WorldWideScience

Sample records for high ar cases

  1. New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages on Oligocene volcanic rocks of northwestern Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.

    2016-02-01

    New, high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages from volcanic rocks in northwestern Kenya are provided for some areas of exposure in this remote area. We report seven 40Ar/39Ar ages generated from single crystal total fusion experiments on alkali feldspar separated from volcanic rocks in the Mogila, Songot, and Lokwanamur Ranges and the Gatome valley. A rhyolite from the lower part of the sequence in the Mogila Range yielded ages of 32.31 ± 0.06 Ma and 32.33 ± 0.07 Ma, and a rhyolite near the top of that sequence yielded 31.67 ± 0.04 Ma. A single sample from the Songot Range yielded an age of 32.49 ± 0.07 Ma, slightly older than the rocks collected from Mogila. In both ranges the early Oligocene rhyolites are underlain by basalts, as is also the case in the Labur Range. Ages of 25.95 ± 0.03 Ma, 25.91 ± 0.04 Ma, and 27.15 ± 0.03 Ma were measured on alkali feldspar from rhyolites from the Lokwanamur Range, and the nearby Gatome valley. All of these rocks are part of an episode of widespread volcanism in northwestern Kenya in the mid-to late Oligocene that is not currently known from the Ethiopian Rift Valley.

  2. Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS): A review and case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waldron, Jennie M

    2011-08-29

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a rare, autosomal dominant condition characterized by ocular, craniofacial, dental, and periumbilical abnormalities. Relatively little information exists on this syndrome within the dental literature despite the fact that midface hypoplasia and maxillary hypodontia are classical presenting features of this syndrome. This is a case report of a 7-year-old Caucasian female with ARS who presented with significant ocular and dental anomalies. She was also found to have osteopenia. Her dental condition is described, her immediate treatment is shown, and her long-term treatment needs are discussed.

  3. BUSINESS ETHICS: THE CASE OF AR CONSULTORIA LTD A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fantoni Bencke

    2014-03-01

    business: the significant taxes, lack of incentives and credit available and the opportunity to “make a little extra” through informal sales. AR Consultoria’s entry to the market was marked by these and other difficulties. This case aims at presenting a real situation that can be found in some organizational sectors areas, which demands readers to take a decision and an ethical stance when faced with moral challenges.

  4. The Functions of a High-Frequency Collocation in Native and Learner Discourse: The Case of French "c'est" and Swedish "det ar"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartning, Inge; Hammarberg, Bjorn

    2007-01-01

    This cross-linguistic study investigates the functionality and use of one particular linguistic collocation in each of two languages, viz. the French c'est and the Swedish det ar, both meaning "it is." The data are drawn from conversational speech production by adult native speakers and second language learners. The investigation shows that these…

  5. Astronomical calibration of 40Ar/39Ar reference minerals using high-precision, multi-collector (ARGUSVI) mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.; Matchan, E. L.; Honda, M.; Kuiper, K. F.

    2017-01-01

    The new generation of multi-collector mass spectrometers (e.g. ARGUSVI) permit ultra-high precision (1%) in 40K decay constants and the ages of natural reference minerals that form the basis of the technique. For example, reported ages for widely used 40Ar/39Ar reference materials, such as the ca. 28 Ma Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCTs) and the ca. 1.2 Ma Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACRs), vary by >1%. Recent attempts to independently calibrate these reference minerals have focused on K-Ar analyses of the same minerals and inter-comparisons with astronomically tuned tephras in sedimentary sequences and U-Pb zircon ages from volcanic rocks. Most of these studies used older generation (effectively single-collector) mass spectrometers that employed peak-jumping analytical methods to acquire 40Ar/39Ar data. In this study, we reassess the inter-calibration and ages of commonly used 40Ar/39Ar reference minerals Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCTs), Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACRs) and Mount Dromedary biotite (MD2b; equivalent to GA-1550 biotite), relative to the astronomically tuned age of A1 Tephra sanidine (A1Ts), Faneromeni section, Crete (Rivera et al., 2011), using a multi-collector ARGUSVI mass spectrometer. These analyses confirm the exceptional precision capability (0.1% in the 40Ar/39Ar ages of reference minerals without consideration of recoil artefacts, thus limiting the benefits of high precision multi-collector analyses. Significant improvement to the accuracy of the 40Ar/39Ar method (<0.1%) will require further inter-laboratory 40Ar/39Ar studies utilizing multi-collector mass spectrometry, additional constraints on recoil 39ArK loss from reference minerals, further resolution of discrepancies between astronomically tuned sedimentary successions and refinement of the 238U/206Pb zircon age cross-calibration approach.

  6. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Jehol Biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Renne, P. R.; Fang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, were discovered from the Yixian Formation and the overlying Jiufotang Formation in Inner Mongolia, Hebei Province and Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Because of the exceptional preservation of fossils, the Jehol Biota is one of the most important Mesozoic fossil outcrops and referred to as a "Mesozoic Pompeii". The Jehol Biota has provided a rare opportunity to address questions about the origin of birds, the evolution of feathers and flight, the early diversification of angiosperms and the timing of the radiation of placental mammals. The Tuchengzi Formation, which lies unconformably just below the Yixian Formation and consists mainly of variegated sandstones, is less fossiliferous than the two overlying formations. However, dinosaur tracks, silicified wood and compressed plants are found in this formation. A systematic 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations was undertaken to provide a framework for understanding the timing and duration of the Jehol Biota and evolutionary events represented within it. Furthermore, determining the absolute age of the Tuchengzi Formation provides information to interpret abundant dinosaur tracks within and provide better age constrains for the beginning of the Jehol Biota. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data for six tuff samples and two basalt samples collected from the Tuchengzi, the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations near the classic outcrops in western Liaoning, NE China. We obtain an age of 139.5 ± 1.0 Ma for the uppermost Tuchengzi Formation, an age of 129.7 ± 0.5 Ma for a basaltic lava from the bottom of the Yixian Formation and an age of 122.1 ± 0.3 Ma for a tuff from the base of the overlying Jiufotang Formation. Our data indicate that the Yixian Formation was deposited during the Early Cretaceous, the Barremian to early Aptian, within a time span

  7. Detecting single graphene layer by using fluorescence from high-speed Ar^7+ ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    A highly-charged-ion interacting with graphite causes structural change in nano-scales [1]. While when the ion's kinetic energy reaches few MeVs, the induced is not the structural change but electronic excitation. An experiment [2] showed fluorescence from Ar^7+ ions penetrating through carbon foil with kinetic energy of 2 MeV. Motivated by this experiment, we tested interaction between an Ar^7+ ion and a graphene sheet by the time-dependent density functional approach, and found that the electronic excitation in the Ar^ 7+ ion is also the case even when the incident kinetic energy is 500 KeV and the target thickness is only mono-atomic layer. This simulation suggests the possibility of detecting a suspended mono-atomic layer of graphene [3] by monitoring fluorescence from the penetrated Ar^7+ ions. We will discuss its importance for analyzing bombardment of solids by highly charged, high-speed ions and possible experiments according to the present result. References: [1] T. Meguro, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett 79, 3866 (2001). [2] S. Bashkin, H. Oona, E. Veje, Phys, Rev. A25, 417 (1982). [3] J. Mayer et al., Nature (London), 446, 60 (2007).

  8. High-Energy Ions Emitted from Ar Clusters Irradiated by Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LEI An-Le; NI Guo-Quan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the energy spectra of Ar ions emitted from Ar clusters irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses. The Ar clusters were produced in the adiabatic expansion of Ar gas into vacuum at high backing pressures. The laser peak intensity was about 2×106 W/cm2 with a pulse duration of 45 fs. The maximum and the average energies of Ar ions are 0.2 MeV and 15kev at a backing pressure of 2. S MPa, respectively. They are almost independent of the backing pressures in the range of 0.6 to 4.5 MPa.

  9. The science case for 37Ar as a monitor for underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Derek A.; Orrell, John L.; Bowyer, Ted W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hayes, James C.

    2010-06-04

    A new calculation of the production of 37Ar from nuclear explosion neutron interactions on 40Ca in a suite of common sub-surface materials (rock, etc) is presented. Even in mineral structures that are relatively low in Ca, the resulting 37Ar signature is large enough for detection in cases of venting or gaseous diffusion driven by barometric pumping. Field and laboratory detection strategies and projected sensitivities are presented.

  10. THE MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IN AR RAIHAN BANDAR LAMPUNG JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Nuraini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study portrays the human resources development management in Junior High School Ar Raihan Bandar Lampung. It was designed into five stages, i.e. planning, designing (determining, collecting data, analyzing data, and drawing conclusion. The study found that (1 the selection process the teachers’, librarians’ and laboratory personnels’ recruitment was nil; (2 the recruitment gave priority only to teachers, counselors, and administrative staff;; (3 the employment of librarians and laboratory assistants becomes a second priority compared to teachers, counselors, and administrative staff; (5 the school gave an equal renumeration to the teachers and the education personnel; (6 the focus of human development was on teachers.

  11. High performance step-down AR coatings for high refractive-index IR materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, J A; Ho, F

    1982-01-15

    A numerical thin film synthesis program has been used to design high performance antireflection coatings of the step-down type for a number of IR window materials. In the calculations, the dispersion of the optical constants of all the materials is accounted for. Various trade offs between the width of the AR region and the maximum reflection within that width are possible. For example, an AR coating for germanium has been found in which the reflectance is zinc selenide, and zinc sulfide substrates. The experimentally measured performance of several coatings will be given.

  12. Energy Levels of Highly Ionized Ar ⅩⅣ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhang; LI Ping; DENG Xiao-Hui

    2006-01-01

    With the Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamics corrections considered, relativistic configuration interaction calculations have been carried out in the extended optimal level scheme using multi-configuration Dirac-Fock wave functions on the 204 energy levels and electric dipole transitions of Ar ⅩⅣ. The results of electric dipole transitions are in good agreement with experiments. Among the energy levels calculated, the lowest 125 levels are in good agreement with available experimental and other theoretical ones, and the other 79 levels are new ones obtained by the present work. This wide range of atomic energy levels is useful in astrophysics and plasma physics.

  13. High resolution mapping of Dense spike-ar (dsp.ar) to the genetic centromere of barley chromosome 7H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Druka, Arnis; Franckowiak, Jerome; Morgante, Michele; Waugh, Robbie; Stein, Nils

    2012-02-01

    Spike density in barley is under the control of several major genes, as documented previously by genetic analysis of a number of morphological mutants. One such class of mutants affects the rachis internode length leading to dense or compact spikes and the underlying genes were designated dense spike (dsp). We previously delimited two introgressed genomic segments on chromosome 3H (21 SNP loci, 35.5 cM) and 7H (17 SNP loci, 20.34 cM) in BW265, a BC(7)F(3) nearly isogenic line (NIL) of cv. Bowman as potentially containing the dense spike mutant locus dsp.ar, by genotyping 1,536 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in both BW265 and its recurrent parent. Here, the gene was allocated by high-resolution bi-parental mapping to a 0.37 cM interval between markers SC57808 (Hv_SPL14)-CAPSK06413 residing on the short and long arm at the genetic centromere of chromosome 7H, respectively. This region putatively contains more than 800 genes as deduced by comparison with the collinear regions of barley, rice, sorghum and Brachypodium, Classical map-based isolation of the gene dsp.ar thus will be complicated due to the infavorable relationship of genetic to physical distances at the target locus.

  14. TACE with Ar-He Cryosurgery Combined Minimal Invasive Technique for the Treatment of Primary NSCLC in 139 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhi ZHOU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective TACE, Ar-He target cryosurgery and radioactive seeds implantation are the mainly micro-invasive methods in the treatment of lung cancer. This article summarizes the survival quality after treatment, the clinical efficiency and survival period, and analyzes the advantages and shortcomings of each methods so as to evaluate the clinical effect of non-small cell lung cancer with multiple minimally invasive treatment. Methods All the 139 cases were nonsmall cell lung cancer patients confirmed by pathology and with follow up from July 2006 to July 2009 retrospectively, and all of them lost operative chance by comprehensive evaluation. Different combination of multiple minimally invasive treatments were selected according to the blood supply, size and location of the lesion. Among the 139 cases, 102 cases of primary and 37 cases of metastasis to mediastinum, lung and chest wall, 71 cases of abundant blood supply used the combination of superselective target artery chemotherapy, Ar-He target cryoablation and radiochemotherapy with seeds implantation; 48 cases of poor blood supply use single Ar-He target cryoablation; 20 cases of poor blood supply use the combination of Ar-He target cryoablation and radiochemotheraoy with seeds implantation. And then the pre- and post-treatment KPS score, imaging data and the result of follow up were analyzed. Results The KPS score increased 20.01 meanly after the treatment. Follow up 3 years, 44 cases of CR, 87 cases of PR, 3 cases of NC and 5 cases of PD, and the efficiency was 94.2%. Ninety-nine cases of 1 year survival (71.2%, 43 cases of 2 years survival (30.2%, 4 cases with over 3 years survival and the median survival was 19 months. Average survival was (16±1.5months. There was no severe complications, such as spinal cord injury, vessel and pericardial aspiration. Conclusion Minimally invasive technique is a highly successful, micro-invasive and effective method with mild complications

  15. Defining the Tristan-Gough Hotspot: High-Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanism at Tristan da Cunha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Explaining the spatial distribution of intra-plate volcanism is an important geologic problem. The Walvis Ridge is a uniquely-shaped hotspot trail in the South Atlantic that is not fully explained by the prevailing mantle plume paradigm. About halfway through its 130 Myr history, Walvis shows a morphological shift from a continuous ridge to a diffuse region of guyots arranged in two volcanic tracks. Recent volcanism at both Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island suggests these tracks are produced by two hotspots sourced from a single plume. However, the islands are located more than 400 km apart, which does not conform to our understanding of plumes as narrow, semi-stationary upwellings. It remains unclear which of the two islands better represents the current plume position. New ages from previously unstudied seamounts show that Tristan is younger than surrounding volcanism, whereas Gough appears to fit the local age progression (Schnur et al. 2014). Modern radiometric ages suggest the main island of Tristan may have been active for up to 1.3 ± 0.2 Myr (O'Connor and le Roex 1992). However, the seemingly older Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands have yet to be reliably dated and could be up to 18 ± 4 Ma based on K-Ar ages (Miller in Baker et al. 1964). In order to confidently delineate the duration of volcanism at Tristan, we present the results of 29 new 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on biotite, hornblende, plagioclase and groundmass separates from rocks collected on Inaccessible, Nightingale and Middle islands. Our results show that volcanism on all three islands is young, in most cases Middle islands are therefore too old and should be ignored in interpretations of plume dynamics. These results also show that magma was being supplied simultaneously to both Tristan and Gough over recent geologic time. Two possible explanations for this are that (1) there is a broad plume underlying the area, with focus points at Tristan and Gough or (2) hotspot magma

  16. Highly hydrophobic materials for ArF immersion lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Yoko; Shirota, Naoko; Sasaki, Takashi; Murata, Koichi; Yokokoji, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In immersion lithography, the impact of water on resist performance and the possibility of damage to the lens by the components eluted from the resist material are seriously concern. And much work has shown that controlling the water-resist interface is critical to enabling high scan rates. Many topcoat materials have been developed to control the aforementioned interfacial properties. Developable topcoats have been particularly investigated as suitable candidates for its applicability to the resist developing process. Achieving the balance between the low surface energy required for higher receding contact angle and the base solubility for topcoat removal is challenging. We have already reported FUGU polymer which have partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and hexafluoroalcohol(HFA) group and showed that its developer solubility was excellent but hydrophobicity was insufficient for high scan rate. We have also reported that co-polymers of FUGU and highly fluorinated monomers which have perfluorinated cyclic structure had sufficient hydrophobicity but lower developer solubility. We have found that it was difficult to use these copolymers in themselves as topcoat. But by blending of moderate amount of these copolymers into FUGU polymer, we have finally obtained highly hydrophobic developer-soluble topcoat. Hydrophobicity can be controlled by blending ratio. Furthermore we have newly successfully synthesized a series of fluoropolymers, FIT polymer partially fluorinated monocyclic structure and having carboxylic acid group as developer-soluble unit. When FIT polymer as well as FUGU polymer, was blended to highly hydrophobic copolymer, the blended polymer also showed higher hydrophobicity keeping sufficient developer solubility.

  17. A high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar lava chronology and edifice construction history for Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Chris E.; Leonard, Graham S.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Gamble, John A.; Eaves, Shaun R.

    2016-11-01

    Ruapehu is an active 150 km3 andesite-dacite composite volcano located at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The growth of the present-day edifice has occurred throughout coeval eruptive and glacial histories since 200 ka. We present high-precision 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages for 46 samples and whole-rock major element geochemical data for 238 samples from lava flows. These new and existing data are interpreted in the context of geomorphologic and geologic mapping, volcano-ice interaction processes and glacier reconstructions to present an improved chronostratigraphic framework and new edifice evolution history for Ruapehu. Sub-glacial to ice-marginal effusive eruption of medium-K basaltic-andesites and andesites constructed the northern portion of the exposed edifice between 200 and 150 ka, and a wide southeast planèze as well as parts of the northern, eastern and western flanks between 160 and 80 ka. None of the dated lava flows have ages in the range of 80-50 ka, which may reflect an eruptive hiatus. Alternatively the lack of ages may be the result of erosion and burial of lavas and syn-eruptive glacial conveyance of lava flows to the ring-plain during glacial advance at 70-60 ka. From 50-15 ka edifice growth occurred via effusive eruptions onto the glaciated flanks of the volcano, resulting in construction of ice-bounded planèzes and ridges. The distribution of dated ice-marginal lavas indicates a general decrease in glacier thicknesses over this time, except for a short-lived period centred at 31 ka when peak ice cover was reached. The compositional ranges of medium- to high-K andesite and dacite lava flows within 50-35 ka eruptive packages define broadly bimodal high- and low-MgO trends. Lavas erupted at 35-22 ka have compositions that fill a transitional geochemical field between older dacites and younger andesites. Large-scale retreat of flank glaciers since 15 ka has resulted in intra-valley lava flow emplacement at elevations below

  18. High mass searches in CMS and ATLAS arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Swagata

    The latest results of high mass searches for new physics in a variety of final states from the CMS and ATLAS collaborations are presented. These searches are based on $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV proton-proton collisions data at the LHC collected in the year 2016 and 2015. No excess above expectation from Standard Model processes are observed and exclusion limits are set at the 95% confidence level on various benchmark models.

  19. Using high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to understand volcanic hazards within the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez lineament, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Heizler, M. T.; Lafferty, J.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Ar/Ar ages were generated for late Quaternary volcanic fields in the Rio Grande rift and along the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico, to assess the time-space patterns of volcanism and begin quantifying volcanic hazards for the region. The published chronology of most late Quaternary volcanic centers in the region is not sufficiently precise, accurate, or complete for a comprehensive volcanic hazard assessment. Ar/Ar ages generated as part of this study were determined using the high-sensitivity, multi-collector ARGUS VI mass spectrometer, which provides about an order of magnitude more precise isotopic measurements compared to older generation, single-detector mass spectrometers. Ar/Ar ages suggest an apparent increase in eruption frequency during the late Quaternary within the Raton-Clayton volcanic field, northeastern NM. Only four volcanoes erupted between 426±8 and 97±3 ka. Contrastingly, four volcanoes erupted between 55±2 and 32±5 ka. This last eruptive phase displays a west to east migration of volcanism, has repose periods of 0 to 17 ka, and an average recurrence rate of 1 eruption per 5750 ka. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, west-central NM, is composed of the ~100 late Quaternary basaltic vents. Preliminary results suggest that most of the Chain of Craters, the largest and oldest part of the Zuni-Bandera field, erupted between ~100 and 250 ka. Volcanism then migrated to the east, where published ages indicate at least seven eruptions between 50 and 3 ka. Both volcanic fields display a west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka, although the pattern is more pronounced in the Zuni-Bandera field. A reassessment of low-precision published ages for other late Quaternary volcanic fields in region indicates that most fields display a similar west to east migration of volcanism during the last ~500 ka. One possible mechanism to explain the observed patterns of volcanism is the westward migration of the North American plate relative

  20. Ar plasma treated polytetrafluoroethylene films for a highly efficient triboelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Yeong; Kim, Hyun Soo; Jung, Jong Hoon

    2016-12-01

    We report an Ar plasma treated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film based triboelectric device for a highly enhanced electric power generation. The plasma treatment of the PTFE in flowing Ar gas results in a sharp increase in surface roughness ( 46 nm), as compared with the as-received film ( 25 nm). In addition, the F ion content decreases whereas the O ion increases with increasing plasma reaction time. Because of the increased number of polar O ions, the surface becomes hydrophilic, as confirmed by water contact angle measurements. After the Ar plasma treatment, the PTFE based triboelectric device, which is periodically contacted with and separated from the ITO electrode, generates a 715 V open-circuit voltage and a 16 μA closed-circuit current, which are almost 79 and 32 times larger than those for as-received PTFE based device. Using the Ar plasma treated PTFE based triboelectric generator, we can turn on the 120 light emitting diodes (LEDs) without any batteries.

  1. Interpretation of discordant 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of mesozoic tholeiites from antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, R.J.; Sutter, J.F.; Elliot, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar ages of tholeiitic basalts of the Ferrar Group in the central Transantarctic Mountains indicate significant loss of radiogenic 40Ar from this unit over much of its outcrop area. Argon loss varies inversely with amount of devitrified matrix in the basalts, which have not been thermally or tectonically disturbed since extrusion. 40Ar/19Ar age-spectra of these tholeiites are generally discordant and indicate significant inhomogeneity in the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar with respect to 39Ar, but are distinctly different from release patterns of thermally disturbed samples. Amounts of argon redistribution vary directly with amounts of devitrification and are reflected in progressive modification of the age spectra. A model of redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar by devitrification of originally glassy matrix is suggested that is consistent with disturbance of the conventional K-Ar systematics as well as the 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra. Samples with substantial redistribution but minor loss of radiogenic argon yield age spectra whose apparent ages decrease from low-temperature to high-temperature steps, similar to those reported for some lunar basalts, breccias, and soils. Modification of all the age spectra is attributed to redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar during progressive devitrification, although 39Ar-recoil effects suggested by Turner and Cadogan (1974) may be a factor in some cases. Where devitrification involves most potassium sites within the basalt, 40Ar/39Ar age-plateaux may be formed that have no geologic significance. ?? 1977.

  2. 40Ar- 39Ar dating of detrital muscovite in provenance investigations: a case study from the Adelaide Rift Complex, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Peter W.; Turner, Simon P.; Kelley, Simon P.; Wartho, Jo-Anne; Sherlock, Sarah C.

    2004-11-01

    Detrital zircon ages are commonly used to investigate sediment provenance and supply routes. Here, we explore the advantages of employing multiple, complimentary techniques via a case study of the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian of the Adelaide Rift Complex, South Australia. Detrital muscovite Ar-Ar ages are presented from stratigraphic units, or equivalents, that have previously been the subject of U-Pb detrital zircon dating, and, in some cases, whole-rock Sm-Nd isotope studies. The zircon age ranges and whole-rock Sm-Nd isotope data suggest that early Neoproterozoic sediments from near the base of the Adelaide Rift Complex comprise a mixture of detritus derived from the adjacent Gawler Craton (Palaeoproterozoic to earliest Mesoproterozoic) and overlying Gairdner flood basalts. In contrast, detrital muscovites from this level have a broad scatter of Mesoproterozoic infrared (IR) laser total fusion Ar-Ar ages, while UV laser traverses indicate that the age spread reflects partial resetting by multiple heating events, rather than a mixture of sources. Younger Neoproterozoic sediments document replacement of the Gawler Craton by the more distant Musgrave and/or Albany-Fraser Orogens as the main provenance. The Cambrian Kanmantoo Group marks an abrupt change in depositional style and a new sediment source. The Kanmantoo Group have older Nd model ages than underlying strata, yet are dominated by near to deposition-aged (˜500-650 Ma) detrital zircons and muscovites, suggesting rapid cooling and exhumation of a tectonically active provenance region. Although this source remains uncertain, evidence points towards the distant Pan-African orogenic belts. Deposition in the Adelaide Rift Complex was terminated in the late Early Cambrian by the Delamerian Orogeny, and the results of previous detrital mineral dating studies from the Lachlan Fold Belt to the east are consistent with at least partial derivation of these sediments from reworked upper Adelaide Rift Complex (Kanmantoo

  3. High Spatial Resolution 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Impact Melt Breccias from Apollo 17 Boulders at Stations 2, 6, and 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several boulders located at the bases of the North and South Massifs were among the primary field targets of the Apollo 17 mission to the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon [1]. Some boulders are polylithologic, including Boulder 1 at Station 2 and the boulders at Stations 6 and 7. These boulders were the subjects of consortium studies [2, 3] that included 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to determine the ages of distinct lithologies within each boulder [e.g., 4-6]. We report new 40Ar/39Ar data for the impact melt breccias 72255, 76315, 77075, and 77135 obtained using the UV laser ablation microprobe (UVLAMP) methods of [7]. For 72255, we obtained a preliminary isochron date ca. 3814 Ma from 22 melt analyses, which is younger than published plateau dates (e.g., 3951-3835 Ma [4, 8]). Fifteen melt analyses of 76315 yield a preliminary isochron date ca. 3850 Ma, younger than the 3900 ± 16 Ma date reported by [8]. Melt analyses of 77075 yield preliminary dates between ca. 3797-3584 Ma, possibly reflecting partial loss of 40Ar. In this case, the oldest date may provide a minimum age for the formation of melt in 77075. Finally, the UVLAMP dates for the 77135 melt range from 3810-3361 Ma and corresponding Ca/K ratios range from ca. 100-6. Electron microprobe analyses of small (ca. 10s of microns wide) pockets of K-rich materials show that both K-rich glass and K-feldspar are present. The UVLAMP dates for 77135 likely reflect spatially variable 40Ar loss, consistent with published step heating results [e.g., 6]. References: [1] Schmitt (1973) Science, 182, 681-690. [2] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 1 - Stations 2 and 3 (South Massif). LPI. [3] Ryder (1993). Catalog of Apollo 17 Rocks: Volume 4 - North Massif. LPI. [4] Leich et al. (1975) The Moon, 14, 407-444. [5] Cadogan & Turner (1976). LPSC, 7, 2267-2285. [6] Stettler et al. (1978). LPSC, 9, 1113-1115. [7] Mercer et al. (2015) Sci. Adv., 1, e1400050. [8] Dalrymple & Ryder (1996). JGR, 101, 26069-26084.

  4. High Resolution AR5 Simulations of Climate Change for Mesoamerica using WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. M.; Oglesby, R. J.; Hays, C.

    2011-12-01

    Mesoamerica (the countries from Mexico to Colombia) has been identified by IPCC as a low-latitude, developing region at considerable risk to climate change. Furthermore, the complex topography of the region, and interactions with adjacent tropical oceans, makes understanding of potential climate change from global climate models alone very problematic. The real need, however, for making these extremely computationally-demanding model simulations is to better define local and regional climate change effects so as to better identify and quantify impacts and associated vulnerabilities. This is an essential precursor to developing robust adaptation strategies. Previously, we made simulations with the WRF regional climate model forced by the NCAR CCSM global climate model to make scenarios based on IPCC AR4. With the recent release of the CMIP global model runs for IPCC AR5, opportunity has been provided to update the previous simulations. From a technical perspective, two key advancements have taken place: 1) The global simulations for AR5 feature models that are significantly improved and are run at higher resolution, and 2) Enhancements to computational resources means that we can run WRF at very high resolution for much more of Mesoamerica. In particular, the mountainous area simulated at 4 km resolution has been expanded greatly; also Jamaica and Hispanola are also now included. The experiment strategy includes simulations for 2006-2010 ('control') and 2056-2060 ('climate change scenario'), under the IPCC A1B emission scenario. The runs are underway as of this writing (expected completion November 2011). First results will be presented at the meeting, with focus on both how they differ from the earlier AR4 simulations, and on key implications for the Mesoamerican region.

  5. High-order harmonic generation in Ar and Ne with a 45fs intense laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐至展; 王迎松; 翟侃; 李学信; 刘亚青; 杨晓东; 张正泉; 李儒新; 张文琦

    1999-01-01

    Experimental results of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in Ar and Ne gas driven with a 45fs Ti: sapphire laser are presented. The shortest-wavelength harmonic emission corresponding to the 91st order harmonic (8.63nm) is observed in argon. In neon, the harmonics up to order 131 (5.99nm) is also observed. The effects of gas density, laser intensity, free electron and the focusing geometry parameters of the laser beam on the process of harmonic generation are investigated. The direct experimental evidence that an increased electron density causes a degenerated harmonic radiation is obtained.

  6. Multiple target ionization in collisions between highly charged ions and Ar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deNijs, G; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1996-01-01

    We have performed measurements on charge-state distributions of target ions produced in collisions of C6+, N6+, O6+, Ne6+, Ar6+ and Kr6+ on Ar. Charge states of Ar target ions higher than the initial projectile charge state are observed for C6+, N6+ and O6+. This intriguing observation seems to

  7. Pyroclastic chronology of the Sancy stratovolcano (Mont-Dore, French Massif Central): New high-precision 40Ar/39Ar constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomade, Sébastien; Scaillet, Stéphane; Pastre, Jean-François; Nehlig, Pierre

    2012-05-01

    The Sancy (16 km2) is the youngest of the two stratovolcanoes that constitute the Mont-Dore Massif (Massif Central, France). The restricted number of high precision radio-isotopic ages currently limits our knowledge of the pyroclastic chronology of this edifice which is the source of many tephra layers detected in middle Pleistocene sequences in southeast Europe. To improve our knowledge of the building phases of this stratovolcano, we collected thirteen pyroclastic units covering the entire proximal record. We present 40Ar/39Ar single grain laser dating performed in the facility hosted at the LSCE (Gif-sur-Yvette, France). The 40Ar/39Ar ages range from 1101 ± 11 ka to 392 ± 7 ka (1σ external). Four pyroclastic cycles lasting on average 100 ka were identified (C. I to C. IV). C. I corresponds to the earlier explosive phase between 1101 ka and 1000 ka and starts about 100 ka earlier than previously thought. The second pyroclastic cycle (C. II) is the main pyroclastic episode spanning from 818 to 685 ka. This cycle is constituted of a minimum of 8 major pyroclastic eruptions and includes a major event that corresponds to a large plinian eruption at 719 ± 10 ka (1σ external) and recorded as a 1.4 m thick layer 60 km south-east of the Sancy volcano. The link between this large eruption and formation of a caldera stays however, hypothetical. The third pyroclastic cycle (C. III) found in the northeastern part of the Sancy (Mont-Dore valley) spanned from 642 to 537 ka. Finally, the youngest pyroclastic cycle (C. IV) starts at 392 ka and probably ends around 280 ka. The age versus geographic location of each pyroclastic cycle indicates three preferential directions of channeling of the pyroclastic events and/or collapse of the volcanic edifice: northwest to west (C. I), southeast (C. II) and finally north to northeast (C. III and IV). The new high precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Queureuilh bas pyroclastic unit (642 ± 9 ka) is identical within error with the U/Pb age

  8. Laser spectroscopy on forbidden transitions in trapped highly charged Ar(13+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäckel, V; Klawitter, R; Brenner, G; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Ullrich, J

    2011-09-30

    We demonstrate resonant fluorescence laser spectroscopy in highly charged ions (HCI) stored in an electron beam ion trap by investigating the dipole-forbidden 1s(2)2s(2)2p (2)P(3/2)-(2)P(1/2) transition in boronlike Ar(13+) ions. Forced evaporative cooling yielded a high resolving power, resulting in an accurate wavelength determination to λ=441.255 68(26)  nm. By applying stronger cooling and two-photon excitation, new optical frequency standards based upon ultrastable transitions in such HCI could be realized in the future, e.g., for the search of time variations of the fine-structure constant.

  9. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Jehol fossil-bearing formations in SE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Hemming, S. R.; Fang, Y.; Mesko, G. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Jehol Biota, defined as the characteristic Eosestheria-Ephemeropsis-Lycoptera assemblage, is known to be widely distributed in East Asia. The fossils of the Jehol Biota are magnificent, exquisitely preserved and extraordinarily diverse. Since the 1990s, abundant and varied fossils, including plants, insects, salamanders, dinosaurs, pterosaurs, choristoderes, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, have been discovered from the Dabeigou, Yixian and Jiufotang Formations in Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning and Hebei Provinces of NE China. Each of these Jehol fossil-bearing formations has preserved a distinct assemblage of invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Based on major invertebrates groups, the Jehol Biota has been divided into three developing stages and a hypothesis about its distribution and spread has been proposed. There is a clear progression towards greater diversity through the three phases and it corresponds to a progressive paleogeographic expansion through time. In addition to their extensive distribution in Inner Mongolia and NE China, other strata that contain Jehol related fossils have been identified in the central and most provinces of eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia and Siberia. However, the detailed correlation between the classic Jehol outcrops and the less-studied localities requires further work, including high-resolution ages. We are analyzing sixteen volcanic samples from Zhejiang and Anhui Provinces to establish a high-precision chronostratigraphy for the less-studied localities across SE China and adjacent regions. Our work will provide important data to test the timing and the duration of three phases of the Jehol radiation. Furthermore, the age results will allow us to understand the temporal relationship among the Jehol localities and test if the later phases of the Jehol radiation had broader geographic distributions, as inferred from existing collections.

  10. Ars disyecta Ars disyecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Castillo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bajo la nominación Ars Disyecta se busca exponer el vínculo entre artes visuales, feminismo y metamorfosis. Las prácticas artísticas feministas aquí presentadas se proponen perturbar el espacio metafórico heredado de la diferencia sexual (pensemos, por ejemplo, en las palabras engendramiento, matriz, vida, compenetración o invaginamiento. En este sentido, la nominación Ars disyecta pone en escena un conjunto de prácticas e intervenciones que intentan interrumpir la matriz de la diferencia, desestabilizando lo femenino desde aquellas figuras que se resisten a la lógica de la totalidad y de un tiempo propio. Buscando seguir la huella de un arte disyecto es que interrogaré en este ensayo aquellas autorías feministas que en el arte contemporáneo trafican con las huellas del contagio, la mutación y la alteridad.This article aims to present the relation between visual arts, feminism I and metamorphosis. The feminist artistic practices portrayed in this article attempt to question categories inherited from the metaphor of sexual difference such as engendering, matrix and life. From this perspective, Ars disyecta will establish a set of artistic practices and interventions that intend to interrupt the proper idea of «feminine difference». Following this line of argument, I will discuss in this article a few contemporary feminist works of art that could be defined by words such as contagious, mutation and otherness.

  11. Phase-matched high-order harmonics by interaction of Ar atoms with high-repetition-rate low-energy femtosecond laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xinhua; ZENG Zhinan; LI Ruxin; CHEN Shu; LU Haihe; YIN Dingjun; XU Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation in Ar gas-filled cell was investigated experimentally. We obtained phase-matched 27th order harmonic driven by a commercially available solid-state femtosecond laser system at 0.55 m J/pulse energy level and 1 kHz repetition rate. To our knowledge, this is the lowest driving laser energy used to obtain phase-matched 27th order harmonic in a static gas cell. High-order harmonic generation at different gas density was studied systematically. Spectral blueshift and broadening of high harmonics under different pressure were analyzed. We found that the source size and spatial distribution of high-order harmonics are quite different under the phase-matching condition from those of the phase-mismatching case.

  12. Ionization and single electron capture in collision of highly charged Ar16+ ions with helium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Fei; Gou Bing-Cong

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling method to study the ionization and the single electron capture in collision of highly charged Ar16+ ions with He atoms in the velocity range of 1.2-1.9 a.u.. The relative importance of single ionization (SI) to single capture (SC) is explored. The comparison between the calculation and experimental data shows that the SI/SC cross section ratios from this work are in good agreement with experimental data. The total single electron ionization cross sections and the total single electron capture cross sections are also given for this collision. The investigation of the partial electron capture cross section shows a general tendency of capture to larger n and l with increasing velocity from 1.2 to 1.9 a.u..

  13. Millennial-scale phase relationships between ice-core and Mediterranean marine records: insights from high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Green Tuff of Pantelleria, Sicily Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaillet, S.; Vita-Scaillet, G.; Rotolo, S. G.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of annually-resolved polar ice records extending back to 70 ka, marine and continental paleoclimate studies have now matured into a discipline where high-quality age control is essential for putting on an equal pace layer-counted timescale models and Late Quaternary sedimentary records. High-resolution U-Th dating of speleothem records and 40Ar/39Ar dating of globally recorded geomagnetic excursions have recently improved the time calibration of Quaternary archives, reflecting the cross-disciplinary effort made to synchronize the geologic record at the millennial scale. Yet, tie-points with such an absolute age control remain scarce for paleoclimatic time-series extending beyond the radiocarbon timescale, most notably in the marine record. Far-travelled tephra layers recorded both onland and offshore provide an alternative in such instance to synchronize continental and marine archives via high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of the parent volcanic eruption. High-resolution 40Ar/39Ar data are reported herein for one such volcanic marker, the Green Tuff of Pantelleria and its Y-6 tephra equivalent recorded throughout the Central and Eastern Mediterranean. Published radiochronometric and δ18O orbitally-tied ages for this marker horizon scatter widely from about 41 ka up to 56 ka. Our new 40Ar/39Ar age at 45.7 ± 1.0 ka (2σ) reveals that previous estimates are biased by more than their reported errors would suggest, including recent orbital tuning of marine records hosting the tephra bed that are reevaluated in the context of this study. This improved estimate enables potential phase lags and leads to be studied between deep-sea and terrestrial archives with unrivaled (near-millennial) 40Ar/39Ar precision in the marine record.

  14. Cerebral artery alpha-1 AR subtypes: high altitude long-term acclimatization responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Goyal

    Full Text Available In response to hypoxia and other stress, the sympathetic (adrenergic nervous system regulates arterial contractility and blood flow, partly through differential activities of the alpha1 (α1 - adrenergic receptor (AR subtypes (α1A-, α1B-, and α1D-AR. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that with acclimatization to long-term hypoxia (LTH, contractility of middle cerebral arteries (MCA is regulated by changes in expression and activation of the specific α1-AR subtypes. We conducted experiments in MCA from adult normoxic sheep maintained near sea level (300 m and those exposed to LTH (110 days at 3801 m. Following acclimatization to LTH, ovine MCA showed a 20% reduction (n = 5; P<0.05 in the maximum tension achieved by 10-5 M phenylephrine (PHE. LTH-acclimatized cerebral arteries also demonstrated a statistically significant (P<0.05 inhibition of PHE-induced contractility in the presence of specific α1-AR subtype antagonists. Importantly, compared to normoxic vessels, there was significantly greater (P<0.05 α1B-AR subtype mRNA and protein levels in LTH acclimatized MCA. Also, our results demonstrate that extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2-mediated negative feedback regulation of PHE-induced contractility is modulated by α1B-AR subtype. Overall, in ovine MCA, LTH produces profound effects on α1-AR subtype expression and function.

  15. A Business Case Analysis of the M4/AR-15 Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    market . The market analysis was conducted to fill missing gaps on the M4/AR-15 market size, customer demographics , and supplier base. Data was collected...Wesson, 2012). The article also provides data on the rapid growth in the modern sporting rifle market segment . Peters (2012) cites a Freedom Group...types of products generally manufactured in each market . The four main market segments are Small Arms (which will be considered the “Gun segment

  16. Triassic High-P Metamorphism of the central Qiangtang terrane, Tibet; constraints using mineral equilibria modelling and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, A.; Hui, L.; Clarke, G. L.; Aitchison, J. C.; Forster, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The SE-trending Qiangtang metamorphic belt (QMB) stretches more than 500 km through the Qiangtang terrane in central Tibet and comprises tectonically disrupted blueschist and eclogite in lower-grade garnet-phengite-bearing schist and quartzite. These rocks record the closure of a paleo-Tethyan Triassic ocean that formerly separated Cathaysian and Gondwana components of Asia, now forming the northern and southern Qiangtang blocks. Eclogite is extensively recrystallized to high-P amphibolite and greenschist facies assemblages, formed during water ingression that accompanied terrane uplift. P-T pseudosections constructed in Na2O-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-TiO2-O (NCKMASHTO) in the context of petrography and mineral chemistry provides the ability to recover a dynamic PT history for the eclogite facies assemblages. Prograde (S1) assemblages for the Gemu Co eclogite are predicted to have formed at P≈21.5 kbars and T≈505°C and involved garnet, glaucophane, omphacite, rutile, lawsonite and chlorite, based on garnet composition and inferred pseudomorphs after lawsonite. Peak (S2) assemblages of garnet, barroisite, omphacite, rutile, epidote and quartz reflect P≈15 kbars and T≈570°C. Based on textural relations, post-peak stages can be divided into epidote-amphibolite and greenschist facies. The geothermal gradient for the prograde S1 assemblage and the peak S2 assemblage is 7.1 and 11.5°C/km respectively.40Ar/39Ar geochronology of phengitic mica using step heating in recrystallized eclogite components and surrounding garnet-mica schist components both yield maximum ages ranging 230-220 Ma. The congruency in ages of the deeply subducted high-pressure eclogites to the surrounding garnet phengite schists indicate they were the most probable source of fluids to extensively recrystallize most of the high-pressure eclogite components in the high-pressure belt. The P-T history of the high-P rocks of the QMB records the deep subduction of paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust to

  17. Study of the cross section determination with the PRISMA spectrometer: The 40Ar + 208Pb case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatović, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Mărginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The PRISMA spectrometer's response function was successfully applied to match three angular and magnetic settings over a wide angular range for measurements of quasi-elastic reactions in 40Ar + 208Pb . The absolute scale of cross sections has been obtained by using the Rutherford cross section at the forward angles and the information from the energy distributions measured with the spectrometer without and with coincidences with the CLARA γ-array. The semi-classical model GRAZING has been used to test the unfolding procedure and for comparison with the corrected cross sections.

  18. Study of interaction of high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam with Ag$^+$-doped glass

    CERN Document Server

    Nahal, A; Payami, M

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the interaction of a high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam, in a continuous multi-line regime, with Ag$^+$-doped glass samples. The samples were subjected to the irradiation after the ion-exchange step. As a result of the irradiation, a peak appears in the absorption spectrum; its evolution depends on both the exposure time and the laser beam power. Interaction of the beam with the clusters causes them break into smaller ones which has been confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Depending on the increment steps of the laser-beam power, different results are obtained. It is found that, in addition to the fragmentations of the nano-clusters, clusters of micro-meter size ($d\\sim 3\\mu m$) are formed in the sample, if the laser power is increased in a fast regime. The fragmentation processes have been explained in the framework of the density-functional theory with stabilized jellium model.

  19. The potential energy surface of the Ar-CO complex obtained using high-resolution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, L. H.; Pak, I.; Surin, L.

    2004-09-01

    A potential energy surface is retrieved for the Ar-CO complex by carrying out a global analysis of its high-resolution spectroscopic data. The data set consists of already published microwave and infrared data and of new microwave transitions which are presented in the paper. The theoretical approach used to reproduce the spectrum is based on a model Hamiltonian which accounts simultaneously for the two large amplitude van der Waals modes and for the overall rotation of the complex. Only the vCO=0 state is considered. The root-mean-square deviation of the analysis is 18 MHz for the microwave data and 1.4×10-3 cm-1 for the infrared energy difference data. Fifteen parameters corresponding to the potential energy function are determined in addition to two kinetic energy parameters and two distortion-type parameters. The potential energy surface derived is in good agreement with the one obtained by Shin, Shin, and Tao [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 183 (1996)].

  20. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael J.; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David L.; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the ages of cleavage development in a normally intractable lower greenschist facies slate belt, the Central Maine-Aroostook-Matapedia belt in east-central Maine. We have attacked this problem by identifying the minimum ages of muscovite in a regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and in a local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Our success stems from the regional low-grade metamorphism of the rocks in which each crystallization event preserves a40Ar/39Ar crystallization age and not a cooling age. Evidence for recrystallization via a pressure solution mechanism comes from truncations of detrital, authigenic, and in some rocks S1 muscovite and chlorite grains by new cleavage-forming muscovite and chlorite grains. Low-blank furnace age spectra from meta-arkosic and slaty rocks climb from moderate temperature Devonian age-steps dominated by cleavage-forming muscovite to Ordovician age-steps dominated by a detrital muscovite component. S1- and S2-cleaved rocks were hornfelsed by granitoids of ∼407 and 377 Ma, respectively. The combination of these minimum ages with the maximum metamorphic crystallization ages establishes narrow constraints on the timing of these two cleavage-forming events, ∼410 Ma (S1) and ∼380 Ma (S2). These two events coincide in time with a change in the plate convergence kinematics from the arrival of the Avalon terrane (Acadian orogeny), to a right-lateral transpression arrival of the Meguma terrane in the Neoacadian orogeny.

  1. Growth of mica porphyroblasts under low-grade metamorphism - A Taiwanese case using in-situ40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Tung; Chan, Yu-Chang; Lo, Ching-Hua; Lu, Chia-Yu

    2016-11-01

    Mica porphyroblasts, a common metamorphic microstructure, are analyzed in the slate belt of northern Taiwan where large fish-like growths are found within a meta-pyroclastics. With constraints on the time-temperature history from deposition through peak metamorphic state to exhumation, in-situ40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe dating was carried out on muscovite and corrensite fibers of mm-scale mica porphyroblasts grown on a pressure-solution seam. Because the peak metamorphic temperature and the porphyroblast formation condition (∼250 °C) remained far below the closure temperature of the K-Ar radioisotope system in muscovite, and the absence of muscovite in the mafic protolith, the dating results likely document the growth of the mica porphyroblast fabrics. The syn-kinematic nature of the analyzed porphyroblasts is confirmed by the ∼6 to ∼2.5 Ma growth ages, suggesting that the host rock was continuously deformed during the earlier two-thirds of the Taiwan Orogeny. The pattern of fiber growth, in contrast to outward-decreasing ages normally observed in peripheral recrystallization, appears random and resembles void fills in boudin openings. We postulate that syntaxial crack-seal following tensile micro-boudinage, along with slips on sub-grain boundaries, as a viable mechanism for the development of mica porphyroblasts and fish especially in lower-grade metamorphic rocks.

  2. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L. [Molecular Physics Department, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cernicharo, J. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB. INTA-CSIC. Crta Torrejón-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M., E-mail: jl.domenech@csic.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London. Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  3. Uncertainty quantification and robust predictive system analysis for high temperature kinetics of HCN/O2/Ar mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sai Hung; Miki, Kenji; Prudencio, Ernesto; Simmons, Chris

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a stochastic system based Bayesian approach is applied to quantify the uncertainties involved in the modeling of the HCN/O2/Ar mixture kinetics proposed by Thielen and Roth (1987). This enables more robust predictions of quantities of interest such as rate coefficients of HCN + Ar → H + CN + Ar and O2 + CN → NCO + O by using a stochastic Arrhenius form calibrated against their experimental data. This Bayesian approach requires the evaluation of multidimensional integrals, which cannot be done analytically. Here a recently developed stochastic simulation algorithm, which allows for efficient sampling in the high-dimensional parameter space, is used. We quantify the uncertainties in the modeling of the HCN/O2/Ar mixture kinetics and in turn the two rate coefficients and the other relevant rate coefficients. The uncertainty in the error including both the experimental measurement error and physical modeling error is also quantified. The effect of the number of uncertain parameters on the uncertainties is investigated.

  4. New methodologies at PF AR-NW12A: the implementation of high-pressure macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavas, Leonard Michel Gabriel, E-mail: leonard.chavas@kek.jp [PF/IMSS/KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-0801 (Japan); Nagae, Tadayuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Yamada, Hiroyuki [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Watanabe, Nobuhisa [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Nagoya University, Furo-cho Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Matsugaki, Naohiro [PF/IMSS/KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-0801 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of AR-NW12A into a multi-purpose end-station with optional high-pressure crystallography is described. The macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamline AR-NW12A is evolving from its original design of high-throughput crystallography to a multi-purpose end-station. Among the various options to be implemented, great efforts were made in making available high-pressure MX (HPMX) at the beamline. High-pressure molecular biophysics is a developing field that attracts the interest of a constantly growing scientific community. A plethora of activities can benefit from high pressure, and investigations have been performed on its applicability to study multimeric complex assemblies, compressibility of proteins and their crystals, macromolecules originating from extremophiles, or even the trapping of higher-energy conformers for molecules of biological interest. Recent studies using HPMX showed structural hydrostatic-pressure-induced changes in proteins. The conformational modifications could explain the enzymatic mechanism differences between proteins of the same family, living at different environmental pressures, as well as the initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process that have been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. To facilitate further HPMX, while allowing access to various individualized set-ups and experiments, the AR-NW12A sample environment has been revisited. Altogether, the newly added implementations will bring a fresh breath of life to AR-NW12A and allow the MX community to experiment in a larger set of fields related to structural biology.

  5. Continuous-wave high specific output power Ar-He-Xe laser with transverse RF excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udalov, Yu.B.; Peters, P.J.M.; Heeman-Ilieva, M.B.; Witteman, W.J.; Ochkin, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    A transverse RF excited gas discharge has been successfully used to produce a CW Ar-He-Xe laser. A maximum output power of 330 mW has been obtained from an experimental device with 37 cm active length and a 2.25 (DOT) 2.25 cm2 cross-section. This corresponds to a specific output power of about 175 m

  6. Instability of a highly vulnerable high alpine rock ridge: the lower Arête des Cosmiques (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, L.; Deline, P.; Lambiel, C.; Vincent, C.

    2012-04-01

    Glacier retreat and permafrost degradation are actually more and more thought to explain the increasing instability of rock slopes and rock ridges in high mountain environments. Hot summers with numerous rockfalls we experienced over the last two decades in the Alps have indeed contributed to test/strengthen the hypothesis of a strong correlation between rockfalls and global warming through these two cryospheric factors. Rockfalls from recently deglaciated and/or thawing areas may have very important economic and social implications for high mountain infrastructures and be a fatal hazard for mountaineers. At high mountain sites characterized by infrastructures that can be affected by rockfalls, the monitoring of rock slopes, permafrost and glaciers is thus an essential element for the sustainability of the infrastructure and for the knowledge/management of risks. Our study focuses on a particularly active area of the Mont Blanc massif (France), the lower Arête des Cosmiques, on which is located the very popular Refuge des Cosmiques (3613 m a.s.l.). Since 1998, when a rockfall threatened a part of the refuge and forced to major stabilizing works, observations allowed to identify 10 detachments (20 m3 to > 1000 m3), especially on the SE face of the ridge. Since 2009, this face is yearly surveyed by terrestrial laser scanning to obtain high-resolution 3D models. Their diachronic comparison gives precise measurements of the evolution of the rock slope. Eight rock detachments have thus been documented (0.7 m3 to 256.2 m3). Rock temperature measurements at the ridge and the close Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l.), and observations of the evolution of the underlying Glacier du Géant have enable to better understand the origin of the strong dynamics of this highly vulnerable area: (i) rock temperature data suggest the presence of warm permafrost (i.e. close to 0°C) from the first meters to depth in the SE face, and cold permafrost in the NW face; (ii) as suggested by the

  7. Measurement of the Ar diffusion coefficient in graphite at high temperature by the ISOL method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleon, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Jardin, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France)], E-mail: Jardin@ganil.fr; Thomas, J.C.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Huet-Equilbec, C.; Alves Conde, R. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Angelique, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 38026 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen (France); Boilley, D.; Cornell, J.; Dubois, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Franberg, H. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); ISOLDE, CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Gaubert, G.; Jacquot, B. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Koester, U. [ISOLDE, CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Institut Laue Langevin, 38042 Grenoble (France); Leroy, R. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France); Maunoury, L. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ion Laser, 14070 Caen (France); Orr, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ISMRA, 14050 Caen (France); Pacquet, J.Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Stodel, C. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM CNRS/IN2P3, 14076 Caen (France)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    This work has been carried out at GANIL within the ambit of the TARGISOL European collaboration which aims to study the relevant variables governing the release of radioactive elements from targets in an ISOL system. This work shows how it has been possible to extract diffusion coefficients for {sup 35}Ar atoms diffusing out of graphite targets from release time measurements by using an analytic description of the release times. The diffusion coefficients and efficiencies are presented and compared with results obtained using a 'continuous' method.

  8. Testing Astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar Timescales for the K/Pg Boundary Interval Using High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphy and U-Pb Geochronology in the Denver Basin of Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyde, W.; Bowring, S. A.; Johnson, K. R.; Ramezani, J.; Jones, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate and precise calibration of the Geomagnetic Polarity Timescale (GPTS) in absolute time is critical for resolving rates of geological and biological processes which in turn help constrain the underlying causes of those processes. Numerical calibration of the GPTS was traditionally carried out by interpolation between a limited number of 40Ar/39Ar dated volcanic ash deposits from superpositional sequences with well-defined magnetostratigraphies. More recently, the Neogene part of the GPTS has been calibrated using high-resolution astrochronological methods, however the application of these approaches to pre-Neogene parts of the timescale is controversial given the uncertainties in relevant orbital parameters this far back in time and differing interpretations of local cyclostratigraphic records. The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary interval is a good example, where various astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar calibrations have been proposed with varying degrees of agreement. The Denver Basin (Colorado, USA) contains one of the most complete stratigraphic sequences across the K/Pg boundary in the world, preserving evidence of bolide impact as well as biotic extinction and recovery in a thick stratigraphic package that is accessible by both core and outcrop. We present a series of high-precision U-Pb age determinations from interbedded volcanic ash deposits within a tightly constrained magnetobiostratigraphic framework across the K/Pg boundary in the Denver Basin. This new timeline provides a precise absolute age for the K/Pg boundary, constrains the ages of magnetic polarity Chrons C28 to C30, and provides a direct and independent test of early Paleogene astronomical and 40Ar/39Ar based timescales. Temporal calibration of fossil pollen evidence of the "fern spike" in the Denver Basin shows that plant extinctions peaked within ~50-500 years of the bolide impact and primary productivity recovered ~500-5000 years after the impact.

  9. High temperature reactive ion etching of iridium thin films with aluminum mask in CF4/O2/Ar plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Pin Yeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive ion etching (RIE technology for iridium with CF4/O2/Ar gas mixtures and aluminum mask at high temperatures up to 350 °C was developed. The influence of various process parameters such as gas mixing ratio and substrate temperature on the etch rate was studied in order to find optimal process conditions. The surface of the samples after etching was found to be clean under SEM inspection. It was also shown that the etch rate of iridium could be enhanced at higher process temperature and, at the same time, very high etching selectivity between aluminum etching mask and iridium could be achieved.

  10. Studies of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission : The cases of $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca

    CERN Multimedia

    Riisager, K; Jokinen, A; Canchel, G; Heinz, A M; Jonson, B N G; Dominguez reyes, R R; Koldste, G T; Fraile prieto, L M; Nilsson, T; Audirac, L L

    2008-01-01

    We propose to perform detailed studies of the decays of the two dripline nuclei $^{31}$Ar and $^{35}$Ca. This will allow an in-depth study in the process of $\\beta$-delayed two-proton emission ($\\beta$2p); as well as provide important information on resonances in $^{30}$S and $^{34}$Ar relevant for the astrophysical rp-process.

