WorldWideScience

Sample records for high apparent porosity

  1. Calculation formula for apparent electrical resistivity of high porosity metal materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘培生; 付超; 李铁藩

    1999-01-01

    A geometrical model has been established based on the structure feature of high porosity metal materials,the mathematical relationship between electrical resistivity and porosity for high porosity materials with even structure has then been deduced conveniently, and the formula for calculating the electrical resistivity of high porosity materials through porosity, which is easy to know, has been acquired further. Besides, the theoretical formula was verified to coincide with the test results well by the application taking nickel foam as an example.

  2. INFLUENCE OF TEXTURE AND MINERALOGY IN APPARENT POROSITY, WATER ABSORPTION AND APPARENT DENSITY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Meyer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work consists in evaluating the results of physical indices (apparent porosity, water absorption and apparent density obtained in granitoids exploited as ornamental and revetment stones in the state of São Paulo and Espírito Santo. The results of physical indices were qualified as parameters specification published by Abirochas use and compared the characteristics observed in petrographic samples.

  3. Relationship between tensile strength and porosity for high porosity metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘培生; 付超; 李铁藩; 师昌绪

    1999-01-01

    An analysis model has been established according to the structure feature of high porosity metals, and the mathematical relationship between the tensile strength and porosity for this material has been derived from the model. Moreover, the corresponding theoretical formula has been proved good to reflect the variation law of tensile strength with porosity for high porosity metals by the example experiment on nickel foam.

  4. Relationship between elongation and porosity for high porosity metal materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A simplified model was proposed targeting at the isotropic high porosity metal materials with well-distributed structure. From the model the mathematical relationship between elongation and porosity was deduced for those materials, and the relationship formula was derived generally for actual high porosity metals at last, whose validity is supported by the representative experiment on a nickel foam prepared by electrodeposition.

  5. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity, and Apparent Specific Gravity of Fired Whiteware Products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for determining water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, and apparent specific gravity of fired unglazed whiteware products. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    Clays, which have been loaded to a high stress level, will under certain conditions keep low porosity and permeability due to the high degree of compression. In some situations it seems that porosity and permeability will recover to a very high extent when the clay is unloaded. This seems...... the clay will expand to an even higher porosity....

  7. Poroelasticity of high porosity chalk under depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    levels of pore pressure. The chalk is oil-saturated Lixhe chalk from a quarry near Liège, Belgium, with a general porosity of 45%. Additionally, we compare the theoretical lateral stress to the experimentally determined lateral stress at the onset of pore collapse. The static Biot coefficient based...

  8. Determination of the apparent porosity level of refractory concrete during a sintering process using an ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJUBICA M. PAVLOVIĆ

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Concrete which undergoes a thermal treatment before (pre-casted concrete blocks and during (concrete embedded in-situ its life-service can be applied in plants operating at high temperature and as thermal insulation. Sintering is a process which occurs within a concrete structure in such conditions. Progression of sintering process can be monitored by the change of the porosity parameters determined with a nondestructive test method - ultrasonic pulse velocity and computer program for image analysis. The experiment has been performed on the samples of corundum and bauxite concrete composites. The apparent porosity of the samples thermally treated at 110, 800, 1000, 1300 and 1500 C was primary investigated with a standard laboratory procedure. Sintering parameters were calculated from the creep testing. The loss of strength and material degradation occurred in concrete when it was subjected to the increased temperature and a compressive load. Mechanical properties indicate and monitor changes within microstructure. The level of surface deterioration after the thermal treatment was determined using Image Pro Plus program. Mechanical strength was estimated using ultrasonic pulse velocity testing. Nondestructive ultrasonic mea¬surement was used as a qualitative description of the porosity change in specimens which is the result of the sintering process. The ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis proved to be reliable methods for monitoring of micro-structural change during the thermal treatment and service life of refractory concrete.

  9. Processing and characterization of high porosity aerogel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1994-11-22

    Aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphology among materials because both the pores and particles making up the material have sizes less than wavelengths of visible light. Such a unique morphology modifies the normal molecular transport mechanisms within the material, resulting in exceptional thermal, acoustical, mechanical, and electrical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. Special methods are required to make aerogel films with high porosity. In this paper, we discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate aerogel films having porosities greater than 75% and we describe methods of processing inorganic aerogel films having controllable thicknesses in the range 0.5 to 200 micrometers. We report methods and results of characterizing the films including thickness, refractive index, density (porosity), and dielectric constant. We also discuss results of metallization and patterning on the aerogel films for applications involving microminiature electronics and thermal detectors.

  10. APPROXIMATE MEANS FOR EVALUATING TENSILE STRENGTH OF HIGH POROSITY MATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Based on the simplified structure model of high porosity materials, the formulas for approximately evaluating the tensile strength of these materials have been derived from the corresponding deductions taken by means of the relative theories about geometry and mechanics. The results show that, the tensile strength of these materials not only associates with the material sort and production method, but do further have a direct value relationship with the porosity, θ. This value relationship can be specifically expressed by the power of the item (1-θ), and it makes the tensile strength variation display a complicated nonlinear law with the porosity. In addition, the application of those formulas has been investigated with the corresponding experiment on a nickel foam.

  11. High=porosity Cenozoic carbonate rocks of South Florida: progressive loss of porosity with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Schmoker, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Porosity measurements by borehole gravity meter in subsurface Cenozoic carbonates of South Florida reveal an extremely porous mass of limestone and dolomite which is transitional in total pore volume between typical porosity values for modern carbonate sediments and ancient carbonate rocks. A persistent decrease of porosity with depth, similar to that of chalks of the Gulf Coast, occurs in these rocks. Carbonate strata with less than 20% porosity are absent from the rocks studied here. Aquifers and aquicludes cannot be distinguished on the basis of porosity. Aquifers are not exceptionally porous when compared to other Tertiary carbonate rocks in South Florida. Permeability in these strata is governed more by the spacial distribution of pore space and matrix than by total volume of porosity present. Dolomite is as porous as, or slightly less porous than, limestones in these rocks. This observation places limits on any model proposed for dolomitization and suggests that dolomitization does not take place by a simple ion-for-ion replacement of magnesium for calcium. Dolomitization may be selective for less porous limestone, or it may involve the incorporation of significant amounts of carbonate as well as magnesium into the rock. The great volume of pore space in these rocks serves to highlight the inefficiency of early diagenesis in reducing carbonate porosity and to emphasize the importance of later porosity reduction which occurs during the burial or late near-surface history of limestones and dolomites.

  12. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques.

  13. Crystal plasticity and grain crushing in high-porosity rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Tjioe, M.; Borja, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies show the significance of considering microstructure of individual crystals in modeling the inelastic behavior of high-porosity rocks. Plastic deformation of high-porosity crystalline rocks, exemplified by limestone, is mainly attributed to crystal plasticity and cataclastic flow. Crystal plasticity is defined as the plastic deformation along potential slip systems within the crystal lattice. In the context of continuum mechanics this micro-mechanism is modeled by a nonlinear relationship between stresses and strains. Two types of nonlinearity characterize the inelastic behavior of the crystal grains: material nonlinearity and geometric nonlinearity. Material nonlinearity defines the changes in stiffness matrix due to plastic slip along slip systems. Geometric nonlinearity contributes to the changes in stiffness matrix due to changes in the geometry of the crystal grains. Geometric nonlinearity is modeled using theory of finite deformation, which assumes the geometry of slip systems to be a function of crystal deformation. This type of nonlinearity is very important in modeling crystal deformation mainly because of plastic spin induced by anisotropy in the crystal structure. However, considering the geometry of slip systems as a function of crystal slip makes the equations highly nonlinear. As a result, many studies either ignore geometric nonlinearity or make other assumptions to simplify the equations. Cataclastic flow, on the other hand, is characterized by pervasive grain crushing in which larger grains are converted into smaller ones. We model cataclastic flow as strong discontinuity in the grain scale via an assumed enhanced strain method formulated within the context of nonlinear finite elements. The method allows the individual finite elements, identified to be in critical condition, to break into two pieces along a plane identified by theory of bifurcation. We show that modeling cataclastic flow combined with finite deformation crystal

  14. Average density and porosity of high-strength lightweight concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Inozemtcev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis results of high-strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC structure are presented in this paper. The X-ray tomography, optical microscopy and other methods are used for researching of average density and porosity. It has been revealed that mixtures of HSLWC with density 1300…1500 kg/m3 have a homogeneous structure. The developed concrete has a uniform distribution of the hollow filler and a uniform layer of cement-mineral matrix. The highly saturated gas phase which is divided by denser large particles of quartz sand and products of cement hydration in the contact area allow forming a composite material with low average density, big porosity (up to 40% and high strength (compressive strength is more than 40 MPa. Special modifiers increase adhesion, compacts structure in the contact area, decrease water absorption of high-strength lightweight concrete (up to 1 % and ensure its high water resistance (water resistance coefficient is more than 0.95.

  15. Ultrasound Attenuation in Liquid ^3He/High Porosity Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H. C.; Mulders, N.

    2005-11-01

    High porosity silica aerogels have been extensively used to study the influence of disorder in p-wave superfluid ^3He. Experimental investigations performed during the last decade revealed three distinct superfluid phases in liquid ^3He /98% aerogel system. The three phases found in this system are called as A, B, and A1-like phases (using the same nomenclature as in the bulk), although only the spin component of the order parameter has been studied and found to resemble that of corresponding bulk phases. A complete understanding of the microscopic structure of the p-wave superfluid phases requires identification of both orbital and spin components of the order parameter. Until now, there is no experimental attempt to directly probe the orbital structure in ^3He/aerogel system. To resolve this issue, we performed acoustic measurements by direct transmission of ultrasound through the ^3He/98% aerogel sample. We will present and discuss our preliminary results.

  16. Manufacturing Microporous Foam Zinc Materials with High Porosity By Electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN QinGhua; GUO Xueyi

    2011-01-01

    In order to get foam zinc materials of porous metal electrode,a novel method for preparing foam zinc was proposed,in which the polyurethane foam with diameter of 0.3 mm as substrate was processed by degreasing,roughening,activating,electroless plating and electrodeposition.The main factors affecting the process,such as ZnSO4 content,temperature,pH value,current density,and electrodes distance,were investigated comprehensively.The optimal process conditions are 250 g/L ZnSO4,20 g/L Al2(SO4)3,40 g/L KAl(SO4)2,30 g/L Na2SO4,pH=3.5,4.0 cm of electrodes distance and 0.04 A/cm2 current density at 30 ℃.The result shows that adding ultrasonic on the process can elevate the deepening plating ability and current efficiency.Foam zinc material with a high porosity of 92.2% and a three-dimensional network structure can be fabricated by electrodeposition.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  18. Synthesis of Metal-Organic Zeolites with Homochirality and High Porosity for Enantioselective Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhong-Xuan; Liu, Liyang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Using lactic acid derivatives as chiral ligands, a pair of unprecedented homochiral metal-organic zeolites have been synthesized that feature zeotype CAN topology and have high porosity for enantioselective separation of racemates.

  19. Reservoir characteristics and genesis of high-porosity and high-permeability reservoirs in Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on detailed studies, this paper proposes that in the Tarim Basin, hydrocarbon reservoirs widespread either in vertical sequences or in plane and high-porosity and high-permeability reservoirs are developed all over the basin. However, obvious difference and heterogeneity exist among different kinds of reservoirs. The lithologic characteristics, reservoir space types and reservoir properties in various strata have been probed. The result indicates that although the Paleozoic carbonates have been deeply buried for a long period, high-quality reservoirs with the porosity of up to 5%-8% (12% as the maximum) and the permeability of 10×10?3-100×10?3 ?m2 (1000×10?3 ?m2 as the maximum) can be found in certain areas. These include the area with the development of reefs and carbonate beaches, the weathered-crust buried-hill belts that have undergone the long-term exposure, weathering and leaching, the area with the development of dolomitization, and those areas that have experienced the resolution of carbonic acid and organic acid generated by the maturity of the organic matter. Finally, the genesis of the high-porosity and high-permeability reservoirs in deep-buried conditions (with the depth more than 3500 m) have been investigated thoroughly.

  20. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  1. Porosity evolution in additively manufactured aluminium alloy during high temperature exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J.; Ding, H. L.; Gu, J. L.; Wang, X. S.; Qiu, H.

    2017-01-01

    A 2319 aluminum alloy is deposited by the Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing technology with Cold Metal Transfer process. Porosity that are both existing in the as-deposited and as-heat treated state metal are revealed by optical microscopy and quantitatively analyzed. It explains the reason why the newly initiated pores are easily tend to gather between each layer around the fusion line zone for the WAAM metal after heat treatment. The inner morphology of the pores are demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Porosity evolution and distribution during high temperature exposure are demonstrated. Thus two porosity growth and number increase mechanisms are proposed eventually, providing theoretical basis for related material design and process optimization.

  2. Analyze of the Possible Causes of Porosity Type Deffects in Aluminium High Pressure Diecast Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferencz Peti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Die casting is a metal casting process that is characterized by forcing molten metal under high pressure into a mold cavity. The mold cavity is created using two hardened tool steel dies which have been machined into shape and work similarly to an injection mold during the process. Most die castings are made from non-ferrous metals, specifically zinc, copper, aluminium, magnesium. Depending on the type of metal being cast, a hot- or cold-chamber machine is used.Die castings are characterized by a very good surface finish (by casting standards and dimensional consistency.The most common deffect that appear in castings is the porosity type of deffect, which can be gas porosity, shrinkage porosity or leaker.

  3. Porosity of UHPFRC exposed to high temperatures determined by different techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecký, Tomáš; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Fořt, Jan; Čítek, David; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    The pore system characterization of an Ultra High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) exposed to the elevated temperatures is presented in the paper. The porosity and pore size distribution of building materials are of the particular importance because of their clear effect on durability and service life of structural elements and buildings. Material characteristics as mechanical, thermal and hygric properties are strongly dependent on pore system. For porosity measurement, several techniques having specific advantages or disadvantages with respect to the pore size are available. In building materials research, usage of Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) with range of the detected pores up to 100 µm is the most common. Nevertheless, in practical measurements, the differences between the porosity values determined by helium pycnometry and MIP are usually observed. It can be attributed to the presence of pores bigger than 100 µm. Based on the literature analysis it is evident that the porosity increases with the amount of fibres used since fibres application reduces workability of fresh mixture and thus cause heterogeneities and microcavities in material microstructure and interfacial transition zone between fibres, aggregates and cement paste. Therefore, the Optical Porosimetry (OP) based on an image analysis is presented in the paper as a suitable supplemental method for classification number, size and shape of bigger pores. At first, porosity is investigated on samples without temperature loading. Then, on samples which are exposed to the temperatures of 400, 800, and 1000 °C respectively. Pores size distribution is studied using mercury intrusion porosimeters Pascal 140 and 440. Images are captured by an optical microscope with an attached digital camera. The obtained results show necessity to apply the combined technique for the assessment of the porosity value.

  4. Combined Heat Transfer in High-Porosity High-Temperature Fibrous Insulations: Theory and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Miller, Steve D.; Knutson, Jeffry R.

    2010-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through various high-temperature, high-porosity, unbonded (loose) fibrous insulations was modeled based on first principles. The diffusion approximation was used for modeling the radiation component of heat transfer in the optically thick insulations. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were derived from experimental data. Semi-empirical formulations were used to model the solid conduction contribution of heat transfer in fibrous insulations with the relevant parameters inferred from thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures in a vacuum. The specific extinction coefficient for radiation heat transfer was obtained from high-temperature steady-state thermal measurements with large temperature gradients maintained across the sample thickness in a vacuum. Standard gas conduction modeling was used in the heat transfer formulation. This heat transfer modeling methodology was applied to silica, two types of alumina, and a zirconia-based fibrous insulation, and to a variation of opacified fibrous insulation (OFI). OFI is a class of insulations manufactured by embedding efficient ceramic opacifiers in various unbonded fibrous insulations to significantly attenuate the radiation component of heat transfer. The heat transfer modeling methodology was validated by comparison with more rigorous analytical solutions and with standard thermal conductivity measurements. The validated heat transfer model is applicable to various densities of these high-porosity insulations as long as the fiber properties are the same (index of refraction, size distribution, orientation, and length). Furthermore, the heat transfer data for these insulations can be obtained at any static pressure in any working gas environment without the need to perform tests in various gases at various pressures.

  5. Apparent kinetics of high temperature oxidative decomposition of microalgal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saad Aldin M; Razzak, Shaikh A; Hossain, Mohammad M

    2015-01-01

    The oxidative thermal characteristics of two microalgae species biomass Nannochloropsis oculta and Chlorella vulgaris have been investigated. The apparent kinetic parameters for the microalgal biomass oxidation process are estimated by fitting the experimental data to the nth order rate model. Also, the iso-conversional methods Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) were used to evaluate the apparent activation energy. The results indicate that biomass of different microalgae strains exhibit different thermal behavior and characteristics. In addition, growth parameters and medium composition can affect the biomass productivity and composition. This would have significant impact on the thermal decomposition trend of the biomass. The kinetic modeling of the oxidation reaction with direct model fitting method shows good prediction to the experimental data. The apparent activation energies estimated by KAS and FWO methods for N. oculta were 149.2 and 151.8kJ/mol, respectively, while for C. vulgaris were 214.4 and 213.4kJ/mol, respectively.

  6. Fabrication and Properties of Porous Si_3N_4 Ceramic with High Porosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangming Li; Litong Zhang; Xiaowei Yin

    2012-01-01

    A novel process combining oxidation-bonding and sintering was developed to fabricate porous Si3N4 ceramic with high porosity. After sintering at 1800℃, the SiO2 in porous Si3N4 ceramic transforms into Si2N2O because of the reaction of SiO2 and Si3N4 . Due to the reaction of SiO2 and carbon, the porosity of porous Si3N4 ceramic increases obviously from 40.2% to 76.8% with the weight decreasing by 35.6%. As the porosity increases, the dielectric constant and loss of the porous Si3N4 ceramic decrease obviously from 3.08 to 1.61 and from 3.70×10(-3) to 0.74×10(-3) , but due to the production of Si2N2O whose mechanical properties are much higher than SiO2 and the increase of the bonding strength among Si3N4 particles, the flexural strength and the fracture toughness of the porous Si3N4 ceramic decrease from 55 to 39 MPa and from 0.7 to 0.5 MPa·m(1/2) , respectively, but its Vickers hardness increases from 1.2 to 1.3 GPa.

  7. Porosity Effect in the Core Thermal Hydraulics for Ultra High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental method of porosity evaluation and a predictive thermal-hydraulic analysis with packed spheres in a nuclear reactor core. The porosity experiments were carried out in both a fully shaken state with the closest possible packing and in a state of non-vibration. The predictive analysis considering the fixed porosity value was applied as a design condition for an Ultra High Temperature Reactor Experiment (UHTREX. The thermal-hydraulic computer code was developed and identified as PEBTEMP. The highest outlet coolant temperature of 1316 oC was achieved in the case of an UHTREX at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, which was a small scale UHTR. In the present study, the fuel was changed to a pebble type, a porous media. In order to compare the present pebble bed reactor and UHTREX, a calculation based on HTGR-GT300 was carried out in similar conditions with UHTREX; in other words, with an inlet coolant temperature of 871oC, system pressure of 3.45 MPa and power density of 1.3 w/cm3. As a result, the fuel temperature in the present pebble bed reactor showed an extremely lower value compared to that of UHTREX.

  8. Reduction of the Residual Porosity in Parts Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting Using Skywriting and High Focus Offset Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancisidor, A. M.; Garciandia, F.; Sebastian, M. San; Álvarez, P.; Díaz, J.; Unanue, I.

    Residual porosity is observed in Inconel 718 samples manufactured by SLM within the optimum process window regardless the process parameters whose origin has been directly related to the starting and finishing of the laser scanning tracks. This porosity is concentrated preferentially in overlaps of fields (stripes and chessboard strategies) and borders. Location of pores has been demonstrated on long stripes, where laser stops only at borders, not in the hatch. It has been concluded that porosity is due to a high interaction time of the laser with powder which increases the energy in those points. Two different strategies have been validated to reduce this effect and thus diminish porosity. These strategies are the skywriting function, where the laser is switched off during the accelerating and decelerating portions and to increase the focus offset. The defocusing strategy is not as effective as the skywriting reducing the residual porosity.

  9. Analysis of porosity characteristics in weld metal of high strength aluminum alloy and the effect of mixed shielding gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaomu Zhang; Zhiyong Zhang; Yun Peng; Zhiling Tian; Changhong He; Hongjun Xiao; Chengyong Ma [Central Iron and Steel Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China)

    2005-07-01

    Aluminum alloy has being widely used in modern automobile and aeronautic industry. However, the welding of aluminum alloy, especially high strength aluminum alloy is difficult. Porosities are usually brought in the weld metal. In this paper, MIG welding using mixed gas shielding is carried out. The characteristic shapes of porosity in weld metal are described, the mechanism of porosity formation is analyzed, and the factors that influence the tendency of porosity formation are studied. Experiment results indicate that by the use of mixed shielding gas of 38%He+62%Ar, the number of porosity is reduced, the width of HAZ and softened zone is decreased, and the mechanical properties of welded joint is increased. (orig.)

  10. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  11. Discovery of an Apparent High Latitude Galactic Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Fesen, Robert; Black, Christine; Koeppel, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Deep H$\\alpha$ images of a faint emission complex 4.0 x 5.5 degrees in angular extent and located far off the Galactic plane at l = 70.0 degrees, b=-21.5 degrees reveal numerous thin filaments suggestive of a supernova remnant's shock emission. Low dispersion optical spectra covering the wavelength range 4500 - 7500 A show only Balmer line emissions for one filament while three others show a Balmer dominated spectrum along with weak [N I] 5198, 5200 A, [O I] 6300, 6364 A, [N II] 6583 A, [S II] 6716, 6731 A and in one case [O III] 5007 A line emission. Many of the brighter H$\\alpha$ filaments are visible in near UV GALEX images presumably due to C III] 1909 A line emission. ROSAT All Sky Survey images of this region show a faint crescent shaped X-ray emission nebula coincident with the portion of the H$\\alpha$ nebulosity closest to the Galactic plane. The presence of long, thin Balmer dominated emission filaments with associated UV emission and coincident X-ray emission suggests this nebula is a high latitude ...

  12. High Frequency Acoustic Microscopy for the Determination of Porosity and Young's Modulus in High Burnup Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mara; Laux, Didier; Cappia, Fabiola; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Wiss, T.; Despaux, G.

    2016-06-01

    During irradiation UO2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of both porosity and elastic properties in high burnup UO2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. For this purpose ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A UO2 pellet with a burnup of 67 GWd/tU was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the JRC-ITU at a 90 MHz frequency, with methanol as coupling liquid. VR was measured at different radial positions. A good agreement was found, when comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using SEM image analysis, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition, Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile and to the hardness radial profile data obtained by Vickers micro-indentation.

  13. Numerical investigation of conductive heat transfer in high-porosity foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coquard, R., E-mail: remi.coquard@ec2-ms.fr [Societe ' Etude Conseils Calcul en Mecanique des Structures' (EC2MS), 66, boulevard Niels Bohr, 69603 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Baillis, D. [Centre Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL), UMR CNRS 5008, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, INSA de Lyon, Batiment Sadi Carnot, 9 rue de la physique, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2009-10-15

    The conductive heat transfer in heterogeneous cellular materials is generally treated by defining the homogeneous effective thermal conductivity. For high-porosity foams, a very large number of empirical or semi-empirical models have already been proposed to evaluate this conductivity. Each approach considered different cellular morphologies and used different solution methods, leading to noticeable discrepancies. In order to estimate the reliability of these models, a numerical finite volume method computing the effective thermal conductivity of discretised two-phase heterogeneous materials was developed. It was applied to different regular open or closed cellular structures and to structures generated from tomographic images of polyvinyl chloride, expanded polystyrene and NiCrAl foams. The comparison with the results of the different models allows their degree of reliability and their domain of applicability to be estimated quantitatively.

  14. Mesoscale modeling of grain fracturing in high porosity rocks using the strong discontinuity approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjioe, M.; Choo, J.; Borja, R. I.

    2013-12-01

    In previous studies, it has been found that two dominant micro-mechanisms play important roles in the deformation of high-porosity rocks. They are grain fracturing and crystal plasticity. Grain fracturing is a phenomenon where larger grains cleave to their smaller constituents as they respond to the stress concentration exerted on them close to the open pore spaces. Specimen-scale modeling cannot reflect such mechanism so our investigation is carried out in the next smaller scale, namely the mesoscopic scale. We model a solid matrix microstructure using finite element in which displacement discontinuity is introduced in each element where the slip condition has been exceeded. Such discontinuity is termed strong discontinuity and is characterized by zero band thickness and localized strain in the band that reaches infinity. For grains under compression, this slip condition is the cohesive-frictional law governing the behavior on the surface of discontinuity. The strong discontinuity in the grain scale is modeled via an Assumed Enhanced Strain (AES) method formulated within the context of nonlinear finite elements. Through this method, we can model grain-splitting as well as halos of cataclastic damage that are usually observed before a macropore collapses. The overall stress-strain curve and plastic slip of the mesoscopic element are then obtained and comparison to the crystal plasticity behavior is made to show the differences between the two mechanisms. We demonstrate that the incorporation of grain-fracturing and crystal plasticity can shed light onto the pore-scale deformation of high-porosity rocks.

  15. A novel method for detecting neutrons using low density high porosity aerogel and saturated foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Kyle A., E-mail: knelson1@ksu.edu [S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Neihart, James L.; Riedel, Todd A.; Schmidt, Aaron J.; McGregor, Douglas S. [S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2012-09-11

    As a result of the recent shortage of {sup 3}He for neutron detection, several new detectors have been proposed as viable alternatives. Thin-film coated diodes and boron-lined proportional counters are suggested options, but both suffer from the 'wall-effect', where only one interaction product can be measured per event. The 'wall-effect' greatly reduces the neutron detection efficiency of the device. A new method is presented using low-density high-porosity materials where both reaction products can escape the absorber and contribute to a single event. Measuring both reaction products simultaneously greatly increases the detection efficiency of the device. Experimentally obtained pulse-height spectra from saturated foam and borosilicate aerogel detectors are presented. Aerogel is a low-density solid, typically less than 50 mg/cm{sup 3}, and can be developed with {sup 10}B in the structure. The thermal neutron response pulse-height spectrum from borosilicate aerogel is presented. Additionally, polyurethane foam, another low-density high-porosity material, was saturated with LiF and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to levels greater than 20 percent by weight and tested as a neutron detection medium. The foam saturated with 4.5 percent {sup 6}LiF was cut into 10 sheets, each 2 mm thick, and a neutron response pulse-height spectrum was collected. The thermal neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 7.3 percent, and the neutron to gamma-ray rejection ratio, acquired using a {sup 137}Cs gamma-ray source, was calculated to be 1.71 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}. Theoretical calculations also show that neutron detection efficiencies above 60 percent can be easily achieved using enriched {sup 6}LiF foam at 20 percent or higher saturation levels.

  16. A simple granulation technique for preparing high-porosity nano copper oxide(Ⅱ) catalyst beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Javad Ahmadia; Mohammad Outokesh; Morteza Hosseinpour; Tahereh Mousavand

    2011-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for fabricating spherical granules of CuO catalyst via a three-step procedure.In the first step,copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal decomposition of copper nitrate solution under supercritical condition.Then,they were immobilized in the polymeric matrix of calcium alginate,and followed by high-temperature calcination in an air stream as the third step,in which carbonaceous materials were oxidized,to result in a pebble-type catalyst of high porosity.The produced CuO nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that revealed an average size of 5 nm,X-ray diffractometry (XRD),and thermo gravimetric (TG)analysis.The catalysts were further investigated by BET test for measurement of their surface area,and by temperature-programmed reduction analysis (H2-TPR) for determination of catalytic activity.The results demonstrated that immobilization of the CuO nanoparticle in the polymeric matrix of calcium alginate,followed by calcination at elevated temperatures,could result in notable mechanical strength and enhanced catalytic activity due to preservation of the high surface area,both valuable for practical applications.

  17. Ultrasonic measurements of normal and superfluid He-3 in high porosity aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonseok

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance have been proven to be the most valuable spectroscopic tools in the study of superfluid 3He. These experimental methods provide complementary information on the orbital and spin structure of the Cooper pairs. In particular, the rich spectrum of the order parameter collective modes, a direct consequence of the exotic broken symmetry in the superfluid phases, have been mapped out by ultrasonic spectroscopic techniques. Aerogel possesses a unique structure, whose topology is at the antipode of conventional porous media such as Vycor glass and metallic sinters. High porosity aerogel presents additional scattering channel that substantially changes the ultrasonic behavior in both normal and superfluid phase of 3He. For example, in the normal fluid the classic first to zero sound crossover is effectively prohibited due to the residual elastic scattering from aerogel. However, the hydrodynamic-Knudsen crossover arises owing to the unique structure and the widely varying inelastic mean free path in 3He. In superfluid, no signatures of the order parameter collective modes were observed but the gapless superfluidity has been clearly verified through ultrasound measurements. In this paper, we will present the experimental results obtained in the past decade using ultrasonic techniques. Supported by NSF DMR-0803516 and DMR-1205891, and DMR-0654118 through National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the State of Florida.

  18. Production and characterization of high porosity porous FeCrC alloys by the space holder leaching technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-rong Tian; Yu-hua Pang; Liang Yu; Li Sun

    2016-01-01

    Spherical carbamide particles were employed to produce porous Fe–Cr–C alloy with high porosity and large aperture via the space-holder leaching technique. A series of porous samples were prepared by regulating the processing parameters, which included the car-bamide content and the compaction pressure. The pore characteristics and compression properties of the produced samples were investigated. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, image analysis, and compression tests. The results showed that the macro-porosity and the mean pore size were in the ranges 40.4%–82.4% and 0.6–1.5 mm, respectively. The compressive strength varied be-tween 25.38 MPa and 127.9 MPa, and was observed to decrease with increasing total porosity.

  19. Numerical Study on the Contribution of Convective Mass Transfer Inside High-Porosity Adsorbents in the VOC Adsorption Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ge; He, Wenna; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    and cavity would form, approximately, a consecutive parabola. The convective mass transfer inside the adsorbents would have little impact on the axial VOC transfer but could affect the average adsorption rate significantly at high porosities. The Peclet number Pe which is based on the inlet velocity...

  20. Effect of High Porosity Screen on the Near Wake of a Circular Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The change in flow characteristics downstream of a circular cylinder (inner cylinder surrounded by a permeable cylinder (outer cylinder made of a high porosity screen was investigated in shallow water using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV technique. The diameter of the inner cylinder, outer cylinder and the water height were kept constant during the experiments as d = 50 mm, D = 100 mm and hw = 50 mm, respectively. The depth-averaged free stream velocity was also kept constant as U = 180 mm/s which corresponded to a Reynolds number of Red = 9000 based on the inner cylinder diameter. It was shown that the outer permeable cylinder had a substantialeffect on the vortex formation and consequent vortex shedding downstream of the circular cylinder, especially in the near wake. The time averaged vorticity layers, streamlines and velocity vector field depict that the location of the interaction of vortices considerably changed by the presence of the outer cylinder. Turbulent statistics clearly demonstrated that in comparison to the natural cylinder, turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses decreased remarkably downstream of the inner cylinder. Moreover, spectra of streamwise velocity fluctuations showed that the vortex shedding frequency significantly reduced compared to the natural cylinder case.

  1. A New Approach for Manufacturing a High Porosity Ti-6Al-4V Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Montasser DEWIDAR; H.Fouad MOHAMED; Jae-Kyoo LIM

    2008-01-01

    Titanivm and its alloys are currently considered as one of the most important metallic materials used in the biomedical applications,due to their excellent mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility.In the present study,a new effective method for fabricating high porosity titanium alloy scaffolds was developed.Porous Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds are successfully fabricated with porosities ranging from 30% to 70% using space-holder and powder sintering technique.Based on its acceptable properties,spherical carbamide particles with different diameters (0.56,0.8,and 1 mm) were used as the space-holder material in the present investigation.The Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds porosity is characterized by using scanning electron microscopy.The results show that the scaffolds spherical-shaped pores are depending on the shape,size and distribution of the space-holder particles.This investigation shows that the present new manufacturing technique is promising to fabricate a controlled high porosity and high purity Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds for hard tissue replacement.

  2. Dietary factors associated with plasma high molecular weight and total adiponectin levels in apparently healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yannakoulia, Mary; Yiannakouris, Nikos; Melistas, Labros; Fappa, Evaggelia; Vidra, Nikoletta; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate associations between dietary factors and high molecular weight (HMW) as well as total adiponectin in a sample of apparently healthy adult Mediterranean women. DESIGN AND METHODS: Two hundred and twenty women were enrolled in this study. Anthropometric and body

  3. Porosity destruction in carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrenberg, S.N. [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    2006-01-15

    The important thing to understand about carbonate diagenesis is not how porosity is created, but how it is destroyed. Detailed core observations from two deeply-buried carbonate platform successions (the Finnmark platform, offshore north Norway; and the Khuff Formation, offshore Iran) show that in both cases most vertical porosity variation can be accounted for by only two or three factors, namely: (1) stylolite frequency, (2) proportion of argillaceous beds, and (3) anhydrite cement. The spatial distribution of these factors is determined by the depositional distribution of clay minerals (important for localizing chemical compaction) and the occurrence of hypersaline depositional conditions and associated brine reflux (important for localizing anhydrite precipitation and dolomitisation). However, the intensity of chemical compaction and consequent porosity loss in adjacent beds by carbonate cementation also depend upon thermal exposure (temperature as a function of time). Evidence from the Finnmark platform and other examples indicate that the stratigraphic distribution of early-formed dolomite is also important for porosity preservation during burial, but this factor is not apparent in the Khuff dataset. Insofar as the Finnmark and Khuff platforms can be regarded as representative of carbonate reservoirs in general, recognition of the above porosity-controlling factors may provide the basis for general models predicting carbonate reservoir potential both locally (reservoir-model scale) and regionally (exploration-scale). Distributions of clay, anhydrite, and dolomitization should be predictable from stratigraphic architecture, whereas variations in thermal exposure can be mapped from basin analysis. In the present examples at least, factors that do not need to be considered include eogenetic carbonate cementation and dissolution, depositional facies (other than aspects related to clay and anhydrite content), and mesogenetic leaching to create late secondary

  4. Robust automatic high resolution segmentation of SOFC anode porosity in 3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2008-01-01

    Routine use of 3D characterization of SOFCs by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning is generally restricted by the time consuming task of manually delineating structures within each image slice. We apply advanced image analysis algorithms to automatically segment the porosity phase of an SOFC...... anode in 3D. The technique is based on numerical approximations to partial differential equations to evolve a 3D surface to the desired phase boundary. Vector fields derived from the experimentally acquired data are used as the driving force. The automatic segmentation compared to manual delineation...... reveals and good correspondence and the two approaches are quantitatively compared. It is concluded that the. automatic approach is more robust, more reproduceable and orders of magnitude quicker than manual segmentation of SOFC anode porosity for subsequent quantitative 3D analysis. Lastly...

  5. Densification-induced conductivity percolation in high-porosity pharmaceutical microcrystalline cellulose compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strømme, M.; Niklasson, G. A.; Ek, R.

    2003-01-01

    The percolation theory is established as a useful tool in the field of pharmaceutical materials science. It is shown that percolation theory, developed for analyzing insulator-conductor transitions, can be applied to describe imperfect dc conduction in pharmaceutical microcrystalline cellulose during densification. The system, in fact, exactly reproduces the values of the percolation threshold and exponent estimated for a three-dimensional random continuum. Our data clearly show a crossover from a power-law percolation theory region to a linear effective medium theory region at a cellulose porosity of ˜0.7.

  6. Low porosity and fine coatings produced by a new type nozzle of high velocity arc spray gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ruijun; Zhang Tianjian; Xu Lin; Huang Xiaoou

    2006-01-01

    The new designed high-velocity arc spray gun with three different nozzles is developed to match the DZ400 arc spray system, which can produce the coatings with the structure of superfine and low porosity.This system can be used to spray three normal wires such as 4Cr13, FeCrAl and 7Cr13 (flux cored wires).Using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze shape and particles size that sprayed by the nozzles with different parameters, as well as with the S-3500N SEM and the energy spectrum analytic ( ESA ) instrument to identify the content of the oxides, porosity and thickness of the coatings, we get the result that the porosity in the coatings of solid wire is less than 3%, of the flux-cored wires is less than 5%, and the distribution of the coatings sprayed by the nozzle with secondary supplementary airflow is typically shown in the form of highdensity lamellarsplat structure and the average lamellar thickness is around 5 μm.

  7. Temperature-dependent surface porosity of Nb2O5 under high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, T. J.; Tripathi, J. K.; Hosinski, G. M.; Joseph, G.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports on high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as a novel method of enhancing the surface porosity and surface area of naturally oxidized niobium (Nb). Our study shows that ion-irradiation-induced Nb surface micro- and nano-structures are highly tunable by varying the target temperature during ion bombardment. Mirror-polished Nb samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a flux of 1.2 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1 to a total fluence of 4.3 × 1024 ions m-2 with simultaneous sample annealing in the temperature range of 773-1223 K to demonstrate the influence of sample temperature on the resulting Nb surface morphology. This surface morphology was primarily characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Below 923 K, Nb surfaces form nano-scale tendrils and exhibit significant increases in surface porosity. Above 923 K, homogeneously populated nano-pores with an average diameter of ∼60 nm are observed in addition to a smaller population of sub-micron sized pores (up to ∼230 nm in diameter). Our analysis shows a significant reduction in surface pore number density and surface porosity with increasing sample temperature. High-resolution ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows Nb2O5 phase in all of the ion-irradiated samples. To further demonstrate the length scales in which radiation-induced surface roughening occurs, optical reflectivity was performed over a spectrum of light between 200 and 1100 nm, showing a recovery of nano-scale surface damage at high sample temperatures.

  8. High Resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale to model porosity and permeability in the Miami Limestone in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface water flow within the Biscayne aquifer is controlled by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability in the karst Miami Limestone and the presence of numerous dissolution and mega-porous features. The dissolution features and other high porosity areas can create preferential flow paths and direct recharge to the aquifer, which may not be accurately conceptualized in groundwater flow models. As hydrologic conditions are undergoing restoration in the Everglades, understanding the distribution of these high porosity areas within the subsurface would create a better understanding of subsurface flow. This research utilizes ground penetrating radar to estimate the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the Miami Limestone at centimeter scale resolution at the laboratory scale. High frequency GPR antennas were used to measure changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through limestone samples under varying volumetric water contents. The Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) was then applied in order to estimate porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates ranged from 45.2-66.0% from the CRIM model and correspond well with estimates of porosity from analytical and digital image techniques. Dielectric permittivity values of the limestone solid phase ranged from 7.0 and 13.0, which are similar to values in the literature. This research demonstrates the ability of GPR to identify the cm scale spatial variability of aquifer properties that influence subsurface water flow which could have implications for groundwater flow models in the Biscayne and potentially other shallow karst aquifers.

  9. Flash light sintered copper precursor/nanoparticle pattern with high electrical conductivity and low porosity for printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Jun [Department of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haendang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Sung, E-mail: kima@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haendang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the hybrid copper inks with precursor and nanoparticles were fabricated and sintered via flash light irradiation to achieve highly conductive electrode pattern with low porosity. The hybrid copper ink was made of copper nanoparticles and various copper precursors (e.g., copper(II) chloride, copper(II) nitrate trihydrate, copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate and copper(II) trifluoroacetylacetonate). The printed hybrid copper inks were sintered at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash light sintering system. The effects of copper precursor weight fraction and the flash light irradiation conditions (light energy and pulse duration) were investigated. Surfaces of the sintered hybrid copper patterns were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope. Also, spectroscopic characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the crystal phases of the flash light sintered copper precursors. High conductivity hybrid copper patterns (27.3 μΩ cm), which is comparable to the resistivity of bulk copper (1.68 μΩ cm) were obtained through flash light sintering at room temperature and under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • The hybrid copper inks with precursor and nanoparticles were fabricated. • The hybrid copper ink was sintered via flash light irradiation. • The resistivity of sintered hybrid copper ink was 27.3 μΩ cm. • Highly conductive copper film with low porosity could be achieved.

  10. Control factors and porosity evolution of high-quality sandstone reservoirs of Kela-2gas field in Kuqa Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the integrated methods including sandbodies modelling of the outcrops, sedimentary facies of the cores and well logs of the drilled wells, and the reservoir correlation of interwells, it is thought that the sandstone reservoirs of Kela-2 gas field are a suit of high-quality natural gas reservoirs with great thickness, extensive and continuous distribution, high porosity and permeability, and a few barrier beds. Sedimentary facies and microfacies are the main factors controlling the reservoir distribution and interior heterogeneity. Based on a great deal of data of rock's thin sections, porosity, permeability, and the parameters of capillary pressure, the reservoir diagenesis, controls, mechanism and evolution of pores have been studied. It is considered that compaction in the early stage and diagenetic dolomite and calcite cements have effect on the decline of reservoirs property. Now compaction is chiefly middle to weak. The better reservoirs have no or a few calcite cements. In the early of deep buried stage, there are still mainly remainder primary intergranular pores. The authigenic kaolinite of reservoirs is the production of the dissolution of feldspars and lithic fragments. The dissolution results in the partly modified and broadened secondary intergranular pores. In the late of deep buried stage, structure fissures and overpressure were in favor of improving and preservation of these pores.

  11. Reduction of lift-off effect in high-frequency apparent eddy current conductivity spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2017-05-01

    Eddy current spectroscopy is capable of mapping conductivities and thicknesses of layered structures due to its frequency-dependent penetration depth. High-frequency apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) spectroscopy applications typically mandate covering a frequency range beyond 10 MHz to capture depth-dependent conductivity profiles. Following the standard four-point linear system calibration method beyond 10 MHz makes it difficult to achieve accurate AECC measurements due to spurious self- and stray-capacitive effects where complex eddy current coil impedance variation with lift-off becomes more nonlinear. In this study, two different approaches are presented to reduce AECC measurement sensitivity to lift-off. First, a nonlinear lift-off correction is developed as a function of measured apparent eddy current lift-off. Second, a semi-quadratic system calibration is developed to capture the lift-off curvature as a function of frequency and hence minimizes the measurement sensitivity to lift-off variations. Presented calibration techniques allow more robust AECC measurements up to 80-100 MHz with one-order of magnitude improvement in accuracy in comparison to the use of standard four-point linear system calibration in a lift-off range of  ±25.4 µm.

  12. Use of 3D Seismic Azimuthal Iso-Frequency Volumes for the Detection and Characterization of High Porosity/Permeability Zones in Carbonate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toelle, Brian E.

    Among the most important properties controlling the production from conventional oil and gas reservoirs is the distribution of porosity and permeability within the producing geologic formation. The geometry of the pore space within these reservoirs, and the permeability associated with this pore space geometry, impacts not only where production can occur and at what flow rates but can also have significant influence on many other rock properties. Zones of high matrix porosity can result in an isotropic response for certain reservoir properties whereas aligned porosity/permeability, such as open, natural fracture trends, have been shown to result in reservoirs being anisotropic in many properties. The ability to identify zones within a subsurface reservoir where porosity/permeability is significantly higher and to characterize them according to their geometries would be of great significance when planning where new boreholes, particularly horizontal boreholes, should be drilled. The detection and characterization of these high porosity/permeability zones using their isotropic and anisotropic responses may be possible through the analysis of azimuthal (also referred to as azimuth-limited) 3D seismic volumes. During this study the porosity/permeability systems of a carbonate, pinnacle reef within the northern Michigan Basin undergoing enhanced oil recovery were investigated using selected seismic attributes extracted from azimuthal 3D seismic volumes. Based on the response of these seismic attributes an interpretation of the geometry of the porosity/permeability system within the reef was made. This interpretation was supported by well data that had been obtained during the primary production phase of the field. Additionally, 4D seismic data, obtained as part of the CO2 based EOR project, supported reservoir simulation results that were based on the porosity/permeability interpretation.

  13. The Manufacturing of High Porosity Iron with an Ultra-Fine Microstructure via Free Pressureless Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Cui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High porosity (>40 vol % iron specimens with micro- and nanoscale isotropic pores were fabricated by carrying out free pressureless spark plasma sintering (FPSPS of submicron hollow Fe–N powders at 750 °C. Ultra-fine porous microstructures are obtained by imposing high heating rates during the preparation process. This specially designed approach not only avoids the extra procedures of adding and removing space holders during the formation of porous structures, but also triggers the continued phase transitions of the Fe–N system at relatively lower processing temperatures. The compressive strength and energy absorption characteristics of the FPSPS processed specimens are examined here to be correspondingly improved as a result of the refined microstructure.

  14. Approximating high angular resolution apparent diffusion coefficient profiles using spherical harmonics under BiGaussian assumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ning; Liang, Xuwei; Zhuang, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques have achieved much importance in providing visual and quantitative information of human body. Diffusion MRI is the only non-invasive tool to obtain information of the neural fiber networks of the human brain. The traditional Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is only capable of characterizing Gaussian diffusion. High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) extends its ability to model more complex diffusion processes. Spherical harmonic series truncated to a certain degree is used in recent studies to describe the measured non-Gaussian Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) profile. In this study, we use the sampling theorem on band-limited spherical harmonics to choose a suitable degree to truncate the spherical harmonic series in the sense of Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), and use Monte Carlo integration to compute the spherical harmonic transform of human brain data obtained from icosahedral schema.

  15. Evaluation of porosity of precision castings made of high-temperature creep resisting nickel superalloys; Beurteilung der Porositaet von Praezisionsguessen aus hochtemperaturkriechfesten Nickel-Superlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Stanislaw [Silesian Univ. of Technology, Katowice (Poland). Dept. of Materials Science

    2013-08-01

    The subject matter of the paper is the quantitative evaluation of gaseous and shrinkage porosity in construction elements of a low-pressure aircraft engine turbine using quantitative metallography methods. The research material consisted of blades and blade segments with a polycrystalline structure made of IN 713C and MAR M247 superalloys. One of the major problems that occur in the precision castings is their porosity: gaseous, which is the result of emission of dissolved gases from the superalloy during solidification, and shrinkage, being the result of shrinkage of the superalloy and from a lack of feeding of the interdendritic space. The comprehensive procedure of porosity evaluation includes: an automatic decimal-to-binary conversion of pores, a selective quantitative evaluation of gaseous and shrinkage porosity, the development of measuring conditions of quantitative metallography parameters, and the application of structural maps showing the varied porosity distribution over the cross-sections of castings of blades and blade segments. The developed practical procedure of selective measurement of gaseous and shrinkage porosity in the examination of precision castings made of high-temperature creep resisting nickel superalloys is presented. (orig.)

  16. Influence of high-porosity mesh stent on hemodynamics of intracranial aneu- rysm:A computational study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱晓宁; 费智敏; 张珏; 曹兆敏

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of a High-Porosity Mesh (HPM) stent on the hemodynamic characteristics in the intracra- nial aneurysm based on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). An idealized basilar tip aneurysm model and a HPM stent model are built. The pulsating blood flow in a cardiac cycle is computationally simulated for non-stented and stented models, to provide a wealth of information of the spatio-temporally varying blood flow field. The influence of the stent placement on the hemodynamic characteristics is analyzed in terms of distributions of velocity, pressure, Wall Shear Stress (WSS) and Energy Loss (EL), which are believed to play an important role in the development and rupture of the aneurysm. The numerical results clearly show that the velo- city, pressure, WSS and EL of the blood flow in the aneurysm are reduced by 30%-40% when the HPM stent is implanted. These computational results may provide valuable hemodynamic information for clinical neurosurgeon.

  17. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; Čuda, J

    2014-01-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  18. Quantification of sub-resolution porosity in carbonate rocks by applying high-salinity contrast brine using X-ray microtomography differential imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingyang; Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-10-01

    Characterisation of the pore space in carbonate reservoirs and aquifers is of utmost importance in a number of applications such as enhanced oil recovery, geological carbon storage and contaminant transport. We present a new experimental methodology that uses high-salinity contrast brine and differential imaging acquired by X-ray tomography to non-invasively obtain three-dimensional spatially resolved information on porosity and connectivity of two rock samples, Portland and Estaillades limestones, including sub-resolution micro-porosity. We demonstrate that by injecting 30 wt% KI brine solution, a sufficiently high phase contrast can be achieved allowing accurate three-phase segmentation based on differential imaging. This results in spatially resolved maps of the solid grain phase, sub-resolution micro-pores within the grains, and macro-pores. The total porosity values from the three-phase segmentation for two carbonate rock samples are shown to be in good agreement with Helium porosity measurements. Furthermore, our flow-based method allows for an accurate estimate of pore connectivity and a distribution of porosity within the sub-resolution pores.

  19. Double porosity models for the description of water infiltration in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars

    2004-01-01

    In this paper some of the possibilities of applying double porosity and permeability models to the problem of water infiltration in wood are explored. It is shown that the double porosity model can capture a number of commonly reported anomalies including two-stage infiltration....../sorption and apparent sample length dependent transfer parameters. Starting with the double porosity model, several extensions are discussed and the type of principal behaviour possible with the models is elaborated on. Finally, a set of highly anomalous experimental results is fitted to within a reasonable accuracy bv...

  20. Double Porosity Models For the Description of Water Infiltration In Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristian, Krabbenhøft; Damkilde, Lars

    2004-01-01

    In this paper some of the possibilities of applying double porosity and permeability models to the problem of water infiltration in wood are explored. It is shown that the double porosity model can capture a number of commonly reported anomalies including two-stage infiltration....../sorption and apparent sample length dependent transfer parameters. Starting with the double porosity model, several extensions are discussed and the type of principal behaviour possible with the models is elaborated on. Finally, a set of highly anomalous experimental results is fitted to within a reasonable accuracy...... by a double permeability model....

  1. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show an impro......This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show...

  2. Instability of supercritical porosity in highly doped ceria under reduced oxygen partial pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teocoli, Francesca; Ni, De Wei; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior and microstructural evolution of low relative density (∼0.40) gadolinium-doped ceria are characterized under oxidative and reducing conditions at high temperatures. The electronic defects generated in the structure by Ce4+ to Ce3+ reduction play an important role...

  3. Mesoporous carbon spheres with controlled porosity for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexian; Fu, Aiping; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Yiqian; Guo, Peizhi; Liu, Jingquan; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous carbon (MC) spheres with hierarchical pores, controlled pore volume and high specific surface areas have been prepared by a mass-producible spray drying assisted template method using sodium alginate as carbon precursor and commercial colloidal silica particles as hard template. The resulting MC spheres, possessing hierarchical pores in the range of 3-30 nm, are employed as conductive matrices for the preparation of cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. A high pressure induced one-step impregnation of elemental sulfur into the pore of the MC spheres has been exploited. The electrochemical performances of sulfur-impregnated MC spheres (S-MC) derived from MC spheres with different pore volume and specific surface area but with the same sulfur loading ratio of 60 wt% (S-MC-X-60) have been investigated in details. The S-MC-4-60 composite cathode material displayed a high initial discharge capacity of 1388 mAhg-1 and a good cycling stability of 857 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C, and shows also excellent rate capability of 864 mAhg-1 at 2C. More importantly, the sulfur loading content in MC-4 spheres can reach as high as 80%, and it still can deliver a capacity of 569 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C.

  4. High prevalence of asymptomatic malaria in apparently healthy schoolchildren in Aliero, Kebbi state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupashree Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In malaria endemic areas, continuous exposure to Plasmodium parasites leads to asymptomatic carriers that provide a reservoir, contributing to the persistence of malaria transmission. Thus, a study of the degree of prevalence of asymptomatic parasitaemias will help in assessing the level of reservoir of infection. Methods: All the consented participants without any signs and symptoms, suggestive of malaria were interviewed and thick blood smears were made to detect malaria parasites. The children presenting with malaria or any other severe illness, and those declining to give consent were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 118 (59.6% children out of 198 apparently healthy children were positive for malaria parasites while 80 (40.4% children were negative for malaria parasites. Prevalence of asymptomatic malaria was higher in males 75 (63.6% compared to females 43 (36.4%, but the difference was not statistically significant. Incidence of asymptomatic malaria was highest with 76.1% in the children aged 6– 10 yr. There was statistically significant association of the use of bednet on prevalence of asymptomatic malaria. Interpretation & conclusion: High prevalence of asymptomatic malaria detected in this study is a big challenge and can be a threat to the present malaria control programme. Thus, it should be considered in assessing and reorganising more effective malaria elimination strategies to achieve the desired goal of malaria control.

  5. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesis of Carbon Aerogels of High-Surface Area and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Peña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work carbon aerogels were synthesized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method (CCVD. Ferrocene were employed as a source both of catalytic material (Fe and of carbon. Gaseous hydrogen and argon were used as reductant and carrier gas, respectively. The products of reaction were collected over alumina. The morphology and textural properties of the soot produced in the reaction chamber were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy, High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and N2 physisorption (BET and BHJ methods. After the evaluation of the porous structure of the synthesized products, 780 ± 20 m2/g of SBET and 0.55 ± 0.02 cm3/g of VBJH were found. The presence of iron carbide and the partial oxidation of carbon nanostructures were revealed by XPS.

  6. Bioaccessible Porosity in Soil Aggregates and Implications for Biodegradation of High Molecular Weight Petroleum Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Ali; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-12-15

    We evaluated the role of soil aggregate pore size on biodegradation of essentially insoluble petroleum hydrocarbons that are biodegraded primarily at the oil-water interface. The size and spatial distribution of pores in aggregates sampled from biodegradation experiments of a clayey, aggregated, hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with relatively high bioremediation end point were characterized by image analyses of X-ray micro-CT scans and N2 adsorption. To determine the bioaccessible pore sizes, we performed separate experiments to assess the ability of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria isolated from the soil to pass through membranes with specific sized pores and to access hexadecane (model insoluble hydrocarbon). Hexadecane biodegradation occurred only when pores were 5 μm or larger, and did not occur when pores were 3 μm and smaller. In clayey aggregates, ∼ 25% of the aggregate volume was attributed to pores larger than 4 μm, which was comparable to that in aggregates from a sandy, hydrocarbon-contaminated soil (~23%) scanned for comparison. The ratio of volumes of inaccessible pores (4 μm) in the clayey aggregates was 0.32, whereas in the sandy aggregates it was approximately 10 times lower. The role of soil microstructure on attainable bioremediation end points could be qualitatively assessed in various soils by the aggregate characterization approach outlined herein.

  7. Electrospun hierarchical TiO2 nanorods with high porosity for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Teng-Long; Fan, Jie; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2013-09-25

    Ultraporous anatase TiO2 nanorods with a composite structure of mesopores and macropores fabricated via a simple microemulsion electrospinning approach were first used as photoanode materials for high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The special multiscale porous structure was formed by using low-cost paraffin oil microemulsion droplets as the soft template, which can not only provide enhanced adsorption sites for dye molecules but also facilitate the electrolyte diffusion. The morphology, porosity, and photovoltaic and electron dynamic characteristics of the porous TiO2 nanorod based DSSCs were investigated in detail by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 sorption measurements, current density-voltage (J-V) curves, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), intensity modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMPS/IMVS), and open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements. The results revealed that, although fewer amounts of dyes were anchored on the porous TiO2 nanorod films, they exhibited stronger light scattering ability, fast electrolyte diffusion, and extended electron lifetime compared to the commercial P25 nanoparticles. A power conversion efficiency of 6.07% was obtained for the porous TiO2 nanorod based DSSCs. Moreover, this value can be further improved to 8.53% when bilayer structured photoanode with porous TiO2 nanorods acting as the light scattering layer was constructed. This study demonstrated that the porous TiO2 nanorods can work as promising photoanode materials for DSSCs.

  8. Adsorption of the Inflammatory Mediator High-Mobility Group Box 1 by Polymers with Different Charge and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Tripisciano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a conserved protein with a variety of biological functions inside as well as outside the cell. When released by activated immune cells, it acts as a proinflammatory cytokine. Its delayed release has sparked the interest in HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we studied the adsorption of HMGB1 to anionic methacrylate-based polymers as well as to neutral polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Both groups of adsorbents exhibited efficient binding of recombinant HMGB1 and of HMGB1 derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The adsorption characteristics depended on particle size, porosity, accessibility of the pores, and charge of the polymers. In addition to these physicochemical parameters of the adsorbents, modifications of the molecule itself (e.g., acetylation, phosphorylation, and oxidation, interaction with other plasma proteins or anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, or association with extracellular microvesicles may influence the binding of HMGB1 to adsorbents and lead to preferential depletion of HMGB1 subsets with different biological activity.

