suggest that the measured contaminants were eliciting severe endocrine disruptive effects in Awba Dam biota, which is an important source of domestic water supply and fisheries for the University of Ibadan community.

  11. Deformation Monitoring and Bathymetry Analyses in Rock-Fill Dams, a Case Study at Ataturk Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Y.; Bilgi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey has 595 dams constructed between 1936 and 2013 for the purposes of irrigation, flood control, hydroelectric energy and drinking water. A major portion of the dam basins in Turkey are deprived of vegetation and have slope topography on near surrounding area. However, landscaping covered with forest around the dam basin is desirable for erosion control. In fact; the dams, have basins deprived of vegetation, fill up quickly due to sediment transport. Erosion control and forestation are important factors, reducing the sediment, to protect the water basins of the dams and increase the functioning life of the dams. The functioning life of dams is as important as the investment and construction. Nevertheless, in order to provide safety of human life living around, well planned monitoring is essential for dams. Dams are very large and critical structures and they demand the use or application of precise measuring systems. Some basic physical data are very important for assessing the safety and performance of dams. These are movement, water pressure, seepage, reservoir and tail-water elevations, local seismic activities, total pressure, stress and strain, internal concrete temperature, ambient temperature and precipitation. Monitoring is an essential component of the dam after construction and during operation and must en­able the timely detection of any behavior that could deteriorate the dam, potentially result in its shutdown or failure. Considering the time and labor consumed by long-term measurements, processing and analysis of measured data, importance of the small structural motions at regular intervals could be comprehended. This study provides some information, safety and the techniques about the deformation monitoring of the dams, dam safety and related analysis. The case study is the deformation measurements of Atatürk Dam in Turkey which is the 6th largest dam of world considering the filling volume of embankment. Brief information is given about the

  12. Arch-Axis Coefficient Optimization of Long-Span Deck-Type Concrete-Filled Steel Tubular Arch Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q. J.; Wan, S.; Liu, H. C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper is based on Nanpuxi super major bridge which is under construction and starts from Wencheng Zhejiang province to Taishun highway. A finite element model of the whole bridge is constructed using Midas Civil finite element software. The most adverse load combination in the specification is taken into consideration to determine the method of calculating the arch-axis coefficient of long-span deck-type concrete-filled steel tubular arch bridge. By doing this, this paper aims at providing references for similar engineering projects.

  13. 75 FR 22758 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Dam Safety Assurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... the Federal action to remediate seismic, seepage, and hydrologic dam safety concerns at the Martis... existing seismic, seepage, and hydrologic issues. Compounding this risk is the large population downstream... inadequate; d. The site is in a high seismic zone and it is probable that the dam and spillway are...

  14. Reliability and Correlation of Static and Dynamic Foot Arch Measurement in a Healthy Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Timo; Zech, Astrid; Wegscheider, Karl; Lezius, Susanne; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Sehner, Susanne; Hollander, Karsten

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of the medial longitudinal foot arch in children is a controversial topic, as there are many different methods without a definite standard procedure. The purpose of this study was to 1) investigate intraday and interrater reliability regarding dynamic arch index and static arch height, 2) explore the correlation between both arch indices, and 3) examine the variation of the medial longitudinal arch at two different times of the day. Eighty-six children (mean ± SD age, 8.9 ± 1.9 years) participated in the study. Dynamic footprint data were captured with a pedobarographic platform. For static arch measurements, a specially constructed caliper was used to assess heel-to-toe length and dorsum height. A mixed model was established to determine reliability and variation. Reliability was found to be excellent for the static arch height index in sitting (intraday, 0.90; interrater, 0.80) and standing positions (0.88 and 0.85) and for the dynamic arch index (both 1.00). There was poor correlation between static and dynamic assessment of the medial longitudinal arch (standing dynamic arch index, r = -0.138; sitting dynamic arch index, r = -0.070). Static measurements were found to be significantly influenced by the time of day (P static arch height index is influenced by gender (P = .004), whereas dynamic arch index is influenced by side (P = .011) and body mass index (P static foot measurements are reliable for medial longitudinal foot arch assessment in children. The variation of static arch measurements during the day has to be kept in mind. For clinical purposes, static and dynamic arch data should be interpreted separately.

  15. Proliferation of Hydroelectric Dams in the Andean Amazon and Implications for Andes-Amazon Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.

    2012-01-01

    Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1) There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2) There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3) Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics. PMID:22529979

  16. Proliferation of hydroelectric dams in the Andean Amazon and implications for Andes-Amazon connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Finer

    Full Text Available Due to rising energy demands and abundant untapped potential, hydropower projects are rapidly increasing in the Neotropics. This is especially true in the wet and rugged Andean Amazon, where regional governments are prioritizing new hydroelectric dams as the centerpiece of long-term energy plans. However, the current planning for hydropower lacks adequate regional and basin-scale assessment of potential ecological impacts. This lack of strategic planning is particularly problematic given the intimate link between the Andes and Amazonian flood plain, together one of the most species rich zones on Earth. We examined the potential ecological impacts, in terms of river connectivity and forest loss, of the planned proliferation of hydroelectric dams across all Andean tributaries of the Amazon River. Considering data on the full portfolios of existing and planned dams, along with data on roads and transmission line systems, we developed a new conceptual framework to estimate the relative impacts of all planned dams. There are plans for 151 new dams greater than 2 MW over the next 20 years, more than a 300% increase. These dams would include five of the six major Andean tributaries of the Amazon. Our ecological impact analysis classified 47% of the potential new dams as high impact and just 19% as low impact. Sixty percent of the dams would cause the first major break in connectivity between protected Andean headwaters and the lowland Amazon. More than 80% would drive deforestation due to new roads, transmission lines, or inundation. We conclude with a discussion of three major policy implications of these findings. 1 There is a critical need for further strategic regional and basin scale evaluation of dams. 2 There is an urgent need for a strategic plan to maintain Andes-Amazon connectivity. 3 Reconsideration of hydropower as a low-impact energy source in the Neotropics.

  17. Effects of a three-dimensional bimetric maxillary distalizing arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçem, T T; Yüksel, S; Okay, C; Gülşen, A

    2000-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dental effects of a three-dimensional (3D) bimetric maxillary distalizing arch. The Wilson rapid molar distalization appliance for Class II molar correction was used in 14 patients (10 girls and four boys with a mean age of 12.18 years). The open coil springs were activated with bent Omega stops and Class II intermaxillary elastics. The mandibular anchorage was gained by a 0.016 x 0.016 utility arch with a 3D lingual arch or a lip bumper with a standard lingual arch. The lateral cephalograms taken before and after treatment formed the material of the research. A Wilcoxon test was used to statistically evaluate the treatment effects. The results showed that the distal tipping of the maxillary first and second molars, and first and second premolars and canines were statistically significant. Significant distal movement occurred in all posterior and canine teeth. The maxillary first molar distalization was found to be 3.5 mm. The maxillary incisor showed significant proclination and protrusion. The decrease in overbite was found to be statistically significant. The mandibular plane angle significantly increased by a mean of 0.5 mm. In addition, significant soft tissue changes were observed.

  18. Knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch (SDA) therapy in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: In this cross‑sectional study, self‑designed‑structured questionnaires were distributed among specialists (SP), residents (RES), and ...

  19. Knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-03

    Aug 3, 2015 ... Objective: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch (SDA) therapy in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, self-designed-structured questionnaires were distributed among specialists (SP), residents ...

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of cases. Key words: Attitude, dentist, knowledge, shortened dental arch. Date of Acceptance: 03-Aug-2015. Address for correspondence: Dr. F Vohra,. Department of Prosthetic Dental Science, College ... Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University Technology MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia. Access this article online.

  1. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@med.uni-marburg.de [University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Philipps University of Marburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M., E-mail: anneke.damberg@rwth-aachen.de [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  2. “Bowstring” Arches in Langer System Without Wind Bracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răcănel Ionuţ Radu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arch bridges are slender structures and can be efficiently used in the range of medium to large spans. These structures have an improved aesthetic aspect and in the same time a low construction height, with obvious advantages regarding reduced costs in the infrastructuers and their foundations.

  3. Oil migration conditions within the Tatar arch and Melekesskiy depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kafichev, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Within the Tatar arch and the Melekesskiy depression, there were and are conditions for vertical migration of oil from the Devonian deposits into the overlying rocks of the Carboniferous and Permian. This explains the close qualities of oil in the region. The oil pools could be found in any level where there are the necessary conditions for their preservation.

  4. Stimulation model for dental arch shapes | Pokhariyal | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stimulation model for dental arch shapes. GP Pokhariyal, CA Moturi, J Hassanali. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  5. Three-Dimensional Stiffness of the Carpal Arch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n = 8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4 ± 4.6 N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.5 N/mm (p articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist's three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  6. Masticatory efficiency of shortened dental arch subjects with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the masticatory efficiency in subjects with shortened dental arch (SDA) before and after restoration with removable partial denture (RPD). Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried out on 36 consecutive patients. The subjects were asked to chew 5 g of ...

  7. Reduction and fixation of unstable fractures of the zygomatic arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sample which consist of 10 patients of both genders with fractures in the zygomatic arch. The collection instrument included a specific sheet with data concerning the patient's age, cause, side of the fracture, type of treatment performed, recurrence and presence of lesions in the facial nerve. The radiographic ...

  8. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Habertheuer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP. Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data.

  9. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Maxillary_arch [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: DNS.Emb.05.AllAg.Maxillary_arch_junction [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Maxillary_arch_junction [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Maxillary_arch_junction [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Maxillary_arch_junction [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Geophysics Methods in Electrometric Assessment of Dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, V. A., E-mail: davydov-va@yandex.ru; Baidikov, S. V., E-mail: badikek@mail.ru; Gorshkov, V. Yu., E-mail: vitalaa@yandex.ru; Malikov, A. V., E-mail: alex.mal.1986@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Institute, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The safety assessment of hydraulic structures is proposed to be conducted via geoelectric measurements, which are capable of assessing the health of earth dams in their natural bedding without intervention in their structure. Geoelectric measurements are shown as being capable of pinpointing hazardous parts of a dam, including areas of elevated seepage. Applications of such methods are shown for a number of mini-dams in the Sverdlovsk region. Aparameter (effective longitudinal conductivity) that may be used to monitor the safety of hydraulic structures is proposed. Quantitative estimates of this parameter are given in terms of the degree of safely.

  16. Arch of opportunity : Peace country operators expand, undeterred by vandalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2006-01-15

    Activity levels in the Peace River Arch (Para) area of northwest Alberta are continuing despite reports of oilfield vandalism. Devon Energy is continuing its development of the 2 trillion cubic feet of original gas in place in the Dunevegan field and is also planning activities in the Triassic halfway formation in the southwest Arch. At depths between 2500 and 2800 metres, initial gas-flow rates from sour wells range from 2 to 5 million cubic feet per day. Devon is also targeting medium gravity oil in the northwest arch, and light gravity oil in the eastern part of the PRA. EnCana is expected to exit 2005 with production of 350 MMcf of gas equivalent per day from the PRA after having drilled more than 200 wells. A number of juniors are also expressing interest in the area. Galleon Energy has increased its focus in the PRA to 9000 barrels of oil equivalent per day and has separated its strategy into 4 areas: multi-zone drilling; a tight gas resource play; light, sweet crude development; and deep exploration in the arch's southwest corner. Talisman Energy has 4 rigs working in the area and plans to spend $168 million in the Grande Prairie area, with plans to drill 85 wells. Details of the Peace Arch Operators Group were provided, who meet with regulatory bodies like the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB), Alberta Environment, regional governments and the RCMP. A rash of oilfield sabotage in the late 1990s led to notoriety for the area. In October 2005, more sabotage occurred near a drilling rig. Satellite connected, web-interface cameras were installed by Anadarko, the rig's owner. Most people in the area are in favour of development, since oil and gas activity in the area will lead to economic benefits for the region. 3 figs.

  17. CREATIVITY METHODS IN TEACHING THE ARCH-DESIGN STUDIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EIGBEONAN Andrew B.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to search and find methods of fostering creativity or ideas relating to creativity in teaching the arch-design studio. Teaching creativity through its methods will be making the students grounded in designing with creativity ideas and therefore we can have professionals that design and build with satisfaction, safety and complementary. It means we can have real buildings and places that satisfy our clients, the society and in harmony with the environment. Although there are similarities in the curricula of training architects all over the world, but educators go about it in their own convenient and suitable ways and styles. The ideas of creativity have been part of architecture from the onset, but are not deligently applied and also not formally incorporated in the curricula of training. The topic is also very relevant and timely as arch-educators and other stakeholders are of the opinion that something has to be done to improve the ways and methods of training architects, especially the teaching of the arch-design studio with regards to creativity. Through exploration of literature and interviews (physical and telephone call this paper finds methods of stimulating creativity ideas in the teaching of arch-design studio. Some of the methods of motivating creativity found in teaching the arch-design studio are: analogy, metaphors, biomimicry, brainstorming, attribute listing, mental map, TRIZ, restrictions, charrette, browsing, excursions, focus groups, other peoples viewpoints, using crazy ideas, using experts, visualizing a goal, working with dreams and images and giving students design tools such as drawings CAD and model making.

  18. Predictions of total deformations in Jebba main dam by finite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the deformations of the Jebba Main Dam, Jebba Nigeria using the finite element method. The study also evaluated the predicted deformations and compared them with the actual deformations in the dam to identify possible causes of the observed longitudinal crack at the dam crest. The Jebba dam is a ...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Downstream Flooding due to a Flexible-Dam Collapse. The case of "La Esperanza" dam, Hidalgo-México: Implication on Hazard Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areu Rangel, O. S., Sr.; Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Bonasia, R.

    2015-12-01

    The risk of flooding of settlements located downstream of a dam is high due to the large number of people living on natural waterways. Risk assessment of flooding could help in projecting containment and protection in case of a dam-break. For projecting containment and protection works, the assessment should take into account velocities, densities and impact pressure of the water on the villages in risk. Therefore, it is appealing to conduct a series of numerical simulations of downstream flooding including velocity and pressure fields, and their temporal and spatial fluctuations. The present work focuses on the real case of "La Esperanza" dam, located in the state of Hidalgo (Mexico). The dam was built 70 years ago and currently two thirds of its capacity is covered with silt, which implies a very high horizontal thrust. The simulation of the flood due to failure of the dam was carried on using the DualSPHysics code, a new implementation of the mesh-free Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) method. For the boundary conditions, a Digital Elevation Model of the potentially affected area was built using satellite images, the actual bathymetry of the dam and cross sections of the channel. In order to evaluate the hazard posed to the villages located downstream of the dam, different collapse scenarios were simulated, with particular focus on the consequences of the temporal variation of rainfall. Preliminary results show acceleration and dynamic pressure values of water in especially selected areas that are subjected to high risk for the elevated number of inhabitant.