  11. arXiv Cuts from residues: the one-loop case

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Samuel; Duhr, Claude; Gardi, Einan

    2017-06-14

    Using the multivariate residue calculus of Leray, we give a precise definition of the notion of a cut Feynman integral in dimensional regularization, as a residue evaluated on the variety where some of the propagators are put on shell. These are naturally associated to Landau singularities of the first type. Focusing on the one-loop case, we give an explicit parametrization to compute such cut integrals, with which we study some of their properties and list explicit results for maximal and next-to-maximal cuts. By analyzing homology groups, we show that cut integrals associated to Landau singularities of the second type are specific combinations of the usual cut integrals, and we obtain linear relations among different cuts of the same integral. We also show that all one-loop Feynman integrals and their cuts belong to the same class of functions, which can be written as parametric integrals.

  12. Ars Electronica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Ars Electronica festivalen 3. - 8. september, 2009 i Linz, Østrig, der fejrede 30 års jubilæum under temaet "Human Nature". Festivalen fokuserer på interaktion mellem menneske, teknologi, kunst og samfund med særlig vægt på udviklingen af computeren og det digitale. Udgivelsesdato: 15.12...

  13. Ars Electronica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Ars Electronica festivalen 3. - 8. september, 2009 i Linz, Østrig, der fejrede 30 års jubilæum under temaet "Human Nature". Festivalen fokuserer på interaktion mellem menneske, teknologi, kunst og samfund med særlig vægt på udviklingen af computeren og det digitale. Udgivelsesdato: 15.12...

  14. An ionization region model of the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M. A.; Huo, Chunqing; Minea, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    A new reactive ionization region model (R-IRM) is developed to describe the reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge with a titanium target. It is then applied to study the temporal behavior of the discharge plasma parameters such as electron density, the neutral and ion composition, the ionization fraction of the sputtered vapor, the oxygen dissociation fraction, and the composition of the discharge current. We study and compare the discharge properties when the discharge is operated in the two well established operating modes, the metal mode and the poisoned mode. Experimentally, it is found that in the metal mode the discharge current waveform displays a typical non-reactive evolution, while in the poisoned mode the discharge current waveform becomes distinctly triangular and the current increases significantly. Using the R-IRM we explore the current increase and find that when the discharge is operated in the metal mode Ar+ and Ti+ -ions contribute most significantly (roughly equal amounts) to the discharge current while in the poisoned mode the Ar+ -ions contribute most significantly to the discharge current and the contribution of O+ -ions, Ti+ -ions, and secondary electron emission is much smaller. Furthermore, we find that recycling of atoms coming from the target, that are subsequently ionized, is required for the current generation in both modes of operation. From the R-IRM results it is found that in the metal mode self-sputter recycling dominates and in the poisoned mode working gas recycling dominates. We also show that working gas recycling can lead to very high discharge currents but never to a runaway. It is concluded that the dominating type of recycling determines the discharge current waveform.

  15. High-precision potassium measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under high vacuum conditions for in situ K–Ar dating of planetary surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yuichiro, E-mail: cho@rikkyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Sugita, Seiji [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Kameda, Shingo [Department of Physics, Rikkyo University, 3-34-1 Nishi-Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo 171-8501 (Japan); Miura, Yayoi N. [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ishibashi, Ko; Ohno, Sohsuke [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Kamata, Shunichi [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Science, 8-2-10 Kita-10 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Arai, Tomoko [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Morota, Tomokatsu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Namiki, Noriyuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Matsui, Takafumi [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a series of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) experiments for K measurements under high vacuum conditions (10{sup -6} Pa) for the purpose of developing in-situ isochron type K–Ar dating instruments for planetary missions. Unlike whole rock measurement methods, isochron measurements require LIBS experiments in a vacuum chamber because simultaneous Ar isotopic measurements are necessary. However, detailed examination of detection limits and accuracy of this method at low pressures has not been examined extensively before. In this study, the capability of K measurements under high vacuum conditions was examined using LIBS. A compact Czerny-Turner type spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a detector was employed. Twenty-three geologic standard samples were measured using the LIBS method. The second strongest K emission line at 769.89 nm was used for calibration because the strongest emission line at 766.49 nm may suffer from strong interference from another emission line. A calibration curve was constructed for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and well fitted by a power-law function. Based on the prediction band method, the detection limit and the quantitation limit were estimated to be 300 and 800 ppm, respectively. The 1σ relative uncertainty of the K calibration was 20% for 1 wt.% K{sub 2}O and 40% for 3000 ppm K{sub 2}O. If the amount of Ar is measured with 15% error for the 3.5 billion years rocks containing 1 and 0.3 wt.% K{sub 2}O, the K–Ar ages would be determined with 10% and 20% 1σ errors, respectively. This level of precision will significantly improve the current Martian chronology, which has uncertainty about a factor of two to four. These results indicate that the concentration of K can be measured quantitatively under high vacuum conditions using a combination of instruments that have previously been carried in planetary missions, which suggests the viability of building in

  16. Natural nanomorphous Ni/NiO magnetic multilayers: structure and magnetism of the high-Ar pressure series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, S D; Delimitis, A; Kapaklis, V; Papaioannou, E Th; Poulopoulos, P; Trachylis, D; Velgakis, M J; Politis, C

    2014-08-01

    Natural nanomorphous Ni/NiO multilayers have exhibited interesting magnetic properties, such as an unusual positive surface anisotropy and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Most attention has been paid to multilayers prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering under relatively low (3 x 10(-3) mbar) Ar pressure. Here we report on the correlation between structural and magnetic properties for a new series of multilayers, prepared under relatively high (3 x 10(-2) mbar) Ar pressure. The crystalline Ni individual layer thickness ranges between 5-8 nm. The amorphous NiO layer thickness is constant, about 1.1 nm thick. X-ray reflectivity showed that in some of the multilayers the high-order Bragg peaks become broader and diminish quickly. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy reveals that this occurs because the first bilayers are formed in accordance to the growth conditions, while the ones near the top are vanished. Despite the deterioration of the interface quality, all samples show tendency for perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for large bilayer thickness of about 9 nm. Similar tendency is observed even by a 330 nm thick non-multilayered Ni film grown under the same conditions. This observation reveals the important role of strain and magnetoelastic anisotropy as a source of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the Ni/NiO multilayers.

  17. High temperature corrosion of hot-dip aluminized steel in Ar/1%SO2 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abro, Muhammad Ali; Lee, Dong Bok

    2017-01-01

    Carbon steels were hot-dip aluminized in Al or Al-1at%Si baths, and corroded in Ar/1%SO2 gas at 700-800 °C for up to 50 h. The aluminized layers consisted of not only an outer Al(Fe) topcoat that had interdispersed needle-like Al3Fe particles but also an inner Al-Fe alloy layer that consisted of an outer Al3Fe layer and an inner Al5Fe2 layer. The Si addition in the bath made the Al(Fe) topcoat thin and nonuniform, smoothened the tongue-like interface between the Al-Fe alloy layer and the substrate, and increased the microhardness of the aluminized layer. The aluminized steels exhibited good corrosion resistance by forming thin α-Al2O3 scales, along with a minor amount of iron oxides on the surface. The interdiffusion that occurred during heating made the aluminized layer thick and diffuse, resulting in the formation of Al5Fe2, AlFe and AlFe3 layers. It also smoothened the tongue-like interface, and decreased the microhardness of the aluminized layer. The non-aluminized steel formed thick, nonadherent, nonprotective (Fe3O4, FeS)-mixed scales.

  18. Electron scattering by Ne, Ar and Kr at intermediate and high energies, 0.5-10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G.; Roteta, M.; Manero, F. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Departamento de Fusion y Particulas Elementales, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Madrid (Spain); Williart, A. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Madrid (Spain)

    1999-04-28

    Semi-empirical total cross sections for electron scattering of noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr) in the energy range 0.5-10 keV have been obtained by combining transmission-beam measurements for impact energies up to 6 keV with an asymptotic behaviour at higher energies according to the Born-Bethe approximation. The influence of the forward electron scattering on the experimental system has been evaluated by means of a Monte Carlo electron transport simulation. Theoretical values have also been obtained by applying the Born approximation in the case of inelastic processes and by means of an atomic scattering potential for the elastic part. The results of these calculations show an excellent agreement with the semi-empirical values in the above-mentioned energy range. (author)

  19. Blueschist-facies high-Si phengites record the timing of greenschist-facies overprinting: a Rb-Sr and Ar-ar study of marbles from the Cyclades, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieling, D.; Bröcker, M.; Hacker, B.; Gans, P.

    2003-04-01

    In the Attic-Cycladic crystalline belt (Greece), white mica geochronology (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, Ar-Ar) has established time constraints for at least two metamorphic events: well-preserved high-pressure/low-temperature rocks yielded Eocene ages (c. 50-40 Ma); their greenschist-facies counterparts provided Oligocene-Miocene dates (c. 25-20 Ma). Previous studies indicated that the ages recorded by high-Si phengites may not correspond to the high-pressure stage but to the subsequent greenschist-facies overprint. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the range in Si-contents and the modal proportion of phengites with a specific Si-value are not significantly different between Eocene HP rocks and Oligocene-Miocene greenschists. The possibility that the barometric information and the geochronological record might be decoupled is of general importance for interpretation of phengite ages from polymetamorphic rocks. In order to look in more detail into this problem, we have studied marbles from Tinos and Sifnos. On both islands, HP rocks are best preserved in the upper parts of the metamorphic succession. Towards the base, the degree of greenschist overprinting increases. Phengite populations of blueschist- and greenschist facies rocks mostly show a considerable range in Si-values. However, in marbles which are either associated with HP or strongly retrogressed rocks, homogeneous high-Si phengite populations (>3.5 pfu) were recognized. On Tinos, Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar white mica dating of such samples yielded ages between 40 to 24 Ma. Of special interest are samples which yielded ages of c. 24 Ma. If the earlier metamorphic history is not taken into account, such datasets may suggest the erroneous conclusion of Miocene HP metamorphism. Recent studies [1] have reported large displacements (> 100km) for detachment faults in the Aegean. The critical parameter for such models is the age of HP metamorphism as deduced from white mica dating [1,2]. In the light of the complexities

  20. Reduction Kinetics of MnO from High-Carbon Ferromanganese Slags by Carbonaceous Materials in Ar and CO Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarian, J.; Tranell, G.; Kolbeinsen, L.; Tangstad, M.; Gaal, S.; Kaczorowski, J.

    2008-10-01

    The kinetics of MnO reduction from synthetic and industrial high-carbon ferromanganese slags were investigated using a sessile drop technique at 1600 °C. The effects of the reductant type, ambient atmosphere, and slag composition on the MnO reduction were illuminated. Six different types of carbonaceous reductants were used as substrates for small slag droplets, which were reacted in a CO or Ar atmosphere, with the reaction studied in situ. The cross sections of the reacted slag-carbon samples were subsequently studied by electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), to find the extent of the MnO reduction as a function of the reaction time. It was found that the rate of the MnO reduction is affected by both the type of reductant and the ambient atmosphere. It was observed that the MnO reduction rate from synthetic slag by cokes produced from single coals is lower than that from industrial cokes. Reduction rates obtained when charcoal was used as the reductant were higher than when coke was used, while the CO atmosphere yielded a faster initial MnO reduction than did the Ar atmosphere. It was found that the faster reduction rates in the CO atmosphere are related to the MnO reduction by CO gas. A newly developed kinetic method was applied, to calculate the rate constants for the MnO reduction by carbon and CO that considered the reaction interfaces. It was indicated that the rate of the MnO reduction by CO is less than that by carbon; however, the contribution of these reductants to slag reduction is very dependent on their contact with the slag.

  1. Integrated Performance of Next Generation High Data Rate Receiver and AR4JA LDPC Codec for Space Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Michael K.; Lyubarev, Mark; Nakashima, Michael A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Lee, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes are the state-of-the-art in forward error correction (FEC) technology that exhibits capacity approaching performance. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has designed a family of LDPC codes that are similar in structure and therefore, leads to a single decoder implementation. The Accumulate-Repeat-by-4-Jagged- Accumulate (AR4JA) code design offers a family of codes with rates 1/2, 2/3, 4/5 and lengths 1024, 4096, 16384 information bits. Performance is less than one dB from capacity for all combinations.Integrating a stand-alone LDPC decoder with a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) receiver faces additional challenges than building a single receiver-decoder unit from scratch. In this work, we outline the issues and show that these additional challenges can be over-come by simple solutions. To demonstrate that an LDPC decoder can be made to work seamlessly with a COTS receiver, we interface an AR4JA LDPC decoder developed on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with a modern high data rate receiver and mea- sure the combined receiver-decoder performance. Through optimizations that include an improved frame synchronizer and different soft-symbol scaling algorithms, we show that a combined implementation loss of less than one dB is possible and therefore, most of the coding gain evidence in theory can also be obtained in practice. Our techniques can benefit any modem that utilizes an advanced FEC code.

  2. Fluorinated analogues of marsanidine, a highly α2-AR/imidazoline I1 binding site-selective hypotensive agent. Synthesis and biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Aleksandra; Sączewski, Franciszek; Hudson, Alan L; Ferdousi, Mehnaz; Scheinin, Mika; Laurila, Jonne M; Rybczyńska, Apolonia; Boblewski, Konrad; Lehmann, Artur

    2014-11-24

    The aim of these studies was to establish the influence of fluorination of the indazole ring on the pharmacological properties of two selective α2-adrenoceptor (α2-AR) agonists: 1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-1H-indazole (marsanidine, A) and its methylene analogue 1-[(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-1H-indazole (B). Introduction of fluorine into the indazole ring of A and B reduced both binding affinity and α2-AR/I1 imidazoline binding site selectivity. The most α2-AR-selective ligands were 6-fluoro-1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-1H-indazole (6c) and 7-fluoro-1-[(imidazolidin-2-yl)imino]-1H-indazole (6d). The in vivo cardiovascular properties of fluorinated derivatives of A and B revealed that in both cases the C-7 fluorination leads to compounds with the highest hypotensive and bradycardic activities. The α2-AR partial agonist 6c was prepared as a potential lead compound for development of a radiotracer for PET imaging of brain α2-ARs.

  3. Novel adiponectin-resistin (AR and insulin resistance (IRAR indexes are useful integrated diagnostic biomarkers for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniandy Sekaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin and resistin are adipokines which modulate insulin action, energy, glucose and lipid homeostasis. Meta-analyses showed that hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia are strongly associated with increased risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, metabolic syndrome (MS and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to propose a novel adiponectin-resistin (AR index by taking into account both adiponectin and resistin levels to povide a better indicator of the metabolic homeostasis and metabolic disorders. In addition, a novel insulin resistance (IRAR index was proposed by integration of the AR index into an existing insulin resistance index to provide an improved diagnostic biomarker of insulin sensitivity. Methods In this case control study, anthropometric clinical and metabolic parameters including fasting serum total adiponectin and resistin levels were determined in 809 Malaysian men (208 controls, 174 MS without T2DM, 171 T2DM without MS, 256 T2DM with MS whose ages ranged between 40-70 years old. Significant differences in continuous variables among subject groups were confirmed by ANCOVA or MANCOVA test using 1,000 stratified bootstrap samples with bias corrected and accelerated (BCa 95% CI. Spearman's rho rank correlation test was used to test the correlation between two variables. Results The AR index was formulated as 1+log10(R0-log10(A0. The AR index was more strongly associated with increased risk of T2DM and MS than hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia alone. The AR index was more strongly correlated with the insulin resistance indexes and key metabolic endpoints of T2DM and MS than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The AR index was also correlated with a higher number of MS components than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The IRAR index was formulated as log10(I0G0+log10(I0G0log10(R0/A0. The normal reference range of the IRAR index for insulin sensitive individuals was

  4. USDA, ARS EOM 402-10 high B-carotene cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high B-carotene cucumber (Cucumis sativus var. sativus L.) line EOM 402-10 is being released. This line was derived from a cross between the "Xishuangbanna gourd" (XIS; Cucumis sativus var. xishuangbannanesis Qi et Yuan; 2n = 2x = 14) that bears orange fruit and the non-orange-fruited cultivated c...

  5. Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters for the High-Luminosity LHC arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Thomas G.

    The increased particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), with instantaneous luminosities of up to 7.5 times the original design value, will have an impact on many sub-systems of the ATLAS detector. This contribution highlights the particular impacts on the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter system, together with an overview of the various upgrade plans leading up to the HL-LHC. The higher luminosities are of particular importance for the forward calorimeters (FCal), where the expected increase in the ionization load poses a number of problems that can degrade the FCal performance such as beam heating and space-charge effects in the liquid argon gaps and high-voltage drop due to increased current drawn over the current-limiting resistors. A proposed FCal replacement as a way to counter some of these problems is weighed against the risks associated with the replacement. To further mitigate the effects of increased pile-up, the installation of a high-granularity timing detector...

  6. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  7. Quantum and quasi-classical collisional dynamics of O2-Ar at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Inga S.; Andrienko, Daniil A.; Boyd, Iain D.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2016-06-01

    A hypersonic vehicle traveling at a high speed disrupts the distribution of internal states in the ambient flow and introduces a nonequilibrium distribution in the post-shock conditions. We investigate the vibrational relaxation in diatom-atom collisions in the range of temperatures between 1000 and 10 000 K by comparing results of extensive fully quantum-mechanical and quasi-classical simulations with available experimental data. The present paper simulates the interaction of molecular oxygen with argon as the first step in developing the aerothermodynamics models based on first principles. We devise a routine to standardize such calculations also for other scattering systems. Our results demonstrate very good agreement of vibrational relaxation time, derived from quantum-mechanical calculations with the experimental measurements conducted in shock tube facilities. At the same time, the quasi-classical simulations fail to accurately predict rates of vibrationally inelastic transitions at temperatures lower than 3000 K. This observation and the computational cost of adopted methods suggest that the next generation of high fidelity thermochemical models should be a combination of quantum and quasi-classical approaches.

  8. Tracking performance in high multiplicities environment at ALICE arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00248142

    In LHC Run 3, ALICE will increase the data taking rate significantly to 50\\,kHz continuous read out of minimum bias Pb-Pb events. This challenges the online and offline computing infrastructure, requiring to process 50 times as many events per second as in Run 2, and increasing the data compression ratio from 5 to 20. Such high data compression is impossible by lossless ZIP-like algorithms, but it must use results from online reconstruction, which in turn requires online calibration. These important online processing steps are the most computing-intense ones, and will use GPUs as hardware accelerators. The new online features are already under test during Run 2 in the High Level Trigger (HLT) online processing farm. The TPC (Time Projection Chamber) tracking algorithm for Run 3 is derived from the current HLT online tracking and is based on the Cellular Automaton and Kalman Filter. HLT has deployed online calibration for the TPC drift time, which needs to be extended to space charge distortions calibration. T...

  9. High purity 100 GeV electron identification with synchrotron radiation arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Depero, E.; Burtsev, V.; Chumakov, A.; Cooke, D.; Dermenev, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dubinin, F.; Dusaev, R.R.; Emmenegger, S.; Fabich, A.; Frolov, V.N.; Gardikiotis, A.; Gninenko, S.N.; Hösgen, M.; Karneyeu, A.E.; Ketzer, B.; Kirsanov, M.M.; Konorov, I.V.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.; Lysan, V.; Matveev, V.A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Myalkovskiy, V.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Polyakov, V.A.; Radics, B.; Rubbia, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tlisov, D.A.; Toropin, A.N.; Vasilishin, B.; Vasquez Arenas, G.; Ulloa, P.; Crivelli, P.

    In high energy experiments such as active beam dump searches for rare decays and missing energy events, the beam purity is a crucial parameter. In this paper we present a technique to reject heavy charged particle contamination in the 100 GeV electron beam of the H4 beam line at CERN SPS. The method is based on the detection with BGO scintillators of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the electrons passing through a bending dipole magnet. A 100 GeV $\\pi^-$ beam is used to test the method in the NA64 experiment resulting in a suppression factor of $10^{-5}$ while the efficiency for electron detection is $\\sim$95%. The spectra and the rejection factors are in very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. The reported suppression factors are significantly better than previously achieved.

  10. Triple parton scatterings in high-energy proton-proton collisions arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2017-01-01

    A generic expression to compute triple parton scattering cross sections in high-energy proton-proton (pp) collisions is presented as a function of the corresponding single parton cross sections and the transverse parton profile of the proton encoded in an effective parameter σeff,TPS. The value of σeff,TPS is closely related to the similar effective cross section that characterizes double parton scatterings, and amounts to σeff,TPS=12.5±4.5  mb. Estimates for triple charm (cc¯) and bottom (bb¯) production in pp collisions at LHC and FCC energies are presented based on next-to-next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations for single cc¯, bb¯ cross sections. At s≈100  TeV, about 15% of the pp collisions produce three cc¯ pairs from three different parton-parton scatterings.

  11. The influence of N2 flow rate on Ar and Ti Emission in high-pressure magnetron sputtering system plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Soo Ren; Nayan, Nafarizal; Lias, Jais

    2017-03-01

    For ionized physical vapor deposition (known as IPVD) technique, investigation on the ionization mechanism of titanium atoms is very important during the deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) thin film using reactive magnetron sputtering plasma. The introduction of nitrogen gas into the chamber discharge leads to modifications of plasma parameters and ionization mechanism of transition species. In this work, an investigation on the influence of nitrogen flow rate on spectrum properties of argon and titanium during the deposition process have been carried out. The experimental configuration consists of OES and structure of magnetron sputtering device with the turbo molecular pump. A high-pressure magnetron sputtering plasma was used as plasma discharge chamber with various flow rate of nitrogen gas. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements were employed as plasma diagnostics tool in magnetron sputtering plasma operated at relatively high pressure. OES is a non-invasive plasma diagnostics method and that can detect the atomic and ionic emission during plasma discharge. The flow rate of the Ar and N2 gas are controlled by mass flow controller. The changes of relative emission for both neutral and ionic of argon as well as titanium were observed using optical spectrometer when the nitrogen gas is introduced into the discharged chamber. We found that the titanium emission decreased very rapidly with the flow rate of nitrogen. In addition, the argon emission slightly decreased with the flow rate of nitrogen.

  12. Independent CMEs from a Single Solar Active Region - The Case of the Super-Eruptive NOAA AR11429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Patsourakos, Spiros; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2014-06-01

    In this investigation we study AR 11429, the origin of the twin super-fast CME eruptions of 07-Mar-2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for the 'perfect storm'; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a delta-magnetic configuration. In fact, during its limb-to-limb transit, AR 11429 spawned several eruptions which caused geomagnetic storms, including the biggest in Cycle 24 so far. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in ~10MK hot plasma emission and are often considered as the culprit causing such super-eruptions. However, their 'dormant' existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is a matter of strong debate. Aided by multi-wavelength and multi-spacecraft observations (SDO/HMI & AIA, HINODE/SOT/SP, STEREO B/EUVI) and by using a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work shows two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of possible pre-eruption MFRs.

  13. High-Temperature Corrosion of AlCrSiN Film in Ar-1%SO2 Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Yadav

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AlCrSiN film with a composition of 29.1Al-17.1Cr-2.1Si-51.7N in at. % was deposited on a steel substrate by cathodic arc ion plating at a thickness of 1.8 μm. It consisted of nanocrystalline hcp-AlN and fcc-CrN, where a small amount of Si was dissolved. Corrosion tests were carried out at 800 °C for 5–200 h in Ar-1%SO2 gas. The major corrosion reaction was oxidation owing to the high oxygen affinity of Al and Cr in the film. The formed oxide scale consisted primarily of (Al,Cr2O3, within which Fe, Si, and S were dissolved. Even after corrosion for 200 h, the thickness of the scale was about 0.7–1.2 μm, indicating that the film had good corrosion resistance in the SO2-containing atmosphere.

  14. High frequency welded (ERW) casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duisberg, J. (Hoesch Roehrenwerke A.G., Hamm (Germany, F.R.))

    1980-09-01

    Due to the up-to-date standard in welding and testing techniques, the significance of ERW-casing is growing rapidly. The basic items of ERW-pipe are explained in detail. The forming mechanism, the high frequency welding by induction and contact welding processes is explained in detail as well as destructive and non-destructive testing methods. Finishing the ends as threading, thread control (gauging), power tight connection, pressure test and final quality control are rounding up the picture of the production of ERW-casing. Last but not least the test results from the joint strength- and collapse tests which are of outstanding interest for casings, are compared with API requirements in order to demonstrate compliance with API requirements.

  15. Study of the cross section determination with the PRISMA spectrometer: The {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijatovic, T.; Szilner, S.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Soic, N. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Goasduff, A.; Stefanini, A.M.; Valiente-Dobon, J.J. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Montanari, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F. [Padova Univ. (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); Pollarolo, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Gadea, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Marginean, N.; Ur, C.A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2016-04-15

    The PRISMA spectrometer's response function was successfully applied to match three angular and magnetic settings over a wide angular range for measurements of quasi-elastic reactions in {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb. The absolute scale of cross sections has been obtained by using the Rutherford cross section at the forward angles and the information from the energy distributions measured with the spectrometer without and with coincidences with the CLARA γ-array. The semi-classical model GRAZING has been used to test the unfolding procedure and for comparison with the corrected cross sections. (orig.)

  16. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  17. Deciphering the Paleoproterozoic cooling history of the northeastern Trans-Hudson Orogen, Baffin Island (Canada), using 40Ar/39Ar step-heating and UV laser thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipton, D. R.; Schneider, D. A.; Kellett, D. A.; Joyce, N. L.

    2017-07-01

    The previously unstudied cooling and exhumation history of mid-crustal rocks exposed on southeastern Baffin Island (Canada) provides new insights into the post-orogenic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO). New 40Ar/39Ar step-heat analyses of biotite, muscovite and phlogopite and core-to-rim intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses of muscovite have a range of apparent ages compatible with slow regional cooling following peak metamorphism. Twenty-nine amphibolite- to granulite-facies rocks were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating laser (CO2) method. 40Ar/39Ar spot analyses were performed across muscovite grains from three samples using an ultraviolet (UV) laser to investigate intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar age variations. Step-heating apparent ages range from ca. 1788-1622 Ma for biotite, 1720-1630 Ma for phlogopite and 1729-1657 Ma for muscovite. UV spot 40Ar/39Ar analyses in the three muscovite grains range from ca. 1661-1640 Ma, 1675-1645 Ma and 1680-1652 Ma, with core-to-rim apparent age gradients of 20-30 Myr. Previous studies resolved peak metamorphism in this region to between ca. 1860 and 1820 Ma and identified late- to post-THO zircon and monazite populations at ca. 1800-1750 Ma. Numerical diffusion models for Ar in muscovite were conducted to test different Proterozoic cooling and exhumation scenarios. Comparisons with our 40Ar/39Ar ages attest to cooling rates of 1-2 °C/Myr following peak metamorphism and 1.5-2.5 °C/Myr after ca. 1740 Ma. Anomalously old apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages, in cases equivalent to U-Pb zircon rim and monazite ages, likely result from incorporation of excess Ar. The results suggest that mid-crustal rocks on southeastern Baffin Island remained hotter than 420-450 °C for 150-200 Myr after peak metamorphism, with subsequent slow cooling and denudation rates that are typical of Proterozoic orogens. The apparent absence of orogenic collapse implies that, despite high temperatures and estimated maximum crustal thicknesses

  18. High northern geomagnetic field behavior and new constraints on the Gilsá event: Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results of ∼0.5-3.1 Ma basalts from Jökuldalur, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, Arne; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Supakulopas, Radchagrit; Riishuus, Morten S.; Mac Niocaill, Conall

    2016-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic results of extrusive rocks from high southern latitudes (>60°S) and high northern latitudes (>60°N) have been suggested to reflect a hemispheric asymmetry of the geomagnetic field on time-scales of 105 to 106 yrs, with higher and more stable fields in the north. This interpretation, however, is based on only a few modern-standard paleodirectional data sets and on high northern stable field paleointensity data of rocks that are mainly younger than 100 kyr. The sparsity of modern-standard data questions the validity (and age range) of this potential geomagnetic asymmetry. In 2013 and 2014, we sampled basaltic lava flows in Jökuldalur, north-eastern Iceland, to obtain high-standard paleodirectional and paleointensity data at relatively high-northern latitudes (65.2°N). On average, we sampled >15 cores per site at 51 sites of predominantly Matuyama age. Complete demagnetization was carried out on all samples using AF or thermal demagnetization. We present 45 distinct paleomagnetic directions based on overall N > 10 ChRMs per site and α 95 age data. The dispersion SB overall supports the interpretation of a dependence of SB on latitude during the Matuyama, while the negligible ΔI suggests little deviation from a GAD field. Based on relatively strict cut-off criteria we also present six new field strength estimates from the time interval ∼1.2-1.83 Ma, thus filling a large data gap of the high-northern stable field behavior. We obtain a median VADM of 57 ± 3ZAm2 (VDM of 60 ± 5Am2), which is higher than the median VADM of 16 intensity estimates from Antarctica (39 ± 7 ZAm2) from the same period. A higher northern field is also found when using less strict cut-off criteria resulting in 14 field estimates from Jökuldalur, i.e. we find support for higher field strength in the northern hemisphere as compared to the southern hemisphere during the Matuyama. Finally, we deliver a revised magneto-chronostratigraphic model of Jökuldalur and conduct

  19. ARABIC LIGHT STEMMER (ARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASMA AL-OMARI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stemming is a main step used to process textual data. It is usually used in several types of applications such as: text mining, information retrieval (IR, and natural language processing (NLP. A major task in stemming is to standardize words; which can be achieved by reducing each word to its base (root or stem. Arabic stemming is not an easy task. Unlike other languages, Arabic language is a highly inflected language, since it uses many inflectional forms. Researchers are divided on the benefit of using stemming in fields of IR, NLP...etc., since in Arabic the morphological variants of a certain word are not always semantically related. The aim of this paper is to design and implement a new Arabic light stemmer (ARS which is not based on Arabic root patterns. Instead, it depends on well defined mathematical rules and several relations between letters. A series of tests were conducted on ARS stemmer to compare its effectiveness with the effectiveness of two other Arabic stemmers. Test shows clearly the effectiveness superiority of ARS compared to effectiveness of these two Arabic stemmers.

  20. Using the WRF Regional Model to Produce High Resolution AR4 Simulations of Climate Change for Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Rowe, C. M.; Hays, C.

    2010-12-01

    Mesoamerica (the countries from Mexico to Colombia) has been identified by IPCC as a low-latitude, developing region at considerable risk to climate change. Furthermore, the complex topography of the region, and interactions with adjacent tropical oceans, makes understanding of potential climate change from global climate models alone very problematic. Statistical downscaling techniques for the region are not very robust, largely due to the lack of sufficient observations upon which to base the large-scale to small-scale relationships. Therefore, we have used the WRF regional climate model to dynamically downscale global results from a NCAR CCSM simulation employing the A2 emission scenario that was made for IPCC AR4. All of Mesoamerica is covered with a domain with a spatial resolution of 12 km, with selected high elevation regions of Mexico, Colombia, and Peru also covered by 4 km domains. A three-year simulation was made forced by NCEP reanalyses for the years 1991, 1992, and 1993. This run has been evaluated using actual station observations in addition to gridded datasets, in order to identify model strengths and weaknesses (biases) for this region. This comparison clearly demonstrated the need to properly resolve elevation, including both topographic heights and valleys. It also showed the difficulty that the model has in simulating extreme precipitation events, as it usually underestimates the actual amount. Additional five-year simulations were made forced with CCSM output for 2000-2004 (present-day control) and 2050-2054 (climate change scenario for the A2 emission scenario) to investigate potential climate change for the region. Summarizing key results, all land regions, except for a narrow strip along the Pacific coast of Mexico, showed a warming. This warming was largest (up to 3-4 deg C) in the highland regions and the Amazonian basin. The warming was less (generally 1-2 deg C) in the lowland and intermountain regions. Changes in precipitation strongly

  1. Trajectory dynamics study of the Ar + CH4 dissociation reaction at high temperatures: the importance of zero-point-energy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, J M C; Martínez-Núñez, E; Fernandez-Ramos, A; Vazquez, S A

    2005-06-23

    Large-scale classical trajectory calculations have been performed to study the reaction Ar + CH4--> CH3 +H + Ar in the temperature range 2500 energy surface used for ArCH4 is the sum of the nonbonding pairwise potentials of Hase and collaborators (J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114, 535) that models the intermolecular interaction and the CH4 intramolecular potential of Duchovic et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 1984, 88, 1339), which has been modified to account for the H-H repulsion at small bending angles. The thermal rate coefficient has been calculated, and the zero-point energy (ZPE) of the CH3 product molecule has been taken into account in the analysis of the results; also, two approaches have been applied for discarding predissociative trajectories. In both cases, good agreement is observed between the experimental and trajectory results after imposing the ZPE of CH3. The energy-transfer parameters have also been obtained from trajectory calculations and compared with available values estimated from experiment using the master equation formalism; in general, the agreement is good.

  2. High-order harmonic generation in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-\\mu m source: high-order harmonic spectroscopy under macroscopic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Kyung-Han; Gkortsas, Vasileios-Marios; Huang, Shu-Wei; Moses, Jeffrey; Granados, Eduardo; Bhardwaj, Siddharth; Kärtner, Franz X

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically study the atomic response and pulse propagation effects of high-order harmonics generated in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-\\mu m infrared femtosecond light source. The light source is an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier, and a modified strong-field approximation and 3-dimensional pulse propagation code are used for the numerical simulations. The extended cutoff in the long-wavelength driven high-harmonic generation has revealed the spectral shaping of high-order harmonics due to the atomic structure (or photo-recombination cross-section) and the macroscopic effects, which are the main factors of determining the conversion efficiency besides the driving wavelength. Using precise numerical simulations to determine the macroscopic electron wavepacket, we are able to extract the photo-recombination cross-sections from experimental high-order harmonic spectra in the presence of macroscopic effects. We have experimentally observed that the macroscopic effects shift the o...

  3. Velocity effect in the l-distribution of the electron capture in collisions of highly charged Ar{sup 8+} ions with a Li(2s) target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascale, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Recherche sur l`Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules; Jacquet, E.; Boduch, P.; Chantepie, M.; Lecler, D. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique

    1994-12-31

    The effect of the velocity of the incident ions in the l-distributions of the electron capture in collisions of highly charged Ar{sup 8+} ions with a Li(2s) target is studied. These Ar{sup 8+} - Li(2s) collisions are experimentally studied by means of near UV and visible photon spectroscopy (200-600 nm) and theoretically analysed by means of three-body classical trajectory Monte-Carlo method. In addition to the effect of the projectile core, we show that the final nl-distributions are, for the most populated n = 8 and n = 9 states strongly energy dependent. (authors). 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pulsed discharge production Ar* metastables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C.; Emmons, Daniel; Perram, Glen P.; Weeks, David E.; Bailey, William F.

    2016-03-01

    The production of relatively high densities of Ar* metastables (>1012 cm-3) in Ar/He mixtures, at total pressures close to 1 atm, is essential for the efficient operation of an optically pumped Ar* laser. We have used emission spectroscopy and diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to observe the production and decay of Ar* in a parallel plate pulsed discharge. With discharge pulses of 1 μs duration we find that metastable production is dominated by processes occurring within the first 100 ns of the gas break-down. Application of multiple, closely spaced discharge pulses yields insights concerning conditions that favor metastable production. This information has been combined with time-resolved measurements of voltage and current. The experimental results and preliminary modeling of the discharge kinetics are presented.

  5. Total cross sections for electron capture and transfer ionization by highly stripped, slow Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe projectiles on helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justiniano, E.; Cocke, C.L.; Gray, T.J.; Dubois, R.; Can, C.; Waggoner, W.; Schuch, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Ingwersen, H.

    1984-03-01

    Experimental cross sections are reported for electron capture and transfer ionization for Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe projectiles on He for charge states (q) between 2 and 13 and for projectile energies between (250 and 1000 eV)q. The double-electron capture is found to be typically an order of magnitude weaker than single-electron capture, and to be dominated in most cases by the transfer ionization channel. While gross features of the cross sections can be qualitatively understood, quantitative agreement with available theoretical model calculations is poor.

  6. ArArCALC—software for 40Ar/ 39Ar age calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.

    2002-06-01

    ArArCALC is a Microsoft Excel ® 97-2000-XP application for performing calculations in 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology. It is coded in Visual Basic for Applications and can be used under the Windows ® 95/98/NT/2000/ME/XP operating systems. ArArCALC provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for the calculation of age plateaus, total fusion ages and isochrons following the regression of 40Ar/ 39Ar mass spectrometry data. Results are stored in single Excel workbooks including nine different data tables and four different diagrams. Analytical, internal and external errors are calculated based on error propagation of all input parameters, analytical data and applied corrections. Finally, the age calculation results can be recalibrated with reference to the primary K-Ar standards (e.g. GA-1550, MMhb-1) in order to obtain more consistent absolute40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations. ArArCALC is distributed as freeware.

  7. Mineralogy and clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Broxton, D.E.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1993-11-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. An important aspect of this evaluation is to understand the geologic history of the site including the diagenetic processes that are largely responsible for the present-day chemical and physical properties of the altered tuffs. This study evaluates the use of K/Ar geochronology in determining the alteration history of the zeolitized portions of Miocene tuffs at Yucca Mountain. Clinoptilolite is not generally regarded as suitable for dating because of its open structure and large ion-exchange capacity. However, it is the most abundant zeolite at Yucca Mountain and was selected for this study to assess the feasibility of dating the zeolitization process and/or subsequent processes that may have affected the zeolites. In this study we examine the ability of this mineral to retain all or part of its K and radiogenic Ar during diagenesis and evaluate the usefulness of the clinoptilolite K/Ar dates for determining the history of alteration.

  8. Early carboniferous wrenching, exhumation of high-grade metamorphic rocks and basin instability in SW Iberia: Constraints derived from structural geology and U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M. Francisco; Chichorro, Martim; Silva, J. Brandão; Ordóñez-Casado, Berta; Lee, James K. W.; Williams, Ian S.

    2012-08-01

    New U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology and structural data from high- to medium grade metamorphic shear zones of the Ossa-Morena Zone, and structural data from Early Carboniferous basins (Ossa-Morena Zone and South-Portuguese Zone), place additional constraints on the Variscan tectonics in SW Iberia. A zircon U-Pb age of 465 ± 14 Ma (Middle Ordovician) measured on migmatite from the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone is interpreted as the age of protolith crystallization. This age determination revises the information contained in the geological map of Portugal, in which these rocks were considered to be Proterozoic in age. This paper describes the evolution of Variscan wrench tectonics related to the development of shear zones, exhumation of deep crustal rocks and emplacement of magma in the Ossa-Morena Zone basement. In the Coimbra-Cordoba shear zone (transpressional), migmatites were rapidly exhumed from a depth of 42.5 km to 16.6 km over a period of ca. 10 Ma in the Viséan (ca. 340-330 Ma), indicating oblique slip exhumation rates of 8.5 to 10.6 mm/yr (Campo Maior migmatites) and 3.2 mm/yr (Ouguela gneisses) respectively. In the Évora Massif, the gneisses of the Boa Fé shear zone (transtensional) were exhumed from 18.5 to 7.4 km depth in the period ca. 344-334 Ma (Viséan), with exhumation oblique slip rates of 2.8 to 4.2 mm/yr. At the same time, the Early Carboniferous basins of SW Iberia were filled by turbidites and olistoliths, composed mostly of Devonian rocks. The presence of olistoliths indicates significant tectonic instability during sedimentation with large-scale mass movement, probably in the form of gravity slides. Deformation and metamorphism dated at 356 ± 12 Ma, 321 ± 13 Ma and 322 ± 29 Ma respectively suggests that Variscan wrench movements were active in SW Iberia during the Early Carboniferous for a period of at least 35 Ma.

  9. High-temperature Corrosion of AlCrTiSiN Film in Ar-1%SO{sub 2} Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam; Lee, Dong Bok [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sik Chol [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lin, Yue; Zhang, Shihong [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China)

    2017-04-15

    An AlCrTiSiN film composed of 31Al-15Cr-1.7Ti-0.5Si-51.8N (at%) was deposited on a steel substrate by arc ion plating to a thickness of 1 μm. It consisted of nano crystalline hcp-AlN and fcc-CrN. Its corrosion behavior in Ar-1%SO{sub 2} gas at 800 ℃ for 5-50 h was studied. The resulting scales consisted primarily of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which effectively suppressed the corrosion. No sulfides formed, because Al and Cr oxidized competitively from the surface. The film was primarily corroded by the inward diffusion of oxygen and a much smaller amount of sulfur.

  10. Observation of a periodic runaway in the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shayestehaminzadeh, Seyedmohammad, E-mail: ses30@hi.is, E-mail: shayesteh@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Arnalds, Unnar B.; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Olafsson, Sveinn [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2015-11-15

    This paper reports the observation of a periodic runaway of plasma to a higher density for the reactive discharge of the target material (Ti) with moderate sputter yield. Variable emission of secondary electrons, for the alternating transition of the target from metal mode to oxide mode, is understood to be the main reason for the runaway occurring periodically. Increasing the pulsing frequency can bring the target back to a metal (or suboxide) mode, and eliminate the periodic transition of the target. Therefore, a pulsing frequency interval is defined for the reactive Ar/O{sub 2} discharge in order to sustain the plasma in a runaway-free mode without exceeding the maximum power that the magnetron can tolerate.

  11. Types of voltage—dependent calcium channels involved in high potassium depolarization—induced amylase secretion in the exocrine pancreatic tumour cell line AR4—2J

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUIZONGJIE

    1998-01-01

    In the perifused fura-2 loaded exocrine pancreatic acinar cell line AR4-2J pulses of high potassium induced repetitive increases in intracellular calcium,Attached cells when stimulated with high potassium secreted large amount of amylase.High potassium-induced secretion was dependent both on the concentration of potassium and duration of stimulation.High potassium induced increases in intracellular calcium were inhibited by voltage-dependent calcium channel anatagonists with an order of potency as follows:nifedipine>ω-agatoxin IVA>ω-conotoxin GVIA.In contrast,the L-type calcium channel anatagonist nifedipine almost completely inhibited potassium-induced amylase secretion,whereas the N-type channel antagonist ω-conotoxin GVIA was without effect.The P-type channel antagonist ω-agatoxin IVA had a small inhibitory effect,but this inhibition was not significant at the level of amylase secretion.In conclusion,the AR4-2J cell line posesses different voltage-dependent calcium channels(L,P,N)with the L-type predominantly involved in depolarization induced amylase secretion.

  12. Laser fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating on young volcanic rocks.%(极)年轻火山岩激光熔蚀40Ar/39Ar定年

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晶; 季建清; Alan DEINO; 龚俊峰; 韩宝福; 涂继耀; 桑海清; 徐剑光

    2013-01-01

    It is extremely difficult to date young volcanic rocks.Accurate 40Ar/39Ar dating research and practice of young volcanic rocks in China put forward several notable and important points during the process of 40Ar/39 Ar dating for young volcanic rocks.Because of the low background level,small sample quantity,and high sensitivity of modem noble gas isotope mass spectrometry device,laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar dating technique has been used in depth application in volcanic rocks dating.With the laser in 40Ar/39Ar dating of young and modern volcanic rocks,the discrepancy of Nier value and initial argon isotope ratio in Quaternary samples may cause a remarkable deviation between K-Ar apparent age and 40 Ar/39 Ar apparent age.The deviation show exponential increase for samples younger than 0.2Ma,but it is not so notable for samples older than 2Ma.There out,the boundary of young and modern volcanic rocks,which is applied to 40 Ar/39 Ar system,is assigned at 0.2Ma:rocks aged 2 ~ 0.2Ma is defined as young volcanic rock,while rocks aged younger than 0.2Ma is defined as modem volcanic rock.The phenocrysts,which are from different argon isotope fractionation system,should be rejected from the sample during 40Ar/39 Ar dating.According to rock texture and grain size of mineral,the matrix should be picked with ideal grain size.In normal cases,about 0.2mm (or 60 ~ 80 mesh) is recommended; Cooling time after irradiation of fast neutron reactor should not be no more than three months,or else it may cause an error on 37 Ar measurement,and consequently on final results.As neutron-flux monitor,standards should be characteristic of high homogeneity during laser 40Ar/39Ar dating.In calibrating the international and domestic standards we have,we find that SB-778-Bi,Bern4M and BT-1 can be ideal standard samples with good homogeneity.We also find that the isochron age calculated from the laser 40Ar/39Ar data of the phenocryst and matrix,which were cooled and crystallized at the same time

  13. Path Integral Monte Carlo study confirms a highly ordered snowball in $^4$He nanodroplets doped with an Ar$^+$ ion

    CERN Document Server

    Tramonto, Filippo; Nava, Marco; Galli, Davide E

    2014-01-01

    By means of the exact Path Integral Monte Carlo method we have performed a detailed microscopic study of 4He nanodroplets doped with an argon ion, Ar$^+$, at $T=0.5$ K. We have computed density profiles, energies, dissociation energies and characterized the local order around the ion for nanodroplets with a number of 4He atoms ranging from 10 to 64 and also 128. We have found the formation of a stable solid structure around the ion, a "snowball", consisting of 3 concentric shells in which the 4He atoms are placed on at the vertices of platonic solids: the first inner shell is an icosahedron (12 atoms); the second one is a dodecahedron with 20 atoms placed on the faces of the icosahedron of the first shell; the third shell is again an icosahedron composed of 12 atoms placed on the faces of the dodecahedron of the second shell. The "magic numbers" implied by this structure, 12, 32 and 44 helium atoms, have been observed in a recent experimental study [Bartl et al, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 2014] of these complexes;...

  14. LASER 40Ar/39Ar DATING AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF THE HIGH-Mg# VOLCANIC ROCKS FROM THE TUQUAN BASIN IN CENTRAL DAXINGANLING%大兴安岭中段突泉盆地高Mg#火山岩激光全熔40Ar/39Ar测年与地球化学特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永飞; 孙守亮; 郜晓勇

    2013-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out on petrology,laser 40Ar/39Ar dating and geochemistry of the high-Mg# volcanic rocks from Tuquan Basin in Central Daxinganling region on the ground of their genesis,magmatic origin and geological implication.It is concluded that the volcanic rocks comprise a series of the acid-medium rocks (namely,andesite and dacite) with the age of 136.0 ±2.0 Ma by the method of laser 40Ar/39Ar dating,identical to early Early-Cretaceous.Geochemically,these rocks show a close affinity to adakitic rocks,with SiO2 ≥57.50%,high Al2O3 (≥ 16.66%),MgO<3.31%,Mg#>45,low Y (averagely 17.53×10-6,<18×10-6) and Yb (averagely 1.84×10-6,<1.90×10-6),high Sr (>534×10-6)and Ba (789×10-6-925×10-6),Sr/Y=22.71-73.54,Y/Yb=8.32-11.32,enriched LREE,depleted HREE and without significant Eu anomaly (average Eu/Eu*=0.94).The features listed above imply that the original magma for the studied rocks is most likely resulted from partial melting of the thickened lower crust and in turn contaminated by the basaltic magma.Combined with the tectonic evolution characteristics in this region in Mesozoic,the volcanics from the Tuquan Basin should be derived from partial melting of the thickened lower crust as the result of the collision of Mongol-Okhotsk (Paleo-Pacific) orogenic belt.%对大兴安岭中段突泉盆地中出露的高Mg#火山岩进行了详细的岩石学、激光全熔40Ar/39Ar测年及地球化学研究,讨论了该组火山岩成因、岩石物质来源及其地质意义.突泉盆地高Mg#火山岩为一套中酸性岩石,化学成分显示其主要为安山岩与英安岩.岩石激光全熔40Ar/39Ar测年结果显示火山岩年龄为136.0±2.0 Ma,形成于早白垩世早期.火山岩地球化学特征总体表现出了埃达克质岩石的地球化学特征:SiO2≥57.50%,A12O3≥16.66%,MgO<3.31%,Mg#>45,贫Y(平均值17.53×10-6),贫Yb(平均值1.84×10-6),高Sr(>534×10-6),高Ba(789× 10-6~925×10-6);Sr/Y=22.71~73.54,Y

  15. Can we model observed soil carbon changes from a dense inventory? A case study over england and wales using three version of orchidee ecosystem model (AR5, AR5-PRIM and O-CN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guenet

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A widespread decrease of the top soil carbon content was observed over England and Wales during the period 1978–2003 in the National Soil Inventory (NSI, amounting to a carbon loss of 4.44 Tg yr-1 over 141 550 km2. Subsequent modelling studies have shown that changes in temperature and precipitation could only account for a small part of the observed decrease, and therefore that changes in land use and management and resulting changes in soil respiration or primary production were the main causes. So far, all the models used to reproduce the NSI data did not account for plant-soil interactions and were only soil carbon models with carbon inputs forced by data. Here, we use three different versions of a process-based coupled soil-vegetation model called ORCHIDEE, in order to separate the effect of trends in soil carbon input, and soil carbon mineralisation induced by climate trends over 1978–2003. The first version of the model (ORCHIDEE-AR5 used for IPCC-AR5 CMIP5 Earth System simulations, is based on three soil carbon pools defined with first order decomposition kinetics, as in the CENTURY model. The second version (ORCHIDEE-AR5-PRIM built for this study includes a relationship between litter carbon and decomposition rates, to reproduce a priming effect on decomposition. The last version (O-CN takes into account N-related processes. Soil carbon decomposition in O-CN is based on CENTURY, but adds N limitations on litter decomposition. We performed regional gridded simulations with these three versions of the ORCHIDEE model over England and Wales. None of the three model versions was able to reproduce the observed NSI soil carbon trend. This suggests that either climate change is not the main driver for observed soil carbon losses, or that the ORCHIDEE model even with priming or N-effects on decomposition lacks the basic mechanisms to explain soil carbon change in response to climate, which would raise a caution flag about the ability of this

  16. 高锆耐碱玻璃纤维的应用研究%Study on the Application of High Zirconia AR Glass Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚德海; 亓松彬; 刘宪琪; 王荟焜

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the chemical, physical and mechanical properties of high zirconia alkali-resistant ( AR) glass fiber,describes the anti-crack and reinforcing effects of this fiber in GRC,mortar and cement concrete, presents the main performance and the application developments of various products of this fiber in GRC, utility poles,3D printing,sprayed concrete,and finally summarizes the direction of future development of AR glass fiber.%分析了高锆耐碱纤维优异的化学性能、物理性能和力学性能,阐述了高锆耐碱玻璃纤维在GRC、砂浆、水泥混凝土中的防开裂和增强效果,介绍了各种耐碱玻璃纤维制品的主要作用以及在GRC、电杆、砂浆、3D打印、喷射混凝土的应用开发情况,总结了耐碱纤维未来的发展方向。

  17. Surface treatment of diamond-like carbon films by reactive Ar/CF{sub 4} high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Takashi, E-mail: t-kimura@nitech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Ryotaro [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Azuma, Kingo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Nakao, Setsuo; Sonoda, Tsutomu; Kusumori, Takeshi; Ozaki, Kimihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) - Chubu, 2266-98 Anagahora, Moriyama, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films deposited by a high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) of Ar was carried out by a HPPMS of Ar/CF{sub 4} mixture, changing a CF{sub 4} fraction from 2.5% to 20%. The hardness of the modified films markedly decreased from about 13 to about 3.5 GPa with increasing CF{sub 4} fraction, whereas the water contact angle of the modified films increased from 68° to 109° owing to the increase in the CF{sub x} content on the film surface. C 1s spectra in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a graphitic structure of modified films was formed at CF{sub 4} fractions less than 5%, above which the modified films possessed a polymer-like structure. Influence of treatment time on the properties of the modified films was also investigated in the range of treatment time from 5 to 30 min. The properties of the modified films did not depend on the treatment time in the range of treatment time longer than 10 min, whereas the water contact angle was not sensitive to the treatment time at any treatment time.

  18. Characterization of the optical properties of hydrophobic coatings and realization of high performance AR coatings with dust- and water-repellent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruynooghe, S.; Spinzig, S.; Fliedner, M.; Hsu, G. J.

    2008-09-01

    Hydrophobic coatings enable the manufacture of easy-to-clean surfaces having dust- and water-repellent properties. In this work, a hydrophobic coating is deposited as a top layer on an antireflective (AR) multilayer system comprising a MgF2 upper layer to produce low reflectance optical surfaces at a normal incident angle in the visible spectrum with dust- and water-repellent properties for applications in precision optics. We report on the preparation and characterization of the optical properties of hydrophobic coatings deposited using a vacuum evaporation process and a commercially available water repellent substance. By means of a grazing incidence X-ray reflectometer it is shown that the hydrophobic coating can be considered, from an optical point of view, as two adjacent thin layers having specific thicknesses and densities. In fact, the hydrophobic layer is one monolayer comprising molecular chains with anchoring groups responsible for the chemical bond with the substrate material and functional groups responsible for the water- and oil-repellent properties. Optical constants are determined using a spectroscopic ellipsometer and are taken into account in the final multilayer system design. High performance AR coatings having an average reflectance of 0.14% at 7° incident angle in the 400-680nm spectral range together with a pleasing purple-red reflex color are produced. Coated lenses exhibit an excellent abrasion resistance, environmental stability, resistance to cleaning agents, homogeneity and water repellence with contact angles against water higher than 110°.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar Ages of Carbonaceous Xenoliths in 2 HED Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Johnson, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The generally young K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages of CM chondrites made us wonder whether carbonaceous xenoliths (CMX) entombed in Howardite–Eucrite–Diogenite (HED) meteorites might retain more radiogenic 40Ar than do ‘free-range’ CM-chondrites. To find out, we selected two HED breccias with carbonaceous inclusions in order to compare the 40Ar/39Ar release patterns and ages of the inclusions with those of nearby HED material. Carbonaceous inclusions (CMXs) in two HED meteorites lost a greater fraction of radiogenic 40Ar than did surrounding host material, but a smaller fraction of it than did free-range CM-chondrites such as Murchison or more heavily altered ones. Importantly, however, the siting of the CMXs in HED matrix did not prevent the 40Ar loss of about 40 percent of the radiogenic 40Ar, even from phases that degas at high laboratory temperatures. We infer that carbonaceous asteroids with perihelia of 1 astronomical unit probably experience losses of at least this size. The usefulness of 40Ar/39Ar dating for samples returned from C-type asteroids may hinge, therefore, on identifying and analyzing separately small quantities of the most retentive phases of carbonaceous chondrites.