  9. Multi-Scale-Porosity TiO2 scaffolds grown by innovative sputtering methods for high throughput hybrid photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzaro, Salvatore; Smecca, Emanuele; Mannino, Giovanni; Bongiorno, Corrado; Pellegrino, Giovanna; Neri, Fortunato; Malandrino, Graziella; Catalano, Maria Rita; Condorelli, Guglielmo Guido; Iacobellis, Rosabianca; De Marco, Luisa; Spinella, Corrado; La Magna, Antonino; Alberti, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    We propose an up-scalable, reliable, contamination-free, rod-like TiO2 material grown by a new method based on sputtering deposition concepts which offers a multi-scale porosity, namely: an intra-rods nano-porosity (1–5 nm) arising from the Thornton’s conditions and an extra-rods meso-porosity (10–50 nm) originating from the spatial separation of the Titanium and Oxygen sources combined with a grazing Ti flux. The procedure is simple, since it does not require any template layer to trigger the nano-structuring, and versatile, since porosity and layer thickness can be easily tuned; it is empowered by the lack of contaminations/solvents and by the structural stability of the material (at least) up to 500 °C. Our material gains porosity, stability and infiltration capability superior if compared to conventionally sputtered TiO2 layers. Its competition level with chemically synthesized reference counterparts is doubly demonstrated: in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells, by the infiltration and chemisorption of N-719 dye (∼1 × 1020 molecules/cm3); and in Perovskite Solar Cells, by the capillary infiltration of solution processed CH3NH3PbI3 which allowed reaching efficiency of 11.7%. Based on the demonstrated attitude of the material to be functionalized, its surface activity could be differently tailored on other molecules or gas species or liquids to enlarge the range of application in different fields.

  10. Reproducible Synthesis and High Porosity of mer-Zn(Im)2 (ZIF-10): Exploitation of an Apparent Double-Eight Ring Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Joseph R; Yang, Haiyang; Kane, Christopher M; Ley, Amanda N; Holman, K Travis

    2016-09-21

    Reproducible synthesis of the elusive merlinoite (mer) topology of zinc imidazolate (mer-Zn(Im)2, or ZIF-10) has been achieved by employing a simple macrocyclic solute-MeMeCH2-as a kinetic template. The corresponding phase-pure material, mer-MeMeCH2@Zn16(Im)32, is confirmed to be porous and exhibits one of the highest experimental surface areas (1893 m(2)/g, BET) yet reported for any ZIF. The X-ray single crystal structure of mer-MeMeCH2@Zn16(Im)32·xsolvent reveals the role of the macrocyle as an 8-fold hydrogen bond acceptor in templating the requisite double-eight rings (d8r) of the mer framework.

  11. Effect of Porosity on the Thick Electrodes for High Energy Density Lithium Ion Batteries for Stationary Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of 250–350 μ m-thick single-sided lithium ion cell graphite anodes and lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC cathodes with constant area weight, but varying porosity were prepared. Over this wide thickness range, micron-sized carbon fibers were used to stabilize the electrode structure and to improve electrode kinetics. By choosing the proper porosities for the anode and cathode, kinetic limitations and aging losses during cell cycling could be minimized and energy density improved. The cell (C38%-A48% exhibits the highest energy density, 441 Wh/L at the C/10 rate, upon cycling at elevated temperature and different C-rates. The cell (C38%-A48% showed 9% higher gravimetric energy density at C/10 in comparison to the cell with as-coated electrodes.

  12. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Carolyne; Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64-68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (Pbone volume. Longitudinal properties were associated negatively with porosity (P≤0.006, linear regressions). Mechanical properties, however, were not associated with osteocyte lacuna density or volumetric tissue mineral density (P≥0.167). Bone properties and structural parameters were not associated significantly with donor age (P≥0.225, linear mixed models). This study presents novel data regarding bone material strength in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight toward understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone tissue in children with osteogenesis imperfecta.

  13. Relationship Between the 3D Porosity and β-Phase Distributions and the Mechanical Properties of a High Pressure Die Cast AZ91 Mg Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Somjeet; Sket, Federico; Chiumenti, Michele; Gutiérrez-Urrutia, Iván; Molina-Aldareguía, Jon M.; Pérez-Prado, Maria Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Currently, most magnesium lightweight components are fabricated by casting as this process is cost effective and allows forming parts with complex geometries and weak textures. However, cast microstructures are known to be heterogeneous and contain unpredictable porosity distributions, which give rise to a large variability in the mechanical properties. This work constitutes an attempt to correlate the microstructure and the mechanical behavior of a high pressure die cast (HPDC) Mg AZ91 alloy, aimed at facilitating process optimization. We have built a stairway-shaped die to fabricate alloy sections with different thicknesses and, thus, with a range of microstructures. The grain size distributions and the content of β-phase (Mg17Al12) were characterized by optical and electron microscopy techniques as well as by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The bulk porosity distribution was measured by 3D computed X-ray microtomography. It was found that the through-thickness microhardness distribution is mostly related to the local area fraction of the β-phase and to the local area fraction of the pores. We correlate the tensile yield strength to the average pore size and the fracture strength and elongation to the bulk porosity volume fraction. We propose that this empirical approach might be extended to the estimation of mechanical properties in other HPDC Mg alloys.

  14. Porosity variation in chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Grøn, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Vertical porosity variations in chalk are generally assumed to result from either a vaguely defined combination of primary sedimentary and diagenetic processes or solely to diagenetic processes. In this study, image analysis of backscatter electron images of polished samples and geochemical...... microprobe mapping were applied to measure the porosity variation in a limited number of chalk samples. Microscope data indicate that in all cases the chalk has been subjected to diagenetic processes, but our data suggest that the variations in porosity originate in primary sedimentary differences....

  15. The Apparent Morphology of Peculiar Galaxies at Intermediate to High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Hibbard, J E

    1997-01-01

    We use rest frame ultraviolet (UV), B, and V band images of five nearby (z1.5 images fail to recover the true global properties of the underlying systems. This is because the high-z observations are sensitive to the rest-frame UV emission, which is dominated by the most active star forming regions. The extended distribution of starlight from more evolved populations would not be detected. We conclude that imaging observations in the restframe UV alone cannot reveal whether high-z systems (z>1.5) are proto-galaxies, proto-bulges, or starbursts within a pre-existing population. Definitive statements regarding the global properties and dynamical states of these objects require deep imaging observations at longer wavelengths.

  16. Apparent protective effect of high density lipoprotein against coronary heart disease in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健斋; 陈曼丽; 王抒; 董军; 曾平; 侯鲁维

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and coronary heart disease (CHD)death and to explore the protective effect of HDL against CHD in the elderly Chinese.Methods Started from 1986, 1211 retirees (92% males) were enrolled consecutively and studied prospectively. The average starting age was 70 ±9 years, and that at the end of the study was 80 ±9years. During the follow-up study, all the participants received yearly physical examination and blood chemistry survey from 1986 -2000. The average duration of the follow up study was 11.2 years. The end point of this study was either attacks of AMI or death due to CHD and other causes. CHD risk factors were screened by logistic regression analysis. According to their HDL-C levels, cases were divided into Iow (<1.03 mmol/L), medium (or normal, 1.03 - 1.56 mmol/L) and high(>1.56mmol/L) level groups, the differences in incidence of AMI and CHD death in each group were analyzed.Results The cumulative attacks of acute coronary syndrome (mostly AMI) were 214 cases,including 89 cases of coronary death and 308 death caused by other diseases during the follow up study. AMI occurrence and CHD death in normal HDL-C group were lower than those in the low HDLC group by 40% and 53%; and those in the high HDL-C group were lower than in the normal group by 56% and 50%, respectively. Statistical analysis on normal lipid cases (411 cases, total cholesterol<5. 17mmol/L, triglyceride<1.69 mmol/L) revealed that the cases at low HDL-C level had similar rates of AMI events and CHD mortality as those of the entire group (including hyperlipidemia);however, AMI attacks and CHD deaths decreased significantly at the normal and high HDL-C levels.The results demonstrated that the protective effect of HDL against coronary artery disease is more prominent in people with low lipid level.Conclusion Low HDL is an important

  17. A High-Resolution Hubble Space Telescope Study of Apparent Lyman Continuum Leakers at z~3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardi, R. E.; Shapley, A. E.; Steidel, C. C.; Trainor, R. F.; Reddy, N. A.; Siana, B.

    2015-09-01

    We present U336V606J125H160 follow-up Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of 16 z ˜ 3 candidate Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters in the HS1549+1919 field. With these data, we obtain high spatial-resolution photometric redshifts of all sub-arcsecond components of the LyC candidates in order to eliminate foreground contamination and identify robust candidates for leaking LyC emission. Of the 16 candidates, we find one object with a robust LyC detection that is not due to foreground contamination. This object (MD5) resolves into two components; we refer to the LyC-emitting component as MD5b. MD5b has an observed 1500 Å to 900 Å flux-density ratio of {({F}{UV}/{F}{LyC})}{obs}=4.0+/- 2.0, compatible with predictions from stellar population synthesis models. Assuming minimal IGM absorption, this ratio corresponds to a relative (absolute) escape fraction of {f}{esc,{rel}}{MD5{{b}}} = 75%-100% ({f}{esc,{abs}}{MD5{{b}}} = 14%-19%). The stellar population fit to MD5b indicates an age of ≲50 Myr, which is in the youngest 10% of the HST sample and the youngest third of typical z ˜ 3 Lyman break galaxies, and may be a contributing factor to its LyC detection. We obtain a revised, contamination-free estimate for the comoving specific ionizing emissivity at z = 2.85, indicating (with large uncertainties) that star-forming galaxies provide roughly the same contribution as QSOs to the ionizing background at this redshift. Our results show that foreground contamination prevents ground-based LyC studies from obtaining a full understanding of LyC emission from z ˜ 3 star-forming galaxies. Future progress in direct LyC searches is contingent upon the elimination of foreground contaminants through high spatial-resolution observations, and upon acquisition of sufficiently deep LyC imaging to probe ionizing radiation in high-redshift galaxies.

  18. Apparent unitarity violation in high mass region of MbW from a "hidden" top partner at high energy colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengcheng; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-09-01

    Perturbative unitarity conditions have been playing an important role in estimating the energy scale of new physics, including the Higgs mass as the most important example. In this letter, we show that there is a possibility to see the hint of a new physics (top quark partner) indirectly by observing an "apparent" unitarity violation in the distribution of invariant mass of b-jet and W-boson (Mbw) well above the mass of a top quark in a process of a heavy resonance decaying into a pair of top quarks.

  19. Longhi Games, Internal Reservoirs, and Cumulate Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, S. A.

    2009-05-01

    values less than 6 %. Hence all the many rocks below that value are perfect adcumulates with zero residual porosity. Two great surprises emerge from the data. First, there is an abrupt spike from a residual porosity of about 2 to 8 % at 90 PCS, attributed to the great over-production and recovery of Augite and Fe-Ti oxides arising from varied interaction with the internal reservoir of the large magma chamber (Morse, 1979 and 2008 JPet). Second, the Fo range of olivine dramatically shows the same pattern, with Fo range up to 6%; the disparately located grains of olivine have not equilibrated with each other at above 1,000 degrees C and for many thousands of years. This demonstrates the lack of interconnected trapped liquid, hence no mushy zone. Application to meager An-range data in the Skaergaard intrusion shows a similar V-shaped decline to zero porosity (at about 70 PCS) followed by a rise to high values at the Sandwich Horizon. In both intrusions, the late rise signifies increasing cooling by conduction and increasing dominance of feldspar networks that retain increasingly large volumes of trapped liquid. The hard ground of maximum adcumulus growth occurs near the top of the Skaergaard Middle Zone, probably explaining why the sulfide-related Au-PGE ores accumulated there. Quantification of INITIAL porosity in natural rocks is seldom if ever achieved, but can plausibly be mapped from the upper limit of the An range for the Kiglapait intrusion. This parameter must apparently also reach zero at 99 PCS, implying a packing fraction of 1.0 at a minimum rate of accumulation. Hence we may now learn the whole route from initial to final porosity for a large array of cumulate rocks. The results will constrain our hypotheses about accumulation, solidification, and mushy zones for a long time to come.

  20. Porosity in hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, D.W.; Beaucage, G.; Loy, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Multicomponent, or hybrid composites are emerging as precursors to porous materials. Sacrifice of an ephemeral phase can be used to generate porosity, the nature of which depends on precursor structure. Retention of an organic constituent, on the other hand, can add desirable toughness to an otherwise brittle ceramic. We use small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to examine porosity in both simple and hybrid materials. We find that microphase separation controls porosity in almost all systems studied. Pore distributions are controlled by the detailed bonding within and between phases as well as the flexibility of polymeric constituents. Thus hybridization opens new regions of pore distributions not available in simple systems. We look at several sacrificial concepts and show that it is possible to generate multimodal pore size distributions due to the complicated phase structure in the precursor.

  1. Porosity of porous Al alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two porosity models of porous Al alloys with different pore types (ball and polygon shape) were established. The experimental results coincide well with theoretical computations. The porosity of Al alloys (Prc) consists of three parts, porosity caused by preform particles (Prp), additional porosity (Pra), and porosity caused by solidification shrinkage (Prs). Prp is the main part of Prc while Pra is the key for fabricating porous Al alloys successfully in spite of its little contribution to Prc.

  2. A New Method for High-Resolution Apparent Thermal Inertia Mapping of Mars: Application to Valles Marineris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, M.; Mège, D.; Gurgurewicz, J.; Ciążela, J.

    2014-12-01

    The minerals absorb and reflect thermal infrared (TIR) light of the different wavelengths depending on their composition and structure. Thus, every rock absorbs and reflects different wavelengths in TIR and has its own spectral signature. The TIR images are used in the thermal inertia mapping and in its approximation called apparent thermal inertia (ATI). We present the methodology and the high-resolution apparent thermal inertia maps for selected parts of Valles Marineris (Mars). ATI was calculated from surface albedo (A) and diurnal temperature difference (∆T) following the equation: ATI = (1 - A) / ∆T. Albedo was computed by dividing reflected radiation (IR) by incident radiation (II): A = IR / II. After introducing: II = F • cosIA, where F stands for solar constant and IA for incident angle (°), it develops to: A = IR / (F • cosIA). This formula allows us to calculate A on a horizontal surface. Calculating A on an inclined surface requires corrections of IA against relief characteristics (slopes, aspects): IAC = (IA - arctan(tans • cos(e + t • 15° - 180°))), where s is slope (°), e - aspect (°) and t - local solar time (h). A correction was made also for ∆T. The calibration process was more complex because it involved changes in incident radiation (II) over a given time interval (∆T = T13:00 - T6:00). II is a function of: Martian tilt, eccentricity, perihelium longitude, solar longitude (Ls, in °), latitude (φ, in °), local solar time and relief characteristics. Total II, integrated over the time interval, can be calculated following the equation [1]. The results were compared to the existing thermal inertia maps of Mars.

  3. High-density cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI as modifiers of plasma fibrin clot properties in apparently healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ząbczyk, Michał; Hońdo, Łukasz; Krzek, Marzena; Undas, Anetta

    2013-01-01

    Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increases cardiovascular risk, whereas its high levels protect against atherosclerosis via multiple beneficial effects. Dense and poorly lysable fibrin clot formation is observed in cardiovascular disease. We sought to investigate whether HDL-C and its major component apolipoprotein A (Apo A)-I affect fibrin clot properties. In 136 apparently healthy individuals (99 men, 37 women, aged 49-69 years) we determined plasma fibrin clot permeability (Ks coefficient) and lysis time (t50%) together with Apo A-I and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] levels. The median HDL-C level was 1.33  mmol/l (range from 0.77 to 2.19  mmol/l). HDL-C was positively associated with Apo A-I (r = 0.62, P Ks (r = 0.52, P Ks and t50% were associated with Lp(a) (r = -0.42, P Ks (P = 0.00016) and 17% shorter t50% (P = 0.0012) than the remainder. After adjustment for age, fibrinogen, and Lp(a), HDL-C was the independent predictor of Ks (β = 0.7, P < 0.00001) and t50% (β = -0.62, P < 0.00001). This study shows that elevated HDL-C levels are associated with improved fibrin clot permeability and lysis, indicating a novel antithrombotic mechanism underlying the postulated beneficial effects of therapy targeted at HDL-C.

  4. Resistant starch: Variation among high amylose rice varieties and its relationship with apparent amylose content, pasting properties and cooking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; Bergman, Christine J; McClung, Anna M; Everette, Jace D; Tabien, Rodante E

    2017-11-01

    Resistant starch (RS), which is not hydrolyzed in the small intestine, has proposed health benefits. We evaluated 40 high amylose rice varieties for RS content in cooked rice and a 1.9-fold difference was found. Some varieties had more than two-fold greater RS content than a US long-grain intermediate-amylose rice. The high amylose varieties were grouped into four classes according to paste viscosity and gelatinization temperature based on genetic variants of the Waxy and Starch Synthase IIa genes, respectively. RS content was not different between the four paste viscosity-gelatinization temperature classes. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that apparent amylose content and pasting temperature were strong predictors of RS within each class. Two cooking methods, fixed water-to-rice ratio/time and in excess-water/minimum-cook-time, were compared using six rice varieties that were extremes in RS in each of the genetic variant classes, no difference in RS content due to cooking method was observed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Study on Control Methods of Welding Porosity in Laser-arc Hybrid Welding for High Nitrogen Steels%高氮钢激光-电弧复合焊接气孔控制方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力锋; 刘凤德; 刘薇娜; 田淼磊

    2016-01-01

    In order to master the control methods of welding porosity on laser-arc hybrid welding for high nitrogen steel, the effect of weld porosity on arc energy and laser energy and the vibration frequency are studied. Causes of welding porosity are analyzed in terms of porosity rate, and its effect is investigated on stability of welding processes through waveforms of current and voltage and droplet transfer. There is certain relevance between fluid flow in the melt pool and formation of welding porosity, and the influence on welding porosity is analyzed in terms of fluid flow in the melt pool. The keyhole is generated when laser power reaches up to a certain extent and condition of keyhole will affect porosity rate. Influence of porosity rate on condition of keyhole is analyzed according to keyhole's stress situation. The results shows that porosity rate of welding seam increased first and then decreased with the increasing of arc energy or laser energy, and porosity rate of welding seam is reduced to the lowest for just 0.49% while arc energy is 4 800 J (I=200 A,U=24 V) and the porosity rate of welding seam is only 0.14% when laser power is 2.8 kW, but porosity rate of welding seam is reduced greatly after work pieces are vibrated during hybrid welding. Porosity rate of welding seam decreased first and then increased with the increasing of vibration frequency. The number of welding porosity is inhibited efficiently by suitable arc energy or laser power, and inhibitory effect of welding porosity is best while vibration frequency amount to 35 Hz.%为了掌握高氮钢复合焊接气孔控制的有效方法,研究电弧能量、激光能量和振动频率对焊缝气孔的影响。从气孔率方面分析焊缝气孔的产生原因,并从电流和电压波形及熔滴过渡方面分析其对焊接过程稳定性的影响。熔池流动与焊缝气孔具有一定的关联性,并从熔池流动状态方面分析其对气孔的影响。激光匙孔的形成需要一

  6. The effects of numerical-model complexity and observation type on estimated porosity values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Green, Christopher T.

    2015-09-01

    The relative merits of model complexity and types of observations employed in model calibration are compared. An existing groundwater flow model coupled with an advective transport simulation of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah (USA), is adapted for advective transport, and effective porosity is adjusted until simulated tritium concentrations match concentrations in samples from wells. Two calibration approaches are used: a "complex" highly parameterized porosity field and a "simple" parsimonious model of porosity distribution. The use of an atmospheric tracer (tritium in this case) and apparent ages (from tritium/helium) in model calibration also are discussed. Of the models tested, the complex model (with tritium concentrations and tritium/helium apparent ages) performs best. Although tritium breakthrough curves simulated by complex and simple models are very generally similar, and there is value in the simple model, the complex model is supported by a more realistic porosity distribution and a greater number of estimable parameters. Culling the best quality data did not lead to better calibration, possibly because of processes and aquifer characteristics that are not simulated. Despite many factors that contribute to shortcomings of both the models and the data, useful information is obtained from all the models evaluated. Although any particular prediction of tritium breakthrough may have large errors, overall, the models mimic observed trends.

  7. Low-Density and High Porosity Hydrogen Storage Materials Built from Ultra-Light Elements. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Pingyun [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2014-01-10

    A number of significant advances have been achieved, opening up new opportunities for the synthetic development of novel porous materials and their energy-related applications including gas storage and separation and catalysis. These include lithium-based metal-organic frameworks, magnesium-based metal-organic frameworks, and high gas uptake in porous frameworks with high density of open donor sites.

  8. New Element Organic Frameworks Based on Sn, Sb, and Bi, with Permanent Porosity and High Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fritsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present new element organic frameworks based on Sn, Sb and Bi atoms connected via organic linkers by element-carbon bonds. The open frameworks are characterized by specific surface areas (BET of up to 445 m2 g-1 and a good stability under ambient conditions resulting from a highly hydrophobic inner surface. They show good performance as heterogeneous catalysts in the cyanosylilation of benzaldehyde as a test reaction. Due to their catalytic activity, this class of materials might be able to replace common homogeneous element-organic and often highly toxic catalysts especially in the food industry.

  9. High porosity and surface area self-doped carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile as efficient electrocatalyst towards oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Chenghang; Zheng, Ruiping; Shu, Ting; Liu, Lina; Liao, Shijun

    2016-08-01

    A highly porous N self-doped carbon catalyst, with three dimensional morphology/structures and high surface area (810.8 m2 g-1), is prepared through a pyrolysis procedure with polyacrylonitrile as the precursor, and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the templates/pore former. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity and stability towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium, as well as outstanding methanol tolerance and stability. For our optimal catalyst PAC/ZnO-900, its half-wave potential is 26 mV more positive (0.859 V, vs. RHE) than that of commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.833 V, vs. RHE), and its current density at 0.88 V (vs. RHE) is almost twice as high as that of Pt/C catalyst (-1.922 and -0.957 mA cm-2, respectively). It is found that the addition of ZnO plays a crucial role for the formation of catalysts' 3D porous structures and high ORR performance. With the addition of ZnO in precursor, the surface area of the catalyst is enhanced by 13 times, and the ORR activity is enhanced by 10 times. Also, pyrolyzing temperature seems to be another important factor significantly affected the structure and performance of the catalyst.

  10. Experimental study of porosity properties of tunnel's high performance porous cement concrete%隧道高性能多孔水泥混凝土孔隙率特性的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时啸林; 扈惠敏

    2012-01-01

    孔隙率是隧道路面多孔水泥混凝土的重要技术指标之一,保证多孔混凝土试件成型后或路面铺筑后的实测孔隙率与目标孔隙率基本一致,同时保证其具有足够大小的有效孔隙率,是高性能多孔混凝土隧道路面配合比设计的关键.依据隧道路面的功能要求,文章选定目标孔隙率为18%.级配对混凝土强度影响非常明显,随着10~15mm集料比例的增加,强度先增大后减小.当采用玄武岩等吸水率偏大的集料制备多孔水泥混凝土时,在有效孔隙率计算中应考虑集料吸水的影响.矿料级配对孔隙率的影响规律为:随着10~15 mm集料比例的增大,计算孔隙率变化幅度很小,且与目标孔隙率(18%)接近;有效孔隙率呈增大的趋势,实测孔隙率先减小后增大;级配2#-2实测孔隙率最小且与目标孔隙率最接近.依据孔隙率及强度试验结果,选取级配2#-2为最佳级配.%Porosity is one of the important technical indexes of porous cement concrete which is used in tunnel pavement. The key of mix proportion design of tunnel's high performance porous cement concrete is to make the observed porosity be consistent with the target porosity after forming the porous concrete specimen or paving the pavement, and to ensure that it has enough effective porosity. Based on the functional requirement of the tunnel pavement, the target porosity of 18% is chosen in this paper. Gradation has significant effect on the strength of concrete. With the increase of the ratio of 10—15 mmaggregate, the strength firstly increases and then decreases. When the aggregate with higher water absorptivity such as basalt is adopted to prepare porous cement concrete, the effect of the aggregate's water absorption should be considered in the calculation of the effective porosity. The affecting principles of the aggregate gradation on the porosity are as follows: with the increase of ratio of 10—15 mm aggregate, the calculation

  11. Upscaling conductivity and porosity in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong

    2004-01-01

    An empirical formula is presented to upscale the conductivity of 3-dimensional heterogeneous porous media, in which the distribution of local-scale conductivity is non-Gaussian with a high variance. The upscaled conductivity is determined as a function of the volumetric proportion, the spatial connectivity and the statistical geometric length of high-permeable inclusions, and the arithmetic mean of conductivities of all hydrofacies. A systematic comparison to other traditional upscaling methods indicates that this empirical formula provides a better estimation of the equivalent conductivity. In the second part of this study, numerical experiments of solute migration reveal that porosity also needs to be upscaled to capture the transport of contaminants in a heterogeneous medium using an effective or upscaled homogeneous medium. This is due to the tendency of contaminants to be preferrentially transported by 3-dimensional pathways composed of high-permeable materials in heterogeneous aquifer systems. The apparent difference between the actual transport velocity of contaminants and the upscaled velocity, based on the equivalent conductivity, forces upscaling of porosity. Further systematic analyses demonstrate that the upscaled porosity follows a non-linear trend as the content of high-permeable sediments decreases. Resultant upscaled porosity, with values varying between 0.004 and 1.5, is beyond the definition of the traditional porosity on the representative elementary volume (REV) scale. When the content of high-permeable materials is less than 30%, the upscaling of porosity is critical in the simulation of the contaminant transport in a heterogeneous medium using an upscaled, homogeneous counterpart.

  12. Reaction-induced porosity and onset of carbonation in abyssal peridotites: insights from 3D high-resolution microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Niels; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Serpentinites are products of hydrous alteration of ultramafic rocks and they are particularly common at slow-spreading mid-oceanic ridges, where tectonic faulting causes exposure of abyssal peridotites at the seafloor. Upon interaction with seawater, the chemical composition as well as the physical properties of peridotites change, and both hydration and carbonation are common. To understand the underlying processes, we performed a detailed study on harzburgite samples from ODP Leg 209 Site 1270D, located at the Mid-Atlantic ridge near 14°45'N. The study focused on one sample taken just 0.75 metres below seafloor. Detailed thin section microscopy revealed a high degree of serpentinization, but relict orthopyroxene (Mg/[Mg+Fe] = 0.91-0.92) and spinel are present. Locally, minor amounts of secondary talc and amphibole were found. Former olivine is completely replaced by serpentine (Mg/[Mg+Fe] = 0.95-0.97) and magnetite in mesh textures. Mesh centers commonly consist either of empty space (

  13. Monolayer MoS2-Graphene Hybrid Aerogels with Controllable Porosity for Lithium-Ion Batteries with High Reversible Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lianfu; Lin, Binghui; Li, Xiaoming; Song, Xiufeng; Xia, Hui; Li, Liang; Zeng, Haibo

    2016-02-03

    Monolayer MoS2 nanosheets (NSs) are promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries because all redox reactions take place at the surface without lithium-ion diffusion limit. However, the expanded band gap of monolayer MoS2 NSs (∼1.8 eV) compared to their bulk counterparts (∼1.2 eV) and restacking tendency due to the van der Waals forces result in poor electron transfer and loss of the structure advantage. Here, a facile approach is developed to fabricate the MoS2-graphene aerogels comprising controlled three-dimensional (3D) porous architectures constructed by interconnected monolayer MoS2-graphene hybrid NSs. The robust 3D architectures combining with the monolayer feature of the hybrid NSs not only prevent the MoS2 and graphene NSs from restacking, but also enable fast electrode kinetics due to the surface reaction mechanism and highly conductive graphene matrix. As a consequence, the 3D porous monolayer MoS2-graphene composite aerogels exhibit a large reversible capacity up to 1200 mAh g(-1) as well as outstanding cycling stability and rate performance, making them promising as advanced anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Studies on the mechanism by which a high intake of soybean oil depresses the apparent digestibility of fibre in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.L.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.; Cone, J.W.; Vries, de H.T.; Hallebeek, J.M.; Hovenier, R.; Kuilen, van der J.; Huurdeman, C.M.; Verstappen, D.C.G.M.; Gresnigt, M.C.; Beynen, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    An increased intake of soybean oil at the expense of an iso-energetic amount of non-structural carbohydrates reduces the apparent digestibility of fibre in horses. Literature data indicate that bile acids and linoleic acid (C18:2 n ¿ 6) may inhibit growth of pure cultures of microorganisms. In the p

  15. Reaction-induced porosity and onset of low-temperature carbonation in abyssal peridotites: Insights from 3D high-resolution microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Niels; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Bach, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In a drillcore sample of serpentinized harzburgite from the uppermost oceanic crust (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, ODP Leg 209, Site 1270), we demonstrate using high-resolution 3D-microtomography that micron-sized open cavities are present. The development of porosity is interpreted to result from dissolution of brucite and/or olivine. Petrographic observations indicate that voids are integrated in a network of carbonate veins, the formation of which is linked to changing alkalinity in conjunction with dissolution reactions. Partial carbonate filling of pore spaces indicates that under static conditions low-temperature carbonation leads to clogging of fluid pathways and thus to a reduction in permeability. Electron microprobe analyses show that the inner walls of open voids are lined with Fe-rich precipitates. We propose that the iron in those phases was released by brucite or olivine dissolution and was subsequently oxidized and precipitated as ferric hydroxide. Thermodynamic computations show that this process may be a potential source of catabolic energy for microorganisms inhabiting serpentinites. The proposed carbonation mechanism implies that carbonate precipitation may start soon after exposure of the abyssal peridotites, when dissolution of brucite and weathering of olivine begin, and continue until the phases become inaccessible to seawater. Predicting carbonation rates of abyssal peridotites will hence require understanding of permeability reactions.

  16. Measurement of porosity in a composite high explosive as a function of pressing conditions by ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mang, Joseph Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hjelm, Rex P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Elizabeth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have used ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) with contrast variation to measure the porosity (voids and binder-filled regions) in a composite high explosive, PBX 9501, formulated with a deuterated binder. Little is known about the microstructure of pressed PBX 9501 parts and thus how it is affected by processing. Here, we explore the effect of varying the pressing intensity on the PBX 9501 microstructure. Disk-shaped samples of PBX 9501 were die-pressed with applied pressures ranging between 10,000 and 29,000 psi at 90 C. Five samples were prepared at each pressure that differed in the fraction of deuterated binder, facilitating variation of the neutron scattering length density contrast ({Delta}{rho}) and thus, the resolution of microstructural details. The sample composition was determined by calculation of the Porod Invariant as a function of {Delta}{rho} and compared with compositional estimates obtained from the bulk sample density. Structural modeling of the USANS data, at different levels of contrast, assuming both spherical and cylindrical morphologies, allowed the mean size and size distribution of voids and binder-filled regions to be determined. A decrease in the mean diameter of binder-filled regions was found with increasing pressing intensity, while the mean void diameter showed no significant change.

  17. Quantifying porosity, compressibility and permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Frykman, Peter

    (XRD) of shale samples show about 50% silt and high content of kaolinite in the clay fraction when compared with offshore samples from the Central Graben. Porosity measurements from helium porosimetry-mercury immersion (HPMI), mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance...... (NMR) show that, the MICP porosity is 9-10% points lower than HPMI and NMR porosity. Compressibility result shows that deep shale is stiffer in situ than normally assumed in geotechnical modelling and that static compressibility corresponds with dynamic one only at the begining of unloading stress...... strain data. We found that Kozeny's modelled permeability fall in the same order of magnitude with measured permeability for shale rich in kaolinite but overestimates permeability by two to three orders of magnitudes for shale with high content of smectite. The empirical Yang and Aplin model gives good...

  18. Plant fibre composites - porosity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo; Thygesen, Anders; Lilholt, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition of the co......Plant fibre composites contain typically a relatively large amount of porosity which influences their performance. A model, based on a modified rule of mixtures, is presented to include the influence of porosity on the composite stiffness. The model integrates the volumetric composition...... of the composites with their mechanical properties. The fibre weight fraction is used as an independent parameter to calculate the complete volumetric composition. A maximum obtainable stiffness of the composites is calculated at a certain transition fibre weight fraction, which is characterised by a best possible...... combination of high fibre volume fraction and low porosity. The model is validated with experimental data from the literature on several types of composites. A stiffness diagram is presented to demonstrate that the calculations can be used for tailoring and design of composites with a given profile...

  19. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    OpenAIRE

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J.; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity durin...

  20. Convergence role of transcriptional coactivator p300 and apparent modification on HMCs metabolic memory induced by high glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong SU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the protein expression of transcriptional coactivator p300, acetylated histone H3 (Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 in human renal mesangial cell (HMCs as imitative "metabolic memory" in vitro, and explore the potential role of convergence point of p300. Methods  The HMCs were divided into the following groups: ① High glucose metabolic memory model: normal glucose group (NG, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×2d, high glucose group (HG, 25mmol/L D-glucose×2d, memory groups (M1, M2, M3, 25mmol/L D-glucose×2days + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d, 6d or 9d, persisting normal glucose group (NG, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×9d. ② Advanced glycation end products memory model: normal glucose group (NG, 5.5mmol/ L D-glucose×2d, NG+AGEs group (AGEs, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose+250µg/ml AGEs×2d; AGEs memory group (AGEs-M, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose + 250µg/ml AGEs×2d + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d; BSA control group (NG+BSA, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose + 250µg/ml BSA×2d. ③ H2O2 was used to simulate oxidative stress memory model: normal glucose group (NG, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×2d, NG+H2O2 group (H2O2, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose +100µmol/L H2O2×30min; H2O2 memory group [(5.5mmol/ L D-glucose + 100µmol/L H2O2×30min + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d]; normal glucose control group (NG3, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d. ④ Transfection with PKCβ2 memory model: normal glucose group (NG, 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×2d; high glucose group (HG, 25mmol/L D-glucose×2d; memory group (M, 25mmol/L D-glucose×2d + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d; Ad5-null memory group (HN, 25mmol/L D-glucose + Ad5-null×2d + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d; PKCβ2 memory group (PO, 25mmol/L D-glucose + Ad5-PKCβ2×2d + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d; inhibitor of PKCβ2 memory group (PI, 25mmol/L D-glucose×2d + 10µmol/L CGP53353 + 5.5mmol/L D-glucose×3d. The expression of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was detected by fluorescence microscope and fluorescence microplate reader. The expression levels of p300, Ac-H3, Ac-H4 and PKCβ2 proteins were

  1. FABRICATION OF POROUS ALUMINA CERAMICS WITH HIGH POROSITY AND HIGH STRENGTH%高气孔率及高强度多孔氧化铝陶瓷的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟渊; 汪长安; 周立忠; 黄勇

    2008-01-01

    In an ultra low solid loading slurry system constituted of tert-butyl alcohol,acrylamide and alumina powder,the influences of different dispersants and pH values on the slurry theology were investigated.When the dispersant is citric acid with a pH value of around 6,alumina slurry with 1 0%(in volume)solid loading exhibits the lowest viscosity.Since tert-butyl alcohol is extremely easy to volatilize,porous alumina ceramics with high porosity and high strength Were successfully fabricated by the gel-casting method.The effects of solid loading and sintering temperature on the porosity and compressive strength were also researched.The eompressive strength of sintered alumina ceramics with 74%porosity can over 8MPa.%在叔丁醇、丙烯酰胺、氧化铝组成的超低固相含量的浆料体系中,研究了分散剂、pH值等参数对浆料流变学性能的影响规律.采用柠檬酸作为分散剂、pH值约为6时,体积分数为10%的Al2O3浆料具有最低的黏度.利用叔丁醇极易挥发的特点,采用凝胶注模的工艺,制备了高气孔率及高强度的多孔氧化铝陶瓷,研究了固相含量和烧结温度对气孔率和压缩强度的影响规律,当气孔率为74%时,多孔氧化铝陶瓷的压缩强度在8MPa以上.

  2. Graded-porosity heat-pipe wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    To maximize the capacity of a nonarterial heat pipe, a wick is considered whose porosity is allowed to vary axially along its length. At every axial location the porosity is set no lower than required to maintain the wick in a nearly saturated state under the maximum heat-transport rate. The result is a wick whose permeability is everywhere as high as possible. The differential equation that governs the optimum porosity variation is solved numerically between a condenser-end boundary condition that just prevents a liquid slug or puddle in the vapor spaces and an evaporator-end boundary condition that just prevents circumferential groove dry-up. Experimental performance measurements for an ammonia heat pipe are presented.

  3. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  4. Structural aspects and porosity features of nano-size high surface area alumina-silica mixed oxide catalyst generated through hybrid sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmaja, P. [Ceramic Technology Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Trivandrum 695019, Kerala (India)]. E-mail: padmavasudev@yahoo.com; Warrier, K.G.K. [Ceramic Technology Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Trivandrum 695019, Kerala (India)]. E-mail: kgk_warrier@yahoo.com; Padmanabhan, M. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686560, Kerala (India); Wunderlich, W. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, 466-8555 Nagoya (Japan); Berry, F.J. [Department of Chemistry, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Mortimer, M. [Department of Chemistry, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Creamer, N.J. [Department of Chemistry, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-10

    Alumina-silica mixed oxide nano-catalyst materials with compositions 83.6 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-16.4 wt.% SiO{sub 2} (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.1SiO{sub 2}), 71.82 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-28.18 wt.% SiO{sub 2} (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.2SiO{sub 2}), 62.84 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-37.16 wt.% SiO{sub 2} (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.3SiO{sub 2}) and 56.03 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-43.97 wt.% SiO{sub 2} (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.4SiO{sub 2}) have been prepared by a hybrid sol-gel technique using boehmite as the precursor for alumina and tetraethoxysilane as that for silica. The bonding characteristics and coordination features around Al and Si in the mixed oxide catalysts have been studied using FTIR and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR after calcination at 400 deg. C which is the temperature region where cross-condensation is seen to take place. A high BET specific surface area of 287 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} is obtained for 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.1SiO{sub 2} mixed oxide composition. The porosity features are further established by BET adsorption isotherms and pore size distribution analysis. The temperature-programmed desorption studies showed more surface active sites for the silica-rich composition, suggesting enhanced catalytic potential. The TEM features of the mixed oxides showed a homogeneous distribution of alumina and silica phases with particle sizes in the nano-range. The low silica-containing mixed oxide showed a needle-like morphology with a high aspect ratio of 1:50 and {approx}10 nm particle size while the silica-rich composition had particle size in a wide range ({approx}20-75 nm)

  5. Effect of a high-palmitic acid fat supplement on milk production and apparent total-tract digestibility in high- and low-milk yield dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, D E; Ying, Y; Harvatine, K J

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a high-palmitic acid fat supplement was tested in 12 high-producing (mean = 42.1 kg/d) and 12 low-producing (mean = 28.9 kg/d) cows arranged in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design. Experimental periods were 21 d, with 18d of diet adaptation and 3 d of sample collection. Treatments were (1) control (no supplemental fat), (2) high-palmitic acid (PA) supplement (84% C16:0), and (3) Ca salts of palm fatty acid (FA) supplement (Ca-FA). The PA supplement had no effect on milk production, but decreased dry matter intake by 7 and 9% relative to the control in high- and low-producing cows, respectively, and increased feed efficiency by 8.5% in high-producing cows compared with the control. Milk fat concentration and yield were not affected by PA relative to the control in high- or low-producing cows, although PA increased the yield of milk 16-C FA by more than 85 g/d relative to the control. The Ca-FA decreased milk fat concentration compared with PA in high-, but not in low-producing cows. In agreement, Ca-FA dramatically increased milk fat concentration of trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (>300%) compared with PA in high-producing cows, but not in low-producing cows. No effect of treatment on milk protein concentration or yield was detected. The PA supplement also increased 16-C FA apparent digestibility by over 10% and increased total FA digestibility compared with the control in high- and low-producing cows. During short-term feeding, palmitic acid supplementation did not increase milk or milk fat yield; however, it was efficiently absorbed, increased feed efficiency, and increased milk 16-C FA yield, while minimizing alterations in ruminal biohydrogenation commonly observed for other unsaturated fat supplements. Longer-term experiments will be necessary to determine the effects on energy balance and changes in body reserves.

  6. Preparation of Porosity-Graded SOFC Anode Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtappels, P.; Sorof, C.; Verbraeken, M.C.; Rambert, S.; Vogt, U.

    2006-01-01

    Porosity graded anode substrates for solid oxide fuel cells are considered to optimise the gas transport through the substrate by maintaining a high electrochemical activity for fuel oxidation at the anode/solid electrolyte interface. In this work, the fabrication of porosity graded anode substrates

  7. Large pore size and high porosity of TiO2 photoanode for excellent photovoltaic performance of CdS quantum dot sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Heping; Lin, Hong; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Yizhu; Oron, Dan

    2013-02-01

    While holding great potential as sunlight absorbers, quantum dots (QDs), which are generally much larger than dye molecule in size, which makes it more difficult to deposit them on the surface of TiO2. As a result, relatively low QD loading is now one of the most challenging issues for improving the photovoltaic performance of QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). In this study, TiO2 photoanodes with different pore sizes and porosities were constructed by systematically varying the solid content of the TiO2 paste. It was confirmed that reducing the solid content resulted in both larger pore sizes and higher porosities. CdS quantum dots were then deposited on these different electrodes by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, with either 4 or 7 repetitive cycles. By correlating the photovoltaic performances of QDSSCs with different solid contents of TiO2 paste and number of SILAR cycles of CdS QD deposition, it was found that the combination of 7 SILAR cycles with 10% electrode solid content yielded the highest overall energy conversion efficiency. In particular this cell exhibited an outstanding open-circuit photovoltage up to 640 mV using a polysulfide electrolyte, which currently ranks the highest among reported literature. This outcome is due to the fact that a 10%-solid-content provided the largest pore sizes and the highest porosity for the QDs deposition, while the 7 SILAR cycles guaranteed the sufficient CdS QD loading which is favorable for light harvesting.

  8. A simple procedure for estimating soil porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Holden, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation from mismanagement is of international concern. Simple, accessible tools for rapidly assessing impacts of soil management are required. Soil structure is a key component of soil quality and porosity is a useful indicator of structure. We outline a version of a procedure described by Piwowarczyk et al. (2011) used to estimate porosity of samples taken during a soil quality survey of 38 sites across Ireland as part of the Government funded SQUARE (Soil Quality Assessment Research) project. This required intact core (r = 2.5 cm, H = 5cm) samples taken at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, to be covered with muslin cloth at one end and secured with a jubilee clip. Samples were saturated in sealable water tanks for ≈ 64 hours, then allowed to drain by gravity for 24 hours, at which point Field Capacity (F.C.) was assumed to have been reached, followed by oven drying with weight determined at each stage. This allowed the calculation of bulk density and the estimation of water content at saturation and following gravitational drainage, thus total and functional porosity. The assumption that F.C. was reached following 24 hours of gravitational drainage was based on the Soil Moisture Deficit model used in Ireland to predict when soils are potentially vulnerable to structural damage and used nationally as a management tool. Preliminary results indicate moderately strong, negative correlations between estimated total porosity at 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth (rs = -0.7, P soil quality scores of the Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) method which was conducted at each survey site. Estimated functional porosity at 5-10 cm depth was found to moderately, negatively correlate with VESS scores (rs = - 0.5, P indicating porosity of a large quantity of samples taken at numerous sites or if done periodically, temporal changes in porosity at a field scale, indicating the impacts of soil management. Reference Piwowarczyk, A., Giuliani, G. & Holden, N.M. 2011. Can soil

  9. Porosity evolution in Icelandic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, B.; Kosakowski, G.; Kulik, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mineralogical alteration of reservoir rocks, driven by fluid circulation in natural or enhanced hydrothermal systems, is likely to influence the long-term performance of geothermal power generation. A key factor is the change of porosity due to dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary phases. Porosity changes will affect fluid circulation and solute transport, which, in turn, influence mineralogical alteration. This study is part of the Sinergia COTHERM project (COmbined hydrological, geochemical and geophysical modeling of geotTHERMal systems, grant number CRSII2_141843/1) that is an integrative research project aimed at improving our understanding of the sub-surface processes in magmatically-driven natural geothermal systems. These are typically high enthalphy systems where a magmatic pluton is located at a few kilometers depth. These shallow plutons increase the geothermal gradient and trigger the circulation of hydrothermal waters with a steam cap forming at shallow depth. Field observations suggest that active and fossil Icelandic hydrothermal systems are built from a superposition of completely altered and completely unaltered layers. With help of 1D and 2D reactive transport models (OpenGeoSys-GEM code), we investigate the reasons for this finding, by studying the mineralogical evolution of protoliths with different initial porosities at different temperatures and pressures, different leaching water composition and gas content, and different porosity geometries (i.e. porous medium versus fractured medium). From this study, we believe that the initial porosity of protoliths and volume changes due to their transformation into secondary minerals are key factors to explain the different alteration extents observed in field studies. We also discuss how precipitation and dissolution kinetics can influence the alteration time scales.

  10. Surface Roughness and Porosity of Hydrated Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ficker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available . Seventy-eight graphs were plotted to describe and analyze the dependences of the height and roughness irregularities on the water-to-cement ratio and on the porosity of the cement hydrates. The results showed unambiguously that the water-to-cement ratio or equivalently the porosity of the specimens has a decisive influence on the irregularities of the fracture surfaces of this material. The experimental results indicated the possibility that the porosity or the value of the water-to-cement ratio might be inferred from the height irregularities of the fracture surfaces. It was hypothesized that there may be a similarly strong correlation between porosity and surface irregularity, on the one hand, and some other highly porous solids, on the other, and thus the same possibility to infer porosity from the surfaces of their fracture remnants.

  11. Mechanistic Effects of Porosity on Structural Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siver, Andrew

    As fiber reinforced composites continue to gain popularity as primary structures in aerospace, automotive, and powersports industries, quality control becomes an extremely important aspect of materials and mechanical engineering. The ability to recognize and control manufacturing induced defects can greatly reduce the likelihood of unexpected catastrophic failure. Porosity is the result of trapped volatiles or air bubbles during the layup process and can significantly compromise the strength of fiber reinforced composites. A comprehensive study was performed on an AS4C-UF3352 TCR carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg system to determine the effect of porosity on flexural, shear, low-velocity impact, and damage residual strength properties. Autoclave cure pressure was controlled to induce varying levels of porosity to construct six laminates with porosity concentrations between 0-40%. Porosity concentrations were measured using several destructive and nondestructive techniques including resin burnoff, sectioning and optical analysis, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. Ultrasonic transmission, thermography, and CT scanning provided nondestructive imaging to evaluate impact damage. A bilinear relationship accurately characterizes the change in mechanical properties with increasing porosity. Strength properties are relatively unaffected when porosity concentrations are below approximately 2.25% and decrease linearly by up to 40% in high porosity specimens.

  12. Turbulent high-latitude oceanic intrusions—details of non-smooth apparent isopycnal transport West of Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Hans; Greinert, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Filament intrusions are observed in high-resolution temperature (T) measurements from a 100-m and several month-long mooring in the Fram Strait in around 400-m water depth at the continental slope West of Svalbard (Spitsbergen, Norway). In this dynamic environment, a wide variety of intrusive layers are observed with thicknesses between 5 and 80 m with warmer water between cooler waters above and below. The layers typically last from several hours up to 1 day, exceeding the local buoyancy period but not lasting as long as intrusive layers in the open ocean. The intrusions are a result of an intermingling of Arctic and North-Atlantic waters and generated in the basins interior and locally via internal wave steepening upon the sloping bottom. Freely propagating semidiurnal lunar internal tides cannot exist without background vorticity at these high latitudes. Strongly nonlinear turbulent bores are not observed at the tidal periodicity, but wave fronts occur at the sub-inertial frequency of dominant baroclinic instability. The fronts are in part associated with near-buoyancy frequency internal waves (breaking). The details of the moored T observations and their spectral content demonstrate the non-smooth, relatively turbulent development including convective overturning and shear-induced instabilities when intrusions disperse in presumably salinity-compensated isopycnal layers.

  13. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  14. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  15. Extending the lanthanide-terephthalate system: Isolation of an unprecedented Tb(III)-based coordination polymer with high potential porosity and luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Natur, François; Calvez, Guillaume; Freslon, Stéphane; Daiguebonne, Carole; Bernot, Kevin; Guillou, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    A novel coordination polymer with chemical formula {[Tb(bdc)1.5(H2O)]ṡ(DMF)(H2O)}∞ (1) has been synthesized by reaction between 1,4-benzene-dicarboxylic acid (H2bdc) and di-cationic hexanuclear entity [Tb6O(OH)8(NO3)6(H2O)12]2+ in an ethylene glycol (EG)/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) mixture. This compound has been obtained as single crystals by slow evaporation in air at room temperature. If the hexanuclear entity is destroyed during the reaction, the coordination polymer that is obtained is original and presents promising potential micro-porosity and luminescent properties. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C12/c1 (No. 15) with the cell parameters a = 23.7540(1) Å, b = 10.5390(4) Å, c = 19.7580(3) Å, β = 125.8100(1)° and Z = 8.

  16. effects of sintering temperature on the density and porosity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... turing. 2. Sintering Mechanism. Sintering occurs by atomic diffusion processes that are stimulated by high .... of the experiments was repeated three times. 3.2. ... test revealed the variation of porosity across the mi- crostructure ...

  17. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, C.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  18. Mode-of-Failure Transitions in High Porosity Sedimentary and Ignimbrite Deposits, and Implications for Fault-Zone Structure and Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, L. B.; Rawling, G. C.; Wilson, J. E.; Tobin, H.

    2001-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that fault-zone deformation processes, and thus structures and fault-zone architecture, vary with the petrophysical properties of the protolith. Factors controlling whether or not open fractures form within a given fault zone are of particular importance to understanding fault-zone impacts on fluid flow. We discuss three examples of mode-of-failure transitions from strike-slip and normal faults in sedimentary and volcanic protoliths. Each example illustrates a mechanism by which porosity was reduced over time, resulting in changes in the mechanical behavior of the faulted material. These temporal variations are recorded by overprinting relationships within fault-zone architectural elements. The Sand Hill normal growth fault cuts poorly lithified sediments of the Rio Grande rift, NM. Architectural elements include a fault core bound by tabular mixed zones, which are in turn bracketed by deformation-band damage zones. The mixed zones have been described in poorly lithified sediments only; they consist of material derived from adjacent beds during slip, which has been disaggregated and tectonically mixed. Structures developed during mixing and particulate flow include foliations defined by compositional bands and aligned grains and attenuated and disarticulated beds. These structures are cut by deformation bands in the footwall mixed zone. We interpret these relationships as recording a transition from bulk particulate flow (in normally consolidated sediment) to localized shear within deformation bands (in overconsolidated sediment) as the footwall of the fault was syntectonically exhumed. Mixed zones are also present in the San Gregorio fault zone, a branch of the San Andreas fault system. The San Gregorio fault was active through sedimentation and lithification of rocks currently exposed along the CA coast. Attenuated and boudinaged beds on the SW side of the fault are cut by fractures and veins. We interpret these features as

  19. Exploring the possibility to detect recent temporal changes in highly disturbed sedimentary records through sampling repetitions and core comparisons of porosity and sand content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, S; Bellucci, L G; Romano, S; Piazza, R; Turetta, C; Vecchiato, M; Nhon, D H; Frignani, M

    2015-07-01

    Dating of sediment cores in dynamic environments (such as tropical coastal lagoons) is often impossible to achieve, due to the difficulty to recover continuous and undisturbed records. Detailed temporal definition of environmental changes cannot be assured, but there is the possibility that information retained in such sediments can still provide useful insights on local or large-scale sedimentary dynamics, when a specific strategy is adopted. This latter consists in repeated core samplings at the same location and in the comparison of core profiles for basic and easily measurable parameters (porosity and sand content). This approach was tested on sediment cores, collected repeatedly during the period 2005-2010, at the same site of the Thi Nai Lagoon (central Vietnam). The proposed procedure was able to evidence the impact on lagoon sediments of activities linked to the construction of industrial settlements in the area, with dredging removing a consistent sediment layer from 2005 to 2008 and waste dumping providing additional sediment input in the following period. Simple statistic confirmed this scenario, together with core profiles of PCBs, As, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The procedure represents a simple tool to study coastal dynamics in places where the level of accuracy of traditional sediment radiodating cannot be reached. Several ameliorations are suggested in order to help developing the monitoring of sedimentary processes in poorly studied areas.

  20. Remembering apparent behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment systematically investigates the role of narrative templates (Wertsch, 2002) in remembering. To stimulate the construction of a diversity of narratives I used Heider and Simmel’s (1944) celebrated “apparent behavior” film, in which geometric shapes moving around a screen...

  1. Carbonate porosity: some remarks; Porosidade em reservatorios carbonaticos: algumas consideracoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadini, Adali Ricardo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao]. E-mail: spadini@petrobras.com.br; Marcal, Rosely de Araujo [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-05-01

    Carbonate rocks are the major reservoirs of the largest super-giants fields in the world, including the Ghawar Field in Saudi Arabia, where the producing oil reservoir is the late Jurassic Arab-D limestone with five million barrels per day. Despite the great susceptibility to early diagenesis, that can dramatically modify the porous media, porosity values of carbonates remain essentially the same as that of deposition before burial. Porosity loss is essentially a subsurface process with a drastic reduction below 2500 m of burial depth. The occurrence of good reservoirs deeply buried, sometimes below 4,000 m, indicate that porosity can be preserved in subsurface in response to a series of mechanisms such as early oil emplacement, framework rigidity, abnormal pore pressure, among others. Percolation of geothermal fluids is a process considered to be responsible for generation of porosity in subsurface resulting in some good reservoir rocks. In Campos Basin, areas with burial around 2000 m, petrophysical data show a cyclic distribution that coincides with the shoaling upward cycles typical of the Albian carbonates. The greatest permeabilities coincide with the grain stones of the top of the cycles while the peloidal/oncolite wackestones/pack stones at the base show low values, reflecting the depositional texture. These relationships indicate that preservation of depositional porosity was very effective. The preservation of high porosity values for all the facies are related to early oil entrance in the reservoirs. In some cases, the presence of porosities of almost 30% in fine-grained peloidal carbonates, 3000 m of burial, without any clear effective preservation mechanism, suggest that corrosive subsurface brines have played an important role in porosity evolution. In Santos Basin, where reservoirs are deeply buried, only the grain stones have preserved porosity. The associated low energy facies has virtually no porosity. In this case, the depositional texture

  2. Porosity and Mechanical Strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Guglielmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the porosity and the mechanical strength of an Autoclaved Clayey Cellular Concrete (ACCC with the binder produced with 75 wt% kaolinite clay and 25 wt% Portland cement. Aluminum powder was used as foaming agent, from 0.2 wt% to 0.8 wt%, producing specimens with different porosities. The results show that the specimens with higher content of aluminum presented pore coalescence, which can explain the lower porosity of these samples. The porosities obtained with the aluminum contents used in the study were high (approximately 80%, what accounts for the low mechanical strength of the investigated cellular concretes (maximum of 0.62 MPa. Nevertheless, comparing the results obtained in this study to the ones for low temperature clayey aerated concrete with similar compositions, it can be observed that autoclaving is effective for increasing the material mechanical strength.

  3. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Sea cliffs 40 km east of Almeria, southeastern Spain, expose upper Miocene reefs and patch reefs of the Plomo formation. These reefs are formed of scleractinian corals, calcareous algae, and mollusks. The reef cores are as much as 65 m thick and several hundred meters wide. Fore-reef talus beds extend 1,300 m across and are 40 m thick. The reefs and reef breccias are composed of calcific dolomite. They lie on volcanic rocks that have a K-Ar date of 11.5 m.y. and in turn are overlain by the upper Miocene Vicar Formation. In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity is both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Plomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Dolomite rhombs are between 10 and 30 μ across. More moldic porosity was formed by the dissolution of the calclte bioclasts. Some porosity reduction has occurred by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsurface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene(?) and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef

  4. Remembering apparent behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment systematically investigates the role of narrative templates (Wertsch, 2002) in remembering. To stimulate the construction of a diversity of narratives I used Heider and Simmel’s (1944) celebrated “apparent behavior” film, in which geometric shapes moving around a screen...... to attend to in the idiographic analysis. Generalization still moves from single case to general model and back to single case, but the movement is facilitated by analysis at the level of the sample as a whole....