  20. Selective cerebral perfusion with aortic cannulation and short-term hypothermic circulatory arrest in aortic arch reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, R; Saritas, B; Ozker, E; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Balci, S; Altun, D; Turkoz, A

    2014-01-01

    The deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) technique has been used in aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia for many years. However, with the demonstration of the deleterious effects of prolonged DHCA, selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) has started to be used in aortic arch repair. For SCP, perfusion via the innominate artery route is generally preferred (either direct innominate artery cannulation or re-routing of the cannula in the aorta is used). Herein, we describe our technique and the result of arch reconstruction in combination with selective cerebral and myocardial perfusion (SCMP) and short-term total circulatory arrest (TCA) (5-10 min) through ascending aortic cannulation. Thirty-seven cases with aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia accompanying cardiac defects were operated on with SCMP and short TCA in Baskent University Istanbul Research and Training Hospital between January 2007 and Sep 2012. There were 17 cases with ventricular septal defect (VSD)-coarctation with aortic arch hypoplasia (CoAAH), 4 cases of transposition of the great arteries-VSD-CoAAH, 4 cases of Taussing Bing Anomaly-CoAAH, 2 cases complete atrioventricular canal defect-CoAAH, 3 cases single ventricle-CoAAH, 3 cases of type A interruption-VSD, 2 subvalvular aortic stenosis-CoAAH and 2 cases of isolated CoAAH. The aorta was cannulated in the middle of the ascending aorta in all cases. The cross-clamp was applied to the aortic arch distal to either the innominate artery or the left carotid artery. In addition, a side-biting clamp was applied to the descending aorta. The aorta between these two clamps was reconstructed with gluteraldehyde-treated autogeneous pericardium, using SCMP. The proximal arch and distal ascending aorta reconstructions were carried out under short TCA. The mean age of the patients was 2.5 ± 2 months. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times were 144 ± 58 and 43 ± 27 minutes, respectively. The mean SCMP and descending aorta ischemia times were 22

  1. Geomorphic Responses to Check-Dam Removal on a Steep Mountain River in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. W.; Kuo, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Chijiawan creek, located in the mountains of Central Taiwan with a strongly seasonal hydrology, high discharge and sediment yields, is the only habitat in Taiwan of the endangered Formosan landlocked salmon. The 13-m-high No. 1 Check Dam was the largest and lowermost barrier on Chijiawan creek built in 1972. After forty years, the dam had 4-m scouring holes below its foundation, raising a significant risk of dam failure. Due to the safety concern and habitat restoration, the Shei-Pa National Park removed the dam in late May 2011. This paper documents the channel evolution after its removal by focusing on understanding the geomorphic responses to sediment processes and complexities of hydrological processes. We collected the hourly discharge data of a Taipower gaging station located 6.8 km from the dam from 2010 to 2013 and conducted surveys of grain size distributions, cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles, and carried out repeat photography. One month after dam removal, a one-year event (Typhoon Meari) excavated a wedge of sediment from the impoundment. The knickpoint migrated to 200 m upstream from the dam and about 20,000 m3 of sediment had eroded from the reservoir. The profile remained pretty much unchanged until a year after in June 2012. Following a 20-year event (Typhoon Saola) in August 2012, the highest flow after dam removal to present, the channel significantly changed and the knickpoint migrated to 800 m upstream to the dam. The cumulative eroded amount increased to 150,000 m3, about three-thirds of the former impounded sediment. After a 5-year event (Typhoon Soulik) later on in July 2013, the knickpoint did not show much difference and the eroded amount of impounded sediment only increased 10,000 m3. However, the surveyed cross-sections showed obvious channel form changes and thalweg migration. It is likely that the entire bed was mobilized during the earlier high flows (Typhoon Saola), resulting in more easily mobilized bed material. As many

  2. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lucy's flat feet: the relationship between the ankle and rearfoot arching in early hominins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M DeSilva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the Plio-Pleistocene, the hominin foot evolved from a grasping appendage to a stiff, propulsive lever. Central to this transition was the development of the longitudinal arch, a structure that helps store elastic energy and stiffen the foot during bipedal locomotion. Direct evidence for arch evolution, however, has been somewhat elusive given the failure of soft-tissue to fossilize. Paleoanthropologists have relied on footprints and bony correlates of arch development, though little consensus has emerged as to when the arch evolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we present evidence from radiographs of modern humans (n = 261 that the set of the distal tibia in the sagittal plane, henceforth referred to as the tibial arch angle, is related to rearfoot arching. Non-human primates have a posteriorly directed tibial arch angle, while most humans have an anteriorly directed tibial arch angle. Those humans with a posteriorly directed tibial arch angle (8% have significantly lower talocalcaneal and talar declination angles, both measures of an asymptomatic flatfoot. Application of these results to the hominin fossil record reveals that a well developed rearfoot arch had evolved in Australopithecus afarensis. However, as in humans today, Australopithecus populations exhibited individual variation in foot morphology and arch development, and "Lucy" (A.L. 288-1, a 3.18 Myr-old female Australopithecus, likely possessed asymptomatic flat feet. Additional distal tibiae from the Plio-Pleistocene show variation in tibial arch angles, including two early Homo tibiae that also have slightly posteriorly directed tibial arch angles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study finds that the rearfoot arch was present in the genus Australopithecus. However, the female Australopithecus afarensis "Lucy" has an ankle morphology consistent with non-pathological flat-footedness. This study suggests that, as in humans today, there was variation in arch

  4. A Retrospective Study on Immediate Placement of Neoss Implants with Early Loading of Full-Arch Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Peter; Degasperi, Werner; Verrocchi, Damiano; Sennerby, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Full-arch clearances of compromised teeth and placement of implant-supported prostheses is one solution for the prosthetic rehabilitation of partially dentate patients. To retrospectively evaluate treatment outcomes after full clearance, immediate placement, and early loading of full-arch fixed bridges. Fifty-five patients subjected to full clearance and placement of 284 Neoss implants (Bimodal™ and Proactive™, Neoss Ltd, Harrogate, UK) in 29 edentulous maxillae and 26 mandibles for early loading (1 to 3 days) of a provisional full-arch bridge were retrospectively evaluated after 1 to 6 years of loading. Osstell™ measurements (Osstell AB, Göteborg, Sweden) were taken at placement and after 3 to 9 months when the provisional bridge was replaced with a permanent one. Marginal bone levels were measured in intraoral radiographs. All patients (100%) wore a fixed bridge at the time of finalizing the study. A total of 18 failures (6.3%) were encountered during the follow-up, giving an overall cumulative survival rate of 93.7%. All failures occurred in the maxilla (10.6%), and no implants were lost in the mandible. More Bimodal™ (9.0%) than Proactive™ (4.1%) implants failed. Failing implants showed a significantly lower mean primary stability than successful ones (p = .015). Failed cases showed a significantly lower average ISQ for all implants (p = .015) and a marked decrease to the second registration, while successful cases showed and maintained high ISQs. The average bone loss after 1 year was 0.8 ± 0.5 mm. Full-arch clearance of severely diseased teeth followed by immediate placement of Neoss implants, early loading with provisional full-arch bridges, and subsequent permanent bridges is a possible treatment modality for partially dentate patients. Caution with this approach is recommended for the maxilla, as opposed to the mandible. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Dharmic projects, imperial reservoirs, and new temples of India: An historical perspective on dams in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As international attention continues to focus on large dam projects across Asia, it is worth noting that conflicts over the politics of and environmental changes caused by dams in India are not new. Population dislocation, siltation, disease, floods caused by catastrophic dam failure, raised water tables, high costs and low returns-all of these concerns, and others, can be discussed in the context of reservoir projects ten, one hundred, or even one thousand years old. In this paper, I identify some of the major issues in the political ecology of contemporary dam projects and show how these same issues have played out in southern India over the last thousand years, suggesting that historical attention to the cultural and political context of reservoir construction might help us to understand some aspects of contemporary conflicts.

  6. 33 CFR 208.19 - Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Tex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir... Marshall Ford Dam and Reservoir (Mansfield Dam and Lake Travis), Colorado River, Tex. The Secretary of the Interior, through his agent, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) shall operate the Marshall Ford Dam...

  7. After Three Gorges Dam: What have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, J.; Williams, P.; Wong, R.; Kondolf, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    China is at a critical point in its development path. By investing heavily in large-scale infrastructure, the rewards of economic growth weigh against long-term environmental and social costs. The construction of Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest hydroelectric project, began in 1994. Between 2002 and 2010, its 660 kilometer reservoir filled behind a 181 meter dam, displacing at least 1.4 million people and transforming Asia's longest river (the Yangtze) while generating nearly 100 billion kWh/yr of electricity -- 2.85% of China's current electric power usage. As the mega-project progenitor in a cascade of planned dams, the Three Gorges Dam emerges as a test case for how China will plan, execute and mitigate its development pathway and the transformation of its environment. Post-Project Assessments (PPA) provide a systematic, scientific method for improving the practice of environmental management - particularly as they apply to human intervention in river systems. In 2012, the Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning at University of California, Berkeley organized a symposium-based PPA for the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River. Prior to this symposium, the twelve invited Chinese scientists, engineers and economists with recent research on Three Gorges Dam had not had the opportunity to present their evaluations together in an open, public forum. With a 50-year planning horizon, the symposium's five sessions centered on impacts on flows, geomorphology, geologic hazards, the environment and socioeconomic effects. Three Gorges' project goals focused on flood control, hydropower and improved navigation. According to expert research, major changes in sediment budget and flow regime from reservoir operation have significantly reduced sediment discharge into the downstream river and estuary, initiating a series of geomorphic changes with ecological and social impacts. While the dam reduces high flow stages from floods originating above the

  8. Physical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem response:...

  9. Dams life; La vie des barrages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of the annual inspections of French dams in operation (fissures, water oozing, concrete swelling etc..). Only the observations which require a special attention are reported. (J.S.)

  10. Chemical - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem response:...

  11. Biological - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem response:...

  12. Final Design Analysis : Lake Ladora Dam Repair

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is intended to present Rocky Mountain Arsenal with details concerning the remedial repair for Ladora Dam to meet the geotechnical concerns and hydrologic...

  13. Technical bulletin : geotechnical considerations for dam safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The safety of dams requires a thorough understanding of the geotechnical elements of dam design. This technical bulletin outlined methods for conducting geotechnical assessments as part of dam safety analyses. It included an overview of methods for minimizing and control seepage, as well as preventing internal and surface erosion. Geotechnical considerations for foundation, abutments, and reservoir bank slope conditions were also presented. Geotechnical safety assessment techniques were presented for earthfill, embankment, and rockfill dams. Appurtenant structures, reservoir rims, and foundations were examined. Hazards and failure modes included overtopping, internal erosion, slope instability, and earthquake liquefaction. Foundation irregularities and surface erosion assesment methods were presented. Geotechnical considerations for loading conditions, shear strength, discontinuities, compatibilities, foundation permeability, and foundation compressibility were presented along with analysis, design, and remedial considerations. 53 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Repair and Rehabilitation of Dams: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    were grouted. In 1958, the entire downstream face of the dam was resurfaced with gunite, and wrought iron nosing was installed on the gatehouse intake...Cpm (32 gpm), virtually all of which was entering the gallery through vertical roof drains and fissures well above the levels grouted. The concrete...long center con- crete gravity dam contains a 12-m- (40-ft-) long gatehouse structure and a 73.5-m- (41-ft-) long flashboard regulated spillway

  15. Internal erosion under spillway rested on an embankment dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sedghi-Asl

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the mechanism of internal erosion caused in the right abutment of the Shahghasem dam’s spillway. Shahghasem dam is an earthen dam located in Yasouj, in southwest of Iran. A significant hole and pipe have been observed in the corner of the right abutment from upstream view. The foundation is Marlstone, which has low cohesion and susceptible for internal erosion and piping in some conditions. Going through details of the design maps has shown that Lane’s criteria for selecting safe dimensions of the seepage control measures have not been considered properly. A series of the supportive walls are designed to attach to the right part of the spillway in order to increase the length of seepage. The pipe route of the erosion should also be grouted with high quality concrete.

  16. Importance of Field Data for Numerical Modeling to Dam Removal on a Mountain Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, W. C.; Wang, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    In 2011, a 13-m high Chijiawan Dam on Chijiawan Creek was removed due to the safety concern due to aging structure and scoured dam foundation as well as habitat restoration of the endangered Formosan landlocked salmon. Similar to Chijiawan Dam, many dams in Taiwan are located in steep mountainous area with coarser sediment and high sediment yield, and may be removed in the near future. Since the capability of current sediment transport model is insufficient, a systematic planning of field survey and monitoring work can effectively help to decrease data uncertainty in simulation. In this study, we aimed to understand the minimum requirements of data for numerical model to predict channel responses after dam removal, according to the data of pre-project and long term post-project monitoring works from removal of Chijiawan dam. We collected the hourly discharge data of Taipower gaging station located 6.8 km from the dam from 2010 to 2012 and conducted surveys of grain size distributions, cross-sectional and longitudinal profiles. We applied Sedimentation and River Hydraulics (SRH) one-dimensional model to simulate bed elevation changes by different setting of data input, including bed sediment, roughness coefficient, cross-section spacing, and flow discharge. Then, we performed a sensitivity analysis by using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) to evaluate the minimum requirements of data for predicting to dam removal. The RMSE variability of varied setting of bed sediment, roughness coefficient, cross-section spacing, and flow discharge ranged from 0.02 m, 0.17 m, 0.14 m and 0.09 m, respectively. The results highlight that the simulation is sensitive to roughness coefficient, cross-section spacing, and flow discharge, and less sensitive to bed sediment. We anticipate the results will help decision maker to understand the importance of field data in future removals.

  17. Estimating the Volatility of Cocoa Price Return with ARCH and GARCH Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lya Aklimawati

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of market changing as a result of market liberalization have an impact on agricultural commodities price fluctuation. High volatility on cocoa price movement reflect its price and market risk. Because of price and market uncertainty, the market players face some difficulties to make a decision in determining business development. This research was conducted to 1 understand the characteristics of cocoa price movement in cocoa futures trading, and 2analyze cocoa price volatility using ARCH and GARCH type model. Research was carried out by direct observation on the pattern of cocoa price movement in the futures trading and volatility analysis based on secondary data. The data was derived from Intercontinental Exchange ( ICE Futures U.S. Reports. The analysis result showed that GARCH is the best model to predict the value of average cocoa price return volatility, because it meets criteria of three diagnostic checking, which are ARCH-LM test, residual autocorrelation test and residual normality test. Based on the ARCH-LM test, GARCH (1,1did not have heteroscedasticity, because p-value  2 (0.640139and F-statistic (0.640449 were greater than 0.05. Results of residual autocorrelation test indicated that residual value of GARCH (1,1 was random, because the statistic value of Ljung-Box (LBon the 36 th lag is smaller than the statistic value of  2. Whereas, residual normality test concluded the residual of GARCH (1,1 were normally distributed, because AR (29, MA (29, RESID (-1^2, and GARCH (-1 were significant at 5% significance level. Increasing volatility value indicate high potential risk. Price risk can be reduced by managing financial instrument in futures trading such as forward and futures contract, and hedging. The research result also give an insight to the market player for decision making and determining time of hedging. Key words: Volatility, price, cocoa, GARCH, risk, futures trading

  18. Acute Traumatic Aortic Disruption and Right Aortic Arch: A Fatal Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirvan Salaminia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute traumatic aortic disruption occurs after forceful deceleration and usually due to motor accidents. Only 10 % to 15 % reach a treatment facility alive and a highly suspicious state is needed for timely diagnosis. Most time they suffer multiple associated lethal injuries. Asymptomatic and isolated right aortic arch is a rare anomaly of the aorta with a prevalence of 0.5% [3]. Its diagnosis is by radiologic studies. We present this patient to remember that the incidental right aortic arch and disruption may interpreted as the left side mediastinal rotation in radiography and so inadvertently lead to late diagnosis and a futile outcome. A 24-year old man was brought to emergency room following a motor accident. He had Glascow Coma Scale Score: 14-15/15 but with stable vital signs. After primary survey chest radiography, emergency abdominal sonography (eFAST and brain CT scanning were requested. Spiral thoracoabdominal CT was also requested about seven hours after admission and when the patient entered an unstable hemodynamic phase. The primary survey was unremarkable. His chest radiography had left mediastinal rotation, which is opposite to what is seen pathologically in the condition of the traumatic aortic disruption, the right mediastinal rotation. His eFAST and brain CT were normal. The patient remained stable until seven hours after admission when the patient becomes unstable. Massive pleural effusion with aortic disruption and a right aortic arch was seen in thoracoabdominal CT. He transferred to the operation room but arrested during transfer. Massive hemothorax was seen during open cardiac massage. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was unsuccessful. This may raises that in any blunt trauma patient with highly suspicious history for the great vessel injury, it may be better to consider the spiral chest CT scanning as the primary radiologic test for evaluation of the chest trauma and not waste the time or resources with rely simply on a

  19. Estimating flood inundation caused by dam failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocan, N. [Crozier and Associates Inc., Collingwood, ON (Canada); Joy, D.M. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). School of Engineering; Rungis, G. [Grand River Conservation Authority, Cambridge, ON (Canada)

    2006-01-15

    Recent advancements in modelling inundation due to dam failures have allowed easier and more illustrative analyses of potential outcomes. This paper described new model and mapping capabilities available using the HEC-RAS hydraulic model in concert with geographic information systems (GIS). The study area was the upper reaches of Canagagigue Creek and the Woolwich Dam near Elmira, Ontario. A hydraulic analysis of a hypothetical dam failure was developed based on the summer probable maximum flood (PMF) event. Limits extended from Woolwich Dam to downstream of the Town of Elmira. An incoming summer PMF hydrograph was set as the upstream boundary condition in the upstream model. Simulation parameters include simulation time-step; implicit weighting factor; water surface calculation tolerance; and output calculation interval. Peak flows were presented, as well as corresponding flood inundation results through the Town of Elmira. The hydraulic model results were exported to a GIS in order to develop inundation maps for emergency management planning. Results from post-processing included inundation maps for each of the simulated time-steps as well as an inundation animation for the duration of the dam breach. It was concluded that the modelling tools presented in the study can be applied to other dam safety assessment projects in order to develop effective and efficient emergency preparedness plans through public consultation and the establishment of impact zones. 1 tab., 2 figs.