  20. Preliminary assessment of clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Broxton, D.E.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    At Yucca Mountain, evidence for at least three distinct temporal groups of clinoptilolites can be delineated from the preliminary K/Ar dates (2 - 3 Ma; 4 - 5 Ma; 7 - 11 Ma). The older K/Ar dates that are similar to published illite/smectite ages (9-12 Ma) may be crystallization ages, whereas the younger dates probably represent continued diagenetic reactions of older clinoptilolites with percolating fluids. The K/Ar dates increase with depth, suggesting minimal argon loss in the deeper samples. internal consistency of the clinoptilolite K/Ar results at different levels within the drill holes suggest that dating of K-rich zeolites may provide useful information for assessing the zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. Variations in the K/Ar dates are probably related to Ar loss during dissolution of older clinoptilolites and to contamination by finely crystalline feldspars. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Preliminary assessment of clinoptilolite K/Ar results from Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A potential high-level radioactive waste repository site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Bish, D.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    1992-03-01

    At Yucca Mountain, evidence for at least three distinct temporal groups of clinoptilolites can be delineated from the preliminary K/Ar dates (2--3 Ma; 4--5 Ma; 7--11 Ma). The older K/Ar dates that are similar to published illite/smectite ages (9--12 Ma) may be crystallization ages, whereas the younger dates probably represent continued diagenetic reactions of older clinoptilolites with percolating fluids. The K/Ar dates increase with depth, suggesting minimal argon loss in the deeper samples. Internal consistency of the clinoptilolite K/Ar results at different levels within the drill holes suggest that dating of K-rich zeolites may provide useful information for assessing the zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. Variations in the K/Ar dates are probably related to Ar loss during dissolution of older clinoptilolites and to contamination by finely crystalline feldspars.

  2. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  3. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar+ laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niry, M. D.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar+ laser beam (intensity: 9.2 × 104 W/cm2) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  4. Enhanced mesoscale climate projections in TAR and AR5 IPCC scenarios: a case study in a Mediterranean climate (Araucanía Region, south central Chile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrego, R; Abarca-Del-Río, R; Ávila, A; Morales, L

    2016-01-01

    Climate change scenarios are computed on a large scale, not accounting for local variations presented in historical data and related to human scale. Based on historical records, we validate a baseline (1962-1990) and correct the bias of A2 and B2 regional projections for the end of twenty-first century (2070-2100) issued from a high resolution dynamical downscaled (using PRECIS mesoscale model, hereinafter DGF-PRECIS) of Hadley GCM from the IPCC 3rd Assessment Report (TAR). This is performed for the Araucanía Region (Chile; 37°-40°S and 71°-74°W) using two different bias correction methodologies. Next, we study high-resolution precipitations to find monthly patterns such as seasonal variations, rainfall months, and the geographical effect on these two scenarios. Finally, we compare the TAR projections with those from the recent Assessment Report 5 (AR5) to find regional precipitation patterns and update the Chilean `projection. To show the effects of climate change projections, we compute the rainfall climatology for the Araucanía Region, including the impact of ENSO cycles (El Niño and La Niña events). The corrected climate projection from the high-resolution dynamical downscaled model of the TAR database (DGF-PRECIS) show annual precipitation decreases: B2 (-19.19 %, -287 ± 42 mm) and A2 (-43.38 %, -655 ± 27.4 mm per year. Furthermore, both projections increase the probability of lower rainfall months (lower than 100 mm per month) to 64.2 and 72.5 % for B2 and A2, respectively.

  5. Emission and absorption spectroscopy study of Ar excited states in 13.56 MHz argon plasma operating at sub-atmospheric to atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L. [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Nikiforov, A., E-mail: anton.nikiforov@ugent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science, Academicheskaya St., 1, Ivanovo, 153045 (Russian Federation); Britun, N. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, R. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Universite de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Centre, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Leys, C. [Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    The densities of metastable and resonant states of Ar atoms are measured in high pressure Ar radio frequency discharge. Resonant absorption spectroscopy for the case of a low pressure spectral lamp and high-pressure plasma absorption lines is implemented for this purpose. The necessary generalizations for the high-pressure resonant absorption method are given. Absolute density of Ar 1s levels obtained at different RF input power and operating pressures are of the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, which is in a good agreement with those reported in the literature. The population distribution on the Ar 2p (excited) levels, obtained from the optical emission spectroscopy, reveals strong deviation from thermal equilibrium for these levels in the high-pressure case. The generation of the Ar excited states in the studied discharges is compared to the previously reported results. - Highlights: • Strong non-equilibrium distribution of Ar 2p levels is observed. • The absolute number density of non-radiative Ar 1s states is determined by the easier and low cost spectral-lamp absorption method. • The modified absorption theory of Mitchell and Zemanski was used to obtain the absolute number density of Ar 1s states at high pressure. • The developed RF source with 5 cm long gap can be a possible alternative to micro-plasma working in Ar at atmospheric pressure.

  6. Construction of a chimeric ArsA-ArsB protein for overexpression of the oxyanion-translocating ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, D; Owolabi, J B; Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1992-12-25

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions of arsenic and antimony in Escherichia coli is conferred by the conjugative R-factor R773, which encodes an ATP-driven anion extrusion pump. The ars operon is composed of three structural genes, arsA, arsB, and arsC. Although transcribed as a single unit, the three genes are differentially expressed as a result of translational differences, such that the ArsA and ArsC proteins are produced in high amounts relative to the amount of ArsB protein made. Consequently, biochemical characterization of the ArsB protein, which is an integral membrane protein containing the anion-conducting pathway, has been limited, precluding studies of the mechanism of this oxyanion pump. To overexpress the arsB gene, a series of changes were made. First, the second codon, an infrequently used leucine codon, was changed to a more frequently utilized codon. Second, a GC-rich stem-loop (delta G = -17 kcal/mol) between the third and twelfth codons was destabilized by changing several of the bases of the base-paired region. Third, the re-engineered arsB gene was fused 3' in frame to the first 1458 base pairs of the arsA gene to encode a 914-residue chimeric protein (486 residues of the ArsA protein plus 428 residues of the mutated ArsB protein) containing the entire re-engineered ArsB sequence except for the initiating methionine. The ArsA-ArsB chimera has been overexpressed at approximately 15-20% of the total membrane proteins. Cells producing the chimeric ArsA-ArsB protein with an arsA gene in trans excluded 73AsO2- from cells, demonstrating that the chimera can function as a component of the oxyanion-translocating ATPase.

  7. Ars Himera / Irina Lobanova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lobanova, Irina

    2003-01-01

    Iseloomustatakse praegust aega ja moodsat kunsti: valitseb vastutustundetus ja ebainimlikkus. Näited - professor von Hageni "Korpwelten" ja uusim kunstinähtus Ars Chimaera - eksponeerimise eesmärgil surrogaatsete elusolendite saamise kunst

  8. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci.

  9. Spectroscopic determination of highly nonequilibrium velocity spectra of hydrogen atoms in H{sub 2} + Ne, Ar, Kr hollow-cathode discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, B.P.; Mel`nikov, A.S. [St. Petersburg State Univ., Peterhof (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Energy distribution functions of excited (into the state with principal quantum number n = 3) and normal hydrogen atoms in plasma of a hollow-cathode discharge in an H{sub 2} + Ar mixture are determined in the range of 0-120 eV from Doppler profiles of spectral lines of the Balmer series. The distribution functions are found to be substantially nonequilibrium. The analysis of spectral profiles of H{sub {alpha}}lines in plasma of a high-volt-age hollow-cathode discharge in pure hydrogen shows that a part of the high-velocity excited hydrogen atoms is formed through charge exchange of negative H{sup {minus}} ions. Estimates show that the concentration of high-velocity H{sup {minus}} ions does not exceed several percent of the concentration of positive ions and increases with hydrogen pressure. Estimates of relative cross sections for excitation of hydrogen atoms to levels with n = 3, 4, and 5 in collisions of H atorns with H{sub 2} molecules are made. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. arXiv Analytical methods for vacuum simulations in high energy accelerators for future machines based on LHC performances

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Ida; Chiggiato, Paolo

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC), currently in the design phase, will address many outstanding questions in particle physics. The technology to succeed in this 100 km circumference collider goes beyond present limits. Ultra-high vacuum conditions in the beam pipe is one essential requirement to provide a smooth operation. Different physics phenomena as photon-, ion- and electron- induced desorption and thermal outgassing of the chamber walls challenge this requirement. This paper presents an analytical model and a computer code PyVASCO that supports the design of a stable vacuum system by providing an overview of all the gas dynamics happening inside the beam pipes. A mass balance equation system describes the density distribution of the four dominating gas species $\\text{H}_2, \\text{CH}_4$, $\\text{CO}$ and $\\text{CO}_2$. An appropriate solving algorithm is discussed in detail and a validation of the model including a comparison of the output to the readings of LHC gauges is presented. This enables the eval...

  11. High-efficiency generation of pulsed Lyman-α radiation by resonant laser wave mixing in low pressure Kr-Ar mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Norihito; Oishi, Yu; Miyazaki, Koji; Okamura, Kotaro; Nakamura, Jumpei; Louchev, Oleg A; Iwasaki, Masahiko; Wada, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    We report an experimental generation of ns pulsed 121.568 nm Lyman-α radiation by the resonant nonlinear four-wave mixing of 212.556 nm and 845.015 nm radiation pulses providing a high conversion efficiency 1.7x10-3 with the output pulse energy 3.6 μJ achieved using a low pressure Kr-Ar mixture. Theoretical analysis shows that this efficiency is achieved due to the advantage of using (i) the high input laser intensities in combination with (ii) the low gas pressure allowing us to avoid the onset of full-scale discharge in the laser focus. In particular, under our experimental conditions the main mechanism of photoionization caused by the resonant 2-photon 212.556 nm radiation excitation of Kr atoms followed by the 1-photon ionization leads to ≈17% loss of Kr atoms and efficiency loss only by the end of the pulse. The energy of free electrons, generated by 212.556 nm radiation via (2 + 1)-photon ionization and accelerated mainly by 845.015 nm radiation, remains during the pulse below the level sufficient for the onset of full-scale discharge by the electron avalanche. Our analysis also suggests that ≈30-fold increase of 845.015 nm pulse energy can allow one to scale up the L-α radiation pulse energy towards the level of ≈100 μJ.

  12. Spatial evaluation of Ar-systematics in rocks from the British Channel Islands: a UV laserprobe Ar/Ar study of excess 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Sherlock, S.; Kelley, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    includes sericitization of the feldspars and chloritization of biotite. Ar-Ar investigations were carried out using high spatial resolution UV laser ablation gas release in combination with a NU instruments Noblesse gas mass spectrometer. This sensitive instrumentation allows for a spatial resolution of 80 to 140 µm spot size. Detailed Ar-Ar analysis shows large variability of ages and also correlation with K and Ca content of the spot (measureable as 37Ar, and 39Ar after irradiation). In quartz in some of the samples there is large amounts of excess 40Ar accompanied by high 38Ar/39Ar and low to non-measurable 37Ar concentrations. This indicates the presence of chlorine and excess 40Ar; and thus fluid inclusions in those quartz crystals may be the host for excess 40Ar. Our preliminary results give insights into the behaviour of the Ar system during and after emplacement of igneous rocks from the Cadomian Belt, and the interaction of different reservoirs within the rocks.

  13. A Refined Astronomically Calibrated 40Ar/39Ar Age for Fish Canyon Sanidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera, Tiffany; Storey, Michael; Zeeden, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Intercalibration between the astronomical and radio-isotopic dating methods provides a means to improving accuracy and reducing uncertainty of an integrated, multi-chronometer geologic timescale. Here we report a high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) neutron fluence...

  14. A refined astronomically calibrated 40Ar/39Ar age for Fish Canyon sanidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivera, T.A.; Storey, M.; Zeeden, C.; Hilgen, F.J.; Kuiper, K.

    2011-01-01

    Intercalibration between the astronomical and radio-isotopic dating methods provides a means to improving accuracy and reducing uncertainty of an integrated, multi-chronometer geologic timescale. Here we report a high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the FishCanyon sanidine (FCs) neutron fluence monitor,

  15. Polineuropatia periférica arsenical: tratamento com penicilamina. Dosagem de arsênico inorgânico em nervo periférico, sangue e urina Arsenical peripheral polyneuropathy: treatment with penicillamine and determination of the concentrations of inorganic arsenic in peripheral nerve, blood, and urine. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrão Anghinah

    1974-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores registram caso de paciente na qual, após intoxicação aguda por arsênico inorgânico, instalou-se quadro de polineuropatia periférica. Foram verificadas altas concentrações de arsênico no nervo periférico estudado (1,48 mg/100 g peso seco, e 0,49 mg/100 g peso fresco e na urina. Antes do tratamento com penicilamina a quantidade de arsênico excretada na urina era de 80,0 micro/100 ml; após 7 dias de tratamento a excreção passou a ser de 150,2 micrograma/100 ml. Estes resultados bioquímicos foram acompanhados de progressiva melhora clínica.Report of a case of acute intoxication by inorganic arsenic with a picture of peripheral polyneuropathy. High concentrations of arsenic were found in the peripheral nerve studied (1.48 mg/100 g fresh tissue; 0,40 mg/100 g dry tissue blood and urine. Before the treatment with penicillamine the urinary concentration of arsenic was 80,0 micrograms/100 ml; 7 days after the onset of treatment the excretion increased to 150.2 micrograms/100 ml. Improvement of the clinical conditions was parallel to these biochemical results.

  16. A study of the oxygen dynamics in a reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge using an ionization region model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, D.; Gudmundsson, J. T.; Brenning, N.; Raadu, M. A.; Minea, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    The oxygen dynamics in a reactive Ar/O2 high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been studied using a new reactive ionization region model. The aim has been to identify the dominating physical and chemical reactions in the plasma and on the surfaces of the reactor affecting the oxygen plasma chemistry. We explore the temporal evolution of the density of the ground state oxygen molecule O 2 ( X 1 Σg - ) , the singlet metastable oxygen molecules O 2 ( a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 ( b 1 Σ g ) , the oxygen atom in the ground state O(3P), the metastable oxygen atom O(1D), the positive ions O2 + and O+, and the negative ion O-. We furthermore investigate the reaction rates for the gain and loss of these species. The density of atomic oxygen increases significantly as we move from the metal mode to the transition mode, and finally into the compound (poisoned) mode. The main gain rate responsible for the increase is sputtering of atomic oxygen from the oxidized target. Both in the poisoned mode and in the transition mode, sputtering makes up more than 80% of the total gain rate for atomic oxygen. We also investigate the possibility of depositing stoichiometric TiO2 in the transition mode.

  17. High-yield soluble expression, purification and characterization of human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) fused to a cleavable Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluchanko, Nikolai N; Tugaeva, Kristina V; Faletrov, Yaroslav V; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2016-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the rapid delivery of cholesterol to mitochondria where the lipid serves as a source for steroid hormones biosynthesis in adrenals and gonads. Despite many successful investigations, current understanding of the mechanism of StAR action is far from being completely clear. StAR was mostly obtained using denaturation/renaturation or in minor quantities in a soluble form at decreased temperatures that, presumably, limited the possibilities for its consequent detailed exploration. In our hands, existing StAR expression constructs could be bacterially expressed almost exclusively as insoluble forms, even upon decreased expression temperatures and in specific strains of Escherichia coli, and isolated protein tended to aggregate and was difficult to handle. To maximize the yield of soluble protein, optimized StAR sequence encompassing functional domain STARD1 (residues 66-285) was fused to the C-terminus of His-tagged Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) with the possibility to cleave off the whole tag by 3C protease. The developed protocol of expression and purification comprising of a combination of subtractive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size-exclusion chromatography allowed us to obtain up to 25 mg/1 L culture of completely soluble StAR protein, which was (i) homogenous according to SDS-PAGE, (ii) gave a single symmetrical peak on a gel-filtration, (iii) showed the characteristic CD spectrum and (iv) pH-dependent ability to bind a fluorescently-labeled cholesterol analogue. We conclude that our strategy provides fully soluble and native StAR protein which in future could be efficiently used for biotechnology and drug discovery aimed at modulation of steroids production.

  18. Note on: Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record, by Lieberman and Melott, arXiv preprint 0704.2896

    CERN Document Server

    Omerbashich, M

    2007-01-01

    Lieberman and Melott built their recent arXiv preprint 0704.2896 on my published paper and (a preprint of) a subsequent comment by Liebermans associate Cornette. But had this group waited for the Cornette comment to actually appear in print together with the expected Reply, they would have learned that his comment exposes Cornettes confusion that likely was due to journal misprint of my figure. Thus 0704.2896 is baseless. Despite receiving the extended Reply with Errata, these authors still fail to recognize that detrending of paleontological records-which they erroneously promote as a must-is an arbitrary rather than a universal operation.

  19. Unilateral dysphotopsia after bilateral intraocular lens implantation using the AR40e IOL model: case report Disfotopsia unilateral após implante bilateral de lente intra-ocular modelo AR40e: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico França Marques

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a recent complication during the postoperative period of cataract surgery. A patient was submitted to cataract surgery in both eyes with IOL implantation (Sensar® inside the capsular bag. The postoperative period of right eye was uneventful, however, in the left eye the patient noted a dark shadow at the temporal visual field at the first postoperative week. This diagnosis was confirmed with the presence of a temporal scotoma revealed by the computerized visual field (first reported in this study and also reducing the pupil area with miotic drops. The treatment of this complication was performed by using brimonidine tartrate and after 6 months this symptom completely disappeared as confirmed by the computerized visual field. The treatment should be based on reducing the pupil area with miotic drops and we also recommend to observe these cases until the 6th postoperative month before indicating an IOL exchange since the capsular edge that overlaps the IOL may opacify creating an optical barrier reducing or eliminating negative dysphotopsia.Os autores relatam uma complicação no período pós-operatório relativamente recente na cirurgia de catarata. Trata-se de paciente que foi submetido à cirurgia de catarata bilateral não simultânea com implante sacular da lente intra-ocular (Sensar®. O pós-operatório do olho direito evoluiu sem nenhuma queixa, entretanto, no olho esquerdo o paciente referiu a presença de uma sombra em campo visual temporal na primeira semana de pós-operatório sendo diagnosticado disfotopsia negativa após exclusão de outras causas oculares, principalmente retinianas. Este diagnóstico foi confirmado com a presença de um escotoma temporal na campimetria visual computadorizada (relatado na literatura pela primeira vez neste estudo e também com a redução medicamentosa do tamanho da pupila. Seu tratamento foi realizado com a administração de tartarato de brimonidina e após 6 meses o sintoma

  20. Tracking fluid action in Little Sark Pluton (Channel Islands, UK): a UV laserprobe Ar/Ar study of excess 40Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Schwanethal, J.; Tindle, A. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Sherlock, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Little Sark pluton (Channel Islands, UK) is a weakly to moderately deformed pluton of quartz diorite composition. Zircon from Little Sark has been dated as 611.4(+2.1/-1.3) Ma [Miller et al. 1991, Tectonophysics, 312], whereas titanite has an age of 606.2±0.6 Ma. Hornblende yields an Ar-Ar age of 606.4±3.4 Ma [Dallmeyer et al., 1991, J. Geol. Soc. London 148]. The rocks show evidence for post-magmatic hydrous alteration including chloritisation of biotite, and sericite formation in feldspar. We investigated the alteration in order to understand its influence on the Ar-Ar system. Detailed petrographic investigations of two samples indicate different deformation levels - S1, (less deformed), and S2 (more deformed). The feldspar is andesine to oligoclase in composition, but contains K-rich areas with patchy and sometimes cleavage guided sericitization. Mafic minerals include hornblende and biotite (the latter partially chloritized). Ar-Ar investigations were carried out using high spatial resolution UV laser ablation gas release in combination with a Nu instruments Noblesse gas mass spectrometer using spots of 80 to 140 μm diameter. Mafic minerals in S1 have highly variable 38Ar/39Ar and 37Ar/39Ar ratios and unusually high atmospheric contents for such old samples, possibly reflecting the presence of fluid inclusions associated with the sericite, particularly in the feldspar. The apparent ages in their entirety range from 429 to 668 Ma. Hornblende yields homogeneous apparent ages, whereas the younger and older ages are measured in both micas and feldspars, whose apparent ages range from 245-670 Ma. The modal age for feldspar is around 400-450 Ma, but this may not have geological meaning. Sample S2 shows many of the same features as S1. Mafic minerals span a slightly smaller age range and feldspars display apparent ages of ~245-645 Ma with a mode around 480 Ma. The alteration of both samples appears to have been accompanied by the introduction of 40Ar-rich fluids

  1. Ramon Llull's Ars Magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa

    2017-01-01

    intelligence and knowledge representation, which seeks to formalise language and knowledge in a way which can be translated into a computer program. And as Fidora’s and Sierra’s [4] anthology Ramon Llull: From the Ars Magna to Artificial Intelligence shows, Llull’s influence and relevance is profound in today......’s work on topics ranging from conceptual graphs and logical analysis, social choice theory and adaptive reasoning to Llull’s influence on Peirce’s pragmatic thinking. Llull is important, even now, on a whole other level. His ethical considera-tions when he wanted to convince people of the one true faith...... Llull: From the Ars Magna to Artificial Intelligence. Barcelona: Artificial Intelligence Research Institute (2011)....

  2. Combined K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the upper Jaramillo reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, Herve; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Nomade, Sebastien; Perez Torrado, Francisco Jose; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Alejandro; Wandres, Camille

    2013-04-01

    The Jaramillo subchron was first evidenced in 1966 (Doell and Dalrymple) through the Rhyolotic domes of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico (USA). 40Ar/39Ar studies achieved by Spell et McDougall (1992), Spell et Harrison (1993), Izett and Obradovich (1994) and Singer et al. (1994) defined the base of this subchron at 1053±6 ka, and the ceiling at 986±5 ka. Channell et al. (2009) delimited the age of the Jaramillo subchron by astronomic calibration (base 1071 ka, top 990 ka). To provide additional absolute ages on this geomagnetic period, which is critical to improve our knowledge of the earth magnetic field behaviour, we have carried out a study combining paleomagnetism and isotopic dating of a lava sequence from Tenerife island. This sequence of basaltic lava flows is some 500 m thick. The first 400 m present, based on field magnetometer measurements, normal polarity lavas, with dykes of normal and reverse polarity, passing at the top to reverse polarity lavas. Preliminary K-Ar ages bracketed this sequence between 1018 ± 18 ka and 978 ± 17 ka. Therefore, the upper Jaramillo reversal at least appeared to be potentially recorded in this sequence. A more detailed paleomagnetic study was then carried out to more precisely delimit the reversal itself (see Laj et al., session EMRP3.4). We have undertaken 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and unspiked K-Ar experiments on groundmass from four transitionally magnetized flows. The first transitional flow is K-Ar dated at 993 ± 18 ka and 40Ar/39Ar dated at 991 ± 13 ka, the second at 981 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 13 ka (40Ar/39Ar), the third at 950 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 8 ka (40Ar/39Ar) and the fourth at 984 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 977 ± 12 (40Ar/39Ar). 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages (relative to FCT 28.02 Ma) are indistinguishable at 2σ. The age of the upper boundary of the Jaramillo event calculated combining 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages is 992 ± 6 ka, in agreement with previous estimates.

  3. Ars Electronica tulekul / Rael Artel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Artel, Rael, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    6.-11. IX toimub Austrias Linzis "Ars Electronica" festival, mille teema on "Code - The Language of Our Time". Festivali kavast, osalejatest, ava-performance'ist "Europe - A Symphonic Vision", näitusest "Cyberarts 2003. Prix Ars Electronica"

  4. Ars Electronica tulekul / Rael Artel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Artel, Rael, 1980-

    2003-01-01

    6.-11. IX toimub Austrias Linzis "Ars Electronica" festival, mille teema on "Code - The Language of Our Time". Festivali kavast, osalejatest, ava-performance'ist "Europe - A Symphonic Vision", näitusest "Cyberarts 2003. Prix Ars Electronica"

  5. Photoionization of Ar VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Jiang, Wen-xian; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The photoionization cross section, energy levels and widths of 22 Rydberg series (in the autoionization region) for Na-like Ar VIII were investigated by using of R-matrix method. The relativistic distorted-wave method is used to calculate the radial functions, and QB method of Quigly-Berrington [Quigley et al. 1998] is employed to calculate the resonance levels and widths. We have identified the formant in the figure of the photoionization cross section.

  6. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  7. Characterizing filaments in regions of high-mass star formation: High-resolution submilimeter imaging of the massive star-forming complex NGC 6334 with ArT\\'eMiS

    CERN Document Server

    André, Ph; Könyves, V; Arzoumanian, D; Tigé, J; Gallais, P; Roussel, H; Pennec, J Le; Rodriguez, L; Doumayrou, E; Dubreuil, D; Lortholary, M; Martignac, J; Talvard, M; Delisle, C; Visticot, F; Dumaye, L; De Breuck, C; Shimajiri, Y; Motte, F; Bontemps, S; Hennemann, M; Zavagno, A; Russeil, D; Schneider, N; Palmeirim, P; Peretto, N; Hill, T; Minier, V; Roy, A; Rygl, K L J

    2016-01-01

    Herschel observations of nearby molecular clouds suggest that interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two fundamental steps in the star formation process. The observations support a picture of low-mass star formation according to which ~ 0.1 pc-wide filaments form first in the cold interstellar medium, probably as a result of large-scale compression of interstellar matter by supersonic turbulent flows, and then prestellar cores arise from gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments. Whether this scenario also applies to regions of high-mass star formation is an open question, in part because Herschel data cannot resolve the inner width of filaments in the nearest regions of massive star formation. We used the bolometer camera ArTeMiS on the APEX telescope to map the central part of the NGC6334 complex at a factor of > 3 higher resolution than Herschel at 350 microns. Combining ArTeMiS data with Herschel data allowed us to study the structure of the main filament of the complex with a re...

  8. ZnWO{sub 4} nanorods decorated with Ag/AgBr nanoparticles as highly efficient visible-light-responsive photocatalyst for dye AR18 photodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kebin, E-mail: kebinlee314@gmail.com [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Function Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Xue, Jie; Zhang, Yanhui [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Function Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China); Wei, Hong [Key Laboratory of Northwest Water Resources, Environment and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048 (China); Liu, Yalan; Dong, Chengxing [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Function Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069 (China)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/AgBr-sensitized ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod heterojunction was fabricated and characterized. • The composite showed the enhanced visible-light activity for AR18 photodegradation. • The enhancement mechanism and the catalytic degradation mechanism were revealed. • The effects of various parameters on AR18 photodegradation kinetics were examined. - Abstract: A novel Ag-AgBr/ZnWO{sub 4} nanorod heterostructure composite was prepared via a facile deposition–precipitation method with ZnWO{sub 4} nanorods as the substrate, and characterized by XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM, XPS, and DRS to confirm its structure, morphology, composition, and optical property. The composite was used as a photocatalyst to destroy azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18) under visible light irradiation. The effects of catalyst composition, solution pH, catalyst loading, and initial dye concentration on photocatalytic degradation rate and efficiency were examined. It was revealed that the photocatalytic activity of Ag-AgBr/ZnWO{sub 4} nanojunction system was higher than that of the single ZnWO{sub 4} or Ag-AgBr for AR18 degradation under visible light irradiation. The optimal content of Ag-AgBr in Ag-AgBr/ZnWO{sub 4} composite was 0.58:1 of Ag/W molar ratio using in the catalyst preparation. Acid pH and decreasing dye initial concentration were favorable to AR18 photodegradation, but the catalyst loading had an optimal value. The catalyst was stable and recyclable, after five successive cycles the photoactivity was fully maintained and the XRD patterns of AgBr displayed no evident change. Photoluminescence spectra revealed the enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability were closely related to the efficient separation of photogenerated carriers in Ag-AgBr/ZnWO{sub 4} nanojunction system. Superoxide radicals and holes were found to be main active species for AR18 photodegradation. Finally, the possible mechanism for AR18 degradation over Ag-AgBr/ZnWO{sub 4} nanorods under

  9. Characterizing filaments in regions of high-mass star formation: High-resolution submilimeter imaging of the massive star-forming complex NGC 6334 with ArTéMiS

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Ph.; Revéret, V.; Könyves, V.; Arzoumanian, D.; Tigé, J.; Gallais, P.; Roussel, H.; Le Pennec, J.; Rodriguez, L.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubreuil, D.; Lortholary, M.; Martignac, J.; Talvard, M.; Delisle, C.; Visticot, F.; Dumaye, L.; De Breuck, C.; Shimajiri, Y.; Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Hennemann, M.; Zavagno, A.; Russeil, D.; Schneider, N.; Palmeirim, P.; Peretto, N.; Hill, T.; Minier, V.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Herschel observations of nearby molecular clouds suggest that interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two fundamental steps in the star formation process. The observations support a picture of low-mass star formation according to which filaments of ~0.1 pc width form first in the cold interstellar medium, probably as a result of large-scale compression of interstellar matter by supersonic turbulent flows, and then prestellar cores arise from gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments. Whether this scenario also applies to regions of high-mass star formation is an open question, in part because the resolution of Herschel is insufficient to resolve the inner width of filaments in the nearest regions of massive star formation. Aims: In an effort to characterize the inner width of filaments in high-mass star-forming regions, we imaged the central part of the NGC 6334 complex at a resolution higher by a factor of >3 than Herschel at 350 μm. Methods: We used the large-format bolometer camera ArTéMiS on the APEX telescope and combined the high-resolution ArTéMiS data at 350 μm with Herschel/HOBYS data at 70-500 μm to ensure good sensitivity to a broad range of spatial scales. This allowed us to study the structure of the main narrow filament of the complex with a resolution of 8″ or inner width remains as narrow as W ~ 0.15 ± 0.05 pc all along the filament length, within a factor of Belt. Conclusions: While it is not completely clear whether the NGC 6334 filament will form massive stars in the future, it is two to three orders of magnitude denser than the majority of filaments observed in Gould Belt clouds, and has a very similar inner width. This points to a common physical mechanism for setting the filament width and suggests that some important structural properties of nearby clouds also hold in high-mass star-forming regions. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) in ESO program

  10. Growth of fluorocarbon macromolecules in the gas phase: IV. Li{sup +}-attachment mass spectrometric investigation of high-mass neutral radicals in the downstream region of Ar/c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Furuya, Kenji; Harata, Akira, E-mail: furuya@mm.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2009-03-21

    Mass analysis has been conducted on neutral species in the downstream region of Ar/c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasmas by Li{sup +}-attachment mass spectrometry. Various peaks appeared in the mass spectrum observed in the case of 29% c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, and many of them have unambiguously been assigned to the Li{sup +} adducts of neutral radicals with odd-numbered fluorine atoms from 2n + 1 to 2n - 5, where n means the number of carbon atoms, as well as neutral species with even-numbered fluorine atoms from 2n + 2 to 2n - 10. In contrast, only the peaks due to C{sub n}F{sub 2n+2} (n = 1-7), C{sub n}F{sub 2n} (n = 1, 4-8), C{sub n}F{sub 2n-2} (n = 3, 5-8) and C{sub 9}F{sub 14} appeared in the case of 2.2% c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}. These findings demonstrate that the Li{sup +}-attachment ionization is fragment-free, not only for relatively stable perfluorocarbon species but also for their neutral radicals, and therefore effective for the identification of high-mass neutral perfluorocarbon radicals. The analysis of the growth mechanisms of C{sub n}F{sub 2n+2} and C{sub n}F{sub 2n} on the basis of thermochemistry has proposed CF{sub 3}CF as an important reactant.

  11. Measurement of the kinetic energy loss double charge transfer in F{sup +}-Ar collisions: a test case for the mini-ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Serge; Bernard, Jerome; Montagne, Guillaume; Bredy, Richard; Chen, Li, E-mail: serge.martin@lasim.univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS, UMR 5579, LASIM (France)

    2011-06-15

    We have built a new small electrostatic ion storage ring, the so-called mini-ring, in order to store ion beams for long durations (up to seconds) using a limited number of electrodes in limited space. In this paper, we demonstrate the capability of the mini-ring to store ions on a rather long time scale (100 ms) limited by collisions on the background gas. We also show that by measuring the frequency of ion motion around the ring, we can use the mini-ring as an energy analyzer to determine the energy loss of F{sup -} anions produced in the double electron transfer process in 4 keV F{sup +}-Ar collisions.

  12. Anomalous behavior in temporal evolution of ripple wavelength under medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion bombardment on Si: A case of initial wavelength selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Sandeep Kumar [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Kanjilal, Dinakar [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, Tapobrata, E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2016-06-14

    We have studied the early stage dynamics of ripple patterns on Si surfaces, in the fluence range of 1–3 × 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup −2}, as induced by medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation at room temperature. Under our experimental conditions, the ripple evolution is found to be in the linear regime, while a clear decreasing trend in the ripple wavelength is observed up to a certain time (fluence). Numerical simulations of a continuum model of ion-sputtered surfaces suggest that this anomalous behavior is due to the relaxation of the surface features of the experimental pristine surface during the initial stage of pattern formation. The observation of this hitherto unobserved behavior of the ripple wavelength seems to have been enabled by the use of medium energy ions, where the ripple wavelengths are found to be order(s) of magnitude larger than those at lower ion energies.

  13. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, M.; Stunitz, H.; Bourgeix, A.-L.; Lee, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ???15mm in length and 6.25mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10kb and a temperature of 600??C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.Infrared (IR) laser (CO2) heating of individual 1.5-2.5mm diameter grains of muscovite and biotite separated from the undeformed granite yield well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 311??2Ma (2??). Identical experiments on single grains separated from the experimentally deformed granite yield results indicating 40Ar* loss of 0-35% in muscovite and 2-3% 40Ar* loss in biotite. Intragrain in situ ultraviolet (UV) laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages (??4-10%, 1??) of deformed muscovites range from 309??13 to 264??7Ma, consistent with 0-16% 40Ar* loss relative to the undeformed muscovite. The in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of deformed biotite vary from 301 to 217Ma, consistent with up to 32% 40Ar* loss. No spatial correlation is observed between in situ 40Ar/39Ar age and position within individual grains. Using available argon diffusion data for muscovite the observed 40Ar* loss in the experimentally treated muscovite can be utilized to predict average 40Ar* diffusion dimensions. Maximum 40Ar/39Ar ages obtained by UV laser ablation overlap those

  14. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (StAR): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile-phone short message system (SMS) text-messages on blood pressure. Methods and Results In this pragmatic single-blind, three-arm randomized trial (StAR), undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information-only or interactive SMS text-messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12-months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012 and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text-messages (n=457), interactive SMS text-messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 (92%) participants. At 12-months, the mean adjusted change (95% CI) in systolic blood pressure compared to usual care was −2.2 mm Hg (−4.4 to −0.04) with information-only SMS and −1.6 mm Hg (−3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios (95% CI) for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure <140/90mm Hg were for information-only messaging 1.42 (1.03 to 1.95) and for interactive messaging 1.41 (1.02 to 1.95) compared to usual care. Conclusions In this randomized trial of an automated adherence support program delivered by SMS text-message in a general outpatient population of adults with high blood pressure, we found a small, reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared to usual care at 12-months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. Clinical Trial Registration Information ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: South African National Clinical Trials Register number (SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386); Pan Africa Trial Register (PACTR201411000724141). PMID:26769742

  15. Electron-emission processes in highly charged Ar and Xe ions impinging on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite at energies just above the kinetic threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2014-01-01

    At keV energies, many electronic processes contribute to the emission of secondary electrons in the interaction of highly charged ions on surfaces. To unravel contributions resulting from isolated hollow atoms in front of the surface or embedded in the electron gas of the target, heavy highly charge

  16. Electron-emission processes in highly charged Ar and Xe ions impinging on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite at energies just above the kinetic threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2014-01-01

    At keV energies, many electronic processes contribute to the emission of secondary electrons in the interaction of highly charged ions on surfaces. To unravel contributions resulting from isolated hollow atoms in front of the surface or embedded in the electron gas of the target, heavy highly

  17. Ars Memorativa, Ars Oblivionis in Middle English Religious Plays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciobanu Estella Antoaneta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the multi-layered violence of religious representation in the late medieval York biblical plays, with a focus on the Supper at Emmaus. I read Emmaus (Y40, a play which commemorates the Crucifixion and openly encourages strong anti-Judaism, alongside scenes in an early predecessor pageant, The Crucifixion (Y35, within their contemporary devotional and mnemonic practices, i.e. the confessional Book of Margery Kempe and Thomas Bradwardine’s tract on ars memorativa. Emmaus in particular demonstrates how a fundamentally violent ars memorativa, the legacy of ancient rhetoric to the Middle Ages, also underpins the instruction of the laity in the basics of Christian faith, here with the aid of highly musical prosody and repetition, and thereby hones a biased, intolerant and violence-inured Christian collective memory. To study the York play’s position relative to late medieval mnemonic practices, I frame my analysis within memory studies, enriched with the more specific insights offered by social-psychological, neurobiological and cognitivist studies of memory.

  18. One-pot tandem Ugi-4CR/S(N)Ar approach to highly functionalized quino[2,3-b][1,5]benzoxazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, Mehdi; Zarezadeh, Nahid; Abbasi, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a convenient and facile method for the synthesis of functionalized diverse quino[2,3-b][1,5]benzoxazepines. These new compounds were synthesized through a one-pot sequential Ugi-4CR/base-free intramolecular aromatic nucleophilic substitution (S(N)Ar) reaction in moderate to good yields from readily available starting materials. Structural confirmation of the products is confirmed by analytical data and X-ray crystallography.

  19. Ramon Llull's Ars Magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa

    ; conceived and written in the late 13th century by a lay-monk whose life alone would be worth a Hollywood movie. In this paper I will take a brief look at Llull’s life and work, before explaining the four main parts of his Ars Magna. Finally, I will try to give a new perspec-tive on how the Ars Magna still...... might be a viable and valuable approach to understand some of the challenges and possibilities found in computer science and ethics. Vita Llull was born in 1232 in Palma de Mallorca, a melting pot for different cul-tures and religions at the time. Being educated at the king’s court, Llull learned...... the trade of the troubadour as well as reading and writing in Catalan. He became a devout Christian later in life only after he had married. Jesus showed himself to Llull on several occasions, and eventually Llull resumed his rather debauched life and decided to dedicate the rest of his life to three...

  20. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  1. A case-based evaluation of SRD5A1, SRD5A2, AR, and ADRA1A as candidate genes for severity of BPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotsman, M; Weinberg, C R; Davis, K; Binnie, C G; Hartmann, K E

    2004-01-01

    In men with a clinical diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), polytomous logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate associations between two silent polymorphisms in SRD5A1 (codon positions 30 and 116), two polymorphisms in SRD5A2 (Val89Leu substitution and C to T transition in intron 1), a trinucleotide (CAG)n repeat in androgen receptor (AR), and an Arg492Cys substitution in ADRA1A and clinical parameters that characterize severity of BPH. Candidate gene selection was based on two mechanistic pathways targeted by pharmacotherapy for BPH: (1) androgen metabolic loci contributing to prostate growth (static obstruction); and (2) factors affecting smooth muscle tone (dynamic obstruction). Polymorphisms in SRD5A2 were not associated with severity of BPH; however, SRD5A1 polymorphisms were associated with severity of BPH. The process(es) in which these silent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence BPH phenotypes is unknown and additional studies will be needed to assess whether these SNPs have direct functional consequences. The characterization of additional molecular factors that contribute to static and dynamic obstruction may help predict response to pharmacotherapy and serve to identify novel drug targets for the clinical management of BPH.

  2. Regional level in the function of mitigating negative demographic trends in rural areas of Serbia: Case study of the district of Zaječar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobnjaković Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term marginalization of villages has caused negative demographic trends in rural areas of Serbia, primarily through forceful de-population, unfavorable demographic structures and other structural problems. The term “extinction” is the most often related to the recent appearance of demographic shrinkage and economic decline of villages. According to the last population census (2011, 13 settlements without permanent inhabitants have been recorded. The fact that about 1/3 of all settlements in rural Serbia is sparsely inhabited (less than 20 inh/km2 indicates that scales of demographic decline impacts are yet to be seen. The Spatial Plan of the Republic of Serbia (2010 advocates polycentric and balanced regional development. Creation of adequate instruments to mitigate demographic decline in rural areas requires clear definition of regional territorial units. Are they going to be NUTS 3 level, or functional urban areas, as spatially and functionally integrated areas which represent more suitable choice for addressing the issue of demographic and economic decline, or should concrete answers be looked for at the level of identified rural regions [Spatial Plan of the Republic of Serbia, 2010; National Program for Rural Development, 2011]? This paper will research these issues in the District of Zaječar with a good practice in Germany. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47007

  3. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aciego, S.M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D.J.; Kennedy, B.M.; Renne, P.R.; Sims, K.W.W.

    2009-10-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 {+-} 40 ka to 119 {+-} 23 ka (2{sigma} uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 {+-} 54 ka and a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 450 {+-} 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published {sup 14}C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from {sup 238}U - {sup 230}Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar (>10%), and where the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 {+-} 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar methods are

  4. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciego, S. M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D. J.; Kennedy, B. M.; Renne, P. R.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2010-03-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the 40Ar/ 39Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with 40Ar/ 39Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 ± 40 to 119 ± 23 ka (2 σ uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than 40Ar/ 39Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 ± 54 ka and a 40Ar/ 39Ar age of 450 ± 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious 40Ar/ 39Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published 14C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from 238U- 230Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic 40Ar (>10%), and where the 40Ar/ 36Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while 40Ar/ 39Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 ± 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and 40Ar/ 39Ar methods are complimentary for basalts with ages of order 100-500 ka.

  5. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of Bacillus sp. CDB3 arsenic-resistance operon ars1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus sp. CDB3 possesses a novel eight-gene ars cluster (ars1, arsRYCDATorf7orf8 with some unusual features in regard to expression regulation. This study demonstrated that the cluster is a single operon but can also produce a short three-gene arsRYC transcript. A hairpin structure formed by internal inverted repeats between arsC and arsD was shown to diminish the expression of the full operon, thereby probably acting as a transcription attenuator. A degradation product of the arsRYC transcript was also identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift analysis demonstrated that ArsR interacts with the ars1 promoter forming a protein-DNA complex that could be impaired by arsenite. However, no interaction was detected between ArsD and the ars1 promoter, suggesting that the CDB3 ArsD protein may not play a regulatory role. Compared to other ars gene clusters, regulation of the Bacillus sp. CDB3 ars1 operon is more complex. It represents another example of specific mRNA degradation in the transporter gene region and possibly the first case of attenuator-mediated regulation of ars operons.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar age calibration against counted annuallayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storey, Michael; Stecher, Ole

    2008-01-01

    worth exploring for an improved absolute age basis for the 40Ar/39Ar system is through cross-calibration with counted annual layers (e.g. tree rings, varves and ice cores). North Atlantic Ash Zone (NAAZ) II is found within the dated part of the annual Greenland ice core record. NAAZ II has been...

  7. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone.

  8. The new 39Ar/40Ar dating facility of the LSCE, background and performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaillet, S.; Nomade, S.; Guillou, H.; Scaillet-Vita, G.

    2007-12-01

    Precise and accurate timescales are increasingly needed in most disciplines of the Earth sciences. To contribute to this challenging task, a new 39Ar/40Ar laboratory, specifically devoted to the dating of very recent (down to 1 ka) volcanic products, has been developed at the LSCE (CEA-IPSL-UVSQ, France). In this contribution, we present the first data obtained from this new facility. The laboratory comprises a VG 5400 mass spectrometer coupled with a high sensitivity and high dynamic range ion counting system. Gas extraction is achieved with a 25 watts C02 laser or a double vacuum furnace depending of the analyzed samples. The full metal vacuum and purification line feature a GP50 and a compact Ti flash getters which permit extremely low blank for all Argon isotopes (e.g. ~ 3.0 10e-19 Moles for 36Ar). Both analytical protocols and hardware were specifically developed and optimized to date extremely young samples. Analytical performances including protocols, flux monitoring as well mass spectrometer discrimination correction method will be presented in the light of data obtained over the last 10 months. All samples were irradiated, under cadmium, in the Β-1 position (~1.0 10e+13 fast n cm-2 s-1) of the 70MWh-1 OSIRIS reactor (Pierre Süe laboratory, CEA-Saclay, France). Irradiation package is composed of home-design Aluminium disks constituting a 4 cm stack (10 to 30 unknowns/irradiation). Analyzed neutrons flux standards indicate less than 1% variation along the 4cm stack and validate the use of this reactor for high-precision 39Ar/40Ar dating. The precision and accuracy of the facility has been checked from cross-comparison of international single grain standards including FCs (28.02Ma), ACR-2 (1.194Ma) and TCR (28.32Ma) using the most recent recommended values for these monitors. A total of 80 grains in two irradiations (10 and 120 minutes) will be presented in details. Results from single-grain analyses agree within errors with those proposed by Renne et al

  9. Sm-Doped Tio2 Nanoparticles with High Photocatalytic Activity for ARS Dye Under Visible Light Synthesized by Ultrasonic Assisted Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aware Dinkar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article series of nano crystalline Sm-doped TiO2 nano particles with various molar concentration of samarium were synthesized by modified ultrasonic assisted sol-gel method and calcined at 500°C for 2 h. The synthesized nanomaterials were characterized in details using XRD, TEM, XPS UV–vis DRS and BET analysis. The detailed photocatalytic activity results revealed that doped samples shows excellent photodegradation efficiency towards model pollutant Alizarin red-S (ARS and almost 93% dye degrades within 120 minutes. The highest photodegradation efficiency was noticed for 1mole % samarium doped sample at 50 mgL-1 of catalyst dose. The photocatalytic activity of synthesized nano particles were also compared with commercially available ZnO and TiO2 (Degussa, P-25 photocatalyst. It was found that synthesized nano materials showed enhanced photocatalytic efficiency than commercially available semiconducting photocatalyst.

  10. Growth Rate Estimates of Supergene Manganese Nodule by 40Ar/39Ar Isotopic Dating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianwei; Vasconcelos P M

    2004-01-01

    Increasing world-class, high-grade, and metals-enriched supergene manganese ore deposits have been discovered in the last two decades, making them more and more economically important. However, data on the timing and duration of their formation are sparse, mainly due to the difficulties extracting datable minerals suited to traditional radiometric dating methods. Hollandite, cryptomelane, coronadite, todorokite, and manjiroite are common manganese oxide minerals in supergene environments. These minerals host potassium of variable amounts from 0.1 wt% to 5.0 wt% in their structural sites. This geochemical property provides possibility to date supergene manganese ores by using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar methods. In this study, we perform 40Ar/39Ar dating on a 7.1-cm-thick botryoidal manganese nodule from an ancient weathering profile at Mount Tabor, central Queensland, Australia. Laser microprobe incremental analyses of distinct growth bands, from the inner core through the intermediate bands to the outermost crusts of the nodule, have yielded high quality 40Ar/39Ar ages at 27.3 Ma, 20.9 Ma, 19.2 Ma, and 16.1 Ma, respectively. The age results permit preliminary estimates on the average growth rates of the nodule varying from 4.7×10-3 mm/ka to 7.6×10-3 mm/ka to 9.0×10-3 mm/ka, from the core to the rim. Results of this study are of significance in our understanding of the mode, mechanism, process, and climatic conditions in the formation of supergene manganese ore deposits.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  12. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of low grade metamorphism: examples on metabasites from Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, L.; Feraud, G.; Fuentes, F.; Delbar, M.; Morata, D.

    2003-04-01

    Dating low to very low-grade burial metamorphic assemblages is often difficult because of (1) few mineral phases compositionally suitable to apply the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods, and (2) small amount in which these phases are commonly found. K-feldspar adularia, sericitic mica, and celadonite are the best known K-bearing secondary minerals. We present some successful attempts to analyse two distinct secondary phases from a same volcanic formation that allow to test the validity of the measured ages. These ages have been also compared with the crystallisation age of the volcanic rocks in which the secondary phases were lately developed. Adularia and sericite were selected from basic lava flows from a 3 to 13 km thick Cretaceous sequence from the Coastal Range of central Chile, at two different locations: the Bustamante Hill (west from Santiago), and the Cordón de Chacana, c. 80 km further north. Adularia came from a low-variance assemblage with pumpellyite, chlorite and low-albite contained in amygdules whereas sericite was present in milky-white strongly sericitized plagioclase crystals. While small clusters of rare fresh plagioclase grains from lava flows from Bustamante and Chacana displayed concordant plateau ages 119.4 ± 2.4 (2 sigma) and 118.7 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively, the adularia from the same formations gave sensibly younger ages around 94 Ma (high temperature steps), and 96.8 ± 0.2 Ma (plateau age) in Bustamante and Chacana, respectively. Sericite ages were measured in situ into single crystals of strongly transformed plagioclases. The relative proportion of sericite and plagioclase corresponding to each degasing step was monitored by measuring the Ca/K ratio (deduced from 37ArCa/39Ar_K). While intermediate ages were measured on some sericite of both sites (corresponding to a variable but permanent contribution of plagioclase on each step), a plateau age of 97.0 ± 1.6 Ma (concordant with adularia) could be obtained on a strongly sericitized plagioclase

  13. Neutron-hole states in 45Ar from p(46Ar,d)45Ar reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, F; Tsang, M B; Bazin, D; Coupland, D; Henzl, V; Henzlova, D; Kilburn, M; Lynch, W G; Rogers, A M; Sanetullaev, A; Sun, Z Y; Youngs, M; Charity, R J; Sobotka, L G; Famiano, M; Hudan, S; Horoi, M; Ye, Y L

    2013-01-01

    To improve the effective interactions in the pf shell, it is important to measure the single particle- and hole- states near the N=28 shell gap. In this paper, the neutron spectroscopic factors of hole-states from the unstable neutron-rich 45Ar (Z=18, N=27) nucleus have been studied using 1H(46Ar, 2H)45Ar transfer reaction in inverse kinematics. Comparison of our results with the particle-states of 45Ar produced in 2H(44Ar, H)45Ar reaction shows that the two reactions populate states with different angular momentum. Using the angular distributions, we are able to confirm the spin assignments of four low-lying states of 45Ar. These are the ground state (f7/2), the first-excited (p3/2), the s1/2 and the d3/2 states. While large basis shell model predictions describe spectroscopic properties of the ground and p3/2 states very well, they fail to describe the s1/2 and d3/2 hole-states.

  14. The Coronae of AR Lac

    CERN Document Server

    Huenemoerder, D P; Drake, J J; Sanz-Forcada, J; Canizares, Claude R.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    We observed the coronally active eclipsing binary, AR Lac, with the High Energy Transmission Grating on Chandra for a total of 97 ks, spaced over five orbits, at quadratures and conjunctions. Contemporaneous and simultaneous EUV spectra and photometry were also obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer. Significant variability in both X-ray and EUV fluxes were observed, dominated by at least one X-ray flare and one EUV flare. We saw no evidence of primary or secondary eclipses. X-ray flux modulation was largest at high temperature, indicative of flare heating of coronal plasma. Line widths interpreted in terms of Doppler broadening suggest that both binary stellar components are active. From line fluxes obtained from total integrated spectra, we have modeled the emission measure and abundance distributions. A strong maximum was found in the differential emission measure, characterized by peaks at log T = 6.9 and 7.4, together with a weak but significant cooler maximum near log T=6.2, and a moderately str...

  15. Ars Poetica : [luuletused] / Mats Traat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Traat, Mats, 1936-

    2008-01-01

    Sisu: Ars poetica ; Veepeegel ; Kontrollõed ; Mandariiniriik ; Nikolai Siamashvili (1888-1911) ; Kolmekümne kolmas aasta ; Kiri linast 1966 ; Italmaz Nuriyev ; Rudolf Rimmelile mõeldes ; Gennadi Aigi

  16. Ars Poetica : [luuletused] / Mats Traat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Traat, Mats, 1936-

    2008-01-01

    Sisu: Ars poetica ; Veepeegel ; Kontrollõed ; Mandariiniriik ; Nikolai Siamashvili (1888-1911) ; Kolmekümne kolmas aasta ; Kiri linast 1966 ; Italmaz Nuriyev ; Rudolf Rimmelile mõeldes ; Gennadi Aigi

  17. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  18. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-α-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Bakule, Pavel; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-01

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-α (Ly-α) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-α generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-α radiation generation can achieve a value of ˜5×10-4 which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  19. Reactive magnetron sputtering of highly (001)-textured WS2-x films: Influence of Ne+, Ar+ and Xe+ ion bombardment on the film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmer, K.; Seeger, S.; Sieber, I.; Bohne, W.; Röhrich, J.; Strub, E.; Mientus, R.

    2006-02-01

    Tungsten disulfide WS2 is a layer-type semi-conductor with an energy band gap and an absorption coefficient making it suitable as an absorber for thin film solar cells. In the article [1] WS2-x films were pre-pared by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metallic tungsten target in Ar-H2S atmospheres.The cover figure shows in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns for films deposited at different substrate potentials, i.e. for deposition conditions with ion assistance at different ion energies. These spectra and the corresponding SEM photographs of the film morphology show the strong influence of the ion energy on the film growth. The crystallographic struc-ture of WS2-x is shown between the two SEM pictures.The first author, Klaus Ellmer, is working at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Dept. of Solar Energy Research. His research fields are thin film deposition by reactive magnetron sputtering for solar cells, plasma characterization, in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction and electronic transport in transpar-ent conductive oxides.

  20. Speech Cases Turned Aside by High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined without comment to take up two major appeals involving student free-speech rights on the Internet. One appeal encompassed two cases decided in favor of students last June by the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia. The other appeal stemmed from a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

  1. Speech Cases Turned Aside by High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined without comment to take up two major appeals involving student free-speech rights on the Internet. One appeal encompassed two cases decided in favor of students last June by the full U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, in Philadelphia. The other appeal stemmed from a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for…

  2. A Tale of Two Signals: AR and WNT in Development and Tumorigenesis of Prostate and Mammary Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Pakula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most common cancers and among the leading causes of cancer deaths for men in industrialized countries. It has long been recognized that the prostate is an androgen-dependent organ and PCa is an androgen-dependent disease. Androgen action is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT is the standard treatment for metastatic PCa. However, almost all advanced PCa cases progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC after a period of ADT. A variety of mechanisms of progression from androgen-dependent PCa to CRPC under ADT have been postulated, but it remains largely unclear as to when and how castration resistance arises within prostate tumors. In addition, AR signaling may be modulated by extracellular factors among which are the cysteine-rich glycoproteins WNTs. The WNTs are capable of signaling through several pathways, the best-characterized being the canonical WNT/β-catenin/TCF-mediated canonical pathway. Recent studies from sequencing PCa genomes revealed that CRPC cells frequently harbor mutations in major components of the WNT/β-catenin pathway. Moreover, the finding of an interaction between β-catenin and AR suggests a possible mechanism of cross talk between WNT and androgen/AR signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of both AR and WNT pathways in prostate development and tumorigenesis, and their interaction during development of CRPC. We also review the possible therapeutic application of drugs that target both AR and WNT/β-catenin pathways. Finally, we extend our review of AR and WNT signaling to the mammary gland system and breast cancer. We highlight that the role of AR signaling and its interaction with WNT signaling in these two hormone-related cancer types are highly context-dependent.