  5. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  6. Apparent density patterns in subchondral bone of the sloth and anteater forelimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Biren A; Carlson, Kristian J

    2008-10-23

    Vertebrate morphologists often are interested in inferring limb-loading patterns in animals characterized by different locomotor repertoires. Because bone apparent density (i.e. mass per unit volume of bone inclusive of porosities) is a determinant of compressive strength, and thus indicative of compressive loading, recent comparative studies in primates have proposed a structure-function relationship between apparent density of subchondral bone and locomotor behaviours that vary in compressive loading. If such patterns are found in other mammals, then these relationships would be strengthened further. Here, we examine the distal radius of suspensory sloths that generally load their forelimbs (FLs) in tension and of quadrupedal anteaters that generally load their FLs in compression. Computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry was used to visualize the patterns in subchondral apparent density. Suspensory sloths exhibit relatively smaller areas of high apparent density than quadrupedal anteaters. This locomotor-based pattern is analogous to the pattern observed in suspensory and quadrupedal primates. Similarity between xenarthran and primate trends suggests broad-scale applicability for analysing subchondral bone apparent density and supports the idea that bone functionally alters its material properties in response to locomotor behaviours.

  7. Gliomas: Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps with standard- or high-b-value diffusion-weighted MR imaging--correlation with tumor grade

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Yusuhn; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yun, Tae Jin; Chang, Kee-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    To explore the role of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps based on entire tumor volume data in determining glioma grade and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of ADC maps at standard...

  8. Relative permeability in dual porosity porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deghmoum, A. [SONATRACH CRD, Boumerdes (Algeria); Tiab, D. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); Mazouzi, A. [SONATRACH PED (Algeria)

    2000-06-01

    One of the important factors in the field of reservoir simulation of dual-porosity systems is reliable relative permeability data. Laboratory limitations hinder measurements. The real behaviour of naturally fractures reservoirs is not reflected in the reservoir core samples, which as a rule originate from zones without induced or natural fractures. Therefore, it is commonly assumed that the relative permeability of a naturally fractured system is a straight line, which can cause errors. The authors undertook to conduct special core analyses on Berea outcrop core samples, to simulate fracture opening through the cutting of the samples to get different fracture apertures, to study the effects of dual porosity on the shape of capillary pressure curves, and to evaluate absolute and relative permeability, as they are affected by fracture opening. The correlation obtained between absolute permeability and fracture aperture was good, and capillary pressure curves permitted the observation of the effect of dual porosity. High residual oil saturation was present in the matrix, since the fractures became the easiest route for water flow, and this situation prevented the use of unsteady-state tests to measure relative permeability on the samples. Instead, the centrifuge technique was successfully used. A naturally fractured reservoir (NFR), the Tin Fouye Tabankort (TFT) reservoir in Algeria was selected to extend the findings. The site was principally selected due to the availability of naturally fractured cores and published data. Core observations, well test analysis and borehole imager tools were all TFT natural fracture indicators presented in the paper. Representative data of relative permeability was obtained by conducting a displacement test on a full diameter core to solve the laboratory limitations. The correlation between permeability and fracture opening was used to estimate the aperture of natural fractures in TFT reservoir. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 24 figs.

  9. Disruption of the ndhF1 gene affects Chl fluorescence through state transition in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, resulting in apparent high efficiency of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takako; Harada, Tetsuyuki; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Sonoike, Kintake

    2013-07-01

    In Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the disruption of the ndhF1 gene (slr0844), which encodes a subunit of one of the NDH-1 complexes (NDH-1L complex) serving for respiratory electron transfer, causes the largest change in Chl fluorescence induction kinetics among the kinetics of 750 disruptants searched in the Fluorome, the cyanobacterial Chl fluorescence database. The cause of the explicit phenotype of the ndhF1 disruptant was examined by measurements of the photosynthetic rate, Chl fluorescence and state transition. The results demonstrate that the defects in respiratory electron transfer obviously have great impact on Chl fluorescence in cyanobacteria. The inactivation of NDH-1L complexes involving electron transfer from NDH-1 to plastoquinone (PQ) would result in the oxidation of the PQ pool, leading to the transition to State 1, where the yield of Chl fluorescence is high. Apparently, respiration, although its rate is far lower than that of photosynthesis, could affect Chl fluorescence through the state transition as leverage. The disruption of the ndhF1 gene caused lower oxygen-evolving activity but the estimated electron transport rate from Chl fluorescence measurements was faster in the mutant than in the wild-type cells. The discrepancy could be ascribed to the decreased level of non-photochemical quenching due to state transition. One must be cautious when using the Chl fluorescence parameter to estimate photosynthesis in mutants defective in state transition.

  10. The apparent Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  11. An Efficient Modelling Approach for Prediction of Porosity Severity in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedayat, Houman; Forghani, Alireza; Hickmott, Curtis; Roy, Martin; Palmieri, Frank; Grimsley, Brian; Coxon, Brian; Fernlund, Goran

    2017-01-01

    Porosity, as a manufacturing process-induced defect, highly affects the mechanical properties of cured composites. Multiple phenomena affect the formation of porosity during the cure process. Porosity sources include entrapped air, volatiles and off-gassing as well as bag and tool leaks. Porosity sinks are the mechanisms that contribute to reducing porosity, including gas transport, void shrinkage and collapse as well as resin flow into void space. Despite the significant progress in porosity research, the fundamentals of porosity in composites are not yet fully understood. The highly coupled multi-physics and multi-scale nature of porosity make it a complicated problem to predict. Experimental evidence shows that resin pressure history throughout the cure cycle plays an important role in the porosity of the cured part. Maintaining high resin pressure results in void shrinkage and collapse keeps volatiles in solution thus preventing off-gassing and bubble formation. This study summarizes the latest development of an efficient FE modeling framework to simulate the gas and resin transport mechanisms that are among the major phenomena contributing to porosity.

  12. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  13. Permeability Evolution and the Mechanisms of Porosity Change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Gribbin, J. L.; Tivey, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding subsurface fluid flow is of critical importance to such geological and engineering applications as faulting mechanics, hydrothermal venting and resource recovery. Mechanical, chemical and thermal loads can significantly alter microscopic pore geometry and thus affect macroscopic permeability. Recently, we measured the permeability and porosity of massive anhydrite deposits recovered from various seafloor hydrothermal vent fields. Together, these deposits comprise anhydrite samples that have undergone different stages of formation. For anhydrite samples with porosities greater than 5%, the dependence of permeability to porosity change is best characterized by a power-law relationship with an exponent n~9. At porosities less than 5%, a much gentler trend of n~1 is observed. These permeability-porosity relationships (PPRs) in anhydrite deposits are in stark contrast to those of Fontainebleau sandstone, a quartz arenite with various degrees of quartz cementation. Fontainebleau sandstone shows a power-law dependence of PPR with an exponent of n~3 for samples with porosities greater than 7%, and a much steeper trend of n~8 at low porosities [Bourbie and Zinszner, 1985]. Microstructural analysis and numerical models suggest that the significant loss in pore connectivity below 7% is responsible for the steeper PPR trend in Fontainebleau sandstone [Zhu et al., 1995]. In anhydrite deposits, petrographic analyses show evidence for both dissolution and precipitation, consistent with the observed PPRs resulting from pore-size controlled solubility. Precipitation of anhydrite takes place preferentially in large pores within the anhydrite deposits, with precipitation limited in small pores, which is proposed to be due to the change in interfacial energy of the growing crystal (e.g., as described by Emmanuel and Ague [2009]). With abundant large voids in high porosity anhydrite samples, the growth of sulfates would result in a drastic loss of pore connectivity and

  14. Influence of high dose of phytase and an emulsifier on performance, apparent metabolisable energy and nitrogen retention in broilers fed on diets containing soy oil or tallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefarian, F; Romero, L F; Ravindran, V

    2015-01-01

    The effects of high dose of microbial phytase and an emulsifier on the performance, apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen (N) retention in broilers fed on diets containing different fat sources were examined in a 5-week trial. Two fat sources (soy oil and tallow), two inclusion levels of E. coli phytase (500 or 1000 phytase units (FTU)/kg diet) and two inclusion levels of lysolecithin emulsifier (0 or 3.5 g/kg of diet) were evaluated in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Throughout the 5-week trial, soy oil supplementation improved weight gain and feed per gain compared with tallow, but had no effect on feed intake. The high dose of phytase increased the weight gain and feed intake and lowered the feed per gain during d 1-21, but had no effect on performance parameters over the whole trial period. An effect of emulsifier was observed for feed intake during d 1-21 and over the whole trial period. Addition of emulsifier increased feed intake compared with diets without emulsifier. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher nitrogen-corrected AME (AMEN) compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, the effect of phytase was significant for AMEN, with the high dose increasing the AMEN. During week 2, AMEN was increased with emulsifier addition. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher fat retention compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. The high dose of phytase improved the retention of fat during week 5 and the addition of emulsifier resulted in higher fat retention during week 1. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, an interaction between fat source × phytase × emulsifier was observed for N retention. In soy oil-based diets, emulsifier plus 1000 FTU/kg phytase increased N retention compared with other groups, while in tallow-based diets, emulsifier addition increased N retention in diets with 500 FTU/kg, but not in 1000 FTU/kg diet. Overall, the

  15. A new paleomagnetic Paleocene-Eocene apparent polar wandering path derived from magnetostratigraphies: correlations for faunal and floral development at high latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, M.; Besse, J.; Fluteau, F.

    2005-12-01

    The development of endemic warm-climate flora and fauna at high latitudes in both hemispheres attests to the global warming that affected the Earth at the end of the Paleocene and the beginning of the Eocene. Nonetheless, the presence of these species at very high latitudes is also conditional on insolation, and the presence of tropical flora and fauna at very high paleomagnetic paleolatitudes, well north of the Arctic Circle, remains intriguing. We thus reappraise paleomagnetic data in a new way, defining an apparent geomagnetic polar wander path (APWP) from the beginning of the Paleocene to the middle of the mid-Eocene (65-42Ma) using a selection of magnetostratigraphies published over the last 25 years. Six series of VGPs are sufficiently long and of high enough quality to be retained; they originate from Gubbio (Italy) and from leg 74 for the African plate; from the Aix en Provence (France) and Basque (Spain) basins for Europe; from leg 171B for North America, and from leg 121 for Australia. For each site, a VGP (virtual geomagnetic pole) is defined for each magnetic anomaly and then transferred using classical kinematic parameters onto Africa selected as the single reference frame. The successive mean geomagnetic poles for each anomaly (hence perfectly synchronous) are then calculated in order to define the APWP. This shows a loop with two cusps at anomalies 26-25 (61-56 Ma) and 24-23 (56-51 Ma); the corresponding mean poles differ according to McFadden and McElhinny (1990), whereas the end poles relating to anomalies 29-27 (65.5-61 Ma) and 22-19 (51-42.5 Ma) are identical. The plate movements inferred from this loop, possibly related to an episode of true polar wander, are shown to be in agreement with the climatic and paleoenvironmental data and suggests a migration of flora and fauna which is synchronous with migration of the pole, rather than an adaptation of these species to the polar obscurity.

  16. Interspecific hybridization contributes to high genetic diversity and apparent effective population size in an endemic population of mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula maculosa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jeffrey L.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Lavretsky, Philip; Rezsutek, Michael; Johnson, William P.; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Under drift-mutation equilibrium, genetic diversity is expected to be correlated with effective population size (Ne). Changes in population size and gene flow are two important processes that can cause populations to deviate from this expected relationship. In this study, we used DNA sequences from six independent loci to examine the influence of these processes on standing genetic diversity in endemic mottled ducks (Anas fulvigula) and geographically widespread mallards (A. platyrhynchos), two species known to hybridize. Mottled ducks have an estimated census size that is about two orders-of-magnitude smaller than that of mallards, yet these two species have similar levels of genetic diversity, especially at nuclear DNA. Coalescent analyses suggest that a population expansion in the mallard at least partly explains this discrepancy, but the mottled duck harbors higher genetic diversity and apparent N e than expected for its census size even after accounting for a population decline. Incorporating gene flow into the model, however, reduced the estimated Ne of mottled ducks to 33 % of the equilibrium Ne and yielded an estimated Ne consistent with census size. We also examined the utility of these loci to distinguish among mallards, mottled ducks, and their hybrids. Most putatively pure individuals were correctly assigned to species, but the power for detecting hybrids was low. Although hybridization with mallards potentially poses a conservation threat to mottled ducks by creating a risk of extinction by hybridization, introgression of mallard alleles has helped maintain high genetic diversity in mottled ducks and might be important for the adaptability and survival of this species.

  17. High prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A and E viruses and viremia of hepatitis B, C, and D viruses among apparently healthy populations in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masaharu; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Gotanda, Yuhko; Tsuda, Fumio; Komatsu, Fumio; Kawabata, Terue; Hasegawa, Kyoko; Altankhuu, Murdorjyn; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen; Narantuya, Luvsanbasaryn; Hoshino, Hiromi; Hino, Kunihiko; Kagawa, Yasuo; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2004-03-01

    The prevalence of infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV), HBV, HCV, HDV, and HEV was evaluated in 249 apparently healthy individuals, including 122 inhabitants in Ulaanbaatar, the capital city of Mongolia, and 127 age- and sex-matched members of nomadic tribes who lived around the capital city. Overall, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was detected in 24 subjects (10%), of whom 22 (92%) had detectable HBV DNA. Surprisingly, HDV RNA was detectable in 20 (83%) of the 24 HBsAg-positive subjects. HCV-associated antibodies were detected in 41 (16%) and HCV RNA was detected in 36 (14%) subjects, none of whom was coinfected with HBV, indicating that HBV/HCV carriers account for one-fourth of this population. Antibodies to HAV and HEV were detected in 249 (100%) and 28 (11%) subjects, respectively. Of 22 HBV DNA-positive subjects, genotype D was detected in 21 subjects and genotype F was detected in 1 subject. All 20 HDV isolates recovered from HDV RNA-positive subjects segregated into genotype I, but these differed by 2.1 to 11.4% from each other in the 522- to 526-nucleotide sequence. Of 36 HCV RNA-positive samples, 35 (97%) were genotype 1b and 1 was genotype 2a. Reflecting an extremely high prevalence of hepatitis virus infections, there were no appreciable differences in the prevalence of hepatitis virus markers between the two studied populations with distinct living place and lifestyle. A nationwide epidemiological survey of hepatitis viruses should be conducted in an effort to prevent de novo infection with hepatitis viruses in Mongolia.

  18. Porosity and Velocity Relations of Grosmont Formation, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehm, Y.; Hu, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results on porosty-velocity relations of Grosmont formation, Alberta, Canada, which is one of largest bitumen carbonate reservoirs. Grosmont formation is divided into four units: LG; UG-1; UG-2; and UG-3 from the bottom. Two lower units are mainly imestone, while upper units are mostly dolomite with vuggy porosity and fractures, which makes the upper units be a good reservoir. Rock physics modeling was then performed to quantify porosity-velocity relations for the four units, which enables us to predict porosity from seismic data. To incorporate the pore-scale details in the modeling, we used DEM (differential effective medium) models. Two lower units are very similar in velocity-porosity domain, thus the relations can be represented by one velocity-porosity model, which is used as our reference model. For the UG-2 unit, we found that one model cannot represent the unit since the degree of fracturing are heterogeneous from location to location. We thus suggested three different DEM models for the UG-2 unit: vuggy-dominant; mildly-fractured; and heavily-fractured. The UG-3 units can be modeled with vuggy porosity, and fractures were not very noticeable. We also investigated the spatial variation of the UG-2 unit, and found that the degree of fracturing is generally proportional to the proximity to the unconformity boundary, where the fresh water invasion can be dominant. In conclusion, we proposed velocity-porosity relations for the four units in Grosmont formation, and believe that these models can help to characterize the reservoir quality. In addition, since the proximity of reservoir to the unconformity boundary highly affects the degree of fracturing, a careful analysis of spatial variation would be essential for the successful characterization of Grosmont formation. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government

  19. High fat intake by ponies reduces both apparent digestibility of dietary cellulose and cellulose fermentation by faeces and isolated caecal and colonic contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.L.; Cone, J.W.; Geelen, S.N.J.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.; Gelder, van A.H.; Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.; Beynen, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Inclusion of extra fat in the diet of horses, at the expense of an iso-energetic amount of nonstructural carbohydrates, has been shown to decrease the apparent digestibility of the various dietary fiber fractions, but the mechanism was unknown. It was hypothesized that inclusion of extra fat in the

  20. Unsteady Free Convection Fluid Flow over an Inclined Plate in the Presence of a Magnetic Field with Thermally Stratified High Porosity Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ahmed Foisal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MHD free convection over an inclined plate in a thermally stratified high porous medium in the presence of a magnetic field has been studied. The dimensionless momentum and temperature equations have been solved numerically by explicit finite difference technique with the help of a computer programming language Compaq Visual Fortran 6.6a. The obtained results of these studies have been discussed for the different values of well known parameters with different time steps. Also, the stability conditions and convergence criteria of the explicit finite difference scheme has been analyzed for finding the restriction of the values of various parameters to get more accuracy. The effects of various governing parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, local and average shear stress and Nusselt number has been investigated and presented graphically.

  1. Constraining the Porosities of Interstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of the X-ray scattering properties of porous grain aggregates with olivine monomers. The small and large angle scattering properties of these aggregates are governed by the global structure and substructure of the grain, respectively. We construct two diagnostics, R_X and T_X, based on the optical and X-ray properties of the aggregates, and apply them to a Chandra measurement of the dust halo around the Galactic binary GX13+1. Grain aggregates with porosities higher than about 0.55 are ruled out. Future high-precision observations of X-ray dust haloes together with detailed modeling of the X-ray scattering properties of porous grain mixtures will further constrain the presence of porous grain aggregates in a given dust population.

  2. Porosity estimation of aged mortar using a micromechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Sanchez, T; Segura, I

    2006-12-22

    Degradation of concrete structures located in high humidity atmospheres or under flowing water is a very important problem. In this study, a method for ultrasonic non-destructive characterization in aged mortar is presented. The proposed method makes a prediction of the behaviour of aged mortar accomplished with a three phase micromechanical model using ultrasonic measurements. Aging mortar was accelerated by immersing the probes in ammonium nitrate solution. Both destructive and non-destructive characterization of mortar was performed. Destructive tests of porosity were performed using a vacuum saturation method and non-destructive characterization was carried out using ultrasonic velocities. Aging experiments show that mortar degradation not only involves a porosity increase, but also microstructural changes in the cement matrix. Experimental results show that the estimated porosity using the proposed non-destructive methodology had a comparable performance to classical destructive techniques.

  3. Influence of the porosity on the

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, P. de; Dijk, W. van; Rooij, M. de

    2011-01-01

    The composition of 23 concrete mixtures was varied in five separate series to evaluate the influence of porosity on the 222Rn exhalation rate. In each series, a range in porosities is obtained by varying (1) the amount of cement, (2) type of cement (Portland or blast furnace slag cement),

  4. To develop a quantitative method for predicting shrinkage porosity in squeeze casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaomin Li; Kenichiro Mine; Shinji Sanakanishi; Koichi Anzai

    2009-01-01

    In order to secure high strength and high elongation of suspension parts, it is critical to predict shrinkage porosity quantitatively. A new simulation method for quantitative predic'don of shrinkage porosity when replenishing molten metal has been proposed for squeeze casting process. To examine the accuracy of the calculation model, the proposed method was applied to a plate model.

  5. Porosity Prediction of Plain Weft Knitted Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Owais Raza Siddiqui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearing comfort of clothing is dependent on air permeability, moisture absorbency and wicking properties of fabric, which are related to the porosity of fabric. In this work, a plug-in is developed using Python script and incorporated in Abaqus/CAE for the prediction of porosity of plain weft knitted fabrics. The Plug-in is able to automatically generate 3D solid and multifilament weft knitted fabric models and accurately determine the porosity of fabrics in two steps. In this work, plain weft knitted fabrics made of monofilament, multifilament and spun yarn made of staple fibers were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed plug-in. In the case of staple fiber yarn, intra yarn porosity was considered in the calculation of porosity. The first step is to develop a 3D geometrical model of plain weft knitted fabric and the second step is to calculate the porosity of the fabric by using the geometrical parameter of 3D weft knitted fabric model generated in step one. The predicted porosity of plain weft knitted fabric is extracted in the second step and is displayed in the message area. The predicted results obtained from the plug-in have been compared with the experimental results obtained from previously developed models; they agreed well.

  6. Determination of the Surface and Volume Porosity, on the Basis of the Main Fraction of the Polifractional Matrix of Moulding and Core Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko R.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the hereby paper is to present the developed model of determining the volume and surface porosity based on the main fraction of polifractional materials, its experimental verification and utilisation for the interpretation of effects accompanying the formation of a moulding sand apparent density, porosity and permeability in the blowing processes of the core and moulds technology.

  7. ROLE OF POROSITY LOSS IN LIMITING SO2 CAPTURE BY CALCIUM BASED SORBENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of high temperature (900-1,300°C), short time (capture was found to be limited by temperature-dependent losses in the porosity of calcium based sorbents. At 970°C these porosity losses were caused by CO2-activated sintering. Sulfation of the sorbents either p...

  8. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  9. Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

    1991-02-12

    A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

  10. Porosity estimates of the upper crust in the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate upper crustal porosity variations using the differential effective medium (DEM) theory to interpret the observed seismic velocity variations for the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, an intermediate spreading center [Weekly et al., 2014]. We use six P-wave vertical velocity profiles averaged within 5 km × 10 km areas to estimate the porosity at depths from 0.4 km to 2 km. The profile regions cover on-axis, east and west flanks of the central Endeavour segment and three regions of the segment ends including the Endeavour-West Valley (E-WV) and the Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) and the relict Middle Valley. At the segment center, our calculated porosities on-axis and on the east and west flanks agree well with the apparent bulk porosities measured in Hole 504B at intermediate-spreading Costa Rica Rift [Becker, 1990] and decrease from 5-15% to 2-7% from 0.5 km to 1 km depth and seal by 2 km depth. At all depths, our calculated porosities on the east and west flanks are lower than those on-axis by ~1.3-3%. This indicates the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation [Newman et al., 2011]. At the segment ends, upper crustal velocities are lower than those in the segment center at depths < 2 km. These lower velocities are attributed to higher porosities (10-20% at 0.4 km decreasing to 3-6% at 2 km depth). This may indicate that fracturing in the OSCs strongly affects porosity at shallow depths. Between 0.7 km and 1 km, porosities estimated in all regions using pore aspect ratios of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 are higher than those from Hole 504B indicating that the aspect ratio of cracks may be smaller than 0.05. There also appears to be a spreading rate dependence to upper crustal porosity structure. On-axis at the Endeavour segment, the calculated porosities from 0.4 km to 2 km are higher than those at the Lucky Strike segment, a slow spreading center [Seher et al., 2010]. Specifically at 2

  11. How burial diagenesis of chalk sediments controls sonic velocity and porosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2003-01-01

    to the progress of burial diagenesis of chalk, which is revised as follows: Newly deposited carbonate ooze and mixed sediments range in porosity from 60 to 80%, depending on the prevalence of hollow microfossils. Despite the high porosity, these sediments are not in suspension, as reflected in IFs of 0.......1 or higher. Upon burial, the sediments lose porosity by mechanical compaction, and concurrently, the calcite particles recrystallize into progressively more equant shapes. High compaction rates may keep the particles in relative motion, whereas low compaction rates allow the formation of contact cement......, whereby IF increases and chalk forms. Rock mechanical tests show that when compaction requires more than in-situ stress, porosity reduction is arrested. During subsequent burial, crystals and pores grow in size as a consequence of the continuing recrystallization. ne lack of porosity loss during...

  12. Porosity effects during a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazares R, R. I. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Posgrado en Energia y Medio Ambiente, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Espinosa P, G.; Vazquez R, A., E-mail: ricardo-cazares@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this work is to study the behaviour of porosity effects on the temporal evolution of the distributions of hydrogen concentration and temperature profiles in a fuel assembly where a stream of steam is flowing. The analysis considers the fuel element without mitigation effects. The mass transfer phenomenon considers that the hydrogen generated diffuses in the steam by convection and diffusion. Oxidation of the cladding, rods and other components in the core constructed in zirconium base alloy by steam is a critical issue in LWR accident producing severe core damage. The oxygen consumed by the zirconium is supplied by the up flow of steam from the water pool below the uncovered core, supplemented in the case of PWR by gas recirculation from the cooler outer regions of the core to hotter zones. Fuel rod cladding oxidation is then one of the key phenomena influencing the core behavior under high-temperature accident conditions. The chemical reaction of oxidation is highly exothermic, which determines the hydrogen rate generation and the cladding brittleness and degradation. The heat transfer process in the fuel assembly is considered with a reduced order model. The Boussinesq approximation was applied in the momentum equations for multicomponent flow analysis that considers natural convection due to buoyancy forces, which is related with thermal and hydrogen concentration effects. The numerical simulation was carried out in an averaging channel that represents a core reactor with the fuel rod with its gap and cladding and cooling steam of a BWR. (Author)

  13. Tumor Extension in High-Grade Gliomas Assessed with Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Values and Lesion-to-Brain Ratios of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westen, D. van; Laett, J.; Englund, E.; Brockstedt, S.; Larsson, E.M. [Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Depts. of Radiology, of Medical Radiation Physics and of Pathology and Cytology

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) can distinguish tumor-infiltrated edema in gliomas from pure edema in meningiomas and metastases. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were studied: 18 WHO grade III or IV gliomas, 7 meningiomas, and 5 metastatic lesions. ADC and FA were determined from ROIs placed in peritumoral areas with T2-signal changes, adjacent normal appearing white matter (NAWM), and corresponding areas in the contralateral healthy brain. Values and lesion-to-brain ratios from gliomas were compared to those from meningiomas and metastases. Results: Values and lesion-to-brain ratios of ADC and FA in peritumoral areas with T2-signal changes did not differ between gliomas, meningiomas, and metastases (P = 0.40, P = 0.40, P = 0.61, P 0.34). Values of ADC and FA and the lesion-to-brain ratio of FA in the adjacent NAWM did not differ between tumor types (P = 0.74, P = 0.25, and P = 0.31). The lesion-to-brain ratio of ADC in the adjacent NAWM was higher in gliomas than in meningiomas and metastases (P = 0.004), but overlapped between tumor types. Conclusion: Values and lesion-to-brain ratios of ADC and FA in areas with T2-signal changes surrounding intracranial tumors and adjacent NAWM were not helpful for distinguishing pure edema from tumor-infiltrated edema when data from gliomas, meningiomas, and metastases were compared.

  14. Increased cortical porosity in women with hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, D; Nilsson, A G; Nilsson, M; Johansson, L; Mellström, D; Lorentzon, M

    2017-05-01

    Hip fractures cause increased mortality and disability and consume enormous healthcare resources. Only 46% of hip fracture patients have osteoporosis at the total hip according to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurement. Cortical porosity increases with ageing and is believed to be important for bone strength. To investigate whether older women with hip fracture have higher cortical porosity than controls, and if so whether this difference is independent of clinical risk factors and areal bone mineral density (aBMD). From an ongoing population-based study, we identified 46 women with a prevalent X-ray-verified hip fracture and 361 control subjects without any fractures. aBMD was measured with DXA. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to measure bone microstructure at the standard (ultradistal) site and at 14% (distal) of the tibial length. Women with a previous hip fracture had lower aBMD at the femoral neck (-11.8%) and total hip (-14.6%) as well as higher cortical porosity at the ultradistal (32.1%) and distal (29.3%) tibia compared with controls. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for covariates (age, height, weight, smoking, calcium intake, physical activity, walk time, oral glucocorticoids, parental hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis, previous fall, current bisphosphonate treatment and femoral neck aBMD), cortical porosity at the ultradistal [odds ratio per standard deviation increase (95% confidence interval) 2.61 (1.77-3.85)] and distal [1.57 (1.12-2.20)] sites was associated with prevalent hip fracture. Cortical porosity was associated with prevalent hip fracture in older women independently of femoral neck aBMD and clinical risk factors. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. Whisker Formation in Porosity in Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, William David; Elsayed, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Mahmoud Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    An examination of the fracture surfaces of tensile test bars from Al alloy castings held in the liquid state for up to 20 minutes revealed porosity which in some cases contained whisker-like features. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis in a SEM suggested that these might be oxide whiskers forming in an oxide-related pore or double oxide film defect. Such entrainment defects (also known as bifilms) may entrap a small amount of the local atmosphere when they form and become incorporated into the liquid metal. This atmosphere may be predominantly air, which then subsequently reacts with the surrounding melt, firstly by reaction with oxygen and secondly by reaction with nitrogen. A CFD model of the heat distribution associated with the reactions between the interior atmosphere of a double oxide film defect and the surrounding liquid alloy suggested that highly localized increases in temperature, up to about 2000 K to 5000 K (1727 °C to 4727 °C), could occur, over a scale of a few hundred micrometers. Such localized increases in temperature might lead to the evaporation or disassociation of oxide within the pore, followed by condensation, to form the whisker structures observed. Hydrogen might also be expected to diffuse into the bifilm and may play a role in the chemical reactions associated with the development of the bifilm.

  16. Modeling fracture porosity evolution in dolostone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia F. W.; Lander, Robert H.; Reed, Robert M.; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2010-09-01

    Opening-mode fractures in dolostones buried to depths of ˜1-5 km contain synkinematic dolomite cement, the amount and internal structure of which has a systematic relationship to fracture size. Narrow fractures (cement or cement with a crack-seal texture that indicates multiple incremental openings. Wider fractures can preserve considerable effective porosity, but anomalously thick dolomite cement bridges are commonly present in fractures that are otherwise lined with a thin veneer of cement. Dolomite bridges resemble quartz bridges that are common in fractured sandstones. We developed a geometric crystal growth model for synkinematic dolomite fracture fill in fractured dolostones, where periodic incremental fracture-opening events are introduced with concurrent cement growth. We assumed constant temperature and supersaturation with respect to dolomite. A key assumption in the model is that rapid dolomite accumulation within bridges is governed by high cement-growth rates on repeatedly broken grain surfaces during the process of crack seal. Slower cement-growth rates occur on euhedral crystals. This assumption is made on the basis of a comparison with quartz cement growth in fractured sandstones. Simulations with different fracture-opening rates mimic bridge and lining cement morphologies, including characteristic rhombic shapes of dolomite bridges.

  17. Effect of porosity on the tensile properties of low ductility aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Waldemar Mugica

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains reports of several studies correlating the porosity and mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Most of these studies determine this correlation based on the parameter of global volumetric porosity. These reports, however, fail to separate the effects of microstructural features and porosity on alloys, though recognizing the influence of the latter on their mechanical properties. Thus, when the decrease in tensile strength due to the porosity effect is taken into account, the findings are highly contradictory. An analysis was made of the correlation between mechanical properties and global volumetric porosity and volumetric porosity in the fracture, as well as of the beta-Al5FeSi phase present in 380 aluminum alloy. Our findings indicate that mechanical properties in tension relating to global volumetric porosity lead to overestimations of the porosity effect in detriment to the mechanical properties. Moreover, the proposed models that take into account the effects of particles, both Si and beta-Al5FeSi, are unapplicable to low ductility alloys.

  18. Effective Stress-Porosity Relationship above and Within the Oil Window in the North Sea Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S. Okiongbo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effective stress - porosity relationship above and within the oil window in the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF in the North Sea Basin (UK using effective stress and porosity determined from wireline logs and pore pressure data. Porosity was determined from an empirical porosity - sonic transit - time transform, calibrated using shale and mudstone core porosity measurements from Jurassic shales in the North Sea. Effective stress was determined from the total overburden stress and pore pressure. The total overburden stress was calculated by integration of the density log. The results show that porosity range between ~11-20% in the pre-generation zone but decreased to <5% within the oil window. Compaction coefficient ($ values above the oil window vary from ~0.08-0.09 M/Pa, but vary from ~0.05-0.06 M/Pa within the oil window implying that deeper burial and a high degree of chemical precipitation and cementation has created a stiff matrix giving rise to low $ values. The effective stress-porosity relationship above and within the oil window reflects a possible decrease in effective stress occasioned by increase in porosity in the pregeneration zone.

  19. A modeling and numerical algorithm for thermoporomechanics in multiple porosity media for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous modeling of coupling between fluid, heat, and geomechanics (thermo-poro-mechanics), in fractured porous media is one of the important and difficult topics in geothermal reservoir simulation, because the physics are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled. Coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics are investigated using the multiple interacting continua (MINC) method as applied to naturally fractured media. In this study, we generalize constitutive relations for the isothermal elastic dual porosity model proposed by Berryman (2002) to those for the non-isothermal elastic/elastoplastic multiple porosity model, and derive the coupling coefficients of coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics and constraints of the coefficients. When the off-diagonal terms of the total compressibility matrix for the flow problem are zero, the upscaled drained bulk modulus for geomechanics becomes the harmonic average of drained bulk moduli of the multiple continua. In this case, the drained elastic/elastoplastic moduli for mechanics are determined by a combination of the drained moduli and volume fractions in multiple porosity materials. We also determine a relation between local strains of all multiple porosity materials in a gridblock and the global strain of the gridblock, from which we can track local and global elastic/plastic variables. For elastoplasticity, the return mapping is performed for all multiple porosity materials in the gridblock. For numerical implementation, we employ and extend the fixed-stress sequential method of the single porosity model to coupled fluid/heat flow and geomechanics in multiple porosity systems, because it provides numerical stability and high accuracy. This sequential scheme can be easily implemented by using a porosity function and its corresponding porosity correction, making use of the existing robust flow and geomechanics simulators. We implemented the proposed modeling and numerical algorithm to the reaction transport simulator

  20. SALTSTONE VARIABILITY STUDY - MEASUREMENT OF POROSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Tommy Edwards, T; Russell Eibling, R; Ray Schumacher, R

    2007-08-23

    One of the goals of the Saltstone Variability Study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. One of the key performance properties is porosity which is a measure of the volume percent of a cured grout that is occupied by salt solution (for the saturated case). This report presents (1) the results of efforts to develop a method for the measurement of porosity of grout samples and (2) initial results of porosity values for samples that have been previously produced as part of the Saltstone Variability Study. A cost effective measurement method for porosity was developed that provides reproducible results, is relatively fast (30 to 60 minutes per sample) and uses a Mettler Toledo HR83 Moisture Analyzer that is already operational and routinely calibrated at Aiken County Technology Laboratory. The method involves the heating of the sample at 105 C until no further mass loss is observed. This mass loss value, which is due to water evaporation, is then used to calculate the volume percent porosity of the mix. The results of mass loss for mixes at 105 C were equivalent to the results obtained using thermal gravimetric analysis. The method was validated by comparing measurements of mass loss at 105 C for cured portland cement in water mixes to values presented in the literature for this system. A stereopycnometer from Quantachrome Instruments was selected to measure the cured grout bulk densities. Density is a property that is required to calculate the porosities. A stereopycnometer was already operational at Aiken County Technology Laboratory, has been calibrated using a solid stainless steel sphere of known volume, is cost effective and fast ({approx}15 minutes per sample). Cured grout densities are important in their own right because they can be used to project the volume of waste form produced from a given amount of salt feed of known composition. For

  1. Porosity, Dispersivity, and Contaminant Transport in Groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOIWO Juana P.

    2001-01-01

    Porosity (n) and Dispersivity (D) were modeled in relation to Solute Transport Time (t) in a saturated, homogeneous, isotropic, unconfined aquifer using the MOC model. It was noted that n and D have an important influence on solute transport time t in groundwater, with a consistently strong and direct relationship between n, D, and t. In the case of porosity, the relationship was found to be directly related to t when other aquifer properties remained unchanged. This was also mathematically argued using a form of the flow equation put forward by Henry Darcy (1856). Dispersivity on the other hand had somehow the same relationship with solute transport time t as porosity, but with much less effect. That is, higher dispersions lead to longer solute transport time within the aquifer system. This was because as the individual solute particles set off from the average seepage velocity, they traversed through longer distances due to tortuosity, mechanical mixing, diffusion, and microscopic heterogeneity latent in the porous media. Also when n and D were co- treated over t, n was noted to be dominant over D with regard t. This follows that the effect of porosity on solute transport time far out shadowed that of dispersivity. Stated in other words, the dispersivity of a substance in any porous medium is to a large extent a function of the porosity of that medium.

  2. Constitutive Theory for Velocity Dispersion in Rock with Dual Porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H F; Berryman, J G

    2002-03-28

    The high frequency behavior of the bulk modulus of fluid-saturated rock can be obtained from a double-porosity constitutive model, which is a direct conceptual extension of Biot's (1941) constitutive equations and which provides additional stiffening due to unrelaxed induced pore pressures in the soft porosity phase. Modeling the stiffening of the shear modulus at high frequency requires an effective medium average over the unequal induced pore pressures in cracks of different orientations. The implicit assumptions are that pore fluid equilibration does not occur between cracks of different orientations and between cracks and porous matrix. The correspondence between the constitutive equations of Berryman and Wang (1995) and Mavko and Jizba (1991) is explicitly noted.

  3. Packing Bunker and Pile Silos to Minimize Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article discusses the issue of porosity (i.e., the portion of volume filled with gas) in silages. As porosity increases, the silage is subject to greater losses. Porosity can be reduced by adequately packing the crop at ensiling. To keep porosity below 40% a minimum bulk density of 44 lbs./cu. ...

  4. Changes in porosity of foamed aluminum during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to control the porosity of foamed aluminum, the changes in the porosity of foamed aluminum melt in the processes of foaming and solidification, the distribution of the porosity of foamed aluminum, and the relationship between them were studied. The results indicated that the porosity of foamed aluminum coincides well with the foaming time.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed laser induced generation of open macro porosity on sintered ZnO pellet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.K., E-mail: anilks@barc.gov.in [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Samanta, Soumen [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Sinha, Sucharita [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Zinc oxide (ZnO) targets have been surface treated using a frequency doubled nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at laser fluence levels ranging between 2 and 9 J/cm{sup 2}. • Our observations establish that laser irradiation provides an effective technique for generation of surface macro porosity in case of ZnO pellets. • Extent of surface porosity and the mean pore size could be controlled by appropriately varying the incident laser fluence. • Such laser treated ZnO surfaces with enhanced surface porosity and large size pores (mean pore area ∼2–5 μm{sup 2}) can serve as potential candidate for humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response time, particularly in high humidity range. - Abstract: Surface porosity and pore size distribution of sensing material greatly influence performance parameters such as sensitivity, reproducibility and response time of sensors. Various approaches have been employed to generate surface porosity having varying pore size distribution. This paper presents our results on pulsed laser irradiation based surface microstructuring of sintered zinc oxide (ZnO) pellets leading to generation of enhanced surface porosity. ZnO targets have been surface treated using a frequency doubled nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at laser fluence levels ranging between 2 and 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Our observations establish that laser irradiation provides an effective technique for generation of surface macro porosity in case of ZnO pellets. Also, extent of surface porosity and the mean pore size could be controlled by appropriately varying the incident laser fluence. Such laser treated ZnO surfaces with enhanced surface porosity and large size pores can serve as potential candidate for humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response time, particularly in high humidity range.

  6. Distribution and origin of anomalously high porosity zones of the Xujiaweizi Fault Depression in Songliao Basin%松辽盆地徐家围子断陷深层异常高孔带分布特征与成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟元林; 周振东; 肖丽华; 刘文慧; 孟凡晋; 梁伯勋; 王建伟; 潘雪梅; 田伟志; 王维安; 丁桂霞

    2011-01-01

    为了解松辽盆地低孔低渗背景下优质储集层的形成和分布,文中应用岩心实测孔隙度、测井孔隙度以及铸体薄片等资料,研究了松辽盆地徐家围子断陷异常高孔带的分布特征及其成因.结果表明,松辽盆地北部纵向上发育3个异常高孔带(ⅰ-ⅲ),其深度分布范围分别为600~2350 m、2500~3500 m、3600~4400m,对应的孔隙度分别为12% ~ 35% ,6% ~ 28% ,5% ~ 20%.第ⅰ高孔带主要发育在中浅层,主要由Ⅰ、Ⅱ型干酪根形成的有机酸溶蚀砂岩储集层形成;第ⅱ、ⅲ异常高孔带发育在深层,主要由Ⅲ型干酪根产生的大量有机酸溶蚀砂砾岩储集层和火山岩储集层形成,大气水淋滤作用也有一定贡献.此外,裂缝和岩相对徐家围子断陷深层异常高孔带的形成具有特别重要的意义.%In order to identify the formation and distribution of high-quality reservoir under the conditions of low porosity and low permeability reservoirs, the distributions and origins of the anomalously high.porosity zones of the Xujiaweizi Fault Depression in the northern Songliao Basin were studied by using the data of measured porosity, logging porosity, thin sections, blue epoxy resin-impregnated thin sections and SEM. As the results show, there are three anomalously high porosity zones at depths of 600 ~ 2350 m,2500~3500 m, 3600 ~4000 m respectively, with porosity ranges of 12% ~35%, 6% ~28%, 5% ~20% correspondingly in the northern Songliao Basin. The first anomalously high porosity zone is distributed in the middle-shallow horizon, mainly formed by organic acids generated from kerogen I and IⅡ dissolving sandstone reservoirs. The second and the third ones are distributed in the deep horizons, formed by organic acid generated from kerogen ⅢI dissolving volcanic reservoirs and conglomerate reservoirs, and meteoric water leaching is important too. Moreover, fracture, lithology and lithofacies are of

  7. Porosity Log Prediction Using Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwi Saputro, Oki; Lazuardi Maulana, Zulfikar; Dzar Eljabbar Latief, Fourier

    2016-08-01

    Well logging is important in oil and gas exploration. Many physical parameters of reservoir is derived from well logging measurement. Geophysicists often use well logging to obtain reservoir properties such as porosity, water saturation and permeability. Most of the time, the measurement of the reservoir properties are considered expensive. One of method to substitute the measurement is by conducting a prediction using artificial neural network. In this paper, artificial neural network is performed to predict porosity log data from other log data. Three well from ‘yy’ field are used to conduct the prediction experiment. The log data are sonic, gamma ray, and porosity log. One of three well is used as training data for the artificial neural network which employ the Levenberg-Marquardt Backpropagation algorithm. Through several trials, we devise that the most optimal input training is sonic log data and gamma ray log data with 10 hidden layer. The prediction result in well 1 has correlation of 0.92 and mean squared error of 5.67 x10-4. Trained network apply to other well data. The result show that correlation in well 2 and well 3 is 0.872 and 0.9077 respectively. Mean squared error in well 2 and well 3 is 11 x 10-4 and 9.539 x 10-4. From the result we can conclude that sonic log and gamma ray log could be good combination for predicting porosity with neural network.

  8. Increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis associated with high visceral adiposity index in apparently healthy Korean adults: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Jihyun; Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki-Won; Park, Sung-Woo; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2016-09-01

    The visceral adiposity index (VAI) is a mathematical tool that reflects a patient's visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. Recent studies have noted an association between VAI and cardiovascular event. We analyzed the association between VAI and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in Korean adults. For 33,468 participants (mean age 42 yrs) in a health screening program, VAI was calculated using the following formulae: [waist circumference (WC)/{39.68 + (1.88 * body mass index (BMI))}] * (triglyceride/1.03) * {1.31/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)} for men and [WC/{36.58 + (1.89 * BMI)}] * (triglyceride/0.81) * (1.52/HDL-C) for women. Coronary artery calcium scores were measured with multi-detector computed tomography. CACS was positively correlated with VAI (r = 0.027, p 0 as the dependent variable, subjects in the highest tertile of VAI (>1.777) had significantly increased odds ratio for CACS >0 compared to subjects in the lowest tertile (<0.967), even after adjusting for confounding variables, including BMI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.147-1.381). Subjects with high VAI had increased risk for subclinical atherosclerosis, as assessed by CACS. Key messages Recent studies have noted an association between visceral adiposity index (VAI) and cardiovascular event. Subjects with coronary artery calcification (CAC) showed significantly higher VAI compared to those without CAC. The subjects with high VAI showed increased odds ratio for CAC as compared to subjects with low VAI, suggesting high VAI reflects increased risk for subclinical atherosclerosis.

  9. THE IMPACT OF TRACE ADDITIVES ON THE APPARENT SOLUBILITY OF HYDROGEN IN HEAVY OIL AND RELATED FEEDSTOCKS AT LOW AND HIGH TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalal Abedi

    2002-09-01

    A systematic investigation was conducted to provide an accurate determination of hydrogen solubility in liquid media in temperatures in the range of 25-250 C and pressures in the range of 0.5-8 MPa. Results were obtained by an indirect gas solubility measurement method. The method was intended for use with high-resolution camera. The hydrogen solubility measurements were indirect and were based on pressure changes at constant temperature and measured volumes. Since the volume of the view cell was fixed the volume available for the vapor phase could be determined by measuring the location of the liquid-vapor interface. The interface was located to within the height of one pixel using high-resolution camera, which added {+-} 0.4 ml to the uncertainty of the vapor volume. Liquid-liquid interface locations were measured with equal precision. The accuracy of the method was illustrated through hydrogen solubility measurements in hexadecane and tetralin, which were in close agreement with the values available in the literature. Hydrogen solubilities in Athabasca bitumen vacuum bottoms (ABVB) were reported over a broad range of temperatures (80-250 C) and pressures (0.5-8 MPa).

  10. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity.

  11. Computer Based Porosity Design by Multi Phase Topology Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burblies, Andreas; Busse, Matthias

    2008-02-01

    A numerical simulation technique called Multi Phase Topology Optimization (MPTO) based on finite element method has been developed and refined by Fraunhofer IFAM during the last five years. MPTO is able to determine the optimum distribution of two or more different materials in components under thermal and mechanical loads. The objective of optimization is to minimize the component's elastic energy. Conventional topology optimization methods which simulate adaptive bone mineralization have got the disadvantage that there is a continuous change of mass by growth processes. MPTO keeps all initial material concentrations and uses methods adapted from molecular dynamics to find energy minimum. Applying MPTO to mechanically loaded components with a high number of different material densities, the optimization results show graded and sometimes anisotropic porosity distributions which are very similar to natural bone structures. Now it is possible to design the macro- and microstructure of a mechanical component in one step. Computer based porosity design structures can be manufactured by new Rapid Prototyping technologies. Fraunhofer IFAM has applied successfully 3D-Printing and Selective Laser Sintering methods in order to produce very stiff light weight components with graded porosities calculated by MPTO.

  12. Reduction of Wake-Stator Interaction Noise Using Passive Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the potential of Passive Porosity Technology as a mechanism to reduce interaction noise in turbomachinery by reducing the fluctuating forces acting on the vane surfaces. To do so, a typical fan stator airfoil was subjected to the effects of a transversely moving wake; time histories of the primitive aerodynamic variables, obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions, were then input into an acoustic prediction code. This procedure was performed on the solid airfoil to obtain a baseline, and on a series of porous configurations in order to isolate those that yield maximum noise reductions without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the stator. It was found that communication between regions of high pressure differential - made possible by the use of passive porosity - is necessary to significantly alter the noise radiation pattern of the stator airfoil. In general, noise reductions were obtained for those configurations incorporating passive porosity in the region between x/c is approximately 0.15 on the suction side of the airfoil and x/c is approximately 0.20 on the pressure side. Reductions in overall radiated noise of approximately 1.0 dB were obtained. The noise benefit increased to about 2.5 dB when the effects of loading noise alone were considered.

  13. Seismic Anisotropy and Velocity-Porosity Relationships in the Seafloor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Patricia A.

    In this dissertation, I investigate the structure and composition of marine sediments and the upper oceanic crust using seismic data and rock physics theories. Common marine sediments such as silty clays exhibit anisotropy because they are made up of thin sub-parallel lamellae of contrasting mineralogical composition and differing elastic properties. In 1986, Rondout Associates, Inc. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution recorded direct shear waves in shallow marine sediments in 21-m-deep water by using a newly developed ocean-bottom shear source and a multicomponent on-bottom receiver. A nearby drill hole showed that the sediments are interbedded silty clays, clays, and sands. I used an anisotropic reflectivity program written by Geo-Pacific Corporation to produce synthetic seismograms to estimate the five independent elastic stiffnesses necessary for describing transverse isotropy, the form of anisotropy found in these sediments. The synthetics fit the vertical and two horizontal components for two intersecting profiles, 150 and 200 m long. The data require low shear velocities (theories to modeling the oceanic crust. Seismic velocities are controlled by the porosity, typically 20-30% for the top of layer 2. Most rock physics theories that relate seismic velocities to porosities are invalid for such high porosities. I combined elements of the self-consistent and noninteraction approaches to extend some rock physics theories for porosities up to at least 30-35%. Since the oceanic crust contains pores and cracks of many shapes, an appropriate theory must model round pores as well as flat cracks. I present examples of how layer 2A of the oceanic crust might be represented using an extended version of the Kuster-Toksoz theory. Alteration processes modify the pore structure of the oceanic crust. Currently, alteration is measured primarily from ocean drilling results. By developing a realistic relationship between seismic velocities and the age-dependent pore

  14. Potential energy landscape of the apparent first-order phase transition between low-density and high-density amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Sciortino, Francesco; Starr, Francis W; Poole, Peter H

    2016-12-14

    The potential energy landscape (PEL) formalism is a valuable approach within statistical mechanics to describe supercooled liquids and glasses. Here we use the PEL formalism and computer simulations to study the pressure-induced transformations between low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at different temperatures. We employ the ST2 water model for which the LDA-HDA transformations are remarkably sharp, similar to what is observed in experiments, and reminiscent of a first-order phase transition. Our results are consistent with the view that LDA and HDA configurations are associated with two distinct regions (megabasins) of the PEL that are separated by a potential energy barrier. At higher temperature, we find that low-density liquid (LDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as LDA, and that high-density liquid (HDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as HDA. We show that the pressure-induced LDL-HDL and LDA-HDA transformations occur along paths that interconnect these two megabasins, but that the path followed by the liquid is different from the path followed by the amorphous solid. At higher pressure, we also study the liquid-to-ice-VII first-order phase transition, and find that the behavior of the PEL properties across this transition is qualitatively similar to the changes found during the LDA-HDA transformation. This similarity supports the interpretation that the LDA-HDA transformation is a first-order phase transition between out-of-equilibrium states. Finally, we compare the PEL properties explored during the LDA-HDA transformations in ST2 water with those reported previously for SPC/E water, for which the LDA-HDA transformations are rather smooth. This comparison illuminates the previous work showing that, at accessible computer times scales, a liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the case of ST2 water, but not for SPC/E water.

  15. Potential energy landscape of the apparent first-order phase transition between low-density and high-density amorphous ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Sciortino, Francesco; Starr, Francis W.; Poole, Peter H.

    2016-12-01

    The potential energy landscape (PEL) formalism is a valuable approach within statistical mechanics to describe supercooled liquids and glasses. Here we use the PEL formalism and computer simulations to study the pressure-induced transformations between low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at different temperatures. We employ the ST2 water model for which the LDA-HDA transformations are remarkably sharp, similar to what is observed in experiments, and reminiscent of a first-order phase transition. Our results are consistent with the view that LDA and HDA configurations are associated with two distinct regions (megabasins) of the PEL that are separated by a potential energy barrier. At higher temperature, we find that low-density liquid (LDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as LDA, and that high-density liquid (HDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as HDA. We show that the pressure-induced LDL-HDL and LDA-HDA transformations occur along paths that interconnect these two megabasins, but that the path followed by the liquid is different from the path followed by the amorphous solid. At higher pressure, we also study the liquid-to-ice-VII first-order phase transition, and find that the behavior of the PEL properties across this transition is qualitatively similar to the changes found during the LDA-HDA transformation. This similarity supports the interpretation that the LDA-HDA transformation is a first-order phase transition between out-of-equilibrium states. Finally, we compare the PEL properties explored during the LDA-HDA transformations in ST2 water with those reported previously for SPC/E water, for which the LDA-HDA transformations are rather smooth. This comparison illuminates the previous work showing that, at accessible computer times scales, a liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the case of ST2 water, but not for SPC/E water.

  16. Apparent Clustering and Apparent Background Earthquakes Biased by Undetected Seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, D

    2005-01-01

    In models of triggered seismicity and in their inversion with empirical data, the detection threshold m_d is commonly equated to the magnitude m_0 of the smallest triggering earthquake. This unjustified assumption neglects the possibility of shocks below the detection threshold triggering observable events. We introduce a formalism that distinguishes between the detection threshold m_d and the minimum triggering earthquake m_0 < m_d. By considering the branching structure of one complete cascade of triggered events, we derive the apparent branching ratio n_a (which is the apparent fraction of aftershocks in a given catalog) and the apparent background source S_a that are observed when only the structure above the detection threshold m_d is known due to the presence of smaller undetected events that are capable of triggering larger events. If earthquake triggering is controlled in large part by the smallest magnitudes as several recent analyses have shown, this implies that previous estimates of the cluster...

  17. Investigation on Formation Mechanism of Irregular Shape Porosity in Hypoeutectic Aluminum Alloy by X-Ray Real Time Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hengcheng; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Yuna; Fan, Ran; Wang, Qigui; Pan, Ye

    2012-08-01

    The formation mechanism of irregular shape porosity in hypoeutectic aluminum silicon alloy (A356) was investigated by X-ray real time observation on porosity evolution during solidification and re-melting. Porosity in the hypoeutectic aluminum A356 alloy with high hydrogen content (>0.3 mL/100 g Al) first forms in the liquid as small spherical gas bubbles, then expands along with the pressure drop in the mushy zone due to shrinkage and lack of feeding, and finally deforms into irregular morphology by the impingement of aluminum dendrite network. Degassing is a key to eliminate porosity in aluminum alloy castings.

  18. Effects of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction on the electromechanical properties of 3-3 piezoelectric foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, B. V.; Challagulla, K. S.; Venkatesh, T. A.; Hadjiloizi, D. A.; Georgiades, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Unit-cell based finite element models are developed to completely characterize the role of porosity distribution and porosity volume fraction in determining the elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric properties as well as relevant figures of merit of 3-3 type piezoelectric foam structures. Eight classes of foam structures which represent structures with different types and degrees of uniformity of porosity distribution are identified; a Base structure (Class I), two H-type foam structures (Classes II, and III), a Cross-type foam structure (Class IV) and four Line-type foam structures (Classes V, VI, VII, and VIII). Three geometric factors that influence the electromechanical properties are identified: (i) the number of pores per face, pore size and the distance between the pores; (ii) pore orientation with respect to poling direction; (iii) the overall symmetry of the pore distribution with respect to the center of the face of the unit cell. To assess the suitability of these structures for such applications as hydrophones, bone implants, medical imaging and diagnostic devices, five figures of merit are determined via the developed finite element model; the piezoelectric coupling constant (K t ), the acoustic impedance (Z), the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d h ), the hydrostatic voltage coefficient (g h ), and the hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h ). At high material volume fractions, foams with non-uniform Line-type porosity (Classes V and VII) where the pores are preferentially distributed perpendicular to poling direction, are found to exhibit the best combination of desirable piezoelectric figures of merit. For example, at about 50% volume fraction, the d h , g h , and d h g h figures of merit are 55%, 1600% and 2500% higher, respectively, for Classes V and VII of Line-like foam structures compared with the Base structure.

  19. The Effect of Using Modified Flask on the Porosity of Processed Heat- Cure Acrylic Resin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed T. Al-Khafagy; Rajaa M. Al-Musawi; Abbas Taher Alaboudy

    2013-01-01

    Porosity is an important property of acrylic resin material because it affect other properties like strength, esthetic and cause bacterial or fungal growth lead to unhealthy dentures. This paper Study the possibility of reducing the porosity of heat- cure acrylic resin by making a modification in the flask of processing .The processing flask was modified by constructing a tongue like projection fixed to the upper half of the flask in order to spread the high temperature occurred in the cente...

  20. Reducing the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyushov, G. G.; Zakharevich, A. M.; Pichkhidze, S. Ya.; Koshuro, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    It is established that a decrease in the open porosity of pyroboroncarbon, a pyrolytic glassy composite material of interest for manufacturing prosthetic heart valves (PHVs), can be achieved via impregnation of articles with an alcohol solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and subsequent thermal treatment. The maximum roughness height and linear size of open pores on the surface of PHV parts made of pyroboroncarbon can additionally be reduced by final mechanical processing of a silicon oxide film formed on the surface.