  20. Global phosphorus retention by river damming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maavara, Taylor; Parsons, Christopher T; Ridenour, Christine; Stojanovic, Severin; Dürr, Hans H; Powley, Helen R; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2015-12-22

    More than 70,000 large dams have been built worldwide. With growing water stress and demand for energy, this number will continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Damming greatly modifies the ecological functioning of river systems. In particular, dam reservoirs sequester nutrient elements and, hence, reduce downstream transfer of nutrients to floodplains, lakes, wetlands, and coastal marine environments. Here, we quantify the global impact of dams on the riverine fluxes and speciation of the limiting nutrient phosphorus (P), using a mechanistic modeling approach that accounts for the in-reservoir biogeochemical transformations of P. According to the model calculations, the mass of total P (TP) trapped in reservoirs nearly doubled between 1970 and 2000, reaching 42 Gmol y(-1), or 12% of the global river TP load in 2000. Because of the current surge in dam building, we project that by 2030, about 17% of the global river TP load will be sequestered in reservoir sediments. The largest projected increases in TP and reactive P (RP) retention by damming will take place in Asia and South America, especially in the Yangtze, Mekong, and Amazon drainage basins. Despite the large P retention capacity of reservoirs, the export of RP from watersheds will continue to grow unless additional measures are taken to curb anthropogenic P emissions.

  1. Paddle River Dam : review of probable maximum flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. [UMA Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Neill, C.R. [Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The Paddle River Dam was built in northern Alberta in the mid 1980s for flood control. According to the 1999 Canadian Dam Association (CDA) guidelines, this 35 metre high, zoned earthfill dam with a spillway capacity sized to accommodate a probable maximum flood (PMF) is rated as a very high hazard. At the time of design, it was estimated to have a peak flow rate of 858 centimetres. A review of the PMF in 2002 increased the peak flow rate to 1,890 centimetres. In light of a 2007 revision of the CDA safety guidelines, the PMF was reviewed and the inflow design flood (IDF) was re-evaluated. This paper discussed the levels of uncertainty inherent in PMF determinations and some difficulties encountered with the SSARR hydrologic model and the HEC-RAS hydraulic model in unsteady mode. The paper also presented and discussed the analysis used to determine incremental damages, upon which a new IDF of 840 m{sup 3}/s was recommended. The paper discussed the PMF review, modelling methodology, hydrograph inputs, and incremental damage of floods. It was concluded that the PMF review, involving hydraulic routing through the valley bottom together with reconsideration of the previous runoff modeling provides evidence that the peak reservoir inflow could reasonably be reduced by approximately 20 per cent. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 8 figs.

  2. Butterfly Arch: A Device for Precise Controlling of the Upper Molars in Three Planes of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nikkerdar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-oral appliances such as transpalatal arch and Nance appliance fail to resist against forces that tend to loosen the anchorage. The infirmity arises due to the long lever arm and the mesial force that is perpendicular to the long axis of the appliance. The butterfly arch is presented here as an intra-oral appliance that withstands the mesially directed forces with a mechanism that puts strain on a stiff wire along its long axis. The unique shape of the butterfly arch is advantageous in maximum anchorage cases, cases in which arch width preservation is critical and cases with a vertical growth pattern. With the aid of the butterfly arch, clinical concerns such as patient cooperation, wearing extra-oral appliances, complicated mechanics in extraction cases and control of the arch length, arch width and vertical dimension would be greatly diminished.

  3. Comparative analysis of the construction solution variants for flat arch coverings of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibragimov Aleksandr Mayorovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arch structures of long span buildings’ coverings are more beneficial in respect to material expenses, than beam and frame systems. Constructive schemes of roof frameworks of arch coverings are diverse, which means their operation under loading differs much. The authors offer a number of construction solutions for flat arch coverings of long span buildings. The comparative analysis of these construction solutions is presented. The operation of radial link arch is observed. The arch consists of discontinuous top chord and radial bowstring under the single load (uniformly distributed and concentrated in nods with different spans and rises. The problem of radial link arch optimization is solved in dependence with arising forces and rise. The optimal camber of arch was found. In further works the authors plan to analyze spans more than 36 meters and solve the problem in case of asymmetrical loadings.

  4. Epigenetic Influence of Dam Methylation on Gene Expression and Attachment in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Stacy Ann-Marie; Brown, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most frequently encountered infections in clinical practice globally. Predominantly a burden among female adults and infants, UTIs primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in high morbidity and fiscal health strains. During pathogenesis, colonization of the urinary tract via fimbrial adhesion to mucosal cells is the most critical point in infection and has been linked to DNA methylation. Furthermore, with continuous exposure to antibiotics as the standard therapeutic strategy, UPEC has evolved to become highly adaptable in circumventing the effect of antimicrobial agents and host defenses. Hence, the need for alternative treatment strategies arises. Since differential DNA methylation is observed as a critical precursor to virulence in various pathogenic bacteria, this body of work sought to assess the influence of the DNA adenine methylase (dam) gene on gene expression and cellular adhesion in UPEC and its potential as a therapeutic target. To monitor the influence of dam on attachment and FQ resistance, selected UPEC dam mutants created via one-step allelic exchange were transformed with cloned qnrA and dam complement plasmid for comparative analysis of growth rate, antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm formation, gene expression, and mammalian cell attachment. The absence of DNA methylation among dam mutants was apparent. Varying deficiencies in cell growth, antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, alongside low-level increases in gene expression (recA and papI), and adherence to HEK-293 and HTB-9 mammalian cells were also detected as a factor of SOS induction to result in increased mutability. Phenotypic characteristics of parental strains were restored in dam complement strains. Dam's vital role in DNA methylation and gene expression in local UPEC isolates was confirmed. Similarly to dam-deficient Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), these findings suggest unsuccessful therapeutic use of

  5. Negligible contribution of reservoir dams to organic and inorganic transport in the lower Mimi River, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukazawa, Kei; Kihara, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    Rivers fulfill an essential ecological role by forming networks for material transport from upland forests to coastal areas. The way in which dams affect the organic and inorganic cycles in such systems is not well understood. Herein, we investigated the longitudinal profiles of the various components of the water chemistry across three cascade dams in Japan: the Yamasubaru Dam, Saigou Dam, and Ohuchibaru Dam, which are situated along the sediment-productive Mimi River in different flow conditions. We analyzed the following water quality components: suspended solids (SS), turbidity, total iron (TFe), dissolved iron (DFe), total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), humic substance (HS), and major ionic components (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42-) in the downstream channels of the three dams during the low-intermediate-flow and high-flow events from 2012 to 2014. We estimated hourly loads of each component using hourly turbidity data and discharge data (i.e., L-Q model) separately, and the results are integrated to estimate the annual fluxes. The annual fluxes between the methods were compared to verify predictability of the conventional L-Q models. Annual flux of TOC, TN, DFe, and HS estimated by the turbidity displayed similar values, whereas the flux of SS, TFe, and TP tended to increase downstream of the dams. Among the dams, estimated flux proportions for TP and TFe were higher during high-flow events (74%-94%). Considering geographic conditions (e.g., absence of major tributary between the dams), the result implies that accumulated TP and TFe in the reservoirs may be flushed and transported downstream with SS over the short height dams during flood events. Assuming this process, the reservoir dams probably make only a fractional contribution to the organic and inorganic transport in the catchment studied. The percent flux errors for SS, TFe, and TP fluxes ranged from -7.2% to -97% (except for the TP flux in 2013), which

  6. Wet-snow avalanche interaction with a deflecting dam: field observations and numerical simulations in a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sovilla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In avalanche-prone areas, deflecting dams are widely used to divert avalanches away from endangered objects. In recent years, their effectiveness has been questioned when several large and multiple avalanches have overrun such dams.

    In 2008, we were able to observe a large wet-snow avalanche, characterized by an high water content, that interacted with a deflecting dam and overflowed it at its lower end. To evaluate the dam's performance, we carried out an airborne laser scanning campaign immediately after the avalanche. This data, together with a video sequence made during the avalanche descent, provided a unique data set to study the dynamics of a wet dense snow avalanche and its flow behavior along a deflecting dam.

    To evaluate the effect of the complex flow field of the avalanche along the dam and to provide a basis for discussion of the residual risk, we performed numerical simulations using a two-dimensional dense snow avalanche dynamics model with entrainment.

    In comparison to dry dense snow avalanches, we found that wet-snow avalanches, with high water content, seem to be differently influenced by the local small-scale topography roughness. Rough terrain close to the dam deflected the flow to produce abrupt impacts with the dam. At the impact sites, instability waves were generated and increased the already large flow depths. The complex flow dynamics around the dam may produce large, local snow deposits. Furthermore, the high water content in the snow may decrease the avalanche internal friction angle, inducing wet-snow avalanches to spread further laterally than dry-snow avalanches.

    Based on our analysis, we made recommendations for designing deflecting dams and for residual risk analysis to take into account the effects of wet-snow avalanche flow.

  7. Dental dam clamp adaptation method on carved gypsum cast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazacu, NCE

    2014-01-01

    Rationale. Dental Dam is the safest and most efficient isolation technique in endodontics and restorative dentistry, but it also used in esthetics, orthodontics, prosthetics, pedodontics and periodontology (for teeth immobilization). While in most cases the standard clamps are efficient, in some clinical situations clamp adaptation is mandatory in order to assure a tight contact on the tooth. Objective. The purpose of this study is to list the elements of the clamp, which should be modified in order to assure a secure constriction of the clamp on the anchor tooth, by using the carved gypsum cast method. Methods and Results. 100 patients were examined, diagnosed and treated for various diagnoses like simple decay, gangrene, chronic apical periodontitis, and endodontic retreatments. The clamps used in this study were produced by Hu-Friedy, Hygenic, KKD, SDI, Hager & Werken. In 10 cases, the anchor tooth did not provide enough stability to the standard clamp – as provided by the producer. Therefore, we have done some adjustments to some of the elements of the clamp: the arch, the wings, the plateau, the active area, and the contact points. In 6 cases, major clamp adaptations on carved gypsum cast were imperative. Discussion. The classic clamps cannot provide a grip to be enough in all the clinical cases due to the huge variety and position and implantation of the anchor teeth. Therefore, in such situations, the clamps should be adapted in order to provide stability and assure the safe isolation during the treatment. The modified clamps will be useful in similar cases, so they must be kept. PMID:25713609

  8. Assessing the Ecological and Geomorphic Context of Dam Removals in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Foley, M.; Torgersen, C. E.; Major, J. J.; Anderson, C.; Connolly, P. J.; Shafroth, P. B.; Evans, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Dams have been a fundamental part of our national agenda over the past two hundred years; recently, however, dam removal has emerged as a significant national strategy and more than 1,100 dams have been removed since ca. 1970. A recent national assessment revealed that only 130 of these removals had any ecological or geomorphic assessments, and only 35 included both. To better assess the current state of dam-removal science, we utilized an extensive data set compiled by American Rivers, which contained geospatial attributes of more than 850 dams removed in the U.S. We used this geospatial information in combination with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHDPlus) and other watershed-scale assessment interfaces that provided data on eco-regions, national land cover attributes, and cumulative watershed disturbance to determine the geographic, ecological, and geomorphic context of removed dams. The highest concentration of removed dams is in the Northeast and Upper Midwest. Nationally, they have been removed mainly from 1st order streams, but more than 40% are on 3rd and 4th order streams. Geomorphically, most removals are in lowland settings with 87% at elevations eco-region classes. Watershed scale assessments indicate most (37%) removals are in watersheds with the lowest cumulative disturbance scores, showing removals have made high-quality habitat available. Principal component analyses showed a strong correlation of removals based on low slope, low elevation, large watershed area, and low cumulative disturbance. Many of the studied removals also have these characteristics, suggesting that our understanding of responses to dam removals is based on a limited range of ecological and geomorphic settings, which limits predictive capacity in other environmental settings.

  9. Laryngopharyngeal dysfunction independent of vocal fold palsy in infants after aortic arch interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ryan R; Carver, Stephanie W; Schmidt, Richard; Keskeny, Heather; Hoch, Jeanine; Pizarro, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Laryngopharyngeal dysfunction contributes significantly to morbidity, length of stay, and increased resource utilization after aortic arch interventions in infants. Previous studies have focused on postoperative evaluation of selected symptomatic patients with vocal fold palsy (VFP). A prospective evaluation of laryngopharyngeal function was undertaken to assess and determine its importance in perioperative management. A routine preoperative and postoperative assessment was done by flexible fiber optic laryngoscopy, oral feeding evaluation (OFE), and modified barium swallow (mBS) on 101 infants undergoing 113 procedures on the aortic arch (2003 to 2011). The primary outcome was the ability to take full nutrition orally at discharge. Preoperative OFE was abnormal in 33.3% of patients. VFP occurred in 39.3%, 30 of 57 patients had an abnormal OFE. Factors predictive of abnormal postoperative feeding evaluation included genetic syndromes (odds ratio [OR], 5.1; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-23.2) and preoperative mechanical ventilation (OR, 24.1; 95% CI, 2.5-226.6). An abnormal postoperative OFE was highly predictive (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 1.8-27.1) of an abnormal postoperative mBS. There was a trend toward decreased long-term survival among patients who were intubated or had an abnormal preoperative feeding evaluation (P = .07). Postoperative laryngopharyngeal dysfunction is common among infants undergoing aortic arch interventions, and is largely independent of vocal fold function. Preoperative evaluation demonstrates significant intrinsic abnormalities in sensory and motor function. Routine, comprehensive, multimodality preoperative and postoperative evaluation is required to identify at-risk children and reduce morbidity and resource utilization. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antenatal evaluation of fetal interrupted aortic arch type B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Babacan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Interruption of the aortic arch (IAA is a rare, severe form of congenital heart defect characterized by complete anatomical discontinuity between two adjacent segments of the aortic arch. The data on the features and outcomes of fetal IAA are limited. Three anatomical types have been described according to the site of interruption. The current recommendations for screening on the obstetric fetal anomaly scan include identification of a 4-chamber view, all 4 valves, and the outflow tracts, all of which can appear to be normal to the ultrasonographer in fetuses with conotruncal anomalies. Although the identification of IAA on a prenatal echocardiogram can be challenging, a number of anatomic features can facilitate the diagnosis. We aim to present the features and outcome of a case of IAA type B referred to our centre in the light of literatures.

  11. Brokenness / Transformation: Reflections on Academic Critiques of L'Arche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline Burghardt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available L'Arche, an international federation of communities for adults with intellectual disabilities, has been critiqued by disability studies scholars throughout its fifty-year history due to its religiosity, its apparent lack of a rigorous stance on the need to address policy concerning people with disabilities, its philosophy concerning disability's meanings, and features of its language and discourse.  I address these concerns as someone who is both an academic and a long-term member of a L'Arche community. While there is historically limited and uneasy interaction between these two communities, I suggest there is potential for mutual and worthwhile exchange from theoretical and practical perspectives.