  3. SEM and ESR measurements on HOPG surfaces irradiated with Ar{sup 11+} and Ar{sup 1+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Shengjin; Sakurai, Makoto; Zhang Weimin; Asakura, Ken; Iida, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi [Department of Physics, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tona, Masahide [Department of Chemistry, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Terui, Toshifumi, E-mail: 076s182s@stu.kobe-u.ac.jp [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Iwaoka, Kobe 651-2492 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were irradiated with a highly charged ion (HCI) Ar{sup 11+} at a fluence of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the irradiated trace. During SEM measurement, an electron acceleration voltage of 0.5, 1 and 5 kV was applied to measure the samples, respectively. The irradiated contrast can be observed in the Si surface at 0.5 kV, which could not be found at 1 kV or higher. The irradiated area becomes brighter than that of the unirradiated area. When Ar{sup 1+} was used to bombard the solid surface, the fluence should become of the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. In this case, the irradiated contrast could be observed. It means HCI is able to enhance more effectively the surface modification. Furthermore, electron spin resonance was used to measure the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). A clear resonant peak appears in the irradiated sample, which cannot be found in the pristine sample. The phenomenon could be related to defects induced by the HCI impact.

  4. Suriname; A Case Study of High Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhdev Shah; Benedikt Braumann

    1999-01-01

    Suriname recently went through a period of destabilizationthat that bordered on hyperinflation. The country’s experience provides a good illustration to study the genesis and dynamics of high inflation and includes some unusual phenomena, such as a monetary overhang, an eight-tiered exchange rate, and inflationary gold purchases by the central bank. High inflation also had a significant impact on the real economy. This paper compares the experience of Suriname with other countries discussed i...

  5. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razhev, A M; Kargapol' tsev, E S [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, D S [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-31

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%. (lasers)

  6. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razhev, A. M.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Churkin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%.

  7. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  8. Making Mathematics Placement Decisions for High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzyn, Amy; Hughes, Trudie

    2015-01-01

    This multiple case study described the experiences of case managers making mathematics placement decisions for high school students with high incidence disabilities. Participants included three parents, three students, three case managers, three mathematics teachers, and three administrators from different high schools across rural, suburban and…

  9. Thermal neutron induced (n,p) and (n,alpha) reactions on Ar-37

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieber, R; Wagemans, C; Goeminne, G; Wagemans, J; Denecke, B; Loiselet, M; Gaelens, M; Geltenbort, P; Oberhummer, H

    1999-01-01

    The Ar-37(n(th),alpha)S-34 and Ar-37(n(th),p)Cl-37 reactions were studied at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble, For the Ar-37(n(th),alpha(0))S-34 and Ar-37(n(th),p)Cl-37 reaction cross sections, values of (1070 +/- 80) b and (37 +/- 4) b, respectively, were obtained. Both values are about

  10. K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks and excess argon--Binary mixing model and quantitative study of excess argon effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A binary mixing model for excess argon is suggested in the note. According to this model and the data of excess argon component obtained in our experiment , a quantitative study of the effect of excess argon on real K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks is done. The result indicates that the effect of 5% excess argon component in samples on K-Ar age of the samples more than 2 Ma is less than 7.36% and can lead K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 32.4%, while 1% excess argon component leads K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 6.26%. Therefore, when pre-processed excess argon component is ≤1%, K-Ar age of the samples more than 0.5 Ma should be credible. On this basis we suggest a principal opinion for evaluation of previous K-Ar dating results and propose that the matrix is used to determine K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks. For the samples less than 0.2 Ma, in the case of high excess argon content, even if only 1% excess argon component exists in their matrix, it can also greatly affect their K-A age. Thus it must be careful to treat the dating result.

  11. High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

    2013-01-01

    Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

  12. Study of laser-generated debris free x-ray sources produced in a high-density linear Ar, Kr, Xe, Kr/Ar and Xe/Kr/Ar mixtures gas jets by 2 ω, sub-ps LLNL Titan laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Schultz, K. A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Safronova, A. S.; Cooper, M. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Petkov, E. E.; Stafford, A.; Moschella, J. J.; Schmidt-Petersen, M. T.; Butcher, C. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Andrews, S. D.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-10-01

    The study of laser-generated debris-free x-ray sources in an underdense plasma produced in a high-density linear gas-puff jet was carried out at the LLNL Titan laser (2 ω, 45 J, sub-ps) with an intensity in the 10 um focal spot of 7 x 1019 W/cm2. A linear nozzle with a fast valve was used for the generation of a clusters/gas jet. X-ray diagnostics for the spectral region of 0.7 - 9 keV include: two spectrometers and pinhole cameras, and 3 groups of fast filtered detectors. Electron beams were measured with the EPPS magnetic spectrometer (>1 MeV) and Faraday cups (>72 keV). Spectralon/spectrometer devices were also used to measure absorption of laser radiation in the jets. New results were obtained on: anisotropic generation of x-rays (laser to x-ray conversion coefficient was >1%) and characteristics of laser-generated electron beams; evolution of x-ray generation with the location of the laser focus in a cluster-gas jet, and observations of a strong x-ray flash in some focusing regimes. Non-LTE kinetic modeling was used to estimate plasma parameters. UNR work supported by the DTRA Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. The development of AR book for computer learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadung, Muneeroh; Wani, Najela; Tongmnee, Nur-aiynee

    2017-08-01

    Educators need to provide the alternative educational tools to foster learning outcomes of students. By using AR technology to create exciting edutainment experiences, this paper presents how augmented reality (AR) can be applied in the education. This study aims to develop the AR book for tenth grade students (age 15-16) and evaluate its quality. The AR book was developed based on ADDIE framework processes to provide computer learning on software computer knowledge. The content was accorded with the current Thai education curriculum. The AR book had 10 pages in three topics (the first was "Introduction," the second was "System Software" and the third was "Application Software"). Each page contained markers that placed virtual objects (2D animation and video clip). The obtained data were analyzed in terms of average and standard deviation. The validity of multimedia design of the AR book was assessed by three experts in multimedia design. A five-point Likert scale was used and the values were X¯ =4 .84 , S.D. = 1.27 which referred to very high. Moreover, three content experts, who specialize in computer teaching, evaluated the AR book's validity. The values determined by the experts were X¯ =4 .69 , S.D. = 0.29 which referred to very high. Implications for future study and education are discussed.

  14. Ar Ar dating of authigenic K-feldspar: Quantitative modelling of radiogenic argon-loss through subgrain boundary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D. F.; Kelley, S. P.; Lee, M. R.; Parnell, J.; Sherlock, S. C.; Brown, D. J.

    2008-06-01

    We have analysed two distinct generations of authigenic K-feldspar in Fucoid Bed sandstones from An-t-Sron and Skiag Bridge, NW Highlands, Scotland, which have experienced post-growth heating to levels in excess of the predicted Ar-closure temperature. Authigenic K-feldspars show microtextural similarities to patch perthites; that is subgrains separated by dislocation-rich boundary networks that potentially act as fast diffusion pathways for radiogenic argon. The two generations of authigenic K-feldspar in the Fucoid Bed sandstones can be distinguished by different microtextural zones, bulk mineral compositions, fluid-inclusion populations, and inferred temperatures and chemistries of parent fluids. Ar-Ar age data obtained using high-resolution ultraviolet laser ablation, show that the first cementing generation is Ordovician and the second cementing generation is Silurian. Modelling of Ar diffusion using subgrain size as the effective diffusion dimension and a simplified tectono-thermal thrust model assuming transient heating of the Fucoid Beds is inconsistent with observed data. Removal of heat from the thrust zone through rapid flushing of heated fluids rather than transient heating can be invoked to explain the observed Ar-Ar ages for both generations of cement. Alternatively, Ar-diffusion modelling using overgrowth thickness as the effective diffusion dimension instead of subgrain size also yields models that are consistent with both the Fucoid Bed palaeothermal maxima and determined Ar-Ar age ages for the two generations of K-feldspar cement. Based on this alternate explanation, we propose a theoretical microtextural model that highlights fundamental differences between the microtextures of deuterically formed patch perthites and authigenic K-feldspars, explaining the apparent robustness of authigenic K-feldspar with respect to Ar-retention.

  15. Analysis list: Ar [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ar Gonad,Kidney,Prostate + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/targe...t/Ar.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ar.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/...kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ar.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ar.Gonad.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ar.Kidney.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscienced...bc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ar.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Gonad.gml,http://dbarchive.bioscience

  16. Analysis list: AR [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AR Blood,Breast,Prostate + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR.1.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/AR.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/AR.Blood.tsv,http://d...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/AR.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosc...iencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/AR.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Blood.gml,http:

  17. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the older eruptive units of Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, M. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Scarpati, C.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Thornber, C.; Cioni, R.; Champion, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    40Ar/ 39Ar ages have been measured on the older major explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius volcano in Italy. These eruptions all have pumice fall, and pyroclastic surge and flow deposits. The eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius volcano has previously been based on uncalibrated 14C ages, mostly on carbon from paleosols, reported by Delibrias and others (1979) and Sigurdsson and others (1985). These assigned ages, plus measured 14C ages, calibrated 14C ages (denoted as 14C*) and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages (all in years) are: Mercato Tuff ~8500 years 14C=8263±29, 14C*=9250±49, 40Ar/ 39Ar=9155±461, 9541±460 Verde Tuff ~15000 years 14C=14420±130, 14C*=17200±380, 40Ar/ 39Ar=18456±302 Pomici di Base ~17000 years 14C=17229±398, 14C*=20360±139, 40Ar/ 39Ar=21759±306, 21568±328 The assigned ages are from Delibrias (1979). The 14C ages (Aleisso and others, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1978) use 1σ counting errors reported by laboratories. The uncertainty in calibrated 14C ages (above) are these reported uncertainties plus 1σ uncertainties of the calibration curves in IntCal04 (Reimer and others, 2004). The uncertainties in 40Ar/ 39Ar ages are 1σ errors. Pomici di Base and Mercato samples were analyzed twice. The weighted mean of plateau ages for Pomici di Base fall unit is 21,670 ± 224 years, and the weighted mean of isochron ages is 21,313 ± 408 years. The weighted mean of plateau ages for Mercato Tuff is 9348 ± 326 years, and the weighted mean of isochron ages is 9577 ± 332 years. The period of time from 0-12.4 ka used in calibrating 14C ages is based on dendrochronologically-dated tree ring samples. The calibration older than 12.4 ka is based on marine samples, primarily corals, and the marine calibrations are in dispute. The calibrated 14C ages above are based on IntCal04. Chui and others (2007) have presented another calibration based on fossil corals. In the younger part of their record, less than 30,000 years, the age difference averages less than 100 years. Aleisso and

  18. Re-measurement of $^{32}$Ar to test the IMME

    CERN Multimedia

    The Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation (IMME) has been subject to extensive studies in the low-mass region. Especially at the A = 32 quintet, the predicted quadratic form could not be confirmed, possible explanations being the insufficient accuracy of input parameters or higher-order interactions within the nucleon. For this quintet, the uncertainty on the mass-excess values of four of the five T = 2 multiplet members is extremely low: 0.6 keV for $^{32}$Cl, 0.3 keV for $^{32}$S, 0.2 keV for $^{32}$P, and 0.7 keV for $^{32}$Si. In the case of $^{32}$Ar, however, the uncertainty is as large as 1.8 keV. State-of-the-art high-precision Penning-trap mass spectrometry makes it possible to decrease this uncertainty. We propose to remeasure the mass of $^{32}$Ar at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP thus decreasing the uncertainty by a factor of 3-5. The proposed measurement is part of an experimental collaboration with JYFLTRAP, where the remaining masses of the T = 2 isospin quintet at A = 32 will be remeas...

  19. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Daqingshan thrust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhenghong; XU Zhongyuan; YANG Zhensheng

    2003-01-01

    The Daqingshan thrust system, to the south of the Shiguai Mesozoic basin, is a complex system of top-to- the-north thrusting tectonic sheets. The thrust system has a complicated evolution due to multi-stage thrusting. In order to date the thrusting events, syntectonic muscovite and biotite grains are respectively analyzed with normal 40Ar/39Ar dating and laser 40Ar/39Ar dating, which yield 2 isochron ages, i.e. 193.74 ± 3.88 Ma and 121.6 ± 1.6 Ma. These ages suggest that faults within the Daqingshan thrust system formed during 2 stages of thrusting, one the early Indosinian and the other the late Yanshanian. The isotopic dating is consistent with field geological relations. Indosinan deformation is evidenced by top-to-the-north thrusting, with the occurrence of a series of large-scale east-west trending thrust faults and folds, while the Yanshanian thrusting is characterized by top-to-the-NNW thrusting. It is superposed on and modifies early Indosinian thrust faults.

  20. Unveiling Turrialba (Costa Rica) volcano's latest geological evolution through new 40Ar/39Ar, ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Cubillo, P.; Turrin, B. D.; Soto, G. J.; Del Potro, R.; Gagnevin, D.; Gazel, E.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Carr, M. J.; Swisher, C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating experiments on whole rock matrix were performed on samples from eight key lava flow units from Turrialba, the easternmost volcano of the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Our results, together with available corrected 14C ages, recent mapping and new geochemical analyses, are part of a study to reconstruct Turrialba’s evolution. The project is being conducted as part of wider studies because of the increase in volcanic activity during the last three years. The geochemical compositions of the lava flow units span the range from basalts to dacites, and commonly have high K2O concentrations, making them good candidates for 40Ar/39Ar radiometric dating. The ages reported here correspond to the Paleo Turrialba (600-250 ka) and Neo Turrialba (< 250 ka) temporal stages. Sample TUR-38 (251 ± 4 ka) belongs to the latest unit of Paleo Turrialba stage, known as Finca Liebres volcano, while the remaining seven samples belong to Neo Turrialba: TUR-30 (99 ± 3 ka), TUR-19 (90 ± 4 ka), TUR-32 (62 ± 2 ka) TUR-33 (61 ± 2 ka), TUR-12 (25 ± 1.9 ka), TUR-36 (10 ± 3 ka) and TUR-08 (3 ± 3 ka). All the obtained ages in this study are in agreement with the local stratigraphy and prior 14C age determinations, adding robustness to our results. According to ages obtained and the areal distribution of the sampled units, the most important construction period of the massif was during the Neo-Turrialba stage which has passed through two important constructing episodes, around 100-60 ka and 10 ka-present. Although our results include some very young ages, all of them meet the established evaluation criteria used for plateau and isochron ages, commonly used for 40Ar/39Ar dating. Furthermore, we used a protocol that closely monitors the mass spectrometer mass discrimination during the measurements to provide additional control. Three of the eight 40Ar/39Ar ages reported here are remarkably young (25 ka or less). Two of those are the samples with the

  1. Towards VR and AR

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Chen

    2016-11-28

    We present a 360° light field display to visualize 3D objects above the table-top screen, and provide a graspable and measurable virtual or augmented reality environment. The display is constructed by a spinning flat-plate deflected diffuser screen, a high-speed light field projector, and the user tracking and interaction components. A rearprojection light propagation is specially designed to reconstruct the light field. By calibrating this levitated light field to the physical dimension, and capturing user gestures, we enable multiple users mid-air interactions based on their virtual measurement perception.

  2. The Thermo Scientific HELIX-SFT noble gas mass spectrometer: (preliminary) performance for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfod, D. N.; Mark, D. F.; Morgan, L. E.; Tomkinson, T.; Stuart, F.; Imlach, J.; Hamilton, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Thermo Scientific HELIX-platform Split Flight Tube (HELIX-SFT) noble gas mass spectrometer is specifically designed for simultaneous collection of helium isotopes. The high mass spur houses a switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and the low mass spur a digital pulse-counting secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We have acquired the HELIX-SFT with the specific intention to measure argon isotopes for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. This contribution will discuss preliminary performance (resolution, reproducibility, precision etc.) with respect to measuring argon isotope ratios for 40Ar/39Ar dating of geological materials. We anticipate the greatest impact for 40Ar/39Ar dating will be increased accuracy and precision, especially as we approach the techniques younger limit. Working with Thermo Scientific we have subtly modified the source, alpha and collector slits of the HELIX-SFT mass spectrometer to improve its resolution for resolving isobaric interferences at masses 36 to 40. The enhanced performance will allow for accurate and precise measurement of argon isotopes. Preliminary investigations show that we can obtain a valley resolution of >700 and >1300 (compared to standard HELIX-SFT specifications of >400 and >700) for the high and low mass spurs, respectively. The improvement allows for full resolution of hydrocarbons (C3+) at masses 37 - 40 and almost full resolution at mass 36. The HELIX-SFT will collect data in dual collection mode with 40Ar+ ion beams measured using the switchable 1011 - 1012 Ω resistor Faraday cup and 39Ar through 36Ar measured using the SEM. The HELIX-SFT requires Faraday-SEM inter-calibration but negates the necessity to inter-calibrate multiple electron multipliers. We will further present preliminary data from the dating of mineral standards: Alder Creek sanidine, Fish Canyon sanidine and Mount Dromedary biotite (GA1550).

  3. Single-crystal 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating reveals bimodal sanidine ages in the Bishop Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, N. L.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The 650 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT) is among the most studied volcanic deposits because it is an extensive marker bed deposited just after the Matuyama-Brunhes boundary. Reconstructions of the vast BT magma reservoir from which high-silica rhyolite erupted have long influenced thinking about how large silicic magma systems are assembled, crystallized, and mixed. Yet, the longevity of the high silica rhyolitic melt and exact timing of the eruption remain controversial due to recent conflicting 40Ar/39Ar sanidine vs. SIMS and ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon dates. We have undertaken 21 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating ages on 2 mm BT sanidine crystals from pumice in 3 widely separated outcrops of early-erupted fall and flow units. Plateau ages yield a bimodal distribution: a younger group has a mean of 766 ka and an older group gives a range between 772 and 782 ka. The younger population is concordant with the youngest ID-TIMS and SIMS U-Pb zircon ages recently published, as well as the astronomical age of BT in marine sediment. Of 21 crystals, 17 yield older, non-plateau, steps likely affected by excess Ar that would bias traditional 40Ar/39Ar total crystal fusion ages. The small spread in older sanidine ages, together with 25+ kyr of pre-eruptive zircon growth, suggest that the older sanidines are not partially outgassed xenocrysts. A bimodal 40Ar/39Ar age distribution implies that some fraction of rhyolitic melt cooled below the Ar closure temperature at least 10 ky prior to eruption. We propose that rapid "thawing" of a crystalline mush layer released older crystals into rhyolitic melt from which sanidine also nucleated and grew immediately prior to the eruption. High precision 40Ar/39Ar dating can thus provide essential information on thermo-physical processes at the millenial time scale that are critical to interpreting U-Pb zircon age distributions that are complicated by large uncertainties associated with zircon-melt U-Th systematics.

  4. "Ars Electronica 2009" / Raivo Kelomees

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kelomees, Raivo, 1960-

    2009-01-01

    30. "Ars Electronica" festival "Human Nature" ("Inimese loomus") Linzis. Osaka ülikooli professori Hiroshi Ishiguro mehaanilis-digitaalsest nukust. Hübriidkunsti kategoorias peapreemia saanud Eduardo Kaci inimtaimest. Konverentsidest. Näitusest "See this Sound", mis oli pühendatud helile kujutavas kunstis

  5. "Ars Electronica 2009" / Raivo Kelomees

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kelomees, Raivo, 1960-

    2009-01-01

    30. "Ars Electronica" festival "Human Nature" ("Inimese loomus") Linzis. Osaka ülikooli professori Hiroshi Ishiguro mehaanilis-digitaalsest nukust. Hübriidkunsti kategoorias peapreemia saanud Eduardo Kaci inimtaimest. Konverentsidest. Näitusest "See this Sound", mis oli pühendatud helile kujutavas kunstis

  6. AR DOC: Augmented reality documentaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Augmented Reality Documentaries (AR DOC) er et ’lille’ Shareplay projekt (ansøgte midler augmented reality cross media løsninger, til at skabe engagerende publikumsformidling...... indenfor oplevelsesindustrien. Projektet har genereret ny viden omkring, hvordan fysisk og digital formidling kan understøttes via Augmented Reality som formidlingsformat....

  7. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    Science.gov (United States)

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  8. High-tension Electrical Burns: Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, A.D.; Dabkana, T.M.; Tahir, C.; Naaya, H.U.

    2009-01-01

    High-tension electrical burns are a rare but devastating form of injury. The objective of this case report is to bring to the fore the severity of this rare form of injury and highlight the benefits of active surgical management of such a condition. We report the cases of two patients who were managed for high-tension electrical burns and highlight the main features of their presentation and management. Both patients needed urgent resuscitation and subsequent multiple amputations and disartic...

  9. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  10. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya S Pratihar; Vishnu P Tripathi; Mukesh P Yadav; Dharani D Dubey

    2015-12-01

    Short, specific DNA sequences called as Autonomously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal context. The two Schizosaccharomyces pombe ARS elements, ars727 and ars2OO4, represent two extremities in their chromosomal origin activity - ars727 is inactive and late replicating, while ars2OO4 is a highly active, early-firing origin. To determine the effect of chromosomal context on the activity of these ARS elements, we have cloned them with their extended chromosomal context as well as in the context of each other in both orientations and analysed their replication efficiency by ARS and plasmid stability assays. We found that these ARS elements retain their origin activity in their extended/altered context. However, deletion of a 133-bp region of the previously reported ars727-associated late replication enforcing element (LRE) caused advancement in replication timing of the resulting plasmid. These results confirm the role of LRE in directing plasmid replication timing and suggest that the plasmid origin efficiency of ars2OO4 or ars727 remains unaltered by the extended chromosomal context.

  11. Book review: Advances in 40Ar/39Ar dating: From archaeology to planetary sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The recently published book Advances in 40Ar/39Ar Dating: From Archaeology to Planetary Sciences is a collection of 24 chapters authored by international scientists on topics ranging from decay constants to 40Ar/39Ar dating of extraterrestrial objects. As stated by the editors in their introduction, these chapters were assembled with the goal of providing technique-specific examples highlighting recent advances in the field of 40Ar/39Ar dating. As this is the first book truly dedicated to 40Ar/39Ar dating since the second edition printing of the argon geochronologist’s handbook Geochronology and Thermochronology by the 40Ar/39Ar Method (McDougall and Harrison 1999), a new collection of chapters highlighting recent advances in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology offers much to the interested reader.

  12. Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    A review on the activities and achievements of Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) and Armenian astronomy in general during the last years is given. ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, Annual Meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, local and international summer schools, science camps, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, amateur astronomy, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are described and discussed.

  13. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léal, Ronan; Haddad, Farah; Poulain, Gilles; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3). Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV) revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  14. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Léal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3. Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  15. ar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fanlo

    Full Text Available A pesar de que el pulmón es el órgano diana por excelencia de la tuberculosis, cualquier otro órgano y sistema puede verse afectado. En este trabajo se revisan las formas de tuberculosis extrapulmonar a excepción de la pleural que requieren del facultativo, en ocasiones, su más valiosa pericia diagnóstica. Desde la temida meningitis tuberculosa, pasando por la afectación insidiosa de la espondilodiscitis, la llamativa afectación ganglionar, la afectación genitourinaria, la pericarditis, para terminar las formas menos frecuentes como la ocular o la cutánea. En cada apartado indicaremos lo más característico con la finalidad de que pueda servir de orientación diagnóstica y terapéutica.

  16. Quantifying interference of krypton produced from neutron irradiation of inclusion-hosted and lattice-coordinated bromine with 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutte, Daniel; Becker, Tim A.; Renne, Paul R.

    2017-08-01

    Various interfering reactions producing Ar isotopes during neutron irradiation from Cl, Ar, K, and Ca have been previously detailed with the significant ones being routinely corrected for in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Interference of double charged 80Kr (80Kr++) with 40Ar has not yet been considered. Significant amounts of 80Kr are produced during neutron irradiation through the reaction 79Br(n,β-)80Kr. While previous workers reported a computed fission spectrum averaged cross section of ∼48 mb-compared to ∼113 mb for 39K(n,p)39Ar-we determined a ∼33-fold higher production rate of 80Kr from Br compared to 39Ar from K in the CLICIT facility of the OSU reactor. Low-K, high-Br phases, e.g., some amphiboles, and fluid or melt inclusion rich samples are prone to 80Kr++ interference biasing 40Ar/39Ar dates in the ‰ to % range. 80Kr++ resembles excess 40Ar in step-heating experiments. The interference can be corrected for by using the parallel reaction 81Br(n,β-)82Kr.

  17. ARS - Helsinki - 2006 / Galina Balashova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Balashova, Galina

    2006-01-01

    Steven Holli projekteeritud Kiasma muuseumihoonest Helsingis. Kontseptuaalkunsti näitusest ARS 06 "Reaalsustunne" Kiasmas. Eestlastest esineb Mark Raidpere. Vene kunstnikegrupi AEC+F ja vene kunstnike Juri Vassiljevi ning Aleksandr Ponomarjovi töödest näitusel. Ka Gerda Steineri & Jörg Lenzlingeri (Šveits), Martin & Munoz'i (USA, Hispaania), arvutigraafik Charles Sandisoni (SB), videokunstnik Bill Viola (USA) jt. töödest

  18. ARS - Helsinki - 2006 / Galina Balashova

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Balashova, Galina

    2006-01-01

    Steven Holli projekteeritud Kiasma muuseumihoonest Helsingis. Kontseptuaalkunsti näitusest ARS 06 "Reaalsustunne" Kiasmas. Eestlastest esineb Mark Raidpere. Vene kunstnikegrupi AEC+F ja vene kunstnike Juri Vassiljevi ning Aleksandr Ponomarjovi töödest näitusel. Ka Gerda Steineri & Jörg Lenzlingeri (Šveits), Martin & Munoz'i (USA, Hispaania), arvutigraafik Charles Sandisoni (SB), videokunstnik Bill Viola (USA) jt. töödest

  19. Ars Industrialis, arsindustrialis.org

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Mingant

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The arsindustrialis.org website was created in 2005, when the association Ars Industrialis came into being. The association was founded by a group of philosophers and jurists, on the initiative of philosopher Bernard Stiegler, the former director of the IRCAM (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique–Institute of Research and Coordination on Acoustic/Music and the current director of the Department of cultural development at the Centre Georges Pompidou (French National Arts C...

  20. Ars Industrialis, arsindustrialis.org

    OpenAIRE

    Frédérique Mingant

    2012-01-01

    The arsindustrialis.org website was created in 2005, when the association Ars Industrialis came into being. The association was founded by a group of philosophers and jurists, on the initiative of philosopher Bernard Stiegler, the former director of the IRCAM (Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique–Institute of Research and Coordination on Acoustic/Music) and the current director of the Department of cultural development at the Centre Georges Pompidou (French National Arts C...

  1. Jurassic cooling ages in Paleozoic to early Mesozoic granitoids of northeastern Patagonia: 40Ar/39Ar, 40K-40Ar mica and U-Pb zircon evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Tohver, Eric; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Wemmer, Klaus; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cawood, Peter A.

    2016-12-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP zircon crystallization ages and Ar-Ar and K-Ar mica cooling ages for basement rocks of the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu areas in northeastern Patagonia are presented. Granitoids that cover the time span from Ordovician to Early Triassic constitute the main outcrops of the western sector of the Yaminué block. The southern Yaminué Metaigneous Complex comprises highly deformed Ordovician and Permian granitoids crosscut by undeformed leucogranite dikes (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 254 ± 2 Ma). Mica separates from highly deformed granitoids from the southern sector yielded an Ar-Ar muscovite age of 182 ± 3 Ma and a K-Ar biotite age of 186 ± 2 Ma. Moderately to highly deformed Permian to Early Triassic granitoids made up the northern Yaminué Complex. The Late Permian to Early Triassic (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 252 ± 6 Ma) Cabeza de Vaca Granite of the Yaminué block yielded Jurassic mica K-Ar cooling ages (198 ± 2, 191 ± 1, and 190 ± 2 Ma). At the boundary between the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu blocks, K-Ar muscovite ages of 188 ± 3 and 193 ± 5 Ma were calculated for the Flores Granite, whereas the Early Permian Navarrete granodiorite, located in the Nahuel Niyeu block, yielded a K-Ar biotite age of 274 ± 4 Ma. The Jurassic thermal history is not regionally uniform. In the supracrustal exposures of the Nahuel Niyeu block, the Early Permian granitoids of its western sector as well as other Permian plutons and Ordovician leucogranites located further east show no evidence of cooling age reset since mica ages suggest cooling in the wake of crystallization of these intrusive rocks. In contrast, deeper crustal levels are inferred for Permian-Early Triassic granitoids in the Yaminué block since cooling ages for these rocks are of Jurassic age (198-182 Ma). Jurassic resetting is contemporaneous with the massive Lower Jurassic Flores Granite, and the Marifil and Chon Aike volcanic provinces. This intraplate deformational pulse that affected northeastern

  2. High-Precision Calculations in Strongly Coupled Quantum Field Theory with Next-to-Leading-Order Renormalized Hamiltonian Truncation arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Elias-Miro, Joan; Vitale, Lorenzo G.

    Hamiltonian Truncation (a.k.a. Truncated Spectrum Approach) is an efficient numerical technique to solve strongly coupled QFTs in d=2 spacetime dimensions. Further theoretical developments are needed to increase its accuracy and the range of applicability. With this goal in mind, here we present a new variant of Hamiltonian Truncation which exhibits smaller dependence on the UV cutoff than other existing implementations, and yields more accurate spectra. The key idea for achieving this consists in integrating out exactly a certain class of high energy states, which corresponds to performing renormalization at the cubic order in the interaction strength. We test the new method on the strongly coupled two-dimensional quartic scalar theory. Our work will also be useful for the future goal of extending Hamiltonian Truncation to higher dimensions d >= 3.

  3. Electron localizability indicators ELI and ELIA: the case of highly correlated wavefunctions for the argon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezugly, Viktor; Wielgus, Pawel; Wagner, Frank R; Kohout, Miroslav; Grin, Yuri

    2008-06-01

    Electron localizability indicators based on the same-spin electron pair density and the opposite-spin electron pair density are studied for correlated wavefunctions of the argon atom. Different basis sets and reference spaces are used for the multireference configuration interaction method following the complete active space calculations aiming at the understanding of the effect of local electron correlation when approaching the exact wavefunction. The populations of the three atomic shells of Ar atom in real space are calculated for each case.

  4. Dipole oscillator strength distributions with improved high-energy behavior: Dipole sum rules and dispersion coefficients for Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok; Thakkar, Ajit J.

    2010-02-01

    The construction of the dipole oscillator strength distribution (DOSD) from theoretical and experimental photoabsorption cross sections combined with constraints provided by the Kuhn-Reiche-Thomas sum rule and molar refractivity data is a well-established technique that has been successfully applied to more than 50 species. Such DOSDs are insufficiently accurate at large photon energies. A novel iterative procedure is developed that rectifies this deficiency by using the high-energy asymptotic behavior of the dipole oscillator strength density as an additional constraint. Pilot applications are made for the neon, argon, krypton, and xenon atoms. The resulting DOSDs improve the agreement of the predicted S2 and S1 sum rules with ab initio calculations while preserving the accuracy of the remainder of the moments. Our DOSDs exploit new and more accurate experimental data. Improved estimates of dipole properties for these four atoms and of dipole-dipole C6 and triple-dipole C9 dispersion coefficients for the interactions among them are reported.

  5. Production of $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ mesons up to high transverse momentum in pp collisions at 2.76 TeV arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal

    The invariant differential cross sections for inclusive $\\pi^{0}$ and $\\eta$ mesons at midrapidity were measured in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV for transverse momenta $0.4high-$p_{\\rm T}$ neutral pions, which exploits that the showers originating from their decay photons overlap in the EMCal. The measured cross sections are found to exhibit a similar power-law behavior with an exponent of about $6.3$. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations and generator-level simulations with PYTHIA 8.2 describe the cross sections to about $30$% for the $\\pi^{0}$, and between $30$-$50$% for the $\\eta$ meson. The new data can therefore be use...

  6. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, Graham

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  7. Occurrences of Excess 40Ar in Hydrothermal Tourmaline:Interpretations from 40Ar-39Ar Dating Results by Stepwise Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Huaning; PU Zhiping; DAI Tongmo

    2007-01-01

    The occurrences of excess 40Ar within a hydrothermal tourmaline is discussed in term of the analysis data of syngenetic muscovite and tourmaline from the Lushui hydrothermal tin-tungsten deposit in western Yunnan, China, using the 40Ar-39Ar stepwise heating technique. About 80% excess 40Ar was released in the last step when the tourmaline was fused, corresponding to a release of only ~3% 39Ar (K), which indicates that most excess 40Ar was held in the mineral lattice rather than in the channels parallel to the Z-axis. This suggests that the excess 40Ar was incorporated during crystallization and not diffused into the tourmaline during the post-crystallization history.

  8. Cooling age of Dabie orogen, China, determined by 40Ar-39Ar and fission track techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江峰; 谢智; 刘顺生; 李学明; K.A.Foland

    1995-01-01

    Based on 40Ar-39Ar results of hornblendes and biotites and fission track dating results of apatites separated from the same rock samples, cooling history of rocks from Dabie orogen is discussed. Rocks from both Southern Dabie Terrain (SDT) and Northern Dabie Terrain (NDT) have an early fast cooling followed by a more recent slow cooling. Rocks from SDT cooled to about 540℃ at about 190 Ma B.C., while rocks from NDT cooled to about 540℃ at 125 Ma B C. Until about 110-120 Ma B.C., rocks from both SDT and NDT cooled to about 100℃. This suggests that a relative movement among rocks from SDT, NDT and ul-Ira-high pressure metamorphic rocks exis-ts before 110-120 Ma B.C.

  9. Eurekan deformation on Prins Karls Forland, Svalbard - new insights from Ar40/Ar39 muscovite dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faehnrich, Karol; Schneider, David; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Myhre, Per Inge; Majka, Jarosław; Kośmińska, Karolina; Barnes, Christopher; Maraszewska, Maria

    2017-04-01

    ) indicates Ellesmerian tectonism, unlike other higher grade rocks on Svalbard (Kośmińska et al. 2016, EGU 2016). Ten metasedimentary rocks from within the shear zone were collected for dating, with eight muscovite crystals dated per sample via 40Ar/39Ar total fusion. High strain is evinced by mylonitic fabric, mica fish or C' shear zones. Moreover, quartz was dynamically recrystallized with significant grain boundary migration. There is notable age dispersion between the samples with weighted mean ages varying from 45 up to 103 Ma and single grain ages are more than 300 Ma, reflecting partial recrystallization and resetting during Eurekan deformation. Younger ages were obtained from lower structural levels, yielding dates of 44 to 54 Ma for the Eurekan deformation on Prins Karls Forland. We suggest that an Ellesmerian ductile shear zone was reactivated during Eocene (commencing as early as 54 Ma) progressing to brittle conditions which continued after 44 Ma. These are the first documented Eurekan 40Ar/39Ar muscovite deformation ages from Svalbard, and enable to better distinguish individual stages of the Eurekan deformation in the Eocene improving our understanding of relative plate tectonic movements. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319 and the NCN research projects 2013/11/N/ST10/00357 and 2015/17/B/ST10/03114.

  10. PF-AR upgrading project

    CERN Document Server

    Kasuga, T

    2002-01-01

    The upgrading project of the dedicated pulse X-ray source PF-AR has been completed by the end of the 2001 fiscal year. Machine commissioning exclusively using the injector linac was successfully accomplished in the beginning of January 2002. After fine tuning of the machine and cleaning of the vacuum system with the beams from the middle of January to the middle of March, routine operation for users has begun in April. The historical details, commissioning and results of the project are reported. (author)

  11. Sedimentary cycles and volcanic ash beds in the Lower Pliocene lacustrine succession of Ptolemais (NW Greece): discrepancy between 40 Ar/39 Ar and astronomical ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, J.; Vugt, N. van; Hilgen, F.J.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Meulenkamp, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution cyclostratigraphy for the rhythmically bedded lignite-marl sequences of the Lower Pliocene Ptole-mais Formation is combined with 40 Ar= 39 Ar dating results of intercalated volcanic ash beds. Detailed field reconnaissance in three open-pit lignite mines reveals three end-member sed

  12. Case mix, quality and high-cost kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesbe, M J; Dimick, J B; Fan, Z; Baser, O; Birkmeyer, J D

    2009-05-01

    A better understanding of high-cost kidney transplant patients would be useful for informing value-based purchasing strategies by payers. This retrospective cohort study was based on the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) files from 2003 to 2006. The focus of this analysis was high-cost kidney transplant patients (patients that qualified for Medicare outlier payments and 30-day readmission payments). Using regression techniques, we explored relationships between high-cost kidney transplant patients, center-specific case mix, and center quality. Among 43 393 kidney transplants in Medicare recipients, 35.2% were categorized as high-cost patients. These payments represented 20% of total Medicare payments for kidney transplantation and exceeded $200 million over the study period. Case mix was associated with these payments and was an important factor underlying variation in hospital payments high-cost patients. Hospital quality was also a strong determinant of future Medicare payments for high-cost patients. Compared to high-quality centers, low-quality centers cost Medicare an additional $1185 per kidney transplant. Payments for high-cost patients represent a significant proportion of the total costs of kidney transplant surgical care. Quality improvement may be an important strategy for reducing the costs of kidney transplantation.

  13. A CASE REPORT ON HIGH ORIGIN OF RADIAL ARTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Bondage

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of radial artery (RA as an access to heart and for other procedures and surgeries make it significant. The context and purpose: The RA is a common access port for coronary angiography (CAG, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, and coronary artery bypass graft Surgery (CABG, RA cannulation, along with others. Results: In this case report, we want to present a case of unilateral high origin of RA arising as branch of brachial artery in the proximal 1/3rd of arm. Conclusions, brief summary and potential implications: Misdiagnosis, complications during medical procedures and increased possibility of injury are the most common dangers of having a superficial RA.

  14. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Studies of ICP Ar Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xuelian; REN Chunsheng; ZHANG Jian; MA Tengcai

    2007-01-01

    The ion line of 434.8 nm and atom line of 419.8 nm of Ar plasma produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were measured by optical emission spectroscopy and the influences from the working gas pressure, radio-frequency (RF) power and different positions in the discharge chamber on the line intensities were investigated in this study. It was found that the intensity of Ar atom line increased firstly and then saturated with the increase of the pressure. The line intensity of Ar+, on the other hand, reached a maximum value and then decreased along with the pressure. The intensity of the line in an RF discharge also demonstrated a jumping mode and a hysteresis phenomenon with the RF power. When the RF power increased to 400 W, the discharge jumped from the E-mode to the H-mode where the line intensity of Ar atom demonstrated a sudden increase, while the intensity of Ar+ ion only changed slightly. If the RF power decreased from a high value, e.g., 1000 W, the discharge would jump from the H-mode back to the E-mode at a power of 300 W. At this time the intensities of Ar and Ar+ lines would also decrease sharply. It was also noticed in this paper that the intensity of the ion line depended on the detective location in the chamber, namely at the bottom of the chamber the line was more intense than that in the middle of the chamber, but less intense than at the top, which is considered to be related to the capacitance coupling ability of the ICP plasma in different discharge areas.

  15. The Contribution of ArsB to Arsenic Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Zhangqi Shen; Jing Han; Yang Wang; Orhan Sahin; Qijing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid, exists in the natural environment and its organic form is approved for use as a feed additive for animal production. As a major foodborne pathogen of animal origin, Campylobacter is exposed to arsenic selection pressure in the food animal production environments. Previous studies showed that Campylobacter isolates from poultry were highly resistant to arsenic compounds and a 4-gene operon (containing arsP, arsR, arsC, and acr3) was associated with arsenic resistanc...

  16. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  17. Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

    2011-02-01

    Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  19. ID4 promotes AR expression and blocks tumorigenicity of PC3 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaragiri, Shravan Kumar; Bostanthirige, Dhanushka H.; Morton, Derrick J.; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Upadhyay, Sunil; Chaudhary, Jaideep, E-mail: jchaudhary@cau.edu

    2016-09-09

    Deregulation of tumor suppressor genes is associated with tumorigenesis and the development of cancer. In prostate cancer, ID4 is epigenetically silenced and acts as a tumor suppressor. In normal prostate epithelial cells, ID4 collaborates with androgen receptor (AR) and p53 to exert its tumor suppressor activity. Previous studies have shown that ID4 promotes tumor suppressive function of AR whereas loss of ID4 results in tumor promoter activity of AR. Previous study from our lab showed that ectopic ID4 expression in DU145 attenuates proliferation and promotes AR expression suggesting that ID4 dependent AR activity is tumor suppressive. In this study, we examined the effect of ectopic expression of ID4 on highly malignant prostate cancer cell, PC3. Here we show that stable overexpression of ID4 in PC3 cells leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration. In addition, in vivo studies showed a decrease in tumor size and volume of ID4 overexpressing PC3 cells, in nude mice. At the molecular level, these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR), p21, and AR dependent FKBP51 expression. At the mechanistic level, ID4 may regulate the expression or function of AR through specific but yet unknown AR co-regulators that may determine the final outcome of AR function. - Highlights: • ID4 expression induces AR expression in PC3 cells, which generally lack AR. • ID4 expression increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and invasion. • Overexpression of ID4 reduces tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts in vivo. • ID4 induces p21 and FKBP51 expression- co-factors of AR tumor suppressor activity.

  20. High case fatality cholera outbreak in Western Kenya, August 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Dickens; Karambu, Shirley; Abade, Ahmed; Amwayi, Samuel; Omolo, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Cholera is a disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholera and has been an important public health problem since its first pandemic in 1817. Kenya has had numerous outbreaks of cholera ever since it was first detected there during 1971. In August 2010 an outbreak of cholera occurred in Kuria West District spreading to the neighboring Migori District. We conducted an investigation in order to determine the magnitude of the problem and institute control measures. In order to update the line lists we reviewed records in Migori and Kuria district hospitals and conducted active case search in the community between 30th August and 6th September 2010. Data was analyzed using Epi-Info 3.5.2. A total of 114 cases and with 10 deaths (Case Fatality Rate = 9%) were documented. The index case was an 80 years old woman from Mabera Division who had hosted a cultural marriage ceremony a day before the outbreak. The mean age of case patients was 34.5 years (Standard Deviation=23.4) with a range 5 to 80 years. Females accounted for 61.4% of cases; people aged 10-39 years accounted 46.9%, those 40-69 years accounted for 29.2% and those above 70 years accounted for 9.7% of the cases. Sixty percent of deaths occurred among patients aged 50 years and over, case fatality rate was highest in this age group (16.7%) followed by those aged 40-49 years (12.5%), 20-29 years (10%) and 10-19 years (4.8%). The outbreak was confirmed within 2 weeks of onset after one (16.7%) of the six samples taken tested positive for V. cholera (serotype Inaba). High case fatality rate and late laboratory confirmation was noted in this outbreak. There was urgent need to capacity build the districts on cholera case management, outbreak management, and equip the Migori District Hospital laboratory to allow prompt confirmation.

  1. Ars grammatica de Dionisio Tracio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán Jorge Enrique

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Ars Grammatica de Dionisio Tracio (170-90 a. C fue la primera gramática griega que se escribió. Su contenido y método fueron modelos que siguieron las gramáticas escolares posteriores. La versión española que se presenta ahora responde a la necesidad que se tenía en nuestro medio de una traducción completa de este texto. Finalmente, se acompaña la traducción de una introducción y de abundantes notas, en un intento por hacerla comprensible para el hablante del español, no necesariamente conocedor de la lengua griega.

  2. GPS-Based AR Games Development Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorius Alvin Raditya Santoso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of new technologies in a game is not a new thing. One example is the application of Augmented Reality (AR technology in game. Many people do not know the application of AR technology in game, although the application of this technology is able to produce a game with unique gameplay. In addition, since AR game is GPS-based, it offers new gaming experience, that is, playing outdoors in which the real world becomes the game arena. This advantage gives the AR technology a huge potential to be developed into a game

  3. Adsorption of Ar on a nonuniform MgO surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, D. C.; Halsey, G. D.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the adsorption of Ar and N2 on a strongly heterogeneous MgO surface at 84 K and for Ar at a range of temperatures between 130 and 250 K. The high-temperature data are analyzed according to a model which separates the contributions to the potential into bulk and surface terms, providing a method for the determination of the surface area from parameters characteristic of the bulk material. A solid-gas energy parameter and parameters indicating the strength of the impurity sites are also evaluated.

  4. Success Despite Socioeconomics: A Case Study of a High-Achieving, High-Poverty School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Thomas Brent; Smith, Samuel J.; Claxton, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty school describes the school's leadership, culture, and programs that contributed to its success. Data were collected from two surveys (the School Culture Survey and the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education), observations at the school site, and interviews with school personnel. The…

  5. High-energy gas fracturing in cased and perforated wellbores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1986-06-01

    A propellant-based technology, High-Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF), has been applied to fracturing through perforations in cased boreholes. HEGF is a tailored-pulse fracturing technique originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories for application in uncased, liquid-free gas wells in Appalachian Devonian shales. Because most oil and gas wells are liquid filled as well as cased and perforated, the potential impact of present research is significantly broader. A number of commercial tailored-pulse fracturing services, using a variety of explosives or propellants, are currently available. Present research provides valuable insight into phenomena that occur in those stimulations. The use of propellants that deflagrate or burn rather than detonate, as do high-order explosives, permits controlled buildup of pressure in the wellbore. The key to successful stimulation in cased and perforated wellbores is to control the pressure buildup of the combustion gases to maximize fracturing without destroying the casing. Eight experiments using cased and perforated wellbore were conducted in a tunnel complex at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, which provides a realistic in situ stress environment (4 to 10 MPa (600 to 1500 psi)) and provides access for mineback to directly observe fracturing obtained. Primary variables in the experiments include propellant burn rate and amount of propellant used, presence or absence of liquid in the wellbore, in situ stress orientation, and perforation diameter, density, and phasing. In general, the presence of liquid in the borehole results in a much faster pressure risetime and a lower peak pressure for the same propellant charge. Fracture surfaces proceed outward along lines of perforations as determined by phasing, then gradually turn toward the hydraulic fracture direction. 8 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Multidiffusion mechanisms for noble gases (He, Ne, Ar) in silicate glasses and melts in the transition temperature domain: Implications for glass polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalberti, Julien; Burnard, Pete; Laporte, Didier; Tissandier, Laurent; Neuville, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Noble gases are ideal probes to study the structure of silicate glasses and melts as the modifications of the silicate network induced by the incorporation of noble gases are negligible. In addition, there are systematic variations in noble gas atomic radii and several noble gas isotopes with which the influence of the network itself on diffusion may be investigated. Noble gases are therefore ideally suited to constrain the time scales of magma degassing and cooling. In order to document noble gas diffusion behavior in silicate glass, we measured the diffusivities of three noble gases (4He, 20Ne and 40Ar) and the isotopic diffusivities of two Ar isotopes (36Ar and 40Ar) in two synthetic basaltic glasses (G1 and G2; 20Ne and 36Ar were only measured in sample G1). These new diffusion results are used to re-interpret time scales of the acquisition of fractionated atmospheric noble gas signatures in pumices. The noble gas bearing glasses were synthesized by exposing the liquids to high noble gas partial pressures at high temperature and pressure (1750-1770 K and 1.2 GPa) in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Diffusivities were measured by step heating the glasses between 423 and 1198 K and measuring the fraction of gas released at each temperature step by noble gas mass spectrometry. In addition we measured the viscosity of G1 between 996 and 1072 K in order to determine the precise glass transition temperature and to estimate network relaxation time scales. The results indicate that, to a first order, that the smaller the size of the diffusing atom, the greater its diffusivity at a given temperature: D(He) > D(Ne) > D(Ar) at constant T. Significantly, the diffusivities of the noble gases in the glasses investigated do not display simple Arrhenian behavior: there are well-defined departures from Arrhenian behavior which occur at lower temperatures for He than for Ne or Ar. We propose that the non-Arrhenian behavior of noble gases can be explained by structural modifications

  7. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  8. Global properties of the white dwarf pulsar AR Scorpii

    CERN Document Server

    Franzon, B

    2016-01-01

    In view of the new recent observation and measurement of the fast-rotating and highly-magnetized white dwarf AR Sco \\cite{Marsh:2016uhc}, we determine bounds for its radius, magnetic fields, moment of inertia and gravitational wave (GW) emission by using observations of the luminosity, as well the rotation frequency $\

  9. Big data computing: Building a vision for ARS information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvements are needed within the ARS to increase scientific capacity and keep pace with new developments in computer technologies that support data acquisition and analysis. Enhancements in computing power and IT infrastructure are needed to provide scientists better access to high performance com...

  10. Late Paleozoic deformation and exhumation in the Sierras Pampeanas (Argentina): 40Ar/39Ar-feldspar dating constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbens, Stefan; Oriolo, Sebastián; Benowitz, Jeff; Wemmer, Klaus; Layer, Paul; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2016-09-01

    Systematic 40Ar/39Ar feldspar data obtained from the Sierras Pampeanas are presented, filling the gap between available high- (>~300 °C) and low-temperature (Pie de Palo regions, whereas the Sierras de San Luis and the Sierra de Comechingones regions record exhumation during the Carboniferous. Comparison between new and available data points to a Carboniferous tectonic event in the Sierras Pampeanas, which represents a key period to constrain the early evolution of the proto-Andean margin of Gondwana. This event was probably transtensional and played a major role during the evolution of the Paganzo Basin as well as during the emplacement of alkaline magmatism in the retroarc.

  11. ANOMALOUS RELATIVE AR/CA CORONAL ABUNDANCES OBSERVED BY THE HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER NEAR SUNSPOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Feldman, U. [Artep, Inc., 2922 Excelsior Springs Court, Ellicott City, MD 21042 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    In determining the element abundance of argon (a high first ionization potential; FIP element) relative to calcium (a low FIP element) in flares, unexpectedly high intensities of two Ar xiv lines (194.40, 187.96 Å) relative to a Ca xiv line (193.87 Å) intensity were found in small (a few arcseconds) regions near sunspots in flare spectra recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Hinode spacecraft. In the most extreme case the Ar xiv line intensity relative to the Ca xiv intensity was 7 times the value expected from the photospheric abundance ratio, which is about 30 times the abundance of argon relative to calcium in active regions, i.e., the measured Ar/Ca abundance ratio is about 10 instead of 0.37 as in active regions. The Ar xiv and Ca xiv lines are formed near 3.4 MK and have very similar contribution functions. This is the first observation of the inverse FIP effect in the Sun. Other regions show increases of 2–3 over photospheric abundances, or just photospheric abundances. This phenomenon appears to occur rarely and only over small areas of flares away from the regions containing multi-million degree plasma, but more work is needed to quantify the occurrences and their locations. In the bright hot regions of flares the Ar/Ca abundance ratio is coronal, i.e., the same as in active regions. In this Letter we show three examples of the inverse FIP effect.

  12. Re-Evaluation of Ar-39 - Ar-40 Ages for Apollo Lunar Rocks 15415 and 60015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    We re-analyzed 39Ar-40Ar ages of Apollo lunar highland samples 15415 and 60015, two ferroan anorthosites analyzed previously in the 1970 s, with a more detailed approach and with revised decay constants. From these samples we carefully prepared 100-200 mesh mineral separates for analysis at the Noble Gas Laboratory at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra for 15415 yielded an age of 3851 +/- 38 Ma with 33-99% of Ar39 release, roughly in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages. For 60015, we obtained an age of 3584 +/- 152 Ma in 23-98% of Ar39 release, also in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages of approximately 3.5 Ga. Highland anorthosites like these are believed by many to be the original crust of the moon, formed by plagioclase floatation atop a magma ocean, however the Ar-Ar ages of 15415 and 60015 are considerably younger than lunar crust formation. By contrast, recently recovered lunar anorthosites such as Dhofar 489, Dhofar 908, and Yamato 86032 yield older Ar-Ar ages, up to 4.35 Ga, much closer to time of formation of the lunar crust. It follows that the Ar-Ar ages of the Apollo samples must have been reset by secondary heating, and that this heating affected highland anorthosites at both the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 landing sites but did not affect lunar highland meteorites. One obvious consideration is that while the Apollo samples were collected from the near side of the moon, these lunar meteorites are thought to have originated from the lunar far side

  13. Modification of stearic acid in Ar and Ar-O2 pulsed DC discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Alexandre Bernardelli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stearic acid (CH3(CH216COOH was treated with Ar and Ar-O2 (10% pulsed DC discharges created by a cathode-anode confined system to elucidate the role of oxygen in plasma cleaning. The treatment time (5 to 120 minutes and plasma gas mixture (Ar and Ar-O2 were varied, and the results showed that the mass variation of stearic acid after Ar-O2 plasma exposure was greater than that of pure Ar plasma treatment. Thus, compared to Ar*, active oxygen species (O and O2, in all states enhance the etching process, regardless of their concentration. During the treatments, a liquid phase developed at the melting temperature of stearic acid, and differential thermal analyses showed that the formation of a liquid phase was associated with the breakage of bonds due to treatment with an Ar or Ar-O2 plasma. After treatment with Ar and Ar-O2 plasmas, the sample surface was significantly modified, especially when Ar-O2 was utilized. The role of oxygen in the treatment process is to break carbonaceous chains by forming oxidized products and/or to act as a barrier again ramification, which accelerates the etching of stearic acid.

  14. Study of the symbiotic star AR Pavonis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Quiroga

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the optical spectra and linear polarization of the eclipsing binary AR Pavonis. The optical spectra were obtained between 1990 and 1998, and polarimetric data between 1995 and 1998. From spectroscopic variations along the orbital motion we analized the nature of the system. Polarimetric studies indicate that AR Pav has intrinsic polarization.

  15. arXiv in the classical Russian literature

    CERN Document Server

    Silagadze, Z K

    2012-01-01

    The creation of arXiv, a highly democratic open access repository of research papers in high-energy physics more than twenty years ago was undoubtedly the most spectacular and landmark event for the high-energy physics community. However, we report a curious observation which indicates that the general cultural significance of this event extends far beyond the boundaries assumed at the beginning.

  16. Konsep Pemikiran Harun ar-Rasyid dalam Pendidikan Karakter

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Afnan Anshori

    2015-01-01

    CHARACTER BUILDING IN HARUN AR-RASYID THOUGH. Ampant cases of violence in society, political instability, as well as the moral degradation of the nation as a whole raises awareness of the importance of good character development at the level of the family as an institution forming the smallest nation to the character development of the nation at large. In addition to the family, the environment and education institutions also have a role no less important in the formation of national characte...

  17. Natural ³⁷Ar concentrations in soil air: implications for monitoring underground nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Robin A; Purtschert, Roland

    2011-10-15

    For on-site inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) measurement of the noble gas ³⁷Ar is considered an important technique. ³⁷Ar is produced underground by neutron activation of Calcium by the reaction ⁴⁰Ca(n,α)³⁷Ar. The naturally occurring equilibrium ³⁷Ar concentration balance in soil air is a function of an exponentially decreasing production rate from cosmic ray neutrons with increasing soil depth, diffusive transport in the soil air, and radioactive decay (T(1/2): 35 days). In this paper for the first time, measurements of natural ³⁷Ar activities in soil air are presented. The highest activities of ~100 mBq m⁻³ air are 2 orders of magnitude larger than in the atmosphere and are found in 1.5-2.5 m depth. At depths > 8 m ³⁷Ar activities are < 20 mBq m⁻³ air. After identifying the main ³⁷Ar production and gas transport factors the expected global activity range distribution of ³⁷Ar in shallow subsoil (0.7 m below the surface) was estimated. In high altitude soils, with large amounts of Calcium and with low gas permeability, ³⁷Ar activities may reach values up to 1 Bq m⁻³.