  1. Air filled porosity in composting processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, L.; Gea, T.; Artola, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2009-07-01

    As it is widely known, the composting process consists in the aerobic decomposition of the biodegradable organic matter present in different types of solid wastes. Water and oxygen are necessary for the biological activity of microorganisms involved in the composting process and their availability is directly related to the total and the air filled porosity (AFP). Maintaining adequate AFP level satisfies the oxygen content requirement to achieve the desired composting conditions and thus, tho enhance biological activity. (Author)

  2. The nature of porosity in organic-rich mudstones of the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea, offshore United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Neil S.; Hackley, Paul C.; Lowers, Heather; Hill, Ronald J.; Egenhoff, Sven O.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Blum, Alex E.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of organic-rich mudstones from wells that penetrated the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridge Clay Formation, offshore United Kingdom, were performed to evaluate the nature of both organic and inorganic rock constituents and their relation to porosity in this world-class source rock. The formation is at varying levels of thermal maturity, ranging from immature in the shallowest core samples to mature in the deepest core samples. The intent of this study was to evaluate porosity as a function of both organic macerals and thermal maturity. At least four distinct types of organic macerals were observed in petrographic and SEM analyses and they all were present across the study area. The macerals include, in decreasing abundance: 1) bituminite admixed with clays; 2) elongate lamellar masses (alginite or bituminite) with small quartz, feldspar, and clay entrained within it; 3) terrestrial (vitrinite, fusinite, semifusinite) grains; and 4) Tasmanites microfossils. Although pores in all maceral types were observed on ion-milled surfaces of all samples, the pores (largely nanopores with some micropores) vary as a function of maceral type. Importantly, pores in the macerals do not vary systematically as a function of thermal maturity, insofar as organic pores are of similar size and shape in both the immature and mature Kimmeridge rocks. If any organic pores developed during the generation of hydrocarbons, they were apparently not preserved, possibly because of the highly ductile nature of much of the rock constituents of Kimmeridge mudstones (clays and organic material). Inorganic pores (largely micropores with some nanopores) have been observed in all Kimmeridge mudstones. These pores, particularly interparticle (i.e., between clay platelets), and intraparticle (i.e., in framboidal pyrite, in partially dissolved detrital K-feldspar, and in both detrital and authigenic dolomite) are noteworthy because they compose much of the observable porosity in the shales in both

  3. Investigation on Porosity and Microhardness of 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahir Mohd Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the porosity and microhardness of 316L stainless steel samples fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM. The porosity content was measured using the Archimedes method and the advanced X-ray computed tomography (XCT scan. High densification level (≥99% with a low average porosity content (~0.82% were obtained from the Archimedes method. The highest porosity content in the XCT-scanned sample was ~0.61. However, the pores in the SLM samples for both cases (optical microscopy and XCT were not uniformly distributed. The higher average microhardness values in the SLM samples compared to the wrought manufactured counterpart are attributed to the fine microstructures from the localised melting and rapid solidification rate of the SLM process.

  4. Urban flood modeling using shallow water equations with depth-dependent anisotropic porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Ilhan; Zhao, Jiaheng; Liang, Dongfang; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    The shallow water model with anisotropic porosity conceptually takes into account the unresolved subgrid-scale features, e.g. microtopography or buildings. This enables computationally efficient simulations that can be run on coarser grids, whereas reasonable accuracy is maintained via the introduction of porosity. This article presents a novel numerical model for the depth-averaged equations with anisotropic porosity. The porosity is calculated using the probability mass function of the subgrid-scale features in each cell and updated in each time step. The model is tested in a one-dimensional theoretical benchmark before being evaluated against measurements and high-resolution predictions in three case studies: a dam-break over a triangular bottom sill, a dam-break through an idealized city and a rainfall-runoff event in an idealized urban catchment. The physical processes could be approximated relatively well with the anisotropic porosity shallow water model. The computational resolution influences the porosities calculated at the cell edges and therefore has a large influence on the quality of the solution. The computational time decreased significantly, on average three orders of magnitude, in comparison to the classical high-resolution shallow water model simulation.

  5. Elastic wave propagation and attenuation in a double-porosity dual-permeability medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.; Wang, H.F.

    1998-10-12

    To account for large-volume low-permeability storage porosity and low-volume high-permeability fracture/crack porosity in oil and gas reservoirs, phenomenological equations for the poroelastic behavior of a double porosity medium have been formulated and the coefficients in these linear equations identified. The generalization from a single porosity model increases the number of independent inertial coefficients from three to six, the number of independent drag coefficients from three to six, and the number of independent stress-strain coefficients from three to six for an isotropic applied stress and assumed isotropy of the medium. The analysis leading to physical interpretations of the inertial and drag coefficients is relatively straightforward, whereas that for the stress-strain coefficients is more tedious. In a quasistatic analysis, the physical interpretations are based upon considerations of extremes in both spatial and temporal scales. The limit of very short times is the one most relevant for wave propagation, and in this case both matrix porosity and fractures are expected to behave in an undrained fashion, although our analysis makes no assumptions in this regard. For the very long times more relevant for reservoir drawdown, the double porosity medium behaves as an equivalent single porosity medium. At the macroscopic spatial level, the pertinent parameters (such as the total compressibility) may be determined by appropriate field tests. At the mesoscopic scale pertinent parameters of the rock matrix can be determined directly through laboratory measurements on core, and the compressibility can be measured for a single fracture. We show explicitly how to generalize the quasistatic results to incorporate wave propagation effects and how effects that are usually attributed to squirt flow under partially saturated conditions can be explained alternatively in terms of the double-porosity model. The result is therefore a theory that generalizes, but is

  6. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  7. Analytical 1-D dual-porosity equivalent solutions to 3-D discrete single-continuum models. Application to karstic spring hydrograph modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Cornaton, F

    2011-01-01

    One dimensional analytical porosity-weighted solutions of the dual-porosity model are derived, providing insights on how to relate exchange and storage coefficients to the volumetric density of the high-permeability medium. It is shown that porosity-weighted storage and exchange coefficients are needed when handling highly heterogeneous systems - such as karstic aquifers - using equivalent dual-porosity models. The sensitivity of these coefficients is illustrated by means of numerical experiments with theoretical karst systems. The presented 1-D dual-porosity analytical model is used to reproduce the hydraulic responses of reference 3-D karst aquifers, modelled by a discrete single-continuum approach. Under various stress conditions, simulation results show the relations between the dual-porosity model coefficients and the structural features of the discrete single-continuum model. The calibration of the equivalent 1-D analytical dual-porosity model on reference hydraulic responses confirms the dependence of ...

  8. Cancellous bone fast and slow waves obtained with Bayesian probability theory correlate with porosity from computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joseph J; Nelson, Amber M; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G

    2012-09-01

    A Bayesian probability theory approach for separating overlapping ultrasonic fast and slow waves in cancellous bone has been previously introduced. The goals of this study were to investigate whether the fast and slow waves obtained from Bayesian separation of an apparently single mode signal individually correlate with porosity and to isolate the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The Bayesian technique was applied to trabecular bone data from eight human calcanei insonified in the medial-lateral direction. The phase velocity, slope of attenuation (nBUA), and amplitude were determined for both the fast and slow waves. The porosity was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT) and ranged from 78.7% to 94.1%. The method successfully separated the fast and slow waves from medial-lateral insonification of the calcaneus. The phase velocity for both the fast and slow wave modes showed an inverse correlation with porosity (R(2) = 0.73 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively). The slope of attenuation for both wave modes also had a negative correlation with porosity (fast wave: R(2) = 0.73, slow wave: R(2) = 0.53). The fast wave amplitude decreased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.66). Conversely, the slow wave amplitude modestly increased with increasing porosity (R(2) = 0.39).

  9. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    OpenAIRE

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. ...

  10. Results from a new Cocks-Ashby style porosity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    A new porosity evolution model is described, along with preliminary results. The formulation makes use of a Cocks-Ashby style treatment of porosity kinetics that includes rate dependent flow in the mechanics of porosity growth. The porosity model is implemented in a framework that allows for a variety of strength models to be used for the matrix material, including ones with significant changes in rate sensitivity as a function of strain rate. Results of the effect of changing strain rate sensitivity on porosity evolution are shown. The overall constitutive model update involves the coupled solution of a system of nonlinear equations.

  11. The origin of a large apparent tortuosity factor for the Knudsen diffusion inside monoliths of a samaria-alumina aerogel catalyst: a diffusion NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R; Zhang, S; Klink, M; Bäumer, M; Vasenkov, S

    2015-11-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR was applied to measure tortuosity factors for carbon dioxide diffusion in the Knudsen and gas regimes inside monoliths of a samaria-alumina aerogel catalyst, a high porosity material containing micropores in addition to meso- and macropores. The apparent tortuosity factor obtained from PFG NMR measurements for the Knudsen diffusion in the meso- and macropores of the catalyst has an unexpectedly large value of approximately 6 if carbon dioxide adsorption in the micropores and other types of surface adsorption sites of the catalyst is ignored. At the same time, the corresponding apparent tortuosity factor in the gas regime was found to be around 2. Application of a proposed model which describes fast molecular exchange between the surface adsorption sites and the main pore volume of the catalyst yields corrected tortuosity factors which depend only on the pore system geometry. Using this model, the corrected tortuosity factors were found to be around 2 for both diffusion regimes, in agreement with the expectations based on a high porosity of the studied catalyst.

  12. 3D Membrane Imaging and Porosity Visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2016-03-03

    Ultrafiltration asymmetric porous membranes were imaged by two microscopy methods, which allow 3D reconstruction: Focused Ion Beam and Serial Block Face Scanning Electron Microscopy. A new algorithm was proposed to evaluate porosity and average pore size in different layers orthogonal and parallel to the membrane surface. The 3D-reconstruction enabled additionally the visualization of pore interconnectivity in different parts of the membrane. The method was demonstrated for a block copolymer porous membrane and can be extended to other membranes with application in ultrafiltration, supports for forward osmosis, etc, offering a complete view of the transport paths in the membrane.

  13. Porosity and liquid absorption of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krus, M.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kunzel, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    be a slowing-down effect which is related to water because the absorption of organic liquids, such as hexane, is quite normal. Measurements of the porosity of hardened cement paste determined by helium pycnometry and water saturation show that water molecules can enter spaces in the microstructure which...... are not accessible to the smaller helium atoms. Considering the results of dilatation tests both before and after water and hexane saturation, it seems possible that a contraction of capillary pores due to moisture-related swelling of the cement gel leads to the non-linear water absorption over the square root...

  14. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  15. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  16. On the porosity of barrier layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mignot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier layers are defined as the layer between the pycnocline and the thermocline when the latter are different as a result of salinity stratification. We present a revisited 2-degree resolution global climatology of monthly mean oceanic Barrier Layer (BL thickness first proposed by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2007. In addition to using an extended data set, we present a modified computation method that addresses the observed porosity of BLs. We name porosity the fact that barrier layers distribution can, in some areas, be very uneven regarding the space and time scales that are considered. This implies an intermittent alteration of air-sea exchanges by the BL. Therefore, it may have important consequences for the climatic impact of BLs. Differences between the two computation methods are small for robust BLs that are formed by large-scale processes. However, the former approach can significantly underestimate the thickness of short and/or localized barrier layers. This is especially the case for barrier layers formed by mesoscale mechanisms (under the intertropical convergence zone for example and along western boundary currents and equatorward of the sea surface salinity subtropical maxima. Complete characterisation of regional BL dynamics therefore requires a description of the robustness of BL distribution to assess the overall impact of BLs on the process of heat exchange between the ocean interior and the atmosphere.

  17. The Porosity of Additive Noise Sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Vinith

    2012-01-01

    Consider a binary additive noise channel with noiseless feedback. When the noise is a stationary and ergodic process $\\mathbf{Z}$, the capacity is $1-\\mathbb{H}(\\mathbf{Z})$ ($\\mathbb{H}(\\cdot)$ denoting the entropy rate). It is shown analogously that when the noise is a deterministic sequence $z^\\infty$, the capacity under finite-state encoding and decoding is $1-\\bar{\\rho}(z^\\infty)$, where $\\bar{\\rho}(\\cdot)$ is Lempel and Ziv's finite-state compressibility. This quantity is termed the \\emph{porosity} $\\underline{\\sigma}(\\cdot)$ of an individual noise sequence. A sequence of schemes are presented that universally achieve porosity for any noise sequence. These converse and achievability results may be interpreted both as a channel-coding counterpart to Ziv and Lempel's work in universal source coding, as well as an extension to the work by Lomnitz and Feder and Shayevitz and Feder on communication across modulo-additive channels. Additionally, a slightly more practical architecture is suggested that draws a...

  18. Anisotropic and Hierarchical Porosity in Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtner, Aaron Zev

    The performance of multifunctional porous ceramics is often hindered by the seemingly contradictory effects of porosity on both mechanical and non-structural properties and yet a sufficient body of knowledge linking microstructure to these properties does not exist. Using a combination of tailored anisotropic and hierarchical materials, these disparate effects may be reconciled. In this project, a systematic investigation of the processing, characterization and properties of anisotropic and isotropic hierarchically porous ceramics was conducted. The system chosen was a composite ceramic intended as the cathode for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Comprehensive processing investigations led to the development of approaches to make hierarchical, anisotropic porous microstructures using directional freeze-casting of well dispersed slurries. The effect of all the important processing parameters was investigated. This resulted in an ability to tailor and control the important microstructural features including the scale of the microstructure, the macropore size and total porosity. Comparable isotropic porous ceramics were also processed using fugitive pore formers. A suite of characterization techniques including x-ray tomography and 3-D sectional scanning electron micrographs (FIB-SEM) was used to characterize and quantify the green and partially sintered microstructures. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure was quantified and discrete element simulations (DEM) were used to explain the experimental observations. Finally, the comprehensive mechanical properties, at room temperature, were investigated, experimentally and using DEM, for the different microstructures.

  19. Effect of porosity on wear resistance of SiCp/Cu composites prepared by pressureless infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin; QU Xuan-hui; DUAN Bo-hua; HE Xin-bo; QIN Ming-li

    2008-01-01

    The influence of porosity on the wear behavior of high volume fraction (61%) SiCp/Cu composite produced by pressureless infiltration was studied using a sliding, reciprocating and vibrating(SRV) machine. SiCp/Cu composites slid against hardened GCr15 bearing steel ball in the load range of 40-200 N. The results show that the wear rate increases with increasing porosity. The composite containing low porosity shows excellent wear resistance, which is attributed to the presence of mechanically mixed layer on the worn surface. In this case, the dominant wear mechanism is oxidative wear. Comparatively, the composite containing high porosity exhibits inferior wear resistance. Fracture and spalling of the particles are considered as the main causes of severe wear. Third body abrasion is the controlling wear mechanism. In addition, porosity has more important influence on wear rate at high load than at low load. This is associated with the fact that the fracture and spalling of particles is a process of crack initiation and propagation. At lower load, the pores beneath the worn surface can not propagate significantly, while the pores become unstable and easily propagate under high load, which results in a higher wear rate.

  20. Apparent Bicarbonate Space in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio A. Repetto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount needed to change the concentration of a solute requires the knowledge of its volume of distribution in the solution. Electrolytes that do not participate in active metabolic reactions have a fixed volume of distribution that corresponds to the volume of water in which they solubilize. Bicarbonate infusion is used to correct hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Its volume of distribution (bicarbonate space changes with its participation in the blood buffer systems. In other words, it is not a fixed physical volume, like that of other solutes. In this paper, we shall review experimental studies that supported evidence for this knowledge and analyze the basic hypothesis to explain the phenomena. Since we have not found clinical studies in children, we shall report our experience in a group of patients with metabolic acidosis treated with bicarbonate infusion in whom apparent bicarbonate space was measured and compared with data in adults from the literature. Guidelines for amount of bicarbonate needed to increase its concentration according to baseline bicarbonate concentration will be suggested.

  1. Gradient-Hierarchic-Aligned Porosity SiOC Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakifahmetoglu, Cekdar; Zeydanli, Damla; Innocentini, Murilo Daniel de Mello; Ribeiro, Fernanda dos Santos; Lasso, Paulo Renato Orlandi; Soraru, Gian Domenico

    2017-01-01

    This work describes a simple technique to produce porous ceramics with aligned porosity having very high permeability and specific surface area. SiOC-based compositions were processed from blends of three types of preceramic polymer and a catalyst, followed by curing and pyrolysis. The heating applied from the bottom of molds promoted the nucleation, expansion and rising of gas bubbles, and the creation of a ceramic matrix with axially oriented channels interconnected by small round pores. The samples were analyzed by SEM, tomography, BET, water immersion porosimetry and permeation to gas flow. The resulting bodies presented levels of open porosity (69.9–83.4%), average channel diameter (0.59–1.25 mm) and permeability (0.56–3.83 × 10−9 m2) comparable to those of ceramic foams and honeycomb monoliths, but with specific surface area (4.8–121.9 m2/g) typical adsorbents, enabling these lotus-type ceramics to be advantageously used as catalytic supports and adsorption components in several environmental control applications. PMID:28106140

  2. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  3. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  4. Evaluation of concrete mechanical strength through porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares, M.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing on voids or pores in any material - if the rest of characteristics remains equal -always causes a decrease in their mechanical strength since the ratio volume/resistant mass is lower Following all these fact a well known conclusion rises: there is a relationship between compacity/porosity and mechanical strengths. The purpose of this research is to establish a new possible correlation between both concrete properties with independence of the proportions, type of cement, size of grain, age, use. etc. So it can be concluded that the results of this research allow the engineer or architect in charge of a restoration or reparation to determine the compression strength of a concrete element. A first step is to determine the porosity through a rather short number of tests. Subsequently, compression strength will be obtained applying just a mathematical formula.

    El aumento de huecos o poros de cualquier material, lo mismo que en otras circunstancias, redunda siempre en una merma de sus resistencias mecánicas, al haber menor volumen-masa resistente. En consecuencia, puede deducirse, que hay una relación entre la compacidad/porosidad y las resistencias mecánicas. En el presente trabajo se estudia una posible correlación entre ambas propiedades del hormigón con independencia de su dosificación, tipo de cemento, granulometría, edad, uso, etc. Las conclusiones obtenidas en la presente investigación permiten al técnico, encargado de una restauración o rehabilitación, determinar la resistencia a compresión de un elemento de hormigón, una vez hallada, de una forma sencilla, la porosidad de una muestra no muy voluminosa, mediante la aplicación de una simple fórmula matemática.

  5. Porosity Assessment for Different Diameters of Coir Lignocellulosic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Fernanda Santos; Paciornik, Sidnei; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; da Silva, Luiz Carlos; Tommasini, Flávio James; Candido, Verônica Scarpini

    2017-08-01

    The application of natural lignocellulosic fibers (LCFs) in engineering composites has increased interest in their properties and structural characteristics. In particular, the inherent porosity of an LCF markedly affects its density and the adhesion to polymer matrices. For the first time, both open and closed porosities of a natural LCF, for different diameter ranges, were assessed. Fibers extracted from the mesocarp of the coconut fruit were investigated by nondestructive methods of density measurements and x-ray microtomography (microCT). It was found that, for all diameter ranges, the closed porosity is significantly higher than the open porosity. The total porosity increases with diameter to around 60% for coir fibers with more than 503 μm in diameter. The amount and characteristics of these open and closed porosities were revealed by t test and Weibull statistics as well as by microCT.

  6. Effect of the porosity of PS-DVB-copolymers on ion chromatographic behavior in inverse size-exclusion and ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füssler, Rainer; Schäfer, Helwig; Seubert, Andreas

    2002-03-01

    Small and highly pressure-stable PS-DVB copolymers of different porosity had been prepared by a two-step swelling procedure which enabled variation of diluent composition, an important characteristic affecting the porosity. The polymers were characterized by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and scanning electron microscopy. Subsequent chloromethylation and amination resulted in anion exchangers suitable for ion chromatography. The pore volume and the pore-size distribution is substantially affected by the fraction of the solvens component in the diluent. It was apparent from scanning electron microscopy that surface structure and the size of the polymer particles was not affected by diluent composition. The functionalization process led to a decrease in pore volume. The pore-size distribution remained unchanged during functionalization, which can be explained in terms of partial closing of all pore sizes. The chromatographic efficiency of the functionalized polymers in ion chromatography was highly dependent on diluent composition and the extent of functionalization was determined by the total pore volume. The composition of the diluent is an excellent tool for optimization of polymers used for the synthesis of surface-functionalized anion exchangers.

  7. Effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion as investigated by X-ray absorption imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Meigs, Lucy C.; Christian-Frear, Tracy; Boney, Craig M.

    2000-03-01

    High-resolution X-ray absorption imaging was used to investigate the effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion. Experiments were performed on four, centimeter-scale slabs of Culebra dolomite taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. These tests involved the diffusion of potassium iodide into a single edge of each brine-saturated rock slab, while X-ray absorption imaging was used to measure the two-dimensional relative concentration distribution at different times during the experiment. X-ray imaging was also used to measure the heterogeneous, two-dimensional porosity distribution of each rock slab. The resulting high-resolution data provide unique insight into the spatially varying diffusion characteristics of each heterogeneous rock sample, which traditional methods such as through-diffusion experiments cannot. In these tests, significant variations in the diffusion coefficient were calculated over the relatively small length (centimeter) and time scales (months) investigated. Results also indicated that these variations were related to the heterogeneous porosity characteristics of each rock sample. Not only were the diffusion coefficients found to depend on the magnitude of the porosity but also on its spatial distribution. Specifically, the geometry, position, and orientation of the heterogeneous porosity features populating each rock slab appeared to influence the diffusion characteristics.

  8. Laser Carbonization of PAN-Nanofiber Mats with Enhanced Surface Area and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Dennis; Lott, Philipp; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Thomas, Helga; Möller, Martin; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2016-10-17

    Here we present a novel laser process to generate carbon nanofiber nonwovens from polyacrylonitrile. We produce carbon nanofabrics via electrospinning followed by infrared laser-induced carbonization, facilitating high surface area and well-controlled hierarchical porosity. The process allows precise control of the carbonization conditions and provides high nanoscale porosity. In comparison with classical thermal carbonization, the laser process produces much higher surface areas and smaller pores. Furthermore, we investigate the carbonization performance and the morphology of polyacrylonitrile nanofibers compounded with graphene nanoplatelet fillers.

  9. Electrical Measurement to Assess Hydration Process and the Porosity Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; XIAO Lianzhen; LI Zongjin

    2008-01-01

    The change of electrical resistivity with time at early ages was used to investigate the hydration process and the porosity development. Porosity reduction process of cement-based materials hydration was developed by a proposed method. The porosity reduction is fast at the setting period. The results find that the pore discontinuity occurs faster at lower water/cement ratios than at higher water/cement ratios which is similar to the results of the Percolation method.

  10. Usage of infinitesimals in the Menger's Sponge model of porosity

    OpenAIRE

    Vita, M. C.; Bartolo, S.; C. Fallico; Veltri, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present work concerns the calculation of the infinitesimal porosity by using the Menger's Sponge model. This computation is based on the grossone theory considering the pore volume estimation for the Menger's Sponge and afterwards the classical definition of the porosity, given by the ratio between the volume of voids and the total volume (voids plus solid phase). The aim is to investigate the different solutions given by the standard characterization of the porosity and the grossone theo...

  11. Study of NMR porosity for terrestrial formation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaowen; XIAO Lizhi; XIE Ranhong; ZHANG Yuanzhong

    2006-01-01

    NMR logging is an effective method for porosity measurement. NMR-derived porosity only comes from the pore fluid and is, in principle, not affected by rock matrix. However, it is found that the difference between NMR-derived and conventional log-derived porosities is often between 2 to 6 pu, which is unacceptable, in terrestrial formation in China. In the paper, the theory of NMR porosity was reviewed. The influence factors on NMR porosity error were analyzed based on NMR core measurements. More than 30 core samples with a wide range of porosities including sandstone, limestone and artificial ceramic were chosen for the conventional and NMR porosity measurements. The current NMR data acquisition method was studied based on laboratory NMR core measurements and found to be not good for terrestrial formation. A new NMR data acquisition method suiting for terrestrial formation in China was proposed and much improved the accuracy of NMR porosity measurement. It is suggested that the analysis of core samples from different regions should be carried out before logging in order to obtain accurate NMR porosity.

  12. Carbonate porosity versus depth: a predictable relation for south Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Halley, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the porosity of limestones and dolomites in the south Florida basin. Porosity data are derived from wire-line measurements which sample large volumes of rock, relative to petrographic methods, and can be examined at vertical scales approaching those of aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Investigation depths range from the surface to about 5500m. Curves of porosity versus depth, reflecting large-scale porosity-loss processes in the subsurface, are derived for a composite carbonate section and for carbonate strata of different ages and compositions.-from Authors

  13. How gradients in porosity can make a better filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ian; Bruna, Maria; Dalwadi, Mohit

    2015-11-01

    Depth filters are a common device for removing contaminants from fluid. Porosity-graded filters, whose porosities decrease with depth, have been shown experimentally to offer improved filtration efficiency over filters with uniform porosity, by allowing contaminants to be trapped more evenly within the filter media. However, experiments are unable to probe the microscopic behavior, and so the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for this improved filtration are unclear. We use homogenization theory to derive a macroscopic model for the fluid flow and particle trapping within a porosity-graded depth filter. We find that gradients in porosity induce a macroscale particle advection in the direction of reducing porosity and show how particle trapping is more evenly spread through the filter for a decreasing porosity compared with a uniform porosity. By quantifying the removal rate, we show how a given operating regime can be fine-tuned to improve filter efficiency. The talk is accompanied by an online demonstration of MEMFI, a software package in which audience members may explore for themselves the effect of porosity gradients in user-specified operating regimes.

  14. X-Ray Tomographic Characterization of the Macroscopic Porosity of Chemical Vapor Infiltration SiC/SiC Composites: Effects on the Elastic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelebart, L.; Chateau, C. [CEA Saclay, SRMA, F-91190 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Chateau, C.; Bornert, M. [Ecole Polytech, LMS, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Crepin, J. [CDM Mines Paris Paristech, F-91003 Evry (France); Boller, E. [ESRF ID19, F-38043 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the macro-porosity, the porosity among the tows, observed in chemical vapor infiltration composites and on its effect on the thermo-mechanical behavior. The experimental characterization of macro-porosity is performed using an X-ray tomography technique. Numerical 3D images are used to describe the distribution of macro-porosity with respect to the position of the plies. It is clearly established that the stacking of the plies has a significant effect on the porosity distribution. As a consequence for the micromechanical modelling, a unique element that contains only one ply is not representative of the porosity distribution and is not sufficient to evaluate the 'effective' mechanical properties; several volume elements (VE), called 'statistical volume elements (SVE)', with at least two plies per VE have to be used in order to account for the variability of the stacking of the plies. Finally, such SVE are directly extracted from the tomographic image and the 'effective' elastic behavior is evaluated from the average of the 'apparent' behavior evaluated on each SVE. In spite of their quite important size, the 'apparent' behaviors evaluated for each SVE exhibit important fluctuations. (authors)

  15. Flash Thermography to Evaluate Porosity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carosena Meola

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that the presence of porosity in composites has detrimental effects on their mechanical properties. Then, due to the high probability of void formation during manufacturing processes, it is necessary to have the availability of non-destructive evaluation techniques, which may be able to discover the presence and the distribution of porosity in the final parts. In recent years, flash thermography has emerged as the most valuable method, but it is still not adequately enclosed in the industrial enterprise. The main reason of this is the lack of sufficient quantitative data for a full validation of such a technique. The intention of the present work is to supply an overview on the current state-of-the-art regarding the use of flash thermography to evaluate the porosity percentage in fiber reinforced composite materials and to present the latest results, which are gathered by the authors, on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. To this end, several coupons of two different stacking sequences and including a different amount of porosity are fabricated and inspected with both non-destructive and destructive testing techniques. Data coming from non-destructive testing with either flash thermography or ultrasonics are plotted against the porosity percentage, which was previously estimated with the volumetric method. The new obtained results are a witness to the efficacy of flash thermography. Some key points that need further consideration are also highlighted.

  16. Effect of porosity of the electrodes on ionic electroactive polymer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakshatharan, S. Sunjai; Johanson, Urmas; Punning, Andres; Aabloo, Alvo

    2017-04-01

    Ionic electroactive polymer (IEAP) actuators with carbon based porous electrodes and ionic liquid electrolyte are attractive alternatives compared to the actuators composed of noble metal electrodes. Besides of numerous other parameters, the porosity of the electrode matrix has high influence on the electrochemical behavior and mechanical response of these actuators. Porosity has direct influence on the tortuosity, electronic conductivity, ionic conductivity, ion diffusivity, mobility, as well as the specific area and specific capacitance of electrode. It can also influence directly the mechanical properties of the IEAP laminate: durability, stiffness, etc. In this study, a detailed physical model that incorporates porosity of electrodes and its relation to the electrochemical, transport and mechanical behavior of the IEAP actuator is developed. The behavior of the actuator under different porosity values is investigated through finite elements simulation. The outputs of the simulation are cation concentration, current consumed and deformation of the actuator etc. Altering porosity and determining its optimum value help to comprehend the occurring physical and electrochemical processes, as well as to design actuators capable of delivering optimum electrical and mechanical response.

  17. Analysis of porosity distribution of large-scale porous media and their reconstruction by Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, G Reza; Sahimi, Muhammad; Rasaei, M Reza; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

    2011-02-01

    Several methods have been developed in the past for analyzing the porosity and other types of well logs for large-scale porous media, such as oil reservoirs, as well as their permeability distributions. We developed a method for analyzing the porosity logs ϕ(h) (where h is the depth) and similar data that are often nonstationary stochastic series. In this method one first generates a new stationary series based on the original data, and then analyzes the resulting series. It is shown that the series based on the successive increments of the log y(h)=ϕ(h+δh)-ϕ(h) is a stationary and Markov process, characterized by a Markov length scale h(M). The coefficients of the Kramers-Moyal expansion for the conditional probability density function (PDF) P(y,h|y(0),h(0)) are then computed. The resulting PDFs satisfy a Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, which is equivalent to a Langevin equation for y(h) that provides probabilistic predictions for the porosity logs. We also show that the Hurst exponent H of the self-affine distributions, which have been used in the past to describe the porosity logs, is directly linked to the drift and diffusion coefficients that we compute for the FP equation. Also computed are the level-crossing probabilities that provide insight into identifying the high or low values of the porosity beyond the depth interval in which the data have been measured.

  18. Preparing diopside nanoparticle scaffolds via space holder method: Simulation of the compressive strength and porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellahi, Majid; Najafinezhad, Aliakbar; Ghayour, Hamid; Saber-Samandari, Saeed; Khandan, Amirsalar

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, diopside nanopowders were prepared via mechanical milling with eggshell as the calcium source. The space holder method (compaction of ceramic powder and spacer) as one of the most important methods to produce ceramic/metal scaffolds was used to produce diopside scaffolds. For the first time, the effect of the spacer size on mechanical properties and porosity of the obtained scaffolds was experimentally discussed. According to the results obtained, the NaCl particles (as the spacer) with the size of 400-600µm maintained their original spherical shape during the compaction and sintering processes. As a new work, the most important parameters including the spacer type, spacer concentration, spacer size, and applied pressure were considered, and their effects on mechanical properties and porosity of diopside scaffolds were simulated. Gene Expression Programming (GEP), as one of the most branches of the artificial intelligence, was used for simulation process. By using the GEP, two equations were introduced to predict the compressive strength and porosity of the obtained scaffolds with the lowest error values. The 3D diagrams extracted from the model were used to evaluate the combined effect of the process parameters on the compressive strength and porosity of the scaffolds. The GEP model presented in this work has a very low level of error and a high level of the squared regression for predicting the compressive strength and porosity of diopside scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Semi-automated porosity identification from thin section images using image analysis and intelligent discriminant classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasi-Freez, Javad; Soleimanpour, Iman; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Ziaii, Mansur; Sedighi, Mahdi; Hatampour, Amir

    2012-08-01

    Identification of different types of porosity within a reservoir rock is a functional parameter for reservoir characterization since various pore types play different roles in fluid transport and also, the pore spaces determine the fluid storage capacity of the reservoir. The present paper introduces a model for semi-automatic identification of porosity types within thin section images. To get this goal, a pattern recognition algorithm is followed. Firstly, six geometrical shape parameters of sixteen largest pores of each image are extracted using image analysis techniques. The extracted parameters and their corresponding pore types of 294 pores are used for training two intelligent discriminant classifiers, namely linear and quadratic discriminant analysis. The trained classifiers take the geometrical features of the pores to identify the type and percentage of five types of porosity, including interparticle, intraparticle, oomoldic, biomoldic, and vuggy in each image. The accuracy of classifiers is determined from two standpoints. Firstly, the predicted and measured percentages of each type of porosity are compared with each other. The results indicate reliable performance for predicting percentage of each type of porosity. In the second step, the precisions of classifiers for categorizing the pore spaces are analyzed. The classifiers also took a high acceptance score when used for individual recognition of pore spaces. The proposed methodology is a further promising application for petroleum geologists allowing statistical study of pore types in a rapid and accurate way.

  20. The influence of dust grain porosity on the analysis of debris disc observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunngräber, Robert; Wolf, Sebastian; Kirchschlager, Florian; Ertel, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Debris discs are often modelled assuming compact dust grains, but more and more evidence for the presence of porous grains is found. We aim at quantifying the systematic errors introduced when modelling debris discs composed of porous dust with a disc model assuming spherical, compact grains. We calculate the optical dust properties derived via the fast, but simple effective medium theory. The theoretical lower boundary of the size distribution - the so-called `blowout size' - is compared in the cases of compact and porous grains. Finally, we simulate observations of hypothetical debris discs with different porosities and feed them into a fitting procedure using only compact grains. The deviations of the results for compact grains from the original model based on porous grains are analysed. We find that the blowout size increases with increasing grain porosity up to a factor of 2. An analytical approximation function for the blowout size as a function of porosity and stellar luminosity is derived. The analysis of the geometrical disc set-up, when constrained by radial profiles, is barely affected by the porosity. However, the determined minimum grain size and the slope of the grain size distribution derived using compact grains are significantly overestimated. Thus, the unexpectedly high ratio of minimum grain size to blowout size found by previous studies using compact grains can be partially described by dust grain porosity, although the effect is not strong enough to completely explain the trend.

  1. Experimental Study on the Porosity Creep Properties of Broken Limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shun-cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the underground engineering, the long-term stability of the surrounding rocks (especially the broken rocks containing water and the ground settlement resulted from the seepage-creep coupling above goaf have been the important research subjects concerning the deep mining. For the broken rock, its porosity is an important structural parameter determining its creep properties, and the porosity change rate is more superior to describe the creep characteristics compared with the strain change rate at a certain direction. In this paper, MTS815.02 Rock Mechanics Test System is used to carry out the creep experiments on water-saturated broken limestone, and then the time curves of porosity and of the porosity change rate are obtained. By regression, we have got the relation equation between the porosity change rate with the instant porosity and the stress level during the creep. The study indicates that when the stress retains a constant level, the relation between the porosity change rate and the instant porosity can be fitted with a cubical polynomial. The obtained creep relation equation between the porosity change rate and the instant porosity and the instant stress provides a necessary state equation for studying the coupling between the seepage and the creep of the broken rock. Furthermore, the seepage in the broken rock has been verified to satisfy the Forchheimer’s non-Darcy flow according to our previous studies, and its seepage properties, k, β and ca can all be expressed respectively as the polynomial of the porosity, so, by combining with these three state equations we have obtained the four essential state equations for solving the coupling problems of the seepage and the creep for the broken rocks.

  2. Porosity and Health: Perspective of Traditional Persian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, Vahid; Nimrouzi, Majid; Daneshfard, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: The authors of this manuscript aimed to show the importance of porosity and condensation in health according to traditional Persian medicine (TPM) with consideration of new evidence in conventional medicine. Methods: Cardinal traditional medical and pharmacological texts were searched for the traditional terms of takhalkhol (porosity) and takassof (condensity) focused on preventive methods. The findings were classified and compared with new medical findings. Results: According to traditional Persian medicine, porosity and condensity are the two crucial items that contribute to human health. Somatotype is a taxonomy based on embryonic development, which may be considered in parallel with porosity and condensation. However, these terms are not completely the same. There are many causes for acquired porosity comprising hot weather, too much intercourse, rage, starvation, and heavy exercises. In general, porosity increases the risk of diseases as it makes the body organs vulnerable to external hot and cold weather. On the other hand, the porose organs are more susceptible to accumulation of morbid matters because the cellular wastes cannot be evacuated in the normal way. There are some common points between traditional and conventional medicine in the context of porosity and condensity. The relation between diet and somatotype is an example. Conclusion: Condensity and porosity are the two basic items cited in the TPM resources and contribute to health maintenance and disease prevention of body organs. Creating a balance between these two states in different body organs, strongly contributes to disease prevention, treatment and diminishing chronic diseases period. Choosing proper modality including diet, drug therapy, and manual therapy depends on the amount porosity and stiffness of the considered organ and the preferred porosity of the affected organ keeping in a normal healthy state. PMID:27840513

  3. Spark plasma sintering and porosity studies of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kyle D.; Wallenius, Janne; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Claisse, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a number of samples of UN sintered by the SPS method have been fabricated, and highly pure samples ranging in density from 68% to 99.8%TD - corresponding to an absolute density of 14.25 g/cm3 out of a theoretical density of 14.28 g/cm3 - have been fabricated. By careful adjustment of the sintering parameters of temperature and applied pressure, the production of pellets of specific porosity may now be achieved between these ranges. The pore closure behaviour of the material has also been documented and compared to previous studies of similar materials, which demonstrates that full pore closure using these methods occurs near 97.5% of relative density.

  4. On the Use of Surface Porosity to Reduce Unsteady Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Ana F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative application of existing technology is proposed for attenuating the effects of transient phenomena, such as rotor-stator and rotor-strut interactions, linked to noise and fatigue failure in turbomachinery environments. A computational study was designed to assess the potential of passive porosity technology as a mechanism for alleviating interaction effects by reducing the unsteady lift developed on a stator airfoil subject to wake impingement. The study involved a typical high bypass fan Stator airfoil (solid baseline and several porous configurations), immersed in a free field and exposed to the effects of a transversely moving wake. It was found that, for the airfoil under consideration, the magnitude of the unsteady lift could be reduced more than 18% without incurring significant performance losses.

  5. Microcrack porosity and in situ stress in Illinois Borehole UPH 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, S. R.; Wang, H. F.

    1986-09-01

    Differential strain analysis was used to study microcracks in granite core taken from 0.7 to 1.6 km depth from Illinois Deep Hole UPH 3. The majority of the microcracks are believed to have been generated by stress relief upon removal of the core from depth. Volumetric microcrack porosity was found to vary by an order of magnitude. Low values of microcrack porosity were found in highly fractured intervals, where large, open fractures have relaxed a portion of the in situ stress. Plotting microcrack porosity against mean in situ stress reveals a strong positive correlation over a range of 25 MPa. Large, subvertical fractures may locally influence the orientation of stress relief microcracks. The direction of maximum horizontal crack strain was found to be subparallel to the strike of the nearest large fracture in 7 of 8 fine-grained samples.

  6. Porosity and mechanical properties of zirconium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyakova, S., E-mail: sbuyakova@ispms.tsc.ru; Kulkov, S. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation); Sablina, T. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science RAS (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Has been studied a porous ceramics obtained from ultra-fine powders. Porous ceramic ZrO{sub 2}(MgO), ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powder was prepared by pressing and subsequent sintering of compacts homologous temperatures ranging from 0.63 to 0.56 during the isothermal holding duration of 1 to 5 hours. The porosity of ceramic samples was from 15 to 80%. The structure of the ceramic materials produced from plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} powder was represented as a system of cell and rod structure elements. Cellular structure formed by stacking hollow powder particles can be easily seen at the images of fracture surfaces of obtained ceramics. There were three types of pores in ceramics: large cellular hollow spaces, small interparticle pores which are not filled with powder particles and the smallest pores in the shells of cells. The cells generally did not have regular shapes. The size of the interior of the cells many times exceeded the thickness of the walls which was a single-layer packing of ZrO{sub 2} grains. A distinctive feature of all deformation diagrams obtained in the experiment was their nonlinearity at low deformations which was described by the parabolic law. It was shown that the observed nonlinear elasticity for low deformation on deformation diagrams is due to mechanical instability of the cellular elements in the ceramic carcass.

  7. Ultrahigh porosity in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Ko, Nakeun; Go, Yong Bok; Aratani, Naoki; Choi, Sang Beom; Choi, Eunwoo; Yazaydin, A Ozgür; Snurr, Randall Q; O'Keeffe, Michael; Kim, Jaheon; Yaghi, Omar M

    2010-07-23

    Crystalline solids with extended non-interpenetrating three-dimensional crystal structures were synthesized that support well-defined pores with internal diameters of up to 48 angstroms. The Zn4O(CO2)6 unit was joined with either one or two kinds of organic link, 4,4',4''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(ethyne-2,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BTE), 4,4',44''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BBC), 4,4',44''-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoate (BTB)/2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate (NDC), and BTE/biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate (BPDC), to give four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-180, -200, -205, and -210, respectively. Members of this series of MOFs show exceptional porosities and gas (hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide) uptake capacities. For example, MOF-210 has Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Langmuir surface areas of 6240 and 10,400 square meters per gram, respectively, and a total carbon dioxide storage capacity of 2870 milligrams per gram. The volume-specific internal surface area of MOF-210 (2060 square meters per cubic centimeter) is equivalent to the outer surface of nanoparticles (3-nanometer cubes) and near the ultimate adsorption limit for solid materials.

  8. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik [Kroto Research Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom); Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece); Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, 71303 Heraklion (Greece); Farsari, Maria, E-mail: mfarsari@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), N Plastira 100, 70013 Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • We studied the porosity of laser-made 3D scaffolds on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells. • We made polylactide 3D scaffolds with pores 25–110 μm. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds’ porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  9. Porosity prediction from seismic inversion, Lavrans Field, Halten Terrace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolberg, David M.

    1998-12-31

    This presentation relates to porosity prediction from seismic inversion. The porosity prediction concerns the Lavrans Field of the Halten Terrace on the Norwegian continental shelf. The main themes discussed here cover seismic inversion, rock physics, statistical analysis - verification of well trends, upscaling/sculpting, and implementation. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Water uptake in biochars: The roles of porosity and hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    We assessed the effects of porosity and hydrophobicity on water uptake by biochars. Biochars were produced from two feedstocks (hazelnut shells and Douglas fir chips) at three production temperatures (370 °C, 500 °C, and 620 °C). To distinguish the effects of porosity from the ...

  11. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  12. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Tanaka

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1 covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes, and 2 open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds. Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1 covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs, and 2 open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment

  13. Eggshell Porosity Provides Insight on Evolution of Nesting in Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kohei; Zelenitsky, Darla K; Therrien, François

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the types of nests built by dinosaurs can provide insight into the evolution of nesting and reproductive behaviors among archosaurs. However, the low preservation potential of their nesting materials and nesting structures means that most information can only be gleaned indirectly through comparison with extant archosaurs. Two general nest types are recognized among living archosaurs: 1) covered nests, in which eggs are incubated while fully covered by nesting material (as in crocodylians and megapodes), and 2) open nests, in which eggs are exposed in the nest and brooded (as in most birds). Previously, dinosaur nest types had been inferred by estimating the water vapor conductance (i.e., diffusive capacity) of their eggs, based on the premise that high conductance corresponds to covered nests and low conductance to open nests. However, a lack of statistical rigor and inconsistencies in this method render its application problematic and its validity questionable. As an alternative we propose a statistically rigorous approach to infer nest type based on large datasets of eggshell porosity and egg mass compiled for over 120 extant archosaur species and 29 archosaur extinct taxa/ootaxa. The presence of a strong correlation between eggshell porosity and nest type among extant archosaurs indicates that eggshell porosity can be used as a proxy for nest type, and thus discriminant analyses can help predict nest type in extinct taxa. Our results suggest that: 1) covered nests are likely the primitive condition for dinosaurs (and probably archosaurs), and 2) open nests first evolved among non-avian theropods more derived than Lourinhanosaurus and were likely widespread in non-avian maniraptorans, well before the appearance of birds. Although taphonomic evidence suggests that basal open nesters (i.e., oviraptorosaurs and troodontids) were potentially the first dinosaurs to brood their clutches, they still partially buried their eggs in sediment. Open nests

  14. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however, ...... to the high momentum tail of the initial vibrational state of nitrogen, allowing for amplitude to cross over the barrier. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Distribution of apparent magnetization for Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Magsat total field anomalies over Asia were used to construct an equivalent magnetization model, which represents the apparent magnetization distribution within an equivalent layer 40 km thick and correlates well with large-scale tectonics, for example, the Kazakhstan, Tarim, Yangtze, India, Sino-Korea and Indochina blocks. The basin, plain, sea basin, and islands are delineated by magnetization lows whereas the plateau and marine ridge correspond to magnetization highs. The boundary between Tibetan Plateau and India marked by a strong gradient along its length coincides with the Yarlung Zangbo River fault roughly. The Tanlu fault belt is the boundary between positive and negative anomalies. This boundary stretches in southwest direction and joins Sanjiang fault belt. The boundary between the Southeast China block and the Yangtze block is also clearly delineated by the magnetization anomalies. Generally, the magnetization boundaries are consistent with the collisional suture of blocks.

  16. A comparison of estimated and calculated effective porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Prieksat, Mark A.; Ankeny, Mark D.; Blandford, Neil; Roth, Tracy L.; Kelsey, James A.; Whitworth, Julia R.

    Effective porosity in solute-transport analyses is usually estimated rather than calculated from tracer tests in the field or laboratory. Calculated values of effective porosity in the laboratory on three different textured samples were compared to estimates derived from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. The agreement was poor and it seems that no clear relationships exist between effective porosity calculated from laboratory tracer tests and effective porosity estimated from particle-size distributions and soil-water characteristic curves. A field tracer test in a sand-and-gravel aquifer produced a calculated effective porosity of approximately 0.17. By comparison, estimates of effective porosity from textural data, moisture retention, and published values were approximately 50-90% greater than the field calibrated value. Thus, estimation of effective porosity for chemical transport is highly dependent on the chosen transport model and is best obtained by laboratory or field tracer tests. Résumé La porosité effective dans les analyses de transport de soluté est habituellement estimée, plutôt que calculée à partir d'expériences de traçage sur le terrain ou au laboratoire. Les valeurs calculées de la porosité effective au laboratoire sur trois échantillons de textures différentes ont été comparées aux estimations provenant de distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. La concordance était plutôt faible et il semble qu'il n'existe aucune relation claire entre la porosité effective calculée à partir des expériences de traçage au laboratoire et la porosité effective estimée à partir des distributions de taille de particules et de courbes caractéristiques sol-eau. Une expérience de traçage de terrain dans un aquifère de sables et de graviers a fourni une porosité effective calculée d'environ 0,17. En comparaison, les estimations de porosité effective de données de

  17. Passively Aerated Composting of Straw-Rich Pig Manure : Effect of Compost Bed Porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Wilde, de V.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2002-01-01

    Straw-rich manure from organic pig farming systems can be composted in passively aerated systems as the high application of straw results in a compost bed with good structure and porosity. The passively aerated composting process was simulated in one-dimensional reactors of 2 m3 for straw-rich

  18. Increased intra-cortical porosity reduces bone stiffness and strength in pediatric patients with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardakastani, V; Saletti, D; Skalli, W; Marry, P; Allain, J M; Adam, C

    2014-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disease occurring in one out of every 20,000 births. Although it is known that Type I collagen mutation in OI leads to increased bone fragility, the mechanism of this increased susceptibility to fracture is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the microstructure of cortical bone fragments from patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) using polarized light microscopy, and to correlate microstructural observations with the results of previously performed mechanical compression tests on bone from the same source. Specimens of cortical bone were harvested from the lower limbs of three (3) OI patients at the time of surgery, and were divided into two groups. Group 1 had been subjected to previous micro-mechanical compression testing, while Group 2 had not been subjected to any prior testing. Polarized light microscopy revealed disorganized bone collagen architecture as has been previously observed, as well as a large increase in the areal porosity of the bone compared to typical values for healthy cortical bone, with large (several hundred micron sized), asymmetrical pores. Importantly, the areal porosity of the OI bone samples in Group 1 appears to correlate strongly with their previously measured apparent Young's modulus and compressive strength. Taken together with prior nanoindentation studies on OI bone tissue, the results of this study suggest that increased intra-cortical porosity is responsible for the reduction in macroscopic mechanical properties of OI cortical bone, and therefore that in vivo imaging modalities with resolutions of ~100 μm or less could potentially be used to non-invasively assess bone strength in OI patients. Although the number of subjects in this study is small, these results highlight the importance of further studies in OI bone by groups with access to human OI tissue in order to clarify the relationship between increased porosity and reduced macroscopic mechanical integrity.

  19. Unconfined versus confined speleogenetic settings: variations of solution porosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Speleogenesis in confined settings generates cave morphologies that differ much from those formed in unconfined settings. Cavesdeveloped in unconfined settings are characterised by broadly dendritic patterns of channels due to highly competing development.In contrast, caves originated under confined conditions tend to form two- or three-dimensional mazes with densely packed conduits.This paper illustrates variations of solution (channel porosity resulted from speleogenesis in unconfined and confined settings by theanalysis of morphometric parameters of typical cave patterns. Two samples of typical cave systems formed in the respective settingsare compared. The sample that represents unconfined speleogenesis consists of solely limestone caves, whereas gypsum cavesof this type tend to be less dendritic and more linear. The sample that represents confined speleogenesis consists of both limestoneand gypsum maze caves. The comparison shows considerable differences in average values of some parameters between thesettings. Passage network density (the ratio of the cave length to the area of the cave field, km/km2 is one order of magnitudegreater in confined settings than in unconfined (average 167.3 km/km2 versus 16.6 km/km2. Similarly, an order of magnitudedifference is observed in cave porosity (a fraction of the volume of a cave block, occupied by mapped cavities; 5.0 % versus 0.4 %.This illustrates that storage in maturely karstified confined aquifers is generally much greater than in unconfined. The average areal coverage (a fraction of the area of the cave field occupied by passages in a plan view is about 5 times greater in confined settingsthan in unconfined (29.7 % versus 6.4 %. This indicates that conduit permeability in confined aquifers is appreciably easier to targetwith drilling than the widely spaced conduits in unconfined aquifers.

  20. Data Qualification Report: Calculated Porosity and Porosity-Derived Values for Lithostratigraphic Units for use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2001-05-30

    The qualification is being completed in accordance with the Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000006, Rev. 00 (CRWMS M&O 2001). The purpose of this data qualification activity is to evaluate for qualification the unqualified developed input and porosity output included in Data Tracking Number (DTN) M09910POROCALC.000. The main output of the analyses documented in DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is the calculated total porosity and effective porosity for 40 Yucca Mountain Project boreholes. The porosity data are used as input to Analysis Model Report (AMR) 10040, ''Rock Properties Model'' (MDL-NBS-GS-000004, Rev. 00), Interim Change Notice [ICN] 02 (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The output from the rock properties model is used as input to numerical physical-process modeling within the context of a relationship developed in the AMR between hydraulic conductivity, bound water and zeolitic zones for use in the unsaturated zone model. In accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q, the porosity output is not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for post-closure safety or disruptive events. The original source for DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) report, ''Combined Porosity from Geophysical Logs'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a and hereafter referred to as Rael 1999). That report recalculated porosity results for both the historical boreholes covered in Nelson (1996), and the modern boreholes reported in CRWMS M&O (1996a,b). The porosity computations in Rael (1999) are based on density-porosity mathematical relationships requiring various input parameters, including bulk density, matrix density and air and/or fluid density and volumetric water content. The main output is computed total porosity and effective porosity reported on a foot-by-foot basis for each borehole, although volumetric water content is derived from neutron data as an interim output. This qualification

  1. Effects of porosity on corrosion resistance of Mg alloy foam produced by powder metallurgy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghion, E., E-mail: egyon@bgu.ac.il; Perez, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Magnesium alloy foams have the potential to serve as structural material for regular light-weight applications as well as for biodegradable scaffold implants. However, their main disadvantage relates to the high reactivity of magnesium and consequently their natural tendency to corrode in regular service conditions and in physiological environments. The present study aims at evaluating the effect of porosity on the corrosion resistance of MRI 201S magnesium alloy foams in 0.9% NaCl solution and in phosphate buffer saline solution as a simulated physiological electrolyte. The magnesium foams were produced by powder metallurgy technology using space-holding particles to control the porosity content. Machined chips were used as raw material for the production of Mg alloy powder by milling process. The microstructure of the foams was examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the porosity has a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of the tested foams. Foams with 14–19% porosity have a corrosion rate of 4–10 mcd and 7–15 mcd in NaCl and phosphate buffer saline solution, respectively, compared to only 0.10 mcd for the same alloy in as cast conditions. This increased corrosion degradation of the Mg foams by more than one order of magnitude compared to the cast alloy may limit their potential application in regular and physiological environments. - Highlights: • Porosity has a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance of MRI 201S Mg foams. • 14–19% porosity increases the corrosion rate by more than one order of magnitude. • Accelerated corrosion limits the use of foams in regular/physiological environments.

  2. Effects of porosity on the fatigue performance of polymethyl methacrylate bone cement: an analytical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S L

    2006-01-01

    Porosity has been shown to affect the fatigue life of bone cements, but, although vacuum mixing is widely used to reduce porosity in the clinical setting, results have been mixed and the effects of porosity are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of porosity using stress analysis and fracture mechanics techniques. The stress concentrations arising at voids in test specimens were found using analytical solutions and boundary element methods. The fatigue life of specimens containing voids of various sizes was predicted using fracture mechanics techniques. For spherical voids that do not occupy a significant proportion of the cross-section, the resulting stress concentration is independent of void size and too small to account for the observed crack initiation. Cracks must therefore initiate at additional stress raisers such as radiopacifier particles or additional voids. For large voids, the stress increases as the remaining cross-section of the specimen decreases, and this may account for much of the observed reduction in fatigue strength in hand-mixed cement. Although crack initiation may be largely independent of void size, there is an effect on crack growth rate. Cracks are predicted to grow faster around larger voids, since they remain in the stress concentration around the void for longer. This effect may account for the relationship between porosity and fatigue life that has been observed in samples without large voids. Since porosity appears to affect crack growth more than initiation, it may be less damaging in high-cycle clinical fatigue, which may be predominantly initiation controlled, than in short laboratory tests.

  3. Porosity determination from 2-D resistivity method in studying the slope failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslinda, Umi; Nordiana, M. M.; Bery, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    Slope failures have become the main focus for infrastructures development on hilly areas in Malaysia especially the development of tourism and residential. Lack of understanding and information of the subsoil conditions and geotechnical issues are the main cause of the slope failures. The failures happened are due to a combination of few factors such as topography, climate, geology and land use. 2-D resistivity method was conducted at the collapsed area in Selangor. The 2-D resistivity was done to study the instability of the area. The collapsed occurred because of the subsurface materials was unstable. Pole-dipole array was used with 5 m minimum electrode spacing for the 2-D resistivity method. The data was processed using Res2Dinv software and the porosity was calculated using Archie's law equation. The results show that the saturated zone (1-100 Ωm), alluvium or highly weathered rock (100-1000 Ωm), boulders (1600-7000 Ωm) and granitic bedrock (>7000 Ωm). Generally, the slope failures or landslides occur during the wet season or after rainfall. It is because of the water infiltrate to the slope and cause the saturation of the slope which can lead to landslides. Then, the porosity of saturated zone is usually high because of the water content. The area of alluvium or highly weathered rock and saturated zone have high porosity (>20%) and the high porosity also dominated at almost all the collapsed area which means that the materials with porosity >20% is potential to be saturated, unstable and might trigger slope failures.