  12. Archéologie de l’extermination à Sobibor

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin, Boris; Charpentier, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cet entretien développe celui que nous avons amorcé lors d’un épisode du « Salon noir » sur France-Culture. On s’interroge sur les enjeux conservatoires, mémoriels et scientifiques d’une archéologie de la Shoah. On y décèle aussi des fondements émotionnels concernant tous les archéologues dans leur pratique : voilà pourquoi nous témoignons. This article furthers a discussion which began during an episode of the « Salon noir » radio program on « France-Culture ».  Issues of conservation, me...

  13. Impacts of Dams and Global Warming on Fish Biodiversity in the Indo-Burma Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Yuichi; Dudgeon, David; Nam, So; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Grudpan, Chaiwut; Grudpan, Jarungjit; Magtoon, Wichan; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Praxaysonbath, Bounthob; Sato, Tomoyuki; Shibukawa, Koichi; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Suvarnaraksha, Apinun; Tanaka, Wataru; Thach, Phanara; Tran, Dac Dinh; Yamashita, Tomomi; Utsugi, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    Both hydropower dams and global warming pose threats to freshwater fish diversity. While the extent of global warming may be reduced by a shift towards energy generation by large dams in order to reduce fossil-fuel use, such dams profoundly modify riverine habitats. Furthermore, the threats posed by dams and global warming will interact: for example, dams constrain range adjustments by fishes that might compensate for warming temperatures. Evaluation of their combined or synergistic effects is thus essential for adequate assessment of the consequences of planned water-resource developments. We made projections of the responses of 363 fish species within the Indo-Burma global biodiversity hotspot to the separate and joint impacts of dams and global warming. The hotspot encompasses the Lower Mekong Basin, which is the world's largest freshwater capture fishery. Projections for 81 dam-building scenarios revealed progressive impacts upon projected species richness, habitable area, and the proportion of threatened species as generating capacity increased. Projections from 126 global-warming scenarios included a rise in species richness, a reduction in habitable area, and an increase in the proportion of threatened species; however, there was substantial variation in the extent of these changes among warming projections. Projections from scenarios that combined the effects of dams and global warming were derived either by simply adding the two threats, or by combining them in a synergistic manner that took account of the likelihood that habitat shifts under global warming would be constrained by river fragmentation. Impacts on fish diversity under the synergistic projections were 10-20% higher than those attributable to additive scenarios, and were exacerbated as generating capacity increased-particularly if CO2 emissions remained high. The impacts of dams, especially those on river mainstreams, are likely to be greater, more predictable and more immediately pressing for

  14. Impacts of Dams and Global Warming on Fish Biodiversity in the Indo-Burma Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, So; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Grudpan, Chaiwut; Grudpan, Jarungjit; Magtoon, Wichan; Musikasinthorn, Prachya; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Praxaysonbath, Bounthob; Sato, Tomoyuki; Shimatani, Yukihiro; Suvarnaraksha, Apinun; Tanaka, Wataru; Thach, Phanara; Tran, Dac Dinh; Yamashita, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Both hydropower dams and global warming pose threats to freshwater fish diversity. While the extent of global warming may be reduced by a shift towards energy generation by large dams in order to reduce fossil-fuel use, such dams profoundly modify riverine habitats. Furthermore, the threats posed by dams and global warming will interact: for example, dams constrain range adjustments by fishes that might compensate for warming temperatures. Evaluation of their combined or synergistic effects is thus essential for adequate assessment of the consequences of planned water-resource developments. We made projections of the responses of 363 fish species within the Indo-Burma global biodiversity hotspot to the separate and joint impacts of dams and global warming. The hotspot encompasses the Lower Mekong Basin, which is the world’s largest freshwater capture fishery. Projections for 81 dam-building scenarios revealed progressive impacts upon projected species richness, habitable area, and the proportion of threatened species as generating capacity increased. Projections from 126 global-warming scenarios included a rise in species richness, a reduction in habitable area, and an increase in the proportion of threatened species; however, there was substantial variation in the extent of these changes among warming projections. Projections from scenarios that combined the effects of dams and global warming were derived either by simply adding the two threats, or by combining them in a synergistic manner that took account of the likelihood that habitat shifts under global warming would be constrained by river fragmentation. Impacts on fish diversity under the synergistic projections were 10–20% higher than those attributable to additive scenarios, and were exacerbated as generating capacity increased—particularly if CO2 emissions remained high. The impacts of dams, especially those on river mainstreams, are likely to be greater, more predictable and more immediately

  15. Impacts of Dams and Global Warming on Fish Biodiversity in the Indo-Burma Hotspot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Kano

    Full Text Available Both hydropower dams and global warming pose threats to freshwater fish diversity. While the extent of global warming may be reduced by a shift towards energy generation by large dams in order to reduce fossil-fuel use, such dams profoundly modify riverine habitats. Furthermore, the threats posed by dams and global warming will interact: for example, dams constrain range adjustments by fishes that might compensate for warming temperatures. Evaluation of their combined or synergistic effects is thus essential for adequate assessment of the consequences of planned water-resource developments. We made projections of the responses of 363 fish species within the Indo-Burma global biodiversity hotspot to the separate and joint impacts of dams and global warming. The hotspot encompasses the Lower Mekong Basin, which is the world's largest freshwater capture fishery. Projections for 81 dam-building scenarios revealed progressive impacts upon projected species richness, habitable area, and the proportion of threatened species as generating capacity increased. Projections from 126 global-warming scenarios included a rise in species richness, a reduction in habitable area, and an increase in the proportion of threatened species; however, there was substantial variation in the extent of these changes among warming projections. Projections from scenarios that combined the effects of dams and global warming were derived either by simply adding the two threats, or by combining them in a synergistic manner that took account of the likelihood that habitat shifts under global warming would be constrained by river fragmentation. Impacts on fish diversity under the synergistic projections were 10-20% higher than those attributable to additive scenarios, and were exacerbated as generating capacity increased-particularly if CO2 emissions remained high. The impacts of dams, especially those on river mainstreams, are likely to be greater, more predictable and more

  16. Re-engineering the state, awakening the nation: Dams, islamist modernity and nationalist politics in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimuna Mohamud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates how and why dam building has fulfilled a crucial role in hegemonic projects of elite consolidation and nation-building. By drawing on the case of Sudan’s Dam Programme and the associated propaganda the Khartoum government has produced, we show how the dams have not just served to materially restructure the Sudanese political economy but have also been essential in the attempted rekindling of the identity of both the regime and the country. Massive investment in hydro-infrastructure dovetailed with the political rebalancing of an authoritarian system in crisis, turning dam-builders into nation-builders: the message of the dams as midwife to a pious, prosperous and revitalised Sudan allowed it to reconcile the nationalism of its military and security wing with the enduring ambitions for transformation of its Islamist base. Dam building in Sudan, as elsewhere, has thus meant a physical redrawing of the landscape and intensified rent creation and seeking but also embodies a high modernist narrative that matches the interests and worldviews of very different constituencies. This, we argue, helps explain its salience in earlier periods of state-building and nation-building, as well as contemporarily

  17. Investigation of quality of storage dam in Ilam, identifying of pollutant resources and pollutants attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moayed Avazpour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Water quality of dam storage is highly affected by upstream environment and basin. Regarding other conducted studies, there exist various reasons such as some studies and general monitoring of dams which cause some main problems including salinity, chemical and microbial pollution eutrophication, and sedimentation. Chame-Gerdalan storage dam in Ilam Province is one of the storages which have many environmental issues because of discharge upstream rural wastewaters, animal excreta, agricultural drainage, and leachate. The aim of this study is to signify the quality of Ilam’s storage dam and also to recognize the pollutant resources and to analyze the pollutants’ behavior at different times and sites in order to determine dam properties for agricultural and domestic usages. Regarding the importance of the topic, the present study (in the year 2012 is based on the collected information of water quality of the basin, recognition of pollutant resources and measurement of qualitative parameters such as temperature, TDS, EC, BOD5, COD, nitrogen, phosphor, and pH in seven periods of time (from May to November. The results show that the total increase in the concentration of all variables along the basin are over double, in particular, Nitrat, Sulfat, BOD, and COD. After analyzing data with some water quality indexes, we analyzed water quality of the storage and some strategies were applied in order to control the effect decrease in the dam storage which, a management program was presented to improve water quality.

  18. A virtual reality approach to public protection and emergency preparedness planning in dam safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assaf, H.; Hartford, D.N.D. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2002-12-01

    BC Hydro has developed a new approach to analyze and assess the consequences of dam emergencies on human communities. The Life Safety Model (LSM) was designed to enable the electric utility to provide different response agencies with realistic dynamic models of a wide range of emergency scenarios that require a response in the event of a dam failure. LSM is pertinent to public safety because it enables response agencies to develop emergency plans and provides insight into the design of risk mitigation measures through its ability to simulate high risk locations. The model can create representations of downstream communities in potentially impacted areas and can geographically illustrate the potential dam breach events with reference to flood propagation and the movement of people on foot or in vehicles. A wide range of downstream dam operation conditions is presented. LSM merges state of the art technologies and recent scientific advances in environmental simulation and modelling, GIS, artificial intelligence, real time modelling of 2-dimensional dam breach flooding scenarios, structural reliability analysis, and human behaviour characterisation. This paper describes the modular architecture of the model and demonstrates how to generate the vital information needed to characterize a dam failure emergency. 2 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  19. Geophysical investigation of earth dam using the electrical tomography resistivity technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Lemos Camarero

    Full Text Available Abstract Dams are structures that dam rivers and streams for a variety of purposes. These structures often need to be sturdy to withstand the force of the impoundment and the high values of accumulated water load. The constant maintenance of these structures is essential, since a possible accident can lead to damage of catastrophic proportions. This research presents an alternative cheap and quick application for investigating water seepage in earth dams, through the application of the DC resistivity geophysical method from the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT technique in Wenner array. Three ERT lines were placed parallel to the longitudinal axis of a dam formed by clay soil from the decomposition of diabase. The data are presented in 2D and pseudo-3D geophysical images with electrical resistivity values modeled. Based on the physical principle of electrolytic conduction, that is, decrease in electrical resistance in materials or siliceous minerals in moisture conditions as compared to the material in the dry state, the results revealed low-resistivity zones restricted to some points, associated with water infiltration in the transverse direction of the dam. The absence of evidence as water upwelling on the front of the dam together with geophysical evidence indicate saturation restricted to some points and low probability at the present time, for installation of piping processes.

  20. The remains of the dam: what have we learned from 15 years of US dam removals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon E. Grant; Sarah L. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Important goals for studying dam removal are to learn how rivers respond to large and rapid introductions of sediment, and to develop predictive models to guide future dam removals. Achieving these goals requires organizing case histories systematically so that underlying physical mechanisms determining rates and styles of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition...

  1. Simulating dam - breach flood scenarios of the Tangjiashan landslide dam induced by the Wenchuan earthquake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Xuanmei; Tang, C.; van Westen, C.J.; Alkema, D.

    2012-01-01

    Floods from failures of landslide dams can pose a hazard to people and property downstream, which have to be rapidly assessed and mitigated in order to reduce the potential risk. The Tangjiashan landslide dam induced by the Mw=7.9 2008 Wenchuan earthquake had impounded the largest lake in the

  2. 78 FR 53494 - Dam Safety Modifications at Cherokee, Fort Loudoun, Tellico, and Watts Bar Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Cherokee, TVA would also install about 40 post-tensioned anchors into the concrete portion of the dam... of Dam Structures: Combination of Concrete Floodwalls and Earthen Embankments, will protect the four... Watts Bar). TVA also installed a permanent concrete apron on approximately 2 acres of the downstream...

  3. Project Planning for Cougar Dam during 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Craig A.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Cougar Dam is a 158 m-tall, rock fill dam located about 63 km east of Springfield, Oregon. Completed in 1963, the dam is owned and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). It impounds Cougar Reservoir, which is 9.7 km long, has a surface area of 518 ha, and is predominately used for flood control. The pool elevation typically ranges from a maximum conservation pool of 515 m (1,690 ft) National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD) in summer to a minimum flood control elevation of 467 m (1,532 ft NGVD) in winter. The reservoir thermally stratifies in the summer, has an average depth of 37 m, and holds 153,500 acre-feet when full. Cougar Dam is located on the South Fork of the McKenzie River 7 km upstream from the mainstem McKenzie River, a tributary of the Willamette River. The McKenzie River Basin basin supports the largest remaining population of wild spawning spring Chinook salmon in the Willamette River Basin (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; NOAA, 2008). Cougar Dam and others were collectively deemed to cause jeopardy to the sustainability of anadromous fish stocks in the Willamette River Basin (NOAA, 2008). Prior to dam construction, as many as 805 redds were observed in the South Fork of the McKenzie River (Willis and others, 1960) and it is estimated that 40 km of spawning habitat were lost when access was blocked after dam construction. The 2008 Willamette Biological Opinion (BIOP) requires improvements to operations and structures to reduce impacts on Upper Willamette River (UWR) Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and UWR steelhead (O. mykiss; NOAA, 2008). In 2010, an adult fish collection facility was completed below Cougar Dam to collect returning adult salmon for transport to spawning habitats above the dam. Before that time, returning adult spring Chinook salmon were transported to upstream spawning areas as part of a trap-and-haul program with adults passed ranging annually from 0 to 1,038 (Taylor, 2000). The progeny of

  4. Immediately Loaded Intraorally Welded Complete-Arch Maxillary Provisional Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiero, Alberto Maria; Benato, Renato; Fincato, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Guided implant surgery is not completely accurate when using computer-designed stereolithographic surgical guides. Complications are frequently reported when combining computer-guided flapless surgery with an immediately loaded prefabricated prosthesis. Achieving passive fit of a prefabricated prosthesis on the inserted implants the same day of the surgery can be difficult. The aim of this report is to show a new treatment approach to immediately loaded implants inserted with computer-guided surgery using an intraoral welded full-arch provisional prosthesis.

  5. Archäoprognose in Schleswig-Holstein

    OpenAIRE

    Mennenga, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    This is the slightly amended version of the authors Diplom-thesis in prehistoric archaeology. In the region of Eastern Holstein in Northern Germany a large amount of neolithic surface finds leading to potential settlements or burials. By using the data of the archäologische Landesaufnahme it was possible to date the sites and classify them. This data was used to do a predictive modelling by using a logistic regression analysis.

  6. Dosimetry arches surgical area; Dosimetria de area en arcos quirurgicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Fernandez Bordes, M.; Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Gomez Llorente, P. L.; Martin Rincon, C.; Montes fuentes, C.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Sena Espinel, E. de; Martin Nunez, J.

    2011-07-01

    Although the Radiological Protection Service assigned personal dosimetry to all exposed workers (TE.) and this is independent of the classification of ET., Recognizes, also, the difficulties found in controlling the proper use of dosimeters by many professionals, and therefore launched a control program area at all doses and each X-ray equipment for fixed and mobile surgical arch of all health facilities that fall within our department, of which presents the results after two years of experience.