  18. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  19. The origins of intra- and inter-molecular vibrational couplings: A case study of H{sub 2}O-Ar on full and reduced-dimensional potential energy surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Dan; Ma, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Li, Hui, E-mail: Prof-huili@jlu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, 2519 Jiefang Road, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2016-01-07

    The origin and strength of intra- and inter-molecular vibrational coupling is difficult to probe by direct experimental observations. However, explicitly including or not including some specific intramolecular vibrational modes to study intermolecular interaction provides a precise theoretical way to examine the effects of anharmonic coupling between modes. In this work, a full-dimension intra- and inter-molecular ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for H{sub 2}O–Ar, which explicitly incorporates interdependence on the intramolecular (Q{sub 1},  Q{sub 2},  Q{sub 3}) normal-mode coordinates of the H{sub 2}O monomer, has been calculated. In addition, four analytic vibrational-quantum-state-specific PESs are obtained by least-squares fitting vibrationally averaged interaction energies for the (v{sub 1},  v{sub 2},  v{sub 3}) =  (0,  0,  0), (0,  0,  1), (1,  0,  0), (0,  1,  0) states of H{sub 2}O to the three-dimensional Morse/long-range potential function. Each vibrationally averaged PES fitted to 442 points has root-mean-square (rms) deviation smaller than 0.15 cm{sup −1}, and required only 58 parameters. With the 3D PESs of H{sub 2}O–Ar dimer system, we employed the combined radial discrete variable representation/angular finite basis representation method and Lanczos algorithm to calculate rovibrational energy levels. This showed that the resulting vibrationally averaged PESs provide good representations of the experimental infrared data, with rms discrepancies smaller than 0.02 cm{sup −1} for all three rotational branches of the asymmetric stretch fundamental transitions. The infrared band origin shifts associated with three fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O in H{sub 2}O–Ar complex are predicted for the first time and are found to be in good agreement with the (extrapolated) experimental values. Upon introduction of additional intramolecular degrees of freedom into the intermolecular potential energy surface, there is clear

  20. Predicting high-need cases among new Medicaid enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lindsey Jeanne; Friedsam, Donna; Voskuil, Kristen; DeLeire, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    To assess the ability of a short, self-reported health needs assessment (HNA) collected at the time of Medicaid enrollment to predict subsequent utilization and costs. Retrospective cohort study. We analyzed individual-level data that included self-reported HNAs, medical care encounter records, and administrative eligibility records for 34,087 childless adult Medicaid enrollees in Wisconsin, covering the period 2009-2010. High need was operationalized using the following outcome variables measured over the first year of program enrollment: having an inpatient admission; membership in the top decile of emergency department (ED) utilization; and membership in the top cost decile. We assessed the ability of the HNA to predict high-need cases using several complementary methods: the C-statistic; integrated discrimination improvement; and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value resulting from multivariate logistic regression estimates. Using the HNA along with sociodemographic measures met the Hosmer-Lemeshow criterion for adequate predictive performance for the high ED and high cost outcomes (C-statistics of 0.74 and 0.72, respectively). The HNA was associated with large improvements in predictive performance over sociodemographic measures alone for all 3 dependent variables (integrated discrimination improvement of 182%, 413%, and 300% for ED, cost, and inpatient variables, respectively). The HNA also led to considerable improvements in sensitivity and positive predictive value with no resulting decreases in specificity or negative predictive value. Collecting self-reported health measures for a Medicaid expansion population can yield data of sufficient quality for predicting high-need cases.

  1. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  2. Krait bite requiring high dose antivenom: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Koirala, Shekhar; Dahal, Gaheraj

    2002-03-01

    Anti snake venom (ASV) is the most specific therapy available for treatment of snakebite envenomation. The ASV available in Nepal are polyvalent ASV produced in India and are effective against envenomation by cobra and krait, the two most common species found in Eastern Nepal. Neurotoxic signs respond slowly and unconvincingly and continuous absorption of venom may cause recurrent neurotoxicity. Therefore, close observation and continuous administration of ASV is essential to save the victim. We report a case of neurotoxic envenomation due to bite by common krait (Bangarus caeruleus). The victim required very high dose of polyvalent ASV for reversal of neurological manifestations.

  3. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  4. Case Studies of Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools. Relevance Strategic Designs: 8. High Tech High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Regis Anne; Ireland, Nicole; City, Elizabeth; Derderian, Julie; Miles, Karen Hawley

    2008-01-01

    This report is one of nine detailed case studies of small urban high schools that served as the foundation for the Education Resource Strategies (ERS) report "Strategic Designs: Lessons from Leading Edge Small Urban High Schools." These nine schools were dubbed "Leading Edge Schools" because they stand apart from other high…

  5. 40Ar/39Ar ages of lunar impact glasses: Relationships among Ar diffusivity, chemical composition, shape, and size

    CERN Document Server

    Zellner, N E B

    2015-01-01

    Lunar impact glasses, quenched melts produced during cratering events on the Moon, have the potential to provide not only compositional information about both the local and regional geology of the Moon but also information about the impact flux over time. We present in this paper the results of 73 new 40Ar/39Ar analyses of well-characterized, inclusion-free lunar impact glasses and demonstrate that size, shape, chemical composition, fraction of radiogenic 40Ar retained, and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages are important for 40Ar/39Ar investigations of these samples. Specifically, analyses of lunar impact glasses from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites indicate that retention of radiogenic 40Ar is a strong function of post-formation thermal history in the lunar regolith, size, and chemical composition. Based on the relationships presented in this paper, lunar impact glasses with compositions and sizes sufficient to have retained 90% of their radiogenic Ar during 750 Ma of cosmic ray exposure at time-integra...

  6. 39Ar-40Ar Dating of Eucrites and Howardites and the Early Bombardment of the HED Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1993-07-01

    degassing ages. High temperature extractions of some (but not all) of these samples suggest small retention of ^40Ar during the degassing events. Five high temperature extractions of Clast EET87503,23 (releasing 35% of the ^39Ar) define an age of 4.41 +- 0.01 Ga. With a few exceptions, ^39Ar-^40Ar analyses of individual clasts from eucrites and howardites show reset ages across a wide range which is at least as broad as 3.4-4.2 Ga ago. These samples represent the full range of thermal metamorphism [2], but it is not yet clear whether these ages actually date the time of homogenization and exsolution observed in pyroxenes. The narrower range of lunar metamorphic ages, typically ~3.8-4.0 Ga ago, probably is due to the major influence of the large Imbrium and Serenitatis events. Early bombardment probably extended to the entire inner solar system, and it may have lasted much longer than suggested by lunar highland ages. Large, lunar-basin impacts with their associated large ejecta deposits and significant quantities of melt cannot occur on smaller bodies like 4 Vesta [4]. Because the extent of isotopic resetting decreases with decreasing crater size and amount of melt generated, meteorite parent bodies significantly smaller than Vesta might not exhibit impact resetting during this time period. Thus, it is interesting to contrast ^39Ar-^40Ar ages of eucrites with those of two meteorites, Ilafegh 009 and Happy Canyon, which represent impact melting on the EL (enstatite chondrite) parent body [5]. Higher temperature ^39Ar-^40Ar ages we recently obtained for both of these meteorites are 4.4-4.5 Ga. References: [1] Binzel R. P. and Shui X. (1993) Science, 260, 186. [2] Takeda H. and Graham A. L. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 129. [3] Kunz J. et al. (1992) Meteoritics, 27, 245. [4] Cintala M. J. and Grieve R. A. (1993) Proc. Internat. Conf. Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution. [5] McCoy T. J. et al. (1992) LPS, XXIII 869.

  7. Bilateral high radial nerve compressions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, A; Muangsombut, S; Sangruchi, T

    2000-06-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bilateral high radial nerve compressions by non-traumatic cause was reported. It occurred first at the right radial nerve which was explored after a period of investigation and conservative treatment. Two constricted sites 2.0 cm apart of the right radial nerve crossed by branches of the radial collateral artery beneath the lateral head of the triceps were found. The constricted sites including tissue in between was resected and replaced with a sural nerve graft. One year later the patient had the same episode on the left side. The operative finding was the same as the previous one. Sural nerve graft was performed after neurolysis had failed. The patient's normal radial nerve function returned in one year. This is the first reported case in the literature of bilateral high radial nerve compressions by branches of the radial collateral artery.

  8. Principal Component Analysis with Contaminated Data: The High Dimensional Case

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Huan; Mannor, Shie

    2010-01-01

    We consider the dimensionality-reduction problem (finding a subspace approximation of observed data) for contaminated data in the high dimensional regime, where the number of observations is of the same magnitude as the number of variables of each observation, and the data set contains some (arbitrarily) corrupted observations. We propose a High-dimensional Robust Principal Component Analysis (HR-PCA) algorithm that is tractable, robust to contaminated points, and easily kernelizable. The resulting subspace has a bounded deviation from the desired one, achieves maximal robustness -- a breakdown point of 50% while all existing algorithms have a breakdown point of zero, and unlike ordinary PCA algorithms, achieves optimality in the limit case where the proportion of corrupted points goes to zero.

  9. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA & androgen receptor (AR genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant V Chavan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Methods: Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. Results: A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (P<0.001 in the proximal promoter region and -3845G/A (P<0.001 in enhancer region showed significant association with serum PSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (P<0.001 at both of these polymorphic sites showed higher expression of PSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (P<0.001 carriers demonstrated lower PSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. Interpretation & conclusions: The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression.

  10. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  11. /sup 40/Ar-/sup 39/Ar dating of melt rock from impact craters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottomley, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Meteorite impacts produce large volumes of shocked and brecciated rocks near the impact site. If the impact is large enough, target rocks will be fused to form melt rock which often pools on the crater floor. This melt rock will typically have a fine grained matrix enclosing heated but unmelted clasts of broken country rock. A suite of melt rocks from fifteen craters along with shocked rock from one crater and three tektites were analyzed by 40Ar-39Ar dating to study the argon systematics of melted and shocked rocks and to determine the time of impact which formed the craters. The age spectra from most of the melt rock samples turned out to be more complex than expected. The spectra could be classified into four families: 1) good plateaux; 2) structured plateaux; 3) stepwise rising spectra; and 4) snail shape spectra. In most cases an age based on one or both of these factors could be made of the non-plateau spectra. However the meaning of the resulting age is less certain than in the good plateaux cases. On the basis of their age, either of two Canadian craters, Wanapitei or Mistastin, could be comtemporaneous with the formation of the bediasites, raising the possibility that more than one impact was responsible for North American tektite strewnfield. In addition, there appears to be evidence that there was a higher than average incidence of impacts about 35 m.y. ago. During sample fusion, melt rocks release a greater proportion of their argon below 800/sup 0/C than do most terrestrial whole rocks.

  12. Non-Adiabatic Dynamics of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Agyeman, Bernice; McCoy, Anne B.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the photodissociation of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n following electronic excitation to states that dissociate into X- + CN and X* + CN- (X = I or Br) using classical dynamics approaches. Observations made from previous experiments and calculations of these anions demonstrated that non-adiabatic effects are important in the photodissociation process and are reflected in the branching ratios of the photoproducts. The addition of an argon atom is expected to shift the relative energies of these excited states, thereby altering the product branching. Interestingly, experimental studies show that electronically exciting ICN- solvated with even a single argon atom leads to a small fraction of the products recombine to form ICN-.a In this study, the dynamics are carried out using classical mechanics, treating the non-adiabatic effect with a surface hopping algorithm. We assess the accuracy of this approach by first calculating the branching ratios for the bare anions and comparing the results to those from quantum dynamics calculations.a,b Once the results from both the quantum and classical dynamics are shown to be consistent, the classical dynamics simulations are extended to the argon solvated anions. S. Case, E. M. Miller, J. P. Martin, Y. J. Lu, L. Sheps, A. B. McCoy, and W. C. Lineberger, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 51, 2651 (2012). B. Opoku-Agyeman, A. S. Case, J. H. Lehman, W. Carl Lineberger and A. B. McCoy, J. Chem Phys. 141, 084305 (2014). J. C. Tully, J. Chem Phys. 93, 1061 (1990).

  13. A Case Study of a High School Fab Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jennifer E.

    This dissertation examines making and design-based STEM education in a formal makerspace. It focuses on how the design and implementation of a Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum affect how instructors and students see themselves engaging in science, and how the Fab Lab relates to the social sorting practices that already take place at North High School. While there is research examining design-based STEM education in informal and formal learning environments, we know little about how K-12 teachers define STEM in making activities when no university or museum partnership exists. This study sought to help fill this gap in the research literature. This case study of a formal makerspace followed instructors and students in one introductory Fab Lab course for one semester. Additional observations of an introductory woodworking course helped build the case and set it into the school context, and provided supplementary material to better understand the similarities and differences between the Fab Lab course and a more traditional design-based learning course. Using evidence from observational field notes, participant interviews, course materials, and student work, I found that the North Fab Lab relies on artifacts and rhetoric symbolic of science and STEM to set itself apart from other design-based courses at North High School. Secondly, the North Fab Lab instructors and students were unable to explain how what they were doing in the Fab Lab was science, and instead relied on vague and unsupported claims related to interdisciplinary STEM practices and dated descriptions of science. Lastly, the design and implementation of the Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum and its separation from North High School's low tech, design-based courses effectively reinforced social sorting practices and cultural assumptions about student work and intelligence.

  14. AR Sco: A White Dwarf Synchronar

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2016-01-01

    The emission of the white dwarf-M dwarf binary AR Sco is driven by the rapid synchronization of its white dwarf, rather than by accretion. This requires a comparatively large magnetic field $\\sim 100$ gauss at the M dwarf and $\\sim 10^8$ gauss on the white dwarf, larger than the fields of most intermediate polars but within the range of fields of known magnetic white dwarfs. The spindown power is dissipated in the atmosphere of the M dwarf by magnetic reconnection, accelerating particles that produce the observed synchrotron radiation. The displacement of the optical maximum from conjunction may be explained either by dissipation in a bow wave as the white dwarf's magnetic field sweeps past the M dwarf or by a misaligned white dwarf's rotation axis and oblique magnetic moment. In the latter case the rotation axis precesses with a period of decades, predicting a drift in the orbital phase of maximum. Binaries whose emission is powered by synchronization may be termed synchronars, in analogy to magnetars.

  15. AR Sco: A Precessing White Dwarf Synchronar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J. I.

    2017-02-01

    The emission of the white dwarf–M dwarf binary AR Sco is driven by the rapid synchronization of its white dwarf, rather than by accretion. Synchronization requires a magnetic field ∼100 Gauss at the M dwarf and ∼ {10}8 Gauss at the white dwarf, larger than the fields of most intermediate polars but within the range of fields of known magnetic white dwarfs. The spindown power is dissipated in the atmosphere of the M dwarf, within the near zone of the rotating white dwarf’s field, by magnetic reconnection, accelerating particles that produce the observed synchrotron radiation. The displacement of the optical maximum from conjunction may be explained either by dissipation in a bow wave as the white dwarf’s magnetic field sweeps past the M dwarf or by a misaligned white dwarf rotation axis and oblique magnetic moment. In the latter case the rotation axis precesses with a period of decades, predicting a drift in the orbital phase of the optical maximum. Binaries whose emission is powered by synchronization may be termed synchronars, in analogy to magnetars.

  16. Tracking the timing of subduction and exhumation using 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages in blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks (Sivrihisar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornash, Katherine F.; Cosca, Michael A.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    Geochronologic studies of high-pressure/low-temperature rocks can be used to determine the timing and rates of burial and exhumation in subduction zones by dating different stages of the pressure–temperature history. In this study, we present new in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from a suite of lawsonite blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks representing different protoliths (metabasalt, metasediment), different structural levels (within and outside of a high-strain zone), and different textural positions (eclogite pod core vs. margin) to understand the timing of these events in an exhumed Neo-Tethyan subduction zone (Sivrihisar Massif, Tavşanlı Zone, Turkey). Weighted mean in situ 40Ar/39Ar ages of phengite from the cores of lawsonite eclogite pods (90–93 Ma) are distinctly older than phengite from retrogressed, epidote eclogite (82 ± 2 Ma). These ages are interpreted as the age of peak and retrograde metamorphism, respectively. Eclogite records the narrowest range of ages (10–14 m.y.) of any rock type analyzed. Transitional eclogite- and blueschist-facies assemblages and glaucophane-rimmed lawsonite + garnet + phengite veins from eclogite pod margins record a much wider age range of 40Ar/39Ar ages (~20 m.y.) with weighted mean ages of ~91 Ma. Blueschists and quartzites record more variable 40Ar/39Ar ages that may in part be related to structural position: samples within a high-strain zone at the tectonic contact of the HP rocks with a meta-ultramafic unit have in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of 84.0 ± 1.3–103.7 ± 3.1 Ma, whereas samples outside this zone range to older ages (84.6 ± 2.4–116.7 ± 2.7 Ma) and record a greater age range (22–38 m.y.). The phengite ages can be correlated with the preservation of HP mineral assemblages and fabrics as well as the effects of deformation. Collectively, these results show that high-spatial resolution UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite data, when considered

  17. Tracking the timing of subduction and exhumation using 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages in blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks (Sivrihisar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornash, Katherine F.; Cosca, Michael A.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2016-07-01

    Geochronologic studies of high-pressure/low-temperature rocks can be used to determine the timing and rates of burial and exhumation in subduction zones by dating different stages of the pressure-temperature history. In this study, we present new in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from a suite of lawsonite blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks representing different protoliths (metabasalt, metasediment), different structural levels (within and outside of a high-strain zone), and different textural positions (eclogite pod core vs. margin) to understand the timing of these events in an exhumed Neo-Tethyan subduction zone (Sivrihisar Massif, Tavşanlı Zone, Turkey). Weighted mean in situ 40Ar/39Ar ages of phengite from the cores of lawsonite eclogite pods (90-93 Ma) are distinctly older than phengite from retrogressed, epidote eclogite (82 ± 2 Ma). These ages are interpreted as the age of peak and retrograde metamorphism, respectively. Eclogite records the narrowest range of ages (10-14 m.y.) of any rock type analyzed. Transitional eclogite- and blueschist-facies assemblages and glaucophane-rimmed lawsonite + garnet + phengite veins from eclogite pod margins record a much wider age range of 40Ar/39Ar ages (~20 m.y.) with weighted mean ages of ~91 Ma. Blueschists and quartzites record more variable 40Ar/39Ar ages that may in part be related to structural position: samples within a high-strain zone at the tectonic contact of the HP rocks with a meta-ultramafic unit have in situ UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar ages of 84.0 ± 1.3-103.7 ± 3.1 Ma, whereas samples outside this zone range to older ages (84.6 ± 2.4-116.7 ± 2.7 Ma) and record a greater age range (22-38 m.y.). The phengite ages can be correlated with the preservation of HP mineral assemblages and fabrics as well as the effects of deformation. Collectively, these results show that high-spatial resolution UV laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar phengite data, when considered in a petrologic and structural

  18. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  19. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  20. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  1. Bacillus sp.CDB3 isolated from cattle dip-sites possesses two ars gene clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somanath Bhat; Xi Luo; Zhiqiang Xu; Lixia Liu; Ren Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of soil and water by arsenic is a global problem.In Australia, the dipping of cattle in arsenic-containing solution to control cattle ticks in last centenary has left many sites heavily contaminated with arsenic and other toxicants.We had previously isolated five soil bacterial strains (CDB1-5) highly resistant to arsenic.To understand the resistance mechanism, molecular studies have been carried out.Two chromosome-encoded arsenic resistance (ars) gene clusters have been cloned from CDB3 (Bacillus sp.).They both function in Escherichia coli and cluster 1 exerts a much higher resistance to the toxic metalloid.Cluster 2 is smaller possessing four open reading frames (ORFs) arsRorf2BC, similar to that identified in Bacillus subtilis Skin element.Among the eight ORFs in cluster 1 five are analogs of common ars genes found in other bacteria, however, organized in a unique order arsRBCDA instead of arsRDABC.Three other putative genes are located directly downstream and designated as arsTIP based on the homologies of their theoretical translation sequences respectively to thioredoxin reductases, iron-sulphur cluster proteins and protein phosphatases.The latter two are novel of any known ars operons.The arsD gene from Bacillus species was cloned for the first time and the predict protein differs from the well studied E.coli ArsD by lacking two pairs of C-terrninal cysteine residues.Its functional involvement in arsenic resistance has been confirmed by a deletion experiment.There exists also an inverted repeat in the intergenic region between arsC and arsD implying some unknown transcription regulation.

  2. Qualidade do ar em ambientes internos hospitalares: estudo de caso e análise crítica dos padrões atuais Indoor air quality in hospitals: a case study and a critical review of current standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Eller Quadros

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a qualidade do ar em três categorias de ambientes hospitalares: unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI adulto, UTI neonatal (UTN e centro cirúrgico de um hospital em Florianópolis, Brasil. Avaliaram-se a concentração de dióxido de carbono, a vazão e renovação de ar nas salas do centro cirúrgico. A concentração de bioaerossóis foi estimada em um dia de avaliação para cada ambiente. Não se observou relação entre a concentração de bioaerossóis e o tempo de uso das salas de cirurgia. A concentração média de bioaerossóis foi de 231 UFC.m-3 para fungos e de 187 UFC.m-3 para bactérias. Os ambientes avaliados atendiam aos valores recomendados pela legislação vigente. Os resultados permitiram avaliar criticamente essa legislação e apresentar sugestões para estabelecimento de uma resolução específica para ambientes hospitalares no Brasil.The objective of this paper was to evaluate the air quality in three indoor hospital environments: a neonatal intensive care unit (ICU, an adult ICU and a surgical ward of a hospital in Florianópolis, Brazil. Carbon dioxide concentrations, exchange air flow rates as well as fungi and bacteria concentrations were measured in these rooms. Bioaerosol concentrations were evaluated throughout one-work day for each operating room. No relationship was observed between bioaerosol concentration and the period of use in the surgical ward. Average bioaerosol concentrations were of 231 UFC.m-3 for filamentous fungi and 187 UFC.m-3 for bacteria. All environments evaluated were, overall, in compliance with current legislations. Results allowed a critical review of the present regulations and suggestions for the establishment of a specific regulation for hospital environments in Brazil.

  3. Instrumentation development for In Situ 40Ar/39Ar planetary geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah; Munk, Madicken; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Warner, Nicholas H.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Slaybaugh, Rachel; Harkness, Patrick; Mark, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extra-terrestrial bodies and their features, is an outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g., Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extra-terrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. Herein, we discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analysing samples are described, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extra-terrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method are presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  4. Ars Baltica-verkoston puheenjohtajuus Suomeen Risto Ruohoselle

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    1990. a. loodud võrgustiku Ars Baltica sekretariaat (Ars Baltica Contact Point & Communication Center) tuleb Kielist Tallinnasse Eesti kultuuriministeeriumi kuni aastani 2002 (Suur-Karja 23). Ars Baltica (ühendus)

  5. Ars Baltica-verkoston puheenjohtajuus Suomeen Risto Ruohoselle

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    1990. a. loodud võrgustiku Ars Baltica sekretariaat (Ars Baltica Contact Point & Communication Center) tuleb Kielist Tallinnasse Eesti kultuuriministeeriumi kuni aastani 2002 (Suur-Karja 23). Ars Baltica (ühendus)

  6. Teacher decision making: The case of prairie high

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikenhead, Glen S.

    This article explores the decisions that science teachers make when they plan for instruction. It is a case study analysis of five teachers in a high school and probes into the personal reasons, beliefs, and dilemmas underlying their decisions. These decisions, while serving many purposes, had a common structure which involved tradeoffs and compromises. The decision represented the end result of the conflict between a cluster of teacher intentions and a melange of ideas about student characteristics. Teachers appeared to make decisions within a framework that holistically integrated science content and practical classroom knowledge-a knowledge system that includes the basic beliefs of a teacher and the socialization of students. By understanding how and why teachers tend to make their decisions, one gains practical insights into the act of teaching science. These insights are of particular interest to science curriculum specialists who wish to understand how teachers use science curriculum materials for the purpose of socializing students.

  7. Power/energy use cases for high performance computing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M; Hammond, Steven; Elmore, Ryan; Munch, Kristin

    2013-12-01

    Power and Energy have been identified as a first order challenge for future extreme scale high performance computing (HPC) systems. In practice the breakthroughs will need to be provided by the hardware vendors. But to make the best use of the solutions in an HPC environment, it will likely require periodic tuning by facility operators and software components. This document describes the actions and interactions needed to maximize power resources. It strives to cover the entire operational space in which an HPC system occupies. The descriptions are presented as formal use cases, as documented in the Unified Modeling Language Specification [1]. The document is intended to provide a common understanding to the HPC community of the necessary management and control capabilities. Assuming a common understanding can be achieved, the next step will be to develop a set of Application Programing Interfaces (APIs) to which hardware vendors and software developers could utilize to steer power consumption.

  8. Application of K-Ar Dating to the Chronology of Young Volcanic Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    K-Ar dating and a derivative technique, 40Ar/39Ar dating, are methods of high-precision chronology applicable to young volcanic centers. Cascade volcanoes studied in detail by several USGS volcanologists, Duane Champion paleomagetist, and me include Mt. Baker, WA; Mt. Rainier, WA; Mt. Adams, WA; Mt. Hood, OR; Crater Lake, OR; and Medicine Lake, CA. For Mt. Adams using detailed geologic mapping by Hildreth and Fierstein and 74 K-Ar ages for 63 mapped units, Hildreth and Lanphere established a detailed chronology for the stratovolcano. Good agreement has been achieved for K-Ar ages and 40Ar/39Ar ages of rocks from Mt. Adams as young as 36 ka. A similar detailed chronology has been established for other Cascade volcanoes using andesites, in particular. These chronologies often take 10 years or more to develop. Major advantages of the 40Ar/39Ar technique are the ability to work with small sample sizes and the possibility to push the technique to very young ages. The Campanian Ignimbrite erupted from the Campi Flegrei crater near Naples, Italy is an example of the use of small samples. Nine incremental-heating ages were determined on samples of sanidine ranging in size from 47 mg to 67 mg. These samples yielded ages for the Campanian Ignimbrite ranging from 37.1 +/- 0.75 ka to 39.5 +/- 0.62 ka and averaging 38.1 +/- 0.8 ka. Other workers have proposed 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Campanian Ignimbrite of 37.1 +/- 0.4 ka and 39.3 +/- 0.1 ka. An example of the use of 40Ar/39Ar dating of very young samples is the Christian Era (CE) age of the Vesuvius eruption of year 79. Eight packets of sanidine weighing 213-296 mg from two localities, Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in nearby Oplontis, yielded a weighted-mean incremental-heating age of 1924 +/- 66 years. The known age for the CE 79 eruption of Vesuvius is 1924 years. Earlier studies of Vesuvius by other workers yielded an 40Ar/39Ar age for the Villa Poppea locality of 1922 +/- 72 years.

  9. Ars ornata / Kadri Mälk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mälk, Kadri, 1958-

    1998-01-01

    V rahvusvaheline ehtekunsti konverents 'Ars ornata Europeana' juuni lõpus Stockholmis. New Yorgis elava kuraatori Charon Kranseni ja prantsuse ehtekunstniku Christophe Burger' juhitud vestlusringidest. 1997. a. Pariisis loodud International Craft Design Association'ist (ICDA).

  10. Differential AR algorithm for packet delay prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Different delay prediction algorithms have been applied in multimedia communication, among which linear prediction is attractive because of its low complexity. AR (auto regressive) algorithm is a traditional one with low computation cost, while NLMS (normalize least mean square) algorithm is more precise. In this paper, referring to ARIMA (auto regression integrated with moving averages) model, a differential AR algorithm (DIAR) is proposed based on the analyses of both AR and NLMS algorithms. The prediction precision of the new algorithm is about 5-10 db higher than that of the AR algorithm without increasing the computation complexity.Compared with NLMS algorithm, its precision slightly improves by 0.1 db on average, but the algorithm complexity reduces more than 90%. Our simulation and tests also demonstrate that this method improves the performance of the average end-to-end delay and packet loss ratio significantly.

  11. "Ars Ornata" Mediterrania / Kadri Mälk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mälk, Kadri, 1958-

    1999-01-01

    VI rahvusvaheline ehtekunstinäitus "Ars Ornata" juuni lõpus Barcelonas. Konverentsist, peanäitusest (osalejad Eestist), ehtekunstiõpetust andvast kõrgkoolist Escola Massana'st Barcelonas, õppejõude. Eesti ehtekunsti tulevikust.

  12. ARS 01 Helsingi Kiasmas / Tarmo Virki

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Virki, Tarmo

    2001-01-01

    Helsingis Kiasmas avatud rahvusvahelisest kunstinäitusest ARS 01 alapealkirjaga "Avanevaid perspektiive", kus esines oma töödega ka Marko Mäetamm. Näituse raames toimuvast Santiago Sierra kunstiprojektist kodututega

  13. ARS 01 Helsingi Kiasmas / Tarmo Virki

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Virki, Tarmo

    2001-01-01

    Helsingis Kiasmas avatud rahvusvahelisest kunstinäitusest ARS 01 alapealkirjaga "Avanevaid perspektiive", kus esines oma töödega ka Marko Mäetamm. Näituse raames toimuvast Santiago Sierra kunstiprojektist kodututega

  14. Ars ornata / Kadri Mälk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mälk, Kadri, 1958-

    1998-01-01

    V rahvusvaheline ehtekunsti konverents 'Ars ornata Europeana' juuni lõpus Stockholmis. New Yorgis elava kuraatori Charon Kranseni ja prantsuse ehtekunstniku Christophe Burger' juhitud vestlusringidest. 1997. a. Pariisis loodud International Craft Design Association'ist (ICDA).

  15. Attempts of whole-rock K/Ar dating of mesozoic volcanic and hypabissal igneous rocks from the Central Subbetic (Southern Spain: A case of differential Argon loss related to very low-grade metamorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz de Galdeano, C.

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available 12 samples of basic intrusives within Triassic rocks «ophites» and 11 samples of volcanic and associated intrusives within Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sequences of the Subbetic Zone were subjected to whole-rock K/Ar dating in combination with chemical/petrological analysis. Satisfactory results were obtained only from a number of samples of volcanic rocks, however, analytical ages commonly agree, within about 10 relative percent, with those deduced from stratigraphic location. «Ophite» samples, on the other hand, may reveal considerably lower analytic ages than the volcanics and show much stronger scattering, even among samples collected within a small area. It is argued that the inferred loss of Ar results from very-low-grade alpine metamorphic alteration, which affected the «ophites» more intensely than the higher volcanic rocks. Other post-emplacement chemical changes, such as the degree of secondary oxidation of Fe, are also distintive among the two groups of samples, and are to some extent consistent with the above view in that the alteration environment of the ophites should have produced conditions for more penetrative fluid-rock interactions and homogeneous recrystallization. Overall, the magmatic activity from which the ophitic rocks originated might have started in the Late Triassic and continued in the Lower Jurassic. 80th, the «ophites» and the volcanics are though to be the result of magmatic events Collowing tensional to transtensive crustal movements affecting the external basins of the Betic Cordilleras Crom Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous times.Doce muestras de cuerpos básicos intrusivos en rocas triásicas («ofitas» y 11 muestras de volcanitas y rocas intrusivas asociadas en secuencias jurásico-cretáceas de la zona Subbética han sido objeto de datación radiométrica K/Ar (roca total en combinación con análisis químico-petrográfico. Las edades analíticas obtenidas son 's

  16. Geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar age of Early Carboniferous dolerite sills in the southern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Motuza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Early Carboniferous magmatic event in the southern Baltic Sea is manifested by dolerite intrusions. The presumable area in which the dolerite intrusions occur ranges from 30 to 60 km in east–west direction, and is about 100 km in north–south direction. The dolerites were sampled in well D1-1 and investigated by applying chemical analysis and 40Ar/39Ar step-heating dating. Dolerites are classified as alkali and sodic, characterized by high TiO2 (3.92, 3.99 wt% and P2O5 (1.67, 1.77 wt% and low MgO (4.89, 4.91 wt% concentrations, enriched in light rare earth elements, originated from an enriched mantle magma source and emplaced in a continental rift tectonic setting. The 351 ± 11 Ma 40Ar/39Ar plateau age for groundmass plagioclase indicates a considerable age gap with the 310–250 Ma magmatism in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany. The magmatic rocks in the Baltic Sedimentary Basin are coeval with alkaline intrusions of NE Poland. Both magmatic provinces lie in the northwestward prolongation of the Pripyat–Dnieper–Donetsk Rift (370–359 Ma and may constitute a later phase of magmatic activity of this propagating rift system.

  17. Effects of Ar and O2 additives on SiO2 etching in C4F8-based plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Ling, Li; Hua, Xuefeng; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Barela, Marcos; Anderson, Harold M.

    2003-01-01

    Gas mixtures based on C4F8 are promising for the development of high-performance SiO2 plasma etching processes. Measurements of important gas phase species, thin film etching rates and surface chemistry changes were performed for inductively coupled plasmas fed with C4F8/Ar and C4F8/O2 gas mixtures. The addition of Ar to C4F8 causes a strong increase of the plasma density relative to that of pure C4F8 (by up to a factor of 4× at 90% Ar). For O2 addition the changes in plasma density are small up to 90% O2 relative to pure C4F8. Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute densities of neutral CF, CF2 and COF2 radical species as a function of the gas composition. The densities of CF and CF2 were enhanced for certain operating conditions when Ar was added to C4F8 as long as the amount of Ar remained below 20%. For instance, the partial pressure of CF was 0.1 mTorr for a 20 mTorr 1400 W source power discharge for pure C4F8, and increased to 0.13 mTorr at 20% Ar. Above 20% Ar it decreased, roughly following the gas dilution. The CF2 partial pressure was about 5 mTorr for the same conditions, and increased by about 10% at 20% Ar. Above 20% Ar the CF2 partial pressure decreased roughly linearly with the amount of Ar added, to about 2 mTorr at 50% Ar. Of particular interest was the analysis of the difference in behavior of CF, CF2 and COF2 partial pressures over SiO2 and Si surfaces, with and without rf bias power (in the latter case a self-bias voltage of -100 V was used). For pure C4F8 discharges at 20 mTorr and 1400 W inductive power without rf bias the partial pressures of CF, CF2 and COF2 radicals are comparable over SiO2 and Si surfaces. Upon applying a rf bias, the CF2 partial pressure over a SiO2 surface is reduced much more strongly than for a Si surface. The overall reduction appears to be consistent with the relative SiO2/Si etch rate ratios observed for these conditions. These results indicate that CF2 is consumed during the

  18. A DNA polymerase mutation that suppresses the segregation bias of an ARS plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtteman, S W; Elder, R T

    1993-03-01

    Yeast autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids exhibit an unusual segregation pattern during mitosis. While the nucleus divides equally into mother and daughter cells, all copies of the ARS plasmid will often remain in the mother cell. A screen was designed to isolate mutations that suppress this segregation bias. A plasmid with a weak ARS (wARS) that displayed an extremely high segregation bias was constructed. When cells were grown under selection for the wARS plasmid, the resulting colonies grew slowly and had abnormal morphology. A spontaneous recessive mutation that restored normal colony morphology was identified. This mutation suppressed plasmid segregation bias, as indicated by the increased stability of the wARS plasmid in the mutant cells even though the plasmid was present at a lower copy number. An ARS1 plasmid was also more stable in mutant cells than in wild-type cells. The wild-type allele for this mutant gene was cloned and identified as POL delta (CDC2). This gene encodes DNA polymerase delta, which is essential for DNA replication. These results indicate that DNA polymerase delta plays some role in causing the segregation bias of ARS plasmids.

  19. Modelagem de um condicionador de ar de alta precisão para uso em processamento agrícola Modeling of a high precision air conditioner for use in agricultural processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Fortes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se neste trabalho, estudo detalhado sobre a modelagem de um condicionador de ar com controle acurado de temperatura e umidade relativa. Desenvolveu-se um programa de computador que permite predizer o comportamento do sistema sob diferentes condições psicrométricas e de vazão do ar de entrada. O modelo global físico-matemático inclui equações de balanço de massa e de energia para três diferentes volumes de controle que compõem o condicionador. Modelaram-se os processos de mistura, evaporação (ou condensação simultânea de uma superfície d'água e de uma gota e o aquecimento de corrente de ar, separadamente. Propõem-se expressões semi-empíricas simples para os coeficientes de transferência de calor e massa inerentes ao processo de evaporação sobre uma superfície d'água e um modelo simplificado para o sistema de spray. Construiu-se um condicionador de ar no qual foram feitos testes experimentais para o ajuste das constantes que aparecem nas expressões para os coeficientes de transferência. Os dados obtidos validaram o modelo global, com precisão aceitável para projetos de engenharia.In this work, a detailed procedure for the analysis of an accurately controlled air conditioner is presented. A computer program, that allows predicting the behavior of the system under different psychrometric conditions and different input air mass flow rates, was developed. The global physical-mathematical model includes mass and energy conservation equations for three different control volumes that compose the conditioner. Thus, the processes of mixture of air, simultaneous evaporation (or condensation from a water surface and from a drop, and the air-stream heating are modeled separately. Simple semi-empiric expressions for heat and mass coefficients inherent to the evaporation process on a water surface are proposed as well a simplified model for the spray system. Experimental tests made on an air-conditioner allowed to obtain

  20. The AR Sandbox: Augmented Reality in Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Reed, S.; Hsi, S.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Schladow, G.; Segale, H.; Chan, L.

    2016-12-01

    The AR Sandbox is a combination of a physical box full of sand, a 3D (depth) camera such as a Microsoft Kinect, a data projector, and a computer running open-source software, creating a responsive and interactive system to teach geoscience concepts in formal or informal contexts. As one or more users shape the sand surface to create planes, hills, or valleys, the 3D camera scans the surface in real-time, the software creates a dynamic topographic map including elevation color maps and contour lines, and the projector projects that map back onto the sand surface such that real and projected features match exactly. In addition, users can add virtual water to the sandbox, which realistically flows over the real surface driven by a real-time fluid flow simulation. The AR Sandbox can teach basic geographic and hydrologic skills and concepts such as reading topographic maps, interpreting contour lines, formation of watersheds, flooding, or surface wave propagation in a hands-on and explorative manner. AR Sandbox installations in more than 150 institutions have shown high audience engagement and long dwell times of often 20 minutes and more. In a more formal context, the AR Sandbox can be used in field trip preparation, and can teach advanced geoscience skills such as extrapolating 3D sub-surface shapes from surface expression, via advanced software features such as the ability to load digital models of real landscapes and guiding users towards recreating them in the sandbox. Blueprints, installation instructions, and the open-source AR Sandbox software package are available at http://arsandbox.org .

  1. Thermal plasma properties for Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: I. Net emission coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressault, Y.; Gleizes, A.

    2013-10-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of the net emission coefficient (NEC) of Ar-Al, Ar-Fe and Ar-Cu mixtures at atmospheric pressure for arc welding processes. The results are given in data tables for temperatures between 3 kK and 30 kK, for five plasma thicknesses (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 mm) and ten concentrations of metallic vapours (pure gas, 0.01%, 0.1%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and pure metal vapours in mass proportions). The results are in good agreement with most of the works published on the subject for such mixtures. They highlight the influence of three parameters on the radiation of the plasma: the NEC is directly related to temperature and inversely related to plasma radius and is highly sensitive to the presence of metal vapours. Finally, numerical data are supplied in tables in order to develop accurate computational modelling of welding arc and to estimate both qualitatively and quantitatively the influence of each metallic vapour on the size and on the shape of the weld pool.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, Marvin; Champion, Duane; Melluso, Leone; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Tedesco, Dario; Calvert, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925±66 years in 2004 (1σ uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes.

  3. Dating samples of lunar soil from the Mare Crisium by the Ar/39/-Ar/40/ technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanin, L. L.; Arakeliants, M. M.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Ivanenko, V. V.; Pupyrev, Iu. G.; Tarasov, L. S.; Frikh-Khar, D. I.

    1981-07-01

    Two samples (dolerite and gabbro fragments) from a depth of 184 cm in the Luna 24 core are dated using the Ar(39)-Ar(40) technique. The values obtained are found to be lower than all published isotopic ages for the Luna 24 samples. An analysis of possible dating errors of the lunar samples, together with the good agreement of the results from the Ar(39)-Ar(40) technique of geochronologic standards and anorthosite from the Korosten pluton with the results from Rb-Sr, U-Pb, and Sm-Nd methods, attests the reliability of the values.

  4. Konsep Pemikiran Harun ar-Rasyid dalam Pendidikan Karakter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Afnan Anshori

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CHARACTER BUILDING IN HARUN AR-RASYID THOUGH. Ampant cases of violence in society, political instability, as well as the moral degradation of the nation as a whole raises awareness of the importance of good character development at the level of the family as an institution forming the smallest nation to the character development of the nation at large. In addition to the family, the environment and education institutions also have a role no less important in the formation of national character, it’s because the institution is spearheading the development of the nation in the realm of formal education. Education as a process that helps mature, directing and developing the potential in man is regarded as an appropriate means in the formation of one’s character. One of the concepts of character education is found in the will written by Harun ar-Rashid to al-Ahmar the teacher who is appointed by the Caliph to educate the crown prince, later known as al-Amin. In this testament, there are several character education concepts, including role models of teachers, obedience, respect for family, teaching the Qur’an and Sunnah as well as many others. The concept of character education promoted by Harun ar-Rashid was not different from the concept of character education offered by modern education experts, this proves that the concept of character education contained in the will of Harun al -Rashid is universal without any limitation of space and time.

  5. Highly Concentrated Acetic Acid Poisoning: 400 Cases Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Brusin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caustic substance ingestion is known for causing a wide array of gastrointestinal and systemic complications. In Russia, ingestion of acetic acid is a major problem which annually affects 11.2 per 100,000 individuals. The objective of this study was to report and analyze main complications and outcomes of patients with 70% concentrated acetic acid poisoning. Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with acetic acid ingestion who were treated at Sverdlovsk Regional Poisoning Treatment Center during 2006 to 2012. GI mucosal injury of each patient was assessed with endoscopy according to Zargar’s scale. Data analysis was performed to analyze the predictors of stricture formation and mortality. Results: A total of 400 patients with median age of 47 yr were included. GI injury grade I was found in 66 cases (16.5%, IIa in 117 (29.3%, IIb in 120 (30%, IIIa in 27 (16.7% and IIIb in 70 (17.5%. 11% of patients developed strictures and overall mortality rate was 21%. Main complications were hemolysis (55%, renal injury (35%, pneumonia (27% and bleeding during the first 3 days (27%. Predictors of mortality were age 60 to 79 years, grade IIIa and IIIb of GI injury, pneumonia, stages “I”, “F” and “L” of kidney damage according to the RIFLE scale and administration of prednisolone. Predictors of stricture formation were ingestion of over 100 mL of acetic acid and grade IIb and IIIa of GI injury. Conclusion: Highly concentrated acetic acid is still frequently ingested in Russia with a high mortality rate. Patients with higher grades of GI injury, pneumonia, renal injury and higher amount of acid ingested should be more carefully monitored as they are more susceptible to develop fatal consequences.          

  6. 40Ar/ 39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, G. P.; Snee, L. W.

    1991-12-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [ 40Ar/ 39Ar ≃32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [ 40Ar/ 39Ar ≃295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150° -250°C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D≤1.5 x 10 -17 cm 2S -1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/ 39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ≃ 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ≃ 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O 2-rich end-member gas with air-like N 2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O 2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ≃ 35%, and that atmospheric O 2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O 2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O 2 reaction with amber).

  7. ars1, an Arabidopsis mutant exhibiting increased tolerance to arsenate and increased phosphate uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David A; Chen, Alice; Schroeder, Julian I

    2003-09-01

    Arsenic is one of the most toxic pollutants at contaminated sites, yet little is known about the mechanisms by which certain plants survive exposure to high arsenic levels. To gain insight into the mechanisms of arsenic tolerance in plants, we developed a genetic screen to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with altered tolerance to arsenic. We report here on the isolation of a mutant arsenic resisant 1 (ars1) with increased tolerance to arsenate. ars1 germinates and develops under conditions that completely inhibit growth of wild-type plants and shows a semi-dominant arsenic resistance phenotype. ars1 accumulates levels of arsenic similar to that accumulated by wild-type plants, suggesting that ars1 plants have an increased ability to detoxify arsenate. However, ars1 plants produce phytochelatin levels similar to levels produced by the wild type, and the enhanced resistance of ars1 is not abolished by the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase inhibitor l-buthionine sulfoxime (BSO). Furthermore, ars1 plants do not show resistance to arsenite or other toxic metals such as cadmium and chromium. However, ars1 plants do show a higher rate of phosphate uptake than that shown by wild-type plants, and wild-type plants grown with an excess of phosphate show increased tolerance to arsenate. Traditional models of arsenate tolerance in plants are based on the suppression of phosphate uptake pathways and consequently on the reduced uptake of arsenate. Our data suggest that arsenate tolerance in ars1 could be due to a new mechanism mediated by increased phosphate uptake in ars1. Models discussing how increased phosphate uptake could contribute to arsenate tolerance are discussed.

  8. Arsenate reduction and expression of multiple chromosomal ars operons in Geobacillus kaustophilus A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuebas, Mariola; Villafane, Aramis; McBride, Michelle; Yee, Nathan; Bini, Elisabetta

    2011-07-01

    Geobacillus kaustophilus strain A1 was previously isolated from a geothermal environment for its ability to grow in the presence of high arsenate levels. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of arsenate resistance of the strain were investigated. As(V) was reduced to As(III), as shown by HPLC analysis. Consistent with the observation that the micro-organism is not capable of anaerobic growth, no respiratory arsenate reductases were identified. Using specific PCR primers based on the genome sequence of G. kaustophilus HTA426, three unlinked genes encoding detoxifying arsenate reductases were detected in strain A1. These genes were designated arsC1, arsC2 and arsC3. While arsC3 is a monocistronic locus, sequencing of the regions flanking arsC1 and arsC2 revealed the presence of additional genes encoding a putative arsenite transporter and an ArsR-like regulator upstream of each arsenate reductase, indicating the presence of sequences with putative roles in As(V) reduction, As(III) export and arsenic-responsive regulation. RT-PCR demonstrated that both sets of genes were co-transcribed. Furthermore, arsC1 and arsC2, monitored by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, were upregulated in response to As(V), while arsC3 was constitutively expressed at a low level. A mechanism for regulation of As(V) detoxification by Geobacillus that is both consistent with our findings and relevant to the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic and its mobility in the environment is proposed.

  9. ArsP: a methylarsenite efflux permease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent organoarsenic compounds are far more toxic than either pentavalent organoarsenicals or inorganic arsenite. Many microbes methylate inorganic arsenite (As(III)) to more toxic and carcinogenic methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Additionally, monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) has been used widely as an herbicide and is reduced by microbial communities to MAs(III). Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid) is a pentavalent aromatic arsenical that is used as antimicrobial growth promoter for poultry and swine, and its active form is the trivalent species Rox(III). A bacterial permease, ArsP, from Campylobacter jejuni, was recently shown to confer resistance to roxarsone. In this study, C. jejuni arsP was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to confer resistance to MAs(III) and Rox(III) but not to inorganic As(III) or pentavalent organoarsenicals. Cells of E. coli expressing arsP did not accumulate trivalent organoarsenicals. Everted membrane vesicles from those cells accumulated MAs(III) > Rox(III) with energy supplied by NADH oxidation, reflecting efflux from cells. The vesicles did not transport As(III), MAs(V) or pentavalent roxarsone. Mutation or modification of the two conserved cysteine residues resulted in loss of transport activity, suggesting that they play a role in ArsP function. Thus, ArsP is the first identified efflux system specific for trivalent organoarsenicals.

  10. Bacterial Expression and Purification of an Active ω-Atracotoxin-Ar1b from Spider Atrax robustus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-qin; WANG Jue; LI Jian; LIU Qiang; HUANG Shi-di; WANG Dun

    2010-01-01

    The ω-atracotoxin-Ar1b toxin(ω-ACTX-Ar1b)is one of the arthropod-selective peptide neurotoxins from the venom of Australian funnel-web spider Atrax robustus.The gene of Ar1b was synthesized and cloned into pET-32a(+)vector to allow expression of Ar1b as a fusion protein with thioredoxin and the His-tag(rTrx-Ar1b)in E.coli BL21(DE3).The optimal condition for inducing the expression of rTrx-Ar1b was 1.0 mmol L-1 IPTG for 6 h at 28℃.The fusion protein rTrx-Ar1b was expressed in soluble form and was purified effectively by His Trap HP affinity column and rpHLPC and a final yield of purified rTrx-Ar1b was 95 mg from 1000 mL E.coli culture.The LD50 values for Mythimna separate and Tenebrio molitor were 111.66 and 11.04 μg g-1 determined by injection of the purified rTrx-Ar1b.The results indicated that the recombinant Ar1b protein was successfully expressed in E.coli and it was high toxicity against tested insects.

  11. ArDroneXT - Ar.Drone 2 eXTension for swarming and service hosting

    OpenAIRE

    Autefage, Vincent; Chaumette, Serge

    2013-01-01

    This is an Operating System Setup Guide.; This report explains how to upgrade an Ar.Drone 2 for swarming and services hosting. In other words, it gives the technical information required to easily create a swarm of Ar.Drone 2 sharing a Wi-Fi network. Moreover, it describes the process to install new services and applications on the drone.

  12. Ar-Ar Analysis of Chelyabinsk: Evidence for a Recent Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, S. P.; Kring, D. A.; Isachsen, C. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is an LL5 ordinary chondrite that fell as a spectacular fireball on February 15th, 2013, over the Ural region in Russia. The meteoroid exploded at an altitude of 25-30 km, producing shockwaves that broke windowpanes in Chelyabinsk and surrounding areas, injuring some 1500 people. Analyses of the samples show that the meteorite underwent moderate shock metamorphism (stage S4; 25-35 GPa) [1]. Most of the samples have a fusion crust ranging from 0.1-1mm thick, and roughly a third of the samples were composed of a dark fine-grained impact melt with chondrule fragments which were targeted for chronometry. A Pb-Pb age obtained by [2] of a shock-darkened and potentially melted sample of Chelyabinsk is reported as 4538.3 +/- 2.1 Ma, while a U-Pb study [3] gave an upper concordia intercept of 4454 +/- 67 Ma and a lower intercept of 585 +/- 390. Galimov et al. 2013 [1] suggest the Sm-Nd system records a recent impact event [290 Ma] that may represent separation from the parent body, while the Rb-Sr isotopic system is disturbed and does not give any definitive isochron. In order to better understand its history, we have performed 40Ar-39Ar analysis on multiple splits of two Chelyabinsk samples; clast- rich MB020f,2 and melt-rich MB020f,5. The term "clast-rich" lithology is meant to indicate a mechanical mixture of highly shock-darkened and less shocked components, both with some shock melt veining.

  13. Episodic Holocene eruption of the Salton Buttes rhyolites, California, from paleomagnetic, U-Th, and Ar/Ar dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Champion, Duane E.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Stelten, Mark; Cooper, Kari M.; Herzig, Charles; Schriener, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    In the Salton Trough, CA, five rhyolite domes form the Salton Buttes: Mullet Island, Obsidian Butte, Rock Hill, North and South Red Hill, from oldest to youngest. Results presented here include 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages, and comparison of remanent paleomagnetic directions with the secular variation curve, which indicate that all domes are Holocene. 238U-230Th zircon crystallization ages are more precise than but within uncertainty of 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase ages, suggesting that zircon crystallization proceeded until shortly before eruption in all cases except one. Remanent paleomagnetic directions require three eruption periods: (1) Mullet Island, (2) Obsidian Butte, and (3) Rock Hill, North Red Hill, and South Red Hill. Borehole cuttings logs document up to two shallow tephra layers. North and South Red Hills likely erupted within 100 years of each other, with a combined 238U-230Th zircon isochron age of: 2.83 ± 0.60 ka (2 sigma); paleomagnetic evidence suggests this age predates eruption by hundreds of years (1800 cal BP). Rock Hill erupted closely in time to these eruptions. The Obsidian Butte 238U-230Th isochron age (2.86 ± 0.96 ka) is nearly identical to the combined Red Hill age, but its Virtual Geomagnetic Pole position suggests a slightly older age. The age of aphyric Mullet Island dome is the least well constrained: zircon crystals are resorbed and the paleomagnetic direction is most distinct; possible Mullet Island ages include ca. 2300, 5900, 6900, and 7700 cal BP. Our results constrain the duration of Salton Buttes volcanism to between ca. 5900 and 500 years.

  14. Modeling Augmented Reality User Interfaces with SSIML/AR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnd Vitzthum

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality (AR technologies open up new possibilities especially for task-focused domains such as assembly and maintenance. However, it can be noticed that there is still a lack of concepts and tools for a structured AR development process and an application specification above the code level. To address this problem we introduce SSIML/AR, a visual modeling language for the abstract specification of AR applications in general and AR user interfaces in particular. With SSIML/AR, three different aspects of AR user interfaces can be described: The user interface structure, the presentation of relevant information depending on the user’s current task and the integration of the user interface with other system components. Code skeletons can be generated automatically from SSIML/AR models. This enables the seamless transition from the design level to the implementation level. In addition, we sketch how SSIML/AR models can be integrated in an overall AR development process.

  15. KioskAR: An Augmented Reality Game as a New Business Model to Present Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones A. Sekhavat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of KioskAR, which is a pervasive game implemented using augmented reality (AR. This game introduces a new business model that makes it possible for players to present their artworks in virtual kiosks using augmented reality, while they are having fun playing the game. In addition to competition between the players in the game, this game requires social interaction between players to earn more points. A user study is conducted to evaluate the sense of presence and the usability of the application. The results of experiments show that KioskAR can achieve a high level of usability as well as sense of presence.

  16. Electron transport in Ar{sup +}-irradiated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skakalova, V.; Woo, Y.S.; Roth, S. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Osvath, Z.; Biro, L.P. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences MFA, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-11-15

    We study the effect of Ar{sup +}-irradiation on electrical transport in an individual single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), a thin SWNT network and a thick SWNT film. The damage to SWNT structure induced by Ar{sup +}-irradiation is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The electrical conductance both in an individual SWNT and in a thin SWNT network is strongly reduced by highly energetic Ar{sup +} ions. On contrary, a thick SWNT film exhibits an increase of its conductivity as well as of its Young modulus after irradiation. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Development of a Low-Level Ar-37 Calibration Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Humble, Paul H.; Keillor, Martin E.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Mace, Emily K.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Myers, Allan W.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen

    2016-03-07

    Argon-37 is an important environmental signature of an underground nuclear explosion. Producing and quantifying low-level 37Ar standards is an important step in the development of sensitive field measurement instruments for use during an On-Site Inspection, a key provision of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. This paper describes progress at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the development of a process to generate and quantify low-level 37Ar standard material, which can then be used to calibrate sensitive field systems at activities consistent with soil background levels. The 37Ar used for our work was generated using a laboratory-scale, high-energy neutron source to irradiate powdered samples of calcium carbonate. Small aliquots of 37Ar were then extracted from the head space of the irradiated samples. The specific activity of the head space samples, mixed with P10 (90% stable argon:10% methane by mole fraction) count gas, is then derived using the accepted Length-Compensated Internal-Source Proportional Counting method. Due to the low activity of the samples, a set of three Ultra-Low Background Proportional-Counters designed and fabricated at PNNL from radio-pure electroformed copper was used to make the measurements in PNNL’s shallow underground counting laboratory. Very low background levels (<10 counts/day) have been observed in the spectral region near the 37Ar emission feature at 2.8 keV. Two separate samples from the same irradiation were measured. The first sample was counted for 12 days beginning 28 days after irradiation, the second sample was counted for 24 days beginning 70 days after irradiation (the half-life of 37Ar is 35.0 days). Both sets of measurements were analyzed and yielded very similar results for the starting activity (~0.1 Bq) and activity concentration (0.15 mBq/ccSTP argon) after P10 count gas was added. A detailed uncertainty model was developed based on the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in

  18. The effect of thermal resetting and recrystallisation on white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages during retrograde metamorphism on Syros, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uunk, Bertram; Wijbrans, Jan; Brouwer, Fraukje

    2015-04-01

    White mica 40Ar/39Ar dating is a proven powerful tool for constraining timing of metamorphism, deformation and exhumation. However, in high-pressure metamorphic rocks, dating often results in wide age ranges which are not in agreement with constraints from other isotopic systems, indicating that geological and chemical processes complicate straightforward 40Ar/39Ar dating. In this research project, white mica ages from rocks of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros, Greece with contrasting rheology and strain mechanisms are compared, in order to better understand the role of deformation, recrystallization and fluid flow on 40Ar/39Ar ages of white mica during retrograde metamorphism. Resulting ages vary along different sections on the island, inconsistent with other isotopic constraints on eclogite-blueschist metamorphism (55-50 Ma) and greenschist overprinting (41-30 Ma). Two end-member models are possible: 1) Results represent continuous crystallization of white mica while moving from blueschist to greenschist conditions in the metamorphic P-T loop, or 2) white mica equilibrated in eclogite-blueschist conditions and their diffusion systematics were progressively perturbed during greenschist overprinting. The single grain fusion analyses yielded contrasting age distributions, which indicate contrasts in degree of re-equilibration during retrograde metamorphism. Step wise heating of larger grain populations resulted in flat plateau shapes, providing no evidence for partial resetting. Electron microprobe measurements of Si per formula unit, as a proxy for pressure during crystallisation, do not explain age variation within sections or on the island scale. The previously unreported north-south age trend and age ranges per sample, as shown only in the 40Ar/39Ar system of the metapelitic and marble lithologies, contains key information that will allow us to test between different scenarios for age formation. Excess argon infiltration at this stage seems to have been of

  19. AR-扩增实境

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    1、什么是AR-扩增实境?AR-扩增实境(Augmented Reality,简称AR),简单地说,就是把虚拟的物体和现实的场景进行嫁接。这是一种实时地计算摄影机影像的位置及角度并加上相应图像的技术,这种技术的目标是在屏幕上把虚拟世界套在现实世界并进行互动。

  20. Charge-exchange, ionization and excitation in low-energy Li$^{+}-$ Ar, K$^{+}-$ Ar, and Na$^{+}-$He collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lomsadze, Ramaz A; Kezerashvili, RomanYa; Schulz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Absolute cross sections are measured for charge-exchange, ionization, and excitation within the same experimental setup for the Li$^{+}-$Ar, K$^{+}-$ Ar, and Na$^{+}-$ He collisions in the ion energy range $0.5-10$ keV. Results of our measurements along with existing experimental data and the schematic correlation diagrams are used to analyze and determine the mechanisms for these processes. The experimental results show that the charge-exchange processes are realized with high probabilities and electrons are predominately captured in ground states. The cross section ratio for charge exchange, ionization and excitation processes roughly attains the value $10:2:1$, respectively. The contributions of various partial inelastic channels to the total ionization cross sections are estimated and a primary mechanism for the process is defined. The energy-loss spectrum, in addition, is applied to estimate the relative contribution of different inelastic channels and to determine the mechanisms for the ionization and f...

  1. Late Paleozoic deformation and exhumation in the Sierras Pampeanas (Argentina): 40Ar/39Ar-feldspar dating constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbens, Stefan; Oriolo, Sebastián; Benowitz, Jeff; Wemmer, Klaus; Layer, Paul; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2017-09-01

    Systematic 40Ar/39Ar feldspar data obtained from the Sierras Pampeanas are presented, filling the gap between available high- (> 300 °C) and low-temperature (< 150 °C) thermochronological data. Results show Silurian-Devonian exhumation related to the late stages of the Famatinian/Ocloyic Orogeny for the Sierra de Pocho and the Sierra de Pie de Palo regions, whereas the Sierras de San Luis and the Sierra de Comechingones regions record exhumation during the Carboniferous. Comparison between new and available data points to a Carboniferous tectonic event in the Sierras Pampeanas, which represents a key period to constrain the early evolution of the proto-Andean margin of Gondwana. This event was probably transtensional and played a major role during the evolution of the Paganzo Basin as well as during the emplacement of alkaline magmatism in the retroarc.

  2. High case fatality cholera outbreak in Western Kenya, August 2010

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    Introduction: Cholera is a disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholera and has ... of cholera occurred in Kuria West District spreading to the neighboring Migori District. .... Cholera treatment centres were not set up and cases were referred.

  3. High northern geomagnetic field behavior and new constraints on the Gilsá event: Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results of ∼0.5–3.1 Ma basalts from Jökuldalur, Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing Andreasen, Arne; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Supakulopas, Radchagrit

    2016-01-01

    Recent paleomagnetic results of extrusive rocks from high southern latitudes (>60°S) and high northern latitudes (>60°N) have been suggested to reflect a hemispheric asymmetry of the geomagnetic field on time-scales of 105 to 106 yrs, with higher and more stable fields in the north. This interpre...

  4. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    The 40K/40Ar (K-Ar) and 40Ar/39Ar dating methods are applied here to the same, very small, micrometric illite-type particles that crystallized under low-temperature (samples with a total of fifteen size fractions from advantages, such as the plateaus obtained by incremental step heating of the various size fractions, even if not translatable straight as ages of the illite populations; they allow identification of two generations of authigenic illite that formed at about 200 and 175 Ma, and one detrital generation. However, 40Ar/39Ar dating of clay minerals remains challenging as technical factors, such as the non-standardized encapsulation, may have potential unexpected effects. Both dating methods have their limitations: (1) K-Ar dating requires relatively large samples (ca. 10-20 mg) incurring potential sample homogeneity problems, with two aliquots required for K and Ar analysis for an age determination, also inducing a higher analytical uncertainty; (2) an identified drawback of 40Ar/39Ar dating is Ar recoil and therefore potential loss that occurs during neutronic creation of 39Ar from 39K, mostly in the finer mineral particles. If all the recoiled 39Ar is redistributed into adjacent grains/minerals, the final 40Ar/39Ar age of the analyzed size fraction remains theoretically identical, but it is not systematic in clay-type material. The finest grain sizes (e.g., convenient and straightforward use supported by a standardized and well-controlled technical approach. The present comparison of the two Ar-dating methods as applied to clay material shows that neither method is presently outdated, and that they are even of reciprocal use. Both methods have distinct application fields in clay geochronology and complementary application fields in clay crystallography.

  5. Preoptimised VB: a fast method for the ground and excited states of ionic clusters I. Localised preoptimisation for (ArCO) +, (ArN 2) + and N 4+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, J. H.; Bucur, I. B.; Archirel, P.

    1997-09-01

    We show that in the simple case of van der Waals ionic clusters, the optimisation of orbitals within VB can be easily simulated with the help of pseudopotentials. The procedure yields the ground and the first excited states of the cluster simultaneously. This makes the calculation of potential energy surfaces for tri- and tetraatomic clusters possible, with very acceptable computation times. We give potential curves for (ArCO) +, (ArN 2) + and N 4+. An application to the simulation of the SCF method is shown for Na +H 2O.

  6. Study of the {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb reaction using the {sup 40}Ar Piave-ALPI test beam and the Prisma-Clara set-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanini, A.M.; Marginean, N.; Corradi, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Padova (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    The study of few- and multi-nucleon transfer reactions in the system {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb may offer interesting results, also in the comparison with what we obtained in the recent study of {sup 40}Ca + {sup 208}Pb where clear evidences of simultaneous nucleon pair transfer have been found. Moreover, the case of {sup 40}Ar + {sup 208}Pb is attractive from the point of view of the possibility of populating neutron-rich nuclei in the sulphur-silicon region with non-negligible cross sections, for nuclear structure studies.

  7. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Medical or surgical castration serves as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR-interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of-and developing new therapeutic agents that target-the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, to continue to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration resistance.

  8. Modification of stearic acid in Ar and Ar-O{sub 2} pulsed DC discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardelli, E.A.; Souza, T.; Maliska, A.M.; Kleinjohann, K.J.; Bendo, T. [Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Mafra, M. [Nancy-Universite (France). Institut Jean Lamour; CNRS, Nancy (France); Belmonte, T. [Federal University of Technology from Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Stearic acid (C{sub 1}8H{sub 36}O{sub 2}) was treated into Ar and Ar-O{sub 2}(10%) pulsed DC discharge created by a cathode-anode confined system. The samples were placed at the floating potential. The results show that the mass variation of the stearic acid samples after Ar-O{sub 2} plasma exposure is more important than the pure Ar plasma treatments. This comportment demonstrate that the oxygen actives species (O and O{sub 2} in all states) strongly enhance the etching process with regards to A{sup *} species, regardless of their concentration. After treatment by Ar and Ar-O{sub 2} plasma, analyses by X-ray diffraction show a significant structural modification of the samples surface, utilizing Ar-O{sub 2} plasma the modification was more pronounced. The chemical composition evolution shows that the acid function is etched preferentially in the beginning of the treatment (about 5 min) and that after 10 min the carbonic chains seems to be functionalized by oxygen. (author)

  9. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  10. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages of Maskelynite Grains from ALHA 77005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, B.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Nyquist, L. E.; Swisher, C., III

    2013-01-01

    We present Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements for twelve small (20-60 micro-g) maskelynite samples from the heavily shocked martian meteorite ALHA 77005. The reported modal composition for ALHA 77005 is 50-60% olivine (Fa28), 30-40% pyroxene (Wo5Fs23En72), approx.8% maskelynite (An53), and approx.2% opaques by volume [1]). The meteorite is usually classified as a lherzolite. Previous Studies - Ar-40/Ar-39 results from previous work display disturbed release spectra [2,3]. In study [2], Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements on a 52-mg whole-rock sample produced an extremely disturbed release spec-trum, with all calculated apparent ages > 1 Ga, (Fig. 1). In a subsequent study [3], a light and a dark phase were analyzed. A 2.3-mg sample of the light, relatively low-K phase produced a disturbed release spectrum. For the first 20% of the Ar-39(sub K), most of the apparent ages exceeded >1 Ga; the remaining 80% yielded ages between 0.3-0.5 Ga. The integrated age for this phase is 0.9 Ga.

  11. Nanostructuring of Si(100) by Normal-Incident Ar+ Ion Sputtering at Low Ion Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Le-Jun; LI Wei-Qing; YANG Xin-Ju; FANG Ying-Cui; LU Ming

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate Si(100) surface morphology evolution under normal-incident Ar+ ions sputtering with low ion flux of 20μA/cm2. The results indicate that under the low flux ion sputtering, the nanostructuring process of Si(100) is governed by the Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) mechanism, rather than by the Bradley-Harper (BH) one for the case of high flux (normally the order of 102 μA/cm2 or larger). This work reveals that the ion flux plays an important role in the surface morphology evolution under ion sputtering, and a usually accepted classification that the ES mechanism is related to metal single-crystals under ion sputtering, while the BH one is to amorphous,and semiconductor targets is questionable.

  12. Constraining the alteration history of a Late Cretaceous Patagonian volcaniclastic bentonite-ash-mudstone sequence using K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, L. N.; Hofmann, H.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Smectite is typically considered unsuitable for radiometric dating, as argon (40Ar) produced from decay of exchangeable potassium (40K) located in the interlayer sites can be lost during fluid-rock interaction and/or during wet sample preparation in the laboratory. However, age analysis of Late Cretaceous Argentinian bentonites and associated volcaniclastic rocks from Lago Pellegrini, Northern Patagonia, indicates that, in the case of these very low-permeability rocks, the radioactive 40Ar was retained and thus can provide information on smectite age and the timing of rock alteration. This study presents isotopic results that indicate the ash-to-bentonite conversion and alteration of the overlying tuffaceous mudstones in Northern Patagonia was complete 13-17 my after middle Campanian sedimentation when the system isotopically closed. The general absence of illite in these smectite-rich lithologies reflects the low activity of K and the low temperature (<60 °C) of the formation waters that altered the parent ash.

  13. TBLR1 as an AR coactivator selectively activates AR target genes to inhibit prostate cancer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Garrett; Li, Yirong; Gellert, Lan Lin; Zhou, Albert; Melamed, Jonathan; Wu, Xinyu; Zhang, Xinming; Zhang, David; Meruelo, Daniel; Logan, Susan K.; Basch, Ross; Lee, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Androgen Receptor (AR), a steroid hormone receptor, is critical for prostate cancer growth. However, activation of AR by androgens can also lead to growth suppression and differentiation. Transcriptional cofactors play an important role in this switch between proliferative and anti-proliferative AR target gene programs. TBLR1, a core component of the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) complex, shows both co-repressor and co-activator activities on nuclear receptors, but little is known about its effects on AR and prostate cancer. We characterized TBLR1 as a coactivator of AR in prostate cancer cells and the activation is both phosphorylation and 19S proteosome dependent. We showed that TBLR1 physically interacts with AR and directly occupies the androgen response elements of affected AR target genes in an androgen-dependent manner. TBLR1 is primarily localized in the nucleus in benign prostate cells and nuclear expression is significantly reduced in prostate cancer cells in culture. Similarly, in human tumor samples, the expression of TBLR1 in the nucleus is significantly reduced in the malignant glands compared to the surrounding benign prostatic glands (p<0.005). Stable ectopic expression of nuclear TBLR1 leads to androgen-dependent growth suppression of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by selective activation of androgen regulated genes associated with differentiation (e.g. KRT18) and growth suppression (e.g. NKX3.1), but not cell proliferation of the prostate. Understanding the molecular switches involved in the transition from AR dependent growth promotion to AR dependent growth suppression will lead to more successful prostate cancer treatments. PMID:24243687

  14. 78 FR 9448 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00061

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00061 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the... Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington,...

  15. "Ars Dictaminis" and Modern Rhetorical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Ernestine P.

    Although not all the problems of writing are solved by practice in letter writing, a review of the classical texts on "ars dictaminis"--letter writing--creates a strong argument for its increased use as an exercise in college composition classrooms. By incorporating the lessons of dictamen as a device for achieving rhetorical modes--narration,…

  16. User Interface Design for Military AR Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-12

    SI: AUGMENTED REALITY User interface design for military AR applications Mark A. Livingston • Zhuming Ai • Kevin Karsch • Gregory O. Gibson Received...several visual representations fundamental to SA. The UI M. A. Livingston (&) Z. Ai K. Karsch G. O. Gibson Naval Research Laboratory, Washington

  17. "ARS 01", perspektiivide avamine / Helen Kivisoo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kivisoo, Helen

    2001-01-01

    30. IX 2001-20. I 2002 Kiasmas kuuendat korda toimuvast rahvusvahelisest näitusest "ARS", kus Eestist osaleb Marko Mäetamm. Kuraatorid Tuula Arkio, Maaretta Jaukkuri, Patrik Nyberg, Jari-Pekka Vanhala. Teemaks "kolmas ruum". Näituse kajastamisest.

  18. 40Ar/ 39Ar and 14C geochronology of the Albano maar deposits: Implications for defining the age and eruptive style of the most recent explosive activity at Colli Albani Volcanic District, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccio, B.; Marra, F.; Hajdas, I.; Karner, D. B.; Renne, P. R.; Sposato, A.

    2009-09-01

    New 40Ar/ 39Ar and 14C ages have been found for the Albano multiple maar pyroclastic units and underlying paleosols to document the most recent explosive activity in the Colli Albani Volcanic District (CAVD) near Rome, Italy, consisting of seven eruptions (Albano 1 = oldest). Both dating methodologies have been applied on several proximal units and on four mid-distal fall/surge deposits, the latter correlated, according to two current different views, to either the Albano or the Campi di Annibale hydromagmatic center. The 40Ar/ 39Ar ages on leucite phenocrysts from the mid-distal units yielded ages of ca. 72 ka, 73 ka, 41 ka and 36 ka BP, which are indistinguishable from the previously determined 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of the proximal Albano units 1, 2, 5 and 7, thus confirming their stratigraphic correspondence. Twenty-one 14C ages of the paleosols beneath Albano units 3, 5, 6 and 7 were found for samples collected from 13 proximal and distal sections, some of which were the same sections sampled for 40Ar/ 39Ar measurements. The 14C ages were found to be stratigraphically inconsistent and highly scattered, and were systematically younger than the 40Ar/ 39Ar ages, ranging from 35 ka to 3 ka. Considering the significant consistence of the 40Ar/ 39Ar chronological framework, we interpret the scattered and contradictory 14C ages to be the result of a variable contamination of the paleosols by younger organic carbon deriving from the superficial soil horizons. These results suggest that multiple isotopic systems anchored to a robust stratigraphic framework may need to be employed to determine accurately the geochronology of the CAVD as well as other volcanic districts.

  19. Progreso y retos de la geocronología 40Ar/39Ar en Costa Rica y Nicaragua Progress and Challenges Using 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology in Costa Rica and Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Saginor¹

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el principal objetivo de realizar mejores cálculos de la producción volcánica, en el Arco Volcánico de América Central, realizamos 61 dataciones 40Ar/39Ar en tefras y lavas en localidades de frente volcánico de Costa Rica y Nicaragua por medio de varias campañas de campo y análisis de laboratorio (preparación de muestras, envió al reactor nuclear, espectroscopía de masas de las muestras radiactivas, al laboratorio de gases nobles del Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y Planetarias de la Universidad Rutgers del 2002-2008. En este artículo presentamos diferentes observaciones que resultaron de este estudio donde se describe la precisión, exactitud y la confiabilidad de las edades 40Ar/39Ar. El primer resultado muestra las limitaciones de esta técnica en muestras baja en K2O con edades To better estimate the extrusive flux of the Central American Arc, from 2002-2008, we obtained sixty one high precision 40Ar/39Ar ages on geographically well-situated lavas and tephra from Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Here, we describe a number of observations encountered during this study using four examples that well document the precision, accuracy and general reliability of the 40Ar/39Ar ages. First, low K2O values, particularly in samples from Nicaragua, is a major limitation in or attempts to obtain reliable dates on samples under 1 My. Second, extensive weathering of samples due to the tropical climate of Central America has resulted in various levels of argon loss even when the hand sample appeared unaltered. Third, our field and geochronological data lead us to conclude that eruptive rates have not been constant over the past 15 to 20 My, but rather appears punctuated by gaps of up to several million years. We attempted to address the temporal gaps in several ways. First, geochemical analyses were used to identify samples that may have erupted during time periods without known volcanism. For example, U/Th values in the active Central

  20. Theoretical prediction on vibrational spectra of [Ar…Ar-H]+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Wei(李巍); ZHAO; Xinsheng(赵新生)

    2003-01-01

    Centrosymmetric linear [Ar-H-Ar]+ and asymmetric linear [Ar…Ar-H]+ are two stable configurations of [Ar2H]+. Based on the global potential energy surface of [Ar2H]+ provided by our group recently, we calculated the vibrational spectra of [Ar…Ar-H]+ with total angular momentum J = 0 by time-dependent quantum mechanical method, and the influence of quantum tunneling effect on vibrational spectra was found. With the help of the observation on the eigenstate functions and the modified potential energy surface, assignments were made to the spectra. The strong coupling between the excited bending mode of [Ar-H-Ar]+ and the vibrational states of [Ar…Ar-H]+ was discussed.

  1. Metalloregulatory properties of the ArsD repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Rosen, B P

    1997-05-30

    The plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon of plasmid R773 produces resistance to trivalent and pentavalent salts of the metalloids arsenic and antimony in cells of Escherichia coli. The first two genes in the operon, arsR and arsD, were previously shown to encode trans-acting repressor proteins. ArsR controls the basal level of expression of the operon, while ArsD controls maximal expression. Thus, action of the two repressors form a homeostatic regulatory circuit that maintains the level of ars expression within a narrow range. In this study, we demonstrate that ArsD binds to the same site on the ars promoter element as ArsR but with 2 orders of magnitude lower affinity. The results of gel shift assays demonstrate that ArsD is released from the ars DNA promoter by phenylarsine oxide, sodium arsenite, and potassium antimonyl tartrate (in order of effectiveness), the same inducers to which ArsR responds. Using the quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to measure the affinity of the repressor for inducers, apparent Kd values for Sb(III) and As(III) of 2 and 60 microM, respectively, were obtained. These results demonstrate that the arsR-arsD pair provide a sensitive mechanism for sensing a wide range of environmental heavy metals.

  2. Utilización de Sistemas Basados en Reglas y en Casos para diseñar transmisiones por tornillo sinfín // Use of rules based systems and cases based systems for worm gear design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Laureano Moya‐Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Las técnicas de Inteligencia Artificial se aplican hoy en día a diferentes problemas de Ingeniería,especialmente los Sistemas Basados en el Conocimiento. Entre estos últimos los más comunes son losSistemas Basados en Patrones, los Sistemas Basados en Reglas, los Sistemas Basados en Casos y losSistemas Híbridos. Los Sistemas Basados en Casos parten de problemas resueltos en un dominio deaplicación y mediante un proceso de adaptación, encuentran la solución a un nuevo problema. Estossistemas pueden ser usados con éxito para el diseño de engranajes, particularmente para el diseño detransmisiones por tornillo sin fin, sin embargo ello constituye un campo de las aplicaciones de laInteligencia Artificial aún inexplorada. En el presente trabajo se hace una comparación del uso de losSistemas Basados en Regla y los Sistemas Basados en Casos para el diseño de transmisiones portornillo sin fin y se muestran los resultados de la aplicación de los sistemas basados en regla al diseñoparticular de una transmisión por tornillo sin fin.Palabras claves: tornillo sin fin, engranajes, sistemas basados en casos, sistemas basados en reglas,inteligencia artificial.____________________________________________________________________________AbstractNowadays Artificial Intelligence techniques are applied successfully to different engineering problems,especially the “Knowledge Based Systems”. Among them the most common are the “Frame basedSystems”, “Rules Based Systems”, “Case Based Systems” and "Hybrid Systems". The “Case BasedSystems” (CBS analyze solved problems in an application domain and by means of a process ofadaptation; they find the solution to a new problem. These systems can be used successfully for thedesign of gears, particularly for designing worm gears; nevertheless it constitutes a field of the applicationsof artificial intelligence even unexplored. A comparison of the use of “Rules Based System” and “Cases

  3. Mars Atmospheric History Derived from Upper-Atmospheric Structure of 38Ar/36Ar Measured From MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce; Slipski, Marek; Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul; Elrod, Meredith K.; Yelle, Roger; Stone, Shane; Alsaeed, Noora

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the structure of the Martian upper atmosphere made from MAVEN observations allow us to derive homopause and exobase altitudes in the Mars upper atmosphere and to determine the isotopic fractionation that occurs between them. Fractionation in the ratio of 38Ar/36Ar occurs between the homopause and exobase due to diffusive separation. This fractionation, combined with measurements of the bulk atmospheric ratio, is used to determine the total amount of argon lost to space by pick-up-ion sputtering. Our analysis is based on Rayleigh distillation, modified by replenishment of gas to the atmosphere by outgassing, impact, and crustal weathering. Approximately 80 % of the 36Ar that was ever in the atmosphere has been removed through time. This high value requires that a major fraction of Mars atmospheric gas has been lost to space. It points strongly to loss to space as having been the dominant mechanism driving the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere.

  4. Geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the evolution of volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Joseph P.

    The tectonic mechanisms producing Pliocene to active volcanism in eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been debated for decades. In order to assess mechanisms that produce volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, we evaluate the evolution of volcanism in eastern PNG using 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and whole rock geochemistry. Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington, Mt. Victory and Waiwa), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin, seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the upper mantle is producing basaltic magmatism. However, the cause of Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift is controversial. Two hypotheses for the tectonic setting have been proposed to explain Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift: (1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere beneath eastern PNG at the Trobriand Tough and (2) decompression melting of mantle, previously modified by subduction, as the lithosphere undergoes extension associated with the opening of the Woodlark Basin. A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar ages with high field strength element (HFSE) concentrations in primary magmas indicates that HFSE concentrations correlate with age in the Woodlark rift. These data support the hypothesis that Pliocene to active volcanism in the Woodlark Rise and D'Entrecasteaux Islands results from decompression melting of a relict mantle wedge. The subduction zone geochemical signatures (negative HFSE anomalies) in Woodlark Rift lavas younger than 4 m.y. are a relict from older subduction beneath eastern Papua, likely in the middle Miocene. As the lithosphere is extended ahead of the tip of the westward propagating seafloor spreading center in the Woodlark Basin, the composition of volcanism is inherited from prior arc magmatism (via flux melting) and through time evolves toward magmatism associated with a rifting

  5. High loading of polygenic risk in cases with chronic schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, S M; Agerbo, E; Maier, R

    2015-01-01

    Genomic risk profile scores (GRPSs) have been shown to predict case-control status of schizophrenia (SCZ), albeit with varying sensitivity and specificity. The extent to which this variability in prediction accuracy is related to differences in sampling strategies is unknown. Danish population...

  6. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Zhan, Yongkun; Xu, Chen; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Zhi, Xiuling; Yin, Lianhua

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology. Intracellular lipid accumulation is the first step in the development and progression of NAFLD. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays an important role in the synthesis of bile acid and intracellular lipid homeostasis and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesize that StAR is involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. The hypothesis was identified using free fatty acid (FFA)-overloaded NAFLD in vitro model and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model transfected by recombinant adenovirus encoding StAR (StAR). StAR expression was also examined in pathology samples of patients with fatty liver by immunohistochemical staining. We found that the expression level of StAR was reduced in the livers obtained from fatty liver patients and NAFLD mice. Additionally, StAR overexpression decreased the levels of hepatic lipids and maintained the hepatic glucose homeostasis due to the activation of farnesoid x receptor (FXR). StAR overexpression attenuated the impairment of insulin signaling in fatty liver. This protective role of StAR was owing to a reduction of intracellular diacylglycerol levels and the phosphorylation of PKCε. Furthermore, FXR inactivation reversed the observed beneficial effects of StAR. The present study revealed that StAR overexpression can reduce hepatic lipid accumulation, regulate glucose metabolism and attenuate insulin resistance through a mechanism involving the activation of FXR. Our study suggests that StAR may be a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD.

  7. A study on plasma parameters in Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas or Ar/SF6 mixing gas is widely used in plasma processes. However, there are a little experimental studies with various external parameters such as gas pressure and mixing ratio. In this work, a study of the plasma parameters by changing the gas mixing ratio was done in an Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma from the measurement of the electron energy distribution function. At a low gas pressure, as the mixing ratio of SF6 gas increased at a fixed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power, the electron density decreased and the electron temperature increased, while they were not changed drastically. At a high gas pressure, a remarkable increase in the electron temperature was observed with the decrease in the electron density. These variations are due to the electron loss reactions such as the electron attachment. It was also found that at a fixed ICP power, the negative ion creation with the diluted SF6 gas can change the discharge mode transition from an inductive mode to a capacitive mode at the high gas pressure. The electron attachment reactions remove the low energy electrons and change the mean electron energy towards higher energies with diluting SF6 gas at high pressure. The measured results were compared with the simplified global model, and the global model is in relatively good agreement with the measured plasma parameters except for the result in the case of the large portion of SF6 gas at the high pressure and the capacitive mode, which causes strong negative ion formation by the electron attachment reactions.

  8. Recoil ion charge state distributions in low energy Ar{sup q+} {minus} Ar collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vancura, J.; Marchetti, V.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1992-12-31

    We have measured the recoil ion charge state distributions in Ar{sup q+} -- Ar (8{le}q{le}16) collisions at 2.3 qkeV and 0.18qkeV by time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy. For Ar{sup 8-16+}, recoil ion charge states up to 6+ are clearly present, indicating that the 3p subshell in the target atom is being depleted, while for Ar{sup 10-16+}, there is evidence that target 3s electrons are also being removed. Comparison of the recoil ion charge state spectra at 2.3 and 0.18 qkeV shows that for a given projectile charge, there is very little dependence of the observed recoil target charge state distribution on projectile energy.

  9. The effects of retrograde reactions and of diffusion on 39Ar-40Ar ages of micas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allaz, Julien; Engi, Martin; Berger, Alfons

    2011-01-01

    Effects of metamorphic reactions occurring during decompression were explored to understand their influence on 39Ar-40Ar ages of micas. Monometamorphic metasediments from the Lepontine Alps (Switzerland) were studied. Collected samples reached lower amphibolite facies during the Barrovian....../K and Cl/K ratios) did not change and the resulting ages can be interpreted unambiguously. In mineral separates containing two white micas, Ca/K and Cl/K ratios were variable, reflecting non-simultaneous laboratory degassing of the two heterochemical Ar-reservoirs. These ratios were used to identify each...... Ar reservoir and to unravel the age. In a chlorite-margarite-biotite-calcschist equilibrated near 560 °C and 0.65 GPa, biotite, margarite, and muscovite all yield ages around 18 Ma. At slightly higher grade (560-580 °C, 0.8-0.9 GPa), the assemblage muscovite-paragonite-plagioclase is at equilibrium...

  10. Case Mix, Quality and High-Cost Kidney Transplant Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Englesbe, M. J.; Dimick, J. B.; Fan, Z; Baser, O.; Birkmeyer, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    A better understanding of high-cost kidney transplant patients would be useful for informing value-based purchasing strategies by payers. This retrospective cohort study was based on the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) files from 2003 to 2006. The focus of this analysis was high-cost kidney transplant patients (patients that qualified for Medicare outlier payments and 30-day readmission payments). Using regression techniques, we explored relationships between high-cost kidney t...

  11. Na2高位振动态与Ar,N2碰撞中模温度的变化%Mode temperature evolution in collisions of highly rovibrationally excited Na2 with Ar and N2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘静; 封丽; 戴康; 沈异凡

    2015-01-01

    利用受激发射泵浦激发Na2分子,使Na2[X1∑g+(ν″=33,J″=11)]得到布居,研究了高振动激发态Na*2与Ar和N2的碰撞弛豫过程。由激光诱导荧光得到Na2(ν≤33)各振动能级的时间分辨布居分布,从而得到Boltzmann振动温度和转动温度随时间的变化。对于Na*2与Ar碰撞,在泵浦-探测延迟时间tD=8μs前,振动温度Tvib减小很慢;在8-12μs间, Tvib迅速下降并达到平衡。而转动温度Trot和平移温度Ttran在Tvib迅速下降时才开始缓慢增加。对于Na*2与N2碰撞, Tvib存在三个变化阶段,先是迅速下降,然后下降减缓,最后减小很慢并达到平衡。而在整个过程中, Trot和Ttran一直是很缓慢地增加。实验数据说明了弛豫过程是分阶段进行的,单一速率系数不能正确解释复杂的弛豫过程,并会丢失平衡过程中的关键特点。%Stimulated emission pumping was used to excite Na2 [ X1∑g+(ν″=33,J″=11) ] via A-X transition. Laser induced fluorescence was used to follow the collision dynamics.Relaxation processes induced by collisions with Ar and N2 were investigated.For Na*2 in a bath of Ar gas, the equilibration takes place via distinct phases, main features of which are a very slow initial vibrational relaxation up to tD =8 μs,that then speeds up before reaching a quasiequilibrium soon after tD=12 μs.Trot and Ttran begin to increase at the onset of faster decline in Tvib.For Na*2 in a bath of N2 gas, the variation of Tvib indicates the existence of three principal change regions in this equilibration process.The initial phase consists of very rapid fall in Tvib.This phase of major vibrational en-ergy exchange is followed by one of slightly rapid Tvib decline that precedes a third phase of much slower change. The data demonstrate that single rate coefficient measurements are unlikely to capture the complex nature of processes that generally are multistage with different

  12. Targeting the unique methylation pattern of androgen receptor (AR) promoter in prostate stem/progenitor cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) leads to suppressed prostate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Lee, Soo Ok; Liang, Liang; Luo, Jie; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Li, Lei; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-11-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) expression surveys found that normal prostate/prostate cancer (PCa) stem/progenitor cells, but not embryonic or mesenchymal stem cells, expressed little AR with high methylation in the AR promoter. Mechanism dissection revealed that the differential methylation pattern in the AR promoter could be due to differential expression of methyltransferases and binding of methylation binding protein to the AR promoter region. The low expression of AR in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells was reversed after adding 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, which could then lead to decreased stemness and drive cells into a more differentiated status, suggesting that the methylation in the AR promoter of prostate stem/progenitor cells is critical not only in maintaining the stemness but also critical in protection of cells from differentiation. Furthermore, induced AR expression, via alteration of its methylation pattern, led to suppression of the self-renewal/proliferation of prostate stem/progenitor cells and PCa tumorigenesis in both in vitro assays and in vivo orthotopic xenografted mouse studies. Taken together, these data prove the unique methylation pattern of AR promoter in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells and the influence of AR on their renewal/proliferation and differentiation. Targeting PCa stem/progenitor cells with alteration of methylated AR promoter status might provide a new potential therapeutic approach to battle PCa because the PCa stem/progenitor cells have high tumorigenicity.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Honghuaqiao Formation in SE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Hemming, S. R.; Mesko, G. T.; Fang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Jehol Biota, defined as the characteristic Eosestheria-Ephemeropsis-Lycoptera assemblage (Grabau, 1923, Bulletin of the Geological Survey of China), is widely distributed in eastern and central Asia (Li et al., 1982, Acta Geologica Sinica; Chen, 1988, Acta Palaeontologica Sinica). Abundant and varied fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals, and freshwater invertebrates, have been discovered from the Dabeigou, the Yixian and the Jiufotang Formations (or their correlative strata) in northeast China from the Liaoning and Hebei Provinces and Inner Mongolia (Chen and Jin, 1999, Acta Palaeontologica Sinica). In addition, strata that may be correlative with the classic Jehol fossil-bearing formations have been identified extensively in central and eastern China, the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia, and Siberia. In the past three decades mollusk, conchostracan, ostracod, insect, fish, and plant fossils from localities in southeastern China, interpreted as related to the Jehol biota of the northeast, have been found (Mateer and Chen, 1986, Cretaceous Research; Li, 2003, Chinese Science Bulletin; Chen, Li and Batten, 2007, Geological Journal). However, a detailed correlation between the classic Jehol outcrops and the more recently found localities to the South and West has yet to emerge. Volcanic rocks from the Honghuaqiao fossil-bearing Formation in Tuzhou City of eastern Anhui Province, southeastern China provide an excellent opportunity to rectify this situation. Preliminary results of a pilot study suggest that the Honghuaqiao Formation is equivalent to the Longwanshan Formation of Anhui Province, southeastern China and the Yixian Formation, northeastern China (Chang et al., 2009, AGU abstract). Initial 40Ar/39Ar results indicate that conchostracans from the upper Honghuaqiao Formation are approximately 130 Ma. Our ongoing work aims to establish a high-resolution chronostratigraphy for Tuzhou City in Anhui Province

  14. 42 CFR 412.84 - Payment for extraordinarily high-cost cases (cost outliers).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outliers). 412.84 Section 412.84 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Payments for Outlier Cases, Special Treatment Payment for New Technology, and Payment Adjustment for Certain Replaced Devices Payment for Outlier Cases § 412.84 Payment for extraordinarily high-cost cases...

  15. Impact of an Engineering Case Study in a High School Pre-Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Eugene; Shafer, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Students at an all-girls high school who were enrolled in an introduction to engineering course were presented an engineering case study to determine if the case study affected their attitudes toward engineering and their abilities to solve engineering problems. A case study on power plants was implemented during a unit on electrical engineering.…

  16. High magnetic field {mu}SR instrument scientific case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, A

    2005-10-15

    In order to gain more insight into the specific behavior of materials, it is often necessary to perform measurements as a function of different external parameters. Despite its high sensitivity to internal fields, this simple observation also applies for the {mu}SR technique. The most common parameter which can be tuned during an experiment is the sample temperature. By using a range of cryostats, temperatures between 0.02 and 900 K can be covered at the PSI {mu}SR Facility. On the other hand, and by using high-energy muons, pressures as high as 10'000 bars can nowadays be reached during {mu}SR experiments. As will be demonstrated in the following Sections, the magnetic field is an additional external parameter playing a fundamental role when studying the ground state properties of materials in condensed matter physics and chemistry. However, the availability of high magnetic fields for {mu}SR experiments is still rather limited. Hence, if on one hand the high value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the muon provides the high magnetic sensitivity of the method, on the other hand it can lead to very high muon-spin precession frequencies when performing measurements in applied fields (the muon-spin precession frequency in a field of 1 Tesla s 135.5 MHz). Consequently, the use of ultra-fast detectors and electronics is mandatory when measuring in magnetic fields exceeding 1 Tesla. If such fields are very intense when compared to the Earth magnetic field < 10{sup -4} Tesla), the energy associated with them is still modest in view of the thermal energy. Hence, the Zeeman energy splitting of a free electron in a magnetic field of 1 Tesla corresponds to a thermal energy as low as 0.67 Kelvin. It is worth mentioning that nowadays magnetic fields of the order of 10 to 15 Tesla are quite common in condensed matter laboratories and have opened up vast new exciting experimental possibilities. (author)

  17. On concentration of $^{42}$Ar in the Earth's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2016-01-01

    Data from the DBA liquid argon ionization chamber experiment have been used to obtain an estimate on the concentration of $^{42}$Ar in the Earth's atmosphere, $6.8^{+1.7}_{-3.2}\\cdot10^{-21}$ atoms of $^{42}$Ar per atom of $^{40}$Ar corresponding to the $^{42}$Ar activity of $1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.5}$ $\\mu$Bq per cubic meter of air.

  18. On concentration of 42Ar in the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, A. S.; Saakyan, R. R.; Umatov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Data from the DBA liquid argon ionization chamber experiment have been used to obtain an estimate on the concentration of 42Ar in the Earth's atmosphere, 6 .8-3.2+1.7 ·10-21 atoms of 42Ar per atom of 40Ar corresponding to the 42Ar activity of 1 .2-0.5+0.3 μBq per cubic meter of air.

  19. Enseñar un oficio, proponer una forma

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    El oficio de enseñar. Enseñar a través de la técnica, enseñar por vía de la cultura. Una ciudadela de figuras. Imitación y relación personal. Enseñar a partir de un sistema. Partir del inicio. Posponer la realidad Peer Reviewed

  20. Highly Automated Agile Testing Process: An Industrial Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Berłowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of an agile testing process in a medium size software project that is developed using Scrum. The research methods used is the case study were as follows: surveys, quantifiable project data sources and qualitative project members opinions were used for data collection. Challenges related to the testing process regarding a complex project environment and unscheduled releases were identified. Based on the obtained results, we concluded that the described approach addresses well the aforementioned issues. Therefore, recommendations were made with regard to the employed principles of agility, specifically: continuous integration, responding to change, test automation and test driven development. Furthermore, an efficient testing environment that combines a number of test frameworks (e.g. JUnit, Selenium, Jersey Test with custom-developed simulators is presented.

  1. High diabetes prevalence among tuberculosis cases in Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While diabetes mellitus (DM is a known risk factor for tuberculosis, the prevalence among TB patients in India is unknown. Routine screening of TB patients for DM may be an opportunity for its early diagnosis and improved management and might improve TB treatment outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of TB patients registered from June-July 2011 in the state of Kerala, India, to determine the prevalence of DM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A state-wide representative sample of TB patients in Kerala was interviewed and screened for DM using glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c; patients self-reporting a history of DM or those with HbA1c ≥6.5% were defined as diabetic. Among 552 TB patients screened, 243(44% had DM - 128(23% had previously known DM and 115(21% were newly diagnosed - with higher prevalence among males and those aged >50 years. The number needed to screen(NNS to find one newly diagnosed case of DM was just four. Of 128 TB patients with previously known DM, 107(84% had HbA1c ≥7% indicating poor glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nearly half of TB patients in Kerala have DM, and approximately half of these patients were newly-diagnosed during this survey. Routine screening of TB patients for DM using HbA1c yielded a large number of DM cases and offered earlier management opportunities which may improve TB and DM outcomes. However, the most cost-effective ways of DM screening need to be established by futher operational research.

  2. Postcollision interactions in the Auger decay of the Ar L-shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, J.A.R.; Stolte, W.C.; He, Z.X. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The photoionization cross sections for Ar{sup +} through Ar{sup 4+}, produced by the Auger decay of an inner shell 2p hole, have been measured between 242 eV and 253 eV on beamline 9.0.1 and 6.3.2. In this study the authors are interested in near threshold phenomenon involving postcollision interactions (PCI), which are related to the Auger decay of a vacancy in the Ar L-shell. During an Auger decay a postcollision interaction can occur causing the out-going photoelectron to be retarded thus losing a certain amount of energy. If the retardation is sufficiently large the photoelectron will not escape. This result produces a singly charged ion, which normally would not be present. Such evidence of electron capture by the PCI effect was first shown clearly by Eberhardt et al. and, with higher resolution, in the present work. However, capture of the photoelectron is expected to be 100% exactly at the L{sub 2,3} thresholds. Thus, from the authors results they would have expected the Ar{sup 2+} signal to be zero at threshold, but it was not? The authors can explain this anomoly on the basis that during the Auger decay the photoelectrons are captured into high lying excited states of Ar{sup +}, which subsequently decay through autoionization yielding Ar{sup 2+}. Future work in this area will seek experimental evidence to verify this prediction.

  3. Lung cancer and arsenic exposure in drinking water: a case-control study in northern Chile Cáncer de pulmón y exposición a arsénico en el agua potable: un estudio de casos y controles en el norte de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catterina Ferreccio

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In some Chilean cities, levels of arsenic (As in drinking water reached 800 µg/L between 1950 and 1970, while current levels are 40 µg/L. To evaluate the causal role of this exposure in lung and bladder cancers, we conducted a case-control study in Regions I, II, and III of the country. From 1994 to 1996, cases diagnosed as lung cancer and two hospital controls were entered in the study; one control was a patient with a cancer, while the other was a patient without cancer, both conditions unrelated to As. Controls were matched with cases by age and sex. A standard survey containing questions about residence, employment, health history, was administered to study subjects. Data on As concentrations in water were obtained from records of the municipal water companies. A total of 151 lung cancer cases and 419 controls (167 with cancer and 242 without cancer were enrolled. Median level of lifetime As exposure was significantly higher among cases, with a clear dose-response relationship between mean As exposure levels, with an OR (95% CI of: 1, 1.7 (0.5-5.1, 3.9 (1.2-13.4, 5.5 (2.2-13.5, and 9.0 (3.6-22 for strata one to five respectively. This study provides new evidence that As in drinking water can cause internal cancers and gives an estimate of the form of this relationship.En algunas ciudades de Chile, entre 1950 y 1970, los niveles de arsénico (As en el agua potable alcanzaron los 800 µg/l, estando hoy en 40 µg/l; para evaluar el rol de esta exposición, se llevó a cabo este estudio de casos de cáncer de pulmón y controles en las Regiones I, II y III. Entre 1994 y 1996, se ingresaron casos de cáncer de pulmón y dos controles hospitalarios: un control, un paciente con cáncer y el otro, un paciente sin cáncer, ambos diagnósticos no relacionados con arsénico. Los controles fueron pareados grupalmente por edad y sexo con los casos. A cada sujeto, se le aplicó una encuesta estandarizada sobre residencia, empleo y salud. La informaci

  4. Regulation of AR Degradation and Function by Ubiquitylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The pathways that normally mediate AR...ligase (CHIP) may mediate the polyubiquitylation and proteasome degradation of AR that fails to fold appropriately and bind ligand. However, there are...pathways that normally mediate the ubiquitin dependent or independent degradation of AR, which might be targeted therapeutically, remain to be

  5. The Case for High-Performance, Healthy Green Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    When trying to reach their sustainability goals, schools and school districts often run into obstacles, including financing, training, and implementation tools. Last fall, the U.S. Green Building Council-Georgia (USGBC-Georgia) launched its High Performance, Healthy Schools (HPHS) Program to help Georgia schools overcome those obstacles. By…

  6. Case Study: International High School at Langley Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassl, Frishtah; Wilkin, Christine; Ward, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    The International High School at Langley Park (IHSLP) opened during the 2015-2016 school year. By the fourth year of operation, the school will be home to 400 English language learners (ELLs) new to the United States. Working in partnership with the Internationals Network for Public Schools, the school is designed around the "HELLO…

  7. Antarlides: A New Type of Androgen Receptor (AR) Antagonist that Overcomes Resistance to AR-Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shun; Fujimaki, Takahiro; Panbangred, Watanalai; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-02-18

    Prostate cancer is treated with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but most patients experience disease progression after long-term treatment with these compounds. Therefore, new AR antagonists are required for patient follow-up treatment. In the course of screening for a new AR antagonist, we isolated the novel compounds antarlides A-E (1-5) from Streptomyces sp. BB47. Antarlides are mutually isomeric with respect to the double bond and have a 22-membered-ring macrocyclic structure. The full stereostructure of 1 was established by chemical modifications, including methanolysis, the Trost method, acetonide formation, and the PGME method. 1-5 inhibited the binding of androgen to ARs in vitro. In addition, 2 inhibited the transcriptional activity of not only wild-type AR but also mutant ARs, which are seen in patients with acquired resistance to clinically used AR antagonists. Therefore, antarlides are a potent new generation of AR antagonists that overcome resistance.

  8. Blood pressure, heart rate and tubuloglomerular feedback in A1AR-deficient mice with different genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S M; Mizel, D; Qin, Y; Huang, Y; Schnermann, J

    2015-01-01

    Differences in genetic background between control mice and mice with targeted gene mutations have been recognized as a potential cause for phenotypic differences. In this study, we have used A1AR-deficient mice in a C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic background to assess the influence of background on the effect of A1AR-deficiency on cardiovascular and renal functional parameters. In A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic backgrounds, we assessed blood pressure and heart rate using radio-telemetry, plasma renin concentrations and tubuloglomerular feedback. We did not detect significant differences in arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rates (HR) between A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in either C57Bl/6, SWR/J or mixed backgrounds. MAP and HR were significantly higher in SWR/J than in C57Bl/6 mice. A high NaCl intake increased MAP in A1AR-/- mice on C57Bl/6 background while there was less or no salt sensitivity in the SWR/J background. No significant differences in plasma renin concentration were detected between A1AR-/- and A1AR+/+ mice in any of the strains. Tubuloglomerular feedback was found to be absent in A1AR-/- mice with SWR/J genetic background. While this study confirmed important differences between inbred mouse strains, we did not identify phenotypic modifications of A1AR-related effects on blood pressure, heart rate and plasma renin by differences in genetic background. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Affinity chromatography of alpha/sub 2/-adrenergic receptors (. cap alpha. /sub 2/AR) from pig cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, M.G.; Limbird, L.E.

    1986-03-01

    A high capacity, ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR-selective affinity resin (YOH. ag) has been prepared by coupling yohimbinic acid to diaminodipropylamine agarose with 1,3 dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Unreacted amino groups on the agarose matrix are blocked subsequently by acetylation. One volume of YOH. ag adsorbs 75% of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR from 50 volumes of digitonin-solubilized preparation containing 0.2 pmol ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR/mg protein. Digitonin-solubilized preparations are derived from cholate extracts of porcine cerebral cortex containing approx. 0.075 pmol ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR/mg protein. Adsorption of ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR to YOH. ag is selective and thus is blocked by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. Adsorbed ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR are eluted with 10 ..mu..M phentolamine (20% yield) after removal of non-related proteins with NaCl gradients. Following hydroxylapatite chromatography to concentrate ..cap alpha..''AR and to remove phentolamine, the ..cap alpha..AR is present at 200-400 pmol/mg protein, assayed using sub-saturating concentrations of (/sup 3/H)-yohimbine. (It is estimated that the specific activity of a homogeneous ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR preparation would be 12,000-16,000 pmol/mg protein.) The availability of large quantities of cortical ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR and a resin easily prepared from commercially-supplied reagents suggests that purification of quantities of ..cap alpha../sub 2/AR sufficient for subsequent biochemical studies is feasible.

  10. The 40Ar/39Ar age record of formation and uplift of the blueschists and eclogites in the western Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the eclogite facies rocks of the Hasiate slice in the western Tianshan Mountains were formed at the early stage of Devonian (401 Ma) and had been uplifted to the greenschist facies tectonic level in the middle stage of Devonian (381 Ma). The formation and uplift of the blueschists of the Akesayi slice are constrained to the late stage of Devonian (370─364 Ma). The different tectonic slices in the high-pressure metamorphic belt have experienced the different uplift history.

  11. ArsH is an organoarsenical oxidase that confers resistance to trivalent forms of the herbicide monosodium methylarsenate and the poultry growth promoter roxarsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P

    2015-06-01

    Environmental organoarsenicals are produced by microorganisms and are introduced anthropogenically as herbicides and antimicrobial growth promoters for poultry and swine. Nearly every prokaryote has an ars (arsenic resistance) operon, and some have an arsH gene encoding an atypical flavodoxin. The role of ArsH in arsenic resistance has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that ArsH is an organoarsenical oxidase that detoxifies trivalent methylated and aromatic arsenicals by oxidation to pentavalent species. Escherichia coli, which does not have an arsH gene, is very sensitive to the trivalent forms of the herbicide monosodium methylarsenate [MSMA or MAs(V)] and antimicrobial growth promoter roxarsone [Rox(V)], as well as to phenylarsenite [PhAs(III), also called phenylarsine oxide or PAO]. Pseudomonas putida has two chromosomally encoded arsH genes and is highly resistant to the trivalent forms of these organoarsenicals. A derivative of P. putida with both arsH genes deleted is sensitive to MAs(III), PhAs(III) or Rox(III). P. putida arsH expressed in E. coli conferred resistance to each trivalent organoarsenical. Cells expressing PpArsH oxidized the trivalent organoarsenicals. PpArsH was purified, and the enzyme in vitro similarly oxidized the trivalent organoarsenicals. These results suggest that ArsH catalyzes a novel biotransformation that confers resistance to environmental methylated and aromatic arsenicals.

  12. ArsH is an organoarsenical oxidase that confers resistance to trivalent forms of the herbicide MSMA and the poultry growth promoter roxarsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental organoarsenicals are produced by microorganisms and are introduced anthropogenically as herbicides and antimicrobial growth promoters for poultry and swine. Nearly every prokaryote has an ars (arsenic resistance) operon, and some have an arsH gene encoding an atypical flavodoxin. The role of ArsH in arsenic resistance has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that ArsH is an organoarsenical oxidase that detoxifies trivalent methylated and aromatic arsenicals by oxidation to pentavalent species. Escherichia coli, which does not have an arsH gene, is very sensitive to the trivalent forms of the herbicide monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) and antimicrobial growth promoter roxarsone (Rox(V)), as well as to phenylarsenite (PhAs(III), also called phenylarsine oxide or PAO). Pseudomonas putida has two chromosomally-encoded arsH genes and is highly resistant to the trivalent forms of these organoarsenicals. A derivative of P. putida with both arsH genes deleted is sensitive to MAs(III), PhAs(III) or Rox(III). P. putida arsH expressed in E. coli conferred resistance to each trivalent organoarsenical. Cells expressing PpArsH oxidized the trivalent organoarsenicals. PpArsH was purified, and the enzyme in vitro similarly oxidized the trivalent organoarsenicals. These results suggest that ArsH catalyzes a novel biotransformation that confers resistance to environmental methylated and aromatic arsenicals. PMID:25732202

  13. A CRISPR CASe for High-Throughput Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob eHeintze

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of gene expression on a genome-wide level is one of the most important systematic tools in the post-genome era. Such manipulations have largely been enabled by expression cloning approaches using sequence-verified cDNA libraries, large-scale RNA interference libraries (shRNA or siRNA and zinc finger nuclease technologies. More recently, the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and CRISPR-associated (Cas9-mediated gene editing technology has been described that holds great promise for future use of this technology in genomic manipulation. It was suggested that the CRISPR system has the potential to be used in high-throughput, large-scale loss of function screening. Here we discuss some of the challenges in engineering of CRISPR/Cas genomic libraries and some of the aspects that need to be addressed in order to use this technology on a high-throughput scale.

  14. The thermal history of the Lhasa Block, South Tibetan Plateau based on FTD and Ar-Ar dating

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, T F; Lo Chong Huah; Chung, S L; Tien, R L; Xu, R; Deng, W

    1999-01-01

    Twelve basement samples were collected from South Tibet Plateau for FTD and Ar-Ar analysis to demonstrate their uplifting history since Cenozoic era. The preliminary results from different minerals with different closure temperatures, including apatite and zircon for fission-track dating, and K-feldspar, biotite for Ar-Ar dating, show that at least four stages of thermal history can be recognized in the studied area.

  15. Case for retrievable high-level nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Plans for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository have called for permanently closing and sealing the repository soon after it is filled. However, the hydrologic environment of the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, should allow the repository to be kept open and the waste retrievable indefinitely. This would allow direct monitoring of the repository and maintain the options for future generations to improve upon the disposal methods or use the uranium in the spent fuel as an energy resource.

  16. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). RESULTS: Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. CONCLUSION: HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  17. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher William M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC on tissue microarrays (TMA consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS. Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46 of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93; p = 0.03 when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  18. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-04-01

    Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  19. Hierarchical classifier design in high-dimensional, numerous class cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyong; Landgrebe, David A.

    1991-01-01

    As progress in new sensor technology continues, increasingly high spectral resolution sensors are being developed. These sensors give more detailed and complex data for each picture element and greatly increase the dimensionality of data over past systems. Three methods for designing a decision tree classifier are discussed; a top down approach, a bottom up approach, and a hybrid approach. Three feature extraction techniques are implemented. Canonical and extended canonical techniques are mainly dependent on the mean difference between two classes. An autocorrelation technique is dependent on the correlation differences. The mathematical relationship among sample size, dimensionality, and risk value is derived.