  4. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity within macroaggregates modified by tillage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, E.J.; Smucker, A.J.M. (MSU)

    2010-07-20

    Greater knowledge of intraaggregate porosity modifications by tillage conveys new information for identifying additional hydrologic, ion retention, and aggregate stability responses to specific management practices. Macroaggregates, 2 to 4, 4 to 6.3, and 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, were separated into multiple concentric layers and their porosities were determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub s}) of multiple aggregate fractions from two soil types subjected to conventional tillage (CT), no tillage (NT), and native forest (NF) soils were measured individually to identify the effects of tillage on aggregate structure, porosity, and K{sub s}. Intraaggregate porosities were the highest in NF aggregates. Greater porosities were identified in exterior layers of soil aggregates from all treatments. Lowest intraaggregate porosities were observed in the central regions of CT aggregates. Soil aggregates, 6.3 to 9.5 mm across, had the greatest total porosities, averaging 37.5% for both soil types. Long-term CT reduced intraaggregate porosities and K, within macroaggregates, of the same size fraction, from both the Hoytville silty clay loam and Wooster silt loam soil types. Values for K, of NF aggregates, 5.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 50-fold by long-term CT treatments of the Hoytville series. The K, values through Wooster aggregates from NF, 16.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, were reduced 80-fold by long-term CT treatments. The K{sub s} values through NF and NT aggregates were positively correlated with their intraaggregate porosities (R{sup 2} = 0.84 for NF and R{sup 2} = 0.45 for NT at P < 0.005). Additional studies are needed to identify rates at which pore geometries within macroaggregates are degraded by CT or improved by NT.

  5. Granule Size Distribution and Porosity of Granule Packing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shu-hua; SHEN Feng-man; YU Ai-bing

    2008-01-01

    The granule size distribution and the porosity of the granule packing process were researched.For realizing the optimizing control of the whole sintering production process,researchers must know the factors influencing the granule size distribution and the porosity.Therefore,tests were carried out in the laboratory with regard to the influences of the size and size distribution of raw materials and the total moisture content on the size and size distribution of granule.Moreover,tests for finding out the influences of the moisture content and the granule volume fraction on the porosity were also carried out.The results show that (1) the raw material has little influence on granulation when its size is in the range of 0.51 mm to 1.0 mm;(2) the influence of the material size on granule size plays a dominant role,and in contrast,the moisture content creates a minor effect on granule size;(3) in binary packing system,with the increase in the constituent volume fraction,the porosity initially increases and then decreases,and there is a minimum value on the porosity curve of the binary mixture system;(4) the minimum value of the porosity in binary packing system occurs at different locations for different moisture contents,and this value shifts from right to left on the porosity curve with increasing the moisture content;(5) the addition of small granules to the same size component cannot create a significant influence on the porosity,whereas the addition of large granules to the same system can greatly change the porosity.

  6. Influence of Powder Characteristics on Formation of Porosity in Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iebba, Maurizio; Astarita, Antonello; Mistretta, Daniela; Colonna, Ivano; Liberini, Mariacira; Scherillo, Fabio; Pirozzi, Carmine; Borrelli, Rosario; Franchitti, Stefania; Squillace, Antonino

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims to study the genesis of defects in titanium components made through two different additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser melting and electron beam melting. In particular, we focussed on the influence of the powders used on the formation of porosities and cavities in the manufactured components. A detailed experimental campaign was carried out to characterize the components made through the two additive manufacturing techniques aforementioned and the powders used in the process. It was found that some defects of the final components can be attributed to internal porosities of the powders used in the manufacturing process. These internal porosities are a consequence of the gas atomization process used for the production of the powders themselves. Therefore, the importance of using tailored powders, free from porosities, in order to manufacture components with high mechanical properties is highlighted.

  7. Influence of Powder Characteristics on Formation of Porosity in Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iebba, Maurizio; Astarita, Antonello; Mistretta, Daniela; Colonna, Ivano; Liberini, Mariacira; Scherillo, Fabio; Pirozzi, Carmine; Borrelli, Rosario; Franchitti, Stefania; Squillace, Antonino

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims to study the genesis of defects in titanium components made through two different additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser melting and electron beam melting. In particular, we focussed on the influence of the powders used on the formation of porosities and cavities in the manufactured components. A detailed experimental campaign was carried out to characterize the components made through the two additive manufacturing techniques aforementioned and the powders used in the process. It was found that some defects of the final components can be attributed to internal porosities of the powders used in the manufacturing process. These internal porosities are a consequence of the gas atomization process used for the production of the powders themselves. Therefore, the importance of using tailored powders, free from porosities, in order to manufacture components with high mechanical properties is highlighted.

  8. Distribution of apparent stress in western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴忠良; 黄静; 林碧苍

    2002-01-01

    Distribution of apparent stress in Chinese mainland and its surrounding regions was presented using the NEIC broadband radiated energy catalogue and the Harvard CMT catalogue from January 1987 to December 1998. Due to the limitation on the number of samples, reliable results are only for the western China. It is observed that the average apparent stress in Chinese mainland is 0.8 MPa; The maximum apparent stress to the east of the Tibetan plateau is 2.6 MPa; And the average apparent stress in the north-south seismic belt is more than one time higher than its adjacent regions. Distribution pattern of apparent stress seems to have a large-scale correlation with the cumulative energy release level in the 20th century.

  9. Porosity and mechanical properties of porous titanium fabricated by gelcasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; GUO Zhimeng; HAO Junjie; REN Shubin

    2008-01-01

    Porous Ti compacts with large size and complex shape for biomedical applications were fabricated in the porosity range from 40.5% to 53.8% by controlling gelcasting parameters and sintering conditions. The experimental results show that the total porosity and open porosity of porous titanium compacts gelcast from the Ti slurry with 34 vol.% solid loading and sintered at 1100℃ for 1.5h are 46.5% and 40.7%, respectively, and the mechanical properties are as follows: compressive strength 158.6MPa and Young's modulus 8.5GPa, which are similar to those of human cortical bone and appropriate for implanting purpose.

  10. Causes and remedies for porosity in composite manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernlund, G.; Wells, J.; Fahrang, L.; Kay, J.; Poursartip, A.

    2016-07-01

    Porosity is a challenge in virtually all composite processes but in particular in low pressure processes such as out of autoclave processing of prepregs, where the maximum pressure is one atmosphere. This paper discusses the physics behind important transport phenomena that control porosity and how we can use our understanding of the underlying science to develop strategies to achieve low porosity for these materials and processes in an industrial setting. A three step approach is outlined that addresses and discusses: gas evacuation of trapped air, volatiles and off-gassing, and resin infiltration of evacuated void space.

  11. Ultrasonic measurement of porosity in casts and welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, L.; Wang, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a quantitative nondestructive method which involves ultrasonic attenuation measurements in frequency domain to determine volume fraction of porosity in aluminum cast is discussed. The aluminum alloy A357 casting samples were produced at the Ohio State University Foundry with controlled porosity contents ranging from 0% to 6%. A computer controlled system was used to direct ultrasonic beam to a test sample to different places to conduct ultrasonic attenuation measurements. The plot of attenuation coefficients as a function of frequency was then evaluated based on existing theories to determine volume fraction of porosity and pore size.

  12. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Soong, Yee [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Dilmore, Robert M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, a numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Finally, initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions.

  13. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Soong, Yee [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Dilmore, Robert M. [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA

    2016-01-14

    A numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions. 1

  14. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States); Soong, Yee [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States); Dilmore, Robert M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States)

    2016-01-14

    A numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions. 1

  15. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Soong, Yee [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Dilmore, Robert M. [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, a numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Finally, initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions.

  16. A new Method to Estimate the Representative Elementary Volume (REV) for Porosity in Heterogeneous Karst Aquifers Using Geographic Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M. R.; Manda, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    Karst limestones are characterized by solution-enhanced macropores and conduits that lead to exceptional heterogeneity at the aquifer scale. The interconnected network of solution cavities often results in a conduit flow regime that bypasses the less permeable rock matrix. Efforts to manage and protect karst aquifers, which are vital water resources in many parts of the world, will benefit from meaningful characterizations of the heterogeneity inherent in these formations. To this end, we propose a new method to estimate the representative elementary volume (REV) for macroporosity within karst aquifers using techniques borrowed from remote sensing and geospatial analysis. The REV represents a sampling window in which numerous measurements of a highly-variable property (e.g., porosity, hydraulic conductivity) can be averaged into a single representative value of statistical and physical significance. High-resolution borehole images are classified into binary images consisting of pixels designated as either rock matrix or pore space. A two-dimensional porosity is calculated by summing the total area occupied by pores within a rectangular sampling window placed over the binary image. Small sampling windows quantify the heterogeneous nature of porosity distribution in the aquifer, whereas large windows provide an estimate of overall porosity. Applying this procedure to imagery taken from the Biscayne aquifer of south Florida yields a macroporosity of ~40%, considerably higher than the ~28% porosity measured from recovered core samples. Geospatial analysis may provide the more reliable estimate because it incorporates large solution cavities and conduits captured by the borehole image. The REV is estimated by varying the size of sampling windows around prominent conduits and evaluating the change in porosity as a function of window size. Average porosities decrease systematically with increasing sampling size, eventually converging to a constant value and thus

  17. Surface Quality Multicriteria Optimization of Flat Parts from 06Cr14Ni6Cu2MoVaTi-SH Steel While Grinding by Varigrain High Porosity CBN Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Y. I.; Nguyen, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The grinding of flat parts from 06Cr14Ni6Cu2MoVaTi-SH high-strength corrosion-resistant steel was made by the highly porous wheel (HPW) of CBN30 (B76, B107, B126, V151) 100 OVK27-KF40 (GOST R 53922-2010, GOST R 53923-2010). As input variables for fuzzy logic modeling in the Matlab the following description of the surface quality is chosen: the microrelief parameters (GOST 25142-82) - Ra1, Rmax1 in the cross-feed direction, Sm2 in the length feed direction, flatness deviation (GOST 24642-81) are introduced with the EFEmax , EFEa and EFEq ; microhardness HV. Every parameter at the model input is presented with position measures (medians) and scattering measures (quartile latitude). The Matlab modeling has shown that the best quality of the part surfaces is provided with HPW CBN30 B151 during the multicriteria optimization.

  18. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. -N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium–Beryllium (Am–Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D–T or D–D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am–Be, D–D, and D–T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D–D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am–Be or D–T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D–D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  19. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, A.X., E-mail: axchen@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Antolak, A.J.; Leung, K.-N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2012-08-21

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  20. Porosity-dependent fractal nature of the porous silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, N.; Dariani, R. S., E-mail: dariani@alzahra.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Alzahra University, Tehran, 1993893973 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Porous silicon films with porosity ranging from 42% to 77% were fabricated by electrochemical anodization under different current density. We used atomic force microscopy and dynamic scaling theory for deriving the surface roughness profile and processing the topography of the porous silicon layers, respectively. We first compared the topography of bare silicon surface with porous silicon and then studied the effect of the porosity of porous silicon films on their scaling behavior by using their self-affinity nature. Our work demonstrated that silicon compared to the porous silicon films has the highest Hurst parameter, indicating that the formation of porous layer due to the anodization etching of silicon surface leads to an increase of its roughness. Fractal analysis revealed that the evolution of the nanocrystallites’ fractal dimension along with porosity. Also, we found that both interface width and Hurst parameter are affected by the increase of porosity.

  1. Effect of volatile elements on porosity formation in solidifying alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, G.; Rappaz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Besides dissolved gases such as hydrogen, the partial vapour pressure of volatile solute elements, such as zinc, has been accounted for in equations governing the nucleation and growth of pores in solidifying alloys. In particular, a simple analytical solution giving the porosity fraction as a function of the fraction of solid is proposed. This solution is then used to study the influence of zinc on porosity formation in aluminium- and copper-base alloys. It is shown that the zinc vapour pressure is too low to increase the porosity of aluminium-base alloys, whereas it has a significant effect in brasses. Implementing this contribution into an existing software which calculates the pressure drop in the mushy zone and the segregation of dissolved gases, simulations have been performed in order to assess in more realistic situations the influence of volatile solute elements on porosity.

  2. Confocal microscopy description of porosity defects in metallic composite alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gawdzińska

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Possibilit ics of confocal microscopy applications for thc dcscripion of open porosity dcfccts in mctallic composirc alloys arcprcscntcd. This aniclc cbaractcrizcs rhc rncthnd and prcscnts its pssihle applications by describing a rcprcscntnr ivc nrcn of thc cxaminedvoid.

  3. Friedmann equations and thermodynamics of apparent horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yungui; Wang, Anzhong

    2007-11-23

    With the help of a masslike function which has a dimension of energy and is equal to the Misner-Sharp mass at the apparent horizon, we show that the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon dE=T(A)dS(A) can be derived from the Friedmann equation in various theories of gravity, including the Einstein, Lovelock, nonlinear, and scalar-tensor theories. This result strongly suggests that the relationship between the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon and the Friedmann equation is not just a simple coincidence, but rather a more profound physical connection.

  4. Ion release, porosity, solubility, and bioactivity of MTA Plus tricalcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Siboni, Francesco; Primus, Carolyn M; Prati, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate MTA Plus (Prevest Denpro Limited, Jammu, India, for Avalon Biomed Inc) material's properties, namely calcium release, the pH change, solubility, water sorption, porosity, surface morphology, and apatite-forming ability after immersion in simulated body fluid. Two tricalcium silicate powders (MTA Plus and ProRoot MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and Dycal (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE) were tested. After incubation at 37°C and 99% relative humidity, calcium and hydroxyl ion release were tested up to 28 days in deionized water at 37°C. Water absorption, interconnected pores, apparent porosity, and solubility were measured after 24 hours of immersion in deionized water at 37°C. The morphologic and elemental analysis of the materials' surfaces were examined using an environmental scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x-ray analysis after storage at 37°C for 1-28 days in simulated body fluid using the ISO 23317 method. All 3 materials created an alkaline pH within 3 hours, which continued for 28 days. MTA Plus had a higher ion release than ProRoot MTA and Dycal; the use of the MTA Plus gel enhanced the initial calcium release and the increase of the pH. Both MTA materials were more porous, water soluble, and water sorptive than Dycal and more bioactive. After aging in simulated body fluid, MTA Plus material caused precipitation of an apparent calcium phosphate layer. MTA Plus showed improved reactivity and prolonged capability to release calcium and increase the local pH to alkaline values in comparison with ProRoot MTA. These pronounced ion-releasing properties are interlinked with its noticeable porosity, water sorption, and solubility and with the formation of calcium phosphorus minerals. The finer calcium silicate powder may explain the higher ion release, water sorption, porosity, and solubility of MTA Plus compared with ProRoot MTA. For clinicians, MTA Plus represents a lower-cost bioactive tricalcium

  5. Etude de la diagraphie neutron du granite de Beauvoir. Effet neutron des altérations et de la matrice du granite. Calibration granite. Porosité totale à l'eau et porosité neutron Analysis of the Beauvoir Granite Neutron Log. Neutron Effect of Alterations and of the Granite Matrix. Granite Calibration. Total Water Porosity and Neutron Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galle C.

    2006-11-01

    chemical analysis to evaluate the PorosityN(ox thermal neutron porosity linked to neutron capture (Schlumberger's Nuclear Parameter Code, SNUPAR. A calibration curve (Fig. 1 between the (Sigmamac macroscopic capture cross-section and the PorosityN neutron porosity enabled us to determine the PorosityN(ox neutron capture porosity for all samples. The macroscopic capture cross-section of the Beauvoir granite, compared to other rocks (Table 2, is very high, about 86 cu. For the Beauvoir granite, the neutron capture porosity was estimated at about 2. 7% (Table 4. The lithium, with Li2O contents varying from 0. 3 to 1. 7%, is the one element which accounts for 85% of this effect (Table 3. Although the response of a neutron tool is not linear for low porosities (especially lower than 5% and although in some cases the neutron effect of the matrix highly depends on the hydrogen index (close imbrication of neutron slowing and capture phenomena, we restored the PorosityNR total neutron porosity of the Beauvoir granite by stacking n, PorosityN(OH- and PorosityN(ox linearly. This porosity is 9% on the average. For this granite, the PorosityNma neutron matrix effect (PorosityNma = PorosityN(OH- + PorosityN(ox is significant and accounts for 75% of the PorosityNR total neutron porosity corresponding to about 7%. This porosity thus cannot be neglected if the objective is to obtain representative water content values of the granite from neutron porosity log. This is why the second part of our project took up the problem of calibrating neutron tool for analyzing a granitic formation. For the Beauvoir granite, the neutron porosity data were obtained from standard calibration in limestone blocks. As the neutron effect of the granite matrix was not negligible, we performed our own calibration using seven granite samples with a perfectly well-known total neutron porosity (free water content and neutron matrix effect. We determined a PorosityNg granitecalibration neutron porosity. For this, the

  6. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Porosity of porcine bladder acellular matrix: impact of ACM thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Walid; Chen, Jun; Erdeljan, Petar; Shemtov, Oren; Courtman, David; Khoury, Antoine; Yeger, Herman

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to examine the porosity of bladder acellular matrix (ACM) using deionized (DI) water as the model fluid and dextran as the indicator macromolecule, and to correlate the porosity to the ACM thickness. Porcine urinary bladders from pigs weighing 20-50 kg were sequentially extracted in detergent containing solutions, and to modify the ACM thickness, stretched bladders were acellularized in the same manner. Luminal and abluminal ACM specimens were subjected to fixed static DI water pressure (10 cm); and water passing through the specimens was collected at specific time interval. While for the macromolecule porosity testing, the diffusion rate and direction of 10,000 MW fluoroescein-labeled dextrans across the ACM specimens mounted in Ussing's chambers were measured. Both experiments were repeated on the thin stretched ACM. In both ACM types, the fluid porosity in both directions did not decrease with increased test duration (3 h); in addition, the abluminal surface was more porous to fluid than the luminal surface. On the other hand, when comparing thin to thick ACM, the porosity in either direction was higher in the thick ACM. Macromolecule porosity, as measured by absorbance, was higher for the abluminal thick ACM than the luminal side, but this characteristic was reversed in the thin ACM. Comparing thin to thick ACM, the luminal side in the thin ACM was more porous to dextran than in the thick ACM, but this characteristic was reversed for the abluminal side. The porcine bladder ACM possesses directional porosity and acellularizing stretched urinary bladders may increase structural density and alter fluid and macromolecule porosity.

  8. Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity

  9. Porosity prediction of calcium phosphate cements based on chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhman, Caroline; Unosson, Johanna; Carlsson, Elin; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The porosity of calcium phosphate cements has an impact on several important parameters, such as strength, resorbability and bioactivity. A model to predict the porosity for biomedical cements would hence be a useful tool. At the moment such a model only exists for Portland cements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a first porosity prediction model for calcium phosphate cements. On the basis of chemical reaction, molar weight and density of components, a volume-based model was developed and validated using calcium phosphate cement as model material. 60 mol% β-tricalcium phosphate and 40 mol% monocalcium phosphate monohydrate were mixed with deionized water, at different liquid-to-powder ratios. Samples were set for 24 h at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Thereafter, samples were dried either under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h or in air at 37 °C for 7 days. Porosity and phase composition were determined. It was found that the two drying protocols led to the formation of brushite and monetite, respectively. The model was found to predict well the experimental values and also data reported in the literature for apatite cements, as deduced from the small absolute average residual errors (brushite, monetite and apatite cements. The model gives a good estimate of the final porosity and has the potential to be used as a porosity prediction tool in the biomedical cement field.

  10. Bone porosity and longevity in early medieval Southern Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bečić, Kristijan; Jandrić Bečić, Darija; Definis-Gojanović, Marija; Zekić Tomaš, Sandra; Anterić, Ivana; Bašić, Zeljana

    2014-03-01

    Porosity of the skull and skeletal remains, especially of the orbital roof, are one of the most frequent pathological findings on ancient human skeletal remains. There are several presumed causes of this condition and anthropologists consider skull porosities as a marker of physical and nutritional stress. A total of 115 graves were discovered at the early-medieval graveyard near Zadar (Croatia) that contained 128 partially preserved skeletons. Average estimated age at death was 37.2 ± 12.6 years for men, 31.9 ± 13.9 for women, and 5.3 ± 3.6 years for subadults. Pathological bone porosity was analysed. Cribra orbitalia was observed on 21 skulls (28.7%), signs of temporal porosity were noticed on six skulls and signs of subperiosteal bleeding on three skulls. Nineteen skulls had bone porosities in other areas. There was a significant difference (p = 0.039) in achieved age of adults with and without cribra orbitalia as those with cribra orbitalia lived on average 8.1 years longer. The bone porosity was probably caused by malnutrition that might have had a beneficial effect on longevity of adults, similar to effects of restricted food intake on extending lifespan through epigenetic signatures influencing gene expression.

  11. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, Colleen; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Collins, Gareth S.; Blair, David M.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Nimmo, Francis; Phillips, Roger J.; Bierson, Carver J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-11-01

    As a result of NASA’s dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; doi:10.1002/2015GL065022]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary crustal porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with the same mean porosity, but that vary with depth. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. We reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km only for simulations where the pre-impact porosity is zero or low. Our results support the observation that SPA has lower

  12. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni; Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds' porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  13. P-wave velocity changes in freezing hard low-porosity rocks: a laboratory-based time-average model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Draebing

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available P-wave refraction seismics is a key method in permafrost research but its applicability to low-porosity rocks, that constitute alpine rock walls, has been denied in prior studies. These explain p-wave velocity changes in freezing rocks exclusively due to changing velocities of pore infill, i.e. water, air and ice. In existing models, no velocity increase is expected for low-porosity bedrock. We postulate, that mixing laws apply for high-porosity rocks, but freezing in confined space in low-porosity bedrock also alters physical rock matrix properties. In the laboratory, we measured p-wave velocities of 22 decimeter-large low-porosity (<6 % metamorphic, magmatic and sedimentary permafrost rock samples with a natural texture (>100 micro-fissures from 25 °C to –15 °C in 0.3 °C increments close to the freezing point. P-wave velocity increases by 7–78 % when freezing parallel to cleavage/bedding and matrix velocity increases from 5–59 % coincident to an anisotropy decrease in most samples. The expansion of rigid bedrock upon freezing is restricted and ice pressure will increase matrix velocity and decrease anisotropy while changing velocities of the pore infill are insignificant. Here, we present a modified Timur's 2-phase equation implementing changes in matrix velocity dependent on lithology and demonstrate the physical basis for refraction seismics in low-porosity bedrock.

  14. Wilcox Group Apparent Thickness, Gulf Coast (wlcxthkg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Apparent Wilcox Group thickness maps are contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The Wilcox...

  15. Fault rock texture and porosity type in Triassic dolostones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Grieco, Donato; Bardi, Alessandro; Prosser, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results of an ongoing project aimed at deciphering the micromechanics and porosity evolution associated to brittle deformation of Triassic dolostones are presented. Samples collected from high-angle, oblique-slip, 10's to 100's m-throw normal faults crosscutting Mesozoic carbonates of the Neo Tethys (Campanian-Lucanian Platform) are investigated by mean of field geological mapping, optical microscopy, SEM and image analyses. The goal is to characterize in detail composition, texture and porosity of cataclastic rocks in order to assess the structural architecture of dolomitic fault cores. Moreover, the present study addresses the time-space control exerted by several micro-mechanisms such as intragranular extensional fracturing, chipping and shear fracturing, which took place during grain rolling and crushing within the evolving faults, on type, amount, dimensions and distribution of micropores present within the cataclastic fault cores. Study samples are representative of well-exposed dolomitic fault cores of oblique-slip normal faults trending either NW-SE or NE-SW. The high-angle normal faults crosscut the Mesozoic carbonates of the Campanian-Lucanian Platform, which overrode the Lagonegro succession by mean of low-angle thrust faults. Fault throws are measured by considering the displaced thrust faults as key markers after large scale field mapping (1:10,000 scale) of the study areas. In the field, hand samples were selected according to their distance from main slip surfaces and, in some case, along secondary slip surfaces. Microscopy analysis of about 100 oriented fault rock samples shows that, mostly, the study cataclastic rocks are made up of dolomite and sparse, minute survivor silicate grains deriving from the Lagonegro succession. In order to quantitatively assess the main textural classes, a great attention is paid to the grain-matrix ratio, grain sphericity, grain roundness, and grain sorting. By employing an automatic box-counting technique

  16. Understanding dynamical black hole apparent horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical, non-asymptotically flat black holes are best characterized by their apparent horizons. Cosmological black hole solutions of General Relativity exhibit two types of apparent horizon behaviours which, thus far, appeared to be completely disconnected. By taking the limit to General Relativity of a class of Brans-Dicke spacetimes, it is shown how one of these two behaviours is really a limit of the other.

  17. Porosity estimates on basaltic basement samples using the neutron absorption cross section (Σ): Implications for fluid flow and alteration of the oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, M. K.; Brewer, T. S.; Marvin, L. G.; Lee, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    Little information presently exists on the heterogeneity of hydrothermal alteration in the oceanic crust or the variability of the associated thermal, fluid, and chemical fluxes. Formation porosities are important controls on these fluxes and porosity measurements are routinely collected during wireline logging operations. These estimates on the formation porosity are measures of the moderating power of the formation in response to bombardment by neutrons. The neutron absorption macroscopic cross-section (Σ = σρ) is a representation of the ability of the rock to slow down neutrons, and as such can be used to invert the porosity of a sample. Boron, lithium and other trace elements are important controls on σ-values, and the distribution of these is influenced by secondary low-temperature alteration processes. Consequently, computed σ-values may be used to discriminate between various basalt types and to identify areas of secondary alteration. Critical in this analysis is the degree of alteration, since elements such as B and Li can dramatically affect the sigma value and leading to erroneous porosity values. We analysed over 150 'pool-samples' for S, Li, Be and B element concentrations to estimate their contribution to the measured neutron porosity. These chemical analyses allow the calculation of the model sigma values for individual samples. Using a range of variably altered samples recovered during IODP Expeditions 309 and 312 we provide bulk estimates of alteration within the drilled section using the measured neutron porosity. B concentration in Hole 1256D increases with depth, with sharp rises at 959 and 1139 mbsf. Elevated wireline neutron porosities cannot always be directly linked with high B content. However, our preliminary results imply that increased neutron porosity (~15) at depths below 1100 mbsf may reflect hydrothermal alteration rather than formation porosity. This interpretation is supported when compared with generally lower computed

  18. 3D Porosity Estimation of the Nankai Trough Sediments from Core-log-seismic Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Nankai Trough off southwest Japan is one of the best subduction-zone to study megathrust earthquake fault. Historic, great megathrust earthquakes with a recurrence interval of 100-200 yr have generated strong motion and large tsunamis along the Nankai Trough subduction zone. At the Nankai Trough margin, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate to the northwest at a convergence rate ~4 cm/yr. The Shikoku Basin, the northern part of the PSP, is estimated to have opened between 25 and 15 Ma by backarc spreading of the Izu-Bonin arc. The >100-km-wide Nankai accretionary wedge, which has developed landward of the trench since the Miocene, mainly consists of offscraped and underplated materials from the trough-fill turbidites and the Shikoku Basin hemipelagic sediments. Particularly, physical properties of the incoming hemipelagic sediments may be critical for seismogenic behavior of the megathrust fault. We have carried out core-log-seismic integration (CLSI) to estimate 3D acoustic impedance and porosity for the incoming sediments in the Nankai Trough. For the CLSI, we used 3D seismic reflection data, P-wave velocity and density data obtained during IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expeditions 322 and 333. We computed acoustic impedance depth profiles for the IODP drilling sites from P-wave velocity and density data. We constructed seismic convolution models with the acoustic impedance profiles and a source wavelet which is extracted from the seismic data, adjusting the seismic models to observed seismic traces with inversion method. As a result, we obtained 3D acoustic impedance volume and then converted it to 3D porosity volume. In general, the 3D porosities show decrease with depth. We found a porosity anomaly zone with alteration of high and low porosities seaward of the trough axis. In this talk, we will show detailed 3D porosity of the incoming sediments, and present implications of the porosity anomaly zone for the

  19. Intrinsic activation: the relationship between biomass inorganic content and porosity formation during pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, James P; Hutchings, Tony R; de Leij, Frans A A M

    2014-05-01

    The utility of pyrolytic carbons is closely related to their porosity and surface area, there is a clear benefit to the development of biomass pyrolysis processes which produce highly porous carbons. The results presented in this work demonstrate that by using biomass precursors with high inorganic content along with specified process conditions, carbons can be consistently produced with specific surface areas between 900 and 1600 m(2)/g. Results from 12 different source materials show that the formation of increased porosity in pyrolytic carbons is strongly associated with the presence of inorganic elements in the precursors including: magnesium, potassium and sulfur. It was found that pyrolysis of macro-algae can produce especially high specific surface area carbons (mean: 1500 m(2)/g), without externally applied activating agents. Using cheap readily available agricultural residues such as oilseed rape straw, pyrolytic carbons can be produced with specific surface areas of around 950 m(2)/g.

  20. Evolution of Anode Porosity under Air Oxidation: The Unveiling of the Active Pore Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Chevarin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The carbon anode, used in aluminum electrolysis (Hall–Héroult process, is over-consumed by air oxidation and carboxy-reaction (with CO2. Several anode features may affect this over-consumption, such as impurity content, graphitization level and anode porosity features (e.g., porosity volume fraction or pore size distribution. The two first parameters are basically related to the quality of raw materials and coke calcination conditions. Anode porosity is, however, greatly affected by anode manufacturing conditions, and is possible to be modified, to some extent, by adjusting the anode recipe and the processing parameters. This work aims to investigate the effect of anode porosity on its air reactivity. Baked anode samples were prepared in laboratory scale and then crushed into powder form (−4760 + 4000 µm. The recipe for anode preparation was similar to a typical industrial recipe, except that in the lab scale no butt particles were used in the recipe. Anode particles were then gasified at six different conversion levels (0, 5, 15, 25, 35 and 50 wt % under air at 525 °C. The porosity was characterized in several pore size ranges, measured by nitrogen adsorption and mercury intrusion (0.0014–0.020, 0.002–0.025, 0.025–0.100, 0.1–40.0 and superior at 40 µm. The volume variation of each pore range, as a function of carbon conversion, was assessed and used to determine the size of the most active pores for air oxidation. The most active pore size was found to be the pores inferior at 40 µm before 15 wt % of gasification and pores superior at 40 µm between 15 and 50 wt % of carbon conversion. Limitation of pore size range could be used as an additional guideline, along with other targets such as high homogeneity and density, to set the optimum anode manufacturing parameters.

  1. Flow-dependent porosity and other biomechanical properties of mysticete baleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Alexander J

    2013-04-01

    Despite its vital function in a highly dynamic environment, baleen is typically assumed to be a static material. Its biomechanical and material properties have not previously been explored. Thus I tested sections of baleen from bowhead whales, Balaena mysticetus, and humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae, alone or in groups representing miniature 'racks', in a flow tank through which water and buoyant particles circulated with variable flow velocity. Kinematic sequences were recorded through an endoscopic camera or viewing window. One set of experiments investigated particle capture; another series analyzed biomechanical behavior, including fringe spacing, movement and interaction. Baleen fringe porosity directly correlates, in a mostly linear fashion, with velocity of incident water flow. However, undulation and interaction of fringes (especially of bowheads) at higher flow velocities can decrease porosity. Fringe porosity depends on distance from the baleen plate. Porosity also varies, with fringe length, by position along the length of an individual plate. Plate orientation, which varied from 0 to 90 deg relative to water flow, is crucial in fringe spacing and particle capture. At all flow velocities, porosity is lowest with plates aligned parallel to water flow. Turbulence introduced when plates rotate perpendicular to flow (as in cross-flow filtration) increases fringe interaction, so that particles more easily strike fringes yet more readily dislodge. Baleen of bowhead whales, which feed by continuous ram filtration, differs biomechanically from that of humpbacks, which use intermittent lunge filtration. The longer, finer fringes of bowhead baleen readily form a mesh-like mat, especially at higher flow velocities, to trap tiny particles.

  2. Linear vs. nonlinear porosity estimation of NMR oil reservoir data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Abdou Abou Mandour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance is widely used to assess oil reservoir properties especially those that can not be evaluated using conventional techniques. In this regard, porosity determination and the related estimation of the oil present play a very important role in assessing the eco1nomic value of the oil wells. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data is usually fit to the sum of decaying exponentials. The resulting distribution; i.e. T2 distribution; is directly related to porosity determination. In this work, three reservoir core samples (Tight Sandstone and two Carbonate samples were analyzed. Linear Least Square method (LLS and non-linear least square fitting using Levenberg-Marquardt method were used to calculate the T2 distribution and the resulting incremental porosity. Parametric analysis for the two methods was performed to evaluate the impact of number of exponentials, and effect of the regularization parameter (? on the smoothing of the solution. Effect of the type of solution on porosity determination was carried out. It was found that 12 exponentials is the optimum number of exponentials for both the linear and nonlinear solutions. In the mean time, it was shown that the linear solution begins to be smooth at α = 0.5 which corresponds to the standard industrial value for the regularization parameter. The order of magnitude of time needed for the linear solution is in the range of few minutes while it is in the range of few hours for the nonlinear solution. Regardless of the fact that small differences exist between the linear and nonlinear solutions, these small values make an appreciable difference in porosity. The nonlinear solution predicts 12% less porosity for the tight sandstone sample and 4.5 % and 13 % more porosity in the two carbonate samples respectively.

  3. Plasma sintering of unalloyed iron: a study of surface porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço Jorge Magner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Samples of unalloyed iron powder were compacted and sintered in an abnormal glow discharge, generated in a gas mixture of 80% Ar + 20% H2 by using a pulsed power source. The samples were placed on a holder, acting as the discharge cathode, and were heated by the bombardment of ions, strongly accelerated in the cathode sheath. Sintering was performed at temperatures of 1173, 1273 and 1373 K for 30 min, varying the voltage applied to the cathode from 400 to 700 V and pressure ranging from 470 to 2650 Pa. It is shown that the kinetic energy of ions striking the sample surface increased approximately three times, when the voltage changed from 400 to 700 V, with a corresponding reduction of surface porosity. The surface sealing is related to the ion bombardment, which produced a high mobility of surface atoms and consequent enhanced diffusion as well as sputtering and condensation on the concave surface, resulting in an activation of surface sintering.

  4. Xiphinema americanum as Affected by Soil Organic Matter and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchillia, P E

    1972-07-01

    The effects of four soil types, soil porosity, particle size, and organic matter were tested on survival and migration of Xiphinema americanum. Survival and migration were significantly greater in silt loam than in clay loam and silty clay soils. Nematode numbers were significantly greater in softs planted with soybeans than in fallow softs. Nematode survival was greatest at the higher of two pore space levels in four softs. Migration of X. americanum through soft particle size fractions of 75-150, 150-250, 250-500, 500-700, and 700-1,000 mu was significantly greater in the middle three fractions, with the least occurring in the smallest fraction. Additions of muck to silt loam and loamy sand soils resulted in reductions in survival and migration of the nematode. The fulvic acid fraction of muck, extracted with sodium hydroxide, had a deleterious effect on nematode activity. I conclude that soils with small amounts of air-filled pore space, extremes in pore size, or high organic matter content are deleterious to the migration and survival of X. americanum, and that a naturally occurring toxin affecting this species may be present in native soft organic matter.

  5. Numerical modeling of porosity waves in the Nankai accretionary wedge décollement, Japan: implications for aseismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ajit; Appold, Martin S.

    2016-10-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai accretionary wedge décollement, Japan, show that overpressures at depths greater than ˜2 km beneath the seafloor could have increased to near lithostatic values due to sediment compaction and diagenesis, clay dehydration, and shearing. The resultant high overpressures are hypothesized then to have migrated in rapid surges or pulses called `porosity waves' up the dip of the décollement. Such high velocities—much higher than expected Darcy fluxes—are possible for porosity waves if the porous media through which the waves travel are deformable enough for porosity and permeability to increase strongly with increasing fluid pressure. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that porosity waves can travel at rates (kilometers per day) fast enough to cause aseismic slip in the Nankai décollement. The hypothesis was tested using a one-dimensional numerical solution to the fluid mass conservation equation for elastic porous media. Results show that porosity waves generated at depths of ˜2 km from overpressures in excess of lithostatic pressure can propagate at rates sufficient to account for aseismic slip along the décollement over a wide range of hydrogeological conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed porosity wave velocity to be strongly dependent on specific storage, fluid viscosity, and the permeability-depth gradient. Overpressure slightly less than lithostatic pressure could also produce porosity waves capable of traveling at velocities sufficient to cause aseismic slip, provided that hydrogeologic properties of the décollement are near the limits of their geologically reasonable ranges.

  6. Modeling and interpretation of Q logs in carbonate rock using a double porosity model and well logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.

    2006-03-01

    Attenuation data extracted from full waveform sonic logs is sensitive to vuggy and matrix porosities in a carbonate aquifer. This is consistent with the synthetic attenuation (1 / Q) as a function of depth at the borehole-sonic source-peak frequency of 10 kHz. We use velocity and densities versus porosity relationships based on core and well log data to determine the matrix, secondary, and effective bulk moduli. The attenuation model requires the bulk modulus of the primary and secondary porosities. We use a double porosity model that allows us to investigate attenuation at the mesoscopic scale. Thus, the secondary and primary porosities in the aquifer should respond with different changes in fluid pressure. The results show a high permeability region with a Q that varies from 25 to 50 and correlates with the stiffer part of the carbonate formation. This pore structure permits water to flow between the interconnected vugs and the matrix. In this region the double porosity model predicts a decrease in the attenuation at lower frequencies that is associated with fluid flowing from the more compliant high-pressure regions (interconnected vug space) to the relatively stiff, low-pressure regions (matrix). The chalky limestone with a low Q of 17 is formed by a muddy porous matrix with soft pores. This low permeability region correlates with the low matrix bulk modulus. A low Q of 18 characterizes the soft sandy carbonate rock above the vuggy carbonate. This paper demonstrates the use of attenuation logs for discriminating between lithology and provides information on the pore structure when integrated with cores and other well logs. In addition, the paper demonstrates the practical application of a new double porosity model to interpret the attenuation at sonic frequencies by achieving a good match between measured and modeled attenuation.

  7. Testing Mercury Porosimetry with 3D Printed Porosity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiuk, F.; Ewing, R. P.; Hu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry is one of the most widely used techniques to study the porous nature of a geological and man-made materials. In the geosciences, it is commonly used to describe petroleum reservoir and seal rocks as well as to grade aggregates for the design of asphalt and portland cement concretes. It's wide utility stems from its ability to characterize a wide range of pore throat sizes (from nanometers to around a millimeter). The fundamental physical model underlying mercury intrusion porosimetry, the Washburn Equation, is based on the assumption that rock porosity can be described as a bundle of cylindrical tubes. 3D printing technology, also known as rapid prototyping, allows the construction of intricate and accurate models, exactly what is required to build models of rock porosity. We evaluate the applicability of the Washburn Equation by comparing properties (like porosity, pore and pore throat size distribution, and surface area) computed on digital porosity models (built from CT data, CAD designs, or periodic geometries) to properties measured via mercury intrusion porosimetry on 3D printed versions of the same digital porosity models.

  8. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. BIB-SEM of representative area clay structures paving towards an alternative model of porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.; Houben, M.; Hemes, S.; Klaver, J.

    2012-04-01

    A major contribution to understanding the sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation in clay-rich geomaterials is based on detailed investigation of the rock microstructures. However, the direct characterization of pores in representative elementary area (REA) and below µm-scale resolution remains challenging. To investigate directly the mm- to nm-scale porosity, SEM is certainly the most direct approach, but it is limited by the poor quality of the investigated surfaces. The recent development of ion milling tools (BIB and FIB; Desbois et al, 2009, 2011; Heath et al., 2011; Keller et al., 2011) and cryo-SEM allows respectively producing exceptional high quality polished cross-sections suitable for high resolution porosity SEM-imaging at nm-scale and investigating samples under wet conditions by cryogenic stabilization. This contribution focuses mainly on the SEM description of pore microstructures in 2D BIB-polished cross-sections of Boom (Mol site, Belgium) and Opalinus (Mont Terri, Switzerland) clays down to the SEM resolution. Pores detected in images are statistically analyzed to perform porosity quantification in REA. On the one hand, BIB-SEM results allow retrieving MIP measurements obtained from larger sample volumes. On the other hand, the BIB-SEM approach allows characterizing porosity-homogeneous and -predictable islands, which form the elementary components of an alternative concept of porosity/permeability model based on pore microstructures. Desbois G., Urai J.L. and Kukla P.A. (2009) Morphology of the pore space in claystones - evidence from BIB/FIB ion beam sectioning and cryo-SEM observations. E-Earth, 4, 15-22. Desbois G., Urai J.L., Kukla P.A., Konstanty J. and Baerle C. (2011). High-resolution 3D fabric and porosity model in a tight gas sandstone reservoir: a new approach to investigate microstructures from mm- to nm-scale combining argon beam cross-sectioning and SEM imaging . Journal of Petroleum Science

  10. Viscous Cosmology and Thermodynamics of Apparent Horizon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Akbar

    2008-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the differential form of Friedmann equations of Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be recast as a similar form of the first law ThdSh=dE + W dV of thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of FRW universe filled with the viscous fluid.It is also shown that by employing the general expression of temperature Th=|k|/2π=1/2π(r)A(1-(r)A/2H(r)A) associated with the apparent horizon of an FRW universe and assumed that the temperature Tm of the energy inside the apparent horizon is proportional to the horizon temperature Tm = bTh,we are able to show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds in the Einstein gravity provided Th-Tm/(r)A≤(p+(P)).

  11. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823-1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V2O5 (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V2O5 surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of "black metal". Combined with the naturally high melting point of V2O5, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V2O5 is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  12. Desorption of phosphate from iron oxides in relation to equilibrium pH and porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, F.; de Arambarri, P.; Madrid, L.; Toca, C.G. (Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Cuarto, Sevilla (Spain))

    1981-01-01

    Reactions of phosphated lepidocrocites and goethites with 0.1 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaOH and 0.5 M NH/sub 4/F solutions have been studied. Solutions of indifferent electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl) at the same pH as used during adsorption of P were used to desorb P so that new apparent equilibria were reached, but a slow readsorption was also observed. Strongly alkaline solutions seemed to cause some breakdown of the solid surface and part of the adsorbed P became occluded. Desorption and isotopic exchange data have been related to porosity of the two oxides, and presence of a component of the exchangeable P released very slowly, has been attributed to P adsorbed on surfaces of micropores.

  13. Quantifying porosity and permeability of fractured carbonates and fault rocks in natural groundwater reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirmoradi, Reza; Wolfmayr, Mariella; Bauer, Helene; Decker, Kurt

    2017-04-01

    .18% to 2.35%. Klinkenberg permeabilities of plugs range from 0.001mD to about 0.6mD thus spreading over three orders of magnitude. Fractured rocks show significantly higher porosities (3% average) with respect to the undeformed country rocks. Plug measurements reveal quite low permeabilities (< 1mD) for this type of rock, which is owed to the measuring technique, where fractures are closed under confining pressure. A second important point is that intensely fractured rocks are underrepresented in the data as they cannot be plugged adequately. Percolation tests give better information for fractured rock permeabilities and revealed hydraulic conductivities of 10-6 m/sec for little fractured to 5x10-5 m/sec for intensely fractured rocks. Plug and rock sample data show that cataclastic fault rocks can have quite high porosities (up to 4.1%). However, plug permeabilities down to 0.03mD demonstrate that pores are too small to result in any significant permeability. Breccias show high porosities of 4% in average and very variable permeabilities between 2.2mD and 2214mD depending mainly on the degree of cementation.

  14. Evaluation of porosity in Al alloy die castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Říhová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of an Al-alloy die casting depend significantly on its structural properties. Porosity in Al-alloy castings is one of the most frequent causes of waste castings. Gas pores are responsible for impaired mechanical-technological properties of cast materials. On the basis of a complex evaluation of experiments conducted on AlSi9Cu3 alloy samples taken from the upper engine block which was die- cast with and without local squeeze casting it can be said that castings manufactured without squeeze casting exhibit maximum porosity in the longitudinal section. The area without local squeeze casting exhibits a certain reduction in mechanical properties and porosity increased to as much as 5%. However, this still meets the norms set by SKODA AUTO a.s.

  15. Chalk porosity and sonic velocity versus burial depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Gommesen, Lars; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne

    2008-01-01

    that porosity and sonic velocity follow the most consistent depth trends when fluid pressure and pore-volume compressibility are considered. Quartz content up to 10% has no marked effect, but more than 5% clay causes lower porosity and velocity. The mineralogical effect differs between P-wave and shear velocity...... for fluid pressure because the cementing ions originate from stylolites, which are mechanically similar to fractures. We find that cementation occurs over a relatively short depth interval.......Seventy chalk samples from four formations in the overpressured Danish central North Sea have been analyzed to investigate how correlations of porosity and sonic velocity with burial depth are affected by varying mineralogy, fluid pressure, and early introduction of petroleum. The results show...

  16. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  17. Prediction of porosity in cast equiaxed alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Y.K. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Sahai, V.; Overfelt, R.A. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Berry, J.T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The prediction of porosity distribution in shaped castings is a popular topic at the present time. A number of criteria functions (CFs) have been proposed to assist in such predictions, these functions generally being obtained from computer modeling of solidification. Although considerable attention has been given to the use of CFs with plain carbon steel and aluminum castings, only limited attention has been given to superalloy castings. Using experimental data on porosity distribution in such castings for validation, various criteria functions were compared for effectiveness in predicting the level of porosity in castings of different thicknesses vacuum investment cast in alloy 718. The criteria functions concerned were obtained by interrogating the output of a simulation using commercially available software. The castings were in the form of vertically cast plates attached to a common top gating system. The problems associated with obtaining thermally accurate simulation, as well as appropriate validation are also discussed.

  18. Porosity of Deep Fat Fried Breaded Chicken Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Brnčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the addition of rice starch and dietary fibres (pectin and Fibrex on the porosity of basic frying mixture formulations (corn flour, salt, spices and oil uptake of coated chicken meat have been evaluated. Porosity of the fried breaded chicken meat was calculated from particle and bulk density. Pore size and particle size distribution were determined using microscopy image analysis and particle density by mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP. Since there is a wide range of particle diameters, significant differences in pore size distribution were found. Also, pore structure appeared to be affected by oil absorption. Mercury entrapment in pores decreased significantly during 8 min of frying. The obtained results show that porosity of the samples is different for different frying mixture formulations and indicate that there is a difference in the extent of oil uptake for different formulations due to film forming capabilities of dietary fibres (pectin and Fibrex.

  19. Tailoring the porosity of hierarchical zeolites by carbon-templating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Kake; Egeblad, Kresten; Christensen, Claus H.

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of hierarchical porous zeolite single crystal materials with a range of porosities made available by carbon-templating using differently-sized carbon particles as templates for the additional non-micropore porosity. The materials were...... prepared by adsorption of the required zeolite synthesis gel components onto various commercially available carbon black powders followed by crystallization of the zeolite crystals in the presence of the inert carbon matrix and subsequent removal of the carbon particles embedded in the zeolite crystals...... by combustion. It is shown that the additional porosity of the hierarchical zeolites can be tailored by encapsulation of the differently-sized carbon particles during crystallization....

  20. Inverse problem for porosity estimation during solidification of TNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldélio Bueno Caldeira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the porosity formed during the solidification process is estimated by an inverse problem technique based on particle swarm optimization. The effective heat capacity method is adopted to model the heat transfer problem. The transient-diffusive heat transfer equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with an explicit scheme, employing the central difference interpolation function. The solution of the direct problem is compared to reference solutions. The model is applied to trinitrotoluene (TNT solidification process. The results show that the proposed procedure was able to estimate the porosity for different Stefan numbers. The analysis of the heat flux in the mold is indicated to predict the porosity formation during the casting process.

  1. Usage of infinitesimals in the Menger's Sponge model of porosity

    CERN Document Server

    Vita, M C; Fallico, C; Veltri, M; 10.1016/j.amc.2011.06.013

    2011-01-01

    The present work concerns the calculation of the infinitesimal porosity by using the Menger's Sponge model. This computation is based on the grossone theory considering the pore volume estimation for the Menger's Sponge and afterwards the classical definition of the porosity, given by the ratio between the volume of voids and the total volume (voids plus solid phase). The aim is to investigate the different solutions given by the standard characterization of the porosity and the grossone theory without the direct estimation of the fractal dimension. Once the utility of this procedure had been clarified, the focus moves to possible practical applications in which infinitesimal parts can play a fundamental role. The discussion on this matter still remains open.

  2. Porosity Variation in Cenozoic and Upper Chalk from the Ontong Java Pleateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine

    1997-01-01

    Porosity was obtained from matrix- and intraparticle porosity assessed from image analysis of backscattered electron micrographs of 3000x and 300x magnification. Comparing porosity assessed from image analysis with porosity measured by index properties, it was seen that image analysis data at 300...

  3. Porosity Variation in Cenozoic and Upper Chalk from the Ontong Java Pleateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine

    1997-01-01

    Porosity was obtained from matrix- and intraparticle porosity assessed from image analysis of backscattered electron micrographs of 3000x and 300x magnification. Comparing porosity assessed from image analysis with porosity measured by index properties, it was seen that image analysis data at 300...

  4. Control of Porosity and Pore Size of Metal Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gray

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT Bucky-Paper (BP composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90% and specific surface area (>400 m2/g. Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20–50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported.

  5. Control of porosity and pore size of metal reinforced carbon nanotube membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumee, Ludovic; Velleman, Leonora; Sears, Kallista; Hill, Matthew; Schutz, Jurg; Finn, Niall; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2010-12-21

    Membranes are crucial in modern industry and both new technologies and materials need to be designed to achieve higher selectivity and performance. Exotic materials such as nanoparticles offer promising perspectives, and combining both their very high specific surface area and the possibility to incorporate them into macrostructures have already shown to substantially increase the membrane performance. In this paper we report on the fabrication and engineering of metal-reinforced carbon nanotube (CNT) Bucky-Paper (BP) composites with tuneable porosity and surface pore size. A BP is an entangled mesh non-woven like structure of nanotubes. Pure CNT BPs present both very high porosity (>90%) and specific surface area (>400 m2/g). Furthermore, their pore size is generally between 20-50 nm making them promising candidates for various membrane and separation applications. Both electro-plating and electroless plating techniques were used to plate different series of BPs and offered various degrees of success. Here we will report mainly on electroless plated gold/CNT composites. The benefit of this method resides in the versatility of the plating and the opportunity to tune both average pore size and porosity of the structure with a high degree of reproducibility. The CNT BPs were first oxidized by short UV/O3 treatment, followed by successive immersion in different plating solutions. The morphology and properties of these samples has been investigated and their performance in air permeation and gas adsorption will be reported.

  6. Tailoring porosity and rotational dynamics in a series of octacarboxylate metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Florian; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Stepanov, Alexander G; Easun, Timothy L; Dailly, Anne; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Nowell, Harriott; Lennox, Matthew J; Besley, Elena; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2017-03-21

    Modulation and precise control of porosity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is of critical importance to their materials function. Here we report modulation of porosity for a series of isoreticular octacarboxylate MOFs, denoted MFM-180 to MFM-185, via a strategy of selective elongation of metal-organic cages. Owing to the high ligand connectivity, these MOFs do not show interpenetration, and are robust structures that have permanent porosity. Interestingly, activated MFM-185a shows a high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 4,734 m(2) g(-1) for an octacarboxylate MOF. These MOFs show remarkable CH4 and CO2 adsorption properties, notably with simultaneously high gravimetric and volumetric deliverable CH4 capacities of 0.24 g g(-1) and 163 vol/vol (298 K, 5-65 bar) recorded for MFM-185a due to selective elongation of tubular cages. The dynamics of molecular rotors in deuterated MFM-180a-d16 and MFM-181a-d16 were investigated by variable-temperature (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy to reveal the reorientation mechanisms within these materials. Analysis of the flipping modes of the mobile phenyl groups, their rotational rates, and transition temperatures paves the way to controlling and understanding the role of molecular rotors through design of organic linkers within porous MOF materials.

  7. Femtosecond laser induced porosity in poly-methyl methacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baset, Farhana, E-mail: fbaset@gmail.com; Villafranca, Ana, E-mail: avillafr@uottawa.ca; Guay, Jean-Michel, E-mail: guay_jeanmichel@hotmail.com; Bhardwaj, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.bhardwaj@uottawa.ca

    2013-10-01

    We show that femtosecond laser ablation of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) induces porosity within the ablation crater that increases with pulse energy/fluence and number of laser shots. For deeper craters the porosity evolves into 3D honeycomb like structure on the sidewalls. Using imaging technique, we show that the porous area fraction decreases with pulse energy while the pore size distribution peaks at a pore area of 0.037 μm{sup 2} at higher energies. In line ablation, the pore size increases with the speed at which the laser focus is moved.

  8. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  9. A kinetic study on the development of porosity in porcelain stoneware tile sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazayeri, S. H.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model to study the mechanism of elimination of total porosity as a function of soaking time using the Navier-Stokes. Then, parameters of the model such as kinetic constants and apparent activation energy are calculated on the basis of experimental data for a standard porcelain stoneware tile composition. The theoretical data calculated from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using the model developed, it is possible to estimate the best soaking time to obtain minimum total porosity at a given firing temperature . The effects of nepheline on sintering process of porcelain stoneware tile is investigated. It was found that when the nepheline syenite content of the starting mix was increased to 10%, the constant kp of the kinetic equation also increased. The results showed that addition of nepheline to composition of porcelain stoneware bodies was influenced remarkably suitable soaking time to obtain the minimum total porosity and increased shrinkage and bulk density while total and closed porosity fall down.

    El propósito de este trabajo es desarrollar un modelo matemático tipo Navier-Stokes para estudiar el mecanismo de eliminación de la porosidad en función del tiempo de maduración en cocción. Los parámetros del modelo tales como las constantes cinéticas y la energía de activación aparente se calcularon a partir de datos experimentales para una composición de gres porcelánico estándar. Los datos teóricos obtenidos a partir del modelo están en buena concordancia con los datos experimentales. Se investigaron los efectos de la nefelina en el gres porcelánico, encontrado que cuando se aumenta el contenido hasta un 10%, la constante de la ecuación cinética kp aumenta. Empleando el modelo desarrollado, es posible estimar el tiempo de maduración en cocción para obtener la porosidad mínima (se alcanza la eliminación de la porosidad debido a la presi

  10. Porosity Effect on Thermal Properties of Al-12 wt % Si/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Miguel Molina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porosity on the thermal conductivity and the coefficient of thermal expansion of composites obtained by infiltration of Al-12 wt % Si alloy into graphite particulate preforms has been determined. Highly irregular graphite particles were used to fabricate the preforms. The thermal conductivity of these composites gradually increases with the applied infiltration pressure given the inherent reduction in porosity. A simple application of the Hasselman-Johnson model in a two-step procedure (that accounts for the presence of both graphite particles and voids randomly dispersed in a metallic matrix offers a good estimation of the experimental results. As concerns the coefficient of thermal expansion, the results show a slight increase with saturation being approximately in the range 14.6–15.2 × 10−6 K−1 for a saturation varying from 86% up to 100%. Results lie within the standard Hashin-Strikman bounds.

  11. In-situ observation of porosity formation during directional solidification of Al-Si casting alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ observation of porosity formation during directional solidification of two Al-Si alloys (7%Si and 13%Si was made by using of micro-focus X-ray imaging. In both alloys, small spherical pores initially form in the melt far away from the eutectic solid-liquid (S/L interface and then grow and coagulate during solidification. Some pores can float and escape from the solidifying melt front at a relatively high velocity. At the end of solidification, the remaining pores maintain spherical morphology in the near eutectic alloy but become irregular in the hypoeutectic alloy. This is attributed to different solidification modes and aluminum dendrite interactions between the two alloys. The mechanism of the porosity formation is briefly discussed in this paper.

  12. Effect of leading-edge porosity on blade-vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soogab

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the porous leading-edge of an airfoil on the blade-vortex interaction noise, which dominates far-field acoustic spectrum of the helicopter, is investigated. The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order upwind-biased scheme and a multizonal grid system. The Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model is modified for considering transpiration on the surface. The amplitudes of the propagating acoustic wave in the near-field are calculated directly from the computation. The porosity effect on the surface is modeled. Results show leading-edge transpiration can suppress pressure fluctuations at the leading-edge during BVI, and consequently reduce the amplitude of propagating noise by 30 percent at maximum in the near-field. The effect of porosity factor on the noise level is also investigated.

  13. Modelling of the luminescent properties of nanophosphor coatings with different porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrin, R.; Graule, T.

    2016-10-01

    Coatings of Y2O3:Eu nanophosphor with the effective refractive index of 1.02 were obtained by flame aerosol deposition (FAD). High-pressure cold compaction decreased the layer porosity from 97.3 to 40 vol % and brought about dramatic changes in the photoluminescent performance. Modelling of interdependence between the quantum yield, decay time of luminescence, and porosity of the nanophosphor films required a few basic simplifying assumptions. We confirmed that the properties of porous nanostructured coatings are most appropriately described by the nanocrystal cavity model of the radiative decay. All known effective medium equations resulted in seemingly underestimated values of the effective refractive index. While the best fit was obtained with the linear permittivity mixing rule, the influence of further effects, previously not accounted for, could not be excluded. We discuss the peculiarities in optical response of nanophopshors and suggest the directions for future research.