  7. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  8. Ontogeny of bone strain: the zygomatic arch in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Scott C.; Huang, Xiaofeng

    2006-01-01

    Summary At the time of weaning, infant animals have little experience with hard food, and thus their skulls are not likely to be epigenetically adapted for the loads imposed by mastication. We examined bone strain in the zygomatic arch of 4-week-old weanling piglets. Functional strains in piglets differed from those previously reported for older pigs (Herring et al., 1996; Rafferty et al., 2000) in that the squamosal bone was not bent in the horizontal plane and the principal tensile strain on the zygomatic bone did not correspond to the direction of masseter muscle pull. Strain patterns were more variable in piglets than in older pigs. In older pigs masticatory strains can be reproduced by stimulating the masseter muscles. When the piglet masseter was stimulated, strain patterns were more similar to those of older pigs, but shear strain magnitudes were the largest yet recorded from mammalian skull bones, up to 4000 με. To put these findings in the context of skeletal adaptation, 45 dry skulls, including some animals from the strain study, were measured. Reduced major axis regressions indicated that the infant arch was rounder in cross section and straighter than that of older animals. With growth the arch became dorsoventrally higher, while mediolateral thickness decreased in the squamosal bone. Overall, these changes should make strain more predictable, explaining the lower variability in older animals. Other factors likely to be important in causing unique strain regimes in piglets include (1) unfamiliarity with hard food, (2) greater importance of muscles other than the same-side masseter, and (3) greater proximity of molariform teeth to the arch. Collectively, these data indicate that the skeleton is not pre-adapted for specific functional loads. PMID:16339870

  9. Determination of metals in water from Billings dam, Sao Paulo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Talita; Sarkis, Jorge E.S.; Ulrich, Joao C.; Yamaguishi, Renata Bazante, E-mail: taoliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: jesarkis@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Menezes, Luciana Carvalho Bezerra de; Castro, Paula Maria Genova de; Monteiro Junior, Adalberto Jose; Maruyama, Lidia Sumile, E-mail: lcbm@usp.br [Instituto de Pesca, (IP/SAA-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secretaria da Agricultura e Abastecimento do Estado de Sao Paulo

    2013-07-01

    The Billings reservoir, located in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is used for several purposes such as: water supply, electric generation, fishing and leisure. Although considered an area of environmental protection, in recent years the dam has suffered diverse environmental aggressions including the release of toxic metals. This study presents a recent evaluation of metal contents along the Dam. Samples were collected every three months during the period of winter 2009 to summer 2010. Samples were collected in thirteen points along of the dam, as follows: Rio dos Porcos (Point 1), Summit Control (Point 2), Ilha do Bigua (Point 3), Casa Caida (Point 4), Barragem (Point 5), Foz de Taquacetuba (Point 6), Braco Borore (Point 7), Foz de Borore (Point 8), Alvarenga (Point 9), Pedreira (Point 10), Borore's Margin (Point 11), Capivari I's Margin (Point 12) and Capivari II's Margin (Point 13). The determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn was performed by using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR-ICPMS). The methodology has been validated using certified reference material Riverine Water Reference Material for Trace Metals provided by National Research Council Canada (NRCC). The sampling points located in the Pedreira, Borore's Margin, Alvarenga, Barragem Taquacetuba, Casa Caida e Ilha do Bigua presented the highest concentrations. The level for Fe, Cu and Ni were higher than the ones reported in the literature and above the limit set by CONAMA 2914/201. (author)

  10. First and second branchial arch syndromes: multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senggen, Elodie; Laswed, Tarek; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Maestre, Leonor Alamo; Meuli, Reto; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital of Lausanne, Radiology Department, Lausanne (Switzerland); Jaques, Bertrand [University Hospital of Lausanne, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    First and second branchial arch syndromes (BAS) manifest as combined tissue deficiencies and hypoplasias of the face, external ear, middle ear and maxillary and mandibular arches. They represent the second most common craniofacial malformation after cleft lip and palate. Extended knowledge of the embryology and anatomy of each branchial arch derivative is mandatory for the diagnosis and grading of different BAS lesions and in the follow-up of postoperative patients. In recent years, many new complex surgical approaches and procedures have been designed by maxillofacial surgeons to treat extensive maxillary, mandibular and external and internal ear deformations. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of different imaging modalities (orthopantomogram (OPG), lateral and posteroanterior cephalometric radiographs, CT and MRI) in the diagnosis of a wide spectrum of first and second BAS, including hemifacial microsomia, mandibulofacial dysostosis, branchio-oto-renal syndrome, Pierre Robin sequence and Nager acrofacial dysostosis. Additionally, we aim to emphasize the importance of the systematic use of a multimodality imaging approach to facilitate the precise grading of these syndromes, as well as the preoperative planning of different reconstructive surgical procedures and their follow-up during treatment. (orig.)

  11. Surface characterization of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manu; Seema, Saraswathy; Tiwari, Brijesh; Sharma, Himanshu S.; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    Background Surface roughness of nickel titanium orthodontic arch wires poses several clinical challenges. Surface modification with aesthetic/metallic/non metallic materials is therefore a recent innovation, with clinical efficacy yet to be comprehensively evaluated. Methods One conventional and five types of surface modified nickel titanium arch wires were surface characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy and 3D profilometry. Root mean square roughness values were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and post hoc Duncan's multiple range tests. Results Study groups demonstrated considerable reduction in roughness values from conventional in a material specific pattern: Group I; conventional (578.56 nm) > Group V; Teflon (365.33 nm) > Group III; nitride (301.51 nm) > Group VI (i); rhodium (290.64 nm) > Group VI (ii); silver (252.22 nm) > Group IV; titanium (229.51 nm) > Group II; resin (158.60 nm). It also showed the defects with aesthetic (resin/Teflon) and nitride surfaces and smooth topography achieved with metals; titanium/silver/rhodium. Conclusions Resin, Teflon, titanium, silver, rhodium and nitrides were effective in decreasing surface roughness of nickel titanium arch wires albeit; certain flaws. Findings have clinical implications, considering their potential in lessening biofilm adhesion, reducing friction, improving corrosion resistance and preventing nickel leach and allergic reactions. PMID:26843749

  12. C-arm guided closed reduction of zygomatic arch fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eo, Yoon Ki; Lee, Dong Kun [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Sam; Jang, Young Il [Kwangyang College, Kwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    The zygomatic arch is structurally protruded and is easily fractured. The classic management of zygomatic arch fracture has been mentioned the Keen, Lothrop, Dingman and Alling and threaded K-wire. All of the above methods have advantages and disadvantages. To minimize the disadvantages, we performed threaded K-wire for the first time using C-arm image intensifier. The subjects were 16 patients with Knight North group II (Zygomatic arch fracture). Among them the C-arm was used in 12 patients and the operator used sensitivity general method in 4 patients and confirmed the operation by mobile X-ray equipment. In conclusion, both groups were satisfied surgically and cosmetically. Using the C-arm, actual image at the time operation was clear and satisfied, the surrounding tissue damage was minimized and at was more accurately completed. The operation time was shortened by 30 to 60 minutes proving it to be an efficient method. We suggest though that further studies be needed to evaluate the radiation effect on these patients.

  13. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Szu-Chia Chen; Mei-Yueh Lee; Jiun-Chi Huang; Ming-Chen Paul Shih; Jer-Ming Chang; Hung-Chun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcificati...

  14. ARCH Models Efficiency Evaluation in Prediction and Poultry Price Process Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Fakari Sardehae

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poultry is an important commodity for household consumption. In recent years, price fluctuation for this commodity has caused an uncertain condition for consumers and poultry prices over the past two years has changed a lot. This has caused many changes and uncertainty in a purchase decision. Analysis of changes and volatility modeling can be a great help to predict the poultry prices and great facilities in creating appropriate policies in future. The prices of staples such as poultry consumption basket is highly variable because much of the protein is necessary for daily energy are supplied in this way to households. So when the price of chicken which has been changed over the past two years and has always been in the press and media attention, has been selected in this study. Fluctuations in price of chicken have caused a surge in consumer expectations and contributed in volatility of chicken price. Materials and Methods: In this study ARCH models have been used for daily price of poultry of Iran’s market and this was investigated for2012-13and2013-14.BecauseARCH models can model the impact of heterogeneous variance over time in time series data then the variance of time series, which is limited in time, has no time limit. Many time series are more complex than a linear patterns, thus, non-linear models are of particular importance in Economic Sciences and Econometrics. Accordingly, Engle presented that ARCH model can model the heterogeneous variance components of the error term. That is a disturbing element and modeling can help to examine and explore the relationship between the components can be found disturbing. Basically, these models fit the data to a cluster and periodic oscillations with high volatility and low volatility associated with the period. In this study, we used several different models like ARCH, GARCH, IGARCH, and TGARCH. The distribution of the error term of the model also followt-student distribution

  15. Determining the Best Arch/Garch Model and Comparing JKSE with Stock Index in Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharisya Ayu Effendi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The slow movement of Indonesia economic growth in 2014 due to several factors, in internal factors; due to the high interest rates in Indonesia and external factors from the US which will raise the fed rate this year. However, JKSE shows a sharp increase trend from the beginning of 2014 until the second quarter of 2015 although it remains fluctuate but insignificant. The purpose of this research is to determine the best ARCH/ GARCH model in JKSE and stock index in developed countries (FTSE, Nasdaq and STI and then compare the JKSE with the stock index in developed countries (FTSE, Nasdaq and STI. The results obtained in this study is to determine the best model of ARCH / GARCH, it is obtained that JKSE is GARCH (1,2, while the FTSE obtains GARCH (2,2, NASDAQ produces the best model which is GARCH (1,1 and STI with GARCH (2,1, and the results of the comparison of JKSE with FTSE, NASDAQ and STI are that even though JKSE fluctuates with moderate levels but the trend shown upward trend. This is different with other stock indexes fluctuated highly and tends to have a downward trend.

  16. CORRELATION BETWEEN DURATION OF BOTTLE-FEEDING AND DENTAL ARCH MEASUREMENT IN DECIDUOUS DENTITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldo Mahniza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to observe the correlation between duration of bottle feeding and dental arch measurement in deciduous dentition. Duration of bottle feeding was divided into 4 groups: ≤ 24 months, 25 – 36 months, 37 – 48 months, and > 48 months. The subjects were 120 kindergarten pupils, aged 3 – 5 years old. Measurements was done on the models of maxilla and mandible with digital caliper for the width and length of dental arch and using flexible curve for dental arch circumference. Pearson correlation showed a weak association for anterior arch width (r=0.206, posterior arch width (r=0.195, and anterior circumference (r=0.206 of maxilla and posterior arch width (r=0.279, anterior circumference (r=0.226 of mandible. One-way Anova was performed to analyze the differences of dental arch measurements among duration of bottle-feeding groups. The results showed that there were significant differences of dental arch measurements for anterior arch width of maxilla, posterior arch width of mandible, and anterior circumference of mandible (p<0,05.

  17. Mechanics Evolution Characteristics Analysis of Pressure-arch in Fully-mechanized Mining Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on a practical engineering, the three-dimension computational model was built using FLAC3D under the fullymechanized mining condition. Considering four variation factors, such as the distance of mining advancing, the strength of the surrounding rock, the speed of mining advancing and the dip angle of the coal seam, the mechanics evolution characteristics of the pressure-arch were analyzed. The result showed that for the horizontal seam, the geometric shape of the pressure-arch varied from flat arch to round arch gradually and the height and thickness of the pressure-arch also increased; the maximum principal stress in the skewback also increased with the working face advancing. With the strength of the surrounding rock from soft to hard, the arch thickness reduced, and the arch loading decreased. To improve the mining speed can do some contributions to the stability of the pressure-arch in the mining field. With the increase of dip angle of the seam, the pressure-arch displayed an asymmetric shape, the vault was tilted and moved to the upward direction. At the same time, the thickness of the pressure-arch increased, and the stress concentration in the skewback tended to be further intensified.

  18. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Trivi?o, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth we...

  19. Ice interactions at a dam face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, B.; Morse, J.; Beaulieu, P.; Pratt, Y. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Stander, E. [State Univ. of New York, Cobleskill College, Cobleskill, NY (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Cote, A.; Tarras, A.; Noel, P. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada). IREQ

    2009-07-01

    This paper reported on a joint research project between Laval University and Hydro-Quebec to study ice forces on dams in an effort to harmonize design criteria and develop mitigation strategies. This paper introduced the project and explored some of the preliminary results of the 2007-2008 field season. Ice displacement, ice stresses and ice forces on the LaGabelle dam were measured at several locations. The paper identified and discussed the complex relationships between data sets and discussed the spatial-temporal variability of the ice forces and its impact on design criteria. The project objective was to develop design criteria for ice forces on dams and to provide a scientific basis for interpreting and harmonizing existing recommended criteria. The methodology and site description were presented. It was concluded that the ice processes in a reservoir near a dam face subject to water fluctuations are quite complex. Therefore, in order to know the real average pressure on the dam, a significant amount of panels are required, having important implications for determining safe design values. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  20. An experimental study of arch perimeter and arch width increase with mandibular expansion: a finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baswaraj; Hemanth, M; Jayasudha; Patil, Chandrashekhargouda; Sunilkumar, P; Raghuveer, H P; Chandralekha, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the increase in arch perimeter associated with mandibular lateral expansion, To estimate the increase in intermolar width with mandibular lateral expansion and to find out the changes of tooth inclination with mandibular expansion. The mandibular bone with dentition of indian skeletal specimen was obtained. The computer tomogram (CT) slices of the mandible were taken. Finite element model (FEM): Numerical representation of the geometry was created by dividing the geometry into finite number of elements and the elements were connected together with nodes at the junction. The result of the study showed when 10° of lateral expansion was applied to the lower buccal segment at the center of rotation found at 4.3 mm below the root apex of first molar, a space of 1.3 mm between the canine and first premolar, and thus an increase in arch perimeter of 2.6 mm. The tip of the mesiolingual cusp of the first molar moved 4.2 mm laterally, resulting in a change in intermolar width by 8.4 mm. Three-dimensional simulation showed that 1 mm of intermolar expansion increased the arch perimeter by 0.30 mm. As the finite element method evolves and scientists are able to more clearly define physical properties of biological tissues, more accurate information can be generated at the level that other analytical methods cannot fully provide data.This result would be of value clinically for prediction of the effects of mandibular expansion.

  1. [Mycotic aneurism in aortic arch by Aspergillus fumigatus: contribution of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burón Fernández, M R; Oruezábal Moreno, M J

    2005-09-01

    The micotic aneurisms by Aspergillus are rare and usually appear in the context of an invasive pulmonary aspergilosis, or by septicum embolism or direct extension from the lungs, for that reason the location the more frequents is in aortic arch and the ascending aorta.8 cases of micotic aneurisms by Aspergillus spp. have been described in literature between 1966 and 2000, being the most frequent location the ascending aorta or the aortic arch. The Aspergillus fumigatus is the isolated species with more frequency, affecting mainly to patients undergoing inmunosupression. The diagnosis of a micotic aneurism requires a high clinical suspicion, given to its peculiarity and the presence of inespecific symptoms, being frequently an accidental finding in an invasive pulmonary aspergilosis.The case of a patient with a micotic aneurism by A. fumigatus appears and we reviewed the similar cases previously disclosed.

  2. A Mathematical Model for Forecasting the Dam-Break Flood Routing Process of a Landslide Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugang Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Once a landslide dam bursts, its reservoir discharges quickly in a flood which will cause catastrophic damage to life and property downstream. For a specific landslide dam, the peak flow rate and the evolution of downstream flood are influenced by the shape and size of the dike breach when dam-break occurs. According to the general nature of landslide dams and field observations of dike-breach development patterns, a dike-breach propagation mode has been determined. By combining an improved empirical equation with knowledge of the dike-breach propagation mode, a mathematical model for forecasting dam-break flood routing has been developed and is presented here. Sensitivity analysis was then carried out based on the computed results for peak flow rate and the flood evolution curve under different parameters. The computed results showed that the width coefficient and the depth coefficient had similar effects on the dam-break flood but that the impact of the depth coefficient was more significant than that of the width coefficient. Finally, the proposed model was used to calculate the flood evolution for the Tangjiashan landslide dam. The computed results showed that the error between the simulated result and the measured data was less than 5%.

  3. Seismic response of concrete gravity dam reinforced with FRP sheets on dam surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring the effects of anti-seismic reinforcement with the fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP material bonded to the dam surface in dam engineering. Time-history analysis was performed to simulate the seismic failure process of a gravity dam that was assumed to be reinforced at the locations of slope discontinuity at the downstream surface, part of the upstream face, and the dam heel. A damage model considering the influence of concrete heterogeneity was used to model the nonlinearity of concrete. A bond-slip model was applied to the interface between FRP and concrete, and the reinforcement mechanism was analyzed through the bond stress and the stress in FRP. The results of the crack pattern, displacement, and acceleration of the reinforced dam were compared with those of the original one. It is shown that FRP, as a reinforcement material, postpones the occurrence of cracks and slows the crack propagation, and that cracks emanating from the upstream surface and downstream surface are not connected, meaning that the reinforced dam can retain water-impounding function when subjected to the earthquake. Anti-seismic reinforcement with FRP is therefore beneficial to improving the seismic resistant capability of concrete dams.