  20. Ar + NO microwave plasmas for Escherichia coli sterilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueso, Jose L; Rico, Victor J; Cotrino, Jose; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla, Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas Isla de la Cartuja, Avda. Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Frias, Jose E [Instituto de BioquImica Vegetal y FotosIntesis (IBVF-CSIC). Centro de Investigaciones CientIficas Isla de la Cartuja. Avda Americo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: jhueso@icmse.csic.es

    2008-05-07

    Ar + NO microwave discharges are used for sterilization and the results are compared with additional experiments with Ar, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} plasma mixtures. The NO{sup *} species produced in the Ar-NO mixtures remain up to long distances from the source, thus improving the sterilization efficiency of the process. E. coli individuals exposed to the Ar + NO plasma undergo morphological damage and cell lysis. Combined effects of etching (by O{sup *} and Ar{sup *} species) and UV radiation (from deactivation of NO{sup *} species) are responsible for the higher activity found for this plasma mixture. (fast track communication)

  1. Escape factors for Paschen 2p-1s emission lines in low-temperature Ar, Kr, and Xe plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Wen; Pu, Yi-Kang; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Radiation trapping phenomenon is often observed when investigating low-temperature plasmas. Photons emitted from the upper excited states may be reabsorbed by the lower states before they leave the plasmas. In order to account for this effect in the modelling and optical diagnostics of plasmas, either an ‘escape factor’ of a function of the optical depth or a strict solution of the radiation transfer equation can be employed. However, the former is more convenient in comparison and thus is widely adopted. Previous literatures have provided several simple expressions of the escape factor for the uniform plasmas. The emission line profiles are assumed to be dominated by the Doppler broadening, and the line splitting due to the hyperfine structure is not considered. This kind of expression is only valid for small atoms, e.g. Ar in low-pressure uniform discharges. Actually, the excited state density in many of the low-temperature plasmas is non-uniform and the emission line profile can be significantly influenced by the collisional broadening at medium and high pressures. In these cases, a new escape factor equation should be calculated. In this work, we study the escape factor equations for the often used 2p-1s transitions (Paschen’s notation) of the Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms. Possible non-uniform density profiles are considered. In addition, we include the line splitting due to the hyperfine structure for Kr and Xe. For the low-pressure plasmas, an escape factor expression mainly based on the Gaussian line profile is given and particularly verified by an experiment in a low-pressure capacitive discharge. For the high-pressure plasmas, an equation based on the Voigt line profile is also calculated. In this way, the new escape factor expression is ready for use in the modelling of the Ar, Kr, and Xe plasmas from low to atmospheric pressure.

  2. Construction management through bot:Taiwan high speed rall case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Luh-maan; CHEN Po-han

    2004-01-01

    One of the key elements in real estate management is streamlining the construction process. Thus,the facilities can be built on a faster, cheaper, and higher quality base. Consequently, it will enhance the owner's competitiveness. Due to the high cost and lengthy duration of mega-construction projects in recent years,Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) contracts are getting popular in delivering constructed projects in the public sector. With BOT, the public owners are able to focus on the effectiveness of fair resource allocation as well as bring the efficiency of private enterprise into governmental operations.This paper uses Taiwan High Speed Rail project to exemplify the BOT method in executing the constructed projects in the chain of real estate management processes. The paper explains the reasons for building HSR and adopting BOT approach.The detail of the HSR project and the feasibility analysis of the project will be presented in this paper. The feasibility analysis comprises the comparisons of different transportation means, the financial analysis, and other benefits from HSR. Finally, conclusions will be drawn.

  3. Determination of Ar Concentration Evolution Within DIII-D Core Plasma by X-ray Ross Filter Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Brooks, N. H.; Snider, R. T.; West, W. P.; Wade, M. R.

    2001-10-01

    Injection of the non-recycling noble gas Ar into the DIII-D divertor is a promising technique for reducing the heat load on the plates; it also seems to improve thermal transport in an advanced operating mode. During such experiments core plasma contamination by migrating Ar can be investigated by measuring the evolution of the Ar concentration profile using the Ross filter method implemented on the fan shaped X-ray poloidal diagnostics on DIII-D. A Ross filter with energy pass band centered on the ArXVII K_α line at 3.14 keV, discriminating Ar K_α line against background radiation, was used on DIII-D. A high sensitivity to the injected quantity of Ar and good discrimination against Ne was observed. We present reconstruction of Ar concentration profiles from the chord-integrated measurements using the measured Te and ne profiles. Using the transport code MIST, the impurity diffusion coefficients can be determined by matching the time evolution of the Ar concentration evolution.

  4. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  5. Adsorption of Ar on planar surfaces studied with a density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartarelli, Salvador A.; Szybisz, Leszek

    2009-11-01

    The adsorption of Ar on planar structureless substrates of alkali metals, alkaline-earth metal Mg, CO2 , and Au was analyzed by applying a density functional formalism which includes a recently proposed effective attractive pair potential conditioned to Ar. It is shown that this approach reproduces the experimental surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface over the entire bulk coexistence curve for temperatures T spanning from the triple point Tt up to the critical point Tc . The wetting properties were studied over the entire range temperatures Tt↔Tc . It was found that Ar wets all the investigated surfaces. The adsorption isotherms for alkali metals exhibit first-order phase transitions. Prewetting lines were resolved even for the less attractive surfaces. In the cases of Mg, CO2 , and Au a continuous growth for T≥Tt was obtained. A comparison with experimental data and other microscopic calculations is reported.

  6. Automatic Metadata Extraction - The High Energy Physics Use Case

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, Joseph; Rajman, Martin

    Automatic metadata extraction (AME) of scientific papers has been described as one of the hardest problems in document engineering. Heterogeneous content, varying style, and unpredictable placement of article components render the problem inherently indeterministic. Conditional random fields (CRF), a machine learning technique, can be used to classify document metadata amidst this uncertainty, annotating document contents with semantic labels. High energy physics (HEP) papers, such as those written at CERN, have unique content and structural characteristics, with scientific collaborations of thousands of authors altering article layouts dramatically. The distinctive qualities of these papers necessitate the creation of specialised datasets and model features. In this work we build an unprecedented training set of HEP papers and propose and evaluate a set of innovative features for CRF models. We build upon state-of-the-art AME software, GROBID, a tool coordinating a hierarchy of CRF models in a full document ...

  7. Maladaptively high and low openness: the case for experiential permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedmont, Ralph L; Sherman, Martin F; Sherman, Nancy C

    2012-12-01

    The domain of Openness within the Five-Factor Model (FFM) has received inconsistent support as a source for maladaptive personality functioning, at least when the latter is confined to the disorders of personality included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; APA, ). However, an advantage of the FFM relative to the DSM-IV-TR is that the former was developed to provide a reasonably comprehensive description of general personality structure. Rather than suggest that the FFM is inadequate because the DSM-IV-TR lacks much representation of Openness, it might be just as reasonable to suggest that the DSM-IV-TR is inadequate because it lacks an adequate representation of maladaptive variants of both high and low Openness. This article discusses the development and validation of a measure of these maladaptive variants, the Experiential Permeability Inventory.

  8. Power quality in high-tech campus: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Munoz, A.; Redel, M.; Gonzalez, M. [Universidad de Cordoba (Spain). Departamento de Electrotecnia y Electronica

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from a power-quality audit conducted at a high-tech campus over the last year. Voltage and current were measured at various R and D buildings; it was found that the main problems for the equipment installed were voltage sags and surges. The paper examines the causes and effects of power disturbances that affect computer or any other microprocessor-based equipment and analyses the auto-protection capabilities of modern power supplies. The convenience of 'enhanced power supply' or 'low-cost customer-side' protection solutions is also discussed. Finally, it addresses the role of the standards on the protection of electronic equipment and the implications for the final customer. (author)

  9. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiki Nagaharu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment.

  10. A case of quinsy following high-pressure water jet injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, C; Oosthuizen, J C; O'Dwyer, T

    2014-06-01

    High-pressure water injuries of the oropharynx are uncommon but can cause significant injury and airway compromise when they occur. A small number of cases of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx have been presented in the literature, detailing a range of effects and outcomes. We describe the first reported case of high-pressure water injury of the oropharynx associated with peritonsillar abscess (quinsy) requiring surgical drainage.

  11. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Liang [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Department of Urology, Civil Aviation General Hospital/Civil Aviation Medical College of Peking University, Beijing 100123 (China); Li, Mingyang [Department of Gastroenterology, Nan Lou Division, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Feng, Fan [Department of Pharmacy, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Yutao [Beijing Institute for Neuroscience, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Hang, Xingyi [National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Cui, Jiajun, E-mail: cuijn@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Cancer and Cell Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Gao, Jiangping, E-mail: jpgao@163.com [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  12. Excess Ar-40 in the Zagami Shergottite: Does It Reveal Crystallization History?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    The Zagami basaltic shergottite has fine- and coarse-grained (FG & CG) areas, which may reflect partial crystallization in a deep, slowly cooled magma chamber to form Mg-rich pyroxene cores, followed by entrainment of these crystals into a magma that rose and crystallized near the surface. Late-stage melt pockets formed mesostasis and feldspar (maskelynite) having a range of compositions, but low water abundance. Higher I(sub Sr) in the FG portion may result from the second stage having incorporated old crustal rocks that failed to reach isotopic equilibrium. Zagami, like other shergottites, contains excess Ar-40(sub xs) beyond that expected from internal decay of K-40 during its Sm-Nd age of 177 Myr. We suggest that at least a portion of this Ar-40(sub xs) in Zagami and some other shergottites was inherited from the magma, much as is the case of MORBs on Earth. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 age determinations on feldspar and pyroxene separates from both the FG and CG portions of Zagami. If Zagami experienced an evolving fractional crystallization history, including possible crustal contamination of the magma, that might be indicated in differing amounts of Ar-40(sub xs) between mineral phases and between FG and CG portions.

  13. A Fault Diagnosis Approach for Gears Based on IMF AR Model and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An accurate autoregressive (AR model can reflect the characteristics of a dynamic system based on which the fault feature of gear vibration signal can be extracted without constructing mathematical model and studying the fault mechanism of gear vibration system, which are experienced by the time-frequency analysis methods. However, AR model can only be applied to stationary signals, while the gear fault vibration signals usually present nonstationary characteristics. Therefore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD, which can decompose the vibration signal into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs, is introduced into feature extraction of gear vibration signals as a preprocessor before AR models are generated. On the other hand, by targeting the difficulties of obtaining sufficient fault samples in practice, support vector machine (SVM is introduced into gear fault pattern recognition. In the proposed method in this paper, firstly, vibration signals are decomposed into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions, then the AR model of each IMF component is established; finally, the corresponding autoregressive parameters and the variance of remnant are regarded as the fault characteristic vectors and used as input parameters of SVM classifier to classify the working condition of gears. The experimental analysis results show that the proposed approach, in which IMF AR model and SVM are combined, can identify working condition of gears with a success rate of 100% even in the case of smaller number of samples.

  14. AR Feels "Softer" than VR: Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Augmented versus Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffary, Yoren; Le Gouis, Benoit; Marchal, Maud; Argelaguet, Ferran; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lecuyer, Anatole

    2017-11-01

    Does it feel the same when you touch an object in Augmented Reality (AR) or in Virtual Reality (VR)? In this paper we study and compare the haptic perception of stiffness of a virtual object in two situations: (1) a purely virtual environment versus (2) a real and augmented environment. We have designed an experimental setup based on a Microsoft HoloLens and a haptic force-feedback device, enabling to press a virtual piston, and compare its stiffness successively in either Augmented Reality (the virtual piston is surrounded by several real objects all located inside a cardboard box) or in Virtual Reality (the same virtual piston is displayed in a fully virtual scene composed of the same other objects). We have conducted a psychophysical experiment with 12 participants. Our results show a surprising bias in perception between the two conditions. The virtual piston is on average perceived stiffer in the VR condition compared to the AR condition. For instance, when the piston had the same stiffness in AR and VR, participants would select the VR piston as the stiffer one in 60% of cases. This suggests a psychological effect as if objects in AR would feel "softer" than in pure VR. Taken together, our results open new perspectives on perception in AR versus VR, and pave the way to future studies aiming at characterizing potential perceptual biases.

  15. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Schweizer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types.

  16. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, Michael; Stunitz, Holger; Bourgiex, Anne-Lise; Lee, John P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of deformation on radiogenic argon (40Ar*) retentivity in mica are described from high pressure experiments performed on rock samples of peraluminous granite containing euhedral muscovite and biotite. Cylindrical cores, ~15 mm in length and 6.25 mm in diameter, were drilled from granite collected from the South Armorican Massif in northwestern France, loaded into gold capsules, and weld-sealed in the presence of excess water. The samples were deformed at a pressure of 10 kb and a temperature of 600 degrees C over a period 29 of hours within a solid medium assembly in a Griggs-type triaxial hydraulic deformation apparatus. Overall shortening in the experiments was approximately 10%. Transmitted light and secondary and backscattered electron imaging of the deformed granite samples reveals evidence of induced defects and for significant physical grain size reduction by kinking, cracking, and grain segmentation of the micas.

  17. Cadomian vs. Variscan evolution of the Ossa-Morena zone (SW Iberia): field and 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral age constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, R. D.; Quesada, C.

    1992-12-01

    . 390-400 Ma) rejuvenation of intracrystalline argon systems which had initially recorded ages > c. 500 Ma. Muscovite was concentrated from several lithologie elements in this area, including: (1) mylonitic Monesterio Granodiorite; (2) metasedimentary rocks of the Montemolin succession (displaying high-grade, sillimanite-potassium feldspar-bearing assemblages); and (3) migmatitic schist of the Siere Negra Group. These muscovite concentrates display similarly discordant 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra which suggest significant but incomplete Variscan rejuvenation occurred at c. 400 Ma. This appears to have affected intracrystalline argon systems which had initially cooled through appropriate closure temperatures sometime prior to c. 450 Ma following an initial high-grade (Cadomian?) metamorphism. The 40Ar/ 39Ar results clearly reflect a variable, complex, and polymetamorphic evolution for the Ossa-Morena zone. Internal consistency of data within each regional tectonic unit compared with marked contrast between the units provides evidence of the extremely heterogeneous Variscan tectonothermal overprint. The results demonstrate that the present tectonic architecture of the Ossa-Morena Zone was not solely the result of late Variscan wrench tectonics, but, instead, a consequence of processes active since at least the Lower-Middle Devonian. Juxtaposition of regional structural units with contrasting tectonothermal histories, and recording variable rates and extents of uplift are consistent with maintainence of an overall transpressional Variscan tectonic regime.

  18. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Noelle C; Stutz, Sonja J; Fink, Latham H L; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-07-15

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity.

  19. Enseñar a ser

    OpenAIRE

    García Barreno, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    El «Informe Delors», cuyo texto fue presentado hace ahora diez años, señala que cualquier proyecto educativo para el siglo XXI debe contemplar dos acciones. «Enseñar a conocer, a hacer, a vivir juntos, a ser», y garantizar el acceso de todos a ello. El siglo que concluyó apenas media docena de años, ha estado cargado de inmensas paradojas: entre grandes males, extraordinarios logros y no pocas esperanzas inalcanzadas. Marcado por dos guerras mundiales, po...

  20. AR Alternative Splicing and Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    evolutionary origin and sequence divergence, with relative ages (oldest to youngest) L1M1 > L1MA3 > L1PB2 > L1PREC2 > L1PA7 > L1PA5 (41, 42). Figure...variant of the human AR, which was originally identified via 5 0 rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) with RNA isolated from human placenta tissue...prerequisite for tran- scriptional activation. However, this theory has not been rigor- ously tested. Therefore, we transfected cells with diverse trun

  1. RISR Observations of High Ion Temperatures: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, H.; Semeter, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Incoherent scatter radars (ISRs) measure the frequency spectrum of the scattered signal from random thermal fluctuations in the ionospheric plasma. Once fitted to a theoretical model, the shape of the spectrum provides estimates to a number of plasma parameters including the ion temperature. The theoretical models of the frequency spectrum of the scattered signal have been often developed based on a set of assumptions on the state of the plasma. One of the most common assumptions is that the plasma is in thermal equilibrium consisting of electron and ion populations that can be described by Maxwellian distributions. Such an assumption, however, is commonly violated at high latitudes where the interactions between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere result in a very dynamic plasma environment. One example of such violations occurs on the edge of auroral arcs when the presence of strong electric fields (Joule heating and investigate the possible role of ISR misfitting (caused by deviation of the ion distribution from Maxwellian) in over estimating the ion temperature.

  2. High efficient ZnO nanowalnuts photocatalyst: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Feng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157011 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China); Zhang, Siwen; Liu, Yang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China); Liu, Hongfeng [School of Basic Medical Sciences, Mudanjiang Medical University, Mudanjiang 157011 (China); Qu, Fengyu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China); Cai, Xue, E-mail: xuecai@mail.sdu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157011 (China); Wu, Xiang, E-mail: wuxiang@hrbnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Normal University, Harbin 150025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. • Morphologies and microstructures of the as-obtained ZnO products were investigated. • The photocatalytic results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. - Abstract: Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are successfully synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The photocatalytic properties of ZnO nanowalnuts are investigated by photodegradating several organic dyes, such as Congo red (CR), methyl orange (MO) and eosin red aqueous solutions under UV irradiation, respectively. The results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. In addition, eosin red and Congo red (CR) aqueous solution degradation experiments are also conducted in the same condition, respectively. It showed that ZnO nanowalnuts represent high photocatalytic activities with a degradation efficiency of 87% for CR with 115 min of irradiation and 97% for eosin red with 55 min of irradiation. The reported ZnO products may be promising candidates as the photocatalysts in waste water treatment.

  3. Asiakastyytyväisyysmittaus : Case Skafferiet ar Ritz

    OpenAIRE

    Pellikka, Jenna

    2010-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni käsittelee Vaasassa sijaitsevan kulttuurinäyttämö/kahvilabaari Ritzin asiakastyytyväisyyttä. Skafferiet r.y. aloitti toimintansa entisen elokuvateatteri Ritzin tiloissa syyskuussa 2008. Tutkimuksen tavoitteena on selvittää, mikä on tämän hetkisten asiakkaiden tyytyväisyyden taso Skafferiet r.y:n toimintasta. Teoriaosassa esittelen tutkimukselleni olennaisia teorioita. Nämä teoriat liittyvät seuraaviin aihepiireihin: palvelun ja suhteiden laatu, asiakastyytyväisyys, segmentointi...

  4. Asiakastyytyväisyysmittaus : Case Skafferiet ar Ritz

    OpenAIRE

    Pellikka, Jenna

    2010-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni käsittelee Vaasassa sijaitsevan kulttuurinäyttämö/kahvilabaari Ritzin asiakastyytyväisyyttä. Skafferiet r.y. aloitti toimintansa entisen elokuvateatteri Ritzin tiloissa syyskuussa 2008. Tutkimuksen tavoitteena on selvittää, mikä on tämän hetkisten asiakkaiden tyytyväisyyden taso Skafferiet r.y:n toimintasta. Teoriaosassa esittelen tutkimukselleni olennaisia teorioita. Nämä teoriat liittyvät seuraaviin aihepiireihin: palvelun ja suhteiden laatu, asiakastyytyväisyys, segmentointi...

  5. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of high-P/T and low-P/T metamorphic rocks in the Tia Complex, southern New England Fold Belt, eastern Australia: Insights from K-Ar chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shiro; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Watanabe, Teruo; Itaya, Tetsumaru

    2012-10-01

    The Tia Complex in the southern New England Fold Belt is a poly-metamorphosed Late Paleozoic accretionary complex. It consists mainly of high-P/low-T type pumpellyite-actinolite facies (rare blueschist facies) schists, phyllite and serpentinite (T = 300 °C and P = 5 kbar), and low-P/high-T type amphibolite facies schist and gneiss (T = 600 °C and P high-Mg andesite and adakite might explain formation of S-type granitoids (Hillgrove suite) and coeval low-P/high-T type metamorphism in the Tia Complex.

  6. Constraints on the thermal history of the Blue Ridge in northernmost Virginia: [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age dating results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunk, M.J.; Lyttle, P.T.; Schindler, S.J.; Burton, W.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

    1993-03-01

    [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age dating techniques have been used to analyze hornblende, phlogopite, white mica, biotite, and K-feldspar mineral separates from Middle and Late Proterozoic crystalline basement and from Late Proterozoic-Early Cambrian cover rocks in the Blue Ridge anticlinorium. Regionally, both cover and basement rocks contain a variably developed overprint fabric, the Blue Ridge-South Mountain cleavage, commonly defined by white mica. Petrographic analysis indicates a maximum metamorphic overprint of lower greenschist facies that locally produces biotite. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age spectra of hornblende from crystalline basement units suggest ages ranging from about 1 Ga to about 920 Ma. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar age spectra of most cleavage-defining white mica are sigmoidal in shape suggesting the presence of multiple generations of white mica, the last of which probably grew below the blocking temperature for retention of argon in muscovite ([approximately]350 C). Interpretation of these complex spectra suggest that most of the cleavage-defining white mica may have formed below [approximately]350 C during the Late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. However, these complex age spectra, together with age spectra from cleavage-defining phlogopite from a marble in the Fauquier Formation and biotite in the Late Proterozoic Robertson River Igneous Suite suggest the existence of an earlier episode of white mica growth of Middle Paleozoic age that has not been thermally reset or totally recrystallized. High temperature release steps can be interpreted to represent times of cooling through closure during the Middle Paleozoic. Low-temperature steps of these same age spectra suggest final closure or partial resetting of the samples at about 200 Ma or less and are interpreted to represent the effects of Mesozoic rifting.

  7. Contribution of the 40Ar/39Ar method to improve Middle-Pleistocene archaeological/palaeontological sites from the Italian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomade, Sebastien, ,, Dr.; Pereira, MSc. Alison; voinchet, Pierre, ,, Dr.; Bahain, Jean-Jacques, ,, Dr.; Aureli, Daniele, ,, Dr.; Arzarello, Marta, ,, Dr.; Anzidei, Anna-Paola, ,, Dr.; Biddittu, Italo, ,, Dr.; Bulgarelli, Maria-Grazia, ,, Dr.; Falguères, Christophe, ,, Dr.; Giaccio, Biagio, ,, Dr.; Guillou, Hervé, ,, Dr.; Manzi, Gorgio, ,, Dr.; Moncel, Marie-Hélène, ,, Dr.; Nicoud, Elisa, ,, Dr.; Pagli, Maria, ,, Dr.; Parenti, Fabio, ,, Dr.; Peretto, Carlo, ,, Dr.; Piperno, Marcello, ,, Dr.; Rocca, Roxane, ,, Dr.

    2017-04-01

    European Middle-Pleistocene archaeological and/or paleontological sites lack a unified and precise chronological framework. Despite recent efforts mostly focused on methods such as OSL, ESR/U-series or cosmogenic nuclides, the age of numerous sites from this period fundamentally still relies on qualitative and speculative palaeoenvironmental and/or palaeontological/palaeoanthropological considerations. The lack of robust chronologies, along with the scarcity of human fossils, prevent coherent correlations between European sites which in turn limits our understanding of human diffusion dynamics, understand techno-cultural evolution or correlate archaeological sites with palaeoclimatic and environmental records. With the goal of providing an accurate and precise chronological framework based on a multi-method approach, a research network including geochronologists, archaeologist and paleoanthropologists from various French and Italian institutions launched in 2010 a wide study of Middle-Pleistocene archaeological sites of central and southern Italy. This study combining the 39Ar/40Ar method with palaeo-dosimetric methods applied to European sites in the age range of 700 ka to 300 ka is unprecedented. In parallel, a large effort has been done to improve the regional Middle-Pleistocene tephrostratigraphic database through a massive application of both high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronological and geochemical investigations. We illustrate our approach and results in addressing several key-sites such as Notarchirico, Valle Giumentina; Ceprano-Campogrande and La Polledrara di Cecanibbio. The accurate and precise chronological framework we built permits us to replace all the investigated archaeological and palaeontological records into a coherent climatic and environmental context. Furthermore, our work provides the opportunity to compare lithic industries from a technical and evolutionary point of view within a homogeneous temporal frame. These preliminary results border

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense Strain CDB2, a Highly Efficient Arsenate-Resistant Soil Bacterium from Arsenic-Contaminated Cattle Dip Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiren; Yu, Xuefei; Zhang, Ren

    2013-04-18

    We report the 4.97-Mb draft genome sequence of a highly efficient arsenate-resistant bacterium, Ochrobactrum sp. strain CDB2. It contains a novel arsenic resistance (ars) operon (arsR-arsC1-ACR3-arsC2-arsH-mfs) and two non-operon-associated ars genes, arsC3 and arsB. The genome information will aid in the understanding of the arsenic resistance mechanism of this and other bacterial species.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense Strain CDB2, a Highly Efficient Arsenate-Resistant Soil Bacterium from Arsenic-Contaminated Cattle Dip Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yiren; Yu, Xuefei; Zhang, Ren

    2013-01-01

    We report the 4.97-Mb draft genome sequence of a highly efficient arsenate-resistant bacterium, Ochrobactrum sp. strain CDB2. It contains a novel arsenic resistance (ars) operon (arsR-arsC1-ACR3-arsC2-arsH-mfs) and two non-operon-associated ars genes, arsC3 and arsB. The genome information will aid in the understanding of the arsenic resistance mechanism of this and other bacterial species.

  10. Potash-rich volcanic rocks and lamprophyres in western Shandong Province: 40Ar39Ar dating and source tracing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Highly precise 40Ar39Ar dating results demonstrate that the ages of potash-rich volcanic rocks in western Shandong Province are 114.7-124.3 Ma, and that of the lamprophyres is 119.6 Ma. The potash-rich volcanic rocks have relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios ( 0.708715-0.711418)and distinctly negative εNd values ( -11.47 - -17.54), and are enriched in radiogenic lead (206Pb/204pb=17.341-17.622,207pb/204Pb=15.525-15.538, 208Pb/204pb = 37.563-37.684).Similarly, the lamprophyres also have quite low εNd values ( -11.57 - -19.64). Based on the fact that the Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of potash-rich volcanic rocks are very consistent with that of the clinopyroxene separates, and by integrating comprehensive analyses of their tectonic settings,and extensive comparisons of the Sr, Nd isotopic compositions with that of the related simultaneous rocks, it is concluded that the potash-rich volcanic rocks and lamprophyres in western Shandong Province were most possibly derived from the partial melting of enriched mantle which was caused by source contamination and metasomatism of subducted continental crustal materials.``

  11. Analysis of surface modifications on graphite induced by slow highly charged ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hida, A. E-mail: hida@postman.riken.go.jp; Meguro, T.; Maeda, K.; Aoyagi, Y

    2003-05-01

    Modifications of the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces induced by the single impacts of slow Ar{sup +} and Ar{sup 8+} were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The difference in the irradiation-induced disorder between Ar{sup +} and Ar{sup 8+} was clearly revealed by comparing two kinds of changes in Raman features against ion fluences: one is the peak intensity ratio of the disorder-induced peak with respect to the E{sub 2g}-mode peak in the first-order Raman spectra, and the other is the full width at half maximum of the E{sub 2g}-mode peak. Judging from the peculiar dependence of them on the fluence of Ar{sup 8+}, it was assumed that the defects introduced by Ar{sup 8+} impacts is not simple vacancies as is the case of Ar{sup +} impacts but vacancy clusters. The formation mechanism of vacancy clusters under Ar{sup 8+} irradiation was also discussed from the change in the second-order Raman spectra.

  12. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity.

  13. Case modifying of high-speed cutting database based on CSP and similarity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kejun XIANG; Zhanqiang LIU; Xing AI

    2009-01-01

    By analyzing the reasoning of a high-speed cutting database system, a case modifying method is put forward. According to the variables' difference of the solution part in a case, a constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) and similarity calculation are used to modify a case. The constraint relationship of discrete variables is described by establishing a rule knowledge base. The algorithm of CSP is used to solve the discrete variable constraint problem. On the basis of the high-speed cutting theory, a similarity calculation formula is deduced to calculate the consecutive variables. The CSP and similarity calculation are applied to case modifying, which is possible to automatically modify cases in the high-speed cutting database system.

  14. Molecule emission from condensed Ar and O2 targets by 750 eV Ne impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Christian; Pedrys, Roman; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-06-01

    The sputtering of a condensed Ar and a condensed O2 solid by 750 eV Ne+ ions is studied both by experiment and by molecular dynamics simulation. We focus on the emission of Ar2 dimers and O2 molecules. The translational energy distribution of ejected O2 molecules follows a high-energy fall-off ∼E-2 characteristic of collision-cascade ejection. Here simulation and experiment are in close agreement. The Ar2 translational energy distribution shows a steeper fall-off ∼En at high emission energies E with n ∼ 4 ; it is interpreted to be due to the so-called recombination mechanism of dimer formation. These interpretations are corroborated by an analysis of the distance-of-origin of the emitted species. The role of three-body collisions on the Ar2 emission is discussed. A comparison of experimental and simulated energy distributions of sputtered Ar atoms and dimers allows us to identify a contribution of electronic sputtering of these species.

  15. Job Stress, Gene Polymorphism of β2-AR, and Prevalence of Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN-FA YU; WEN-HUI ZHOU; KAI-YOU JIANG; GUI-ZHENG GU; SHENG WANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the interactive effect of job stress and genetic susceptibility (or gene polymorphism) on hypertension. Methods A cross-sectional epidemioiogical study was conducted in 452 workers from a thermal power plant in China. Extrinsic effort, occupational reward, and over-commitment were measured. Hypertensive patients were defined by three phases of screening, reexamination, and final diagnosis. β2-AR genotypes and allele frequencies at amino acid positions 16 (β2-AR-16:Arg→Gly) and 27(β2-AR-27:Gln→Glu) were identified by PCR-RFLP. Results Job stress was related with the prevalence of hypertension in males (P0.05). Differences in genotypes and allele frequencies of the β2-AR-16 were statistically significant between the hypertension and control groups (P0.05). The prevalence of hypertension was higher in individuals carrying Gly16 allele than in those carrying Arg16 allele of the high job stress group (P<0.01 or 0.05). Conclusion High job stress and polymorphism of β2-AR-16 have an interactive effect on the prevalence of hypertension in male workers.

  16. Behavior of argon gas release from manganese oxide minerals as revealed by 40Ar/39Ar laser incremental heating analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Manganese oxides in association with paleo- weathering may provide significant insights into the multiple factors affecting the formation and evolution of weathering profiles, such as temperature, precipitation, and biodiversity. Laser probe step-heating analysis of supergene hollandite and cryptomelane samples collected from central Queensland, Australia, yield well-defined plateaus andconsistent isochron ages, confirming the feasibility dating very-fined supergene manganese oxides by 40Ar/39Ar technique. Two distinct structural sites hostingAr isotopes can be identified in light of their degassing behaviors obtained byincremental heating analyses. The first site, releasing its gas fraction at thelaser power 0.2-0.4 W, yields primarily 40Aratm, 38Aratm, and 36Aratm (atmospheric Ar isotopes). The second sites yield predominantly 40Ar* (radiogenic 40Ar),39ArK, and 38ArK (nucleogenic components), at ~0.5-1.0 W. There is no significant Ar gas released at the laser power higher than 1.0 W, indicating the breakdown of the tunnel sites hosting the radiogenic and nucleogenic components. The excellent match between the degassing behaviors of 40Ar*, 39ArK, and 38ArK suggests that these isotopes occupy the same crystallographic sites and that 39ArK lossfrom the tunnel site by recoil during neutron irradiation and/or bake-out procedure preceding isotopic analysis does not occur. Present investigation supports that neither the overwhelming atmospheric 40Ar nor the very-fined nature of the supergene manganese oxides poses problems in extracting meaningful weathering geochronological information by analyzing supergene manganese oxides minerals.

  17. Development of High-speed Machining Database with Case-based Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Applying high-speed machining technology in shop floor has many benefits, such as manufacturing more accurate parts with better surface finishes. The selection of the appropriate machining parameters plays a very important role in the implementation of high-speed machining technology. The case-based reasoning is used in the developing of high-speed machining database to overcome the shortage of available high-speed cutting parameters in machining data handbooks and shop floors. The high-speed machining data...

  18. Case Study: Fort Mill High School--A Culture of Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This is the latest in a series of case studies highlighting best practices High Schools That Work (HSTW) network schools and districts are implementing to prepare students better for further studies and careers. Fort Mill High School is in Fort Mill, South Carolina, an outlying suburb of Charlotte, North Carolina. Fort Mill links high quality…

  19. Identification of an AR mutation-negative class of androgen insensitivity by determining endogenous AR activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornig, N.C.; Ukat, M.; H.U. Schweikert (H.); O. Hiort (Olaf); Werner, R.; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); M.L. Cools (Martine); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); L. Audí (Laura); S.F. Ahmed (S. Faisal); Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A.E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; T. Reinehr (Thomas); Hadidi, A.T.; Eckstein, A.K.; Van Der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; R. Siebert (Reiner); O. Ammerpohl (Ole); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Only approximately 85%of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30%with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study

  20. Discordant K-Ar and young exposure dates for the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, P. M.; Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P.; Ming, D.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Rice, Melissa S.

    2016-10-01

    K-Ar and noble gas surface exposure age measurements were carried out on the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley region, Gale Crater, Mars, by using the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument on the Curiosity rover. The sandstone is unusually rich in sanidine, as determined by CheMin X-ray diffraction, contributing to the high K2O concentration of 3.09 ± 0.20 wt % measured by Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer analysis. A sandstone aliquot heated to 915°C yielded a K-Ar age of 627 ± 50 Ma. Reheating this aliquot yielded no additional Ar. A second aliquot heated in the same way yielded a much higher K-Ar age of 1710 ± 110 Ma. These data suggest incomplete Ar extraction from a rock with a K-Ar age older than 1710 Ma. Incomplete extraction at 900°C is not surprising for a rock with a large fraction of K carried by Ar-retentive K-feldspar. Likely, variability in the exact temperature achieved by the sample from run to run, uncertainties in sample mass estimation, and possible mineral fractionation during transport and storage prior to analysis may contribute to these discrepant data. Cosmic ray exposure ages from 3He and 21Ne in the two aliquots are minimum values given the possibility of incomplete extraction. However, the general similarity between the 3He (57 ± 49 and 18 ± 32 Ma, mean 30 Ma) and 21Ne (2 ± 32 and 83 ± 24 Ma, mean 54 Ma) exposure ages provides no evidence for underextraction. The implied erosion rate at the Kimberley location is similar to that reported at the nearby Yellowknife Bay outcrop.

  1. High grade angiosarcoma fifteen years after breast conservation therapy with radiation therapy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Boyan, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Secondary breast angiosarcoma diagnosis requires frequent follow ups and a high index of suspicion. With mastectomy giving the best chance of treatment in these cases, early detection is crucial in this rare sequela.

  2. A Framework to Improve Surgeon Communication in High-Stakes Surgical Decisions: Best Case/Worst Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lauren J; Nabozny, Michael J; Steffens, Nicole M; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Brasel, Karen J; Johnson, Sara K; Zelenski, Amy; Rathouz, Paul J; Zhao, Qianqian; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Campbell, Toby C; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2017-06-01

    Although many older adults prefer to avoid burdensome interventions with limited ability to preserve their functional status, aggressive treatments, including surgery, are common near the end of life. Shared decision making is critical to achieve value-concordant treatment decisions and minimize unwanted care. However, communication in the acute inpatient setting is challenging. To evaluate the proof of concept of an intervention to teach surgeons to use the Best Case/Worst Case framework as a strategy to change surgeon communication and promote shared decision making during high-stakes surgical decisions. Our prospective pre-post study was conducted from June 2014 to August 2015, and data were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. The data were drawn from decision-making conversations between 32 older inpatients with an acute nonemergent surgical problem, 30 family members, and 25 surgeons at 1 tertiary care hospital in Madison, Wisconsin. A 2-hour training session to teach each study-enrolled surgeon to use the Best Case/Worst Case communication framework. We scored conversation transcripts using OPTION 5, an observer measure of shared decision making, and used qualitative content analysis to characterize patterns in conversation structure, description of outcomes, and deliberation over treatment alternatives. The study participants were patients aged 68 to 95 years (n = 32), 44% of whom had 5 or more comorbid conditions; family members of patients (n = 30); and surgeons (n = 17). The median OPTION 5 score improved from 41 preintervention (interquartile range, 26-66) to 74 after Best Case/Worst Case training (interquartile range, 60-81). Before training, surgeons described the patient's problem in conjunction with an operative solution, directed deliberation over options, listed discrete procedural risks, and did not integrate preferences into a treatment recommendation. After training, surgeons using Best Case/Worst Case clearly presented a choice between

  3. 40Ar/39Ar Ages for the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field, Southwestern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, S. R.; Greeley, R.; Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Sentinel Plains lava field and proximate small (history as well as the timing of the ancient Gila River interactions that led to the development of the Painted Rock transverse drainage. The absolute timing was determined in order datermine causal relationships with local tectonism. The SAVF basal contact is ~30 m above the Holocene surface where exposed along the current river channel; and the lavas show similar amounts mantling by aeolian dust, development of pedogenic calcium carbonate, and subsequent incision by radial ephemeral drainages. Relative timing of eruptive events was determined by stratigraphic and embayment relationships. Continuity of distal flows exposed in cross-sections to their source vents could be established using field work, and confirmed using geomagnetic secular variation and geochemical analyses. Edifices generally corresponded to discreet geomagnetic inclination, declination, and paleointensity values. Older eruptive events exhibited normal polarity, while stratigraphically younger events exhibited reversed polarity. Most lavas were alkali olivine basalt with a range of unnormalized SiO2 weight percentages ranging from 47.16-51.48. Geochronology using 40Ar/39Ar method revealed an age of 1.94 +/- 0.85 Ma for Painted Rock Low Shield (New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory), 1.64 +/- 0.14 Ma for Theba Low Shield (Rutgers University) and 1.24 +/- 0.040 Ma for Wild Horse Low Shield (Rutgers University). Some ages were precise enough to correspond to the Matuyama reversed polarity epoch, with SAVF initiation possibly within the Olduvai normal polarity event. These dates represent an overall improvement in precision and accuracy over previous dates (values corresponding to 6.20 Ma to 1.28 Ma) collected in the late 1970s and early 1980s using K-Ar technique. The 40Ar/39Ar ages correspond to expected magnetic polarities and stratigraphic sequences.

  4. Teachers Motivation in Senior High Schools in Ghana: A Case of Ghana Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingful, Stephen; Nusenu, Angela Abena

    2015-01-01

    Motivation involves both extrinsic and intrinsic types. One must intrinsically be motivated before accepting a new challenges followed by intrinsic motivation for best achievement. In this study, the researcher used census sampling technique whereby all 85 respondents were used for the case study as a result of the fairly small total population of…

  5. Investigation of Deep Ocean Circulation and Mixing Using Ar-39 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smethie, W. M.; Schlosser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Ar-39 is a radioactive noble gas that forms in the atmosphere by cosmic ray interaction with Ar-40. It has a half-life of 269 years and its production rate in the atmosphere has varied no more than 7% during the past 1000 years. It enters the surface ocean with an average equilibration time of about one month and thus the entire surface ocean, except for ice covered regions at high latitudes, is in quasi-equilibrium with the atmospheric Ar-39:Ar ratio. The well known input to the ocean, radioactive decay constant and chemical inertness make Ar-39 an ideal tracer of circulation and mixing in the deep ocean, where anthropogenic transient tracers such as CFCs and tritium have not yet penetrated. However, due to the difficult measurement, only about 125 oceanic Ar-39 samples have been measured to date. This was done by counting the decays of Ar-39 atoms and required a half liter of argon gas per sample, extracted from about 1500 liters of water. The 125 samples that have been measured provide a glimpse of the information that can be gained from Ar-39 observations. In the Pacific Ocean three vertical profiles show a decrease in Ar-39 from the surface mixed layer through the thermocline to a minimum at intermediate depths and an increase from there to the bottom. This reflects formation of bottom water around the Antarctic continent, spreading of this water northward and upwelling and mixing into intermediate depths. The lowest concentration was 6×4% modern which is equivalent to a 900-1600 year isolation time from the surface. In the Atlantic Ocean newly formed North Atlantic Deep Water has an Ar-39 concentration of about 85% modern compared to 55% modern for newly formed Antarctic Bottom Water and reach values as low as about 40% modern in the interior reflecting the more rapid ventilation of the deep Atlantic Ocean relative to the deep Pacific Ocean. In the Arctic Ocean the mean residence time of deep water in the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov Basins based on Ar-39

  6. Geology, geochemistry and Ar Ar geochronology of the Nangimali ruby deposit, Nanga Parbat Himalaya (Azad Kashmir, Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pêcher, A.; Giuliani, G.; Garnier, V.; Maluski, H.; Kausar, A. B.; Malik, R. H.; Muntaz, H. R.

    2002-12-01

    The Nangimali ruby deposit in the southern part of the Nanga Parbat Himalaya, has been investigated through field work, geochemistry, stable and radiogenic isotopes. It outcrops in the Shontar valley in a large north-vergent syncline consisting of high-grade metamorphic gneisses capped by a metasedimentary series dominated by marbles and amphibolites. The ore-body is stratiform. Ruby is found within 0.1-2 cm thick shear-veinlets and gash veins cutting dolomitic marbles and carbonate-bearing bands. The marbles of the Nangimali Formation display restricted ranges in δ18O (from 23.6 to 27.6‰ relative to SMOW) and in δ13C (from -1.9 to 2.6‰ relative to PDB). Fluid infiltration along the shear-zone in the marble has no effect on the isotopic signatures of the carbonates. Fluids are metamorphic and CO 2 is derived from the decarbonation of marbles. Mass-balance and geochemical analyses suggest that the mobilisation by the fluids of aluminium and chromium in the marbles is sufficient to enable the formation of ruby in the shear-zone. Rubies have been indirectly dated using a stepwise 40Ar- 39Ar laser heating technique on syngenetic phlogopites. The Miocene age records a Neogene cooling in the South of the Nanga Parbat massif and a minimum formation age for ruby of 16 Ma.

  7. Amplification of 126 nm femtosecond seed pulses in optical-field-induced Ar plasma filamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Deshimaru, Naoyuki; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    We have observed amplification of femtosecond (fs) VUV coherent seed beam at 126 nm by utilizing an optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) high-pressure Ar plasma filamentation. We have produced a low-temperature and high-density Ar plasma filamentation inside a high-pressure Ar cell by irradiating a high-intensity laser with an intensity of approximately 1014 W cm-2. Argon excimer molecules (Ar2*) as an amplifier medium were produced inside the high-pressure cell and were used to amplify a weak VUV ultrashort seed pulse at 126 nm, which was generated by harmonic generation of another short pulse infrared laser at 882 nm. We have measured the amplification characteristics and the OFI plasma diagnosis by utilizing the fs VUV pulses at 126 and 882 nm, respectively. The maximum optical gain value of 1.1 cm-1 was observed. Temporal behaviors of the plasma temperature and density in the nano-second time scale indicated a high-density and low-temperature plasma produced by using the OFI. These plasma behaviors were utilized to reproduce the optical amplification characteristics with our OFI excimer simulation code.

  8. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT. However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  9. Determination of air kerma standard of high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source; Determinacao da taxa de kerma no ar de referencia para {sup 192}Ir de alta taxa de dose para braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, E.J.; Alves, C.F.E.; Leite, S.P.; Magalhaes, L.A.G.; David, M.G.; Almeida, C.E. de, E-mail: cfealves@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Di Prinzio, R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the methodology developed by the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas and presently in use for determining of the air kerma standard of {sup 192}Ir high dose rate sources to calibrate well-type chambers. Uncertainty analysis involving the measurements procedure are presented. (author)

  10. A method for intercalibration of U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages in the Phanerozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Mike; Sandeman, Hamish A.; Davis, William J.

    2000-12-01

    The increasing analytical precision of 40Ar- 39Ar geochronological data and its use in studies that combine U-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar data has necessitated derivation of a means to intercalibrate ages between the two isotopic systems. The primary determinants inhibiting accurate cross calibration are uncertainty in decay constant values and uncertainty in 40Ar∗/ 40K (usually presented as apparent age) for 40Ar- 39Ar standards, notably those derived from the Fish Canyon Tuff. By utilizing a monazite- and biotite bearing Oligocene ash flow tuff (MAC-83) as the primary standard material, precise U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages can be derived. Because both isotopic systems should reflect closure during the instantaneous eruption event, the 24.21 ± 0.10 Ma 207Pb/ 235U age should match the age resulting from 40Ar- 39Ar biotite analysis. This forced equivalence will partly offset the effects of decay constant uncertainty. Furthermore, by co-irradiating Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine with MAC-83 biotite, the apparent age for Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine is back-calculated to 27.98 ± 0.15 Ma, relative to the MAC-83 207Pb/ 235U age. Hence, intercalibration between the two isotopic systems in a relative sense can be accomplished, allowing for a direct and valid comparison of ages. It is also shown that forcing equivalence of the two isotopic systems minimizes the effect of decay constant uncertainty for samples of Phanerozoic age.

  11. Identification and analysis of ARS function of six plant MARs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; YANG Yutao; ZHANG Kewei; ZHENG Chengchao

    2004-01-01

    Six plant MARs isolated from tobacco and Arabdiposis were investigated for their ARS activity in yeast.The results showed that among the six plant MARs, only TM1 and AM4 had strong ARS activity which was almost the same as that of ARS from yeast chromosome. In order to further identify the core region of the two MARs for the ARS activity, a series of subclones were created by PCR strategy,and the corresponding subclones were designated as TM1-1,TM1-2, TM1-3, AM4-1, AM4-2 and AM4-3, respectively. Our studies revealed that TM1-3 and AM4-3 not only had higher ARS activity, but also displayed higher transformation frequency, plasmid stability and growth rate compared to their intact MARs, TM1 and AM4. These data present an important clue for further elucidating the relationship between MAR and ARS.

  12. Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring 37Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, A.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Haas, D. A.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; Humble, P. H.; Keillor, M. E.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electro-chemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with 14C/3H, age-dating of groundwater with 39Ar, and soil-gas assay for 37Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of 37Ar samples over a broad range of proportional counter operating pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for 37Ar soil gas background studies.

  13. Development of a Control and Vision Interface for an AR.Drone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AR.Drone is a remote controlled quadcopter which is low cost, and readily available for consumers. Therefore it represents a simple test-bed on which control and vision research may be conducted. However, interfacing with the AR.Drone can be a challenge for new researchers as the AR.Drone's application programming interface (API is built on low-level, bit-wise, C instructions. Therefore, this paper will demonstrate the use of an additional layer of abstraction on the AR.Drone’s API via the Robot Operating System (ROS. Using ROS, the construction of a high-level graphical user interface (GUI will be demonstrated, with the explicit aim of assisting new researchers in developing simple control and vision algorithms to interface with the AR.Drone. The GUI, formally known as the Control and Vision Interface (CVI is currently used to research and develop computer vision, simultaneous localisation and mapping (SLAM, and path planning algorithms by a number of postgraduate and undergraduate students at the school of Aeronautical, Mechanical, and Mechatronics Engineering (AMME in The University of Sydney.

  14. Polarimetric evidence of a white dwarf pulsar in the binary system AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Meintjes, P. J.; Potter, S. B.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    The variable star AR Scorpii (AR Sco) was recently discovered to pulse in brightness every 1.97 min from ultraviolet wavelengths into the radio regime. The system is composed of a cool, low-mass star in a tight, 3.55-hour orbit with a more massive white dwarf. Here we report new optical observations of AR Sco that show strong linear polarization (up to 40%) that varies strongly and periodically on both the spin period of the white dwarf and the beat period between the spin and orbital period, as well as low-level (up to a few per cent) circular polarization. These observations support the notion that, similar to neutron-star pulsars, the pulsed luminosity of AR Sco is powered by the spin-down of the rapidly rotating white dwarf that is highly magnetized (up to 500 MG). The morphology of the modulated linear polarization is similar to that seen in the Crab pulsar, albeit with a more complex waveform owing to the presence of two periodic signals of similar frequency. Magnetic interactions between the two component stars, coupled with synchrotron radiation from the white dwarf, power the observed polarized and non-polarized emission. AR Sco is therefore the first example of a white dwarf pulsar.

  15. A single cell level measurement of StAR expression and activity in adrenal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Dong, Hui; Jefcoate, Colin

    2017-02-05

    The Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) directs mitochondrial cholesterol uptake through a C-terminal cholesterol binding domain (CBD) and a 62 amino acid N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) that contains an import sequence and conserved sites for inner membrane metalloproteases. Deletion of the NTD prevents mitochondrial import while maintaining steroidogenesis but with compromised cholesterol homeostasis. The rapid StAR-mediated cholesterol transfer in adrenal cells depends on concerted mRNA translation, p37 StAR phosphorylation and controlled NTD cleavage. The NTD controls this process with two cAMP-inducible modulators of, respectively, transcription and translation SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA resolves slow RNA splicing at the gene loci in cAMP-induced Y-1 cells and transfer of individual 3.5 kB mRNA molecules to mitochondria. StAR transcription depends on the CREB coactivator CRTC2 and PKA inhibition of the highly inducible suppressor kinase SIK1 and a basal counterpart SIK2. PKA-inducible TIS11b/Znf36l1 binds specifically to highly conserved elements in exon 7 thereby suppressing formation of mRNA and subsequent translation. Co-expression of SIK1, Znf36l1 with 3.5 kB StAR mRNA may limit responses to pulsatile signaling by ACTH while regulating the transition to more prolonged stress.

  16. Progress on using deuteron-deuteron fusion generated neutrons for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutte, Daniel; Renne, Paul R.; Becker, Tim; Waltz, Cory; Ayllon Unzueta, Mauricio; Zimmerman, Susan; Hidy, Alan; Finkel, Robert; Bauer, Joseph D.; Bernstein, Lee; van Bibber, Karl

    2017-04-01

    We present progress on the development and proof of concept of a deuteron-deuteron fusion based neutron generator for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation. Irradiation with deuteron-deuteron fusion neutrons is anticipated to reduce Ar recoil and Ar production from interfering reactions. This will allow dating of smaller grains and increase accuracy and precision of the method. The instrument currently achieves neutron fluxes of ˜9×107 cm-2s-1 as determined by irradiation of indium foils and use of the activation reaction 115In(n,n')115mIn. Multiple foils and simulations were used to determine flux gradients in the sample chamber. A first experiment quantifying the loss of 39Ar is underway and will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. In ancillary experiments via irradiation of K salts and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis we determined the cross-sections of the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction at ˜2.8 MeV to be 160 ± 35 mb (1σ). This result is in good agreement with bracketing cross-section data of ˜96 mb at ˜2.45 MeV and ˜270 mb at ˜4 MeV [Johnson et al., 1967; Dixon and Aitken, 1961 and Bass et al. 1964]. Our data disfavor a much lower value of ˜45 mb at 2.59 MeV [Lindström & Neuer, 1958]. In another ancillary experiment the cross section for 39K(n,α)36Cl at ˜2.8 MeV was determined as 11.7 ± 0.5 mb (1σ), which is significant for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology due to subsequent decay to 36Ar as well as for the determination of production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl. Additional experiments resolving the cross section functions on 39K between 1.5 and 3.6 MeV are on their way using the LICORNE neutron source of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator. Results will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. While the neutron generator is designed for fluxes of ˜109 cm-2s-1, arcing in the sample chamber currently limits the power—straightforwardly correlated to the neutron flux—the generator can safely be run at. Further

  17. Low Profile, High Impact: Four Case Studies of High School Department Chairs Whose Transactions "Transform" Teachers and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettersten, Jill A.

    This paper explores the leadership strategies of four exemplary high school department chairs. It develops a model based on social-exchange theory to show how chairs, as middle managers, must satisfy the expectations of both teachers and administrators. Data were derived from a case study of department chairs identified as exemplary in four…

  18. Enseñar a ser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Barreno, Pedro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available El «Informe Delors», cuyo texto fue presentado hace ahora diez años, señala que cualquier proyecto educativo para el siglo XXI debe contemplar dos acciones. «Enseñar a conocer, a hacer, a vivir juntos, a ser», y garantizar el acceso de todos a ello. El siglo que concluyó apenas media docena de años, ha estado cargado de inmensas paradojas: entre grandes males, extraordinarios logros y no pocas esperanzas inalcanzadas. Marcado por dos guerras mundiales, por genocidios, por la acelerada degradación de la biosfera o por la miseria de una masa de marginados frente al creciente bienestar de los privilegiados.…

  19. Experimental and numerical study on casing wear in highly deviated drilling for oil and gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at studying the casing wear in the highly deviated well drilling, the experimental study on the casing wear was carried out in the first place. According to the test data and the linear wear model based on the energy dissipation proposed by White and Dawson, the tool joint–casing wear coefficient was obtained. The finite element model for casing wear mechanism research was established using ABAQUS. The nodal movement of the contact surface was employed to simulate the evolution of the wear depth, exploiting the Umeshmotion user subroutine. In addition, the time-dependent geometry of the contact surfaces between the tool joint and casing was being updated continuously. Consequently, the contact area and contact pressure were changed continuously during the casing wear process, which gives a more realistic simulation. Based on the shapes of worn casing, the numerical simulation research was carried out to determine the remaining collapse strength. Then the change curve of the maximum casing wear depth with time was obtained. Besides, the relationship between the maximum wear depth and remaining collapse strength was established to predict the maximum wear depth and the remaining strength of the casing after a period of accumulative wear, providing a theoretical basis for the safety assessment of worn casing.

  20. Experiences of High-Ability High School Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Carrie; Goebel, Vella

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to answer the question, "To what extent do 12th-grade high-ability students feel that their past educational experiences, particularly in high school, have challenged their academic abilities?" Much research has been conducted in the field of gifted education about the identification, social and emotional…

  1. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  2. Mechanistic aspects of hydrosilylation catalyzed by (ArN=)Mo(H)(Cl)(PMe3)3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalimon, Andrey Y; Shirobokov, Oleg G; Peterson, Erik; Simionescu, Razvan; Kuzmina, Lyudmila G; Howard, Judith A K; Nikonov, Georgii I

    2012-04-02

    The reaction of (ArN=)MoCl(2)(PMe(3))(3) (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) with L-Selectride gives the hydrido-chloride complex (ArN=)Mo(H)(Cl)(PMe(3))(3) (2). Complex 2 was found to catalyze the hydrosilylation of carbonyls and nitriles as well as the dehydrogenative silylation of alcohols and water. Compound 2 does not show any productive reaction with PhSiH(3); however, a slow H/D exchange and formation of (ArN=)Mo(D)(Cl)(PMe(3))(3) (2(D)) was observed upon addition of PhSiD(3). Reactivity of 2 toward organic substrates was studied. Stoichiometric reactions of 2 with benzaldehyde and cyclohexanone start with dissociation of the trans-to-hydride PMe(3) ligand followed by coordination and insertion of carbonyls into the Mo-H bond to form alkoxy derivatives (ArN=)Mo(Cl)(OR)(PMe(2))L(2) (3: R = OCH(2)Ph, L(2) = 2 PMe(3); 5: R = OCH(2)Ph, L(2) = η(2)-PhC(O)H; 6: R = OCy, L(2) = 2 PMe(3)). The latter species reacts with PhSiH(3) to furnish the corresponding silyl ethers and to recover the hydride 2. An analogous mechanism was suggested for the dehydrogenative ethanolysis with PhSiH(3), with the key intermediate being the ethoxy complex (ArN=)Mo(Cl)(OEt)(PMe(3))(3) (7). In the case of hydrosilylation of acetophenone, a D-labeling experiment, i.e., a reaction of 2 with acetophenone and PhSiD(3) in the 1:1:1 ratio, suggests an alternative mechanism that does not involve the intermediacy of an alkoxy complex. In this particular case, the reaction presumably proceeds via Lewis acid catalysis. Similar to the case of benzaldehyde, treatment of 2 with styrene gives trans-(ArN=)Mo(H)(η(2)-CH(2)═CHPh)(PMe(3))(2) (8). Complex 8 slowly decomposes via the release of ethylbenzene, indicating only a slow insertion of styrene ligand into the Mo-H bond of 8.

  3. Contrasting Early and Late Shock Effects on the L Chondrite Parent Body: Evidence from Ar Ages and Olivine Microstructures for Two Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, A. M.; Clay, P. L.; Hugo, R.; Joy, K. H.; Busemann, H.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss Ar age and olivine microstructure data for two L6 chondrites that provide a case study of contrasting shock effects in similar chondritic materials deformed in different epochs and under different conditions.

  4. Melt-inclusion-hosted excess 40Ar in quartz crystals of the Bishop and Bandelier magma systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, J.A.; McIntosh, W.C.; Dunbar, N.W.

    2001-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar experiments on melt-inclusion-bearing quartz (MIBQ) from the Bishop and Bandelier Tuff Plinian deposits indicate high concentrations of excess 40Ar in melt inclusions. Two rhyolite glass melt inclusion populations are present in quartz; exposed melt inclusions and trapped melt inclusions. Air-abrasion mill grinding and hydrofluoric acid treatments progressively remove exposed melt inclusions while leaving trapped melt inclusions unaffected. Laser step-heating of MIBQ yields increasing apparent ages as a function of exposed melt inclusion removal, reflecting the higher nonatmospheric 40Ar concentrations hosted in trapped melt inclusions. Exposed melt inclusion-free MIBQ from the Bishop, Upper Bandelier, and Lower Bandelier Tufts yield total-gas ages of 3.70 ?? 1.00 Ma, 11.54 ?? 0.87 Ma, and 14.60 ?? 1.50 Ma, respectively. We interpret these old apparent ages as compelling evidence for the presence of excess 40Ar in MIBQ. Trapped melt inclusions in sanidine phenocrysts may contain excess 40Ar concentrations similar to those in MIBQ. This excess 40Ar has the potential to increase single-crystal laser-fusion ages of sanidine by tens of thousands of years, relative to the actual eruption age.

  5. A Crossover from High Stiffness to High Hardness: The Case of Osmium and Its Borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yongming; Liu, Xiaomei; Li, Anhu; Liang, Yongcheng

    2016-09-01

    Transition-metal light-element compounds are currently raising great expectations for hard and superhard materials. Using the widely attracting osmium (Os) and its borides (OsB, Os2B3 and OsB2) as prototypes, we demonstrate by first-principles calculations that heavy transition metals, which possess high stiffness but low hardness, can be converted into highly hard materials by incorporating of light elements to form compounds. Such a crossover is a manifestation that the underlying sources of high stiffness and high hardness are fundamentally different. The stiffness is related to elastic deformation that is closely associated with valence electron density, whereas the hardness depends strongly on plastic deformation that is determined by bonding nature. Therefore, the incorporation of light atoms into transition metal should be a valid pathway of designing hard and superhard materials. This strategy is in principle also applicable to other transition-metal borides, carbides, and nitrides.

  6. Race-Class Relations and Integration in Secondary Education: The Case of Miller High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Eick explores the history of a comprehensive high school from the world views of its assorted student body, confronting issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, and religion. Her case study examines the continuities and differences in student relationships over five decades. While she discusses the "dark side" of the high school…

  7. High-context and Low-context communication:A Case Study of A Chinese Refusal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建晓; 钱敏

    2013-01-01

    Edward Hall offers us an effective means of examining cultural similarities and differences, that is the classification of high-context and low-context culture. The paper attempts to analyze a case of a Chinese refusal from the perspective of high-context and low-context communication and explores the differences between the two types of communication.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar dates from the West Siberian Basin: Siberian flood basalt province doubled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, Marc K; Saunders, Andrew D; White, Rosalind V; Pringle, Malcolm S; Al'Mukhamedov, Alexander I; Medvedev, Alexander I; Kirda, Nikolay P

    2002-06-07

    Widespread basaltic volcanism occurred in the region of the West Siberian Basin in central Russia during Permo-Triassic times. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on plagioclase grains from deep boreholes in the basin reveal that the basalts were erupted 249.4 +/- 0.5 million years ago. This is synchronous with the bulk of the Siberian Traps, erupted further east on the Siberian Platform. The age and geochemical data confirm that the West Siberian Basin basalts are part of the Siberian Traps and at least double the confirmed area of the volcanic province as a whole. The larger area of volcanism strengthens the link between the volcanism and the end-Permian mass extinction.

  9. 40Ar-39Ar age of carbonatite-alkaline magmatism in Sung Valley, Maghalaya, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotiranjan S Ray; Kanchan Pande

    2001-09-01

    40Ar-39Ar analyses of one alkali pyroxenite whole rock and two phlogopite separates of calcite carbonatites from the Sung Valley carbonatite-alkaline complex, which is believed to be a part of the Rajmahal-Bengal-Sylhet (RBS) ood basalt province, yielded indistinguishable plateau ages of 108.8 ± 2.0 Ma, 106:4 ± 1.3 Ma and 107.5 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The weighted mean of these ages, 107.2 ± 0.8 Ma, is the time of emplacement of this complex. This implies that Sung Valley complex and probably other such complexes in the Assam-Meghalaya Plateau postdate the main ood basalt event (i.e., the eruption of tholeiites) in the RBS province by ∼10 Ma.

  10. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, B D; Champion, D; Fleck, R J

    1991-08-09

    Paleomagnetic and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 +/- 8 and 141 +/- 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7 degrees ) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago.

  12. Laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating on young volcanic rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fei; HE Huaiyu; ZHU Rixiang; YANG Liekun; SANG Haiqing; WANG Yinglan

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to use CO2 laser step-heating method to date the late Pleistocene basaltic groundmass (DF-2) from Tengchong volcanic field. Among the fourteen heating steps, ten define a good inverse isochron (MSWD = 1.4) with an age of 32.2 ± 7.1 ka (2 σ).The inverse isochron also shows that the initial argon isotopic ratio is 297.1±2.0 (2σ)which is the same as the atmospheric argon at the 2σ error level. Study indicates that it is a useful means to date young volcanic groundmass with low K content by using CO2 laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar method.

  13. Sizeable beta-strength in 31Ar (beta 3p) decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Koldste, G.; Blank, B.; J. G. Borge, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time precise spectroscopic information on the recently discovered decay mode beta-delayed 3p-emission. The detection of the 3p events gives an increased sensitivity to the high energy part of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution from the decay of 31Ar revealing that as ...

  14. Multiple Electron Capture Processes in Slow Collisions of Ar9+ Ions with Na Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuXiaolong; ShaShan; LiuHuiping; WeiBaoren; MaXinwen; WangZhengling; CaoShiping; QianDongbing; YangZhihu

    2003-01-01

    Slow collisions of highly charged ions with neutral atoms and molecules are of great importance in basic atomic collision physics, Recently, we built a new research facility for atomic physics at the Institute of Modern Physics. We report here the multiple electron transfer processes in collisions of Ar9+ with Na gas target at energy of 180 keV.

  15. Thermochronologic Implications of Low-Temperature (100-300°C) ar Difussion in Basaltic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, M.; Manganelli, S.

    2010-12-01

    Down-temperature extrapolation of laboratory argon diffusion data to conditions relevant to shallow crustal settings is the major uncertainty in modeling natural diffusion properties. In the case of basaltic glass, anomalous behavior related to the glass transition renders diffusion data collected above 600°C irrelevant to crustal conditions prevalent for the uppermost portion of oceanic crust. We measure the diffusion of reactor-induced argon (37Ar, 39Ar) in vacuum-fused Kilauea basaltic glass at temperatures between 100-300°C using a halogen light-based image furnace to establish empirical diffusion data at these low temperatures. Sized fractions of raw crushed glass as well as air-abraded particles derived from the crushed material were analyzed. Five different nominal size fractions of basaltic glass were prepared (mean sieve diameters of ~850, 325, 170, 80, and 40 μm respectively). Size and shape distributions were digitally imaged. The calculated sphericity, symmetry, and convexity of the abraded size fractions approached values for spherical grains. Less ideal behavior and wider variation in these parameters was observed for the untreated crushed material. The image furnace-based diffusion experiments produced reproducible and self-consistent results between 100-300°C for all air-abraded size fractions. The activation energy (73.6 ± 0.6 kJ/mol) and frequency factor (1.8 ± 0.2 x 10-13 m2/s) yield bulk closure temperatures that range from 13 to 354 °C for diffusive length scales of 0.001 to 1 cm and cooling rates of 1-100°C/m.y. The results indicate that basaltic glass is less retentive with respect to Ar diffusion than previous studies had indicated. Only rapidly cooled, cm-scale unaltered glass formed near spreading ridges appears capable of recording the time of basalt eruption during the formation of new oceanic crust. Similarly, bulk closure temperatures for basaltic glass occurring in typical cataclastic rocks of fault zones range between 13

  16. Implications of 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology for Fluid Transfer and Magma Generation Across Southeastern Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J.; Bemis, K.; Cameron, B.; Noll, K.; Singer, B.; Zhang, X.; Ruscitto, D.; Roggensack, K.; Olney, J.

    2005-12-01

    Behind-the-front , or back-arc, monogenetic volcanism extends some 110 km across southeastern Guatemala providing an important window into fluid transfer and melting in the Central American subduction zone. New 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating measurements on basaltic lavas from cinder cones in southeastern Guatemala place important temporal constraints on this across-arc volcanism. Behind-the-front (BVF) volcanism has been notably long-lived: from 1070 ± 22 ka to 137 ± 25 ka. The morphologies of some undated cinder cones suggest that BVF volcanism has probably extended into the Holocene. Most morphological parameters for the dated cinder cones show no systematic changes with age, suggesting that cone degradation is rapid in the tropical climate of Guatemala, quickly approaching a morphological equilibrium stabilized by the thick vegetative cover. The volumes of cinder cones, however, have consistently increased towards the present. In additon, Ar/Ar ages become younger towards Pacaya volcano on the volcanic front, indicating a southwestward migration of eruptive activity with time. Some incompatible element concentrations and ratios, such as Ba, La, and La/Y, decrease with time suggesting increasing amounts of melting in the mantle wedge, consistent with the production of larger and larger cinder cones. Increasing melting, however, does not appear to be directly related to fluid transfer from the slab as the Ba/La, Ba/Th and U/Th ratios of basalts erupted from the dated cinder cones have also declined over time. Thus, the new age constraints suggest the increasing influence of decompression, versus flux, melting in the BVF region, an influence that has also spread into Pacaya volcano on the volcanic front (Cameron et al., 2002).

  17. K$^{*}(892)^{0}$ and $\\phi(1020)$ meson production at high transverse momentum in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; 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Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Mishra, Tribeni; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zimmermann, Sebastian; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    The production of K$^{*}(892)^{0}$ and $\\phi(1020)$ mesons in proton-proton (pp) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} =$ 2.76 TeV has been analyzed using a high luminosity data sample accumulated in 2011 with ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm{T}}$) spectra have been measured for K$^{*}(892)^{0}$ and $\\phi(1020)$ mesons via their hadronic decay channels for $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ up to 20 GeV/$c$. The measurements in pp collisions have been compared to model calculations and used to determine the nuclear modification factor and particle ratios. The K$^{*}(892)^{0}$/K ratio exhibits significant reduction from pp to central Pb-Pb collisions, consistent with the suppression of the K$^{*}(892)^{0}$ yield at low $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ due to rescattering of its decay products in the hadronic phase. In central Pb-Pb collisions the $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ dependent $\\phi(1020)/\\pi$ and K$^{*}(892)^{0}$/$\\pi$ ratios show an enhancement over pp collisions for $p_{\\mat...

  18. Search for collectivity with azimuthal J/$\\psi$-hadron correlations in high multiplicity p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 and 8.16 TeV arXiv

    CERN Document Server

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Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Antonio; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chang, Wan; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Ding, Yanchun; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dudi, Sandeep; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dukhishyam, Mallick; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Gonzalez Hernandez, Emma; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Varga-kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kreis, Lukas; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Toledo Matuoka, Paula Fernanda; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Auro Prasad; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Nag, Dipanjan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Hoonjung; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Amal; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schaefer, Brennan; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shirinkin, Sergey; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silaeva, Svetlana; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Toppi, Marco; Rojas Torres, Solangel; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Xu, Ran; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yun, Eungyu; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Ya; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    We present a measurement of azimuthal correlations between inclusive J/$\\psi$ and charged hadrons in p-Pb collisions recorded with the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC. The J/$\\psi$ are reconstructed at forward (2.03 $<$ y $<$ 3.53) and backward ($-$4.46 $<$ y $<$ $-$2.96) rapidity via their $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay channel, while the charged hadrons are reconstructed at mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|$ $<$ 1.8). The correlations are expressed in terms of associated charged-hadron yields per J/$\\psi$ trigger. A rapidity gap of at least 1.5 units between the trigger J/$\\psi$ and the associated charged hadrons is required. Possible correlations due to collective effects are assessed by subtracting the associated per-trigger yields in the low-multiplicity collisions from those in the high-multiplicity collisions. After the subtraction, we observe a strong indication of remaining symmetric structures at $\\Delta\\varphi$ $\\approx$ 0 and $\\Delta\\varphi$ $\\approx$ $\\pi$, similar to those previously found in two-particle...

  19. Spatial autocorrelation method using AR model; Kukan jiko sokanho eno AR model no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Obuchi, T.; Saito, T. [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Examination was made about the applicability of the AR model to the spatial autocorrelation (SAC) method, which analyzes the surface wave phase velocity in a microtremor, for the estimation of the underground structure. In this examination, microtremor data recorded in Morioka City, Iwate Prefecture, was used. In the SAC method, a spatial autocorrelation function with the frequency as a variable is determined from microtremor data observed by circular arrays. Then, the Bessel function is adapted to the spatial autocorrelation coefficient with the distance between seismographs as a variable for the determination of the phase velocity. The result of the AR model application in this study and the results of the conventional BPF and FFT method were compared. It was then found that the phase velocities obtained by the BPF and FFT methods were more dispersed than the same obtained by the AR model. The dispersion in the BPF method is attributed to the bandwidth used in the band-pass filter and, in the FFT method, to the impact of the bandwidth on the smoothing of the cross spectrum. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  20. An Assessment of the South Asian Summer Monsoon Variability for Present and Future Climatologies Using a High Resolution Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3 under the AR5 Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Hassan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the present and future climatologies of mean summer monsoon over South Asia using a high resolution regional climate model (RegCM4 with a 25 km horizontal resolution. In order to evaluate the performance of the RegCM4 for the reference period (1976–2005 and for the far future (2070–2099, climate change projections under two greenhouse gas representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 were made, the lateral boundary conditions being provided by the geophysical fluid dynamic laboratory global model (GFDL-ESM2M. The regional climate model (RCM improves the simulation of seasonal mean temperature and precipitation patterns compared to driving global climate model (GCM during present-day climate conditions. The regional characteristic features of South Asian summer monsoon (SASM, like the low level jet stream and westerly flow over the northern the Arabian Sea, are well captured by the RegCM4. In spite of some discrepancies, the RegCM4 could simulate the Tibetan anticyclone and the direction of the tropical easterly jet reasonably well at 200 hPa. The projected temperature changes in 2070–2099 relative to 1976–2005 for GFDL-ESM2M show increased warming compared to RegCM4. The projected patterns at the end of 21st century shows an increase in precipitation over the Indian Peninsula and the Western Ghats. The possibilities of excessive precipitation include increased southwesterly flow in the wet period and the effect of model bias on climate change. However, the spatial patterns of precipitation are decreased in intensity and magnitude as the monsoon approaches the foothills of the Himalayas. The RegCM4-projected dry conditions over northeastern India are possibly related to the anomalous anticyclonic circulations in both scenarios.

  1. Chronology and shock history of the Bencubbin meteorite: A nitrogen, noble gas, and Ar-Ar investigation of silicates, metal and fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Bernard; Kelley, Simon; Turner, Grenville

    2010-11-01

    We have investigated the distribution and isotopic composition of nitrogen and noble gases, and the Ar-Ar chronology of the Bencubbin meteorite. Gases were extracted from different lithologies by both stepwise heating and vacuum crushing. Significant amounts of gases were found to be trapped within vesicles present in silicate clasts. Results indicate a global redistribution of volatile elements during a shock event caused by an impactor that collided with a planetary regolith. A transient atmosphere was created that interacted with partially or totally melted silicates and metal clasts. This atmosphere contained 15N-rich nitrogen with a pressure ⩾3 × 10 5 hPa, noble gases, and probably, although not analyzed here, other volatile species. Nitrogen and noble gases were re-distributed among bubbles, metal, and partly or totally melted silicates, according to their partition coefficients among these different phases. The occurrence of N 2 trapped in vesicles and dissolved in silicates indicates that the oxygen fugacity ( fO2) was greater than the iron-wüstite buffer during the shock event. Ar-Ar dating of Bencubbin glass gives an age of 4.20 ± 0.05 Ga, which probably dates this impact event. The cosmic-ray exposure age is estimated at ˜40 Ma with two different methods. Noble gases present isotopic signatures similar to those of "phase Q" (the major host of noble gases trapped in chondrites) but elemental patterns enriched in light noble gases (He, Ne and Ar) relative to Kr and Xe, normalized to the phase Q composition. Nitrogen isotopic data together with 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios indicate mixing between a 15N-rich component (δ 15N = +1000‰), terrestrial N, and an isotopically normal, chondritic N. Bencubbin and related 15N-rich meteorites of the CR clan do not show stable isotope (H and C) anomalies, precluding contribution of a nucleosynthetic component as the source of 15N enrichments. This leaves two possibilities, trapping of an ancient, highly fractionated

  2. [Transient high frequency nodal rhythm after a high voltage electric shock. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supervía, August; Del Baño, Francisco; Aguirre, Alfons; Membrilla, Estela

    2013-09-01

    Electrical shock can cause a direct myocardial damage and different types of arrhythmias, which are uncommon and occur more often when there is a high voltage exposure. We report a 19-year-old male that received a high voltage shock, falling thereafter from an altitude of four meters. On admission to the emergency room, he had second and third degree burns in the right hand and the left thigh. The electrocardiogram showed a nodal rhythm of 72 beats per minute. After four hours of monitoring, sinus rhythm returned spontaneously.

  3. Remaining life assessment of a high pressure turbine casing in creep and low cycle service regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Gordana M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thick walled components such as high pressure (HP steam turbine casings operating under high parameter conditions are subjected to a complex stress state. As a result of that stress state, some parts of HP turbine casing undergo to the creep fatigue caused by the combination of thermal fatigue resulted from repeated start/stop operation and the creep which occurs during long-term operation at high temperature and high-pressure. It is well known that domestic thermal power plants have been in use over 100000 h which means that significant cost is required not only for maintenance, but often for renewal of equipment. Based on comprehensive investigation, the results of residual life assessment of one high pressure steam turbine casing, which belongs to the older turbine generation, taking into account simultaneous action of thermal fatigue and creep, are presented in this paper. Also, the critical flaw crack size of HP turbine casing is determined because this parameter has a strong influence on casing integrity and residual life. The results of residual life assessment provide not only a basis for further maintenance, but also estimated time for reparation or renewal.

  4. Catatonia in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Ken; Takata, Tomoji

    2007-12-01

    Although catatonia has been identified in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, little is known about this relationship. Studies on previous case reports dealing with the relationship between catatonia and autism spectrum disorders are reviewed, then the case of a 28-yr.-old Japanese woman with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder who exhibited mood disorder and catatonia is described. Her mood disorder was apparently induced by a crisis of her "inner world," constituted as a way of coping with a sense of alienation, related to her impaired development in reciprocal social interaction. Environmental change, a precipitating factor, induced alternation between catatonia and depression. Fluvoxamine ameliorated both features. The catatonia identified in this patient is considered to be symptom derived from depression. Given the limitation of this single case, such a conclusion is necessarily tentative. Closer investigation into cases in which patients with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders describe their own psychological experiences should be pursued.

  5. Bilateral upper limb amputations in victims of high tension electrical injuries: Three case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajetan Nwadinigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral upper limb amputations result in severe disability. High voltage electrical injury is a rare cause of such an outcome and injuries often occur as occupational hazards. We present three case reports of accidental high voltage injuries that occurred in a non-occupational setting. Victims were all initially managed at other centres before referral to our hospital and all subsequently had bilateral upper limb amputations. The high cost of treatment, importance of prevention, and need for rehabilitation are highlighted.

  6. Primary treatment of acromegaly with high-dose lanreotide: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Cordes Uwe; Both Stefan; Wuster Christian; Omran Wael; Reisch Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The first-line treatment for acromegaly is transsphenoidal surgery. In approximately 50% of patients, however, a cure is not possible with surgery and alternatives are needed. Somatostatin analog therapy is the recommended first-line treatment in patients with such cases. Here we provide the first report of a high-dose lanreotide primary therapy in patients with acromegaly. Case presentation Six patients who were not suitable for surgery were given 60 mg of lanreotide (A...

  7. Can anisodamine be a potential substitute for high-dose atropine in cases of organophosphate poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Chen, Q-F; Ruan, H-L; Chen, K; Chen, B; Wen, J-M

    2014-11-01

    A case of organophosphate (OP) poisoning was admitted to the emergency room. The patient accepted treatment with pralidoxime (PAM), atropine, and supporting therapy. It was observed that even after 22 h after treatment, 960 mg of atropine was not enough for the patient to be atropinized. However, a 160-mg follow-up treatment of anisodamine was quite enough for atropinization after 4 h. As a case report, more studies are required before any definite conclusion can be reached regarding the use of anisodamine as a potential substitute for high-dose atropine in cases of OP poisoning.

  8. Forensic entomology of high-rise buildings in Malaysia: Three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsa, R A; Omar, B; Zuha, R M; Faridah, M N; Swarhib, M S; Hidayatulfathi, O; Shahrom, A W

    2015-06-01

    The distributions of flies are not only confined to ground level but can also be at higher altitudes. Here, we report three forensic cases involving dipterans in high-rise buildings in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Case 1 involved a corpse of adult female found at the top floor of a fifteen-story apartment. Case 2 dealt with a body of a 75-year-old female discovered in a bedroom on the eleventh floor of an eighteen-story building, while Case 3 was a 52-year-old male found in his fifth floor shop house. Interestingly, entomological analysis revealed that all corpses were infested with similar Dipterans: Megaselia scalaris (Loew) (Diptera: Phoridae), Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp) (Diptera: Muscidae) and sarcophagid (Diptera: Sarcophagidae). The first two species were commonly associated with corpses found indoors at ground level. We noted the additional occurrence of blowflies Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and Chrysomya rufifacies Macquart (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae in Case 2 and Case 3, respectively. Findings from this study are significant as they demonstrate that certain groups of fly can locate dead bodies even in high-rise buildings. Forensic entomofauna research on corpses found at high elevation is scarce and our study has highlighted the peculiarity of the fly species involved in Malaysia.

  9. 75 FR 12163 - Class E Airspace; Mountain View, AR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Mountain View, AR AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Mountain View, AR. Decommissioning of the Wilcox non-directional beacon (NDB) at Mountain View Wilcox Memorial Field Airport has made this action necessary for the...

  10. Aspects of What Makes or Breaks a Museum AR Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus B.; Madsen, Jacob Boesen; Morrison, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The paper critically evaluates central aspects of an iPad AR application developed for a museum context. The application is designed for children aged 8 to 12 and mixes AR and mini-game elements to convey dramatized historical events. The game has been deployed for roughly 3 months and the findin...

  11. Regulation of AR Degradation and Function by Ubiquitylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Identify ubiquitylation sites associated with degradation of the unliganded AR. We have used liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC...unmodified AR band in another gel slice). Protein in gel slices was then digested with trypsin (which leaves a gly-gly tag on ubiquitin-modified proteins

  12. High throughput thermal conductivity of high temperature solid phases: The case of oxide and fluoride perovskites

    CERN Document Server

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Oses, Corey; Curtarolo, Stefano; Mingo, Natalio

    2016-01-01

    Using finite-temperature phonon calculations and machine-learning methods, we calculate the mechanical stability of about 400 semiconducting oxides and fluorides with cubic perovskite structures at 0 K, 300 K and 1000 K. We find 92 mechanically stable compounds at high temperatures -- including 36 not mentioned in the literature so far -- for which we calculate the thermal conductivity. We demonstrate that the thermal conductivity is generally smaller in fluorides than in oxides, largely due to a lower ionic charge, and describe simple structural descriptors that are correlated with its magnitude. Furthermore, we show that the thermal conductivities of most cubic perovskites decrease more slowly than the usual $T^{-1}$ behavior. Within this set, we also screen for materials exhibiting negative thermal expansion. Finally, we describe a strategy to accelerate the discovery of mechanically stable compounds at high temperatures.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He model age signatures of elusive Mercurian and Venusian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Fred; Eroglu, Ela

    2017-05-01

    No meteorites from Mercury and Venus have been conclusively identified so far. In this study, we develop an original approach based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion models to explore the radiogenic argon (40Ar*) and helium (4He*) loss behavior and the range of 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He age signatures expected for a range of crystals if meteorites from these planets were ever to be found. We show that we can accurately date the crystallization age of a meteorite from both Mercury and Venus using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on clinopyroxene (± orthopyroxene) and that its 40Ar/39Ar age should match the Pb-Pb age. At the surface of Mercury, phases like albite and anorthite will exhibit a complete range of 40Ar* loss ranging from 0% to 100%, whereas merrillite and apatite will show 100% 4He* loss. By measuring the crystal size and diffusion parameters of a series of plagioclase crystals, one can inverse the 40Ar* loss value to estimate the maximum temperature experienced by a rock, and narrow down the possible pre-ejection location of the meteorite at the surface of Mercury. At the surface of Venus, plagioclase and phosphate phases will only record the age of ejection. The (U-Th)/He systematics of merrillite and apatite will be, respectively, moderately and strongly affected by 4He* loss during the transit of the meteorite from its host planet to Earth. Finally, meteorites from Mercury or Venus will each have their own 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He isotopic age and 38Arc cosmic ray exposure age signatures over a series of different crystal types, allowing to unambiguously recognize a meteorite for any of these two planets using radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases.

  14. 用于早前寒武纪岩石Ar-Ar法定年的K-Ar法年龄国家二级标准物质——ZMT04白云母的定值结果%The certified results of ZMT04 muscovite reference material utilized for 40Ar/39Ar isotopic geochronological research on Early precambrian rocks in China.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑海清; 王非; 龚俊峰; 周晶

    2013-01-01

    为了满足Ar-Ar快中子活化法定年的需要,经过十几年的连续测定与检验,一个用于早前寒武纪矿物定年的K-Ar法年龄标准物质—ZMT04白云母已被研制成功.它采自内蒙古自治区卓资县天皮山.40Ar-39 Ar定年结果表明,40Ar*在矿物晶格中保存均匀稳定,年龄谱平坦,39 Ar析出量为99.1%,40Ar/39 Ar坪年龄为1823±15Ma,说明该白云母结晶以来未受热扰动,40K-40Ar*同位素计时体系封闭良好.40Ar/39Ar等时年龄为1824±15Ma,与坪年龄一致,代表了伟晶岩中白云母的结晶时间.(40Ar/36Ar)0初始值为288±16,此值与(40Ar/36Ar)a大气氩丰度比(295.5±0.5)处于同一范围,表明该白云母不含过剩氩.根据国家一级标准物质技术规范(JJG 1006-1994)的有关规定,对ZMT04白云母进行了一系列分析检验.均匀性检验结果表明,在0.05显著性水平下,K和40Ar*的F分布值小于F临界值,证明该白云母是均匀的.t检验法和稳定性检验与分析表明,ZMT04白云母完全满足国家一级标准物质技术规范对稳定性的要求.国内8个实验室参加了ZMT04白云母K和40 Ar*含量的定值分析,正态性和等精度检验结果显示,全部定值分析数据服从正态分布并具等精度.当置信概率为0.95时,该白云母40Ar*和K含量的相对标准偏差都小于1%.经过严格计算最后获得40 Ar*和K含量及年龄的认定值和不确定度分别为:40Ar*=4.449±0.060×10-8mol/g(2σ),K=8.28±0.04%(2σ),K-Ar年龄=1804±21Ma(2σ).此标准物质纯度达100%,总重量为1080g,缩分为196瓶,每瓶5.51g.可供我国K-Ar和Ar-Ar法年代学实验室至少使用54年.此标准物质于2009年3月4日被国家质量监督检验检疫总局审核批准为国家二级标准物质(见国质检量函[2009] 89号文),国家质检总局认定的ZMT04白云母制造计量器具许可证编号为GBW (E) 040019.%In the 40Ar-39Ar dating technique,the irradiation with a high integrated neutron dose is very

  15. Efficacy of High-Dose Baclofen for Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Bulimia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Sébastien; Lalanne, Laurence; Riegert, Myriam; Bertschy, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    High-dose baclofen is a promising treatment for alcohol use disorder, with a specific action on craving. A more general action on craving in other addictive disorders has been suggested based on the hypothesis of a common neurobiological pathway in addictions. We report the case of a woman with both alcohol use disorder and bulimia nervosa. There was a positive response to high-dose baclofen on alcohol craving, but no response on food craving. The case illustrates that craving could be differentially responsive to anti-craving drugs.

  16. Proton Pump Inhibitors in the Management of Tachypnoea following Panproctocolectomy: A Case of High Output Ileostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville Azzopardi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available High output ileostomies are important complications of stoma formation following bowel surgery. Adequate management of such stomas might prevent severe morbidity and mortality when this potentially fatal complication develops. In this case report, we describe a female patient with a recent ileostomy formation following panproctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis who presented with progressively increasing shortness of breath. The patient was found to have a hypochloraemic metabolic acidosis on arterial blood gases. She rapidly improved with adequate sodium and fluid replacement and with the use of a course of proton pump inhibitors. This case highlights the importance of recognising high output ileostomies early and important management issues in their regard.

  17. Crater Retention Ages from (4) Vesta Matching Independent Ar-Ar Ages of HED Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedemann, Nico; Kneissl, Thomas; Ivanov, Boris A.; Michael, Gregory G.; Neukum, Gerhard; Nathues, Andreas; Sierks, Holger; Wagner, Roland; Krohn, Katrin; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-04-01

    In July 2012 the Dawn spacecraft completed its mapping task of the Main Belt asteroid Vesta with a second high altitude mapping orbit. Dawn is now on its way to the dwarf planet (1) Ceres, where it will perform a similar mapping campaign like that at Vesta [1]. The Main Belt is the source region of most impactors in the inner solar system [2,3,4], making it a key region for understanding the early history of our Solar System. In order to determine absolute surface ages from Vesta we derived a crater production function and a chronology function for Vesta. We derived these functions from the respective lunar functions [2] and scaled [5] them to the impact conditions on Vesta [6]. In general we find good agreement between the derived crater production function and the measured crater distribution. However, we also find disagreement between 8 and 15 km crater size, on areas older ~2.2 Ga. Older areas show a steep (~-6 cumulative) slope, which we link to a decaying influence of the vestan collisional family (Vestoids). The lower boundary of 8 km crater size may be explained by fast ejected small spalls and/or a more efficient Yarkovsky effect [7]. This influence is not observed for instance inside the large Rheasilvia basin, which we date with ~2.2 Ga. Since the formation of this basin is believed to be a major source of replenishment of the Vestoids, it's currently observed cratering record is not indicative for the basin formation age in contrast to [8]. The young interior of the Rheasilvia basin is likely a result of repeated resets of the crater retention age due to mass wasting processes on the basin walls. We use topographic heights, which are less affected by mass wasting such as the top of the central peak of the basin as well as proximal ejecta blankets outside the basin to date the formation age of Rheasilvia. For the central peak we derive a surface age of 3.59 (+0.079/-0.18) Ga. The proximal ejecta blanket at the Oppia crater is dated with 3.62 (+0

  18. High prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis and inadequate case finding in rural western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van't Hoog, Anna H; Laserson, Kayla F; Githui, Willie A; Meme, Helen K; Agaya, Janet A; Odeny, Lazarus O; Muchiri, Benson G; Marston, Barbara J; DeCock, Kevin M; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2011-05-01

    Limited information exists on the prevalence of tuberculosis and adequacy of case finding in African populations with high rates of HIV. To estimate the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and the fraction attributable to HIV, and to evaluate case detection. Residents aged 15 years and older, from 40 randomly sampled clusters, provided two sputum samples for microscopy; those with chest radiograph abnormalities or symptoms suggestive of PTB provided one additional sputum sample for culture. PTB was defined by a culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis or two positive smears. Persons with PTB were offered HIV testing and interviewed on care-seeking behavior. We estimated the population-attributable fraction of HIV on prevalent and notified PTB, the patient diagnostic rate, and case detection rate using provincial TB notification data. Among 20,566 participants, 123 had PTB. TB prevalence was 6.0/1,000 (95% confidence interval, 4.6-7.4) for all PTB and 2.5/1,000 (1.6-3.4) for smear-positive PTB. Of 101 prevalent TB cases tested, 52 (51%) were HIV infected, and 58 (64%) of 91 cases who were not on treatment and were interviewed had not sought care. Forty-eight percent of prevalent and 65% of notified PTB cases were attributable to HIV. For smear-positive and smear-negative PTB combined, the patient diagnostic rate was 1.4 cases detected per person-year among HIV-infected persons having PTB and 0.6 for those who were HIV uninfected, corresponding to case detection rates of 56 and 65%, respectively. Undiagnosed PTB is common in this community. TB case finding needs improvement, for instance through intensified case finding with mobile smear microscopy services, rigorous HIV testing, and improved diagnosis of smear-negative TB.

  19. ``Smoking From The Same Pipe": Developement of an 40Ar/39Ar Datting Intercalibration PIpette System (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Hodges, K.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of Ar isotope ratio measurements is one of the main limiting factors in the uncertainties of an 40Ar/39Ar age. Currently, it is relatively common to measure Ar isotopic ratios to a precision of 1-2‰ or better on an intralaboratory basis. This level of analytical precision equates to a comparable level of precision (1-3‰) in the calculated age, depending on the extent of atmospheric Ar contamination, importance of nucleogenic interference corrections, and other factors. However, it has become clear that improving the precision of mass spectrometry is not the only bottleneck towards improving the accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dating in general. Rather, the most urgent issue is interlaboratory reproducibility. This became obvious in a recent EARTHTIME initiative undertaken to intercalibrate two commonly used 40Ar/39Ar standards [the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) and the Alder Creek sanidine (ACs)]. This effort revealed variations amongst laboratories (at the 1-2% level), an order of magnitude greater than the internal analytical precisions. To address these issues, we have proposed (to NSF) to construct two identical pipette systems loaded to identical starting pressures and with identical isotopic compositions. One pipette system will travel between participating 40Ar/39Ar labs and the second system will not travel and serve as the “Master” system to test for any fractionation or undocumented depletion of the traveling pipette system. In order to ensure delivery of uniform amounts of homogenous gas, the pipette system will be computer-controlled with preprogrammed routines and lockouts to prevent compromising the reservoirs. The pipette systems will deliver three gas samples with different isotopic ratios at two different pressures/concentrations. One pipette bulb will be of atmospheric isotopic composition, and the other two pipette bulbs will have 40Ar*/39ArK ratios corresponding to co-irradiated ACs and FCs fixed by their

  20. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  1. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  2. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and exhumation of mylonitized metamorphic complex in Changle-Nanao ductile shear zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志洪; 卢华复

    1997-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages from rocks of Changle-Nanao ductile shear zone are 107.9 Ma(Mus), 108.2 Ma(Bi), 107. 1 Ma(Bi), 109. 2 Ma(Hb) and 117. 9 Ma(Bi) respectively, which are concordant with their isochron ages and record the formation age of the ductile shear zone. The similarity and apparent overlap of the cooling ages with respective closure temperatures of 5 minerals document initial rapid uplift during 107-118 Ma following the collision between the Min-Tai microcontinent and the Min-Zhe Mesozoic volcanic arc. The 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, K-Ar date of K-feldspar and other geochronologic information suggest that the exhumation rate of the ductile shear zone is about 0.18-1.12 mm/a in the range of 107-70 Ma, which is mainly influenced by tectonic extension.

  3. Evaluation of the IPCC Models (AR4 and AR5) in the Precipitation Simulation in the Northeast of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, José; Vasconcelos Junior, Francisco; Chaves, Rosane; Silva, Emerson; Servain, Jacques; Costa, Alexandre; Sombra, Sérgio; Barbosa, Augusto; Dos Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    With the simulations of the models used in the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), comparative studies are necessary between observations and the so-called historical run (C20) and future projections of the AR4 (A2) and AR5 (RCP8.5) experiments, in order to assess whether the AR5 models had a better performance in the representation of physical processes. This article compares the sensitivity of IPCC models (AR4 and AR5) in representing the anuall average and seasonal rainfall variation (summer and autumn) in three regions of the Northeast of Brazil between 1979 and 2000, using the CMAP - CPC (Merged Analysis of Precipitation) data as reference. The projections made by these models for the period 2040-2070 were also analyzed.

  4. Provenance of Greenland Ice Sheet icebergs constrained by Ar-Ar radioisotope data from late glacial-early Holocene records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutz, P. C.; Storey, M.; Kuijpers, A.

    2009-12-01

    Radiogenic Ar-Ar dating of hornblende has been used to constrain the sources of ice-rafted detritus on the southwest Greenland margin and central Davis Strait. Single hornblende grains (total of 248) were picked from sand-size fractions of two marine cores, DA04-31P and TTR462G, covering the early Holocene to late glacial interval including Heinrich events (HE) 1-3. Paleoceanographic analyses of DA04-31P have indicated that the last deglaciation of the southern Greenland Ice Sheet occurred in multiple steps during the early deglacial/HE1, Allerød and early Holocene intervals (Knutz et al., in review). Each of these collapse stages were preceded by upper ocean warming related to enhanced Irminger Current activity. Pre-HE1, Allerød and Holocene hornblende samples show a bimodal signature of late Archean (2.5-3.0 Ga) and early Proterozoic (1.6-2.2 Ga) ages consistent with southern Greenland bedrock sources. In contrast hornblende grains from detrital carbonate HE layers and within the Younger Dryas interval show a dominant early Proterozoic spectrum that is similar to results obtained from the central North Atlantic IRD belt. The early Proterozoic age of Younger Dryas samples from the Davis Strait site and the high amounts of basalt in this core, presumably derived from the Disko-Nussuaq province, suggests that icebergs carrying Archean material from southern Greenland did not enter the Baffin Bay or at least not for this specific time interval. The conclusion of our study is that the Greenland Ice Sheet appears to have been a much larger contributor to non-Heinrich IRD in the North Atlantic than thought previously. P. C. Knutz, H. Ebbesen, S. Christiansen, M.-A. Sicre and A. Kuijpers. Multiple deglaciation steps of the southern Greenland Ice Sheet driven by vigorous Irminger Current: Significance for the Younger Dryas cooling. Submitted to Quaternary Science Reviews.

  5. Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar Studies of DHO 908 and 489: Implications for Lunar Crustal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C. Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2011-01-01

    It is widely assumed that ferroan anorthosites (FANs) formed as flotation cumulates on a global lunar magma ocean (LMO). A corollary is that all FANs are approximately contemporaneous and formed with the same initial Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio. Indeed, a whole rock isochron for selected FANs (and An93 anorthosite) yields an isochron age of 4.42 +/- 0.13 Ga and initial Nd-143/Nd-144, expressed in epsilon-units, of epsilon(sub Nd,CHUR) = 0.3+/-0.3 relative to the CHondritic Uniform Reservoir , or epsilon(sub Nd,HEDPB)=-0.6+/-0.3 relative to the HED Parent Body. These values are in good agreement with the age (T) = 4.47+/-0.07 Ga, and epsilon(sub Nd,HEDPB) =-0.6 +/- 0.5 for FAN 67075. We also have studied anorthositic clasts in the Dhofar 908 and 489 lunar highland meteorites containing clasts of magnesian anorthosites (MAN) with Mg# approximately 75. Because of their relatively high Mg#, magnesian anorthosites should have preceded most FANs in crystallization from the LMO if both are LMO products. Thus, it is important to determine whether the Nd-isotopic data of MAN and FAN are consistent with a co-magmatic origin. We previously reported Sm-Nd data for white clast Dho 908 WC. Mafic minerals in this clast were too small to be physically separated for an isochron. However, we estimated initial Nd-143/Nd-144 for the clast by combining its bulk ("whole rock") Sm-Nd data with an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.42+/-.04 Ga. Here we report additional Sm-Nd data for bulk samples of Dho 908 and its pair Dho 489.

  6. No FIP fractionation in the active stars AR Psc and AY Cet

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Micela, G

    2009-01-01

    Context: The comparison of coronal and photospheric abundances in cool stars is an essential question pending of resolution. In the Sun an enhancement of the elements with low First Ionization Potential (FIP) is observed in the corona with respect to the photosphere. Stars with high levels of activity seem to show a depletion of elements with low FIP when compared to solar standard values. However the few cases of active stars in which photospheric values are available for comparison shed confusing results, and an enlargement of the sample is mandatory to solve this long-standing problem. Aims: We calculate in this paper the photospheric and coronal abundances of two well known active binary systems, AR Psc and AY Cet, to reach further insights in the complicate scene of coronal abundances. Methods: Coronal abundances of 9 elements are calculated by means of the reconstruction of a detailed Emission Measure Distribution, using a line-based method that consider the lines from different elements separately. Pho...

  7. Gene expression profile of FVII and AR in primary prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Khorasani, Maryam; Mahdian, Reza

    2016-09-26

    The ectopic expression of coagulation Factor VII has been shown in various cancers. Recently, F7 gene has been identified as a direct target of the androgen receptor in breast cancer. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of F7 and AR in clinical sample series of prostate cancer and BPH. All the prostate cancer patients were new cases with no medical history of surgery or chemotherapy. The tissue samples were assigned as either prostate cancer tumor (n= 45) harboring at least 80% tumor cell content, or BPH (n= 36). Relative AR and F7 mRNA expression in each tissue sample was normalized to the mean of the Ct values determined for GAPDH and PSA genes. Mean plasma level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 17.82 ± 3.71 ng/ml and 7.71 ± 1.28 ng/ml (Mean ± SEM) in PCa and BPH group, respectively. AR mean expression was up-regulated 22.468 fold in clinical tumor sample cohort (S.E., 0.175-2,916, 95% CI: 0.001-126,764, P= 0.001). The mean expression of F7 gene in tumor tissues relative to PBH samples was 6.981 (S.E., 0.099-413.001, 95% CI: 0.002-34,183, P= 0.012). ANOVA analysis of the gene expression results showed significant correlation between F7 and AR mRNA expression in tumor samples (pF7 gene expression could be up-regulated via various AR mediators affecting the promoter region of the F7 gene. Should this be confirmed by further studies, it may be suggested as a potential contributing factor in prostate cancer.

  8. Ar-40/Ar-39 age determinations for the Rotoiti eruption, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, S.; Storey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The contemporaneous Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites, erupted from the Taupo Volcanic zone, New Zealand, form a distinctive tephrostratigraphic horizon in the Southern Pacific. Radioisotopic dating results for these eruptions remain controversial, with published ages ranging from 35.1 × 2.8 ka [1] to 71 × 6 ka [2], with 61.0 × 1.5 ka [3] often being cited as the most widely accepted age. These eruptions are difficult to date as their age is near the limit for various radiometric dating techniques, which are complicated by a large proportion of inherited material (xenocrysts) and a lack of phases suitable for dating. Glass-bearing plutonic blocks erupted with the Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites have previously been interpreted as deriving from a slowly cooled and incompletely solidified magma body that was sampled by the eruptions. They contain large vugs lined with euhedral quartz, sanidine and biotite crystals, indicating that these crystals grew in a gas or aqueous fluid rich environment and are interpreted to have formed shortly before or during eruption. Here we will present Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for sanidines and biotites extracted from vugs in lithic blocks erupted as part of the Earthquake Flat ignimbrite. We show that, even for vug-lining material, inherited ages remain a problem and are the likely source of the wide variation in published radiometric ages. Nevertheless, many of the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are much younger than the 61 ka age [3] and are more consistent with the recent stratigraphic, C-14 and U-238/Th-230+(U-Th)/He ages that have been suggested (e.g. [4,5]). 1. Whitehead, N. & Ditchburn, R. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 37, 381-383 (1994). 2. Ota, Y., Omura, A. & Iwata, H. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 32, 327-331 (1989). 3. Wilson, C. J. N. et al. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 1861-1870 (2007). 4. Molloy, C., Shane, P. & Augustinus, P. Geological Society of America Bulletin 121, 1666-1677 (2009). 5

  9. A Two-Stage Decomposition of High School Timetabling applied to cases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias; Dahms, Florian H.W.

    2014-01-01

    -Stage Decomposition of an IP model for a practical case of high school timetabling is shown. This particular timetabling problem consists of assigning lectures to both a timeslot and a classroom, which is modeled using a very large amount of binary variables. The decomposition splits this model into two separate...... the database of the high school ERP system Lectio are used. Computational results show that the decomposition performs significantly better than solving the original IP, in terms of both found solutions and bounds....

  10. A Case Study of Student-to-student Cyber Bullying in one High School

    OpenAIRE

    Peter P. KIRIAKIDIS; Lakes DeMARQUES

    2013-01-01

    The research site was one high school located in southern United States where school stakeholders were concerned about student-to-student cyber bullying. The school district administrators did not examine student-to-student cyber bullying at the research site. The purpose of this case study was to explore teachers’ experiences in student-to-student cyber bullying. The conceptual framework was based on choice theory. Data were collected from semi structured interviews with high school teachers...

  11. Analysis of Ar plasma jets induced by single and double dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judée, F.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The aim is the comparison of different plasma parameters of single and double dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet configurations (S-DBD and D-DBD) which are potentially usable in biomedical applications. Both configurations are studied in terms of electric field distribution, electrical discharge characteristics, plasma parameters (estimated by optical emission spectroscopy analysis), and hydrodynamics of the plasma jet for electrical parameters of power supplies corresponding to an applied voltage of 10 kV, pulse duration of 1 μs, frequency of 9.69 kHz, and Ar flow of 2 l/min. We observed that the D-DBD configuration requires half the electrical power one needs to provide in the S-DBD case to generate a plasma jet with similar characteristics: excitation temperature around 4700 K, electron density around 2.5 × 1014 cm-3, gas temperature of about 320 K, a relatively high atomic oxygen concentration reaching up to 1000 ppm, the presence of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (nitric oxide, hydroxyl radical, and atomic oxygen), and an irradiance in the UV-C range of about 20 μW cm-2. Moreover, it has been observed that D-DBD plasma jet is more sensitive to short pulse durations, probably due to the charge accumulation over the dielectric barrier around the internal electrode. This results in a significantly longer plasma length in the D-DBD configuration than in the S-DBD one up to a critical flow rate (2.25 l/min) before the occurrence of turbulence in the D-DBD case. Conversely, ionization wave velocities are significantly higher in the S-DBD setup (3.35 × 105 m/s against 1.02 × 105 m/s for D-DBD), probably due to the higher electrostatic field close to the high voltage electrode in the S-DBD plasma jet.

  12. 200 nm-1000 nm spectra of light emitted in the impact of 40Ar10+ upon Al and Si solid surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoan; (张小安); ZHAO; Yongtao; (赵永涛); LI; Fuli; (李福利); YANG; Zhihu(杨治虎); XIAO; Guoqing(肖国青); ZHAN; Wenlong(詹文龙)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measured results of the 200 nm-1000 nm characteristic spectral lines of Al, Si and Ar atoms when highly charged ions 40Ar10+ are incident upon Al and P-type Si surfaces. The ion 40Ar10+ is provided by the ECR ion source of the National Laboratory of the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou. The results show that when the low-speed ions in the highly charged state interact with the solid surfaces, the characteristic spectral lines of the target atoms and ions spurted from the surfaces can be effectively excited. Moreover, because of the competition of the non-radiation de-excitation of the hollow atom by emitting secondary electrons with the de-excitation process by radiating photons, the spectral intensity of the characteristic spectral lines of Ar atoms on the P-type Si surface is, as a whole, greater than that of Ar atoms on the Al surface.

  13. Study of the excitation mechanisms of the second positive system in the negative glow of a N{sub 2}-Ar discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isola, L; Lopez, M; Gomez, B J, E-mail: isola@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) 27 Febrero 210 Bis. (S2000EZP) Rosario (Argentina)

    2011-09-21

    In an Ar-N{sub 2} discharge, the high excitation transfer from Ar({sup 3}P{sub 2,0}) to N{sub 2} produces an overpopulation of the high rotational levels of the bands of the second positive system (SPS), and so the spectra interpretation is not straightforward. This paper presents a fit function for the SPS bands measured in Ar-N{sub 2}, which allows us to study the excitation process contributions to the N{sub 2}(C) level. The procedure was tested in the negative glow of a pulsed Ar-N{sub 2} discharge at a pressure of 2.5 Torr, for different mixture concentrations. In this discharge, through the fitting, it was possible to calculate the variation of the N{sub 2}(C) densities produced by different excitation processes as well as the variation of Ar metastable density.

  14. Cupping Therapy for 103 Cases of High Fever due to Infection of the Upper Respiratory Tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖东

    2002-01-01

    @@ The cupping therapy has remarkable antipyretic effect in the treatment of fever. In recent years, the author has treated 103 cases of high fever caused by infection of the upper respiratory tract and obtained quite satisfactory therapeutic results. A report follows.

  15. Trichoderma species fungemia after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festuccia, M; Giaccone, L; Gay, F; Brunello, L; Maffini, E; Ferrando, F; Talamo, E; Boccadoro, M; Serra, R; Barbui, A; Bruno, B

    2014-08-01

    We present a case of Trichoderma fungemia with pulmonary involvement in a multiple myeloma patient, who was severely immunocompromised and heavily treated with high-dose melphalan, and underwent autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of proven Trichoderma fungemia, defined by published criteria, successfully treated with voriconazole.

  16. Music Composition in the High School Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Student and teacher perceptions regarding composition instruction were investigated using case study techniques in two high school music programs: a general music program providing accelerated instruction to gifted musicians in small classes and a typical performance-based band program. Students in both programs participated in a composition…

  17. Pushing the Employment Agenda: Case Study Research of High Performing States in Integrated Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison Cohen; Butterworth, John; Winsor, Jean; Gilmore, Dana; Metzel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Organizational variables, including policies, practices, collaborations, and funding mechanisms resulting in high performance in integrated employment, were described through case study research in 3 states. Findings address how contextual factors, system-level strategies, and goals of the system are related as well as how they sustain systems…

  18. No Need to Wait for Superman: A Case Study of One Unique High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, N. J.; Jones, C. R.; Costner, R. H.; Knight, C.; Disney, G.; Savage-Davis, E.; Sheehan, H.; Hunt, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a theoretical model developed by Schlechty, this case study focuses on a small high school, located on a college campus and designed to address the educational needs of gifted 9th- through 12th-grade students. Eight teachers who taught 9th- and 12th-grade classes and their 60 students were observed. Each teacher was observed during six…

  19. Managing School Districts for High Performance: Cases in Public Education Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Stacey, Ed.; Elmore, Richard F., Ed.; Grossman, Allen, Ed.; Johnson, Susan Moore, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Managing School Districts for High Performance" brings together more than twenty case studies and other readings that offer a powerful and transformative approach to advancing and sustaining the work of school improvement. At the center of this work is the concept of organizational coherence: aligning organizational design, human…

  20. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  1. Outsourcing a High Speed Internet Access Project: An Information Technology Class Case Study in Three Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Richard G.; Carper, William B.; McCool, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In early 2004, the Hilton Hotels Corporation (HHC) required that all of its hotels (both owned and franchised) install high-speed Internet access (HSIA) in all of their rooms by June 2004. This case focuses on how one of its franchise properties located on the northern gulf coast of Florida (the Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort &…

  2. Leadership to Build a Democratic Community within School: A Case Study of Two Korean High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Taek; Printy, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to explore how democratic community is manifest in schools in Korea. It also tries to examine how leadership, specifically transformational leadership, functions in shaping a democratic community within a school. Toward this aim, we have conducted a case study of two religious high schools in Korea. Based on the findings from the…

  3. Recurrent Early Cretaceous, Indo-Madagascar (89-86 Ma) and Deccan (66 Ma) alkaline magmatism in the Sarnu-Dandali complex, Rajasthan: 40Ar/39Ar age evidence and geodynamic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu; Pande, Kanchan; Vijayan, Anjali; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Cucciniello, Ciro

    2017-07-01

    The Sarnu-Dandali alkaline complex in Rajasthan, northwestern India, is considered to represent early, pre-flood basalt magmatism in the Deccan Traps province, based on a single 40Ar/39Ar age of 68.57 Ma. Rhyolites found in the complex are considered to be 750 Ma Malani basement. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages of 88.9-86.8 Ma (for syenites, nephelinite, phonolite and rhyolite) and 66.3 ± 0.4 Ma (2σ, melanephelinite) provide clear evidence that whereas the complex has Deccan-age (66 Ma) components, it is dominantly an older (by 20 million years) alkaline complex, with rhyolites included. Basalt is also known to underlie the Early Cretaceous Sarnu Sandstone. Sarnu-Dandali is thus a periodically rejuvenated alkaline igneous centre, active twice in the Late Cretaceous and also earlier. Many such centres with recurrent continental alkaline magmatism (sometimes over hundreds of millions of years) are known worldwide. The 88.9-86.8 Ma 40Ar/39Ar ages for Sarnu-Dandali rocks fully overlap with those for the Indo-Madagascar flood basalt province formed during continental breakup between India (plus Seychelles) and Madagascar. Recent 40Ar/39Ar work on the Mundwara alkaline complex in Rajasthan, 120 km southeast of Sarnu-Dandali, has also shown polychronous emplacement (over ≥ 45 million years), and 84-80 Ma ages obtained from Mundwara also arguably represent post-breakup stages of the Indo-Madagascar flood basalt volcanism. Remnants of the Indo-Madagascar province are known from several localities in southern India but hitherto unknown from northwestern India 2000 km away. Additional equivalents buried under the vast Deccan Traps are highly likely.

  4. The 40Ar/39Ar age record and geodynamic significance of Indo-Madagascar and Deccan flood basalt volcanism in the Sarnu-Dandali alkaline complex, Rajasthan, northwestern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Anjali; Pande, Kanchan; Sheth, Hetu; Kant Sharma, Kamal

    2017-04-01

    The Sarnu-Dandali alkaline complex in Rajasthan, northwestern India, is considered to represent early, pre-tholeiite magmatism in the Deccan Traps continental flood basalt (CFB) province, based on a single 40Ar/39Ar age of 68.57 Ma. Rhyolites found in the complex are considered to be 750 Ma Malani basement. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages of 88.9-86.8 Ma (for syenites, nephelinite, phonolite and rhyolite) and 66.3 ± 0.4 Ma (2σ, melanephelinite) provide clear evidence that whereas the Sarnu-Dandali complex has Deccan-age components, it is dominantly an older (by ˜20 million years) alkaline complex, with rhyolites included. Sarnu-Dandali is thus an alkaline igneous center active at least twice in the Late Cretaceous, and also much before as suggested by a basalt flow underlying t