  14. Watching dehydration: transient vein-shaped porosity in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Wasja; John, Timm; Kummerow, Jörn; Wigger, Peter; Salazar, Pablo; Shapiro, Serge

    2016-04-01

    Subduction zones around the world show the common pattern of a Double Seismicity Zone, where seismicity is organized in the form of two sub-parallel planes, one at the plate contact and the other one, 10 to 30 km below, in the mantle of the oceanic lithosphere (Lower Seismicity Zone, LSZ). A commonly held hypothesis states that dehydration processes and the associated mineral reactions promote the earthquakes of the LSZ. Fluids filling a porespace strongly alter the petropyhsical properties of a rock. Especially the seismic P- to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of fluid-filled porosity. It transforms uniquely to Poisson's ratio. To test the mineral-dehydration-hypothesis, we use local earthquake data to measure Vp/Vs in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab at 21°S. We determine it as the slope of the de-meaned differential P- vs. S-wave arrivaltimes of a dense seismicity cluster in the LSZ. This measurement yields a value for Vp/Vs of 2.10 ± 0.09, i.e. a Poisson's ratio of ˜0.35. This value clearly exceeds the range of Vp/Vs values expected for oceanic mantle rocks in their purely solid form at ˜50km depth. We follow a poroelastic approach to model the rock's elastic properties, including Vp/Vs, as a function of porosity and porespace-geometry. This results in a porespace model for the target volume having a vein-like porosity occupying only a minor volume fraction. Porosity is in the order of 0.1%. These findings are in very good agreement with field surveys and laboratory experiments of mantle dehydration. The pore-geometry is close to the geometrical percolation threshold, where long-ranged interconnectivity statistically emerges, suggesting good draining capabilities. Indeed, porosity is soft so that the amount of porosity and, consequently, permeability is very sensitive to local fluid pressure. We conclude that in the oceanic mantle of the subducting Nazca slab, mineral dehydration reactions are

  15. ABSTRACT: CONTAMINANT TRAVEL TIMES FROM THE NEVADA TEST SITE TO YUCCA MOUNTAIN: SENSITIVITY TO POROSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl F. Pohlmann; Jianting Zhu; Jenny B. Chapman; Charles E. Russell; Rosemary W. H. Carroll; David S. Shafer

    2008-09-05

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. In this study, we investigate the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the YM area by estimating the timeframe for advective travel and its uncertainty resulting from porosity value uncertainty for hydrogeologic units (HGUs) in the region. We perform sensitivity analysis to determine the most influential HGUs on advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways and advective travel times are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model by the U.S. Geological Survey. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. We base our simulations on two steady state flow scenarios for the purpose of long term prediction and monitoring. The first represents pre-pumping conditions prior to groundwater development in the area in 1912 (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model). The second simulates 1998 pumping (assuming steady state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model). Considering underground tests in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa on the NTS as initial particle positions, we track these particles forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine which flowpaths will intercept the YM area. Out of the 71 tests in the saturated zone, flowpaths of 23 intercept the YM area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, flowpaths from 55 of the 71 tests intercept the YM area. The results illustrate that mean

  16. Contaminant Travel Times From the Nevada Test Site to Yucca Mountain: Sensitivity to Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, K. F.; Zhu, J.; Chapman, J. B.; Russell, C. E.; Carroll, R. W.; Shafer, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. In this study, we investigate the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the YM area by estimating the time frame for advective travel and its uncertainty resulting from porosity value uncertainty for hydrogeologic units (HGUs) in the region. We perform sensitivity analysis to determine the most influential HGUs on advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways and advective travel times are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model by the U.S. Geological Survey. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. We base our simulations on two steady state flow scenarios for the purpose of long term prediction and monitoring. The first represents pre-pumping conditions prior to groundwater development in the area in 1912 (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model). The second simulates 1998 pumping (assuming steady state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model). Considering underground tests in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa on the NTS as initial particle positions, we track these particles forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine which flowpaths will intercept the YM area. Out of the 71 tests in the saturated zone, flowpaths of 23 intercept the YM area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, flowpaths from 55 of the 71 tests intercept the YM area. The results illustrate that mean

  17. Fabrication of PLLA/β-TCP nanocomposite scaffolds with hierarchical porosity for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Tao; Wang, Xuejun; Song, Guojun; Gu, Zheng; Yang, Zhen

    2014-08-01

    Polymer and ceramic composite scaffolds play a crucial role in bone tissue engineering. In an attempt to mimic the architecture of natural extracellular matrix (ECM), poly(l-lactic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PLLA/β-TCP) nanocomposite scaffolds with a hierarchical pore structure were fabricated by combining thermal induced phase separation and salt leaching techniques. The nanocomposite scaffold consisted of a nanofibrous PLLA matrix with a highly interconnected, high porosity (>93%) hierarchical pore structure with pore diameters ranging from 500nm to 300μm and a homogeneously distributed β-TCP nanoparticle phase. The nanofibrous PLLA matrix had a fiber diameter of 70-300nm. The nanocomposite scaffolds possess three levels of hierarchical structure: (1) porosity; (2) nanofibrous PLLA struts comprising the pore walls; and (3) β-TCP nanoparticle phase. The β-TCP nanoparticle phase improved the mechanical properties and bioactivity of the PLLA matrix. The nanocomposite scaffolds supported MG-63 osteoblast proliferation, penetration, and ECM deposition, indicating the potential of PLLA/β-TCP nanocomposite scaffolds with hierarchical porosity for bone tissue engineering applications.

  18. POROSITY CALCULATION OF MIXTURES OF FIBROUS PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruping Zou; Aibing Yu

    2003-01-01

    The initial forming of fiber blend to high green density, i.e. the packing of fibrous particles, is important to the reinforcement of composite materials. It is very useful to develop a general predictive method for the optimum selection of particle mixtures for the property control of ceramic or composite products. This paper presents such a mathematical model developed on the basis of the similarity analysis between the spherical and non-spherical particle packings and assesses its applicability to the packing of fibrous particles with discrete and/or continuous length distributions. The results indicate that the model can predict this packing system well and hence provide an effective way to solve various packing problems in the composite materials processing.

  19. The porosity in a fluidized bed heat transfer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Visser, G.; Valk, M.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of heat transfer between a fluidized bed and an immersed surface and a model of gas flow and porosity, both recently published, were combined and further modified in the area of low velocities where the particle convective component of heat transfer is low or neglectable. Experi

  20. Laboratory photometry of regolith analogues: Effect of porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, A.; Sen, A. K.; Gupta, R.

    2016-10-01

    New Laboratory phase curves are presented, to examine the effect of porosity on reflectance as a function of phase angle for grain size having dimension about half, twice and those larger than the illuminating wavelength. The experimental setup used for generating reflectance data is a goniometric device developed at the Department of Physics, Assam University, Silchar, India. Some of the well-documented samples having different sizes were chosen; alumina, olivine, basalt, rutile, chromite and iron. The sample surfaces were prepared with different porosities, in order to simulate natural regolith surface as much as possible. The wavelength of observation is 632.8 nm. A model based on the Radiative Transfer Equation is presented here to analyze and model the laboratory data. In the present modelling work, the empirical relation of Hapke, Mie theory and Henyey-Greenstein phase function are used. For particles having dimension about half, twice to the wavelength, Mie theory is used to calculate single scattering albedo. Although the Mie theory is insufficient for describing the scattering properties of particles larger than the wavelength, for such large particle single scattering albedo (SSA) is estimated through method of best fit. It has been found that, the porosity has a distinguishable effect on reflectance. Also the contribution of multiple scattering function for different porosity is examined. Further the results presented in the current work, demonstrates the light scattering properties of a diverse collections of regolith like samples.

  1. The porosity in a fluidized bed heat transfer model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Valk, M.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of heat transfer between a fluidized bed and an immersed surface and a model of gas flow and porosity, both recently published, were combined and further modified in the area of low velocities where the particle convective component of heat transfer is low or neglectable. Experi

  2. Direct synthesis of metal nanoparticles with tunable porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Punzhin, Sergey; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile one-step synthesis route of porous bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles involving two parallel processes: alloying during nanocrystal growth and dealloying via galvanic replacement reaction. Further, we show that porosity in these nanoparticles can be tuned via their alloy compo

  3. Direct synthesis of metal nanoparticles with tunable porosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detsi, Eric; Punzhin, Sergey; Onck, Patrick R.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report a facile one-step synthesis route of porous bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles involving two parallel processes: alloying during nanocrystal growth and dealloying via galvanic replacement reaction. Further, we show that porosity in these nanoparticles can be tuned via their alloy

  4. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  5. Porosity and surface properites of SBA-15 with grafted PNIPAAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichhardt, N. V.; Nylander, T.; Klösgen, B.;

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous silica SBA-15 was modified in a three-step process to obtain a material with poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAM) grafted onto the inner pore surface. Water sorption calorimetry was implemented to characterize the materials obtained after each step regarding the porosity and surface...

  6. Ultrasonic Characterization of Water Saturated Double Porosity Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruonan; Tinel, Alain; Alem, Abdellah; Franklin, Hervé; Wang, Huaqing

    Wave propagation through a multilayered structure consisting of a water saturated double porosity medium in an aluminum rectangular box immersed in water is studied. By assuming a plane incident wave from water onto the structure, the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived by application of the boundary conditions at each interface. Numerical computations are done for two particular double porosity media, ROBU® and Tobermorite 11 Å, that are assumed to obey Berryman's extension of Biot's theory [Berryman 1995, 2000]. The influence of the thickness of double porosity medium is investigated. To compare experiments to computations, two comparison coefficients Cnum and Cexp are introduced. The theoretical one Cnum is defined as the ratio of the transmission coefficient of the structure to the transmission coefficient of the box filled exclusively with water. The experimental comparison coefficient Cexp is defined as the ratio of the Fourier transforms of the transmitted signals by the box filled with the double porous medium to that of the transmitted signals by the box filled with water. A method of minimization based on a gradient descent algorithm is used to optimize some of the parameters of the double porosity media such as the bulk moduli.

  7. [Aortobifemoral prostheses with "0" porosity. Results after 2 years' experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, J R; Llagostera, S; Riambau, V; Latorre, E; Upegui, L; Pastor, O; Viver, E

    1990-01-01

    During the last years diverse types of Dacron prosthesis without porosity (because to be impregnated by different materials) have appeared. In the presented study, outcomes from three different types of prosthesis (differentiated by the impregnated material) were evaluated and a comparison with classical prosthesis was made.

  8. A dual porosity model of nutrient uptake by root hairs

    KAUST Repository

    Zygalakis, K. C.

    2011-08-09

    Summary: • The importance of root hairs in the uptake of sparingly soluble nutrients is understood qualitatively, but not quantitatively, and this limits efforts to breed plants tolerant of nutrient-deficient soils. • Here, we develop a mathematical model of nutrient uptake by root hairs allowing for hair geometry and the details of nutrient transport through soil, including diffusion within and between soil particles. We give illustrative results for phosphate uptake. • Compared with conventional \\'single porosity\\' models, this \\'dual porosity\\' model predicts greater root uptake because more nutrient is available by slow release from within soil particles. Also the effect of soil moisture is less important with the dual porosity model because the effective volume available for diffusion in the soil is larger, and the predicted effects of hair length and density are different. • Consistent with experimental observations, with the dual porosity model, increases in hair length give greater increases in uptake than increases in hair density per unit main root length. The effect of hair density is less in dry soil because the minimum concentration in solution for net influx is reached more rapidly. The effect of hair length is much less sensitive to soil moisture. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Permeability porosity relationships (K, Phi cut-off)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djettou, F.; Reda, H. [Sonatrach, Algiers (Algeria)

    1995-08-01

    Several reservoirs of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin present porosities greater than 10 Pu, but during the test they are rather impermeable. It seems that this phenomena extends to BERKINE and Rhourd Messaoud areas. This seriously affect the estimation of recovery reserves. The best we can do is to study and try to understand reservoir problems. The method we choose is based on statistical analysis of test results and their comparison with core and log measurements. It concerns mainly cummulative curves of productive and non-productive tests (dry test). This involves about 20 wells where are can define: Siegenian with: Fine grained in BBK and ROM Coarse grained toward BRN - Emsian is rather homogeneous in the region. The sand cut-off porosity is greater than 11 Pu. However the reservoir can`t produce itself then we can not take account in reserve estimation. In conclusion, a sandy reservoir of Lower Devonian in Ghadames basin may be very porous (11-12%) and impermeable while in the other cases reservoirs can produce with porosity of 7 or 8 Po. However a HC definition based on cut-off porosity in Ghadames basin should be done before net pay an recovery reserves estimation.

  10. 3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Emilson Pereira; Vidal, Alexandre Campane

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack 3D seismic amplitude data, using measured density and sonic well log data as constraints. In this methodology, a 3D acoustic impedance model is calculated from seismic reflection amplitudes by applying an L1-norm sparse-spike inversion algorithm in the time domain, followed by a recursive inversion performed in the frequency domain. A 3D low-frequency impedance model is estimated by kriging interpolation of impedance values calculated from well log data. This low-frequency model is added to the inversion result which otherwise provides only a relative numerical scale. To convert acoustic impedance into a single reservoir property, a feed-forward Neural Network (NN) is trained, validated and tested using gamma-ray and acoustic impedance values observed at the well log positions as input and effective porosity values as target. The trained NN is then applied for the whole reservoir volume in order to obtain a 3D effective porosity model. While the particular conclusions drawn from the results obtained in this work cannot be generalized, such results suggest that this workflow can be applied successfully as an aid in reservoir characterization, especially when there is a strong non-linear relationship between effective porosity and acoustic impedance.

  11. Variations in Pyroclast Porosity: The 2010 Gunung Merapi Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K. D.; Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of Gunung Merapi (Java, Indonesia) began with an explosion resulting from the rapid development of shallow conduit overpressure, which destabilized the pre-existing lava dome and generated large PDCs on 26 October. This was followed by rapid ascent and extrusion of a juvenile dome that also collapsed, generating the largest surges of the series on 5 November. Lava lapilli within the PDC deposits were analyzed using helium pycnometry to determine variations in pyroclast porosity during the transition from dome collapse to rapid dome regrowth and subsequent collapse. Lapilli were separated into pyroclasts derived from the earlier phase of dome growth from those derived from the later and more voluminous phase of dome growth. For all lapilli, regardless of eruptive phase, open porosity of the pyroclasts averages 0.19 (0.08). However, closed porosities of the lapilli are generally higher for the earlier phase, which were derived from deposits of the 26 October PDCs. Efficient degassing during both stages of dome growth produced similar open porosities in pyroclasts, but a higher closed porosity in the 26 October samples resulted from late-stage vesiculation of the residual melt during the initial explosion. This vesiculation event was triggered by the rapid development of shallow conduit overpressure, evidence of which is provided by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling analyses of plagioclase phenocrysts from the ash-sized component of the PDC deposits. Phenocrysts from the earlier phase of dome growth show a build-up of Li in the groundmass glass (attached to crystal surfaces) due to a stage of protracted gas accumulation prior to the 26 October explosion. Conversely, phenocrysts from the later stage of dome growth reveal decreasing Li contents in the groundmass glass due to efficient volatile loss during magma ascent. Vesiculation of the residual melt during the initial explosion resulted in a higher closed porosity in pyroclasts

  12. Porosity Estimation of Lodgepole Formation, Manitoba, Canana Using Log Data Anaysis and Impedance Inversion of Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J.; Keehm, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We estimated porosity distribution of Lodgepole Formation, a carbonate reservoir in Virden Field, Manitoba, Canada by applying rock physics models to seismic impedance data. From well log data analysis, we found that Lodgepole formation can be divided into three carbonate units: Scallion, Virden and Whitewater Lake from the bottom. From rock physics analysis, we divided the Lodgepole formation into 2 groups: lower (Scallion and Virden) and upper (Whitewater Lake), since the two lower units have very similar impedance-porosity relations. Then we have two impedance-porosity models to apply to the seismic impedance data. Impedance inversion was performed by the routine procedures - upscaling well log data, wavelet extraction, synthetic data creation, well tie and inversion. Since log data are very sparse, we have only one log data (Well 1) that has Vp and density on the seismic line. Moreover, the log data is located near the left edge of the seismic line, which can cause representativeness issue. To mitigate this issue, we adopted a psuedo-well technique using a multivariated statistical approach. We found another well (Well 2) located at the right part of the seismic line, which has only Vp data. Using nearby wells, we created bivariated statistical distribution of Vp and density and we drew density data condition to the Vp data from Well 2. Now, we have two wells with Vp and density, and repeat the impedance inversion. When we compare two inverted impedance maps, those show similar general trends. However, there are differences in detail, especially high variability in the right part was lessened with two wells, which caused negative porosity estimation with one well. The final porosity map by applying the rock physics models to the inverted impedance data also showed more reasonable and smooth porosity distribution. From the estimated porosity map, we found that the lower group has higher porosity (more prospective) than the upper group and that porosity increases

  13. Comment: An Apparent Controversy in Auroral Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    In his article ``A turning point in auroral physics,'' Bryant argued against what he called the `standard' theory of auroral acceleration, according to which the electrons ``gain their energy from static electric fields,'' and offered wave acceleration as an alternative. Because of the importance of the process, not only for the aurora borealis but also for other cosmic plasmas, a clarification of this apparent controversy seems to be in place.

  14. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  15. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  16. Apparently healthy urinary bacteriology in children

    OpenAIRE

    Burstein de Herrera, S.; Departamento de Microbiología y Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Domínguez Navarrete, N.; Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Villanueva, D.; Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriological study of urine of 350 apparently healthy children who were divided into groups according to the various stages of childhood ago. In each study urine sediment , gram staining and the qualitative and quantitative culture was performed. The study revealed three maximum sediment leukocytes per microscopic field in 12.3 % of things and 1-2 erythrocytes per field in 6.28 %. No clear cylinders or inflammatory cells were observed . QRAM by coloring germs no sediment or total urine wer...

  17. Osteosarcoma with apparent Ewing sarcoma gene rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Melissa; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lulu; Berger, Michael F.; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges due to their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and dele...

  18. Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albany Research Center

    2005-04-01

    Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed

  19. Apparent exchange rate mapping with diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Water exchange through the cell membranes is an important feature of cells and tissues. The rate of exchange is determined by factors such as membrane lipid composition and organization, as well as the type and activity of aquaporins. A method for noninvasively estimating the rate of water exchange would be useful for characterizing pathological conditions, e.g., tumors, multiple sclerosis, and ischemic stroke, expected to be associated with a change of the membrane barrier properties. This study describes the filter exchange imaging method for determining the rate of water exchange between sites having different apparent diffusion coefficients. The method is based on the filter-exchange pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy experiment, which is here modified to be compatible with the constraints of clinical MR scanners. The data is analyzed using a model-free approach yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate, here being introduced in analogy with the concept of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on microimaging and whole-body clinical scanners using yeast suspension phantoms. The limitations and appropriate experimental conditions are examined. The results demonstrate that filter exchange imaging is a fast and reliable method for characterizing exchange, and that it has the potential to become a powerful diagnostic tool.

  20. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick has been extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 K and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: (1) maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, (2) maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, (3) maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and (4) influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data was compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the computer program GRADE.

  1. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R.B.; Eninger, J.E.

    1975-12-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick has been extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 K and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: (1) maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory; (2) maximum performance as a function of operating temperature; (3) maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation; and (4) influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data was compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the computer program GRADE. (GRA)

  2. Effect of Porosity and Concentration Polarization on Electrolyte Diffusive Transport Parameters through Ceramic Membranes with Similar Nanopore Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Romero

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusive transport through nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs produced by the two-step anodization method, with similar pore size but different porosity, is studied by analyzing membrane potential measured with NaCl solutions at different concentrations. Donnan exclusion of co-ions at the solution/membrane interface seem to exert a certain control on the diffusive transport of ions through NPAMs with low porosity, which might be reduced by coating the membrane surface with appropriated materials, as it is the case of SiO2. Our results also show the effect of concentration polarization at the membrane surface on ionic transport numbers (or diffusion coefficients for low-porosity and high electrolyte affinity membranes, which could mask values of those characteristic electrochemical parameters.

  3. Self-supported ceramic substrates with directional porosity by mold freeze casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurauskis, Jonas; Graves, Christopher R.; Moreno, R.

    2016-01-01

    Manufacture of thin-film ceramic substrates with high permeability and robustness is of high technological interest. In this work thin (green state thickness ∼500 μm) porous yttria-stabilized zirconia self-supported substrates were fabricated by pouring stable colloidal aqueous suspensions...... in a mold and applying directional freeze casting. Use of optimized suspension, cryoprotector additive and mold proved to deliver defect free ceramic films with high dimensional control. Microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of desirable aligned porosity at macro-structural scale and resulted...

  4. Effect of hierarchical porosity and phosphorus modification on the catalytic properties of zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenlin; Zheng, Jinyu; Luo, Yibin; Da, Zhijian, E-mail: dazhijian.ripp@sinopec.com

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Hierarchical zeolite Y was prepared by citric acid treatment and alkaline treatment with NaOH&TBPH. • The addition of TBPH during desilication process transferred the bridge bonded OH− to the terminal P−OH group. • Moderate Brønsted acid sites could be created with phosphorus modification. • Zeolite with hierarchical porosity and appropriated acidities favored high conversion of 1,3,5-TIPB. - Abstract: The zeolite Y is considered as a leading catalyst for FCC industry. The acidity and porosity modification play important roles in determining the final catalytic properties of zeolite Y. The alkaline treatment of zeolite Y by dealumination and alkaline treatment with NaOH and NaOH&TBPH was investigated. The zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, transmission electron microscope, NMR, NH{sub 3}-TPD and IR study of acidity. Accordingly, the hierarchical porosity and acidity property were discussed systematically. Finally, the catalytic performance of the zeolites Y was evaluated in the cracking of 1,3,5-TIPB. It was found that desilication with NaOH&TBPH ensured the more uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity with higher microporosity, while preserving higher B/L ratio and moderate Brønsted acidities resulting in catalysts with the most appropriated acidity and then with better catalytic performance.

  5. Porosity and surface roughness simulation of nickel-aluminum coating in plasma spray forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hao-ping; FANG Jian-cheng; XU Wen-ji; ZHAO Zi-yu; WANG Li

    2006-01-01

    As the important evaluation parameters concerning the spray qualities, the porosity and surface roughness of the coatings obtained by thermal spray forming have great influence on their forming accuracy, mechanical properties and service lifetime. But it is difficult to predict or control the two parameters for such a highly nonlinear process. A two-dimensional simulation of coating porosity and surface roughness of nickel-aluminum alloy (Ni-5%Al) in plasma spray forming was presented, which was based on the multi-dimensional statistical behaviors of the droplets as well as the simplification and digitization of the typical splat cross sections. Further analysis involving the influence of the droplet diameters and the scanning velocities of the spray gun on the two parameters was conducted. The simulation and analysis results indicate that the porosity and surface roughness are more influenced by the droplet diameters, but less influenced by the spray gun velocities. The results will provide basis for the prediction or control of coating mechanical properties by depositing parameters.

  6. The Effect of Using Modified Flask on the Porosity of Processed Heat- Cure Acrylic Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed T. Al-Khafagy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porosity is an important property of acrylic resin material because it affect other properties like strength, esthetic and cause bacterial or fungal growth lead to unhealthy dentures. This paper Study the possibility of reducing the porosity of heat- cure acrylic resin by making a modification in the flask of processing .The processing flask was modified by constructing a tongue like projection fixed to the upper half of the flask in order to spread the high temperature occurred in the center of the muffle. In the this research; forty lower denture base with bite rim samples were prepared from heat-cure acrylic resin denture base. The study include 4 testing groups depending on the type of curing cycle and using of ordinary traditional and modified flask in curing process, each group contain 10 samples. One way ANOVA with Tukey's test between tested groups in regarding the type of flasking and curing cycle are indicated, the results revealed a significant difference at (P=0.05 when compare between group 2(I.I.O.Fand 3(S.C.M.F and between group2and 4(S.C.O.F, and also between group 3and 4. While there was a non significant differences between group 1,2 and1,3 and finally between group1and4. Less Porosity was observed in the group of samples that cured with slow curing cycle in modified flask when compare with other groups.

  7. Resistivity response to the porosity and permeability of low rank coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gang⇑; Qin Yong; Shen Jian; Hu Yuanyuan; Liu Donghai; Zhao Long

    2016-01-01

    Laojunmiao coal samples from the eastern Junggar basin were studied to understand the relationship between coal resistivity and the physical parameters of coal reservoirs under high temperatures and pressures. Specifically, we analysed the relationship of coal resistivity to porosity and permeability via heating and pressurization experiments. The results indicated that coal resistivity decreases exponen-tially with increasing pressure. Increasing the temperature decreases the resistivity. The sensitivity of coal resistivity to the confining pressure is worse when the temperature is higher. The resistivity of dry coal samples was linearly related to/m. Increasing the temperature decreased the cementation expo-nent (m). Increasing the confining pressure exponentially decreases the porosity. Decreasing the pressure increases the resistivity and porosity for a constant temperature. Increasing the temperature yields a quadratic relationship between the resistivity and permeability for a constant confining pressure. Based on the Archie formula, we obtained the coupling relationship between coal resistivity and perme-ability for Laojunmiao coal samples at different temperatures and confining pressures.

  8. Root porosity and radial oxygen loss related to arsenic tolerance and uptake in wetland plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, and School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Ye, Z.H., E-mail: lssyzhh@mail.sysu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory for Bio-control, and School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wei, Z.J. [School of Information and Technology, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.h [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-15

    The rates of radial oxygen loss (ROL), root porosity, concentrations of arsenic (As), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in shoot and root tissues and on root surfaces, As tolerances, and their relationships in different wetland plants were investigated based on a hydroponic experiment (control, 0.8, 1.6 mg As L{sup -1}) and a soil pot trail (control, 60 mg As kg{sup -1}). The results revealed that wetland plants showed great differences in root porosity (9-64%), rates of ROL (55-1750 mmo1 O{sub 2} kg{sup -1} root d.w. d{sup -1}), As uptake (e.g., 8.8-151 mg kg{sup -1} in shoots in 0.8 mg As L{sup -1} treatment), translocation factor (2.1-47% in 0.8 mg As L{sup -1}) and tolerance (29-106% in 0.8 mg As L{sup -1}). Wetland plants with higher rates of ROL and root porosity tended to form more Fe/Mn plaque, possess higher As tolerance, higher concentrations of As on root surfaces and a lower As translocation factor so decreasing As toxicity. - Research highlights: There is significant correlation between the porosity of roots and rates of ROL. The rates of ROL are significantly correlated with tolerance indices and concentrations of As, Fe, Mn on root surface. The rates of ROL is negatively correlated with As translocation factor. - Wetland plants with high rates of ROL tended to form more Fe plaque on root surfaces and possess higher As tolerance.

  9. The referential grain size and effective porosity in the Kozeny-Carman model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urumović, Kosta; Urumović, Kosta, Sr.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the results of permeability and specific surface area analyses as functions of granulometric composition of various sediments (from silty clays to very well graded gravels) are presented. The effective porosity and the referential grain size are presented as fundamental granulometric parameters expressing an effect of the forces operating on fluid movement through the saturated porous media. This paper suggests procedures for calculating referential grain size and determining effective (flow) porosity, which result in parameters that reliably determine the specific surface area and permeability. These procedures ensure the successful application of the Kozeny-Carman model up to the limits of validity of Darcy's law. The value of effective porosity in the referential mean grain size function was calibrated within the range of 1.5 µm to 6.0 mm. The reliability of the parameters applied in the KC model was confirmed by a very high correlation between the predicted and tested hydraulic conductivity values (R2 = 0.99 for sandy and gravelly materials; R2 = 0.70 for clayey-silty materials). The group representation of hydraulic conductivity (ranging from 10-12 m s-1 up to 10-2 m s-1) presents a coefficient of correlation of R2 = 0.97 for a total of 175 samples of various deposits. These results present new developments in the research of the effective porosity, the permeability and the specific surface area distributions of porous materials. This is important because these three parameters are critical conditions for successful groundwater flow modeling and contaminant transport. Additionally, from a practical viewpoint, it is very important to identify these parameters swiftly and very accurately.

  10. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    The space between agricultural soil aggregates is defined as structural porosity. It plays important roles in soil key functions that an agricultural soil performs in the global ecosystem. Porosity is one of the soil properties that affect plant growth along with soil texture, aggregate size, aeration and water holding capacity (Alaoui et al. 2011). Water supplies regulation of agricultural soil is related to the number of very small pores present in a soil due to the effect of capillarity. Change of porosity also affect the evaporation of the water on the surface (Le Maitre et al. 2014). Furthermore, soil is a habitat for soils organisms, and most living organisms, including plant roots and microorganisms require oxygen. These organisms breathe easier in a less compacted soil with a wide range of pores sizes. Soil compaction by agricultural engine degrades soil porosity. At the same time, fragmentation with tillage tools, creation of cracks due to wetting/drying and freezing/thawing cycles and effects of soil fauna can regenerate soil porosity. Soil compaction increases bulk density since soil grains are rearranged decreasing void space and bringing them into closer contact (Hamza & Anderson 2005). Drainage is reduced, erosion is facilitated and crop production decreases in a compacted soil. Determining soil porosity, giving insight on the soil compaction, with the aim to provide advices to farmers in their soil optimization towards crop production, is thus an important challenge. Acoustic wave velocity has been correlated to the porosity and the acoustic attenuation to the water content (Oelze et al. 2002). Recent studies have shown some correlations between the velocity of acoustic waves, the porosity and the stress state of soil samples (Lu et al. 2004; Lu 2005; Lu & Sabatier 2009), concluding that the ultrasonic waves are a promising tool for the rapid characterisation of unsaturated porous soils. Propagation wave velocity tends to decrease in a high porous

  11. [The porosity, microhardness, roughness and internal stresses of PMMA base materials in relation to their isolation. 1. Porosity and microhardness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockowandt, P; Loges, H; Wagner, I V

    1989-01-01

    Selected material properties of hot and cold polymerized denture basic materials (polymethylmethacrylate) were investigated after different methods of isolation: alginate, tin foil and silicone. Both tin foil and silicone isolation the handling of which is much easier result in a decreased portion of porosities and an increased microhardness in the PMMA.

  12. Lead-Free Metamaterials with Enormous Apparent Piezoelectric Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wanfeng; Chen, Pan; Pan, Qi; Zhang, Xiaotong; Chu, Baojin

    2015-11-01

    Lead-free flexoelectric piezoelectric metamaterials are created by applying an asymmetric chemical reduction to Na1/2 Bi1/2 TiO3 -BaTiO3 ceramics. The reduction induces two gradient-generating mechanisms, curvature structure and chemical inhomogeneity, and enhances the flexoelectric effect. The ceramics behave like piezoelectric materials, exhibiting an enormous and high-temperature stable apparent piezoelectric response, outperforming existing lead-oxide-based piezoelectrics.

  13. Fusion zone microstructure and porosity in electron beam welds of an α+β titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kutumba Rao, V. V.

    1999-03-01

    The effect of electron beam welding parameters on fusion zone (FZ) microstructure and porosity in a Ti -6.8 Al -3.42 Mo -1.9 Zr -0.21 Si alloy (Russian designation VT 9) has been investigated. It has been observed that the FZ grain width increased continuously with increase in heat input when the base metal was in the β heat-treated condition, while in the α+β heat-treated base metal welds, the FZ grain width increased only after a threshold energy input. The difference is attributed to both the weld thermal cycle and the pinning effect of equiaxed primary alpha on grain growth in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of α+β heat-treated base metal. Postweld heat treatment (PWHT) in the subtransus and supertransus regions did not alter the columnar grain morphology in the FZ, possibly due to the lack of enough driving force for the formation of new grains by the breaking up of the columnar grains and grain boundary movement for grain growth. As the PWHTs were conducted in a furnace, the role of thermal gradients can be ruled out. Intragranular microstructure in the aswelded condition consisted of hexagonal martensite. The scale of the martensite laths depended on welding speed. The highest porosity was observed at intermediate welding speeds. At low speeds, a majority of pores formed at the fusion boundary, while at high speeds, occurrence of porosity was maximum at the weld center. The trends on porosity can be explained on the basis of solubility of hydrogen in titanium as a function of temperature and the influence of weld thermal cycle on nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles. The porosity at slow welding speeds is low because sufficient time exists for the nucleation, growth, and escape of hydrogen gas bubbles, while insufficient time exists for the nucleation of gas bubbles at high welding speeds. The effect of pickling of joint surface, vacuum annealing of the base metal, and successive remelting of the weld metal has also been investigated.

  14. Apparent magnitude of earthshine: a simple calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The Sun illuminates both the Moon and the Earth with practically the same luminous fluxes which are in turn reflected by them. The Moon provides a dim light to the Earth whereas the Earth illuminates the Moon with somewhat brighter light which can be seen from the Earth and is called earthshine. As the amount of light reflected from the Earth depends on part of the Earth and the cloud cover, the strength of earthshine varies throughout the year. The measure of the earthshine light is luminance, which is defined in photometry as the total luminous flux of light hitting or passing through a surface. The expression for the earthshine light in terms of the apparent magnitude has been derived for the first time and evaluated for two extreme cases; firstly, when the Sun’s rays are reflected by the water of the oceans and secondly when the reflector is either thick clouds or snow. The corresponding values are -1.30 and -3.69, respectively. The earthshine value -3.22 reported by Jackson lies within these apparent magnitudes. This paper will motivate the students and teachers of physics to look for the illuminated Moon by earthlight during the waning or waxing crescent phase of the Moon and to reproduce the expressions derived here by making use of the inverse-square law of radiation, Planck’s expression for the power in electromagnetic radiation, photopic spectral luminous efficiency function and expression for the apparent magnitude of a body in terms of luminous fluxes.

  15. Apparent life threatening events (ALTE: diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Manuel Toro-Monjaraz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apparent Life-Threatening Events (ALTE are a form of clinical presen- tation of various problems or diseases in children under one year of age. A frequency of 0.6/1000 newborns is estimated. In Mexico, there is no known incidence, systematic approach or guidelines for hospital discharge, so we performed a literature review. Its etiology may be gastrointestinal, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic, endocrine or-idiopathic. The detailed history and physical examination provide an outline to select the laboratory and imaging studies to perform.

  16. Noncommutative FRW Apparent Horizon and Hawking Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhallouf, H.; Mebarki, N.; Aissaoui, H.

    2017-09-01

    In the context of noncommutative (NCG) gauge gravity, and using a cosmic time power law formula for the scale factor, a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) like metric is obtained. Within the fermions tunneling effect approach and depending on the various intervals of the power parameter, expressions of the apparent horizon are also derived. It is shown that in some regions of the parameter space, a pure NCG trapped horizon does exist leading to new interpretation of the role played by the noncommutativity of the space-time.

  17. Apparent exchange rate imaging in anisotropic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Lundell, Henrik M; Søgaard, Lise V;

    2014-01-01

    Double-wave diffusion experiments offer the possibility of probing correlation between molecular diffusion at multiple time points. It has recently been shown that this technique is capable of measuring the exchange of water across cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate the ...... the effect of macroscopic tissue anisotropy on the measurement of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) in multicompartment systems.......Double-wave diffusion experiments offer the possibility of probing correlation between molecular diffusion at multiple time points. It has recently been shown that this technique is capable of measuring the exchange of water across cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate...

  18. Electric potential and apparent resistivity in rocks containing non-uniformly distributed cracks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the formula of electric field distribution and ground apparent resistivity of high resistance rock medi-um containing low resistance crack are deduced and simulated. The result shows that interstitial parameters, such as buried depth, scale, strike, and real resistivity, etc, have influence on observation and computing result of apparent resistivity. This study provided a useful foundation for earthquake prediction using apparent resistivity method.

  19. P-wave velocity changes in freezing hard low-porosity rocks: a laboratory-based time-average model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Draebing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available P-wave refraction seismics is a key method in permafrost research but its applicability to low-porosity rocks, which constitute alpine rock walls, has been denied in prior studies. These studies explain p-wave velocity changes in freezing rocks exclusively due to changing velocities of pore infill, i.e. water, air and ice. In existing models, no significant velocity increase is expected for low-porosity bedrock. We postulate, that mixing laws apply for high-porosity rocks, but freezing in confined space in low-porosity bedrock also alters physical rock matrix properties. In the laboratory, we measured p-wave velocities of 22 decimetre-large low-porosity (< 10% metamorphic, magmatic and sedimentary rock samples from permafrost sites with a natural texture (> 100 micro-fissures from 25 °C to −15 °C in 0.3 °C increments close to the freezing point. When freezing, p-wave velocity increases by 11–166% perpendicular to cleavage/bedding and equivalent to a matrix velocity increase from 11–200% coincident to an anisotropy decrease in most samples. The expansion of rigid bedrock upon freezing is restricted and ice pressure will increase matrix velocity and decrease anisotropy while changing velocities of the pore infill are insignificant. Here, we present a modified Timur's two-phase-equation implementing changes in matrix velocity dependent on lithology and demonstrate the general applicability of refraction seismics to differentiate frozen and unfrozen low-porosity bedrock.

  20. Influence of surface roughness and porosity of inclusion in water droplet on heat transfer enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Anastasia G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using high-speed camera, the experiments were performed to research evaporation of 10 μl water droplets containing 2 mm solid inclusions in the shape of cube, when heated (up to 850 K in combustion products of technical ethanol. Adding solid inclusions in water droplets allowed considerably decreasing (by 70% their evaporation times. Also, the artificial irregularities (roughness and porosity at the surfaces of solid inclusions were manufactured to increase heat transfer area. Such approach enabled to decrease evaporation times of heterogeneous liquid droplets in high-temperature gases by 40% (when comparing inclusions with artificial irregularities and smooth surface.

  1. Porosity and Inclusion Detection in CFRP by Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Toscano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever wide use of composite materials in the aeronautical industry has evidenced the need for development of ever more effective nondestructive evaluation methodologies in order to reduce rejected parts and to optimize production costs. Infrared thermography has been recently enclosed amongst the standardized non destructive testing techniques, but its usefulness needs still complete assessment since it can be employed in several different arrangements and for many purposes. In this work, the possibility to detect slag inclusions and porosity is analyzed with both lock-in themography and pulse thermography in the transmission mode. To this end, carbon-fiber-peinforced polymers different specimens are specifically fabricated of several different stacking sequences and with embedded slag inclusions and porosity percentages. As main results, both of the techniques are found definitely able to reveal the presence of the defects above mentioned. Moreover, these techniques could be considered complementary in order to better characterize the nature of the detected defects.

  2. Stylolites, porosity, depositional texture, and silicates in chalk facies sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Borre, Mai K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of chalk on the Ontong Java Plateau and chalk in the Central North Sea indicates that, whereas pressure dissolution is controlled by effective burial stress, pore-filling cementation is controlled by temperature. Effective burial stress is caused by the weight of all overlying water...... and sediments as counteracted by the pressure in the pore fluid, so the regional overpressure in the Central North Sea is one reason why the two localities have different relationships between temperature and effective burial stress. In the chalk of the Ontong Java Plateau the onset of calcite-silicate pressure...... dissolution around 490 m below sea floor (bsf) corresponds to an interval of waning porosity-decline, and even the occurrence of proper stylolites from 830 m bsf is accompanied by only minor porosity reduction. Because opal is present, the pore-water is relatively rich in Si which through the formation of Ca...

  3. Permeability Description by Characteristic Length, Tortuosity, Constriction and Porosity

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Carl Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate the permeability of a porous medium as given in Darcy's law. The permeability is described by an effective hydraulic pore radius in the porous medium, the fluctuation in local hydraulic pore radii, the length of streamlines, and the fractional volume conducting flow. The effective hydraulic pore radius is related to a characteristic hydraulic length, the fluctuation in local hydraulic radii is related to a constriction factor, the length of streamlines is characterized by a tortuosity, and the fractional volume conducting flow from inlet to outlet is described by an effective porosity. The characteristic length, the constriction factor, the tortuosity and the effective porosity are thus intrinsic descriptors of the pore structure relative to direction. We show that the combined effect of our pore structure description fully describes the permeability of a porous medium. The theory is applied to idealized porous media, where it reproduces Darcy's law for fluid flow derived from t...

  4. Microstructure, porosity and mineralogy around fractures in Olkiluoto bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuva, J. (ed.); Myllys, M.; Timonen, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Kelokaski, M.; Ikonen, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Aaltonen, I.

    2012-01-15

    3D distributions of minerals and porosities were determined for samples that included waterconducting fractures. The analysis of these samples was performed using conventional petrography methods, electron microscopy, C-14-PMMA porosity analysis and X-ray tomography. While X-ray tomography proved to be a very useful method when determining the inner structure of the samples, combining tomography results with those obtained by other methods turned out to be difficult without very careful sample preparation design. It seems that the properties of rock around a water-conducting fracture depend on so many uncorrelated factors that no clear pattern emerged even for rock samples with a given type of fracture. We can conclude, however, that a combination of different analysis methods can be useful and used to infer novel structural information about alteration zones adjacent to fracture surfaces. (orig.)

  5. Microstructure, porosity and mineralogy around fractures in Olkiluoto bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuva, J. (ed.); Myllys, M.; Timonen, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland); Kelokaski, M.; Ikonen, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Lindberg, A. [GTK Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Aaltonen, I.

    2012-01-15

    3D distributions of minerals and porosities were determined for samples that included waterconducting fractures. The analysis of these samples was performed using conventional petrography methods, electron microscopy, C-14-PMMA porosity analysis and X-ray tomography. While X-ray tomography proved to be a very useful method when determining the inner structure of the samples, combining tomography results with those obtained by other methods turned out to be difficult without very careful sample preparation design. It seems that the properties of rock around a water-conducting fracture depend on so many uncorrelated factors that no clear pattern emerged even for rock samples with a given type of fracture. We can conclude, however, that a combination of different analysis methods can be useful and used to infer novel structural information about alteration zones adjacent to fracture surfaces. (orig.)

  6. Origin of porosity in arylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, D.W.; Loy, D.A.; Ulibarri, T.A.; Black, E.; Buss, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beaucage, G.B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Materials Science and Engineering; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigate the porosity of a series of xerogels prepared from arylene-bridged silsesquioxane xerogels as a function of organic bridging group, condensation catalyst and post-synthesis plasma treatment to remove the organic functionalities. They conclude that porosity is controlled by polymer-solvent phase separation in the solution with no evidence of organic-inorganic phase separation. As the polymer grows and crosslinks, it becomes increasingly incompatible with the solvent and eventually microphase separates. The domain structure is controlled by a balance of network elasticity and non-bonding polymer-solvent interactions. The bridging organic groups serve to ameliorate polymer-solvent incompatibility. As a result, when the polymer does eventually phase separate, the rather tightly crosslinked network limits domain size to tens of angstroms, substantially smaller than that observed in xerogels obtained from purely inorganic precursors where incompatibility drives phase separation earlier in the gelation sequence.

  7. Investigating the Relationship between Knitted Fabric Porosity and Light Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Imrith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper attempts to investigate the relationship between fabric porosity and light permeability of the knitted structures, namely, rib 1 × 1, rib 2 × 1, single jersey, and plain structure. The rationale is that pores (in a fabric would allow light to pass through but at the same time provide a quantitative assessment of the UV light permeability of the knitted fabrics, an indication of the protective capacity of the fabrics against UV radiation. The porosity and corresponding light permeability of the knitted structures were measured after varying the following knitting parameters: stitch length, stitch density, and tension on the machine. Furthermore, this work has enabled the development of an apparatus that can measure the amount of light transmitted through the knitted fabrics. The results generated by the equipment were validated through the use of regression equations.

  8. Reversibly switching the surface porosity of a DNA tetrahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Qian, Hang; Hao, Chenhui; Jiang, Wen; Mao, Chengde

    2012-07-25

    The ability to reversibly switch the surface porosity of nanocages would allow controllable matter transport in and out of the nanocages. This would be a desirable property for many technological applications, such as drug delivery. To achieve such capability, however, is challenging. Herein we report a strategy for reversibly changing the surface porosity of a self-assembled DNA nanocage (a DNA tetrahedron) that is based on DNA hydridization and strand displacement. The involved DNA nanostructures were thoroughly characterized by multiple techniques, including polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and cryogenic electron microscopy. This work may lead to the design and construction of stimuli-responsive nanocages that might find applications as smart materials.

  9. Tunable thermal conductivity in mesoporous silicon by slight porosity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Jae Hun; Barth, David S.; Zhu, Jia; Ćoso, Dušan; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Lim, Jongwoo; Han, Junkyu; Zhang, Xiang; Majumdar, Arun

    2017-08-01

    We report the thermal conductivity of photoelectrochemically synthesized mesoporous silicon (MPS), with ˜20-nm diameter pores and 52%-58% porosity. The thermal conductivity of MPS samples with a thickness of a few microns was measured using the three omega (3 ω ) differential technique. We experimentally demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of MPS varies between 3 and 7 W/m K at room temperature and is dependent on the photoelectrochemical etching times used during the MPS synthesis, which induces a slight change in the MPS porosity. Calculations were conducted using the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, with the results suggesting that the large thermal conductivity reduction in the MPSs was not entirely explained by the pore boundary scattering. Our findings indicate that elastic softening in the mesoporous structure may be responsible for the reduction in the thermal conductivity.

  10. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  11. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  12. Interaction of Porosity with a Planar Solid/Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Sen, Subhayu; Kaukler, William F.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, an investigation of the interaction between gas porosity and a planar solid/liquid (SL) interface is reported. A two-dimensional numerical model able to accurately track sharp SL interfaces during solidification of pure metals and alloys is proposed. The finite-difference method and a rectangular undeformed grid are used for computation. The SL interface is described through the points of intersection with the grid lines. Its motion is determined by the thermal and solute gradients at each particular point. Changes of the interface temperature because of capillarity or solute redistribution as well as any perturbation of the thermal and solute field produced by the presence of non-metallic inclusions can be computed. To validate the model, the dynamics of the interaction between a gas pore and a solidification front in metal alloys was observed using a state of the art X-ray transmission microscope (XTM). The experiments included observation of the distortion of the SL interface near a pore, real-time measurements of the growth rate, and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with the SL interface in pure Al and Al-0.25 wt pct Au alloy. In addition, porosity-induced solute segregation patterns surrounding a pore were also quantified.

  13. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  14. The Albedo of Pervious Cement Concrete Linearly Decreases with Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervious pavements have been advocated as a potential countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. To understand if pervious pavements stay cooler than conventional pavements, the albedo of the pervious concrete must be understood. This study measured the albedo of pervious concrete with different porosity. Four Portland cement concrete mixes were casted, using designed amounts of sand to vary the porosity of the pervious concrete samples. The samples were sliced and the spectral reflectance and albedo of the sliced samples were measured and analyzed. It is found that the albedo of pervious concrete decreases linearly with the increase of the porosity. The albedo of a pervious Portland concrete varies from 0.25 to 0.35, which is 0.05~0.15 lower than the albedo of conventional cement concrete. Due to this lower albedo, it should be cautious to develop pervious concrete to battle with urban heat island unless the evaporation of pervious concrete is promoted to compensate the additional solar absorption caused by the low albedo.

  15. Porosity and wear resistance of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed coatings offer practical and economical solutions for corrosion and wear protection of components or tools. To improve the coating properties, heat treatment such as preheat is applied. The selection of coating and substrate materials is a key factor in improving the quality of the coating morphology after the heat treatment. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of preheat temperatures, i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C, on porosity and wear resistance of tungsten carbide (WC) coating sprayed by flame thermal coating. The powders and coatings morphology were analyzed by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDS), whereas the phase identification was performed by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD). In order to evaluate the quality of the flame spray obtained coatings, the porosity, micro-hardness and wear rate of the specimens was determined. The results showed that WC coating gives a higher surface hardness from 1391 HVN up to 1541 HVN compared to that of the non-coating. Moreover, the wear rate increased from 0.072 mm3/min. to 0.082 mm3/min. when preheat temperature was increased. Preheat on H13 steel substrate can reduce the percentage of porosity level from 10.24 % to 3.94% on the thermal spray coatings.

  16. On the Relation of Porosity and Permeability in Low Porosity and Low Permeability Rock%低孔隙度低渗透率岩石孔隙度与渗透率关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵维志; 解经宇; 迟秀荣; 李俊国; 吴淑琴; 肖斐

    2013-01-01

    The view about the higher porosity with the higher permeability has guided high porosity and high permeability reservoir production operations,but in the low porosity and low permeability reservoirs,there often appears the phenomenon contrary to this view,the capacity difference is very large in almost the same porosity reservoir.Experiment data from 250 rock samples indicate that permeability is not obviously controlled by the total porosity in the low porosity and low permeability rock,traditional porosity-permeability calculation method is no longer applicable.In the low porosity and low permeability rock,permeability is mainly controlled by pore structure,the pore with different pore sizes has different contribution to the permeability,the pore sizes and the corresponded proportion in the pores control the permeability value together.On this basis,the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is used to depict the pore size ranges,then the interval porosity is used to calculate the permeability.This method not only improves the permeability calculation accuracy in the low porosity and permeability reservoir but also develops the traditional formula,it can effectively guide the productivity evaluation of low porosity and low permeability reservoirs in the future.%孔隙度越高渗透性越好的观点一直指导中-高孔隙度渗透率储层生产作业,但在低孔隙度低渗透率储层中常出现与该观点相违背的现象,孔隙度基本一致的储层产能差异非常大.通过256块岩样实验发现,低孔隙度低渗透率岩石的渗透率受总孔隙度控制作用不明显,传统的孔隙度—渗透率计算方法已经不再适用;低孔隙度低渗透率岩石渗透率主要受控于孔隙结构,不同孔径尺寸孔隙对渗透率贡献不同,渗透率大小受孔径尺寸大小及其相对应孔隙的比例高低共同控制.提出利用核磁共振测井刻画孔径尺寸区间,根据岩石压汞实验中的孔隙分布直方图数据,参

  17. The influence of precursor structure on the development of porosity in polymer-derived SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebo, J.F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Micro-Engineered Ceramics; Scotto, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.; Bennett, C.A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Brinker, C.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Micro-Engineered Ceramics]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    1996-07-01

    Polymer-based routes to ceramic oxides take advantage of precursor chemistry and structure to produce materials with a range of pore sizes. Polymer precursor routes to non-oxide ceramics offer products with superior thermal and chemical stability in many cases. Polymethylsilane (PMS), a versatile cross linked SiC precursor, [(MeHSi){sub x}(MeSi){sub y}], was synthesized using published procedures to yield fluid precursors with a low (20--40%) degree of cross linking. Unique, highly cross linked (60--70%), solid polymers were produced under reaction conditions which carefully conserve the volatile monomer. These two polymers were converted to SiC to determine the relative importance of the various contributions to porosity, and to assess the role of precursor structure on porosity development in non-oxides. Initial results indicate that precursor structure has little effect on porosity. The development of the porosity appears to be dominated by high temperature thermochemistry and/or microstructural changes.

  18. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu; Novakowski, T.J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Surface nanostructuring on vanadium surface using novel He{sup +} ion irradiation process. • Tuning surface-porosity using high-flux, low-energy He{sup +} ion irradiation at constant elevated sample temperature (823–173 K). • Presented top-down approach guarantees good contact between different crystallites. • Sequential significant enhancement in surface-pore edge size (and corresponding reduction in surface-pore density) with increasing sample temperature. - Abstract: In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He{sup +} ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He{sup +} ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 10{sup 20} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1} for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823–1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V{sub 2}O{sub 5} surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of “black metal”. Combined with the naturally high melting point of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  19. Chemical diagenesis, porosity reduction, and rock strength, IODP Site U1480: Influences on great earthquakes at shallow depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insun; Milliken, Kitty; Dugan, Brandon; Bourlange, Sylvain; Colson, Tobias; Frederik, Marina; Jeppson, Tamara; Kuranaga, Mebae; Nair, Nisha; Henstock, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 362 drilled two sites, U1480 and U1481, on the Indian oceanic plate ˜250 km west of the Sunda subduction zone to a maximum depth of 1500 meters below seafloor (mbsf). One of the primary objectives was to understand the mechanism of great earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Mw 9.0) which showed unexpectedly shallow megathrust slip by establishing the initial and evolving properties of the North Sumatran incoming sedimentary section. Core sampling and logging from the complete sedimentary section at U1480 indicates a distinct change in sedimentation rate from a slowly deposited pelagic system to a rapidly deposited submarine fan system at late Miocene. Following burial, sediments of the Nicobar Fan underwent compaction leading to porosity reduction from 66±9% near seafloor to ˜30% at the base of the sampled Nicobar Fan section (˜1250 mbsf), representing a normal consolidation behavior. Rock strength gradually increases with depth as the sediments are mechanically compacted. Below the fan (1250-1415 mbsf), the pelagic sediments are composed of tuffaceous, calcareous, and siliceous sediments/rocks and their porosity is dependent upon lithology more than upon depth. Tuffaceous materials exhibit high porosity ranging from ˜30-60%, even higher than that of overlying layers. However, porosity of most calcareous samples is lower than 20% at the same depth. The large variation in porosity depends on the degree of cementation, which in turn is controlled by grain assemblage composition and environmental conditions such as slow sedimentation rates and locally high temperatures related to igneous activity as documented by local igneous intrusives and extrusives. The minor cementation in tuffaceous sandy sediments has retained high porosity, but strengthened their skeleton so as to bear the overburden. The low porosity in calcareous rocks is considered to come from extensive cementation rather than

  20. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Martin

    2015-05-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich [1] have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  1. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  2. Apparent energy distribution of sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙孚; 丁平兴

    1995-01-01

    A concept of apparent energy distribution of sea waves is suggested and named "the outer frequency spectrum" to distinguish it from the frequency spectrum in common sense In line with the concept, a kind of outer spectrum with three parameters in Cauchy’ s form is derived theoretically from the joint distribution of wave periods and heights reached previously by the present authors and the Bretschneider spectrum is rededuced simply in a distinct manner. The foundation of mechanics of the similarity between the frequency spectrum in common sense and the outer one is briefly discussed. In view of the fact that Bretschneider spectrum has a wide application in engineering, the advantages and probability of using the outer spectrum as a common one are also considered.

  3. AGN jet physics and apparent opening angles

    CERN Document Server

    Clausen-Brown, Eric; Pushkarev, Alexander B; Kovalev, Yuri Y; Lister, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to measure Gamma*theta_j in flux-limited samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, where Gamma is the bulk Lorentz factor and theta_j is the jet's half-opening angle. The Gamma*theta_j parameter is physically important for models of jet launching, and also determines the effectiveness of jet instabilities and magnetic reconnection. We measure Gamma*theta_j by analyzing the observed distribution of apparent opening angles in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) flux-limited samples of jets, given some prior knowledge of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) radio luminosity function. We then apply this method to the MOJAVE flux-limited sample of radio loud objects and find Gamma*theta_j = 0.1 +- 0.03, which implies that AGN jets are subject to a variety of physical processes that require causal connection.

  4. Product design enhancement using apparent usability and affective quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seva, Rosemary R; Gosiaco, Katherine Grace T; Santos, Ma Crea Eurice D; Pangilinan, Denise Mae L

    2011-03-01

    In this study, apparent usability and affective quality were integrated in a design framework called the Usability Perception and Emotion Enhancement Model (UPEEM). The UPEEM was validated using structural equation modeling (SEM). The methodology consists of four phases namely product selection, attribute identification, design alternative generation, and design alternative evaluation. The first stage involved the selection of a product that highly involves the consumer. In the attribute identification stage, design elements of the product were identified. The possible values of these elements were also determined for use in the experimentation process. Design of experiments was used to identify how the attributes will be varied in the design alternative stage and which of the attributes significantly contribute to affective quality, apparent usability, and desirability in the design evaluation stage. Results suggest that product attributes related to form are relevant in eliciting intense affect and perception of usability in mobile phones especially those directly related to functionality and aesthetics. This study considered only four product attributes among so many due to the constraints of the research design employed. Attributes related to aesthetic perception of a product enhance apparent usability such as those related to dimensional ratios.