  4. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p carpal arch height (p carpal arch curvature (p carpal arch area (p carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  5. Stabilisation of the unstable fractured zygomatic arch with a ballooned foley catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D G

    2014-01-01

    The zygomatic arch fracture is one of the most common facial bone fractures. Especially the isolated zygomatic arch fracture is usually repaired via Gillies' approach. But in the case of unstable zygomatic arch fracture, we need an additional step for stabilising the unstable zygomatic arch segment after repositioning the fractured segment. For the stabilising method we use the ballooned Foley catheter on the medial side of the zygomatic arch in the zygomaticotemporal fossa. This method is of assistance to the patient who has a zygomatic arch fracture with comminution or an old patient with weak and torn periosteum. In this study, we achieved a good result and we will introduce this simple method as one of alternatives of stabilising tool.

  6. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Jason [Lac Courte Oreilles, Hayward, WI (United States); Meyers, Amy [Kiser Hydro, LLC, Norway, MI (United States)

    2014-12-31

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  7. Computational Aspects of Dam Risk Analysis: Findings and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Escuder-Bueno

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, risk analysis techniques have proved to be a useful tool to inform dam safety management. This paper summarizes the outcomes of three themes related to dam risk analysis discussed in the Benchmark Workshops organized by the International Commission on Large Dams Technical Committee on “Computational Aspects of Analysis and Design of Dams.” In the 2011 Benchmark Workshop, estimation of the probability of failure of a gravity dam for the sliding failure mode was discussed. Next, in 2013, the discussion focused on the computational challenges of the estimation of consequences in dam risk analysis. Finally, in 2015, the probability of sliding and overtopping in an embankment was analyzed. These Benchmark Workshops have allowed a complete review of numerical aspects for dam risk analysis, showing that risk analysis methods are a very useful tool to analyze the risk of dam systems, including downstream consequence assessments and the uncertainty of structural models.

  8. National Inventory of Dams Coastal California Extract 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The National Inventory of Dams (NID) is a congressionally authorized database, which documents dams in the U.S. and its territories. The NID was most recently...

  9. Dam-Break Flood Analysis Upper Hurricane Reservoir, Hartford, Vermont

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acone, Scott

    1995-01-01

    .... Various dam break flood conditions were modeled and inundation maps developed. Based on this analysis the dam is rated a Class 2 or significant hazard category in terms of its potential to cause downstream damage...

  10. Inventory of Dams in the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Permitted dams in Iowa and associated attributes, as recorded by the Floodplain Section of the DNR. The dams regulated are those with the parameters listed below: a....

  11. Lucy's Flat Feet: The Relationship between the Ankle and Rearfoot Arching in Early Hominins

    OpenAIRE

    DeSilva, Jeremy M.; Throckmorton, Zachary J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Plio-Pleistocene, the hominin foot evolved from a grasping appendage to a stiff, propulsive lever. Central to this transition was the development of the longitudinal arch, a structure that helps store elastic energy and stiffen the foot during bipedal locomotion. Direct evidence for arch evolution, however, has been somewhat elusive given the failure of soft-tissue to fossilize. Paleoanthropologists have relied on footprints and bony correlates of arch development, though l...

  12. Initial arch wires for alignment of crooked teeth with fixed orthodontic braces.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    The initial arch wire is the first arch wire to be inserted into the fixed appliance at the beginning of orthodontic treatment and is used mainly for correcting crowding and rotations of teeth. With a number of orthodontic arch wires available for initial tooth alignment, it is important to understand which wire is most efficient, as well as which wires cause the least amount of root resorption and pain during the initial aligning stage of treatment.

  13. Investigation on the Causes of Cracking in Earth Dams (Case study: Mahmood-Abad Earth Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rahimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cracking of earth dams is a one of the main threat causes of stability of embankment dams. In this research by modeling of the behavior of an embankment dam and employing conditions of the earthquake, the reasons of cracking were inspected using by modeling of earth dam behavior. Based on the literature, one of the main causes of dam failures is sliding and cracking of the dam structure during earthquake. Localized liquefaction of foundation soils was one of the causes of the observed post-earthquake distress within these dams. Material and Methods: In order to study the causes and the results of crack on earth dams, Mahmoodabad earthen dam with a height of 19 m, is located in Zanjan province, northwest of Iran, which suffered a longitudinal crack on the crest and slight sliding of the upstream slope due to 2001 Avaj earthquake was studied. This dam has faced earthquake two times with an interval of two years. During the first earthquake with the magnitude about 6.6 in Richter scale small longitudinal cracks had created on the crest. The developed cracks had been repaired by injecting the cement and then has been hidden by passing the time. After the second earthquake with the magnitude about 6.5 in Richter scale the hidden cracks had been appeared again and the slight movement of the upper slopes of dam reported. Based on the site investigation and documented information about dam, including maps and parameter data, the behavior of the dam has modeled by using Plaxis as a finite element model. In order to check the accuracy of the design of dam, the stability analysis has been conducted using by Xslope as a limit equilibrium model. The foundation conditions and the Geotechnical properties of the layer beneath the dam has been inspected by open excavation. Results and Discussion: Underground investigation about Geotechnical properties of dam foundation has showed that there is a thin sandy layer confined in alluvium material of the

  14. Dams and transnational advocacy: Political opportunities in transnational collective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Teng

    Possible arguments to explain the gradual decline in big dam development and its site transferring from developed to developing countries include technical, economic, and political factors. This study focuses on the political argument---the rise of transnational anti-dam advocacy and its impact on state policy-making. Under what conditions does transnational anti-dam advocacy matter? Under what conditions does transnational advocacy change state dam policies (delay, scale down, or cancel)? It examines the role of transnational anti-dam actors in big dam building in a comparative context in Asia. Applying the social movement theory of political opportunity structure (POS) and using the qualitative case-study method, the study provides both within-case and cross-case analyses. Within-case analysis is utilized to explain the changing dynamics of big dam building in China (Three Gorges Dam and proposed Nu/Salween River dam projects), and to a lesser extent, Sardar Sarovar Project in India and Nam Theun 2 Dam in Laos. Different domestic and international POS (DPOS and IPOS) impact the strategies and outcomes of anti-dam advocacies in these countries. The degree of openness of the POS directly affects the capacity of transnational efforts in influencing state dam policies. The degree of openness or closure is measured by specific laws, institutions, discourse, or elite allies (or the absence of these) for the participation of non-state actors on big dam issues at a particular moment. This degree of openness is relative, varying over time, across countries and regions. This study finds that the impact of transnational anti-dam activism is most effective when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively open. Transnational anti-dam advocacy is least effective in influencing state dam policies when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively closed. Under a relatively open DPOS and closed IPOS, transnational anti-dam advocacy is more likely to successfully change state dam policies and even

  15. Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01

    spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

  16. Miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion for managing arch perimeter in an adult patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    da Cunha Amanda Carneiro; Lee Hisun; Nojima Lincoln Issamu; Nojima Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Lee Kee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    ...: This case report illustrates a 24-year old woman, with maxillary transverse deficiency, upper and lower arches crowding, Class II, division 1, subdivision right relationship, previous upper incisors...

  17. Out-of-plane free vibration analysis of a cable-arch structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. J.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Zhu, H. P.

    2013-02-01

    Cable-arch structure has been widely used in many long-span structures such as cable roofs and cable-stayed arch bridges, but its dynamics is still not well understood. In this paper, the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of a cable-arch structure is investigated. The equations governing the out-of-plane free vibration of the structure are derived using d'Alembert's principle. A transfer matrix method is used to solve the governing equations and determine the frequencies of the out-of-plane vibration. The theories are then used to study two specific cases: free vibration of a model cable-arch and simulation of an arch erection process. The effects of some key parameters of cable and arch, such as tension of cable and radius, open-angle and shape of arch, are examined. The results indicate that in-plane and spatial cables can largely improve the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of arch structures, which are further verified by analyzing the out-of-plane buckling of cable-arch structures. The present work should be valuable and significant not only for the fundamental research but also engineering design of roofs and bridges.

  18. The transverse forefoot arch demonstrated by a novel X-ray projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ole; Vuust, M.; Understrup, B.

    2009-01-01

    and thirty-four subjects (79%) presented themselves for interview and X-ray examination. The study group was representative of the randomly selected population sample in terms of age, sex and incidence of metatarsalgia. The study verified that the interrelated geometry of the metatarsal heads in the AP plane...... of the forefoot. The relative height of the arch (arch height divided by forefoot width) was independent of age and sex. A non-significant tendency towards a lower arch among subjects with metatarsalgia was observed. Conclusion: This population study demonstrated that the metatarsal heads constitute arches...

  19. Track-Bridge Longitudinal Interaction of Continuous Welded Rails on Arch Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking arch bridges, including deck, half-through, and through arch bridges (short for DAB, HTAB, and TAB as examples, mechanics analysis models of longitudinal interaction between continuously welded rails (short for CWRs and arch bridges are established. Based on the finite element method (FEM, the longitudinal interaction calculation software of CWR on arch bridges has been developed. Focusing on an HTAB, the tension, compression, and deflection conditions are calculated and analyzed. The results show that the mechanics analysis models of three types of arch bridges can truly reflect the real state of the structure; the calculation software can be used for systematic research of the CWR on arch bridge; as for HTAB, temperature difference of arch rib has a small effect on rail tension/compression, and arch bridge can be simplified as a continuous beam for rail tension/compression additional force calculation; in calculation of deflection conditions of HTAB, it is suggested that train loads are arranged on half span and full span and take the direction of load entering bridge into account. Additionally, the deflection additional force variation of CFST basket handle arch bridge is different from that of ordinary bridge.

  20. A rare cause of cervical spinal stenosis: posterior arch hypoplasia in a bipartite atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atasoy, C. [Emek, Kirim Caddesi, Ankara (Turkey); Department of Radiology, Ankara University School of Medicine (Turkey); Fitoz, S.; Karan, B.; Erden, I.; Akyar, S. [Department of Radiology, Ankara University School of Medicine (Turkey)

    2002-03-01

    We describe CT and MRI of a previously unreported combination of atlantoaxial anomalies consisting of posterior arch hypoplasia in a bipartite atlas with an os odontoideum, in a 30-year-old woman presenting with neck and left arm pain. MRI showed the os odontoideum, marked stenosis of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas, with cord compression and evidence of myelopathy. CT revealed a bipartite atlas with midline clefts in anterior and posterior arches, thickening in the anterior arch and hypoplasia of the posterior arch with incurving of both hemiarches. Flexion and extension radiographs demonstrated atlantoaxial instability. (orig.)

  1. Modified Gillies approach for zygomatic arch fracture reduction in the setting of bicoronal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Edward; Vercler, Christian; Yaremchuk, Michael J; Gordon, Chad R

    2012-05-01

    Zygomatic arch fractures are common injuries, occurring in isolation in 5% of all patients with facial fractures and in 10% of patients with any fracture to the zygomaticomaxillary complex. Isolated noncomminuted depressed zygomatic arch fractures are easily treated with the minimally invasive Gillies approach, which most often provides long-term stability. However, zygomatic arch fractures often occur in conjunction with zygomaticomaxillary complex, Le Fort, calvarial, and naso-orbitoethmoid fractures. In situations requiring a bicoronal incision to address concomitant injuries, zygomatic arch fractures are frequently treated with wide dissection and rigid fixation. Using principles obtained from isolated arch fractures, we present for the first time to our knowledge the use of a modified Gillies approach to noncomminuted zygomatic arch fractures in a case requiring a bicoronal incision. With the deep temporal fascia exposed from the reflected bicoronal flap, a 1-cm horizontal incision is made within the deep temporal fascia allowing a Gillies elevator to easily reduce the arch fracture in a plane between the deep layer of the deep temporal fascia and the temporalis muscle. This technique exploits the advantages of the traditional Gillies approach, preserving fascial attachments, avoiding neurovascular injury, and obviating the need for rigid fixation. Moreover, this method saves time and money and decreases morbidity. Our modified Gillies approach to zygomatic arch fractures in the setting of a bicoronal incision can be applied to a wide range of cases because of the frequency with which arch fractures occur with concomitant craniomaxillofacial injuries requiring wide exposure.

  2. Evaluating upstream passage and timing of approach by adult bigheaded carps at a gated dam on the Illinois River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubejko, Matthew; Whitledge, Greg; Coulter, Alison A; Brey, Marybeth; Oliver, Devon; Garvey, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Dams are a conservation threat because they function as barriers to native fish movement; however, they may prevent the spread of invasive species. Invasive bigheaded carps (Hypophthalmichthys spp.) threaten the Great Lakes ecosystem and are advancing towards Lake Michigan via the Illinois River. Navigation dams on the Illinois River may deter bigheaded carps' upstream movement. We investigated the permeability of the Starved Rock Lock and Dam (SRLD), the most downstream gated Illinois River dam, to bigheaded carps' migration by examining the timing of individuals approaching and passing through SRLD in relation to gate openness, tailwater elevation, and water temperature. Using acoustic telemetry of (N = ~104 per year) tagged fish, 13 upstream passages of bigheaded carps occurred through SRLD between 2013 and 2016. Eleven passages occurred through the dam gates and 2 through the lock chamber, indicating deterrents (e.g., CO2) placed in SRLD lock chamber may only limit passage of a small proportion of all fish passing through the lock-and-dam structure. Passages were documented only in 2013 and 2015. Most of the dam gate passages occurred during high water when gates were completely out of the water. Timing of bigheaded carps approaching SRLD was positively correlated with rising water temperature and high tailwater elevation, and all fish approached during late March through mid-September. Movement through dams is rare; modifying gate operations to reduce gate openness during late spring and summer could further reduce the permeability of gated dams such as SRLD to bigheaded carps, slowing their upstream advance.

  3. Diagnosis of embankment dam distresses using Bayesian networks. Part I. Global-level characteristics based on a dam distress database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, L. M; Xu, Y; Jia, J. S; Zhao, C

    2011-01-01

    .... The main objective of this paper is to develop a robust probability-based tool using Bayesian networks for the diagnosis of embankment dam distresses at the global level based on past dam distress data...

  4. Major dams of the United States, Geographic NAD83, USGS (2006) [dams00x020_USGS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This map layer portrays major dams of the United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The map layer was created by extracting dams 50 feet or...

  5. How to manage the cumulative flood safety of catchment dams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dam safety is a significant issue being taken seriously worldwide. However, in Australia, although much attention is being devoted to the medium- to large-scale dams, minimal attention is being paid to the serious potential problems associated with smaller dams, particularly the potential cumulative safety threats they pose ...

  6. INTRODUCTION All earth dams in their natural state experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. All earth dams in their natural state experience some degree of seepage and spillage flow from the reservoir and through permeable soils. Seepage and spillage may also be associated with internal erosion in the dam, and internal erosion is one of the main reasons for dam failures (Sjodahl, 2006).

  7. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF DAM WITH SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bycroft, G.N.; Mork, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution to the response of a long trapezoidal-section dam on a foundation consisting of an elastic half-space and subjected to simulated earthquake motion is developed. An optimum seismic design is achieved when the cross section of the dam is triangular. The effect of soil structure interaction is to lower the strain occurring in the dam.

  8. Earthquake induced liquefaction analysis of Tendaho earth-fill dam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fill dam, which is part of Tendaho Dam and Irrigation Project; the largest irrigation project in Ethiopia to date. The dam is located in the most seismic part of Ethiopia and was originally designed to be founded on potentially liquefiable alluvium ...

  9. Shape change in the atlas with congenital midline non-union of its posterior arch: a morphometric geometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Luis; Palancar, Carlos; Pastor, Francisco; Llidó, Susana; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; Bastir, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The congenital midline non-union of the posterior arch of the atlas is a developmental variant present at a frequency ranging from 0.7% to 3.9%. Most of the reported cases correspond to incidental findings during routine medical examination. In cases of posterior non-union, hypertrophy of the anterior arch and cortical bone thickening of the posterior arches have been observed and interpreted as adaptive responses of the atlas to increased mechanical stress. We sought to determine if the congenital non-union of the posterior arch results in a change in the shape of the atlas. This study is an analysis of the first cervical vertebrae from osteological collections through morphometric geometric techniques. A total of 21 vertebrae were scanned with a high-resolution three-dimensional scanner (Artec Space Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg). To capture vertebral shape, 19 landmarks and 100 semilandmarks were placed on the vertebrae. Procrustes superimposition was applied to obtain size and shape data (MorphoJ 1.02; Klingenberg, 2011), which were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA) and mean shape comparisons. The PCA resulted in two components explaining 22.32% and 18.8% of the total shape variance. The graphic plotting of both components indicates a clear shape difference between the control atlas and the atlas with posterior non-union. This observation was supported by statistically significant differences in mean shape comparisons between both types of vertebra (patlas is associated with significant changes in the shape of the vertebra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Nan; Chen, Lei; Ge, Yi-Peng; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Wei-Guo; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    EuroSCORE II is an objective risk scoring model. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of EuroSCORE II in the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection and evaluate the risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Between February 2009 to February 2012, data from 240 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection were collected retrospectively. Mechanical ventilation after the surgery longer than 48 hours was defined as postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II was applied to predict prolonged mechanical ventilation. A C statistic (receiver operating characteristic curve) was used to test discrimination of the model. Calibration was assessed with a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the final risk factors of prolonged mechanical ventilation. The overall mortality was 10%. The mean length of mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement was 42.72 ± 51.45 hours. Total 74 patients needed prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II showed poor discriminatory ability (C statistic 0.52) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, pmechanical ventilation. On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation were age ≥ 48.5 years (pmechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Preoperative high level of leukocyte, age and surgical period from symptom onset are risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Survival of migrating salmon smolts in large rivers with and without dams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Welch

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The mortality of salmon smolts during their migration out of freshwater and into the ocean has been difficult to measure. In the Columbia River, which has an extensive network of hydroelectric dams, the decline in abundance of adult salmon returning from the ocean since the late 1970s has been ascribed in large measure to the presence of the dams, although the completion of the hydropower system occurred at the same time as large-scale shifts in ocean climate, as measured by climate indices such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We measured the survival of salmon smolts during their migration to sea using elements of the large-scale acoustic telemetry system, the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST array. Survival measurements using acoustic tags were comparable to those obtained independently using the Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag system, which is operational at Columbia and Snake River dams. Because the technology underlying the POST array works in both freshwater and the ocean, it is therefore possible to extend the measurement of survival to large rivers lacking dams, such as the Fraser, and to also extend the measurement of survival to the lower Columbia River and estuary, where there are no dams. Of particular note, survival during the downstream migration of at least some endangered Columbia and Snake River Chinook and steelhead stocks appears to be as high or higher than that of the same species migrating out of the Fraser River in Canada, which lacks dams. Equally surprising, smolt survival during migration through the hydrosystem, when scaled by either the time or distance migrated, is higher than in the lower Columbia River and estuary where dams are absent. Our results raise important questions regarding the factors that are preventing the recovery of salmon stocks in the Columbia and the future health of stocks in the Fraser River.

  12. Survival of migrating salmon smolts in large rivers with and without dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David W; Rechisky, Erin L; Melnychuk, Michael C; Porter, Aswea D; Walters, Carl J; Clements, Shaun; Clemens, Benjamin J; McKinley, R Scott; Schreck, Carl

    2008-10-28

    The mortality of salmon smolts during their migration out of freshwater and into the ocean has been difficult to measure. In the Columbia River, which has an extensive network of hydroelectric dams, the decline in abundance of adult salmon returning from the ocean since the late 1970s has been ascribed in large measure to the presence of the dams, although the completion of the hydropower system occurred at the same time as large-scale shifts in ocean climate, as measured by climate indices such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We measured the survival of salmon smolts during their migration to sea using elements of the large-scale acoustic telemetry system, the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) array. Survival measurements using acoustic tags were comparable to those obtained independently using the Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag system, which is operational at Columbia and Snake River dams. Because the technology underlying the POST array works in both freshwater and the ocean, it is therefore possible to extend the measurement of survival to large rivers lacking dams, such as the Fraser, and to also extend the measurement of survival to the lower Columbia River and estuary, where there are no dams. Of particular note, survival during the downstream migration of at least some endangered Columbia and Snake River Chinook and steelhead stocks appears to be as high or higher than that of the same species migrating out of the Fraser River in Canada, which lacks dams. Equally surprising, smolt survival during migration through the hydrosystem, when scaled by either the time or distance migrated, is higher than in the lower Columbia River and estuary where dams are absent. Our results raise important questions regarding the factors that are preventing the recovery of salmon stocks in the Columbia and the future health of stocks in the Fraser River.

  13. Rock engineering design of post-tensioned anchors for dams – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.T. Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available High-capacity, post-tensioned anchors have found wide-spread use, originally in initial dam design and construction, and more recently in the strengthening and rehabilitation of concrete dams to meet modern design and safety standards. Despite the advances that have been made in rock mechanics and rock engineering during the last 80 years in which post-tensioned anchors have been used in dam engineering, some aspects of the rock engineering design of high-capacity rock anchors for dams have changed relatively little over the last 30 or 40 years. This applies, in particular, to the calculations usually carried out to establish the grouted embedment lengths required for deep, post-tensioned anchors. These calculations usually make simplified assumptions about the distribution and values of rock–grout interface shear strengths, the shape of the volume of rock likely to be involved in uplift failure under the influence of a system of post-tensioned anchors, and the mechanism of that failure. The resulting designs are generally conservative. It is concluded that these aspects of the rock engineering design of large, post-tensioned rock anchors for dams can be significantly improved by making greater use of modern, comprehensive, numerical analyses in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D models of the rock mass structure, realistic rock and rock mass properties, and the results of prototype anchor tests in the rock mass concerned.

  14. A VIRTUAL OASIS: TRAFALGAR SQUARE’S ARCH OF PALMYRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Burch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the destruction of the Arch of Palmyra in Syria in 2015 and its temporary reconstruction a year later in London’s Trafalgar Square. Attention is paid to an adjacent pedestal known as the Fourth Plinth, with a particular focus on a proposed monument by the Iraqi-American conceptual artist, Michael Rakowitz (born 1973. His works provide the basis for a discussion of public memorials and art’s commemorative function; the preservation, destruction and politicisation of heritage; the role of technology for the purposes of documentation and reconstruction; notions of authenticity; ethics and legal issues surrounding the global trade in cultural artefacts.

  15. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaouthar Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken.

  16. Distribution of dental plaque and gingivitis within the dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Prem K; Prasad, Kakarla V V

    2017-10-01

    Objective The natural accumulation of supragingival plaque on surfaces of human teeth is associated with gingival inflammation and the initiation of common oral diseases. This study evaluated the distribution of dental plaque and gingivitis scores within the dental arches after prophylaxis. Methods Adult subjects from the Dharwad, India area representing the general population who provided written informed consent were scheduled for screening. Healthy subjects over the age of 18 years, not currently requiring any medical or dental care, and presenting with a complement of at least 20 natural teeth were recruited for this parallel design study. Enrolled subjects (n = 41) underwent oral examinations for dental plaque (PI) and gingivitis (GI) using the Turesky modification of the Quigley-Hein and the Löe-Silness Index, respectively, at the baseline visit, followed by a whole mouth dental prophylaxis. Subjects were given fluoride toothpaste for twice daily oral hygiene for the next 30 days. Subjects were recalled on days 15 and 30 for PI and GI examinations identical to baseline. Results Analyses indicated that mean scores for PI and GI on either arch and the whole mouth were higher than 2 and 1, respectively, during all examinations. Anterior surfaces consistently exhibited lower PI scores than posterior regions of either arch, or the entire dentition. Regional GI differences within the dentition were similar to PI scores, with lower scores on anterior than posterior teeth. Prophylaxis reduced both the frequency and mean scores of both PI and GI, irrespective of arch, with lower scores observed on anterior than posterior regions during all recall visits. Molar and lingual regions consistently exhibited higher PI and GI scores compared with anterior surfaces. At all examinations, mean scores for both plaque and gingivitis were higher on approximal vestibular than mid-vestibular surfaces. Conclusions Differences observed in PI and GI within the dentition have

  17. CONDUCT RESEARCH STOCK MARKET BASED ON MODELS OF ARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Burtnyak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study the dynamics of the volatility of some indicators of financial market of Ukraine using the methods ARCH modeling. As indicators of the financial market we take the most aggregated variables describing profitability or market price of the portfolio, but not individual assets constituting the portfolio. An indicator of the stock market index stands First Stock Trading System (PFTS. The conditional variance of financial indicators reflecting the level of systemic risk, measures the uncertainty associated with forecasting market dynamics. Key words. Autoregression models, econometric models, stock market, financial instruments, the PFTS index, volatility time series. JEL: C 50

  18. Abnormal foramina on the posterior arch of atlas vertebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak SB

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Atlas is the first cervical vertebra. It articulates with the occipital bone above and the axis vertebra below. It plays an important role in movement of the skull and the neck. We found a rare variation of the atlas vertebra. The posterior arch of the atlas had one accessory foramen just behind each lateral mass. Foramen on the right side was larger than that of the left. The knowledge of this variation may be of importance to orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, radiologists and anthropologists.

  19. The static and dynamic behavior of MEMS arch resonators near veering and the impact of initial shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-07-19

    We investigate experimentally and analytically the effect of initial shapes, arc and cosine wave, on the static and dynamic behavior of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) arch resonators. We show that by carefully choosing the geometrical parameters and the initial shape of the arch, the veering phenomenon (avoided-crossing) among the first two symmetric modes can be strongly activated. To demonstrate this, we study electrothermally tuned and electrostatically driven initially curved MEMS resonators. Upon changing the electrothermal voltage, we demonstrate high frequency tunability of arc resonators compared to the cosine-configuration resonators for the first and third resonance frequencies. For arc beams, we show that the first resonance frequency increases up to twice its fundamental value and the third resonance frequency decreases until getting very close to the first resonance frequency triggering the veering phenomenon. Around the veering regime, we study experimentally and analytically the dynamic behavior of the arc beam for different electrostatic loads. The analytical study is based on a reduced order model of a nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli shallow arch beam model. The veering phenomenon is also confirmed through a finite-element multi-physics and nonlinear model.

  20. Injuries and Footwear (Part 1): Athletic Shoe History and Injuries in Relation to Foot Arch Height and Training in Boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney; Orr, Robin; Grier, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the history of the athletic shoe, examines whether selecting running shoes based on foot arch height influences injuries, and examines historical data on injury rates when physical training (PT) is performed in boots versus running shoes. In the 1980s and into the 2000s, running shoe companies were advertising specialized shoes with "motion control," "stability," and "cushioning," designed for individuals with low, normal, and high arches, respectively. Despite marketing claims that these shoes would reduce injury rates, coordinated studies in Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps basic training showed that assigning or selecting shoes on this basis had no effect on injury rates. Consistent with this finding, biomechanical studies have shown that the relationships between arch height, foot joint mobility, and rear-foot motion are complex, variable, and frequently not as strong as often assumed. In 1982, the US Army switched from PT in boots to PT in running shoes because of the belief that boots were causing injuries and that running shoes would reduce injury rates. However, a historical comparison of injury rates before and after the switch to running shoes showed virtually no difference in injury risk between the two periods. It is not clear at this point if the type of footwear effects injury incidence. 2015.

  1. A prospective study of the efficacy of various gloving techniques in the application of Erich arch bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, S P; Schimmele, S R; Johnson, J A; Harper, J L

    1995-10-01

    This is a prospective study of the efficacy of three different techniques of triple gloving during the application of Erich arch bars. Two different cut-resistant glove liners and three layers of latex gloves were compared with double gloving. Thirty patients underwent Erich arch bar placement from first molar bilaterally on both arches. Two surgeons per case were arbitrarily placed into one of four groups that included double latex gloving, triple gloving with kevlar or stainless steel glove liners, or triple layer latex gloving, based on the availability of glove liners. All gloves were collected postoperatively and tested for perforation using water insufflation. One hundred eight of 120 outer gloves were perforated. There were 16 perforations in 11 inner gloves of the double latex glove group, but no perforations in the inner gloves of the triple latex glove group. There were two inner gloves with one perforation each in the stainless steel group and one glove with a perforation in the kevlar group. All techniques of triple gloving were found to be superior to double gloving. There was no difference between the techniques of triple gloving. During certain high-risk procedures greater protection to the surgeon can be obtained by triple gloving. The use of cut-resistant glove liners or triple layer latex gloving is superior to double layer latex gloving.

  2. Application of a wearable GPS unit for examining interindividual distances in a herd of Thoroughbred dams and their foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumio; Tanabe, Tomoki; Murase, Harutaka; Tominari, Masataka; Kawai, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) units are now lightweight and compact. They have proven useful for analyzing the behavioral characteristics of horses in pastures. Because the GPS records data in latitude and longitude, it may be feasible to calculate the distance between GPS units. The present study aimed to confirm the applicability of GPS units in behavioral studies on horses. For this, we analyzed the accuracy of the distances calculated from GPS units using Hubeny's distance formula and of the monthly changes in interindividual distances obtained from GPS units worn by Thoroughbred dams and their foals in a pasture until weaning. The calculated inter-GPS distances were highly accurate. The regression line was linear, and the squared correlation coefficient (r2) was 0.9998. During the first month of age, the interindividual dam-dam and foal-foal distances were significantly greater than the dam-foal distance. During the second month of age, the dam-foal distance increased once and gradually decreased up to the fifth month of age. During the sixth month of age, the dam-foal distance was significantly greater than the foal-foal distance. The GPS distances calculated using Hubeny's distance formula were useful for analyzing changes in interindividual distances in a herd of Thoroughbred dams and their foals. Most likely, calculation of the distance between GPS units worn on equine head collars is likely to become a very useful tool as an objective index for quantifying equine behavioral observations.

  3. Spatial multicriteria decision analysis of flood risks in aging-dam management in China: a framework and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Qian, Xin; Zhang, Yuchao; Sheng, Jinbao; Shen, Dengle; Ge, Yi

    2011-05-01

    Approximately 30,000 dams in China are aging and are considered to be high-level risks. Developing a framework for analyzing spatial multicriteria flood risk is crucial to ranking management scenarios for these dams, especially in densely populated areas. Based on the theories of spatial multicriteria decision analysis, this report generalizes a framework consisting of scenario definition, problem structuring, criteria construction, spatial quantification of criteria, criteria weighting, decision rules, sensitivity analyses, and scenario appraisal. The framework is presented in detail by using a case study to rank dam rehabilitation, decommissioning and existing-condition scenarios. The results show that there was a serious inundation, and that a dam rehabilitation scenario could reduce the multicriteria flood risk by 0.25 in the most affected areas; this indicates a mean risk decrease of less than 23%. Although increased risk (<0.20) was found for some residential and commercial buildings, if the dam were to be decommissioned, the mean risk would not be greater than the current existing risk, indicating that the dam rehabilitation scenario had a higher rank for decreasing the flood risk than the decommissioning scenario, but that dam rehabilitation alone might be of little help in abating flood risk. With adjustments and improvement to the specific methods (according to the circumstances and available data) this framework may be applied to other sites.

  4. Geomorphic and vegetation changes in a meandering dryland river regulated by a large dam, Sauce Grande River, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Ana; Peiry, Jean-Luc; Campo, Alicia M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates post-dam geomorphic and vegetation changes in the Sauce Grande River, a meandering dryland river impounded by a large water-conservation dam. As the dam impounds a river section with scarce influence of tributaries, sources for fresh water and sediment downstream are limited. Changes were inspected based on (i) analysis of historical photographs/imagery spanning pre- (1961) and post-dam (1981, 2004) channel conditions for two river segments located above and below the dam, and (ii) field survey of present channel conditions for a set of eight reference reaches along the river segments. Whilst the unregulated river exhibited active lateral migration with consequent adjustments of the channel shape and size, the river section below the dam was characterized by (i) marked planform stability (93 to 97%), and by (ii) vegetation encroachment leading to alternating yet localized contraction of the channel width (up to 30%). The present river displays a moribund, stable channel where (i) redistribution of sediment along the river course no longer occurs and (ii) channel forms constitute a remnant of a fluvial environment created before closing the dam, under conditions of higher energy. In addition to providing new information on the complex geomorphic response of dryland rivers to impoundment, this paper represents the very first geomorphic assessment of the regulated Sauce Grande and therefore provides an important platform to underpin further research assessing the geomorphic state of this highly regulated dryland river.

  5. [Clinical study of treatment effects on deep overbite: a comparison between Multiloop edgewise arch wire and manufactured artificial NiTi reverse-curve arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-jun

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of multiloop edgewise arch wire(MEAW) and NiTi reverse-curve arch in correcting deep overbite. Twenty cases(12-27 year of age)with deep overbite were treated with MEAW or NiTi reverse-curve arch. Pre-and post-treatment cephalogram were taken and analyzed. SPSS13.0 software package was used for paired t test. Two methods could intrude incisors and extrude molars.Maxilla and mandibular had no apparent changes, but less time was spent in the MEAW group. Two methods could correct deep overbite by the same mechanism, but the MEAW has more effective results.

  6. Field Experimental Analysis of Prototype Twin Dam Failure Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Fu-Min; Chen, Su-Chin; An, Hsiuan-Pei

    2015-04-01

    We constructed a full scale two-dam system in Landao Creek, Huisun forest, Taiwan. From its own alluvium to investigate the dam break morphology and physical properties between two dams with three intervals in 16.2m (case 1), 32.4m (case 2) and 64.8m (case 3). We adjusted the interval by fixed upstream dam and changed downstream dam site to observed and analyzed dam failure processes and hydraulic properties of the dam system. Grain size distribution investigation and 3D Lidar model of the stream bed were executed before and after dams break to discuss the river morphology evolution. In addition, to explore the type of breach varying with time, we used the method of 3D Remodeling from Motion Structure with Multi-View Stereo, which is a 3D spatial modeling process by photoing an object at same time in more than four different angles with over 70% overlap to each other, to construct the 3D model of dams system in this study. Furthermore, the dam break process were analyzed by cameras images and data recorded from water level gauges. The result showed that the shortest intervals in Case 1 result in a stronger torrent impact at upstream side of downstream dam, more significant reduction in dam intensity and wider breach which was 22% more than that in Case 2. On the contrary, the failure duration between two dams in Case 3 was 4.0 and 2.7 times longer than that in Case 1 and Case 2, respectively. Consequently, the decrement of dam interval led to a greater damage and rapid increment of water level which was prompted by outburst flow from the upstream dam failure at downstream dam, and shorter failure duration in two-dam system. In addition, the transport distance of sediment which yielded from upstream dam breach depend on whether downstream was obstructed or not. The 90% sediment of upstream dam breach were deposited on the upstream side of downstream dam with a comparison of entire loss in case of downstream dam.

  7. Investigation of geophysical methods for assessing seepage and internal erosion in embankment dams : a study of through-dam seismic testing at WAC Bennett Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffran, P.; Jeffries, M. [BC Hydro, Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2005-07-15

    Crosshole tomography is used to establish the distribution of seismic velocity between drill holes. The through-dam mode takes advantage of the triangular cross-section of earth embankments, obviating the need for drill holes. Seismic energy, generated on one face of the dam, passes underneath the crest and is detected by sensors arrayed on the opposite face. The sinkholes discovered at WAC Bennett Dam in 1996 provided an opportunity to test the procedure. Using p-wave energy, two series of measurements were conducted, notably one immediately before remediation of one sinkhole, and a second one shortly after the sinkhole was repaired. The known defect was successfully imaged by the first round of measurements. This report presented the results of an investigation of the through-dam seismic method using propagation of seismic waves through a dam from upstream to downstream, or vice-versa. The purpose of the study was to determine if this procedure could characterize the distribution of seismic velocity within a dam in an accurate and cost effective manner. The report presented the methods of velocity testing such as crosshole and downhole, and tomography; and through-dam measurements. Background to the Bennett Dam studies was also provided, with particular reference to the Bennett Dam sinkholes; sinkhole investigations; working hypothesis for sinkhole development; sinkhole number one characterization; and sinkhole remediation. An analysis of compression wave testing at Bennett Dam and shear wave testing was then offered. Other topics that were discussed included field test procedures; methodologies for data processing; p-waves versus s-waves; applicability of the research; and costs of through-dam surveys. It was concluded that under the right circumstances, through-dam seismic testing was capable of detecting changed conditions in an embankment dam. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 41 figs., 1 appendix.

  8. DAM-LAKEFRONT PLAZA: Revitalization of an Agriculture Reservoir Dam in Kashar-Tirana/Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valbona Koçi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dam-Lakefront Plaza in Kashar-Tirana/Albania is a research project that proposes not only the re-consideration and reinforcement of the artificial Reservoirs Dams built during Socialism in Albania, but envisions the maintenance of dams and revitalization of the lakeside area promoting the public-private collaboration. In addition, it envisions the generation of qualitative and lively public spaces in sub-urban areas as well. Admitting the artificial lakes as specific nodes of man-made infrastructure in the landscape, and consequently the dams (together with the drainage channels as important hydrotechnic elements of the flood protection infrastructure, this research intends to elaborate on one type of landscape infrastructure - the vertical screens, offering a mediation between the natural and built landscape.

  9. Dams life. Dams in operation; La vie des barrages. Barrages en exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the conclusions of the annual inspections of French dams in operation (fissures, water oozing, concrete swelling etc..). Only the observations which require a special attention are reported. (J.S.)

  10. Facilitating fish passage at ultra low head dams: An alternative to dam removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Ecosystem sustainability and returning the biological integrity to rivers continue to change the landscape of fish passage technology. Installing a conventional fishways has a limited degree of success in accommodating fish passage needs. Recently, the option of total dam removal has been gaining momentum among resource managers, conservationists, and even engineers. Certain dams, however, cannot be removed, and conventional fishways are either too expensive to build or the real estate is simply not available; yet freedom of passage must be attained. At the Little Falls Dam on the Potomac River a notch in the crest of the dam was installed to accommodate passage of fish. The notch has three labyrinth weirs used for energy dissipation. Water velocities are maintained at less than about 4 m/s anywhere within the passage structure during migratory season of the target species (American shad). Construction of this novel design was recently completed (March 2000) and future biological evaluations are ongoing. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  11. Anticipated sediment delivery to the lower Elwha River during and following dam removal: Chapter 2 in Coastal habitats of the Elwha River, Washington--biological and physical patterns and processes prior to dam removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Randle, Timothy J.; Bountry, Jennifer A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Jonathan A.; Curran, Christopher A.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    During and after the planned incremental removal of two large, century-old concrete dams between 2011 and 2014, the sediment-transport regime in the lower Elwha River of western Washington will initially spike above background levels and then return to pre-dam conditions some years after complete dam removal. Measurements indicate the upper reaches of the steep-gradient Elwha River, draining the northeast section of the Olympic Mountains, carries between an estimated 120,000 and 290,000 cubic meters of sediment annually. This large load has deposited an estimated 19 million cubic meters of sediment within the two reservoirs formed by the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams. It is anticipated that from 7 to 8 million cubic meters of this trapped sediment will mobilize and transport downstream during and after dam decommissioning, restoring the downstream sections of the sediment-starved river and nearshore marine environments. Downstream transport of sediment from the dam sites will have significant effects on channel morphology, water quality, and aquatic habitat during and after dam removal. Sediment concentrations are expected to be between 200 and 1,000 milligrams per liter during and just after dam removal and could rise to as much as 50,000 milligrams per liter during high flows. Downstream sedimentation in the river channel and flood plain will be potentially large, particularly in the lower Elwha River, an alluvial reach with a wide flood plain. Overall aggradation could be as much as one to several meters. Not all reservoir sediment, however, will be released to the river. Some material will remain on hill slopes and flood plains within the drained reservoirs in quantities that will depend on the hydrology, precipitation, and mechanics of the incising channel. Eventually, vegetation will stabilize this remaining reservoir sediment, and the overall sediment load in the restored river will return to pre-dam levels.

  12. Modelling approach for gravity dam break analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussekine Mourad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams in rivers can provide considerable benefits such as the supply of drinking and irrigation water; however the consequences which would result in the event of their failure could be catastrophic. They vary dramatically depending on the extent of the inundation area, the size of the population at risk.

  13. 75 FR 49429 - Metal and Nonmetal Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... monitored at frequent intervals by a person trained to recognize unusual conditions; be inspected by a... identify unusual conditions and signs of instability. Personnel with more specialized knowledge of dam... be qualified for their level of responsibility and trained in inspection procedures. 11. What...

  14. Resilience scales of a dammed tropical river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Elisa; Schmid, Martin; Wehrli, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Artificial river impoundments disrupt the seasonality and dynamics of thermal, chemical, morphological and ecological regimes in river systems. These alterations affect the aquatic ecosystems in space and time and specifically modify the seasonality and the longitudinal gradients of important biogeochemical processes. Resilience of river systems to anthropogenic stressors enables their recovery along the flow path; however little is known about the longitudinal distance that rivers need to partially restore their physical, chemical and biological integrity. In this study, the concept of a "resilience scale" will be explored for different water quality parameters downstream of Kariba dam, the largest artificial lake in the Zambezi basin (South-East Africa). The goal of this project is to develop a modelling framework to investigate and quantify the impact of large dams on downstream water quality in tropical context. In particular, we aim to assess the degree of reversibility of the main downstream alterations (temperature, oxygen, nutrients) and consequently the quantification of their longitudinal extent. Coupling in-situ measurements with hydraulic and hydrological parameters such as travel times, will allow us to define a physically-based parametrization of the different resilience scales for tropical rivers. The results will be used for improving future dam management at the local scale and assessing the ecological impact of planned dams at the catchment scale.

  15. living in Kapulukaya Dam Lake (Kirikkale, Turkey)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... This study involves the investigation of the breeding properties of Esox lucius (L., 1758) living in. Kapulukaya Dam Lake in Turkey. It was observed that the fish reaches sexual maturity at the age of 3, and the breeding period starts in February and ends in March. The highest and lowest gonadosomatic.

  16. Aquatic toxicity of the decontamination agent: Multipurpose (DAM) decontamination solution. Final report, May-December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, M.V.; Kurnas, C.W.; Chester, N.A.; Muse, W.T.

    1994-05-01

    A new formulation, Decontaminating Agent: Multipurpose (DAM) Decontamination Solution, is being considered as a replacement to the DS-2 decontaminating solution. The new formulation is composed of calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Since this is a new formulation little environmental data exists. To estimate potential impact to an aquatic environment, Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum (a luminescent marine bacterium) were exposed to the DAM solution and to the individual components (Calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone). The toxicity of the DAM solution to D. magna and P. phosphoreum was 5000 and 0.00053, respectively (highly toxic). The toxicity of calcium hypochlorite' and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone to daphnia was 0.04 mg/L (highly toxic) and 107 mg/L (moderately toxic), respectively.

  17. Dam that social networking: connecting South Africa's major dams to social media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available appealing to the general public, the Internet was trawled for additional information. This additional information was appended to the water level status updates. Sites such as YouTube, Google Scholar, Google Books, and Google News were automatically... searched on a regular basis for various keywords such as ?Vaal Dam Sluice Gates? and ?Bloemhof Dam fishing?. The information which was retrieved on those automatic searches was randomly appended to the water level information. 8. Evaluation...

  18. Experimental Research on the Dam-Break Mechanisms of the Jiadanwan Landslide Dam Triggered by the Wenchuan Earthquake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fu-gang; Yang, Xing-guo; Hao, Ming-hui

    2013-01-01

    Dam breaks of landslide dams are always accompanied by large numbers of casualties, a large loss of property, and negative influences on the downstream ecology and environment. This study uses the Jiadanwan landslide dam, created by the Wenchuan earthquake, as a case study example. Several laboratory experiments are carried out to analyse the dam-break mechanism of the landslide dam. The different factors that impact the dam-break process include upstream flow, the boulder effect, dam size, and channel discharge. The development of the discharge channel and the failure of the landslide dam are monitored by digital video and still cameras. Experimental results show that the upstream inflow and the dam size are the main factors that impact the dam-break process. An excavated discharge channel, especially a trapezoidal discharge channel, has a positive effect on reducing peak flow. The depth of the discharge channel also has a significant impact on the dam-break process. The experimental results are significant for landslide dam management and flood disaster prevention and mitigation. PMID:23844387

  19. Effects of asthma and inhalation corticosteroids on the dental arch morphology in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S S; Nandlal, B

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary, environmental and developmental factors play an important role in dentofacial development, as well as the initiation of malocclusion disorder. Allergic phenomenon such as asthma that induces an alternative mode of breathing in patients is a contributing factor in development of the dental arch. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the dentoalveolar morphology in asthmatic children and to analyze the effects of asthmatic medications on the dental arch. This study is centered on 44 asthmatic children aged between 6-12 years from J.S.S Hospital, Mysore. Selected variables from model analysis of the casts of the asthmatic group were subjected to comparison with those of the non-asthmatic group, which comprised of 44 non-asthmatic children. Selected parameters were arch width, arch length and palatal depth. Impressions of upper and lower arches were made with rubber based impression material. A sliding digital caliper was used to measure the casts for arch width and arch length. A palatal depth gauge was used to measure the palatal depth. Differences in arch widths, arch lengths and palatal depths between asthmatics and non-asthmatics groups were evaluated by independent sample t-tests. Chi-square test was applied to assess the frequency of occurrence of malocclusion in the asthmatic children. The results obtained revealed that the arch length and palatal depth of asthmatic group had higher values compared to that of non-asthmatic groups for both age groups (6 to 8-year-old males and females, 10 to 12-year-old males and females). Inter molar width showed a significant lower value in asthmatics in the maxillary arches of 10 to 12-year-old females. Fifty percent of the asthmatic children aged 10 to 12-years had open-bite. Children under regular medication showed significant deviation in the dentoalveolar morphology as compared to those under irregular medication. The present study proves a strong relation between asthma and dentoalveolar morphology.

  20. Dam-breach analysis and flood-inundation mapping for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Samuel H.; Ashworth, Chad E.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2012-01-01

    Dams provide beneficial functions such as flood control, recreation, and reliable water supplies, but they also entail risk: dam breaches and resultant floods can cause substantial property damage and loss of life. The State of Oklahoma requires each owner of a high-hazard dam, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency defines as dams for which failure or misoperation probably will cause loss of human life, to develop an emergency action plan specific to that dam. Components of an emergency action plan are to simulate a flood resulting from a possible dam breach and map the resulting downstream flood-inundation areas. The resulting flood-inundation maps can provide valuable information to city officials, emergency managers, and local residents for planning the emergency response if a dam breach occurs. Accurate topographic data are vital for developing flood-inundation maps. This report presents results of a cooperative study by the city of Lawton, Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to model dam-breach scenarios at Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka near Lawton and to map the potential flood-inundation areas of such dam breaches. To assist the city of Lawton with completion of the emergency action plans for Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka Dams, the USGS collected light detection and ranging (lidar) data that were used to develop a high-resolution digital elevation model and a 1-foot contour elevation map for the flood plains downstream from Lakes Ellsworth and Lawtonka. This digital elevation model and field measurements, streamflow-gaging station data (USGS streamflow-gaging station 07311000, East Cache Creek near Walters, Okla.), and hydraulic values were used as inputs for the dynamic (unsteady-flow) model, Hydrologic Engineering Center's River Analysis System (HEC-RAS). The modeled flood elevations were exported to a geographic information system to produce flood-inundation maps. Water-surface profiles were developed for a 75-percent probable maximum