  5. Ambiguity in Tactile Apparent Motion Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Liaci

    Full Text Available In von Schiller's Stroboscopic Alternative Motion (SAM stimulus two visually presented diagonal dot pairs, located on the corners of an imaginary rectangle, alternate with each other and induce either horizontal, vertical or, rarely, rotational motion percepts. SAM motion perception can be described by a psychometric function of the dot aspect ratio ("AR", i.e. the relation between vertical and horizontal dot distances. Further, with equal horizontal and vertical dot distances (AR = 1 perception is biased towards vertical motion. In a series of five experiments, we presented tactile SAM versions and studied the role of AR and of different reference frames for the perception of tactile apparent motion.We presented tactile SAM stimuli and varied the ARs, while participants reported the perceived motion directions. Pairs of vibration stimulators were attached to the participants' forearms and stimulator distances were varied within and between forearms. We compared straight and rotated forearm conditions with each other in order to disentangle the roles of exogenous and endogenous reference frames.Increasing the tactile SAM's AR biased perception towards vertical motion, but the effect was weak compared to the visual modality. We found no horizontal disambiguation, even for very small tactile ARs. A forearm rotation by 90° kept the vertical bias, even though it was now coupled with small ARs. A 45° rotation condition with crossed forearms, however, evoked a strong horizontal motion bias.Existing approaches to explain the visual SAM bias fail to explain the current tactile results. Particularly puzzling is the strong horizontal bias in the crossed-forearm conditions. In the case of tactile apparent motion, there seem to be no fixed priority rule for perceptual disambiguation. Rather the weighting of available evidence seems to depend on the degree of stimulus ambiguity, the current situation and on the perceptual strategy of the individual

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling and Changes in Porosity at Reactive Interfaces in a HLW repository in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, J.; Mon, A.; Montenegro, L.; Naves, A.; Fernández, J.

    2016-12-01

    High-level radioactive waste disposal in a deep geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept which combines natural barriers such as the geological formation and artificial barriers such as metallic containers, bentonite and concrete buffers and sealing materials. The stability and performance of the bentonite barrier could be affected by the corrosion products at the canister-bentonite interface and the hyperalkaline conditions caused by the degradation of concrete at the bentonite-concrete interface. Additionally, the host clay formation could also be affected by the hyperalkaline plume at the concrete-clay interface. Here we present a nonisothermal reactive transport model of the long-term interactions of the compacted bentonite with the corrosion products of a carbon-steel canister and the concrete liner of the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository in clay. This problem involves large pH changes with a hyperalkaline high-pH plume, complex mineral dissolution/precipitation patterns, cation exchange reactions and proton surface complexation. These reactions lead to large changes in porosity which can even lead to pore clogging. Model results show that magnetite, the main corrosion product, precipitates and reduces significantly the porosity of the bentonite near the canister. The degradation of the concrete liner leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals and the reduction of the porosity of the bentonite and the clay formation at their interfaces with the concrete liner. The zones affected by pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete-clay interfaces at 1 Ma are equal to 10, 25 and 25 mm thick, respectively. The results of our simulations share many of the features of the models reported by others for engineered barrier systems at similar chemical conditions, including: 1) Narrow alteration zones; and 2) Pore clogging at the canister-bentonite, bentonite-concrete and concrete

  7. A Simple Synthesis of an N-Doped Carbon ORR Catalyst: Hierarchical Micro/Meso/Macro Porosity and Graphitic Shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David; Stroek, Wowa; Geels, Norbert J; Sandu, Cosmin S; Heller, Adam; Yan, Ning; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2016-01-11

    Replacing platinum as an oxygen reduction catalyst is an important scientific and technological challenge. Herein we report a simple synthesis of a complex carbon with very good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at pH 13. Pyrolysis of magnesium nitrilotriacetate yields a carbon with hierarchical micro/meso/macro porosity, resulting from in situ templating by spontaneously forming MgO nanoparticles and from etching by pyrolysis gases. The mesopores are lined with highly graphitic shells. The high ORR activity is attributed to a good balance between high specific surface area and mass transport through the hierarchical porosity, and to improved electronic conductivity through the graphitic shells. This novel carbon has a high surface area (1320 m(2) g(-1) ), and high nitrogen content for a single precursor synthesis (∼6 %). Importantly, its synthesis is both cheap and easily scalable.

  8. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  9. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...

  10. Pore space connectivity and porosity using CT scans of tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previatello da Silva, Livia; de Jong Van Lier, Quirijn

    2015-04-01

    Microtomography has been used in soil physics for characterization and allows non-destructive analysis with high-resolution, yielding a three-dimensional representation of pore space and fluid distribution. It also allows quantitative characterization of pore space, including pore size distribution, shape, connectivity, porosity, tortuosity, orientation, preferential pathways and is also possible predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity using Darcy's equation and a modified Poiseuille's equation. Connectivity of pore space is an important topological property of soil. Together with porosity and pore-size distribution, it governs transport of water, solutes and gases. In order to quantify and analyze pore space (quantifying connectivity of pores and porosity) of four tropical soils from Brazil with different texture and land use, undisturbed samples were collected in São Paulo State, Brazil, with PVC ring with 7.5 cm in height and diameter of 7.5 cm, depth of 10 - 30 cm from soil surface. Image acquisition was performed with a CT system Nikon XT H 225, with technical specifications of dual reflection-transmission target system including a 225 kV, 225 W high performance Xray source equipped with a reflection target with pot size of 3 μm combined with a nano-focus transmission module with a spot size of 1 μm. The images were acquired at specific energy level for each soil type, according to soil texture, and external copper filters were used in order to allow the attenuation of low frequency X-ray photons and passage of one monoenergetic beam. This step was performed aiming minimize artifacts such as beam hardening that may occur during the attenuation in the material interface with different densities within the same sample. Images were processed and analyzed using ImageJ/Fiji software. Retention curve (tension table and the pressure chamber methods), saturated hydraulic conductivity (constant head permeameter), granulometry, soil density and particle density

  11. CONFERENCE NOTE: Comité Consultatif pour la Masse et les grandeurs apparentées (CCM), High Pressure and Medium Pressure Working Groups, Second International Seminar on Pressure Metrology from 1 kPa to 1 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The seminar will be held from 2 to 4 June 1993, preceding the next meeting of the CCM, at the Laboratoire National d'Essais (LNE), 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75015 Paris, France. Scope of the Seminar The purpose of the seminar is to review the state of the art of pressure measurements in the 1 kPa to 1 GPa range and to present original and innovative contributions from standards laboratories and industry. Main Topics The seminar will be organized in six sessions as follows: Liquid-column manometers Piston gauge pressure standards Properties of liquids and gases relevant to pressure metrology Pressure transducers and transfer standards Pressure standard comparison (methods and results) Dynamic pressure measurements. Each topic will be introduced by a review paper presented by a session chairman. A final session, coordinated by Dr G F Molinar (IMGC), Chairman of the CCM High Pressure Working Group, and Dr P Stuart (NPL), Chairman of the CCM Medium Pressure Working Group, will deal with: Actual limits of accuracy of static pressure measurements in fluid media Fundamental problems in pressure metrology between I kPa and 1 GPa. Call for Papers Papers should be prepared for oral presentation and will be refereed by the session chairmen. The Proceedings will be published as a special issue of Metrologia. Papers should be written according to the instructions for authors printed on the inside back cover of this journal. A one-page abstract should be sent to Dr Molinar at the IMGC, to arrive before 31 January 1993. A participation fee of 900 FFr (175 US) will be charged. This will cover general expenses and a copy of the Proceedings. Hotel reservations, meals and transport are not included. Organizers For further information please contact: 1993 CCM Pressure Seminar, Dr G F Molinar, Istituto di Metrologia "G Colonnetti", Strada delle Cacce 73, 1-10135 Torino, Italy telephone (39) 11 39771; telex 212209 IMGCTO-I; fax (39) 11 346761. Contact at the LNE: J C Legras, telephone (33

  12. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir with double porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelet, R.; Loret, B.; Khalili, N.

    2012-07-01

    The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations of fractured media are embodied in the theory of mixtures applied to three-phase poroelastic media. The solid skeleton contains two distinct cavities filled with the same fluid. Each of the three phases is endowed with its own temperature. The constitutive relations governing the thermomechanical behavior, generalized diffusion and transfer are structured by, and satisfy, the dissipation inequality. The cavities exchange both mass and energy. Mass exchanges are driven by the jump in scaled chemical potential, and energy exchanges by the jump in coldness. The finite element approximation uses the displacement vector, the two fluid pressures and the three temperatures as primary variables. It is used to analyze a generic hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. Three parameters of the model are calibrated from the thermal outputs of Fenton Hill and Rosemanowes HDR reservoirs. The calibrated model is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro-mechanical response provided by the dual porosity model with respect to a single porosity model is highlighted in a parameter analysis. Emphasis is put on the influence of the fracture spacing, on the effective stress response and on the permeation of the fluid into the porous blocks. The dual porosity model yields a thermally induced effective stress that is less tensile compared with the single porosity response. This effect becomes significant for large fracture spacings. In agreement with field data, fluid loss is observed to be high initially and to decrease with time.

  13. Adobe photoshop quantification (PSQ) rather than point-counting: A rapid and precise method for quantifying rock textural data and porosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Kaibo; Wu, Shuanglin

    2014-08-01

    Commonly used petrological quantification methods are visual estimation, counting, and image analyses. However, in this article, an Adobe Photoshop-based analyzing method (PSQ) is recommended for quantifying the rock textural data and porosities. Adobe Photoshop system provides versatile abilities in selecting an area of interest and the pixel number of a selection could be read and used to calculate its area percentage. Therefore, Adobe Photoshop could be used to rapidly quantify textural components, such as content of grains, cements, and porosities including total porosities and different genetic type porosities. This method was named as Adobe Photoshop Quantification (PSQ). The workflow of the PSQ method was introduced with the oolitic dolomite samples from the Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Northeastern Sichuan Basin, China, for example. And the method was tested by comparing with the Folk's and Shvetsov's "standard" diagrams. In both cases, there is a close agreement between the "standard" percentages and those determined by the PSQ method with really small counting errors and operator errors, small standard deviations and high confidence levels. The porosities quantified by PSQ were evaluated against those determined by the whole rock helium gas expansion method to test the specimen errors. Results have shown that the porosities quantified by the PSQ are well correlated to the porosities determined by the conventional helium gas expansion method. Generally small discrepancies (mostly ranging from -3% to 3%) are caused by microporosities which would cause systematic underestimation of 2% and/or by macroporosities causing underestimation or overestimation in different cases. Adobe Photoshop could be used to quantify rock textural components and porosities. This method has been tested to be precise and accurate. It is time saving compared with usual methods.

  14. Apparent life-threatening event in infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Joung

    2016-01-01

    An apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) is defined as the combination of clinical presentations such as apnea, marked change in skin and muscle tone, gagging, or choking. It is a frightening event, and it predominantly occurs during infancy at a mean age of 1–3 months. The causes of ALTE are categorized into problems that are: gastrointestinal (50%), neurological (30%), respiratory (20%), cardiovascular (5%), metabolic and endocrine (2%–5%), or others such as child abuse. Up to 50% of ALTEs are idiopathic, where the cause cannot be diagnosed. Infants with an ALTE are often asymptomatic at hospital and there is no standard workup protocol for ALTE. Therefore, a detailed initial history and physical examination are important to determine the extent of the medical evaluation and treatment. Regardless of the cause of an ALTE, all infants with an ALTE should require hospitalization and continuous cardiorespiratory monitoring and evaluation for at least 24 hours. The natural course of ALTEs has seemed benign, and the outcome is generally associated with the affected infants' underlying disease. In conclusion, systemic diagnostic evaluation and adequate treatment increases the survival and quality of life for most affected infants.

  15. A study on the porosity of CO2 laser welding of titanium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li; Hu Lunji; Gong Shuili

    2006-01-01

    The CO2 laser welding of BT20 titanium alloy and Ti-23Al-17Nb titanium aluminide was conducted to investigate into the porosity in titanium alloy weld. The results show that there are two sorts of porosities observed in welds of titanium alloy laser welding based on the microscopic characteristics of the porosities. One is the metallurgical porosity with round and smooth inner wall, which results from the surface contamination. The other is the processing porosity with irregular and rough inner wall that displays the trace of the pool flowing, which results from the ruffle on the keyhole wall gathering together locally and closing down the gas in the keyhole into bubbles because of the keyhole fluctuating. The CO2 laser welding could break down easily the surface oxide film and produce little metallurgical porosity, but produces easily processing porosity when partial penetration or unstable-full penetration laser welding is conducted, which always occurs in the center of weld.

  16. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  17. Inclusions, Porosity, and Fatigue of AlSi10Mg Parts Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming

    dendrite arm spacings in metal powder particles of different diameters were measured and also agree with literature correlations, showing the expected increase in secondary dendrite arm spacing with increasing particle diameter. It is well-known that the fatigue behavior of cast aluminum alloy parts is largely determined by the internal defects, particularly pores and inclusions, such as oxides. This study shows that such imperfections are also present in AlSi10Mg parts produced by SLM, and serve as sites for failure initiation. The effect of hatch spacing and building orientation on tensile and fatigue properties was tested. Similar defects were found both on polished cross-sections and on fracture surfaces. The results imply that the oxide-driven pores dominate the fatigue resistance of the samples in this work. The larger oxide particles which are associated with the crack initiation likely form by oxidation of metal vapor during part manufacture. Residual porosity in parts produced by SLM mainly results from lack-of-fusion, entrapped gas, pores left in powder, evaporation of elements, and collapse of key-holes. Lack-of-fusion porosity is caused by the the insufficient overlap of melt pools in powder bed fusion and is particularly detrimental to fatigue performance due to the stress concentration at the sharp edges of the pores. The third part of this work deals with predicting lack-of-fusion porosity quantitatively by a geometrically-based model and designing processing parameters for build rate improvement without introducing porosity. The inputs into the simulation are hatch spacing, layer thickness, melt-pool cross-sectional area, and hatch rotation angle. Comparison with several data sets from the literature shows that the simulations correctly predict process conditions at which lack-of-fusion porosity becomes apparent, as well as the rate at which porosity increases with changes in process conditions such as beam speed, layer thickness, and hatch spacing

  18. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias, Paula Condé Lamparelli; Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12), aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females); and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20), aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05). Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures. PMID:28057963

  19. Apparent exchange rate for breast cancer characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Oredsson, Stina; Partridge, Savannah C; Saal, Lao H; Topgaard, Daniel; Nilsson, Markus; Bryskhe, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments on several breast epithelial cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we performed the first in vivo FEXI measurement of water exchange in human breast. In cell suspensions, pulsed gradient spin-echo experiments with large b values and variable pulse duration allow the characterization of the intracellular compartment, whereas FEXSY provides a quantification of AXR. These experiments are very sensitive to the physiological state of cells and can be used to establish reliable protocols for the culture and harvesting of cells. Our results suggest that different breast cancer subtypes can be distinguished on the basis of their AXR values in cell suspensions. Time-resolved measurements allow the monitoring of the physiological state of cells in suspensions over the time-scale of hours, and reveal an abrupt disintegration of the intracellular compartment. In vivo, exchange can be detected in a tumor, whereas, in normal tissue, the exchange rate is outside the range experimentally accessible for FEXI. At present, low signal-to-noise ratio and limited scan time allows the quantification of AXR only in a region of interest of relatively large tumors.

  20. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Reis Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12, aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females; and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20, aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results: Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05. Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures.

  1. Changes in porosity and organic matter phase distribution monitored by NMR relaxometry following hydrous pyrolysis under uniaxial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael D.; Miller, Michael; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Artificial maturation methods are used to induce changes in source rock thermal maturity without the uncertainties that arise when comparing natural samples from a particular basin that often represent different levels of maturation and different lithofacies. A novel uniaxial confinement clamp was used on Woodford Shale cores in hydrous pyrolysis experiments to limit sample expansion by simulating the effect of overburden present during thermal maturation in natural systems. These samples were then subjected to X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) imaging and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry measurements. LF-NMR relaxometry is a noninvasive technique commonly used to measure porosity and pore-size distributions in fluid-filled porous media, but may also measure hydrogen present in hydrogen-bearing organic solids. Standard T1 and T2 relaxation distributions were determined and two dimensional T1-T2 correlation measurements were performed on the Woodford Shale cores. The T1-T2 correlations facilitate resolution of organic phases in the system. The changes observed in NMR-relaxation times correspond to bitumen and lighter hydrocarbon production that occur as source rock organic matter matures. The LF-NMR porosities of the core samples at maximum oil generation are significantly higher than porosities measured by other methods. This discrepancy likely arises from the measurement of highly viscous organic constituents in addition to fluid-filled porosity. An unconfined sample showed shorter relaxation times and lower porosity. This difference is attributed to the lack of fractures observed in the unconfined sample by X-CT.

  2. Porosity and fluid budget of a water-rich megathrust revealed with electromagnetic data at the Middle America Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naif, Samer; Key, Kerry; Constable, Steven; Evans, Rob L.

    2016-11-01

    At convergent margins, the distribution of fluids released from the downgoing slab modulates the state of stress and seismic coupling at the megathrust plate interface. However, existing geophysical data are unable to quantify the porosity along this interface. Here we use controlled-source electromagnetic data collected across the Middle America Trench offshore Nicaragua to image the electrical conductivity structure of the outer fore arc. Our results detect a highly conductive channel, inferred to be the region around the décollement, showing the entire section of water-rich seafloor sediments underthrust with the subducting lithosphere. We use an empirical model of the electrical conductivity of porous media to quantify the channel porosity. Our estimates are consistent with sediment compaction studies, showing a rapid decay of 65%-10% porosity from the trench to 25 km landward. We constrain the channel thickness and use the porosity estimates to determine the water budget, which represents the fraction taken up by fluid. The porosity and water budget estimates show significant lateral variations that we attribute to changes in subducted sediment thickness caused by outer rise bending faults. Between 18 and 23 km from the trench, the conductive channel broadens greatly to 1.5-2 km thick, possibly due to concentrated blind faults or sediment underplating, which suggests a sudden change in hydrogeologic structure at the plate interface. The impact of the anomalous conductor on the seismic coupling and mechanical properties of the megathrust is potentially related to the discrepancy in estimated fault slip between seismic and tsunami source inversions for the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake.

  3. Application of nuclear logging to porosity studies in Itaborai basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Milena F.S.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu, E-mail: milena@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Ferrucio, Paula Lucia; Borghi, Leonardo, E-mail: ferrucio@acd.ufrj.br, E-mail: borghi@ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia; Abreu, Carlos Jorge, E-mail: jo_abreu@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear logging provides information on bulk density and porosity variations by measuring the intensity of the scattered radiation induced on the formation by radioactive sources. In this study, nuclear logging was employed to analyze the pore-space system of the 2-ITAB-1-RJ well placed on the Itaborai limestone basin, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. This is one of the smallest sedimentary basin in Brazil and it is formed by clastic deposits and travertine limestone rocks which are fractured. Understanding the pore-space system of carbonate rocks has become important subject for the oil industry, specially in Brazil. A Density Gamma Probe (LSD) and a Neutron Probe (NEUT) were used for data acquisition, which nuclear logging was carried out in part of the well, with continuous detection for about 50 m of deep. The detection speed was 4 m/min for the LSD and 5 m/min for the NEUT. The results obtained by nuclear logging showed that the 2-ITAB-1-RJ well consists of three different intervals with rocks ranging from low to moderate porosity present in travertine, marls and gneisses. (author)

  4. A study of porosity of synthetic polymer nanoparticles using PALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, B; Smith, S V [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) NSW 2232 (Australia); Guagliardo, P; Williams, J; Samarin, S, E-mail: binh.pham@ansto.gov.au, E-mail: svs@ansto.gov.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) has been used to study the free volume in dry synthetic polymer nanoparticles of various sizes. A series of poly(styrene/divinyl benzene) particles with diameters in the range of 100 to 500 nm were synthesized and then carefully chemically treated using the sulfonation process, to increase their porosity. The particles were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), light scattering and PALS. Light scattering gave larger size for the treated particles, reflecting the hydration effect and therefore the increase in porosity. PALS spectra of untreated and treated particles gave four and three life-time components, respectively. Analysis by PAScual version 1.3.0 program indicated there was a reduction in the intensity and the type of the micropores in the treated particles. The data suggest PALS is a sensitive tool for detecting changes in microporosity in particles. The conflicting results obtained for light scattering compared to PALS for chemically treated particles is difficult to resolve and suggests sample preparation of polymeric materials for PALS is the critical factor.

  5. Porosity and mechanically optimized PLGA based in situ hardening systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegl, W; Marschall, V; Witting, M Y; Volkmer, E; Drosse, I; Leicht, U; Schieker, M; Wiggenhorn, M; Schaubhut, F; Zahler, S; Friess, W

    2012-11-01

    Goal of the present study was to develop and to characterize in situ-hardening, porous PLGA-based systems for their future application as bone grafting materials. Therefore, we investigated the precipitation behavior of formulations containing PLGA and a water-miscible solvent, DMSO, PEG 400, and NMP. To increase porosity, a pore forming agent (NaCMC) was added and to enhance mechanical properties of the system, an inorganic filler (α-TCP) was incorporated. The behavior upon contact with water and the influence of the prior addition of aqueous media on the morphology of the corresponding hardened implants were investigated. We proved cell-compatibility by live/dead assays for the hardened porous polymer/ceramic-composite scaffolds. The IsHS formulations can therefore be used to manufacture hardened scaffolds ex vivo by using molds with the desired shape and size. Cells were further successfully incorporated into the IsHS by precultivating the cells on the α-TCP-powder prior to their admixing to the formulation. However, cell viability could not be maintained due to toxicity of the tested solvents. But, the results demonstrate that in vivo cells should well penetrate, adhere, and proliferate in the hardened scaffolds. Consequently, we consider the in situ hardening system being an excellent candidate as a filling material for non-weight-bearing orthopedic indications, as the resulting properties of the hardened implant fulfill indication-specific needs like mechanical stability, elasticity, and porosity.

  6. Effect of Dihedral Angle and Porosity on Percolating-Sealing Capacity of Texturally Equilibrated Rock Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S.; Hesse, M. A.; Prodanovic, M.; Gardner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Salt deposits in sedimentary basins have long been considered to be a seal against fluid penetration. However, experimental, theoretical and field evidence suggests brine (and oil) can wet salt crystal surfaces at higher pressures and temperatures, which can form a percolating network. This network may act as flow conduits even at low porosities. The aim of this work is to investigate the effects of dihedral angle and porosity on the formation of percolating paths in different salt network lattices. However, previous studies considered only simple homogeneous and isotropic geometries. This work extends the analysis to realistic salt textures by presenting a novel numerical method to describe the texturally equilibrated pore shapes in polycrystalline rock salt and brine systems. First, a theoretical interfacial topology was formulated to minimize the interfacial surface between brine and salt. Then, the resulting nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations was solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Results show that the formation of connected fluid channels is more probable in lower dihedral angles and at higher porosities. The connectivity of the pore network is hysteretic, because the connection and disconnection at the pore throats for processes with increasing or decreasing porosities occur at different porosities. In porous media with anisotropic solids, pores initially connect in the direction of the shorter crystal axis and only at much higher porosities in the other directions. Consequently, even an infinitesimal elongation of the crystal shape can give rise to very strong anisotropy in permeability of the pore network. Also, fluid flow was simulated in the resulting pore network to calculate permeability, capillary entry pressure and velocity field. This work enabled us to investigate the opening of pore space and sealing capacity of rock salts. The obtained pore geometries determine a wide range of petrophysical properties such as permeability and

  7. The effect of porosity on performance of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Muhammet; Genc, Gamze; Elden, Gulsah; Yapici, Huseyin

    2016-03-01

    A polybenzimidazole (PBI) based polymer electrolyte fuel cells, which called high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEMS), operate at higher temperatures (120-200°C) than conventional PEM fuel cells. Although it is known that HT-PEMS have some of the significant advantages as non-humidification requirements for membrane and the lack of liquid water at high temperature in the fuel cell, the generated water as a result of oxygen reduction reaction causes in the degradation of these systems. The generated water absorbed into membrane side interacts with the hydrophilic PBI matrix and it can cause swelling of membrane, so water transport mechanism in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) needs to be well understood and water balance must be calculated in MEA. Therefore, the water diffusion transport across the electrolyte should be determined. In this study, various porosity values of gas diffusion layers are considered in order to investigate the effects of porosity on the water management for two phase flow in fuel cell. Two-dimensional fuel cell with interdigitated flow-field is modelled using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a software. The operating temperature and doping level is selected as 160°C and 6.75mol H3PO4/PBI, respectively.

  8. Wave propagation in a strongly heterogeneous elastic porous medium: Homogenization of Biot medium with double porosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Eduard; Naili, Salah; Nguyen, Vu-Hieu

    2016-08-01

    We study wave propagation in an elastic porous medium saturated with a compressible Newtonian fluid. The porous network is interconnected whereby the pores are characterized by two very different characteristic sizes. At the mesoscopic scale, the medium is described using the Biot model, characterized by a high contrast in the hydraulic permeability and anisotropic elasticity, whereas the contrast in the Biot coupling coefficient is only moderate. Fluid motion is governed by the Darcy flow model extended by inertia terms and by the mass conservation equation. The homogenization method based on the asymptotic analysis is used to obtain a macroscopic model. To respect the high contrast in the material properties, they are scaled by the small parameter, which is involved in the asymptotic analysis and characterized by the size of the heterogeneities. Using the estimates of wavelengths in the double-porosity networks, it is shown that the macroscopic descriptions depend on the contrast in the static permeability associated with pores and micropores and on the frequency. Moreover, the microflow in the double porosity is responsible for fading memory effects via the macroscopic poroviscoelastic constitutive law. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Effect of sinter layer porosity distribution on flow and temperature fields in a sinter cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jik-chang Leong; Kai-wun Jin; Jia-shyan Shiau; Tzer-ming Jeng; Chang-hsien Tai

    2009-01-01

    When sinters are filled into the sinter cooler from the sintering machine, it is commonly seen that, due to segregation ef-fects, sinters of larger size usually accumulate closer to the inner wall of the sinter cooler, whereas those of smaller size are to the outer wall. This nonuniform distribution of sinters has led to uneven cooling effect throughout the cooler. This causes the sinters leaving the cooler at a large temperature difference. This undesired temperature difference leads to the deformation and even the de-struction of the conveyors. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique was used in the present work to investigate the heat and fluid flow phenomena within the sinter cooler corresponding to the different distribution of sinter layer porosity, which was highly dependent on the arrangement and orientation of sinters within the sinter cooler. It is confirmed that a high mass flow rate within the sinter layer causes a low temperature region and vice versa. The flow fields for vertically reducing porosity distribution and random distribution are almost identical indicating the relative insignificance of convective heat transfer mechanism.

  10. The effect of porosity on performance of phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A polybenzimidazole (PBI based polymer electrolyte fuel cells, which called high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (HT-PEMS, operate at higher temperatures (120-200°C than conventional PEM fuel cells. Although it is known that HT-PEMS have some of the significant advantages as non-humidification requirements for membrane and the lack of liquid water at high temperature in the fuel cell, the generated water as a result of oxygen reduction reaction causes in the degradation of these systems. The generated water absorbed into membrane side interacts with the hydrophilic PBI matrix and it can cause swelling of membrane, so water transport mechanism in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA needs to be well understood and water balance must be calculated in MEA. Therefore, the water diffusion transport across the electrolyte should be determined. In this study, various porosity values of gas diffusion layers are considered in order to investigate the effects of porosity on the water management for two phase flow in fuel cell. Two-dimensional fuel cell with interdigitated flow-field is modelled using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a software. The operating temperature and doping level is selected as 160°C and 6.75mol H3PO4/PBI, respectively.

  11. Microstructure and porosity of Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, M. E.; Laurich, B.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mont Terri rock laboratory (Canton Jura, Switzerland) is an international scientific platform of research on radioactive waste disposal in Opalinus Clay and results provide input for assessing the feasibility and safety of deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in argillaceous formations [1]. A main safety issue is to accurately investigate mass transport rates. To date several methods analyzed bulk permeability and porosity of Opalinus Clay. However, detailed quantitative investigation of microstructure and pore morphology is necessary to understand sealing capacity, coupled flow, capillary processes and associated deformation. To produce high quality cross-sections without microstructural damage that enable investigation of microstructure and porosity down the nm scale a combination of Broad Ion Beam (BIB) milling and SEM imaging has been used [2]. This method allowed direct imaging of the clay fabric and porosity on ca. 1 mm2 areas. The lateral variability of Opalinus Clay is low on the regional scale [1], whereas vertically the Opalinus Clay can be subdivided into six different lithological subfacies [3] based on variable silt layers, sandstone layers and siderite concretions present, where the end-members are the Shaly and Sandy facies. In this contribution microstructures and pore space in Opalinus Clay from the undisturbed Shaly and Sandy facies are studied and compared to disturbed samples from the "Main fault" within the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The Shaly facies in the lower half of the sequence constitutes of dark grey silty calcerous shales and argillaceous marls, whereas the Sandy facies comprises silty to sandy marls with sandstone lenses cemented with carbonate [3]. The qualitative mineralogical composition of all Opalinus Clay facies is similar, whereas the "Main Fault" shows calcite, celestite and pyrite veins. Although the overall microfabric differs per layer and per facies we observe low variability of microstructure and porosity in

  12. Quantification of trapped gas redistribution in dual-porosity media with continuous and discontinuous domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snehota, Michal; Sacha, Jan; Jelinkova, Vladimira; Cislerova, Milena; Vontobel, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Nonwetting phase (residual air) is trapped in the porous media at water contents close to the saturation. Trapped gas phase resides in pores in form of bubbles, blobs or cluster forming residual gas saturation. In homogeneous soil media trapped gas is relatively stable until it is released upon porous media drainage. If porous media remain saturated, trapped gas can slowly dissolve in response to changed air solubility of surrounding water. In heterogeneous media, relatively rapid change in the trapped gas distribution can be observed soon after the gas is initially trapped during infiltration. It has been recently shown that the mass transfer of gas is directed from regions of fine porosity to regions of coarse porosity. The mass transfer was quantified by means of neutron tomography for the case of dual porosity sample under steady state flow. However the underlying mechanism of the gas mass transfer is still not clear. Based on the robust experience of visualization of the flow within heterogeneous samples, it seems that due to the huge local (microscopic) pressure gradients between contrasting pore radii the portion of faster flowing water becomes attracted into small pores of high capillary pressure. The process depends on the initial distribution of entrapped air which has to be considered as random in dependence on the history and circumstances of wetting/drying. In this study, the redistribution of trapped gas was quantitatively studied by 3D neutron imaging on samples composed of fine porous ceramic and coarse sand. The redistribution of water was studied under no-flow and steady state flow conditions. Two different inner geometries of the samples were developed. In the first case the low permeability regions (ceramics) were disconnected, while in the second structure, the fine porosity material was continuous from the top to the bottom of the sample. Quantitative 3D neutron tomography imaging revealed similar redistribution process in both cases of

  13. Mechanics of Apparent Horizon in Two Dimensional Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we give a definition of apparent horizon in a two dimensional general dilaton gravity theory. With this definition, we construct the mechanics of the apparent horizon by introducing a quasi-local energy of the theory. Our discussion generalizes the apparent horizons mechanics in general spherically symmetric spactimes in four or higher dimensions to the two dimensional dilaton gravity case.

  14. Relevance of Pore Structure and Diffusion-Accessible Porosity for Calcium-Bromide Diffusion in Na-Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    , and evaluate the implications for metal diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of solute charge for solute diffusion rates based on results from a calcium-bromide (CaBr2) through-diffusion experiment in Na-montmorillonite. In this experiment, dry, purified Na-montmorillonite (SWy-2, Clay Minerals Society) was packed into a diffusion cell, allowed to equilibrate with the background electrolyte (pH=7, I=0.1 M NaCl), and then exposed to a constant CaBr2 concentration gradient between two solution reservoirs. After reaching steady-state conditions for the diffusive fluxes of Ca and Br, cumulative mass data could be used to compute effective and apparent Ca and Br diffusion coefficients. Furthermore, the diffusion data for an uncharged, non-reactive tracer (tritiated water) allowed us to calculate the clay porosity in the system, and to determine Ca and Br sorption distribution coefficients (Kd values). Our results indicate that Ca diffusion in Na-montmorillonite is slower than for the non-reactive tracer, most likely due to Ca exchange reactions within the clay interlayers. In contrast, rates of Br diffusion are faster than for an uncharged tracer, indicating solute-specific differences in diffusion-accessible porosities and/or effective concentration gradients in pore spaces.

  15. On temporal and spatial distribution of seismic apparent stresses in Yunnan area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jia-zheng; QIAN Xiao-dong

    2006-01-01

    motion is applied to a detailed study on the temporal and spatial distribution of the seismic apparent stresses (σa)for the moderate and small earthquakes and two aftershock sequences in Yunnan area. The results show that there exists an obvious non-homogeneity for the seismic apparent stresses in the spatial distribution. The concentrated regions of the high apparent stresses are related to the active places of the moderate and small earthquakes. Before the Dayao M=6.2 earthquake, there was a period in which the apparent stresses were high and the value was 5times of the average value, 0.25 MPa. The relatively high values of apparent stresses distribute around the epicentral area of the major shock and nearby. It indicates that the variation characteristics of the apparent stresses can be taken as a new kind of criterion for the earthquake-risk forecast. Usually the ratio of the apparent stresses of the aftershock sequence σaA to the ones σaM of main shock is less than 1.0.

  16. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  17. Density, porosity and magnetic susceptibility of the Ko\\v{s}ice meteorite shower and homogeneity of its parent meteoroid

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, Tomáš; Tóth, Juraj; Husárik, Marek; Gritsevich, Maria; Britt, Daniel; Borovička, Jiří; Spurný, Pavel; Igaz, Antal; Svoreň, Ján; Kornoš, Leonard; Vereš, Peter; Koza, Július; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Világi, Jozef; Čapek, David; Krišandová, Zuzana; Tomko, Dušan; Šilha, Jiří; Schunová, Eva; Bodnárová, Marcela; Búzová, Diana; Krejčová, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    Bulk and grain density, porosity, and magnetic susceptibility of 67 individuals of Ko\\v{s}ice H chondrite fall were measured. The mean bulk and grain densities were determined to be 3.43 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ with standard deviation (s.d.) of 0.11 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ and 3.79 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ with s.d. 0.07 g/cm$^\\text{3}$, respectively. Porosity is in the range from 4.2 to 16.1%. The logarithm of the apparent magnetic susceptibility (in 10$^\\text{-9}$ m$^\\text{3}$/kg) shows narrow distribution from 5.17 to 5.49 with mean value at 5.35 with s.d. 0.08. These results indicate that all studied Ko\\v{s}ice meteorites are of the same composition down to ~g scale without presence of foreign (non-H) clasts and are similar to other H chondrites. Ko\\v{s}ice is thus a homogeneous meteorite fall derived from a homogeneous meteoroid.

  18. Effect of silica on porosity, strength, and toughness of pressureless sintered calcium phosphate-zirconia bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas C; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-08-12

    The preparation of dense, high-strength calcium phosphate-zirconia (CaP-ZrO2) composed bioceramics is realized via versatile pressureless sintering by adding silica nanoparticles. Two different weight ratios of HAp:ZrO2, 9:1 and 1:1, are used with varying silica contents from 5 to 20 wt%. After sintering at 1200 °C, the phase composition, microstructure, porosity, biaxial bending strength, and fracture toughness as well as SBF in vitro bioactivity are characterized. We show that the addition of silica altered the crystal phase composition, inhibiting the formation of non-favourable cubic ZrO2. Furthermore, SiO2 addition leads to an increase of the biaxial bending strength, and the fracture toughness of CaP-ZrO2-containing materials. With the addition of 20 wt% silica we find the highest characteristic strength (268 MPa) and toughness (2.3   ±   0.1 MPam(0.5)) at  <1% porosity. Both mechanical properties are 2 times higher than those of pure hydroxyapatite. At the same time we observe for the very same composition similar bioactivity to that of pure hydroxyapatite.

  19. Sol–gel synthesis of nanostructured indium tin oxide with controlled morphology and porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kőrösi, László, E-mail: ltkorosi@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632 Pécs (Hungary); Scarpellini, Alice [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Petrik, Péter [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Papp, Szilvia [Department of Biotechnology, Nanophage Therapy Center, Enviroinvest Corporation, Kertváros u. 2, H-7632 Pécs (Hungary); Dékány, Imre [MTA-SZTE Supramolecular and Nanostructured Materials Research Group, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 8, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline ITO thin films and powders were prepared by a sol–gel method. • The nature of the compounds used for hydrolysis plays a key role in the morphology. • Hydrolysis of In{sup 3+}/Sn{sup 4+} with EA led to a rod-like morphology. • Monodisperse spherical ITO nanoparticles were obtained on the use of AC. • ITO{sub E}A was highly porous, while ITO{sub A}C contained densely packed nanocrystals. - Abstract: Nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) powders and thin films differing in morphology and porosity were prepared by a sol–gel method. In{sup 3+} and Sn{sup 4+} were hydrolyzed in aqueous medium through the use of ethanolamine (EA) or sodium acetate (AC). X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrated that both EA and AC furnished indium tin hydroxide, which became nanocrystalline after aging for one day. The indium tin hydroxide samples calcined at 550 °C afforded ITO with a cubic crystal structure, but the morphology differed significantly, depending on the agent used for hydrolysis. Electron microscopy revealed the formation of round monodisperse nanoparticles when AC was used, whereas the application of EA led to rod-like ITO nanoparticles. Both types of nanoparticles were suitable for the preparation of transparent and conductive ITO thin films. The influence of the morphology and porosity on the optical properties is discussed.

  20. Suppression of ion-implantation induced porosity in germanium by a silicon dioxide capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan T.; Alkhaldi, Huda S.; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Pastor, David; Huston, Larissa Q.; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Aziz, Michael J.; Williams, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Ion implantation with high ion fluences is indispensable for successful use of germanium (Ge) in the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. However, Ge readily becomes porous after a moderate fluence implant ( ˜1 ×1015 ion cm-2 ) at room temperature, and for heavy ion species such as tin (Sn), holding the target at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature suppresses porosity formation only up to a fluence of 2 ×1016 ion cm-2 . We show, using stylus profilometry and electron microscopy, that a nanometer scale capping layer of silicon dioxide significantly suppresses the development of the porous structure in Ge during a S n - implant at a fluence of 4.5 ×1016 ion cm-2 at LN2 temperature. The significant loss of the implanted species through sputtering is also suppressed. The effectiveness of the capping layer in preventing porosity, as well as suppressing sputter removal of Ge, permits the attainment of an implanted Sn concentration in Ge of ˜15 at.% , which is about 2.5 times the maximum value previously attained. The crystallinity of the Ge-Sn layer following pulsed-laser-melting induced solidification is also greatly improved compared with that of uncapped material, thus opening up potential applications of the Ge-Sn alloy as a direct bandgap material fabricated by an ion beam synthesis technique.

  1. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Aliasghari, Sepideh; Němcová, Aneta; Burnett, Timothy L; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, George E; Skeldon, Peter; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-06

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is of increasing interest for the formation of ceramic coatings on metals for applications that require diverse coating properties, such as wear and corrosion resistance, low thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Porosity in the coatings can have an important impact on the coating performance. However, the quantification of the porosity in coatings can be difficult due to the wide range of pore sizes and the complexity of the coating morphology. In this work, a PEO coating formed on titanium is examined using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). The observations are validated by comparisons of surface views and cross-sectional views of specific coating features obtained using X-ray CT and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray CT technique is shown to be capable of resolving pores with volumes of at least 6 μm(3). Furthermore, the shapes of large pores are revealed and a correlation is demonstrated between the locations of the pores, nodules on the coating surface, and depressions in the titanium substrate. The locations and morphologies of the pores, which constitute 5.7% of the coating volume, indicate that they are generated by release of oxygen gas from the molten coating.

  2. Investigation of surface porosity measurements and compaction pressure as means to ensure consistent contact angle determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, René; Borkenfelt, Simon; Allesø, Morten; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Beato, Stefania; Holm, Per

    2016-02-10

    Compounds wettability is critical for a number of central processes including disintegration, dispersion, solubilisation and dissolution. It is therefore an important optimisation parameter both in drug discovery but also as guidance for formulation selection and optimisation. Wettability for a compound is determined by its contact angle to a liquid, which in the present study was measured using the sessile drop method applied to a disc compact of the compound. Precise determination of the contact angle is important should it be used to either rank compounds or selected excipients to e.g. increase the wetting from a solid dosage form. Since surface roughness of the compact has been suggested to influence the measurement this study investigated if the surface quality, in terms of surface porosity, had an influence on the measured contact angle. A correlation to surface porosity was observed, however for six out of seven compounds similar results were obtained by applying a standard pressure (866 MPa) to the discs in their preparation. The data presented in the present work therefore suggest that a constant high pressure should be sufficient for most compounds when determining the contact angle. Only for special cases where compounds have poor compressibility would there be a need for a surface-quality-control step before the contact angle determination.

  3. Influence of coal preoxidation on the porosity of the activated carbons with steam activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuwen; Gao, Jihui; Sun, Fei; Li, Yang; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Activated carbons have been prepared from a low ash content anthracite preoxidized in air to different degrees. Steam has been used as activating agent to prepare different burn-off samples. The preoxidation effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the resulting chars and activated carbons were comparatively studied. The surface area and porosity of sample was studied by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 0A0;K. The results show that introduced oxygen in coal structure had a great influence on the carbonization and subsequent activation process. The carbonization of oxidized coal exhibited a broader volatile evolution with respect to temperature, and the resulting chars had a larger microporosity. The porosity of the char is a primary foundation to develop more microporosity upon activation. Activation of char from oxidized coal facilitated development of small scale micropore, however, the micropore widening was also observed at high burn-offs. Compared with development of supermicropore, the evolution of mesoporosity is hindered strongly by preoxidation treatment. The quantity of basic surface sites in activated carbons increased with an increase in oxidation degree, while the quantity of acidic sites appeared equivalent. It seemed that the amount of surface groups and the microporosity mainly developed in a parallel way.

  4. Apparent nitrogen digestibility data: AACC-ASTM collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happich, M L; Bodwell, C E; Hackler, L R; Phillips, J G; Derse, P H; Elliott, J G; Hopkins, D T; Parsons, G F; Prescher, E E; Robaidek, E S

    1984-01-01

    Apparent nitrogen digestibility data were obtained from 4 laboratories for 6 protein sources and 2 diet levels, 6 and 10% protein, after a 2-day adaptation period during the AACC-ASTM protein efficiency ratio (PER) and net protein ratio (NPR) collaborative studies. For 5 protein sources fed as 10% of the diet, the interlaboratory variation as measured by coefficient of variation (CV) values was low (1.5-3.5%), indicating high precision of the method. Wheat flour (6% protein diet) had the highest variation and, therefore, the lowest precision (CV of 7.10%). The interlaboratory variation (CV value) for 3 of the 4 laboratories was considerably lower, less than half that for the 4 laboratories. An analysis of variance of apparent nitrogen digestibility data indicated significant (P less than 0.05) effects for the 4-laboratory group due to laboratories and protein diets at both 10 and 6% protein levels, and for the 3-laboratory group at the 10% protein level. The 3-laboratory ANOVA for the 6% diets indicated a significant effect (P less than 0.05) due to diet only.

  5. Fabrication and Mechanical Characterisation of Titanium Lattices with Graded Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William van Grunsven

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Electron Beam Melting (EBM is an Additive Manufacturing technique which can be used to fabricate complex structures from alloys such as Ti6Al4V, for example for orthopaedic applications. Here we describe the use of EBM for the fabrication of a novel Ti6Al4V structure of a regular diamond lattice incorporating graded porosity, achieved via changes in the strut cross section thickness. Scanning Electron Microscopy and micro computed tomography analysis confirmed that generally EBM reproduced the CAD design of the lattice well, although at smaller strut sizes the fabricated lattice produced thicker struts than the model. Mechanical characterisation of the lattice in uniaxial compression showed that its behaviour under compression along the direction of gradation can be predicted to good accuracy with a simple rule of mixtures approach, knowing the properties and the behaviour of its constituent layers.

  6. Matrix-fracture interactions in dual porosity simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shook, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for simulating flow in fractured media is presented which uses a truncated version of the analytical solution to resolve pressure transients in the rock matrix. The point at which the series solution may be truncated is a known function of the problem, and may therefore be readily determined. Furthermore, the functional form of the method is essentially dimension-independent, and implementation of the method requires only minimal modification to an existing dual porosity simulator. Three test cases are presented comparing results from fine grid simulations, Warren and Root simulations, and the new formulation. In each of the three cases presented, excellent agreement with the fine grid simulations is obtained using the new method. The W&R formulation exhibits excessive error throughout the simulated time, first underpredicting outflow rates, and then overpredicting rates. The error using the W&R formulation is largest for 3-D fracture networks, but is large for all cases tested.

  7. Influence of porosity on thermophysical properties of a composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishaeva, N. Yu., E-mail: anohina@mail2000.ru; Ljukshin, B. A., E-mail: lba2008@yandex.ru; Bochkareva, S. A., E-mail: svetlanab7@yandex.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Strukov, Yu. S., E-mail: regent@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    In many modern information systems, the heat generated during the operation of electronic devices is usually dissipated by heat-conductive pads between the casing of the respective equipment and a massive base (platform). For newly developed pads, the promising materials are composites on the basis of various types of silicone rubber. At the same time, during the production of the pads without a vacuum setup, the material can contain air bubbles, which causes the porosity potentially negative for the thermal properties of the material. This work studies the thermal conductivity depending on the degree of silicone matrix filling by copper particles, introduced to improve thermal conductivity, and by air bubbles that are considered as reinforcing inclusions.

  8. Fabrication of slag-glass composite with controlled porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Adziski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and performance of porous ceramics made from waste materials were investigated. Slag from thermal electrical plant Kakanj (Bosnia and Herzegovina with defined granulations: (0.500÷0.250 mm; (0.250÷0.125 mm; (0.125÷0.063 mm; (0.063÷0.045 mm and 20/10 wt.% of the waste TV screen glass with a granulation <0.063 mm were used for obtaining slag-glass composites with controlled porosity. The one produced from the slag powder fraction (0.125÷0.063 mm and 20 wt.% TV screen glass, sintered at 950°C/2h, was considered as the optimal. This system possesses open porosity of 26.8±1.0%, and interconnected pores with the size of 250–400 μm. The values of E-modulus and bending strength of this composite were 10.6±0.6 GPa and 45.7±0.7 MPa, respectively. The coefficient of thermal expansion was 8.47·10-6/°C. The mass loss in 0.1M HCl solution after 30 days was 1.2 wt.%. The permeability and the form coefficient of the porous composite were K0=0.12 Da and C0=4.53·105 m-1, respectively. The porous composite shows great potential to be used as filters, diffusers for water aeration, dust collectors, acoustic absorbers, etc.

  9. Controlled ceramic porosity and membrane fabrication via alumoxane nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher Daniel

    Carboxylate-alumoxanes, [Al(O)x(OH)y(O2CR) z]n, are organic substituted alumina nano-particles synthesized from boehmite in aqueous solution which are an inexpensive and environmentally-benign precursor for the fabrication of aluminum based ceramic bodies. The carboxylate-ligand on the alumoxane determines the morphology and the porosity of the derived alumina. Investigations of A-, MA-, MEA-, and MEEA-alumoxanes, were undertaken to determine the effects of these organic peripheries on the properties of the alumina at different sintering temperatures including the morphology, surface area, pore volume, pore size, pore size distribution, and crystal phase. The effects of physically or chemically mixing different carboxylate-alumoxanes were also investigated. The alumina derived from the thermolysis of the carboxylate-alumoxanes exhibits small pore diameters and narrow pore size distributions that are desirable for use in ceramic ultrafiltration membranes. In addition, it is possible to form alumina membranes with a range of pore sizes and porosity by changing the organic periphery. This lead to investigating the ability to produce asymmetric alumina filters with characteristics that at the lower end of the ultrafiltration range. The flux, permeability, molecular weight cut-off, roughness, and wettability of the asymmetric alumina membranes derived from carboxylate-alumoxanes are determined. Comparisons of these filters are made with commercially available filters. The ability to dope carboxylate-alumoxanes via a transmetallation reaction followed by thermolysis has previously shown to result in catalytically active alumina based materials. This lead to investigations into forming catalytically active membranes. Dip-coating aqueous solutions of the doped carboxylate-alumoxanes onto porous alumina supports, followed by thermolysis, resulted in the formation of doped-alumina asymmetric filters. In addition, a novel method to form surface-modified carboxylate

  10. Estimation of porosity in thin-layered reservoirs by seismic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Nanqun; Reynolds, A.C. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An effective method is presented to determine porosity distributions from seismic data for cases where the reservoir layers are thin. Porosity is determined by solving the inverse problem using a constrained generalized linear inversion (GLI) procedure. The inversion procedure estimates porosities directly rather than inverting for acoustic impedance or velocities and then estimating porosities. It is shown that sensitivity coefficients for porosity, i.e., the derivative of amplitudes with respect to porosity, can be computed analytically. Artificial interfaces are used to reduce non-uniquiness caused by lack of knowledge of thin bed reflection times. The artificial interfaces are generated by integration of seismic with log data. By using the artificial interfaces, the number of parameters to be estimated can be reduced and known formation information can be added as constraints. Inversion is done on only the seismic record associated with the reservoir instead of the whole seismic record.

  11. Numerical Modeling of the Coagulation and Porosity Evolution of Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2009-01-01

    Porosity evolution of dust aggregates is crucial in understanding dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. In this study, we present useful tools to study the coagulation and porosity evolution of dust aggregates. First, we present a new numerical method for simulating dust coagulation and porosity evolution as an extension of the conventional Smoluchowski equation. This method follows the evolution of the mean porosity for each aggregate mass simultaneously with the evolution of the mass distribution function. This method reproduces the results of previous Monte Carlo simulations with much less computational expense. Second, we propose a new collision model for porous dust aggregates on the basis of our N-body experiments on aggregate collisions. We first obtain empirical data on porosity changes between the classical limits of ballistic cluster-cluster and particle-cluster aggregation. Using the data, we construct a recipe for the porosity change due to general hit-and-stick collisions as well as formulae fo...

  12. The Effect of Oil and Filer Contents on the Porosity of Lead Acid Battery Separators Produced From Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyad Rafa'a Zair

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation a high density polyethylene (HDPE was used as a substitute to polyvinylchloride in the production of lead acid battery separators. This has been achieved by preparing mixtures of different percentages of the feed materials which include a high density polyethylene (HDPE locally produced, filler materials such as silica and oils such as dioctylphthalate (DOP or paraffin which were added to the mixture to improve the final properties of the separator. The materials were compounded by two roll-mills under the same conditions. The following parameters are involved: 1- Studying the use of a high density polyethylene as a binder to film components with (15-30 wt.%. 2- Studying the use of finely divided silica sand with (25-45 wt.% as a medium to oil adsorption.- Studying the use of two type plasticizers (Paraffin or DOP with (35-55 wt. %. as a creative medium to films porosity.The best results of the feed materials in the mixture were selected so as to give the highest porosity using 15 wt. % PE, 30 wt. % filler, and 55 wt. % oil. It has been found that the films with DOP oil give higher porosity.

  13. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  14. Hypercholesterolemia among apparently healthy university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawar, Said M; Al-Bati, Neda A; Al-Mahameed, Ali; Nagalla, Das S; Obeidat, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    Hypercholesterolemia (HC) is a major risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Serum cholesterol is directly related to complications and mortalities associated with heart diseases. There are a few studies that describe HC among youths in the Arab Gulf countries. We sought to evaluate HC among young healthy university students to assess their risk of developing CHD. Lipid profile of 166 students between the ages of 16-30 years (Mean: 20.49±2.96) were examined and blood glucose, total protein, albumin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and the inflammation marker high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) were determined. Each volunteer filled a questionnaire about her/his lifestyle and personal and family medical histories and height and weight were measured to determine body mass index (BMI). The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Chi-Square was used to determine the relation between categorical variables. A p-value students were identified with primary hypercholesterolemia (PHC) in the first testing round. After proper health counseling, the same tests were repeated after 2-3 weeks in all 44 hypercholesterolemic students. We found only 26 (15.6%) of them to be hypercholesterolemic. There was a significant relation between high total cholesterol (TC) and high TC/HDLC, as well as high or very high hsCRP and high TC/HDLC (both, pFamily history of CHD was found in 8 students and obesity was recorded in 5 volunteers. The results necessitate further studies in determining the cause of PHC. We predict a genetic element contributing to the high percentage of PHC in the current study.

  15. Hypercholesterolemia Among Apparently Healthy University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said M. Shawar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypercholesterolemia (HC is a major risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease (CHD. Serum cholesterol is directly related to complications and mortalities associated with heart diseases. There are a few studies that describe HC among youths in the Arab Gulf countries. We sought to evaluate HC among young healthy university students to assess their risk of developing CHD.Methods: Lipid profile of 166 students between the ages of 16-30 years (Mean: 20.49±2.96 were examined and blood glucose, total protein, albumin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH and the inflammation marker high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP were determined. Each volunteer filled a questionnaire about her/his lifestyle and personal and family medical histories and height and weight were measured to determine body mass index (BMI. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Chi-Square was used to determine the relation between categorical variables. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: According to the American Heart Association criteria, 44 (26.5% students were identified with primary hypercholesterolemia (PHC in the first testing round. After proper health counseling, the same tests were repeated after 2-3 weeks in all 44 hypercholesterolemic students. We found only 26 (15.6% of them to be hypercholesterolemic. There was a significant relation between high total cholesterol (TC and high TC/HDLC, as well as high or very high hsCRP and high TC/HDLC (both, p<0.001. Males tend to have higher TC/HDLC and hsCRP than females (both p0.002 and 0.005, respectively. Family history of CHD was found in 8 students and obesity was recorded in 5 volunteers.Conclusion: The results necessitate further studies in determining the cause of PHC. We predict a genetic element contributing to the high percentage of PHC in the current study.

  16. Linking air and water transport in intact soils to macro-porosity by combining laboratory measurements and X-ray Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per

    with air permeability and 5% arrival time. Even in the same field high variability in air permeability, ranging from 4.66 to 78.10 µm2, and 5% arrival time of tracer (0.07 to 2.36 h) were observed between the samples. Both air permeability and 5% arrival time of tracer were strongly correlated with macro-porosity...... (R2 = 0.80 for air permeability: R2= 0.61 for 5% arrival time) and macro-porosity of the restricting layer (R2=0.83 for air permeability: R2= 0.71 for 5% arrival time) over air-filled porosity and all the correlations were positive. The high positive correlation these air and water transport...... functions with macro-porosity stressed the importance of continuity and tortuosity of pores in air, water and solute flow and transport through the soils. Negative correlations of air permeability, 5% arrival time of tracer and macro-porosity were obtained with bulk density whereas with other soil physical...

  17. Matrix diffusion coefficients in volcanic rocks at the Nevada test site: Influence of matrix porosity, matrix permeability, and fracture coating minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, Paul W.; Callahan, Timothy J.; Ware, S. Doug; Haga, Marc J.; Counce, Dale A.

    2007-08-01

    Diffusion cell experiments were conducted to measure nonsorbing solute matrix diffusion coefficients in forty-seven different volcanic rock matrix samples from eight different locations (with multiple depth intervals represented at several locations) at the Nevada Test Site. The solutes used in the experiments included bromide, iodide, pentafluorobenzoate (PFBA), and tritiated water ( 3HHO). The porosity and saturated permeability of most of the diffusion cell samples were measured to evaluate the correlation of these two variables with tracer matrix diffusion coefficients divided by the free-water diffusion coefficient ( Dm/ D*). To investigate the influence of fracture coating minerals on matrix diffusion, ten of the diffusion cells represented paired samples from the same depth interval in which one sample contained a fracture surface with mineral coatings and the other sample consisted of only pure matrix. The log of ( Dm/ D*) was found to be positively correlated with both the matrix porosity and the log of matrix permeability. A multiple linear regression analysis indicated that both parameters contributed significantly to the regression at the 95% confidence level. However, the log of the matrix diffusion coefficient was more highly-correlated with the log of matrix permeability than with matrix porosity, which suggests that matrix diffusion coefficients, like matrix permeabilities, have a greater dependence on the interconnectedness of matrix porosity than on the matrix porosity itself. The regression equation for the volcanic rocks was found to provide satisfactory predictions of log( Dm/ D*) for other types of rocks with similar ranges of matrix porosity and permeability as the volcanic rocks, but it did a poorer job predicting log( Dm/ D*) for rocks with lower porosities and/or permeabilities. The presence of mineral coatings on fracture walls did not appear to have a significant effect on matrix diffusion in the ten paired diffusion cell experiments.

  18. Relationship between micro-porosity and tensile properties of 6063 alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Li Xiehua; He Lizi; Zhu Pei

    2013-01-01

    The micro-porosity is usually present in the as-cast microstructure, which decreases the tensile strength and ductility and therefore limit the application of cast aluminum parts. Although much work has been done to investigate the effects of various casting parameters on the formation of porosity in various aluminum alloys, up to now, little information has been available for the relationship between micro-porosity and tensile properties of 6063 alloy. In this study, the influences of size a...

  19. Identification of Stress Change Within a Rock Mass Through Apparent Stress of Local Seismic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura; Hudyma, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Mine blasting produces excavation geometry changes which induce stress change that can be observed in the seismic source parameter apparent stress calculated for local seismic events. Using high apparent stress as a proxy for increasing stress within a rock mass, areas experiencing increases in the local stress conditions can be determined. This paper presents the use of apparent stress of seismic events to identify areas within a rock mass experiencing local stress change. Examples from a deep Canadian mine, operating in excess of 2900 m below surface, are provided.

  20. SNR dependence of optimal parameters for apparent diffusion coefficient measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Emine U; Lee, Jin H; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2011-02-01

    Optimizing the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) parameters (i.e., the b-value and the number of image averages) to the tissue of interest is essential for producing high-quality apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Previous investigation of this optimization was performed assuming Gaussian noise statistics for the ADC map, which is only valid for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) imaging. In this work, the true statistics of the noise in ADC maps are derived, followed by an optimization of the DWI parameters as a function of the imaging SNR. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the optimum b-value is a monotonically increasing function of the imaging SNR, which converges to the optimum b-value from previously proposed approaches for high-SNR cases, while exhibiting a significant deviation from this asymptote for low-SNR situations. Incorporating the effects of T(2) weighting further increases the SNR dependence of the optimal parameters. The proposed optimization scheme is particularly important for high-resolution DWI, which intrinsically suffers from low SNR and therefore cannot afford the use of the conventional high b-values. Comparison scans were performed for high-resolution DWI of the spinal cord, demonstrating the improvements in the resulting images and the ADC maps achieved by this method.

  1. Simulation of the impact of 3-D porosity distribution in metallic U-10Zr fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Di; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Stan, Marius; Bauer, Theodore H.; Wright, Arthur E.

    2014-05-01

    Evolution of porosity generated in metallic U-Zr fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactors leads to changes in fuel properties and impacts important phenomena such as heat transport and constituent redistribution. The porosity is generated as a result of the accumulation of fission gases and is affected by the possible bond sodium infiltration into the fuel. Typically, the impact of porosity development on properties, such as thermal conductivity, is accounted for through empirical correlations that are dependent on porosity and infiltrated sodium fractions. Currently available simulation tools make it possible to take into account fuel 3-D porosity distributions, potentially eliminating the need for such correlations. This development allows for a more realistic representation of the porosity evolution in metallic fuel and creates a framework for truly mechanistic fuel development models. In this work, COMSOL multi-physics simulation platform is used to model 3-D porosity distributions and simulate heat transport in metallic U-10Zr fuel. Available experimental data regarding microstructural evolution of fuel that was irradiated in EBR-II and associated phase stability information are used to guide the simulation. The impact of changes in porosity characteristics on material properties is estimated and the results are compared with calculated temperature distributions. The simulations demonstrate the developed capability and importance of accounting for detailed porosity distribution features for accurate fuel performance evaluation.

  2. Spatial Distribution of the Increased Porosity of Cement Paste due to Calcium Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Keshu; LI Lin; XU Qiong; SUN Wei

    2015-01-01

    Using the tomography image, a method to characterize the 3D spatial distributions of increased porosity was proposed, and the increased porosity distributions of cement pastes with different leaching degrees were given using the current method. The leaching processes of CH/C-S-H and the contribution of CH/C-S-H leaching to porosity evolution were discussed. The proposed method can be applied to all cement-based materials with any leaching degrees. From the quantitative increased porosity results, we ifnd that the CH leaching ifnished quickly on the sharp CH leaching front.

  3. Response of Swimming Paramecia to in situ changes in their apparent weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ilyong; Mickalide, Harry; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2012-02-01

    There is a class of marine micro-organisms that are small enough that low Reynold's number hydrodynamics dictates their swimming mechanics and large enough that the force of gravity exerts a noticeable influence on their motion. Experiments on populations of paramecia suggest that they exert a greater propulsion when swimming against gravity. This negative gravi-kinesis is surprising because it suggests that they sense their tiny apparent weight of about 80 pN. To understand this response in more detail, we are investigating how individual paramecia caudatum change their swimming speed and helical trajectories in response to changes in their apparent weight. We vary the apparent weight with the technique of Magnetic Force Buoyancy Variation employing a high field resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. We will present analysis of the swimming for apparent weight changes as large as a factor of 8.

  4. Influence of porosity on electrical properties of low-k dielectrics irradiated with vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, F. A.; Nguyen, H. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; de Marneffe, J. F.; Li, W.; Pei, D.; Benjamin, D. I.; Zheng, H.; King, S. W.; Lin, Y.-H.; Fung, H.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are exposed to high levels of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted from the plasma. The porous structure of these materials makes them more sensitive to modification because of their low density and consequently deep penetration of active species into the film. Here, we investigate the changes to electrical properties of porous low-k dielectrics as a function of porosity after VUV irradiation. Organosilicate low-k films of porosities between 30% and 50% were exposed to synchrotron VUV radiation at 8 eV with a fluence of approximately 5 × 1014 photons/cm2. Capacitance-voltage measurements showed an increase in the dielectric constant along with a flat-band voltage shift. FTIR results show methyl depletion as well as water uptake after VUV treatment. These show that deterioration of the electrical properties after VUV exposure and the degree of damage are found to be higher for the more porous films.

  5. Identifying the optimal HVOF spray parameters to attain minimum porosity and maximum hardness in iron based amorphous metallic coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vignesh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flow based Erosion – corrosion problems are very common in fluid handling equipments such as propellers, impellers, pumps in warships, submarine. Though there are many coating materials available to combat erosion–corrosion damage in the above components, iron based amorphous coatings are considered to be more effective to combat erosion–corrosion problems. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF spray process is considered to be a better process to coat the iron based amorphous powders. In this investigation, iron based amorphous metallic coating was developed on 316 stainless steel substrate using HVOF spray technique. Empirical relationships were developed to predict the porosity and micro hardness of iron based amorphous coating incorporating HVOF spray parameters such as oxygen flow rate, fuel flow rate, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spray distance. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to identify the optimal HVOF spray parameters to attain coating with minimum porosity and maximum hardness.

  6. A theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage of bone cement: A potential major source of porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Hasenwinkel, J M; Wixson, R L; Lautenschlager, E P

    2000-10-01

    A theoretical basis for understanding polymerization shrinkage of bone cement is presented based on density changes in converting monomer to polymer. Also, an experimental method, based on dilatometry and the Archimedes' principle is presented for highly precise and accurate measurement of unconstrained volumetric shrinkage of bone cement. Furthermore, a theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage in a constrained deformational state is presented to demonstrate that porosity can develop due to shrinkage. Six bone-cement conditions (Simplex-Ptrade mark vacuum and hand mixed, Endurancetrade mark vacuum mixed, and three two-solution experimental bone cements with higher initial monomer levels) were tested for volumetric shrinkage. It was found that shrinkage varied statistically (ptheory that they are the result of shrinkage. The results of this study show that shrinkage of bone cement under certain constrained conditions may result in the development of porosity at the implant-bone cement interface and elsewhere in the polymerizing cement mantle.

  7. Diagenesis in porosity evolution of opening-mode fractures, Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic La Boca Formation, NE Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Stephen E.; Ward, Meghan E.

    2006-06-01

    Opening-mode fractures (joints) in Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic La Boca Formation sandstones, northeastern Mexico, have patterns of fracture porosity, mineral-fill structures, and size distributions not previously described from outcrop. Patterns match those found in cores from many basins. We used aperture measurements along lines of observation (scanlines), fracture-trace maps, petrography, high-resolution scanning-electron-microscope-(SEM)-based cathodoluminescence, and fluid inclusions to characterize fracture populations. Open fractures are lined by quartz that precipitated while fractures were opening, whereas sealed fractures additionally contain calcite deposited after fractures ceased opening. Large fractures and arrays of contemporaneous microfractures have consistent power-law aperture-size scaling over approximately three orders of magnitude. Our results imply that open fractures and fracture sizes depend on diagenetic state. The interplay of fracture mechanics and diagenetic history is a determinant on effective porosity within fractures and, thus, open fracture persistence, connectivity, and fluid flow.

  8. Porosity evolution at the brittle-ductile transition in the continental crust: Implications for deep hydro-geothermal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violay, M; Heap, M J; Acosta, M; Madonna, C

    2017-08-09

    Recently, projects have been proposed to engineer deep geothermal reservoirs in the ductile crust. To examine their feasibility, we performed high-temperature (up to 1000 °C), high-pressure (130 MPa) triaxial experiments on granite (initially-intact and shock-cooled samples) in which we measured the evolution of porosity during deformation. Mechanical data and post-mortem microstuctural characterisation (X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy) indicate that (1) the failure mode was brittle up to 900 °C (shear fracture formation) but ductile at 1000 °C (no strain localisation); (2) only deformation up to 800 °C was dilatant; (3) deformation at 900 °C was brittle but associated with net compaction due to an increase in the efficiency of crystal plastic processes; (4) ductile deformation at 1000 °C was compactant; (5) thermally-shocking the granite did not influence strength or failure mode. Our data show that, while brittle behaviour increases porosity, porosity loss is associated with both ductile behaviour and transitional behaviour as the failure mode evolves from brittle to ductile. Extrapolating our data to geological strain rates suggests that the brittle-ductile transition occurs at a temperature of 400 ± 100 °C, and is associated with the limit of fluid circulation in the deep continental crust.

  9. Characterization of porosity in a 19th century painting ground by synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Claire [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland); Bern University of the Arts, Bern (Switzerland); Boon, Jaap J. [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland); JAAP Enterprise for MOLART Advice, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Marone, Federica [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source (SLS), Villigen (Switzerland); Ferreira, Ester S.B. [Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA), Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    The study of the early oeuvre of the Swiss painter Cuno Amiet (1868-1961) has revealed that, up to 1907, many of his grounds were hand applied and are mainly composed of chalk, bound in protein. These grounds are not only lean and absorbent, but also, as Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography has shown, porous. Our approach to the characterization of pore structure and quantity, their connectivity, and homogeneity is based on image segmentation and application of a clustering algorithm to high-resolution X-ray tomographic data. The issues associated with the segmentation of the different components of a ground sample based on X-ray imaging data are discussed. The approach applied to a sample taken from ''Portrait of Max Leu'' (1899) by Amiet revealed the presence of three sublayers within the ground with distinct porosity features, which had not been observed optically in cross-section. The upper and lower layers are highly porous with important connectivity and thus prone to water uptake/storage. The middle layer however shows low and nonconnected porosity at the resolution level of the X-ray tomography images, so that few direct water absorption paths through the entire sample exist. The potential of the method to characterize porosity and to understand moisture-related issues in paint layer degradation are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Mechanical behaviour of dacite from Mount St. Helens (USA): A link between porosity and lava dome extrusion mechanism (dome or spine)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    There is a rich diversity in lava dome morphology, from blocky domes and lobes to imposing spine and whaleback structures. The latter extrude via seismically active, gouge-rich conduit-margin faults, a manifestation of a brittle failure mode. Brittle versus ductile behaviour in volcanic rocks is known to be porosity dependent, and therefore offers a tantalising link between the properties of the material near the conduit margin and the extrusion mechanism (dome or spine). We test this hypothesis by complementing published data on the mechanical behaviour of dacites from the 2004-2008 spine-forming eruption at Mount St. Helens (MSH) with new data on dacite lavas collected from the 1980 dome. The 1980 dacite samples were deformed at room temperature under a range of pressures (i.e., depths) to investigate their mechanical behaviour and failure mode (brittle or ductile). Low-porosity dacite (porosity 0.19) is brittle up to an effective pressure of 30 MPa (depth 1 km) and is ductile at 40 MPa (depth 1.5 km). High-porosity dacite (porosity 0.32) is ductile above an effective pressure of 5 MPa (depth 200 m). Samples deformed in the brittle regime show well-developed ( 1 mm) shear fracture zones comprising broken glass and crystal fragments. Samples deformed in the ductile regime feature anastomosing bands of collapsed pores. The combined dataset is used to explore the influence of strain rate, temperature, and porosity on the mechanical behaviour and failure mode of dacite. A decrease in strain rate does not influence the strength of dacite at low temperature, but reduces strength at high temperature (850 °C). Due to the extremely low glass content of these materials, such weakening is attributed to the increased efficiency of subcritical crack growth at high temperature. However, when strain rate is kept constant, temperature does not significant impact strength reflecting the highly crystallised nature of dacite from MSH. Dacite from the 2004-2008 eruption is stronger

  11. Contributions to the study of porosity in fly ash-based geopolymers. Relationship between degree of reaction, porosity and compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luna-Galiano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of this paper relates to the development of a systematic study involving a set of parameters which could potentially have an impact on geopolymer properties: curing temperature, type of activating solution, alkali metal in solution, incorporation of slag (Ca source and type of slag used. The microstructures, degrees of reaction, porosities and compressive strengths of geopolymers have been evaluated. Geopolymers prepared with soluble silicate presented a more compacted and closed structure, a larger amount of gel, lower porosity and greater compressive strength than those prepared with hydroxides. On the other hand, Na-geopolymers were more porous but more resistant than K-geopolymers. Although there is an inverse relation between degree of reaction and porosity, between compressive strength and porosity it is not always inversely proportional and could, in some cases, be masked by changes produced in other influencing parameters.

  12. All-time Apparent Vertical Conductance Interpretation for CLTEM and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanLiangjun; HuWenbao; Xushizhe; LuYi

    2003-01-01

    This paper is based on the transient electromagnetic theory of a thin sheet. The induced EMF formula (as a function of vertical conductance and depth in the central loop transient electromagnetic method) was derived by using the reciprocation law and the formula from the electrical component of EMF induced by a magnetic dipole source over a thin sheet. At the same time, the inversion algorithm of all-time apparent vertical conductance and apparent depth was derived by using the induced EMF and its first derivative. In the transition area there is no distortion for the calculated apparent vertical conductance curve. The location where the curves slope was changing corresponds to an electric interface of the layer. This is because the curve of the slope is directly proportional to the conductivity. Comparing the shapes of the neighboring curves in the same section line, the interfaces of the same layer can be continuously traced, resulting in a high quality CLTEM get-electric section. Theoretical testing with two models shows that the curves of all-time apparent vertical conductance represents the electric property of each layer and its variation. Finally, the authors show application examples of apparent vertical conductance interpretation. The mapped apparent vertical conductance section has fine electric division from the inversion algorithm and is in good co-herence with the inverted resistivity section. This demonstrates that the interpretation method of all-time apparent vertical conductance is feasible and effective

  13. Determination of porosity and facies trends in a complex carbonate reservoir, by using 3-D seismic, borehole tools, and outcrop geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharakis, T.G. Jr.; Comet, J.N.; Murillo, A.A. [Respol Exploracion, S.A., Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Mesozoic carbonate reservoirs are found in the Mediterranean Sea, off the east coast of Spain. A wide variation of porosities are found in the core samples and logs: vuggy, breccia, fractures, and cavern porosity. In addition, complex Tertiary carbonate geometries include olistostromes, breccia bodies, and reef buildups, which are found on top of Mesozoic carbonates. Predicting the porosity trends within these oil productive reservoirs requires an understanding of how primary porosity was further enhanced by secondary processes, including fractures, karstification, and dolomitization in burial conditions. Through an extensive investigation of field histories, outcrop geology, and seismic data, a series of basic reservoir styles have been identified and characterized by well log signature and seismic response. The distribution pattern of the different reservoirs styles is highly heterogeneous, but by integrating subsurface data and outcrop analogs, it is possible to distinguish field-scale and local patterns of both vertical and local variations in reservoir properties. Finally, it is important to quantify these reservoir properties through the study of seismic attributes, such as amplitude variations, and log responses at the reservoir interval. By incorporating 3-D seismic data, through the use of seismic inversion, it is possible to predict porosity trends. Further, the use of geostatistics can lead to the prediction of reservoir development within the carbonate facies.

  14. OBSERVATION AND ANALYSIS OF A PRONOUNCED PERMEABILITY AND POROSITY SCALE-EFFECT IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED TUFF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. VESSELINOV; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Over 270 single-hole (Guzman et al., 1996) and 44 cross-hole pneumatic injection tests (Illman et al., 1998; Illman, 1999) have been conducted at the Apache Leap Research Site (ALRS) near Superior, Arizona. They have shown that the pneumatic pressure behavior of fractured tuff at the site is amenable to analysis by methods which treat the rock as a continuum on scales ranging from meters to tens of meters, and that this continuum is representative primarily of interconnected fractures. Both the single-hole and cross-hole test results are free of skin effect. Single-hole tests have yielded estimates of air permeability at various locations throughout the tested rock volume, on a nominal support scale of about 1 m. The corresponding log permeability data exhibit spatial behavior characteristic of a random fractal and yield a kriged estimate of how these 1-m scale log permeabilities vary in three-dimensional space (Chen et al., 2000). Cross-hole tests have been analyzed by means of a three-dimensional inverse model (Vesselinov et al., 2000) in two ways: (a) by interpreting pressure records from individual borehole monitoring intervals, one at a time, while treating the rock as if it was spatially uniform; and (b) by using the inverse model to interpret pressure records from multiple tests and borehole monitoring intervals simultaneously, while treating the rock as a random fractal characterized by a power variogram. The first approach has yielded equivalent air permeabilities and air-filled porosities for a rock volume characterized by a length-scale of several tens of meters. Comparable results have been obtained by means of type-curves (Illman and Neuman, 2001). The second approach amounts to three-dimensional pneumatic tomography, or stochastic imaging, of the rock. It has yielded a high-resolution geostatistical estimate of how air permeability and air-filled porosity, defined over grid blocks having a length-scale of 1 m, vary throughout the modeled rock volume

  15. Observation and analysis of a pronounced permeability and porosity scale-effect in unsaturated fractured tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illman, W. A. (Walter A.); Hyun, Y. (Yunjung); Neuman, S. P.; Di Federico, V. (Vittorio); Tartakovsky, D. M. (Daniel M.); Vesselinov, V. V. (Velimir V.)

    2001-01-01

    Over 270 single-hole (Guzman et d., 1996) and 44 cross-hole pneumatic injection tests (Illman et al., 1998; Illman, 1999) have been conducted at the Apache Leap Research Site (ALRS) near Superior, Arizona. They have shown that the pneumatic pressure behavior of fractured tuff at the site is amenable to analysis by methods which treat the rock as a continuum on scales ranging from meters to tens of meters, and that this continuum is representative primarily of interconnected fractures. Both the single-hole and cross-hole test results are free of skin effect. Single-Role tests have yielded estimates of air permeability at various locations throughout the tested rock volume, on a nonind support scale of about 1 m. The corresponding log permeability data exhibit. spatial behavior characteristic of a random fractal and yield a kriged estimate (Fig. 1) of how these 1-m scale log permeabilities vary in three-dimemional space (Chen et al., 2000). Cross-hole tests have been analyzed by means of a thee-dimensional inverse model (Vesselinov et al., 2000) in two ways: (a) by interpreting pressure 1n:ccirds from individual borehole monitoring intervals, one at a time, while treating the rock as if it was spatially uniform; and (b) by using the inverse model to interpret pressure records from multiple tests and borehole monitoring intervals simultaneously, while treating the rock as a random fractal characterized by a power variogram. The first approach has yielded equivalent air permeabilities and air-filled porosities for a rock volume characterized by a length-scale of several tens of meters. Comparable results have been obtained by means of type-curves (Illman and Neuman, 2001). The second approach mounts to three-tlimensional pneumatic tomography, or stochastic imaging, of the rock. It has yielded a high-resolution geostatistical estimate of how air permeability and air-filled porosity, defined over grid blocks having a length-scale of 1 m, vary throughout the modeled rock

  16. Characterization of the porosity of thin zirconium oxide coatings prepared at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugas-Carrion, R. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, Darmstadt (Germany); Sittner, F. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: sittner@ca.tu-darmstadt.de; Ochs, C.J.; Flege, S.; Ensinger, W. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Department of Materials Science, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-01-30

    In this work we investigated the possibilities to reduce the porosity of thin protective zirconium oxide films deposited with the sol-gel technique at low temperatures. Electrochemical investigations showed that the concentration of the stabilizing agent acetylacetone is a crucial parameter for the protection performance of the zirconium oxide films and that it is possible to run the deposition process at much lower temperatures with the optimum stabilizer concentration. This allows the application of the process to sensitive substrates that cannot be treated at high temperatures and reduces energy costs as well. Characterization of the film structure with secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that the stabilizing agent is responsible for the formation of a mixed oxide layer at the interface of substrate and coating. The thickness of this layer can be tuned with the concentration of the stabilizing agent.

  17. The role and importance of porosity in the deflagration rates of HMX-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Hsu, P C; Springer, H K

    2011-03-15

    The deflagration behavior of thermally damaged HMX-based materials will be discussed. Strands of material were burned at pressures ranging from 10-300 MPa using the LLNL high pressure strand burner. Strands were heated in-situ and burned while still hot; temperatures range from 90-200 C and were chosen in order to allow for thermal damage of the material without significant decomposition of the HMX. The results indicate that multiple variables affect the burn rate but the most important are the polymorph of HMX and the nature and thermal stability of the non-HE portion of the material. Characterization of the strands indicate that the thermal soak produces significant porosity and permeability in the sample allowing for significantly faster burning due to the increased surface area and new pathways for flame spread into the material. Specifically, the deflagration rates of heated PBXN-9, LX-10, and PBX-9501 will be discussed and compared.

  18. Flexible, Luminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks Showing Synergistic Solid-Solution Effects on Porosity and Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Yang; Zhou, Dong-Dong; He, Chun-Ting; Liao, Pei-Qin; Cheng, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Yan-Tong; Ye, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2016-12-23

    Mixing molecular building blocks in the solid solution manner is a valuable strategy to obtain structures and properties in between the isostructural parent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We report nonlinear/synergistic solid-solution effects using highly related yet non-isostructural, phosphorescent Cu(I) triazolate frameworks as parent phases. Near the phase boundaries associated with conformational diversity and ligand heterogeneity, the porosity (+150 %) and optical O2 sensitivity (410 times, limit of detection 0.07 ppm) can be drastically improved from the best-performing parent MOFs and even exceeds the records hold by precious-metal complexes (3 ppm) and C70 (0.2 ppm).

  19. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures. [methane and ethane working fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick was extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the GRADE computer program.

  20. Mullite Plasma Spraying for In Situ Repair of Cracks in Mullite Refractories: Simultaneous Optimization of Porosity and Thickness by Statistical Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijnemakers, A.; Francq, B. G.; Cloots, R.; Vertruyen, B.; Boschini, F.

    2013-10-01

    We report a laboratory-scale study about the suitability of the plasma spraying process for "in situ" repair of cracks in mullite refractories of industrial furnaces. The "design of experiments" approach is used to investigate how the coating porosity and thickness are influenced by six experimental parameters. Arc current, secondary gas (H2) flow rate, and stand-off distance are the most significant parameters for both responses. Several interaction terms also affect significantly the thickness response. The validity of the model equations is discussed both from a statistical point of view and regarding the physical credibility of the main model terms. Additional experiments confirm that the measured properties lie into the prediction intervals provided by the model. Using a set of parameters optimized for minimal porosity and high thickness (relevant for the crack repair application), coatings with 6% porosity and 1070 μm thickness can be prepared reproducibly.

  1. Effects of grain size and porosity on strength of Li2TiO3 tritium breeding pebbles and its grain growth behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Maoqiao; Zhang, Yingchun; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chaofu; Liu, Wei; Yu, Yonghong

    2016-12-01

    Tons of Li2TiO3 tritium breeding pebbles will be filled in the blanket for obtaining tritium fuel. In this work, isothermal sintering was carried out to study the grain growth behavior of the Li2TiO3 pebbles fabricated by agarose method. The grain growth exponent (n) and the activation energy (Q) calculated by the phenomenological kinetic equation were 2 and 435.65 kJ/mol, respectively. The grain growth was controlled by vapor transport (p = 2S/r). In addition, effects of porosity and grain-size on the strength of Li2TiO3 pebbles were investigated. The strength was affected by the grain size and the porosity of Li2TiO3 pebbles, and high strength (about 72 MPa) depended partly on achieving the optimum balance between the porosity (about 10%) and grain size (about 2 μm).

  2. The nature of the alkoxide group, solvent, catalyst, and concentration on the gelation and porosity of hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loy, D. A. (Douglas A.); Small, J. H. (James H.)

    2004-01-01

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(trialkoxysilyl)hexane monomers: (1) R = Methyl; (2) R = Ethyl; and (3) R = n-Propyl. Previous studies showed that high surface area xerogels could be prepared from 2 with base catalyzed polymerizations while non-porous xerogels could be prepared with acidic catalysts. The object of this study was to ascertain the influences of monomer alkoxide group, solvent, catalyst, and monomer concentration on gelation time, and the properties of the resulting xerogels.This study has provided some insight into the chemical parameters that affect the ultimate structure in bridged polysilsesquioxanes. First, gelation times do not necessarily directly reflect the hydrolysis and condensation rates expected for different alkoxide groups. The collapse of porosity during the drying of hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes occurs in nearly all acid-catalyzed samples, save those that form quickly due to concentration or from the methoxide monomer 1 in methanolic solution. This suggests that there may be a kinetic contribution to creating porosity in addition to the network compliance model. It would also appear that syneresis of gels during aging may be the symptom of changes resulting in increased porosity. Whatever these changes may be due to, they do not appear to significantly alter the structural composition. Experiments are underway to provide more information and test some of these hypotheses.

  3. Quantifying Porosity through Automated Image Collection and Batch Image Processing: Case Study of Three Carbonates and an Aragonite Cemented Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Buckman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern scanning electron microscopes often include software that allows for the possibility of obtaining large format high-resolution image montages over areas of several square centimeters. Such montages are typically automatically acquired and stitched, comprising many thousand individual tiled images. Images, collected over a regular grid pattern, are a rich source of information on factors such as variability in porosity and distribution of mineral phases, but can be hard to visually interpret. Additional quantitative data can be accessed through the application of image analysis. We use backscattered electron (BSE images, collected from polished thin sections of two limestone samples from the Cretaceous of Brazil, a Carboniferous limestone from Scotland, and a carbonate cemented sandstone from Northern Ireland, with up to 25,000 tiles per image, collecting numerical quantitative data on the distribution of porosity. Images were automatically collected using the FEI software Maps, batch processed by image analysis (through ImageJ, with results plotted on 2D contour plots with MATLAB. These plots numerically and visually clearly express the collected porosity data in an easily accessible form, and have application for the display of other data such as pore size, shape, grain size/shape, orientation and mineral distribution, as well as being of relevance to sandstone, mudrock and other porous media.

  4. Tailoring the strength and porosity of rapid-hardening magnesia phosphate paste via the pre-foaming method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Jie; Li, Jin-Hong; Wang, Xiang; Qian, Ting-Ting; Li, Xiao-Hui

    2015-08-13

    High-porosity magnesia phosphate paste (HPMPP) was prepared via the pre-foaming method. In the pre-foaming method, sintering treatment was not required. The bulk density and maximum compressive strength of the HPMPP prepared according to the ratio of water to solids (W/So) of 0.32 reached 464.00 ± 5.00 Kg/m(3) and 0.30 ± 0.05 MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased with the increases in the addition amounts of sodium silicate and polypropylene fibers. The bulk density of HPMPP increased with the increase in the addition of sodium silicate and decreased with the increase in the addition of polypropylene fibers. Besides, the porosity of the magnesia phosphate paste increased from 79.85% to 81.27% and from 80.31% to 83.75% after the addition of sodium silicate and polypropylene fibers respectively. The highest porosity (83.75%) of the prepared HPMPP was realized under the addition proportion (sodium silicate: polypropylene fibers: solids = 0.06:0.0025:1). The average pore size of the prepared HPMPP is about 180 μm and the pore distribution range is relatively narrow. The hydration product (struvite) is combined with MgO particle one by one and then coated on the surface of bubbles. With the decrease of the water content, after breaking bubbles, the porous structure can be achieved.

  5. Tailoring the strength and porosity of rapid-hardening magnesia phosphate paste via the pre-foaming method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Jie; Li, Jin-Hong; Wang, Xiang; Qian, Ting-Ting; Li, Xiao-Hui

    2015-08-01

    High-porosity magnesia phosphate paste (HPMPP) was prepared via the pre-foaming method. In the pre-foaming method, sintering treatment was not required. The bulk density and maximum compressive strength of the HPMPP prepared according to the ratio of water to solids (W/So) of 0.32 reached 464.00 ± 5.00 Kg/m3 and 0.30 ± 0.05 MPa, respectively. The compressive strength increased with the increases in the addition amounts of sodium silicate and polypropylene fibers. The bulk density of HPMPP increased with the increase in the addition of sodium silicate and decreased with the increase in the addition of polypropylene fibers. Besides, the porosity of the magnesia phosphate paste increased from 79.85% to 81.27% and from 80.31% to 83.75% after the addition of sodium silicate and polypropylene fibers respectively. The highest porosity (83.75%) of the prepared HPMPP was realized under the addition proportion (sodium silicate: polypropylene fibers: solids = 0.06:0.0025:1). The average pore size of the prepared HPMPP is about 180 μm and the pore distribution range is relatively narrow. The hydration product (struvite) is combined with MgO particle one by one and then coated on the surface of bubbles. With the decrease of the water content, after breaking bubbles, the porous structure can be achieved.

  6. Critical porosity of melt segregation during crustal melting: Constraints from zonation of peritectic garnets in a dacite volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xun; Lee, Cin-Ty A.

    2016-09-01

    The presence of leucogranitic dikes in orogenic belts suggests that partial melting may be an important process in the lower crust of active orogenies. Low seismic velocity and low electrical resistivity zones have been observed in the lower crust of active mountain belts and have been argued to reflect the presence of partial melt in the deep crust, but volcanoes are rare or absent above many of these inferred melt zones. Understanding whether these low velocity zones are melt-bearing, and if so, why they do not commonly erupt, is essential for understanding the thermal and rheologic structure of the crust and its dynamic evolution. Central to this problem is an understanding of how much melt can be stored before it can escape from the crust via compaction and eventually erupt. Experimental and theoretical studies predict trapped melt fractions anywhere from 30%. Here, we examine Mn growth-zoning in peritectic garnets in a Miocene dacite volcano from the ongoing Betic-Rif orogeny in southern Spain to estimate the melt fraction at the time of large-scale melt extraction that subsequently led to eruption. We show that the melt fraction at segregation, corresponding approximately to the critical melt porosity, was ∼30%, implying significant amounts of melt can be stored in the lower crust without draining or erupting. However, seismic velocities in the lower crust beneath active orogenic belts (southern Spain and Tibet) as well as beneath active magmatic zones (e.g., Yellowstone hotspot) correspond to average melt porosities of <10%, suggesting that melt porosities approaching critical values are short-lived or that high melt porosity regions are localized into heterogeneously distributed sills or dikes, which individually cannot be resolved by seismic studies.

  7. Geologic characteristics, controlling factors and hydrocarbon accumulation mechanisms of China’s Large Gas Provinces of low porosity and permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the geological characteristics and controlling factors, we analyzed the formation mechanism of different types of gas reservoirs. The main characteristics of gas provinces with low porosity and permeability are mainly as follows: large area, low abundance, small gas pools and large gas provinces; widely distributed excellent hydrocarbon source rocks with closely contacted source-reservoir-cap association; development mainly in large continental depressions or in paralic shallow-river delta systems; many kinds of traps coexisting in large areas, dominantly para-layered lithologic, digenetic and capillary pressure traps; double fluid flow mechanisms of Darcy flow and non-Darcy flow; complicated gas and water relations; and having the resource distribution of highly productive "sweet spots", banding concentration, and macroscopically large areas integrated. The main controlling factors of large sandstone gas provinces with low porosity and permeability are stable dynamic backgrounds and gentle structural frameworks which control the extensive distribution of alternate (interbedded) sandstones and mudstones; weak hydropower of large gentle lake basins controlling the formation of discontinuous, low porosity and permeability reservoirs in shallow-water deltas; regionally differential diagenesis and no homogeneous digenetic facies controlling the development of favorable reservoirs and digenetic traps; and weak and dispersive reservoir-forming dynamic forces leading to the widely distributed small traps with low abundance. Low porosity and permeability gas provinces with different trap types have different formation mechanisms which include fluid diversion pressure difference interactive mechanism of lithologic-trap gas accumulations, separated differential collection mechanism of digenetic-trap gas accumulations, and the Non-Darcy flow mechanism of capillary-pressure gas accumulations.

  8. Geolosic characteristics, controlling factors and hydrocarbon accumulation mechanisms of China's Large Gas Provinces of low porosity and permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU CaiNeng; TAO ShiZhen; ZHANG XiangXiang; HE DongBo; ZHOU ChuanMin; GAO XiaoHui

    2009-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the geological characteristics and controlling factors, we analyzed the formation mechanism of different types of gas reservoirs. The main characteristics of gas provinces with low porosity and permeability are mainly as follows: large area, low abundance, small gas pools and large gas provinces; widely distributed excellent hydrocarbon source rocks with closely contacted source-reservoir-cap association; development mainly in large continental depressions or in paralic shallow-river delta systems; many kinds of traps coexisting in large areas, dominantly para-layered lithologic, digenetic and capillary pressure traps; double fluid flow mechanisms of Darcy flow and non-Darcy flow; complicated gas and water relations; and having the resource distribution of highly productive "sweet spots", banding concentration, and macroscopically large areas integrated. The main controlling factors of large sandstone gas provinces with low porosity and permeability are stable dynamic backgrounds and gentle structural frameworks which control the extensive distribution of alternate (interbedded) sandstones and mudstones; weak hydropower of large gentle lake basins controlling the formation of discontinuous, low porosity and permeability reservoirs in shallow-water del-tas; regionally differential diagenesis and no homogeneous digenetic facies controlling the development of favorable reservoirs and digenetic traps; and weak and dispersive reservoir-forming dynamic forces leading to the widely distributed small traps with low abundance. Low porosity and permeability gas provinces with different trap types have different formation mechanisms which include fluid diversion pressure difference interactive mechanism of lithologic-trap gas accumulations, separated differential collection mechanism of digenetic-trap gas accumulations, and the Non-Darcy flow mechanism of capillary-pressure gas accumulations.

  9. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC TABLETS OF LORNOXICAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Uma Maheswari*, K. Elango, Daisy Chellakumari, K. Saravanan and Anglina Jeniffer Samy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to formulate and evaluate controlled release formulation of lornoxicam based on osmotic technology. Lornoxicam, a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID with shorter half life, makes the development of sustained release (SR dosage forms extremely advantageous. However, due to its weak acidic nature, its release from SR delivery system is limited to the lower GIT which consequently leads to a delayed onset of its analgesic action. Basic pH modifier tromethamine and wicking agent SLS were incorporated into the core tablet to create basic environmental pH inside the tablets, which provide complete drug release that starts in the stomach to rapidly alleviate the painful symptoms and continue in the intestine to maintain protracted analgesic effect. The effect of different formulation variables namely level of osmogen (mannitol in the core tablet and level of pore former (sorbitol in the coating membrane on in-vitro release was studied. Lornoxicam release from controlled porosity osmotic pump was directly proportional to the pore former (sorbitol and level of osmogen (mannitol. Drug release from the developed formulations was independent of pH and agitational intensity and was dependent on osmotic pressure of the release media. Results of SEM studies showed the formation of pores in the membrane from where the drug release occurred. The optimized formulation was found to release the drug in zero order and found to be stable upon stability studies.

  10. Analysis of Porosity Effects on Unsteady Stretching Permeable Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phool SINGH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze two-dimensional unsteady flow of a viscous incompressible fluid about a stagnation point on a permeable stretching sheet in presence of a time dependent free stream velocity. Fluid is considered in the porous media with radiation effect. The Rosseland approximation is used to model the radiative heat transfer. Using a time-dependent stream function, partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum and energy equations are converted into non-linear ordinary differential equations. The numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by using the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method with the help of shooting technique. In the present work, the effect of porosity parameter, radiation parameter and suction parameter on flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The skin-friction coefficient and the Nusselt number at the sheet are computed and discussed. The results reported in the paper are in good agreement with published work in literature by other researchers.doi:10.14456/WJST.2014.13

  11. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF BACLOFEN CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC PUMP TABLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indarapu Rajendra Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, attempts were made to develop and evaluate the controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP based drug delivery system of sparingly water soluble drug Baclofen. Formulation variables, such as, levels of solubility enhancer, ratio of drug to osmogents, coat thickness of semi permeable membrane (SPM and level of pore former were found to affect the drug release from the developed formulations. Cellulose acetate was used as the semi permeable membrane. Drug release was directly proportional to the level of the solubility enhancer, osmotic pressure generated by osmotic agent and level of pore former; however, was inversely proportional to the coat thickness of SPM. Drug release from developed formulations was independent of pH and agitation intensities of release media. Burst strength of the exhausted shells decreased with increase in the level of pore former. This system was found to deliver Baclofen at a zero-order rate. The optimized formulations were subjected to stability studies as per ICH guidelines, and formulations were found to be stable after 45days study.

  12. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Castro-Garcia, Sergio; Blanco-Roldan, Gregorio L.; Sola-Guirado, Rafael R.; Gil-Ribes, Jesus A.

    2016-01-01

    Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments. PMID:27213391

  13. Effect of Inter Yarn Fabric Porosity on Dye Uptake of Reactive Dyed cotton Woven Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Farooq

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabric Porosity is an important property in determining the functional properties of a fabric. It relates to the count of a yarn as well as to the type of weave. Twill and satin cotton woven fabrics in three different weft densities (warp density kept constant were used to investigate the effect of porosity on the dyeuptake within one weave. The effects of change in weave type, keeping yarn densities the same, on the porosity were also investigated. Objective determination of porosity was carried out using an image analysis technique while, colour yield was determined using K/S values. Higher the weft density in a satin fabric low will be the porosity of that fabric. Porosity values varied from 6.85-10.98% for S1 and S3 respectively. However, for the twill fabric no substantial change in porosity have been observed as the porosity values varied from 6.4-5.3% for T1 and T3 respectively. Colour strengths for S1 and T1 are lower than S3 and T3 respectively for all the primary colours at 0.25, 1.00 and 2.00% depth levels. It is observed that the change in colour strength is more prominent at 2% depth level as compared to 0.25% depth level

  14. Calculated Porosity of Volcanic Reservoir in Wangjiatun of the Northern Songliao Basin, NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuanlong Shan; Chuanbiao Wa; Rihui Cheng; Wanzhu Liu

    2003-01-01

    In Wangjiatun area of the Northern Songliao Basin, reservoir space can be divided into three types: primary pore, secondary pore and fissure according to their origins,which can be subdivided into eight subtypes: macro-vesicule,shrank primary vesicule, alteration pore, groundmass corrosive pore, normal structural crack, corrosive structural crack,filled structural crack and groundmass shrank crack according to texture and origin of the pore space. It has characteristic of double pore medium. Volcanic porosities of small diameter samples (with diameter of ca. 2.5 cm) and large diameter samples (with diameter of ca. 21.5 cm) were tested in accordance with the characteristic of volcanic reservoir space. Volcanic porosities for small diameter samples correspond with matrix porosities and those of large diameter samples correspond with total porosities including matrix and fractured porosities. Models of the calculated porosity by acoustic wave or density of volcanic reservoir are established in view of those measured data. Comparison of calculated and measuredporosities shows that precision of calculated porosities is lower for rhyolite and tuffites, and higher for basaltand andesite.Relative errors of calculated porosities by model of large diameter samples are lower than those of small diameter samples, i. e. precision of the former is higher than that of the later.

  15. Porosity testing methods for the quality assessment of selective laser melted parts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, W.W.; Carmignato, S.; Zanini, F.; Vaneker, T.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of porosity testing methods for the quality assessment of selective laser melted parts. Porosity is regarded as important quality indicator in metal additive manufacturing. Various destructive and non-destructive testing methods are compared, ranging from global

  16. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Castillo-Ruiz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments.

  17. Why would cement porosity reduction be clinically irrelevant, while experimental data show the contrary.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Stolk, J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory bench tests have shown that porosity reduction increases the fatigue life of bone cement specimens. Clinically, however, the effect porosity reduction is subject to debate. We hypothesized that the discrepancy between clinical and experimental findings is related to differences in the str

  18. The Consistent Kinetics Porosity (CKP) Model: A Theory for the Mechanical Behavior of Moderately Porous Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-11-01

    A theory is developed for the response of moderately porous solids (no more than {approximately}20% void space) to high-strain-rate deformations. The model is consistent because each feature is incorporated in a manner that is mathematically compatible with the other features. Unlike simple p-{alpha} models, the onset of pore collapse depends on the amount of shear present. The user-specifiable yield function depends on pressure, effective shear stress, and porosity. The elastic part of the strain rate is linearly related to the stress rate, with nonlinear corrections from changes in the elastic moduli due to pore collapse. Plastically incompressible flow of the matrix material allows pore collapse and an associated macroscopic plastic volume change. The plastic strain rate due to pore collapse/growth is taken normal to the yield surface. If phase transformation and/or pore nucleation are simultaneously occurring, the inelastic strain rate will be non-normal to the yield surface. To permit hardening, the yield stress of matrix material is treated as an internal state variable. Changes in porosity and matrix yield stress naturally cause the yield surface to evolve. The stress, porosity, and all other state variables vary in a consistent manner so that the stress remains on the yield surface throughout any quasistatic interval of plastic deformation. Dynamic loading allows the stress to exceed the yield surface via an overstress ordinary differential equation that is solved in closed form for better numerical accuracy. The part of the stress rate that causes no plastic work (i.e-, the part that has a zero inner product with the stress deviator and the identity tensor) is given by the projection of the elastic stressrate orthogonal to the span of the stress deviator and the identity tensor.The model, which has been numerically implemented in MIG format, has been exercised under a wide array of extremal loading and unloading paths. As will be discussed in a companion

  19. Monitoring of NMR porosity changes in the full-size core salvage through the drying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattakhov, Artur; Kosarev, Victor; Doroginitskii, Mikhail; Skirda, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Currently the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the most popular technologies in the field of borehole geophysics and core analysis. Results of NMR studies allow to calculate the values of the porosity and permeability of sedimentary rocks with sufficient reliability. All standard tools for the study of core salvage on the basis of NMR have significant limitations: there is considered only long relaxation times corresponding to the mobile formation fluid. Current trends in energy obligate to move away from conventional oil to various alternative sources of energy. One of these sources are deposits of bitumen and high-viscosity oil. In Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University (Russia) there was developed a mobile unit for the study of the full-length core salvage by the NMR method ("NMR-Core") together with specialists of "TNG-Group" (a company providing maintenance services to oil companies). This unit is designed for the study of core material directly on the well, after removing it from the core receiver. The maximum diameter of the core sample may be up to 116 mm, its length (or length of the set of samples) may be up to 1000 mm. Positional precision of the core sample relative to the measurement system is 1 mm, and the spatial resolution along the axis of the core is 10 mm. Acquisition time of the 1 m core salvage varies depending on the mode of research and is at least 20 minutes. Furthermore, there is implemented a special investigation mode of the core samples with super small relaxation times (for example, heavy oil) is in the tool. The aim of this work is tracking of the NMR porosity changes in the full-size core salvage in time. There was used a water-saturated core salvage from the shallow educational well as a sample. The diameter of the studied core samples is 93 mm. There was selected several sections length of 1m from the 200-meter coring interval. The studied core samples are being measured several times. The time interval

  20. Effect of thermally activated paper sludge on the mechanical properties and porosity of cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, R.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the effect of paper sludge additions, calcined at 700 ºC for two hours, on cement paste pore structure and mechanical strength. Both total and capillary porosity were observed to depend on the percentage of calcined sludge added to the cementitious matrix. While a 10% addition induced values for both slightly higher than the control, adding 20% prompted the opposite result, reducing porosity values with respect to the control. Substantial refinement was observed, with a rise in pores smaller than 0.01 μm (gel pores when the calcined sludge was added. Such refinement was greater at the higher percentage of sludge. After approximately 15 days, strength was lower in both the additioned pastes compared to the control. A high correlation (R2≥0.939 was found between total porosity and compressive strength for both percentages studied.El presente trabajo muestra el resultado de una investigación llevada a cabo en pastas de cemento que contienen un 10 y un 20% de lodo de papel calcinado a 700 ºC, durante 2h. Se estudia cómo afecta esta adición activa en la estructura porosa y las resistencias mecánicas. Se demuestra que tanto la porosidad total como la capilar dependen del porcentaje de lodo calcinado añadido a la matriz cementante. Así, un 10% de adición muestra para ambas porosidades valores ligeramente superiores al de la pasta de referencia, sin embargo la incorporación de un 20% produce un resultado contrario, disminuyendo ambas porosidades con respecto a la pasta control. Para el caso de poros de tamaño inferior a 0,01 μm (poros de gel se detecta un importante proceso de refinamiento con la incorporación del lodo calcinado, este refinamiento es tanto mayor cuanto mayor es el porcentaje añadido. En cuanto a los valores de resistencia, para los dos porcentajes de adición se produce una disminución a partir de aproximadamente 15 días, respecto a la pasta patrón. Se muestra una buena correlaci

  1. Roller compaction scale-up using roll width as scale factor and laser-based determined ribbon porosity as critical material attribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allesø, Morten; Holm, René; Holm, Per

    2016-05-25

    Due to the complexity and difficulties associated with the mechanistic modeling of roller compaction process for scale-up, an innovative equipment approach is to keep roll diameter fixed between scales and instead vary the roll width. Assuming a fixed gap and roll force, this approach should create similar conditions for the nip regions of the two compactor scales, and thus result in a scale-reproducible ribbon porosity. In the present work a non-destructive laser-based technique was used to measure the ribbon porosity at-line with high precision and high accuracy as confirmed by an initial comparison to a well-established volume displacement oil intrusion method. The ribbon porosity was found to be scale-independent when comparing the average porosity of a group of ribbon samples (n=12) from small-scale (Mini-Pactor®) to large-scale (Macro-Pactor®). A higher standard deviation of ribbons fragment porosities from the large-scale roller compactor was attributed to minor variations in powder densification across the roll width. With the intention to reproduce ribbon porosity from one scale to the other, process settings of roll force and gap size applied to the Mini-Pactor® (and identified during formulation development) were therefore directly transferrable to subsequent commercial scale production on the Macro-Pactor®. This creates a better link between formulation development and tech transfer and decreases the number of batches needed to establish the parameter settings of the commercial process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An atomistic modelling of the porosity impact on UO{sub 2} matrix macroscopic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelea, A., E-mail: andrei.jelea@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Institute of Physical Chemistry Ilie Murgulescu, Romanian Academy, 202 Spl Independentei St., 060021 Bucharest-12 (Romania); Colbert, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Ribeiro, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), DPAM, SEMCA, LEC, Cadarache (France); Treglia, G. [Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Pellenq, R.J.-M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > The porosity impact on the UO{sub 2} matrix thermomechanical properties was investigated. > Atomistic simulation techniques were used in this study. > The UO{sub 2} thermal expansion coefficient is modified due to the pore surface effects. > The elastic moduli at 0 K and at finite temperature decrease linearly with porosity. - Abstract: The porosity impact on the UO{sub 2} matrix thermomechanical properties was investigated using atomistic simulation techniques. The porosity modifies the thermal expansion coefficient and this is attributed to pore surface effects. The elastic moduli at 0 K and at finite temperature decrease with porosity, this variation being well approximated using affine functions. These results agree with other mesoscale model predictions and experimental data, showing the ability of the semiempirical potential atomistic simulations to give an overall good description of the porous UO{sub 2}. However, the surface effects are incompletely described.

  3. Riser simulation and radial porosity distribution characterization for gas-fluidized bed of cork particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Ouyang, Jie; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for gas-solid fluidized bed of cork particles, using discrete element method. Results exhibit the existence of a so-called anti core-annular porosity profile with lower porosity in the core and higher porosity near the wall for non-slugging fluidization. The tendency to form this unfamiliar anti core-annular porosity profile is stronger when the solid flux is higher. There exist multiple inflection points in the simulated axial solid volume fraction profile for non-slugging fluidization. Results also show that the familiar core-annular porosity profile still appears for slugging fluidization. In addition, the classical choking phenomenon can be captured at the superficial gas velocity slightly lower than the correlated transport velocity.

  4. Production of a Porosity Map by Kriging in Sandstone Reservoirs, Case Study from the Sava Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Malvić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Variogram analyses and usages of geostatistical interpolations have been standard analytical tools in Croatian geology in the last five years. Such analyses have especially been applied in the mapping of petroleum geological data. In this paper, spatial modelling of porosity data and, consequently, kriging mapping are described for a relatively large dataset obtained at an oil field located in the Croatian part of Pannonian basin (Sava depression. Analyzed datasets included porosity values measured in a sandstone reservoir of Pannonian age. The original dataset can be considered as a rare extensive porosity set available for Croatian hydrocarbon reservoirs. It made possible very reliable semivariogram modelling and kriging interpolation of porosity. The obtained results point out kriging as the most appropriate interpolation approach for porosity, but also for other geological data in sandstone reservoirs of Miocene age.

  5. Biot's coefficient as an indicator of strength and porosity reduction: Calcareous sediments from Kerguelen Plateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Borre, Mai Kirstine; Fabricius, Ida Lykke;

    2010-01-01

    Biot's coefficient, β. In calcareous ooze, β is one. Mechanical compaction reduces porosity, but only leads to a minor decrease in β. Recrystallization renders particles smoother, but does not lead to reduction in β unless it gives rise to pore stiffening cementation. Pore stiffening cementation causes......Chalk develops as a result of diagenesis of pelagic calcareous ooze. In a newly deposited ooze sediment, porosity ranges from 60% to 80% but porosity reduces with burial. We studied how different porosity reduction mechanisms change the strength of these deep sea carbonate-rich sediments and effect...... β to fall, even when porosity remains constant. Biot's coefficient correlates with strength-indicating properties: compressional and shear modulus, oedometer modulus, yield strength, strain from direct loading and creep strain. Our data indicate that β may be used for predicting the diagenetic...

  6. "Apparent Weight": A Concept that Is Confusing and Unnecessary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent articles make prominent use of the concept of "apparent weight." The concept of "apparent weight" leads to two confusing inconsistencies. We need to know that with very little change in our representations, we can give our students an improved understanding of "weight" without ever having to invent the appealing but confusing concept of…

  7. Observations on the Apparent Solubility of Carbonate-Apatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis; Lee; Wilson

    1999-10-15

    Previousreports indicating that the apparent solubilities of carbonate-apatites are low appear to conflict with findings that carbonate incorporation into the apatite structure tends to reduce stability. Carbonate-apatites were prepared by a precipitation method and by hydrolysis of monetite and brushite. Apparent solubility profiles were determined by measuring dissolution after exposure for 24 h to acetate buffers with known saturations with respect to hydroxyapatite. All preparations showed a range of apparent solubilities, in agreement with previous work. Precipitated samples had higher apparent solubilities than samples prepared by hydrolysis and this was correlated with differences in crystallinity. Further experiments showed that pyrophosphate ion reduced the apparent solubility, but it was concluded that pyrophosphate occurring naturally in synthetic apatites would be insufficient to cause low apparent solubilities. Microscopical observations showed that precipitated carbonate-apatites were composed of small crystals of uniform size, whereas carbonate-apatites prepared by hydrolysis consisted of both small crystals and very large crystals. The low apparent solubilities observed in the latter preparations are attributed to the large crystals. The surface phenomena possibly involved in apparent solubility behavior are discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and modified Friedman equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a quantum corrected relation, $S=\\frac{A}{4G}-\\alpha \\ln \\frac{A}{4G}+\\beta \\frac{4G}{A}$, we derive modified Friedmann equations describing the dynamics of the universe with any spatial curvature. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the quantum corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  9. Evolution of porosity and diffusivity associated with chemical weathering of a basalt clast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.; Tomutsa, L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-02-15

    Weathering of rocks as a result of exposure to water and the atmosphere can cause significant changes in their chemistry and porosity. In low-porosity rocks, such as basalts, changes in porosity, resulting from chemical weathering, are likely to modify the rock's effective diffusivity and permeability, affecting the rate of solute transport and thus potentially the rate of overall weathering to the extent that transport is the rate limiting step. Changes in total porosity as a result of mineral dissolution and precipitation have typically been used to calculate effective diffusion coefficients through Archie's law for reactive transport simulations of chemical weathering, but this approach fails to account for unconnected porosity that does not contribute to transport. In this study, we combine synchrotron X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) and laboratory and numerical diffusion experiments to examine changes in both total and effective porosity and effective diffusion coefficients across a weathering interface in a weathered basalt clast from Costa Rica. The {mu}CT data indicate that below a critical value of {approx}9%, the porosity is largely unconnected in the basalt clast. The {mu}CT data were further used to construct a numerical pore network model to determine upscaled, effective diffusivities as a function of total porosity (ranging from 3 to 30%) for comparison with diffusivities determined in laboratory tracer experiments. By using effective porosity as the scaling parameter and accounting for critical porosity, a model is developed that accurately predicts continuum-scale effective diffusivities across the weathering interface of the basalt clast.

  10. Relationship between micro-porosity and tensile properties of 6063 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiehua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The micro-porosity is usually present in the as-cast microstructure, which decreases the tensile strength and ductility and therefore limit the application of cast aluminum parts. Although much work has been done to investigate the effects of various casting parameters on the formation of porosity in various aluminum alloys, up to now, little information has been available for the relationship between micro-porosity and tensile properties of 6063 alloy. In this study, the influences of size and area fraction of micro-porosity on the tensile properties and fracture behavior of 6063 aluminum alloy were investigated by means of tensile testing, optical microscopy (OM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The tensile tests were conducted in air at 100 ℃, 200 ℃ and 300 ℃, respectively. Results show that the large micro-porosity with sizes between 100 μm and 800 μm located at the center and top of the ingot, while the small micro-porosity with size between 2 μm and 60 μm distributed at the edge and bottom of the ingot. The area fraction of micro-porosity at the center of the ingot is much bigger than that at the edge of the ingot. When tested at 100 ℃, with the decrease in the area fraction of micro-porosity from the top of the ingot to the bottom of the ingot, the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and the elongation are increased from 82 to 99 MPa, 32 to 66 MPa and 7% to 11%, respectively. When the temperature is no more than 200 ℃, the strain hardening exponent decreases with an increase in the area fraction of micro-porosity; while the deviation disappears when the temperature reaches 300 ℃. The fracture mode of the alloy is greatly influenced by the size and area fraction of the micro-porosity.

  11. Laboratory measurements of Vp and Vs in a porosity-developed crustal rock: Experimental investigation into the effects of porosity at deep crustal pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Arima, Makoto; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of porosity on the elastic properties of crustal rocks at deep crustal pressures, we performed laboratory measurements of compressional-wave (Vp) and shear-wave (Vs) velocities in a porosity-developed gabbro sample up to 1.0 GPa at room temperature. Based on the measured Vp and Vs data, we evaluated the changes in velocities, Vp/Vs, Poisson's ratio (σ), and total porosity of the rock as a function of pressure. Compared with the 'porosity-free' intrinsic elastic values of the gabbro sample, our results suggest that the development of porosity in crustal rocks lowers their Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs, and Poisson's ratio. Deviations (ΔVp, ΔVs, ΔVp/Vs, and Δσ) of the measured values from the intrinsic values are enhanced with increasing porosity. We evaluated the ΔVp from previous experimental study on the rocks of Tanzawa plutonic complex providing constraints on interpretation of the seismic velocity profiles of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc and found a large negative ΔVp (up to - 22.7%) at lower pressures. The intrinsic velocity combined with the measured velocity data at in situ pressure conditions suggest that the ranges of Vp (6.0-6.5 km/s) in the middle crust of the IBM arc reflect the presence of considerable porosity and its closure in intermediate rocks and/or the change of composition from felsic to intermediate in mid-crustal rocks.

  12. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Salewski

    Full Text Available Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and

  13. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditio