WorldWideScience

Sample records for high alloyed austenitic

  1. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance

  2. High temperature ductility of austenitic alloys exposed to thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K.; Kondo, T.; Ogawa, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Loss of high temperature ductility due to thermal neutron irradiation was examined by slow strain rate test in vacuum up to 1000 0 C. The results on two heats of Hastelloy alloy X with different boron contents were analyzed with respect to the influence of the temperatures of irradiation and tensile tests, neutron fluence and the associated helium production due to nuclear transmutation reaction. The loss of ductility was enhanced by increasing either temperature or neutron fluence. Simple extrapolations yielded the estimated threshold fluence and the end-of-life ductility values at 900 and 1000 0 C in case where the materials were used in near-core regions of VHTR. The observed relationship between Ni content and the ductility loss has suggested a potential utilization of Fe-based alloys for seathing of the neutron absorber materials

  3. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  4. Localized corrosion of high alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morach, R.; Schmuki, P.; Boehni, H.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of several high alloyed stainless steels against localized corrosion was investigated by traditional potentiostatic and -kinetic methods and the current transient technique. Different test cells, proposed in literature, were evaluated for use in testing of plate materials. The AVESTA-cell showed to be not useful for potentiokinetic current density potential curves, but useable for pitting experiments. After pickling and prepassivation epoxy embedded materials proved to be resistant to crevice corrosion at the metal-resin interface. The electrode in form of a wire was the most reliable crevice free cell design. The grinding of the samples in the pretreatment procedure was found to have a large effect on the pitting corrosion behaviour. Using different paper types with varying grit, a drop in pitting potential for rougher surfaces and an increase in metastable pitting activity was found. Increasing surface roughness led also to changes in the electronic structure of the passive film reflected by a lower bandgap energy. High alloyed stainless steels showed no breakdown potential within the examined potential range. Compared to 18/8 type stainless steels significantly less transients were found. The number of transients decreases with increasing molybdenum and chromium content

  5. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  6. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  7. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  8. Precipitation of Second Phases in High-Interstitial-Alloyed Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Ha, Heon-Young; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2011-12-01

    The precipitation reaction of an austenitic stainless steel containing N + C was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The main precipitate formed during isothermal aging at 1123 K (850 °C) was M23C6 carbide, and its morphology gradually changed in a sequence of intergranular (along grain boundary) → cellular (or discontinuous) → intragranular (within grain interior) form with aging time. Irrespective of different morphologies, the M23C6 was consistently related to austenite matrix in accordance with the cube-on-cube orientation relationship. Based on the analysis of electron diffraction, two variants of intragranular M23C6 were identified, and they were related to each other by twin relation. Prolonged aging produced other types of precipitates—the rod-shaped Cr2N and the coarse irregular intermetallic sigma phase. The similarities and differences in precipitation behavior between N only and N + C alloyed austenitic stainless steels are briefly discussed.

  9. Influence of manganese, carbon and nitrogen on high-temperature strength of Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Okazaki, Y.; Wade, N.; Miyahara, K.

    1990-01-01

    High Mn-Cr-Fe base alloys are candidates for the first wall material of fusion reactors because of rapid decay of radioactivity of the alloys after neutron irradiation compared with that of Ni-Cr-Fe base alloys. Their high temperature properties, however, are not clearly understood at present. In this paper, a study has been made of the effects of Mn, C and N content on the high-temperature tensile strength and creep properties of a 12% CR-Fe base alloy. Mn tends to decrease tensile strength and proof stress at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures in the austenite range, however, tensile properties scarcely depend on Mn content. C and N additions improve the tensile properties markedly. The combined addition of 0.2%C and 0.2%N to a 12%Cr-15%Mn-Fe base alloy makes the strength at 873K as high as that of a modified type 316 stainless steel. Combined alloying with C and N also improves the creep strength. Cold working is very useful in increasing the creep strength because of the finely dispersed precipitates in the matrix during creep. From these results, Fe-12%Cr-15%Mn-15%Mn-0.2%c-0.2%N is recommended as one of the most suitable alloys in this system for high temperature usage. (author)

  10. Austenitic stainless steels and high strength copper alloys for fusion components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Stubbins, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel (316LN), an oxide-dispersion-strengthened copper alloy (GlidCop A125), and a precipitation-hardened copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr) are the primary structural materials for the ITER first wall/blanket and divertor systems. While there is a long experience of operating 316LN stainless steel in nuclear environments, there is no prior experience with the copper alloys in neutron environments. The ITER first wall (FW) consists of a stainless steel shield with a copper alloy heat sink bonded by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The introduction of bi-layer structural material represents a new materials engineering challenge; the behavior of the bi-layer is determined by the properties of the individual components and by the nature of the bond interface. The development of the radiation damage microstructure in both classes of materials is summarized and the effects of radiation on deformation and fracture behavior are considered. The initial data on the mechanical testing of bi-layers indicate that the effectiveness of GlidCop A125 as a FW heat sink material is compromised by its strongly anisotropic fracture toughness and poor resistance to crack growth in a direction parallel to the bi-layer interface. (orig.)

  11. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D

    2003-08-28

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s{sup -1}, at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions.

  12. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s -1 , at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions

  13. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Pankiw, Roman [Duraloy Technologies Inc; Voke, Don [Duraloy Technologies Inc

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  14. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mummert, K; Uhlemann, M; Engelmann, H J [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  16. A new high-strength iron base austenitic alloy with good toughness and corrosion resistance (GE-EPRI alloy-TTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, S.

    1989-01-01

    A new high strength, iron based, austenitic alloy has been successfully developed by GE-EPRI to satisfy the strength and corrosion resistance requirements of large retaining rings for high capacity generators (>840Mw). This new alloy is a modified version of the EPRI alloy-T developed by the University of California, Berkeley, in an earlier EPRI program. It is age hardenable and has the nominal composition (weight %): 34.5 Ni, 5Cr, 3Ti, 1Nb, 1Ta, 1Mo, .5Al, .3V, .01B. This composition was selected based on detailed metallurgical and processing studies on modified versions of alloy-T. These studies helped establish the optimum processing conditions for the new alloy and enabled the successful scale-up production of three large (50-52 inch dia) test rings from a 5,000 lb VIM-VAR billet. The rings were metallurgically sound and exhibited yield strength capabilities in the range 145 to 220 ksi depending on the extent of hot/cold work induced. The test rings met or exceeded all the property goals. The above alloy can provide a good combination of strength, toughness and corrosion resistance and, through an suitable modification of chemistry or processing conditions, could be a viable candidate for high strength LWR internal applications. 3 figs

  17. Austenitic alloys Fe-Ni-Cr dominating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Austenitic alloy essentially comprising 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminium, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06% zirconium, the balance being iron. The characteristic of this alloy is a conventional elasticity limit to within 2% of at least 450 MPa, with a maximum tensile strength of at least 500 MPa at a test temperature of 650 0 C after immersion annealing at 1038 0 C and 30% hardening. To this effect the invention concerns Ni-Cr-Fe high temperature alloys possessing excellent mechanical strength characteristics, that can be obtained with lower levels of nickel and chromium than those used in alloys of this kind in the present state of the technique, a higher amount of niobium than in the previous alloys and with the addition of 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium [fr

  18. Austenitic stainless steel alloys with high nickel contents in high temperature liquid metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvicka, H.R.; Schwarz, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys (nickel content: from 15 to 70 wt%, Chromium content: 15 wt%, iron: balance) together with stainless steel (W.Nr. 1.4981) have been exposed to flowing liquid sodium at 730 0 C in four intervals up to a cumulative exposure time of 1500 hours. Weight change data and the results of post-exposition microcharacterization of specimens are reported. The corrosion rates increase with increasing nickel content and tend to become constant after longer exposure times for each alloy. The corrosion rate of stainless steel is considerably reduced due to the presence of the base alloys. Different kinetics of nickel poor (up to 35% nickel) and nickel rich (> 50% nickel) alloys and nickel transport from nickel rich to nickel poor material is observed. (orig.)

  19. Three-dimensional modeling for deformation of austenitic NiTi shape memory alloys under high strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Young, Marcus L.

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional model for phase transformation of shape memory alloys (SMAs) during high strain rate deformation is developed and is then calibrated based on experimental results from an austenitic NiTi SMA. Stress, strain, and martensitic volume fraction distribution during high strain rate deformation are simulated using finite element analysis software ABAQUS/standard. For the first time, this paper presents a theoretical study of the microscopic band structure during high strain rate compressive deformation. The microscopic transformation band is generated by the phase front and leads to minor fluctuations in sample deformation. The strain rate effect on phase transformation is studied using the model. Both the starting stress for transformation and the slope of the stress-strain curve during phase transformation increase with increasing strain rate.

  20. Development of high nickel austenitic steels for the application to fast reactor cores, (I). Alloy design with the aid of the d-electrons concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Masahiko; Yukawa, Natsuo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Okuda, Takanari; Harada, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    The design of high nickel austenitic steels for the core materials of the fast reactors was performed following the d-electrons concept devised on the basis of molecular orbital calculations of transition-metal based alloys. In this design two calculated parameters are mainly utilized. The one is the d-orbital energy level (Md) of alloying transition elements, and the other is the bond order (Bo) that is a measure of the covalent bond strength between atoms. Using the Md-bar - Bo-bar phase stability diagram accurate prediction become possible for the phase stability of the austenite phase and 5% swelling at 140 dpa for nickel ions. Here, Md-bar and Bo-bar are the compositional average of Md and Bo parameters, respectively. On the basis of the phase stability diagram and preliminary experiments, guidelines for the alloy design of carbo-nitrides precipitated high nickel austenitic steels were constructed. Following the guidelines several new austenitic steels were designed for the fast reactors core material. (author)

  1. The role of nitrogen in improving pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic and duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilpas, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloyed shielding gas on weld nitrogen content and pitting corrosion resistance of super austenitic (6%Mo) and super duplex stainless steels have been studied with special emphasis on microsegregation behaviour of Cr, Mo and N. The measurements performed with the 6%Mo steel indicate that all these elements segregate interdendritically in the fully austenitic weld metal. With nitrogen addition to the shielding gas the enrichment of nitrogen to the interdendritic regions is more pronounced than to the dendrite cores due to which the pitting corrosion resistance of the dendrite cores increases only marginally. In the super duplex steel welds nitrogen enriches in austenite increasing its pitting corrosion resistance more effectively. In these welds the pitting corrosion resistance of the ferrite phase remains lower. (orig.)

  2. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  3. Elimination of casting heterogeneities by high temperature heat treatment on a titanium stabilized austenitic alloy. Effect on the microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, Jacques; Cadalbert, Robert; Sidhom, Habib.

    1982-06-01

    Microstructural observation on a longitudinal section of stainless steels often reveals the presence of a ''veined'' structure showing a segregation remainder due to the setting of the ingot. This casting heterogeneity can be eliminated by high temperature treatments. This study shows the change in the structure and the state of solubilization produced by these high temperature treatments and the effect of a stabilizing element such as titanium on Z6CNDT17.13 and Z10CNDT15.15B alloys compared with the Z6CND17.13 alloy. It is also shown that a high temperature treatment applied to these stabilized alloys deeply modifies the recrystallization kinetics [fr

  4. Austenite Grain Growth Behavior of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 alloy steel is widely applied in the manufacture of various parts such as gears, rams, and spindles due to its good performance of strength, toughness, and wear resistance. The former researches most focused on its deformation and recrystallization behaviors under high temperature. However, the evolution laws of austenite grain growth were rarely studied. This behavior also plays an important role in the mechanical properties of parts made of this steel. In this study, samples are heated to a certain temperature of 1073 K, 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K at a heating rate of 5 K per second and hold for different times of 0 s, 120 s, 240 s, 360 s, and 480 s before being quenched with water. The experimental results suggest that the austenite grains enlarge with increasing temperature and holding time. A mathematical model and an application developed in Matlab environment are established on the basis of previous works and experimental results to predict austenite grains size in hot deformation processes. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental results which indicates that the model and the application are reliable.

  5. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steel under shear loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R., E-mail: r.j.p.blonde@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E., E-mail: enrique.jimenez-melero@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L., E-mail: lie.zhao@tudelft.nl [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Schell, N., E-mail: norbert.schell@hzg.de [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max Planck Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Brück, E., E-mail: e.h.bruck@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der, E-mail: s.vanderzwaag@tudelft.nl [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: n.h.vandijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-31

    The microstructure evolution during shear loading of a low-alloyed TRIP steel with different amounts of the metastable austenite phase and its equivalent DP grade has been studied by in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction. A detailed powder diffraction analysis has been performed to probe the austenite-to-martensite transformation by characterizing simultaneously the evolution of the austenite phase fraction and its carbon concentration, the load partitioning between the austenite and the ferritic matrix and the texture evolution of the constituent phases. Our results show that for shear deformation the TRIP effect extends over a significantly wider deformation range than for simple uniaxial loading. A clear increase in average carbon content during the mechanically-induced transformation indicates that austenite grains with a low carbon concentration are least stable during shear loading. The observed texture evolution indicates that under shear loading the orientation dependence of the austenite stability is relatively weak, while it has previously been found that under tensile load the {110}〈001〉 component transforms preferentially. The mechanical stability of retained austenite in TRIP steel is found to be a complex interplay between the interstitial carbon concentration in the austenite, the grain orientation and the load partitioning.

  6. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  7. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  8. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  9. Internal Friction of Austenitic Fe-Mn-C-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kook; Jeong, Sohee; Kang, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Min

    2017-12-01

    The internal friction (IF) spectra of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) austenitic phase were measured at a wide range of temperature and frequency ( f) to understand the mechanisms of anelastic relaxations occurring particularly in Fe-Mn-C twinning-induced plasticity steels. Four IF peaks were observed at 346 K (73 °C) (P1), 389 K (116 °C) (P2), 511 K (238 °C) (P3), and 634 K (361 °C) (P4) when f was 0.1 Hz. However, when f increased to 100 Hz, whereas P1, P2, and P4 disappeared, only P3 remained without the change in peak height, but with the increased peak temperature. P3 matches well with the IF peak of Fe-high Mn-C alloys reported in the literature. The effects of chemical composition and vacancy (v) on the four IF peaks were also investigated using various alloys with different concentrations of C, Mn, Al, and vacancy. As a result, the defect pair responsible for each IF peak was found as follows: a v-v pair for P1, a C-v pair for P2, a C-C pair for P3, and a C-C-v complex (major effect) + a Mn-C pair (minor effect) for P4. These results showed that the IF peaks of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys reported previously were caused by the reorientation of C in C-C pairs, not by the reorientation of C in Mn-C pairs.

  10. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage effects in a 316LN austenitic alloy for a high power spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Hunn, J.D.; Rice, P.M.; Lewis, M.B.; Cook, S.W.; Farrell, K.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-09-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe ++ , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  11. Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage Effects in a 316LN Austenitic Alloy for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.

    2001-01-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe 2 , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  12. Alkaline stress corrosion of iron-nickel-chromium austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquellet, Dominique

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the behaviour in stress corrosion of austenitic iron-nickel-chromium alloys by means of tensile tests at imposed strain rate, in a soda solution at 50 pc in water and 350 degrees C. The author shows that the mechanical-chemical model allows the experimental curves to be found again, provided the adjustment of characteristic parameters, on the one hand, of corrosion kinetics, and on the other hand, of deformation kinetics. A classification of the studied alloys is proposed [fr

  13. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  14. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Dunn, D.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (E rp ) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (E corr ) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence E corr however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between E corr and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in E corr . These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen-Alloyed High-Mn Austenitic Hot Work Die Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the requirements for mechanical properties and service life above 650 °C, a high-Mn austenitic hot work die steel, instead of traditional martensitic hot work die steel such as H13, was developed in the present study. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the newly developed work die steel was studied. The results show that the microstructure of the high-Mn as-cast electroslag remelting (ESR ingot is composed of γ-Fe, V(C,N, and Mo2C. V(C,N is an irregular multilateral strip or slice shape with severe angles. Most eutectic Mo2C carbides are lamellar fish-skeleton-like, except for a few that are rod-shaped. With increasing solid solution time and temperature, the increased hardness caused by solid solution strengthening exceeds the effect of decreased hardness caused by grain size growth, but this trend is reversed later. As a result, the hardness of specimens after various solid solution heat treatments increases first and then decreases. The optimal combination of hardness and austenitic grain size can be obtained by soaking for 2 h at 1170 °C. The maximum Rockwell hardness (HRC is 47.24 HRC, and the corresponding austenite average grain size is 58.4 μm. When the solid solution time is 3 h at 1230 °C, bimodality presented in the histogram of the austenite grain size as a result of further progress in secondary recrystallization. Compared with the single-stage aging, the maximum impact energy of the specimen after two-stage aging heat treatment was reached at 16.2 J and increased by 29.6%, while the hardness decreased by 1–2 HRC. After two-stage aging heat treatment, the hardness of steel reached the requirements of superior grade H13, and the maximum impact energy was 19.6% higher than that of superior grade H13, as specified in NADCA#207-2003.

  16. Influence of phosphorus on point defects in an austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, L.

    1988-06-01

    The influence of phosphorus on points defects clusters has been studied in an austenitic alloy (Fe/19% at. Cr/13% at. Ni). Clusters are observed by transmission electron microscopy. After quenching and annealing, five types of clusters produced by vacancies or phosphorus-vacancies complexes are observed whose presence depends on cooling-speed. Vacancy concentration (with 3.6 10 -3 at. P) in clusters is about 10 -5 and apparent vacancy migration is 2 ± 0.1 eV. These observations suggest the formation of metastable small clusters during cooling which dissociate during annealing and migrate to create the observed clusters. With phosphorus, the unfrequent formation of vacancy loops has been observed during electron irradiation. Ions irradiations show that phosphorus does not favour nucleation of interstitial loops but slowers their growth. It reduces swelling by decreasing voids diameter. Phosphorus forms vacancy complexes whose role is to increase the recombination rate and to slow vacancy migration [fr

  17. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  18. Weldability of newly developed austenitic alloy for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Koseki, T.

    1986-01-01

    The testing reported in this paper involved typical steels of the new grades such as STEEL-A (0.025C-14Ni-25Cr-0.35N), STEEL-B (0.04C-23Mn-13Cr-0.22N) and STEEL-C (0.20C-25Mn-5Cr), and commercial steels of Type 300 series. Weldments were made mainly using the GTAW, SMAW and SAW processes with experimental and commercial filler metals. Strength and toughness of weldments were examined at 77 K (-321 0 F) and 4 K. The strengthening of material through the addition of nitrogen was far greater in the weld metal that in the base metal at cryogenic temperature. In fact, 0.2% proof stress of weld metals bearging 0.20% to 0.40% nitrogen at 77 K exhibited a higher value by 60 to 150 MPa (8,740 to 21,760 psi) than that of the base metal. Impact absorbed energy of weld metals at 77 K decreased rapidly with nitrogen content, 60-90 J at 0.20%N to 20-50J at 0.35% N. Rather high impact absorbed energy was obtained when the weld metal solidified as primary austenitic phase, resulting in fully austenitic microstructure or austenite-eutectic ferrite mixture at ambient temperature. In addition, oxide inclusions, the number of which strongly depends on welding processes, were detrimental to toughness of weld metals at cryogenic temperature

  19. Effect of small addition of Cr on stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid, E-mail: f.pahlevani@unsw.edu.au; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-15

    High carbon steels with dual phase structures of martensite and austenite have considerable potential for industrial application in high abrasion environments due to their hardness, strength and relatively low cost. To design cost effective high carbon steels with superior properties, it is crucial to identify the effect of Chromium (Cr) on the stability of retained austenite (RA) and to fully understand its effect on solid-state phase transition. This study addresses this important knowledge gap. Using standard compression tests on bulk material, quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, nano-indentation on individual austenitic grains, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction–based orientation microscopy techniques, the authors investigated the effect of Cr on the microstructure, transformation behaviour and mechanical stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel, with varying Cr contents. The results revealed that increasing the Cr %, altered the morphology of the RA and increased its stability, consequently, increasing the critical pressure for martensitic transformation. This study has critically addressed the elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite – and provides a deep understanding of the effect of small additions of Cr on the metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level. Consequently, it paves the way for new applications for high carbon low alloy steels. - Highlights: • Effect of small addition of Cr on metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level • A multi-scale study of elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite in high carbon steel • The mechanical stability of retained austenite during plastic deformation increased with increasing Cr content • Effect of grain boundary misorientation angle on hardness of individual retained austenite grains in high carbon steel.

  20. Study of the effects of austenitizing and tempering heat treatments on the alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmon, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential use of the ferritic alloy Sandvik HT-9 (12 Cr - 1 Mo) as an alternative to stainless steels used in high-neutron-fluence environments. The neutron radiation influences embrittlement where the impact-energy versus test-temperature curve is seen displaced to the right. As a result, commercially effective solutioning and tempering processes are needed to suppress this effect in the pre-irradiated condition. The effects of austenitizing treatments on the impact energy of HT-9 were identified. 18 figures, 6 tables

  1. Characterization of the dissimilar welding - austenitic stainless steel with filler metal of the nickel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Bruno Amorim; Schvartzman, Monica Maria de Abreu Mendonca; Campos, Wagner Reis da Costa

    2007-01-01

    In elevated temperature environments, austenitic stainless steel and nickel alloy has a superior corrosion resistance due to its high Cr content. Consequently, this alloys is widely used in nuclear reactors components and others plants of energy generation that burn fossil fuel or gas, chemical and petrochemical industries. The object of the present work was to research the welding of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel using the nickel alloy filler metals, Inconel 625. Gas tungsten arc welding, mechanical and metallographic tests, and compositional analysis of the joint were used. A fundamental investigation was undertaken to characterize fusion boundary microstructure and to better understand the nature and character of boundaries that are associated with cracking in dissimilar welds. The results indicate that the microstructure of the fusion zone has a dendritic structure, inclusions, and precipitated phases containing Ti and Nb are present in the inter-dendritic region. In some parts near to the fusion line it can be seen a band in the weld, probably a eutectic phase with lower melting point than the AISI 304, were the cracking may be beginning by stress corrosion. (author)

  2. First stage of the structural evolution of austenite in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelosin, V.; Gerland, M.; Riviere, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two shape memory Cu-Al-Ni alloys, a polycrystal and a single crystal, exhibiting a martensitic transformation close to 130 C (in the as-quenched state) have been studied. Specimens have been quenched after heat treatment at 850 C. The structural evolutions of the high temperature phase (austenite) have been studied for thermal treatments performed below 200 C. Investigations have been carried out using electrical resistivity measurements, TEM (transmission electron microscopy) observations and X-ray diffraction analysis. The main structural modifications are observed in the polycrystalline alloy and concern first, the reordering process of the austenite structure (B2→L2 1 ), and second, the precipitation of the (Cu 9 Al 4 ) γ 2 phase. In the single crystal alloy, the evolutions are very slight and localized on the structural defects. Particular attention is paid to the role of the quenched-in vacancy elimination on the observed mechanisms. In addition, the incidence of the structural evolution on the transformation temperatures is also discussed. (orig.)

  3. Study of interactions between liquid lead-lithium alloy and austenitic and martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.

    1992-06-01

    In the framework of Fusion Technology, the behaviour of structural materials in presence of liquid alloy Pb17Li is investigated. First, the diffusion coefficients of Fe and Cr have been determined at 500 deg C. Then mass transfer experiments in Pb17Li have been conducted in an anisothermal container with pure metals (Fe, Cr, Ni), Fe-Cr steels and austenitic steels. These experiments showed a very high loss of Nickel, which is an accordance with its high solubility, and Cr showed mass-losses one order of magnitude higher than for pure iron, as the diffusion coefficient of Cr is three orders of magnitude higher than for pure Fe. The corrosion rate of binary Fe-Cr and pure Fe are identical. In austenitic steels, the gamma lattice allows a higher mass-transfer of Cr than the alpha lattice, the presence of Cr slows downs the dissolution of Ni, and the porosity of corrosion layers results of losses of Cr and Ni. Finally, a review of our results and those of other laboratories allowed an identification of the corrosion limiting step. In the case of 1.4914 martensitic steel it is the diffusion of Fe in Pb17Li, while in the case of 316L austenitic steel it is the diffusion of Cr in Pb17Li

  4. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Walters, G.P.; Buckley, S.N.; Bullough, R.; Hanks, W.; Bolster, D.E.J.; Sowden, B.C.; Lurcook, D.; Murphy, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H 2 ) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  5. Fatigue and creep–fatigue deformation of an ultra-fine precipitate strengthened advanced austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Carroll, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. To investigate the behavior in more representative conditions than are offered by uniaxial creep tests, the low-cycle continuous fatigue and combined creep–fatigue response of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 °C and 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of −1 and hold times at peak tensile strain of up to 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure between the two alloys are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in both fatigue and creep–fatigue of each alloy at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present following the application of hold times of 60 min and longer, and considerably more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ substantially; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in the microstructure of 316 SS, whereas HT-UPS exhibits widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep–fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as the microstructure evolves with continued cycling.

  6. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of an ultra-fine precipitate strengthened advanced austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M.C., E-mail: Mark.Carroll@INL.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 Fremont, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2218 (United States); Carroll, L.J. [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 Fremont, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2218 (United States)

    2012-10-30

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. To investigate the behavior in more representative conditions than are offered by uniaxial creep tests, the low-cycle continuous fatigue and combined creep-fatigue response of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 Degree-Sign C and 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain of up to 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure between the two alloys are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in both fatigue and creep-fatigue of each alloy at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present following the application of hold times of 60 min and longer, and considerably more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ substantially; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in the microstructure of 316 SS, whereas HT-UPS exhibits widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as the microstructure evolves with continued cycling.

  7. Alloying effect on the structure and properties of austenitic heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, V.V.; Grabovskij, V.Ya.; Korostelev, V.F.; Ryvkin, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated have been mechanical properties at test temperatures of 20-95O deg C, wear resistance, softening at thermomechanical cycling and microstructure of cast austenitic chromium-nickel steels (13%Cr + 35%Ni), produced by electroslag remelting with variations in Ti, Mo, Nb and W contents. Regression equations for relationship of the investigated characteristics to alloying element content have been obtained. Titanium, molybdenum and niobium increasing hardness and strength limit at room and high temperatures promote a decrease in ductility. Tungsten increases strength properties, wear resistance and thermal stability of the steels without negative effect on the impact strength. The impact strength decrease with an increase in alloying is due to brittle precipitations along the boundaries of as-cast grains, containing Ti, Mo, Nb and Si

  8. A study on the influence of trace elements (C, S, B, Al, N) on the hot ductility of the high purity austenitic alloy Fe-Ni 36% (INVAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetta-Perrot, M T

    1994-11-01

    In order to study the damage mechanisms leading to the ductility decrease of the Invar alloy at 600 C, a high-purity Fe-Ni 36% sample has been doped with trace elements with the purpose of identifying the role of sulfur, sulfur with Al N or B N precipitates and sulfur with boron, on the ductility, the failure modes, the intergranular damage and the plastic deformation mechanisms prior to failure. A new AES segregation quantification method has been used to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of intergranular and surface segregations and determine the relation between sulfur segregation and grain joint fragility. refs., figs., tabs.

  9. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500 o C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  10. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  11. Radiation induced phosphorus segregation in austenitic and ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation induced surface segregation (RIS) of phosphorus in stainless steel attained a maximum at a dose of 0.8 dpa then decreased continually with dose. This decrease in the surface segregation of phosphorus at high dose levels has been attributed to removal of the phosphorus layer by ion sputtering. Phosphorus is not replenished since essentially all of the phosphorus within the irradiation zone has been segregated to the surface. Sputter removal can explain the previously reported absence of phosphorus segregation in ferritic alloys irradiated at high dosessup(1,2) (>1 dpa) since irradiation of ferritic alloys to low doses has shown measurable RIS. This sputtering phenomenon places an inherent limitation to the heavy ion irradiation technique for the study of surface segregation of impurity elements. The magnitude of the segregation in ferritics is still much less than in stainless steel which can be related to the low damage accumulation in these alloys. (orig.)

  12. Attenuation capability of low activation-modified high manganese austenitic stainless steel for fusion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eissa, M.M. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El-kameesy, S.U.; El-Fiki, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ghali, S.N. [Steel Technology Department, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan (Egypt); El Shazly, R.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, Cairo (Egypt); Saeed, Aly, E-mail: aly_8h@yahoo.com [Nuclear Power station Department, Faculty of Engineering, Egyptian-Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Improvement stainless steel alloys to be used in fusion reactors. • Structural, mechanical, attenuation properties of investigated alloys were studied. • Good agreement between experimental and calculated results has been achieved. • The developed alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactors. - Abstract: Low nickel-high manganese austenitic stainless steel alloys, SSMn9Ni and SSMn10Ni, were developed to use as a shielding material in fusion reactor system. A standard austenitic stainless steel SS316L was prepared and studied as a reference sample. The microstructure properties of the present stainless steel alloys were investigated using Schaeffler diagram, optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction pattern. Mainly, an austenite phase was observed for the prepared stainless steel alloys. Additionally, a small ferrite phase was observed in SS316L and SSMn10Ni samples. The mechanical properties of the prepared alloys were studied using Vickers hardness and tensile tests at room temperature. The studied manganese stainless steel alloys showed higher hardness, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength than SS316L. On the other hand, the manganese stainless steel elongation had relatively lower values than the standard SS316L. The removal cross section for both slow and total slow (primary and those slowed down in sample) neutrons were carried out using {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. Gamma ray attenuation parameters were carried out for different gamma ray energy lines which emitted from {sup 60}Co and {sup 232}Th radioactive sources. The developed manganese stainless steel alloys had a higher total slow removal cross section than SS316L. While the slow neutron and gamma rays were nearly the same for all studied stainless steel alloys. From the obtained results, the developed manganese stainless steel alloys could be considered as candidate materials for fusion reactor system with low activation based on the short life

  13. The high temperature oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, R.

    1977-04-01

    High temperature annealing in a dynamic vacuum has been utilised to induce the growth of duplex oxide over the whole surface of stainless steel specimens. It is found that duplex oxide grows at a rate which does not obey a simple power law. The oxidation kinetics and oxide morphology have also been studied for a series of ternary austenitic alloys which cover a range of composition between 5 and 20% chromium. A model has been developed to describe the formation of duplex oxide and the subsequent formation of a 'healing layer' which virtually causes the oxidation process to stop. This phase tends to form at grain boundaries and a relationship has been derived for the reaction kinetics which relates the reaction rate with grain size of the substrate. (author)

  14. The Effects of CO{sub 2} Pressure on Corrosion and Carburization Behaviors of Chromia-forming Austenitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    By applying S-CO{sub 2} cycle to SFR, the inherent safety could be improved by alleviating the concern of explosive reaction between high temperature steam and liquid sodium as well as increased thermal efficiency at 500-550 .deg. C compared to helium Brayton cycle. Meanwhile, from the material point of view, a compatibility such as corrosion and carburization of candidate materials in S-CO{sub 2} environment should be evaluated to assure the long-term integrity of IHX. It has been previously reported that Ni-base alloys and high-Cr Fe-base austenitic alloys showed a good corrosion resistance by the formation of thin chromia layer while carburization behaviors of those materials were not properly investigated. Corrosion and carburization behaviors of three chromia-forming austenitic alloys (Ni-base alloys and Alloy 800HT) were evaluated in S-CO{sub 2} (200 bar) and CO{sub 2} (1 bar) environment at 550.650 .deg. C for 1000 h. For all test materials, a good corrosion resistance was exhibited by the formation of thin chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with small amount of minor oxides such as Mn1.5Cr1.5O{sub 4}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TiO{sub 2}.

  15. Plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Songtao; Yang Ke; Shan Yiyin; Li Laifeng

    2008-01-01

    The plastic deformation and fracture behaviors of two nitrogen-alloyed austenitic stainless steels, 316LN and a high nitrogen steel (Fe-Cr-Mn-0.66% N), were investigated by tensile test and Charpy impact test in a temperature range from 77 to 293 K. The Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel showed ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior, but not for the 316LN steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that the strain-induced martensite occurred in the 316LN steel, but no such transformation in the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel. Tensile tests showed that the temperature dependences of the yield strength for the two steels were almost the same. The ultimate tensile strength of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel displayed less significant temperature dependence than that of the 316LN steel. The strain-hardening exponent increased for the 316LN steel, but decreased for the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel, with decreasing temperature. Based on the experimental results and the analyses, a modified scheme was proposed to explain the fracture behaviors of austenitic stainless steels

  16. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  17. Recent experimental and theoretical insights on the swelling of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to the variables that determine the duration of the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature and composition is also discussed

  18. Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-03-01

    The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H 2 , CO, CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000 0 C (1200 to 1832 0 F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 50 μatm H 2 O for Environment A; 200 μatm H 2 , 100 μatm CO, 20 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 for Environment B; 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 2 O for Environment C; and 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 1.5 μatm H 2 O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys

  19. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidification of primary austenite dendrites most intensively. It clearly increases the tendency to volumetric solidification. Influence of the other elements is much weaker. This means that the solidification way of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu does not differ from that in an unalloyed cast iron.

  20. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  1. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  2. Oxidization and stress corrosion cracking initiation of austenitic alloys in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Li, M.; Luo, J.L.; Chen, W.X. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Zheng, W. [Materials Technology Laboratory, NRCan, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of austenitic alloys in pure supercritical water. Austenitic stainless steels 310S, 316L, and Inconel 625 were tested as static capsule samples at 500{sup o}C for up to 5000 h. After that period, crack initiations were readily observed in all samples, signifying susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The microcracks in 316L stainless steel and Inconel 625 were almost intergranular, whereas transgranular microcrack initiation was observed in 310S stainless steel. (author)

  3. Dissolution and oxidation behaviour of various austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys in lead-bismuth eutectic at 520 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Marion, E-mail: marion.roy@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martinelli, Laure, E-mail: laure.martinelli@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ginestar, Kevin, E-mail: kevin.ginestar@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Favergeon, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.favergeon@utc.fr [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 7337, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, CS 60319, 60203 Compiègne Cedex (France); Moulin, Gérard [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 7337, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, CS 60319, 60203 Compiègne Cedex (France)

    2016-01-15

    Ten austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in static lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 520 °C in order to obtain a selection of austenitic steels having promising corrosion behaviour in LBE. A test of 1850 h was carried out with a dissolved oxygen concentration between 10{sup −9} and 5 10{sup −4} g kg{sup −1}. The combination of thermodynamic of the studied system and literature results leads to the determination of an expression of the dissolved oxygen content in LBE as a function of temperature: RT(K)ln[O](wt%) = −57584/T(K) −55.876T(K) + 254546 (R is the gas constant in J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}). This relation can be considered as a threshold of oxygen content above which only oxidation is observed on the AISI 316L and AISI 304L austenitic alloys in static LBE between 400 °C and 600 °C. The oxygen content during the test leads to both dissolution and oxidation of the samples during the first 190 h and leads to pure oxidation for the rest of the test. Results of mixed oxidation and dissolution test showed that only four types of corrosion behaviour were observed: usual austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys behaviour including the reference alloy 17Cr-12Ni-2.5Mo (AISI 316LN), the 20Cr-31Ni alloy one, the Si containing alloy one and the Al containing alloy one. According to the proposed criteria of oxidation and dissolution kinetics, silicon rich alloys and aluminum rich alloy presented a promising corrosion behaviour. - Highlights: • 10 austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in LBE at 520 °C with dissolved oxygen content between 10{sup -9} and 5 10{sup -4} wt%. • It is shown that only thermodynamics cannot explain the Ni rich alloys corrosion behaviour in LBE. • The role of oxygen on corrosion behaviour in LBE was highlighted. • An equilibrium line was defined above which only oxidation has occurred on 316L: RTln[O](wt%) = -57584/T(K)-55.876T(K)+254546. • 18Cr-15Ni-3.7Si, 21Cr-11Ni-1.6Si and 14Cr-25Ni-3.5Al

  4. Radiation damage simulation studies in the Harwell VEC of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazey, D J; Walters, G P; Buckley, S N; Hanks, W; Bolster, D E.J.; Murphy, S M

    1988-07-01

    Three austenitic (316 L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb); four high-nickel (IN 625, IN 706, PE 16, Fe-25Ni-8Cr) and four ferritic (CRM 12, FV 448, FV 607, FI) alloys have been irradiated with 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions in the Harwell VEC to simulated fusion-reactor doses up to 110 dpa (proportional to 10 MW-yr m/sup -2/) at temperatures from 425 to 625/sup 0/C. Gas production rates appropriate to fusion were obtained from a mixed beam of He+H/sub 2/ in the ratio 1:4 He:H with gas/dpa ratios of 13 appm He/dpa and 52 appm H/dpa. The 316 alloys showed irradiation-induced precipitation and swelling as high as 40% in ST 316-Ti after 110 dpa at 625/sup 0/C. Low swelling (e.g. <2% at 110 dpa) was observed in the high-nickel alloys. The ferritic/martensitic alloys showed negligible swelling (e.g. <0.2% in FV 607 after 100 dpa at 475/sup 0/C). The results demonstrate the high swelling behaviour of 316 alloys and the better swelling resistance of high-nickel and ferritic alloys under simulated fusion conditions.

  5. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  6. Hydrogen solubility in austenite of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnova, V.V.; Mogutnov, B.M.; Tomilin, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in Fe-Ni-Cr alloys at 600-1000 deg C is determined. Hydrogen solubility in ternary alloys can not be predicted on the basis of the data on its solubility in binary Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr alloys. Chromium and nickel effect on hydrogen solubility in iron is insignificant in comparison with the effect of these elements on carbon or nitrogen solubility [ru

  7. The kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite of the Mn-Ni iron based model alloy

    OpenAIRE

    E. Rożniata; R. Dziurka; J. Pacyna

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Present work corresponds to the research on the kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite of Mn-Ni iron based model alloy. The kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite of investigated alloy was presented on CCT diagram (continuous cooling transformation). Also the methodology of a dilatometric samples preparation and the method of the critical points determination were described.Design/methodology/approach: The austenitising temperature was defined ...

  8. The Effects of Alloy Chemistry on Localized Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiro, David O.

    This study investigated localized corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels under stressed and unstressed conditions, as well as corrosion of metallic thin films. While austenitic stainless steels are widely used in corrosive environments, they are vulnerable to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in chloride-containing environments. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is closely tied to the alloying elements chromium, nickel, and molybdenum. Polarization curves were measured for five commercially available austenitic stainless steels of varying chromium, nickel, and molybdenum content in 3.5 wt.% and 25 wt.% NaCl solutions. The alloys were also tested in tension at slow strain rates in air and in a chloride environment under different polarization conditions to explore the relationship between the extent of pitting corrosion and SCC over a range of alloy content and environment. The influence of alloy composition on corrosion resistance was found to be consistent with the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) under some conditions, but there were also conditions under which the model did not hold for certain commercial alloy compositions. Monotonic loading was used to generate SCC in in 300 series stainless steels, and it was possible to control the failure mode through adjusting environmental and polarization conditions. Metallic thin film systems of thickness 10-200 nm are being investigated for use as corrosion sensors and protective coatings, however the corrosion properties of ferrous thin films have not been widely studied. The effects of film thickness and substrate conductivity were examined using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) on iron thin films. Thicker films undergo more corrosion than thinner films in the same environment, though the corrosion mechanism is the same. Conductive substrates encourage general corrosion, similar to that of bulk iron

  9. Swelling of austenitic iron-nickelchromium ternary alloys during fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling data are now available for 15 iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys irradiated to exposures as high as 110 displacements per atom (dpa) in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) between 400 and 650 0 C. These data confirm trends observed at lower exposure levels and extend the generality of earlier conclusions to cover a broader range of composition and temperature. It appears that all austenitic iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys eventually approach an intrinsic swelling rate of about1%/dpa over a range of temperature even wider than studied in this experiment. The duration of the transient regime that precedes the attainment of this rate is quite sensitive to nickel and chromium content, however. At nickel and chromium levels typical of 300 series steels, swelling does not saturate at engineering-relevant levels. However, there appears to be a tendency toward saturation that increases with declining temperature, increasing nickel and decreasing chromium levels. Comparisons of these results are made with those of similar studies conducted with charged particles. Conclusions are then drawn concerning the validity of charged particle simulation studies to determine the compositional and temperature dependence of swelling

  10. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain); Castro, L.; Diego, G. de [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  11. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; Diego, G. de

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  12. High temperature strength and aging behavior of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kazuya; Bae, Dong-Su; Sakai, Hidenori; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of reduced radio-activation. The objective of the present study is to make a fundamental research of mechanical properties and microstructure of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels. Especially the effects of alloying elements of V and Ti on the mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of high Mn-Cr steels were studied. Precipitation behaviors of carbides, nitrides and σ phase are investigated and their remarkable effects on the high temperature strength are found. The addition of V was very effective for strengthening the materials with the precipitation of fine VN. Ti was also found to be beneficial for the improvement of high temperature strength properties. The results of high temperature strengths of the 12Cr-15Mn austenitic steels were compared with those of the other candidate and/or reference materials, for example, JFMS (modified 9Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel) and JPCAs (modified 316 austenitic stainless steels). (author)

  13. Thermal Effects That Arise upon Different Heat Treatments in Austenitic Steels Alloyed with Titanium and Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Berger, I. F.; Bobrovskii, V. I.; Voronin, V. I.; Danilov, S. E.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Kataev, N. V.; Sagaradze, V. V.

    2018-04-01

    Structural and microstructural changes that arise in the course of the heat treatment of Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic stainless steels with different concentrations of titanium and phosphorus have been studied. It has been found that the alloying with phosphorus decreases the lattice parameter of these steels. The phosphorus contribution to this effect is 0.015 ± 0.002 Å/at %. Aging at a temperature of 670 K for about 20 h leads to the precipitation of dispersed needle-like particles, which are most likely to be iron phosphides. In the temperature range of 700-800 K, in austenitic steels, the atomic separation of the solid solution occurs, the intensity of which decreases upon alloying with titanium or phosphorus at concentrations of 1.0 and 0.1 wt %, respectively. At higher temperatures (about 950 K), the formed precipitates of the Ni3Ti (γ') phase increase in size to 7-10 nm.

  14. Processing of a new high strength high toughness steel with duplex microstructure (Ferrite + Austenite)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martis, Codrick J.; Putatunda, Susil K.; Boileau, James

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This new steel has exceptional combination of high strength and fracture toughness. ► Austempering treatment resulted in a very fine scale bainitic ferrite microstructure. ► As the austempering temperature increases yield strength and toughness decreases. ► Maximum fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m is obtained after austempering at 371 °C. ► A relationship between fracture toughness and the parameter σ y (X γ C γ ) 1/2 was observed. - Abstract: In this investigation a new third generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS) has been developed. This steel was synthesized by austempering of a low carbon and low alloy steel with high silicon content. The influence of austempering temperature on the microstructure and the mechanical properties including the fracture toughness of this steel was also examined. Compact tension and cylindrical tensile specimens were prepared from a low carbon low alloy steel and were initially austenitized at 927 °C for 2 h and then austempered in the temperature range between 371 °C and 399 °C to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography. Test results show that the austempering heat treatment has resulted in a microstructure consisting of very fine scale bainitic ferrite and austenite. A combination of very high tensile strength of 1388 MPa and fracture toughness of 105 MPa √m was obtained after austempering at 371 °C

  15. Damping Capacity of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel with a Two Phase Mixed Structure of Martensite and Austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tae Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The damping capacity of high manganese austenitic stainless steel with a two phase mixed structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was studied. Reversed austenite with an ultra-fine grain size of less than 0.2 μm was obtained by reversion treatment. The two phase structure of deformation-induced martensite and reversed austenite was obtained by annealing treatment at a range of 500-700 °C and various times in cold rolled high manganese austenitic stainless steel. The damping capacity increased with an increasing annealing temperature and time. In high manganese stainless steel with the two phase mixed structure of martensite and austenite, the damping capacity decreased with an increasing volume fraction of deformation-induced martensite. Thus, the damping capacity was strongly affected by deformation-induced martensite. The results confirmed that austenitic stainless steel with a good combination of strength and damping capacity was obtained from the two phase mixed structure of austenite and martensite.

  16. Overview of Strategies for High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Santella, M. L.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2011-04-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the ~923 K to 1173 K (650 °C to 900 °C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al2O3 scale rather than the Cr2O3 scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe2(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni3Al-L12, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  17. Physical and welding metallurgy of Gd-enriched austenitic alloys for spent nuclear fuel applications. Part II, nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Michael, Joseph Richard; Williams, David Brian; Dupont, John Neuman; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-01-01

    The physical and welding a metallurgy of gadolinium- (Gd-) enriched Ni-based alloys has been examined using a combination of differential thermal analysis, hot ductility testing. Varestraint testing, and various microstructural characterization techniques. Three different matrix compositions were chosen that were similar to commercial Ni-Cr-Mo base alloys (UNS N06455, N06022, and N06059). A ternary Ni-Cr-Gd alloy was also examined. The Gd level of each alloy was ∼2 wt-%. All the alloys initiated solidification by formation of primary austenite and terminated solidification by a Liquid γ + Ni 5 Gd eutectic-type reaction at ∼1270 C. The solidification temperature ranges of the alloys varied from ∼100 to 130 C (depending on alloy composition). This is a substantial reduction compared to the solidification temperature range to Gd-enriched stainless steels (360 to 400 C) that terminate solidification by a peritectic reaction at ∼1060 C. The higher-temperature eutectic reaction that occurs in the Ni-based alloys is accompanied by significant improvements in hot ductility and solidification cracking resistance. The results of this research demonstrate that Gd-enriched Ni-based alloys are excellent candidate materials for nuclear criticality control in spent nuclear fuel storage applications that require production and fabrication of large amounts of material through conventional ingot metallurgy and fusion welding techniques

  18. Effect of Ge, Sn, Sb on the resistance to swelling of austenitic alloys irradiated by 1 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Levy, V.; Seran, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of new solute elements namely Ge, Sn and Sb on the void swelling resistance of austenitic alloys irradiated with 1 MeV electrons has been studied. Except for tin in Ti-modified 316, all solute improve the swelling resistance of base alloys. Tin addition shifts the swelling peak of 316 S.S. to high temperature. In fact, these solute additions have the same qualitative effect on the swelling components: they enhance the void density and decrease strongly void growth rate. This effect is opposite to the one of usual swelling inhibitors such as Si or Ti which decrease the void density. We have explained this influence on the void nucleation and void growth by introducing a strong interaction between vacancies and solute atoms in a void growth model

  19. The effect of alloying and treatment on martensite transformation during deformation in Fe-Cr-Mn steels with unstable austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinov, L.S.; Konop, V.I.; Sokolov, K.N.

    1977-01-01

    The effect is studied of alloying with chromium (6-10%), silicon (1-2%), molybdenum (1-3%), and copper (2%), the heat treatment conditions, and the deformation conditions, or the martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of Fe-Cr-Mn steels of the transitional class based on 0G8AM2S. It is shown that appropriate alloying and treatment, taking into account the degree of stability of the austenite, can ensure a complex of high mechanical properties of the steels investigated. For instance, the treatment of steel 0Kh10AG8MD2S by the technique: hardening+ 40% deformation at 400 deg C + 10% deformation at room temperature has yielded the following mechanical properties: sigmasub(B)=150 kgf/mm 2 , sigmasub(T)=110 kgf/mm 2 , sigma=18%, psi=32%

  20. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  1. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  2. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs

  3. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1997-01-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within ±53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within ± MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa

  4. Development of a high temperature austenitic stainless steel for Stirling engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Lemkey, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    An alloy, designed NASAUT 4G-A1, was developed which exhibited an excellent balance of oxidation resistance and high temperature strength while maintaining an austenitic matrix necessary for hydrogen compatibility. This alloy, having the composition 15Cr-15Mn-2Mo-1Nb-1Si-1.5C-bal. Fe in wt%, was microstructurally characterized and shown to contain a fine M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated phase. Subsequent heat treatments were shown to substantially modify this microstructure resulting in improved mechanical properties. Yield, creep and low cycle fatigue strengths were found to be superior to the best iron base alloy thus far identified as a potential heater head candidate material, XF-818

  5. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  6. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  7. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  8. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels

  9. Hydrogen-plasticity in the austenitic alloys; Interactions hydrogene-plasticite dans les alliages austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De lafosse, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Lab. PECM-UMR CNRS 5146, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation deals with the hydrogen effects under stresses corrosion, in austenitic alloys. The objective is to validate and characterize experimentally the potential and the limits of an approach based on an elastic theory of crystal defects. The first part is devoted to the macroscopic characterization of dynamic hydrogen-dislocations interactions by aging tests. then the hydrogen influence on the plasticity is evaluated, using analytical classic models of the elastic theory of dislocations. The hydrogen influence on the flow stress of bcc materials is analyzed experimentally with model materials. (A.L.B.)

  10. Synergistic enhancing effect of N+C alloying on cyclic deformation behaviors in austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Long, X.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, Z.N. [National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2014-07-29

    Cyclic plastic and elastic strain controlled deformation behaviors of Mn18Cr7 austenitic steel with N0.6C0.3 synergistic enhancing alloying have been investigated using tension-compression low cycle fatigue and three-point bending high cycle fatigue testing. Results of cyclic deformation characteristic and fatigue damage mechanism have been compared to that in Mn12C1.2 steel. Mn18Cr7N0.6C0.3 steel always shows cyclic softening caused by enhanced planar sliding due to the interaction between N+C and the substitutional atoms as well as the dislocation, which is totally different from cyclic hardening in Mn12C1.2 steel caused by the interaction between C members of C–Mn couples with the dislocation. Enhanced effective stress is obtained due to the solid solution strengthening effect caused by the short range order at low strain amplitude while this effect does not work at high strain amplitude. Internal stress contributes most to the cyclic softening with the increase of strain amplitudes. Significant planar slip characteristic can be observed resulting from low stacking fault energy and high short range order effects in Mn18Cr7N0.6C0.3 steel and finally the parallel or intersecting thin sheets with dislocation tangles separated by dislocation free sheets are obtained with the prolonged cycles under cyclic elastic or plastic strain controlled fatigue testing. There exist amounts of small cracks on the surface of the Mn18Cr7N0.6C0.3 steel because fatigue crack initiation is promoted by the cyclic plastic strain localization. However, the zigzag configuration of the cracks reveals that the fatigue crack propagation is highly inhibited by the planar slip characteristic, which eventually improves the fatigue life.

  11. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  12. Study of the microstructure and of microhardness variation of a Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic alloy by niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho e Camargo, M.U. de; Lucki, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of hardening and corrosion resistance increase in Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic stainless steels by Nb additions are of interest to nuclear technology Niobium additions to a 321 type stainless steel were made in order to study the microhardness, electrical resistivity and metallography. Experimental measurements results are shown. The effect of Nb additions as a micro-alloying element and the thermal and mechanical processes (cold working in particular) in the microstructure and microhardness properties of the 11% Ni - 70%Fe - 17% Cr austenitic alloys were studied. (Author) [pt

  13. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process....... As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite...... investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low...

  14. Influence of Short Austenitization Treatments on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steels for Hot Forming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweissig, Martin Joachim; Lackmann, Jan; Konrad, Stefan; Schaper, Mirko; Niendorf, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The current work elucidates an improvement of the mechanical properties of tool-quenched low-alloy steel by employing extremely short austenitization durations utilizing a press heating arrangement. Specifically, the influence of different austenitization treatments—involving austenitization durations ranging from three to 15 seconds—on the mechanical properties of low-alloy steel in comparison to an industrial standard furnace process was examined. A thorough set of experiments was conducted to investigate the role of different austenitization durations and temperatures on the resulting mechanical properties such as hardness, bending angle, tensile strength, and strain at fracture. The most important finding is that the hardness, the bending angle as well as the tensile strength increase with shortened austenitization durations. Furthermore, the ductility of the steels exhibits almost no difference following the short austenitization durations and the standard furnace process. The enhancement of the mechanical properties imposed by the short heat treatments investigated, is related to a refinement of microstructural features as compared to the standard furnace process.

  15. Fundamental flow and fracture analysis of prime candidate alloy (PCA) for path a (austenitics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.E.; Jayakumar, M.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Room temperature microhardness tests have been performed on samples of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) for the austenitics (Path A) subjected to various thermomechanical treatments (TMT). The TMTs have effected various microstructures, which have been well characterized by optical metallography and TEM. For comparison, microhardness tests have been performed on samples of N-lot, DO heat and MFE 316 stainless steel with similar TMTs. The results indicate that the TMTs investigated can significantly alter the microhardness of the PCA in a manner which is consistent with microstructural changes. Moreover, while PCA had the lowest microhardness of the four alloys types after cold working, its microhardness increased while the others decreased to comparable values after aging for 2 h at 750 0 C

  16. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  17. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Domankova; Katarína Bártová; Ivan Slatkovský; Peter Pinke

    2016-01-01

    The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with ...

  18. High Cycle Fatigue of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Fargas Ribas, Gemma; Zapata Dederle, Ana Cristina; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan; Mateo García, Antonio Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are currently used in applications where severe forming operations are required, such as automotive bodies, due to its excellent ductility. They are also gaining interest for its combination of high strength and formability after forming. The biggest disadvantage is the difficulty to predict the mechanical response, which depends heavily on the amount of martensite formed. The martensitic transformation in metastable stainless steels can b...

  19. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  20. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  1. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  2. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  3. The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys at 646-700 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of model Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys at 646 to 700 K under fast neutron irradiation has been investigated, in comparison with that of a complex austenitic alloy (JPCA-2). In the model alloys, void swelling decreased with increasing phosphorus content. Void average size and density of JPCA-2 were comparable to those of the 0.024P alloy. The fact that these two alloys have the same phosphorus level suggests the void swelling of the model alloys would be strongly suppressed by increasing the phosphorus concentration and/or coaddition of phosphorus and titanium. The present study demonstrated that the phosphorus level is the strongest determinant of void swelling of both model and complex austenitic alloys. ((orig.))

  4. Manufacturing and characterization of Ni-free N-containing ODS austenitic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A.; Mamiya, H.; Ohnuma, M.; Ilavsky, J.; Ohishi, K.; Woźniak, Jarosław; Olszyna, A.; Watanabe, N.; Suzuki, J.; Kitazawa, H.; Lewandowska, M.

    2018-04-01

    Ni-free N-containing oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) austenitic alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The phase evolutions during milling under a nitrogen atmosphere and after sintering were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) and alloy contrast variation analysis (ACV), including small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), revealed the existence of nanoparticles with a diameter of 3-51 nm for the samples sintered at 950 °C. Sintering at 1000 °C for 5 and 15 min caused slight growth and a significant coarsening of the nanoparticles, up to 70 nm and 128 nm, respectively. The ACV analysis indicated the existence of two populations of Y2O3, ε-martensite and MnO. The dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) confirmed two kinds of nanoparticles, Y2O3 and MnO. The material was characterized by superior micro-hardness, of above 500 HV0.1.

  5. Intergranular corrosion in unserviced austenitic stainless steel pipes made of alloy 904L; Kornzerfall in nicht betriebsbeanspruchten rostfreien austenitischen Rohren aus Alloy 904L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Cagliyan, Erhan; Fischer, Boromir; Giller, Madeleine; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Berlin (Germany). Gasturbinenwerk Berlin

    2017-09-01

    Seamless tubes of the highly corrosion resistant austenitic steel 1.4539, X1NiCrMoCu25-20-5 (Alloy 904L) were observed to exhibit signs of inter-crystalline damage to a depth of several layers of grains and in particular on their internal surface. The material had been stored and had not been put into service. A number of hypotheses had been discussed to explain the predominant cause of the damage. Using optical light and scanning electron microscopy investigation techniques, clear evidence was obtained indicating it to be inter-crystalline corrosion due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries. The most probable cause of this was determined to be the presence of residual deposits from the rolling process, which due to poor cleaning, had not been completely removed prior to the final solution annealing treatment. This explaining why predominantly the internal surface of the tubes was affected.

  6. Annealing effect on redistribution of atoms in austenite of Fe-Ni-Mo and Fe-Ni-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodionov, Yu.L.; Isfandiyarov, G.G.; Zambrzhitskij, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    Using the Moessbauer spectrum method, studied has been the change in the fine atomic structure of the Fe-(28-36)%Ni austenite alloys with Mo and Si additives during annealing in the 200-800 deg C range. Also, the energy of the activation of processes, occurring at the annealing temperatures of below 500 deg C has been researched. On the basis of the obtained results a conclusion is drawn that the annealing of the investigated alloys at 300-500 deg C is conducive to the redistribution of the atoms of the alloying element and to the formation of regions with a higher content of Ni and Mo(Si) atoms

  7. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  8. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  9. Effect of structure and alloying elements on void formation in austenitic steels and nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, V.; Azam, N.; Le Naour, L.; Didout, G.; Delaplace, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the development of the fast breeder reactors the phenomenon of metal swelling due to the formation of radiation induced voids is a large problem. In the complex alloys small fluctuations in composition can have a considerable effect on swelling and a great deal of investigation on the effect of both major and minor alloying elements is needed to be able to predict swelling. To provide more insight a research program involving irradiation of both commercial or specially cast alloys by 500 keV Ni + ions or 1 MeV electrons has been developed. The major results are presented

  10. Measurement of carbon activity in sodium by Fe-Mn 20% alloy, and by strainless austenitic steel 304L and 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlin, C.; Saint Paul, P.; Baque, P.; Champeix, L.

    1980-01-01

    Precise knowledge of carbon activity in sodium used as coolant in fast breeder reactors, is essential for continuous survey of carburization-decarburization processes. Carbon activity can be periodically surveyed by measuring the carbon concentration or by hot trap like metal alloy strip placed in sodium loop. In fact, in equilibrium, activity of carbon in sodium is equal to the activity in metal alloy. Thus if the relation between concentration of carbon and it activity in the alloy is known, it is possible to estimate the activity of carbon in sodium. Materials to be used should have high solubility in carbon at the needed temperature. They should quickly attain equilibrium with sodium and they should not contain impurities that can affect the results. Materials chosen according to these criteria were Fe-Mn 20%, stainless austenitic steel AISI 304L and 316L

  11. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  12. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  13. Effect of Ti additions on the swelling of electron irradiated austenitic steels and Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbon, D.; Didout, G.; Le Naour, L.; Levy, V.

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that titanium is a beneficial additive for the swelling of austenitic steels. The amplitude of the effects observed depends much on the nature and concentration of the other additives in the austenitic matrix [fr

  14. The effect of alloying elements on the vacancy defect evolution in electron-irradiated austenitic Fe-Ni alloys studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhkov, A.P. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: druzhkov@imp.uran.ru; Perminov, D.A.; Davletshin, A.E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The vacancy defect evolution under electron irradiation in austenitic Fe-34.2 wt% Ni alloys containing oversized (aluminum) and undersized (silicon) alloying elements was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy at temperatures between 300 and 573 K. It is found that the accumulation of vacancy defects is considerably suppressed in the silicon-doped alloy. This effect is observed at all the irradiation temperatures. The obtained results provide evidence that the silicon-doped alloy forms stable low-mobility clusters involving several Si and interstitial atoms, which are centers of the enhanced recombination of migrating vacancies. The clusters of Si-interstitial atoms also modify the annealing of vacancy defects in the Fe-Ni-Si alloy. The interaction between small vacancy agglomerates and solute Al atoms is observed in the Fe-Ni-Al alloy under irradiation at 300-423 K.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  16. Comparison of ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, M.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel carried out to improve the surface corrosion resistance. The gas composition for plasma nitriding was 85% N 2 -15% H 2 and that for plasma nitrocarburizing was 85% N 2 -12% H 2 -3% CO 2 . Both treatments were performed for 5 h, for different process temperatures of 570 and 620 o C for ferritic and austenitic plasma treatment, respectively. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution, were used to study the treated surfaces. The results of X-ray analysis revealed that with increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C for both treatments, the amount of ε phase decreased and γ' phase increased. Nitrocarburizing treatment resulted in formation of a more amount of ε phase with respect to nitriding treatment. However, the highest amount of ε phase was observed in the ferritic nitrocarburized sample at 570 o C. The sample nitrided at 620 o C exhibited the thickest layer. The potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that after plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing at 570 o C, corrosion potential increased with respect to the untreated sample due to the noble nitride and carbonitride phases formed on the surface. After increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C, corrosion potential decreased due to the less ε phase development in the compound layer and more porous compound layer formed at 620 o C with respect to the treated samples at 570 o C.

  17. PRECIPITATION BEHAVIOR OF M2N IN A HIGH-NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL DURING ISOTHERMAL AGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Shi; L.J. Wang; W.F. Cui; C.M. Liu

    2007-01-01

    The precipitation behavior of M2N and the microstructural evolution in a Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel with a high nitrogen content of 0.43mass% during isothermal aging has been investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy ( SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The aging treatments have led to the decomposition of nitrogen supersaturated austenitic matrix through discontinuous cellular precipitation. The precipitated cells comprise alternate lamellae of M2N precipitate and austenitic matrix. This kind of precipitate morphology is similar to that of pearlite. However, owing to the non-eutectoidic mechanism of the reaction, the growth characteristic of the cellular precipitates is different from that of pearlite in Fe-C binary alloys. M2N precipitate in the cell possesses a hexagonal crystal structure with the parameters a=0.4752nm and c=0.4429nm, and the orientation relationship between the MN precipitates and austenite determined from the SADP is [01110]M2N// [101]γ,[2-1-10]M2N// [010]γ.

  18. Study of retained austenite and nano-scale precipitation and their effects on properties of a low alloyed multi-phase steel by the two-step intercritical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Z.J.; Han, G., E-mail: hangang@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhou, W.H.; Zeng, C.Y.; Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn

    2016-03-15

    Microstructure evolution and properties were studied in a low carbon low alloyed hot-rolled bainitic steel by annealing and annealing plus tempering. Microstructure of the hot-rolled steel consists of lath bainite and martensite. By annealing at 720 °C for 30 min and water quenching, multi-phase microstructure consisting of intercritical ferrite, tempered bainite/martensite, retained austenite and fresh martensite was obtained. With increasing annealing temperature to 760 °C, microstructure of the steel consisted of intercritical ferrite, fresh martensite without retained austenite. After the second step of tempering at 680 °C for samples annealed both at 720 °C and 760 °C, ~ 8–9% volume fraction of retained austenite was obtained in the multi-phase microstructure. Moreover, fine precipitates of VC with size smaller than 10 nm and copper precipitates with size of ~ 10–50 nm were obtained after tempering. Results from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) give evidence to support that the partitioning of Mn, Ni and Cu is of significance for retained austenite stabilization. Due to the combined contribution of multiphase microstructure, the transformation-induced-plasticity effect of retained austenite and strengthening effect of nanometer-sized precipitates, yield strength greater than 800 MPa, yield to tensile ratio of 0.9, uniform elongation of ~ 9% and good low temperature impact toughness of 147 J at − 40 °C were achieved. - Highlights: • Stable retained austenite was produced in a low alloyed steel. • Partition of Mn, Ni and Cu was confirmed by STEM for austenite stabilization. • Nano-sized VC and Cu precipitates were achieved by second tempering. • High strength–high toughness with low Y/T ratio was obtained.

  19. The conflicting roles of boron on the radiation response of precipitate-forming austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, T.; Sekimura, N.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Boron is often a deliberately added solute to improve the radiation resistance of austenitic structural alloys, with boron exerting its greatest influence on carbide precipitation. However, boron also a source of helium via transmutation and therefore tends to accelerate the onset of void nucleation. These conflicting contributions of boron with respect to radiation resistance are not easily separated, but are sometimes utilized to mimic fusion-relevant gas generation rates when testing in surrogate fission spectra. In an earlier study the authors demonstrated that in simple model ternary alloys that boron additions tended to homogenize swelling somewhat via increased helium generation but not to exert any significant influence on the total swelling. In these easily swelling alloys void nucleation was not significantly influenced by additional helium or by boron's chemical effect, with boron remaining primarily in solution. In the current study, Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25 Ti-0.05C alloys with four levels of natural boron addition (0, 100, 500, 2500 appm) were irradiated side-by-side at ∼400 deg. C in the Fast Flux Test Facility under active temperature control in the Materials Open Test Assembly. Although three sets of irradiation conditions were explored, the boron variation was the only variable operating in each data set. The bulk swelling was measured using an immersion density technique and electron microscopy was employed to determine the details of void, dislocation and precipitate microstructure. It was found that by 100 appm B the strongest and most immediate effect of boron was to reduce swelling at all irradiation conditions explored, but the boron-induced increases in overall helium content were rather small over the 0-100 appm B range. This indicates that boron's primary effect was chemical in nature, expressed via its effect on precipitation. As the boron level was progressively increased, however, there was a reversal in

  20. The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and nickel on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihal, V.

    1985-01-01

    From the results of the stress corrosion cracking tests it is evident that austenitic alloys with a phosphorus content 0.01% causes a strong increase in stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloys with a nickel content in the range 33 to 38%. With a nickel content of approx. 35%, an increase of nitrogen concentration to approx. 0.15% also produces a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. A sulphur content up to 0.033% does not produce a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  1. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  2. Study of Creep of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, Natalie Petrovna

    To withstand the high temperature (>700°C) and pressure demands of steam turbines and boilers used for energy applications, metal alloys must be economically viable and have the necessary material properties, such as high-temperature creep strength, oxidation and corrosion resistance, to withstand such conditions. One promising class of alloys potentially capable of withstanding the rigors of aggressive environments, are alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels (AFAs) alloyed with aluminum to improve corrosion and oxidation resistance. The effect of aging on the microstructure, high temperature constant-stress creep behavior and mechanical properties of the AFA-type alloy Fe-20Cr-30Ni-2Nb-5Al (at.%) were investigated in this study. The alloy's microstructural evolution with increased aging time was observed prior to creep testing. As aging time increased, the alloy exhibited increasing quantities of fine Fe2Nb Laves phase dispersions, with a precipitate-free zone appearing in samples with higher aging times. The presence of the L1 2 phase gamma'-Ni3Al precipitate was detected in the alloy's matrix at 760°C. A constant-stress creep rig was designed, built and its operation validated. Constant-stress creep tests were performed at 760°C and 35MPa, and the effects of different aging conditions on creep rate were investigated. Specimens aged for 240 h exhibited the highest creep rate by a factor of 5, with the homogenized sample having the second highest rate. Samples aged for 2.4 h and 24 h exhibited similar low secondary creep rates. Creep tests conducted at 700oC exhibited a significantly lower creep rate compared to those at 760oC. Microstructural analysis was performed on crept samples to explore high temperature straining properties. The quantity and size of Fe2Nb Laves phase and NiAl particles increased in the matrix and on grain boundaries with longer aging time. High temperature tensile tests were performed and compared to room temperature results. The

  3. Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some σ phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Influence of alloy elements on physical and mechanical properties of single crystalline austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazutaka; Kaneda, Junya; Yoshinari, Akira; Aono, Yasuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The single crystalline austenitic stainless steels based on 316 L were developed to improve their resistance to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. However the mechanical properties of the single crystals were lower than those of polycrystalline. The precipitation hardening methods were applied to the single crystal for the increase of their mechanical strength by addition of niobium and heat treatments. In this paper, the influences of niobium concentration on the several physical and mechanical properties of these single crystalline austenitic stainless steels were studied. The thermal conductivity, coefficients of thermal expansion and elastic constants of the single crystals were almost the same as those of polycrystalline independently of the niobium concentration. The mechanical properties of the single crystals strongly depended on the niobium concentration and the orientation. In the specimen which contains 1.0 mass% niobium, 0.2% proof stress were remarkably improved; 370 MPa, 337 MPa and 403 MPa were obtained in , and orientations at the room temperature. The creep rupture strength and the high cycle fatigue strength were also improved by addition of niobium. In the -orientated specimen which contains 1.0 mass% niobium, the creep rupture strength at 873 K for 103 hours, 245 MPa and the high cycle fatigue strength at 773 K for 107 cycles, 220 MPa were obtained. Furthermore, the single crystalline pipe, bolts and nuts were successfully manufactured for the application of these single crystals. (author)

  5. Influence of grain structure on the deformation mechanism in martensitic shear reversion-induced Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy with low interstitial content: Coarse-grained versus nano-grained/ultrafine-grained structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challa, V.S.A. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra2@utep.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Department of Metallurgical, Materials Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Somani, M.C. [Center for Advanced Steels Research, The University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Wang, Z.D. [State Key Laboratory for Rolling and Automation, Northeastern University, 3-11 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-04-20

    Nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) materials characterized by high strength-high ductility combination are excellent vehicles to obtain an unambiguous understanding of deformation mechanisms vis-à-vis their coarse-grained counterparts. In this context, the innovative concept of phase reversion-induced NG/UFG structure enabled achieving high strength besides comparable ductility, for instance, in metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the phase reversion process, severe deformation of austenite at room temperature (typically ~60–80%) transforms face-centered cubic austenite (γ) to body centered cubic martensite (α′). Upon annealing, martensite reverts to austenite leading to extensive grain refinement. The objective of the present study to fundamentally understand the deformation mechanisms in NG/UFG structure in relation to that of the coarse-grained (CG) structure was accomplished by combining depth-sensing nanoscale experiments on an Fe-16Cr-10Ni model austenitic alloy conducted at different strain rates, followed by the study of structural evolution in the deformed zone using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the high strength NG/UFG steel (YS~585 MPa), stacking faults and nanotwins contributed to the enhanced ductility (El~35%), while in the case of low strength (YS~260 MPa) coarse-grained (CG) counterpart, ductility was also high (El~40%), but chiefly due to strain-induced martensite, which points to a clear case of grain size effect (and the corresponding level of strength). The distinct change in the deformation mechanism from stacking faults and twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) in the NG structure to transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) in the CG structure is elucidated in terms of austenite stability-strain energy relationship. The insights on the relationship between grain structure (and strength) and deformation mechanisms are envisaged to be important in providing a new direction for the futuristic design of high strength-high

  6. The Primary Origin of Dose Rate Effects on Microstructural Evolution of Austenitic Alloys During Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Sato, Toshihiko; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on neutron-induced microstructural evolution was experimentally estimated. Solution-annealed austenitic model alloys were irradiated at approximately 400 degrees C with fast neutrons at seven different dose rates that vary more than two orders difference in magnitude, and two different doses were achieved at each dose rate. Both cavity nucleation and growth were found to be enhanced at lower dose rate. The net vacancy flux is calculated from the growth rate of cavities that had already nucleated during the first cycle of irradiation and grown during the second cycle. The net vacancy flux was found to be proportional to (dpa/sec) exp (1/2) up to 28.8 dpa and 8.4 x 10 exp (-7) dpa/sec. This implies that mutual recombination dominates point defect annihilation, in this experiment even though point defect sinks such as cavities and dislocations were well developed. Thus, mutual recombination is thought to be the primary origin of the effect of dose rate on microstructural evolution

  7. Effect of Hot Rolling on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Alloyed Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Karthick, N. K.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; Cherian, Roy M.

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of multi-pass hot rolling in the temperature range of 700-1000 °C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel was studied with the aid of optical microscopy, tensile testing and x-ray diffraction measurements. The microstructural changes that occurred in the hot rolled specimens were elongation of grains in rolling direction, nucleation of new grains at the grain boundaries of elongated grains and growth of nucleated grains to form fully recrystallized grains. Elongated grains formed at lower rolling temperature (700-800 °C) due to inadequate strain/temperature for the initiation of dynamic recrystallization. At higher rolling temperature (900-1000 °C), fine grains formed due to dynamic recrystallization. Tensile properties showed strong dependency on the rolling temperature. Tensile strength increased with the decrease in the rolling temperature at the cost of ductility. Maximum strength was observed in samples hot rolled at 700 °C with yield strength of 917 MPa and ductility of 25%. This variation in the tensile properties with the rolling temperature is attributed to changes in the dislocation density and grain structure. The estimated yield strength from the dislocation density, solid solution and grain boundary strengthening closely matched with experimentally determined yield strength confirming the role of dislocation density and grain size in the strengthening.

  8. Diffusive Phenomena and the Austenite/Martensite Relative Stability in Cu-Based Shape-Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrina, J. L.; Yawny, A.; Sade, M.

    2018-02-01

    The main characteristic of martensitic phase transitions is the coordinate movement of the atoms which takes place athermally, without the contribution of diffusion during its occurrence. However, the impacts of diffusive phenomena on the relative stability between the phases involved and, consequently, on the associated transformation temperatures and functional properties can be significant. This is particularly evident in the case of Cu-based shape-memory alloys where atomic diffusion in both austenite and martensite metastable phases might occur even at room-temperature levels, giving rise to a variety of intensively studied phenomena. In the present study, the progresses made in the understanding of three selected diffusion-related effects of importance in Cu-Zn-Al and Cu-Al-Be alloys are reviewed. They are the after-quench retained disorder in the austenitic structure and its subsequent reordering, the stabilization of the martensite, and the effect of applied stress on the austenitic order. It is shown how the experimental results obtained from tests performed on single crystal material can be rationalized under the shed of a model developed to evaluate the variation of the relative stability between the phases in terms of atom pairs interchanges.

  9. Ab initio investigation of the surface properties of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rák, Zs., E-mail: zrak@ncsu.edu; Brenner, D.W.

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • The trend in the surface energies of austenitic stainless steels is: (111) < (100) < (110). • On the (111) orientation Ni segregates to the surface and Cr segregates into the bulk. • The surface stability of the alloys in contact with water decrease with temperature and pH. - Abstract: The surface energetics of two austenitic stainless steel alloys (Type 304 and 316) and three Ni-based alloys (Alloy 600, 690, and 800) are investigated using theoretical methods within the density functional theory. The relative stability of the low index surfaces display the same trend for all alloys; the most closely packed orientation and the most stable is the (111), followed by the (100) and the (110) surfaces. Calculations on the (111) surfaces using various surface chemical and magnetic configurations reveal that Ni has the tendency to segregate toward the surface and Cr has the tendency to segregate toward the bulk. The magnetic frustration present on the (111) surfaces plays an important role in the observed segregation tendencies of Ni and Cr. The stability of the (111) surfaces in contact with aqueous solution are evaluated as a function of temperature, pH, and concentration of aqueous species. The results indicate that the surface stability of the alloys decrease with temperature and pH, and increase slightly with concentration. Under conditions characteristic to an operating pressurized water reactor, the Ni-based alloy series appears to be of better quality than the stainless steel series with respect to corrosion resistance and release of aqueous species when in contact with aqueous solutions.

  10. Welding of austenitic stainless steel with a high molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, A.; Holmberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    Welding of austenitic steel is discussed. Welding tests of AVESTA 250 SMO (six percent Mo) are reported. Welding without special additives can make the joints susceptible for corrosion in aggressive environments, e.g. sea water. (L.E.)

  11. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  12. Effects of minor alloying additions on the strength and swelling behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessel, G.R.

    1978-06-01

    A set of 32 alloys consisting of various additions of the elements Mo, W, Al, Ti, Nb, C and Si to an Fe-7.5 Cr-20 Ni alloy were made in order to investigate the effects of these solute additions on alloy swelling and strength. Both single and multiple additions were examined. The influence of various solute elements on the swelling behavior in the range 500 to 730 0 C was investigated using 4 MeV Ni ion bombardment to a dose 170 dpa. It was found that on an atomic percent basis, the elements may be arranged in order of decreasing effectiveness in reducing peak temperature swelling as follows: Ti, C, Nb, Si, and Mo. Small amounts of aluminum enhance swelling. Additions of Si, Ti, or Nb truncate the high temperature swelling regime of the ternary alloy. Mo, W, and C do not have a strong effect on the temperature dependence of swelling. The results may be interpreted in terms of the effect of point defect trapping on void growth rates, and it is suggested that the changes in peak temperature are the result of small changes in the free vacancy formation energy. A method for treating certain multiple additions is proposed. The effect of these alloying additions on short time high temperature strength properties was estimated using hot hardness measurements over the temperature range 22 to 850 0 C. On an atom percent basis Nb and Ti were most effective in conferring solid solution strengthening and Si the least effective. In the regime 22 to approximately 650 0 C, the hardness data was found to fit an equation of the form: H = H 0 + b/T; where H is the hardness, T is the temperature, and H 0 and b are constants for a given alloy. An empirical method was devised to estimate the hot hardness of alloys containing more than one solute addition

  13. Highly corrosive and high strength Cr-Mn series austenite sintered steel, method of manufacturing the same and the usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masahiko; Hirano, Tatsumi; Aono, Yasuhisa; Kato, Takahiko; Kondo, Yasuo; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    1998-01-01

    The steel of the present invention comprises a highly corrosive and high strength Cr-Mn series austenite sintered steel containing up to 0.1% of C, up to 1% of Si, up to 0.4% of N, from 9 to 25% of (Mn + Ni) within a range of more than 2% and up to 15% of Mn and from 14 to 20% of Cr, and it has an average crystal grain size of 1μm or less and comprises at least 90 vol% of an austenite phase. In addition, the alloy is incorporated with one or more elements of up to 3% of Mo, 1.0% of Ti, up to 2.0% of Zr and up to 1.0% of Nb in an amount of up to 2.0% in total of Ti, Zr and Nb. When these materials are used under the circumstance where materials are generally deteriorated in grain boundaries, since they are excellent in corrosion resistance and strength, remarkable effects can be attained in the improvement of the safety and the reliability of products. In addition, they are applied not only to a reactor core but also to a water-cooled circumstance and a circumstance where hydrogen exists, thereby capable of exhibiting remarkable effects. (T.M.)

  14. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  15. The use of potential drop techniques for the evaluation of environment assisted cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, P.; Hwang, I.S.; Ballinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    The DC potential drop technique has been adapted for strain measurements. An AC potential drop technique has been developed for crack detection. It has been demonstrated that a DC with switched polarity can have a strain accuracy of ±0.12% after yielding and a multi-frequency AC system with up to 200 kHz frequency can have a sensitivity of 50 μm for crack detection. The techniques have been applied to environment assisted cracking tests of Ni-Cr-Fe alloys in 350 degrees C water and austenitic stainless steel in 288 degrees C water using both static and dynamic loading. Long term signal stability is maintained given: (1) rigid probe attachments; (2) local preamplification; and (3) adequate lead grounding and shielding. The AC potential drop technique is found to be more suitable for constant load than for dynamic loading and is also compatible with aggressive environments. During dynamic loading, sensitivity can be significantly reduced due to serrated yielding. An analytical model has been developed to predict the DC and AC potential drops in a round bar geometry. A sensitivity analysis has been made to determine test to test variation associated with variations in supplied current, specimen dimensions, and probe spacing. Multifrequency analysis shows that the measured data agrees with the prediction at frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz induced signal in the probes results in increases in potential drop and phase angle. The induced signal is reproducible and therefore may be related to the crack mouth opening displacement

  16. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  17. A new effect of retained austenite on ductility enhancement in high strength bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ying; Zhang Ke; Guo Zhenghong; Chen Nailu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rong Yonghua, E-mail: yhrong@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new DARA effect in the bainitic steel is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conditions of DARA effect are proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of retained austenite on ductility enhancement is clarified. - Abstract: A designed high strength bainitic steel with considerable amount of retained austenite is presented in order to study the effect of retained austenite on the ductility enhancement in bainitic steels. Transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) effect is verified by both X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement of retained austenite fraction in various deformation stages and transmission electron microscopy observation of the deformed twin-type martensite. Results from XRD line profile analysis reveal that the average dislocation density in bainite during the deformation is lower than that before deformation, and such a phenomenon can be explained by a new effect, dislocations absorption by retained austenite (DARA) effect, based on our previous investigation of martensitic steels. DARA effect availably enhances the compatibility of deformation ability of bainite with retained austenite. In view of microstructure similarity of bainitic steels with martensitic steels, the conditions of DARA effect are proposed. The effects of retained austenite on the ductility enhancement in bainitic steels are clarified.

  18. A preliminary investigation of the initiation of pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginson, A.

    1984-01-01

    Pitting corrosion in a number of austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys that differ widely in their resistance to corrosion was studed by electrochemical and electron-optical techniques. The effect of contamination of the sulphuric acid electrolyte by chloride ions was also investigated. Preliminary results for the surface analysis of samples of 316 stainless steel by Auger electron spectroscopy are presented, and suggestions are included for further application of this technique to the examination of pitting corrosion. A comprehensive review of the literature concerning the initiation of pitting corrosion is included

  19. New developments in irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of austenitic alloys and their consequences on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Hamilton, M.L.; Dodd, R.A.; Porter, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented of recent development in the study of radiation-induced changes in the microstructure of austenitic structural alloys that occur in fission reactors. The associated macroscopic consequences of these changes on both mechanical properties and dimensional stability are also reviewed. It is anticipated that some changes will occur in these phenomena as a result of the differences inherent in fission and fusion neutron spectra, but relevant data obtained to date do not indicate that the effects of helium and several other transmutation-related changes will be large. 78 refs., 12 figs

  20. Effects of alloys elements, impurities and microstructural factors in austenitic stainless steel to utilize in fuel rod of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, A.

    1988-08-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steel is used as cladding material of pressurized water reactor fuel rods because of its good performance. The addition of alloy elements and the control of impurities make this to happen. Fission products do not contribute to corrosion. Dimensional changes are not critical up to 1,0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0,1 MeV) of neutronic doses. The hydrogen does not cause embrittlement in the reactor operation temperatures, and helium contributes to embrittlement if the material is warmed upon 650 0 C. (author) [pt

  1. On abnormal decomposition of supercooled austenite in carbon and alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parusov, V.V.; Dolzhenkov, I.I.; Podobedov, L.V.; Vakulenko, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    Residual stresses which appear as a result of thermal cycling in the temperature range of 300-700 deg C are investigated in an austenitic class steel (03Kh18N11) to ground the assumption on the effect of plastic deformation, appearing due to thermal stresses, on the mechanism of supercooled austenite decomposition. The determination of residual stresses is carried out with the help of X-ray diffraction analysis. It is established that the deformation brings about an increase in density of dislocation the interaction of which leads to the formation of a typical austenite substructure which conditions the proceeding of the eutectoid transformation according to an abnormal mechanism. It is noted, that the grain pearlite formation due to plastic and microplastic deformation of supercooled austenite induced by thermal stresses should be taken into account when developing steel heat treatment shedules [ru

  2. Effect of carbide precipitates on high temperature creep of a 20Cr-25Ni austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakagawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature creep of an austenitic stainless steel having carbide precipitates, is different from that of the carbide precipitate-free one. Strain rates of the steady state creep d(epsilonsub(s))/dt, or minimum strain rates of the creep in precipitate hardened and dispersion strengthened alloys at the creep temperature T, can be expressed by Sherby-Dorn's equation d(epsilonsub(s))/dt = Aσsup(n) exp (-Qsub(c)/RT). The stress exponent n, and the activation energy for creep Qsub(c), in a power law creep region, are more than those of unstrengthened alloys, where σ is the creep stress, R the gas constant and A the constant. In this research, the influence of carbide precipitates on steady creep rates, is investigated. Experimental details are given. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  3. Effects of carbon content on high-temperature mechanical and thermal fatigue properties of high-boron austenitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature mechanical properties of high-boron austenitic steels (HBASs were studied at 850 °C using a dynamic thermal-mechanical simulation testing machine. In addition, the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys were investigated using the self-restraint Uddeholm thermal fatigue test, during which the alloy specimens were cycled between room temperature and 800°C. Stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the surface cracks and cross-sectional microstructure of the alloy specimens after the thermal fatigue tests. The effects of carbon content on the mechanical properties at room temperature and high-temperature as well as thermal fatigue properties of the HBASs were also studied. The experimental results show that increasing carbon content induces changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HBASs. The boride phase within the HBAS matrix exhibits a round and smooth morphology, and they are distributed in a discrete manner. The hardness of the alloys increases from 239 (0.19wt.% C to 302 (0.29wt.% C and 312 HV (0.37wt.% C; the tensile yield strength at 850 °C increases from 165.1 to 190.3 and 197.1 MPa; and the compressive yield strength increases from 166.1 to 167.9 and 184.4 MPa. The results of the thermal fatigue tests (performed for 300 cycles from room temperature to 800 °C indicate that the degree of thermal fatigue of the HBAS with 0.29wt.% C (rating of 2–3 is superior to those of the alloys with 0.19wt.% (rating of 4–5 and 0.37wt.% (rating of 3–4 carbon. The main cause of this difference is the ready precipitation of M23(C,B6-type borocarbides in the alloys with high carbon content during thermal fatigue testing. The precipitation and aggregation of borocarbide particles at the grain boundaries result in the deterioration of the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys.

  4. The compositional dependence of irradiation creep of austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR at 420{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Munro, B. [AEA Technology, Dounreay (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep data are expensive and often difficult to obtain, especially when compared to swelling data. This requires that maximum use be made of available data sources in order to elucidate the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep for application to new alloys and to new environments such as those of proposed fusion environments. One previously untapped source of creep data is that of a joint U.S./U.K. experiment conducted in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in Dounreay, Scotland. In this experiment, five austenitic steels were irradiated in a variety of starting conditions. In particular, these steels spanned a large range (15-40%) of nickel contents, and contained strong variations in Mo, Ti, Al, and Nb. Some alloys were solution-strengthened and some were precipitation-strengthened. Several were cold-worked. These previously unanalyzed data show that at 420{degrees}C all austenitic steels have a creep compliance that is roughly independent of the composition of the steel at 2{+-}1 x 10{sup {minus}6}MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}. The variation within this range may arise from the inability to completely separate the non-creep strains arising from precipitation reactions and the stress-enhancement of swelling. Each of these can be very sensitive to the composition and starting treatment of a steel.

  5. The independence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys of displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The majority of high fluence data on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic steels were generated at relatively high displacement rates and relatively low helium/dpa levels that are not characteristic of the conditions anticipated in ITER and other anticipated fusion environments. After reanalyzing the available data, this paper shows that irradiation creep is not directly sensitive to either the helium/dpa ratio or the displacement rate, other than through their possible influence on void swelling, since one component of the irradiation creep rate varies with no correlation to the instantaneous swelling rate. Until recently, however, the non-swelling-related creep component was also thought to exhibit its own strong dependence on displacement rate, increasing at lower fluxes. This perception originally arose from the work of Lewthwaite and Mosedale at temperatures in the 270-350{degrees}C range. More recently this perception was thought to extend to higher irradiation temperatures. It now appears, however, that this interpretation is incorrect, and in fact the steady-state value of the non-swelling component of irradiation creep is actually insensitive to displacement rate. The perceived flux dependence appears to arise from a failure to properly interpret the impact of the transient regime of irradiation creep.

  6. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr 2 N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite

  7. Severe embrittlement of neutron irradiated austenitic steels arising from high void swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neustroev, V.S. [FSUE ' SSC RF Research Institute of Atomic Reactors' , Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)], E-mail: neustroev@niiar.ru; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-04-30

    Data are presented from BOR-60 irradiations showing that significant radiation-induced swelling causes severe embrittlement in austenitic stainless steels, reducing the service life of structural components and introducing limitations on low temperature handling especially. It is shown that the degradation is actually a form of quasi-embrittlement arising from intense flow localization with high levels of localized ductility involving micropore coalescence and void-to-void cracking. Voids initially serve as hardening components whose effect is overwhelmed by the void-induced reduction in shear and Young's moduli at high swelling levels. Thus the alloy appears to soften even as the ductility plunges toward zero on a macroscopic level although a large amount of deformation occurs microscopically at the failure site. Thus the failure is better characterized as 'quasi-embrittlement' which is a suppression of uniform deformation. This case should be differentiated from that of real embrittlement which involves the complete suppression of the material's capability for plastic deformation.

  8. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Wahabi, M.; Gavard, L.; Montheillet, F.; Cabrera, J.M.; Prado, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain (ε = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d rec and twin boundary fraction f TB measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature

  9. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  10. Influence of Ti on the Hot Ductility of High-manganese Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Bowei; Su, Xiaofeng; Li, Shiqi; Ding, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The influence of Ti addition ( 0.10 wt%) on hot ductility of as-cast high-manganese austenitic steels has been examined over the temperature range 650-1,250 °C under a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 using Gleeble3500 thermal simulation testing machine. The fracture surfaces and particles precipitated at different tensile temperatures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Hot ductility as a function of reduction curves shows that adding 0.10 wt% Ti made the ductility worse in the almost entire range of testing temperatures. The phases' equilibrium diagrams of precipitates in Ti-bearing high-Mn austenitic steel were calculated by the Thermo-Calc software. The calculation result shows that 0.1 wt% Ti addition would cause Ti(C,N) precipitated at 1,499 °C, which is higher than the liquidus temperature of high-Mn austenitic steel. It indicated that Ti(C,N) particles start forming in the liquid high-Mn austenitic steel. The SEM-EDS results show that Ti(C,N) and TiC particles could be found along the austenite grain boundaries or at triple junction, and they would accelerate the extension of the cracks along the grain boundaries.

  11. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A specification is provided for an austenitic stainless steel consisting of Fe, Cr and Ni, with small amounts of Mo, Mn, Si and Ti. The specification includes a fuel element and a method for cladding a reactor fuel. (U.K.)

  12. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels. 3 figures, 3 tables

  13. Austenitic stainless steel alloys having improved resistance to fast neutron-induced swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is based on the discovery that radiation-induced voids which occur during fast neutron irradiation can be controlled by small but effective additions of titanium and silicon. The void-suppressing effect of these metals in combination is demonstrated and particularly apparent in austenitic stainless steels

  14. Relation between the mechanical properties and SCC behavior of the alloys used in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Katayama, Y.; Kanazawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    It was shown in the previous reports that carbon and low alloy steels, martensitic stainless steels and cold worked austenitic stainless steels have shown high SCC susceptibility in the highly hardened condition. Those steels had similar critical hardness for SCC (HV300-340), over which the materials showed SCC susceptibility, even though the hardening process was different. Hardening processes applied for the alloys were as follows: (1) Martensitic transformation: Carbon and low alloy steels and martensitic stainless steels. (2) Alpha-prime decomposition (precipitation hardening): martensitic stainless steels. (3) Cold work: austenitic stainless steels. The relationship between the mechanical properties and SCC susceptibility of the alloys is discussed and summarized in the present paper. (author)

  15. Irradiation creep and swelling of various austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR and FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In order to use data from surrogate neutron spectra for fusion applications, it is necessary to analyze the impact of environmental differences on property development. This is of particular importance in the study of irradiation creep and its interactions with void swelling, especially with respect to the difficulty of separation of creep strains from various non-creep strains. As part of an on-going creep data rescue and analysis effort, the current study focuses on comparative irradiations conducted on identical gas-pressurized tubes produced and constructed in the United States from austenitic steels (20% CW 316 and 20% CW D9), but irradiated in either the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in the United Kingdom or the Fast Flux Test Facility in the United States. In PFR, Demountable Subassemblies (DMSA) serving as heat pipes were used without active temperature control. In FFTF the specimens were irradiated with active ({+-}{degrees}5C) temperature control. Whereas the FFTF irradiations involved a series of successive side-by-side irradiation, measurement and reinsertion of the same series of tubes, the PFR experiment utilized simultaneous irradiation at two axial positions in the heat pipe to achieve different fluences at different flux levels. The smaller size of the DMSA also necessitated a separation of the tubes at a given flux level into two groups (low-stress and high-stress) at slightly different axial positions, where the flux between the two groups varied {le}10%. Of particular interest in this study was the potential impact of the two types of separation on the derivation of creep coefficients.

  16. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  17. Microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of modulated martensite, non-modulated martensite, and pre-martensitic tweed austenite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Le; Schneider, Matthew M.; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu; Sohn, Yongho

    2017-01-01

    A combinatorial approach using diffusion couples and TEM analyses was carried out to investigate the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys. The compositions cover a large portion of the off-stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa compositions and some Mn-rich compositions. Crystallographic variations of the martensitic phase, including non-modulated (NM) martensite, modulated (5M or 7M) martensite, and austenitic phase were identified in the diffusion couples and investigated with respect to their microstructure and crystallography. The 5M and 7M martensitic structures were only found near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, while the NM martensitic structures were found mostly away from the interphase boundary. The tetragonality ratio (c/a) for NM martensite generally increases with e/a ratio, but was also dependent on the composition. The habit plane and martensitic microstructure that consists of twinned variants with differing orientations were documented using electron diffraction. The pre-martensitic state was observed in the austenitic phase that was located near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, with distinctive tweed microstructure and a strain field originating from the local lattice distortions. The combinatorial approach proves to be efficient and systematic in studying the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys and can be potentially applied to other shape memory alloys.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Diego, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  19. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, V.N.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.; Ruzhytskyi, V.V. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Tolstolutskaya, G.D., E-mail: g.d.t@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ∼1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  20. Reversibility in martensitic transformation and shape memory in high Mn ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomota, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The reversibility of austenite (γ : fcc) epsilon (ε : hcp) martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in high Mn ferrous alloys are discussed. A particular emphasis is put on the ε → γ reverse transformation behavior in two poly-crystalline alloys, Fe-24Mn and Fe-24Mn-6Si, where the latter exhibits excellent shape memory while the former shows poor memory although their forward γ → ε transformation behavior is quite similar. TEM in situ observations have revealed that the motion of Shockley partial dislocations during ε → γ reverse transformation is different from each other in these two alloys. The influence of alloying elements on the shape memory effect can be related to solid solution hardening of austenite, suggesting an important role of internal stress. The effect of training on enhancing the shape memory is explained by such an internal stress distribution associated with the formation of very thin, i.e., nano-scale ε/γ lamellae. (orig.)

  1. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Syarif, Dani Gustaman

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO 2 . The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe 2 O 3 . Minor element such as Cr 2 O 3 is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO 2 appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate

  2. High temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id; Syarif, Dani Gustaman, E-mail: djokohp@batan.go.id [Research Center for Nuclear Materials and Radiometry, Jl. Tamansari 71, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The objective of this study is to evaluate high temperature oxidation behavior of austenitic stainless steel SS 304 in steam of nanofluids contain nanoparticle ZrO{sub 2}. The oxidation was performed at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 800°C. The oxidation time was 60 minutes. After oxidation the surface of the samples was analyzed by different methods including, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of stainless steel AISI 304 alloys is dominated by iron oxide, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Minor element such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is also appeared in the diffraction pattern. Characterization by optical microscope showed that cross section microstructure of stainless steel changed after oxidized with the oxide scale on the surface stainless steels. SEM and x-ray diffraction examination show that the oxide of ZrO{sub 2} appeared on the surface of stainless steel. Kinetic rate of oxidation of austenite stainless steel AISI 304 showed that increasing oxidation temperature and time will increase oxidation rate.

  3. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...... instantaneous loading or during the primary creep stage. Trace analysis has shown that the multipoles are confined to {1 1 1} planes during primary creep but are not necessarily confined to these planes during steady-state creep unless they are pinned by interstitials....

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water and alternative stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of SFE on SCC resistance of austenitic stainless steels and to develop the alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel for BWR application, the effect of chemical composition and heat treatment on SFE value and SCCGR in oxygenated high temperature water were studied. The correlation factors between SFE values for 54 heats of materials and their chemical compositions for nickel, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, nitrogen, silicon and carbon were obtained. From these correlation factors, original formulae for SFE values calculation of austenitic stainless steels in the SHTWC, SHTFC and AGG conditions were established. The maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area of the IGSCC for 33 heats were evaluated as IGSCC resistance in oxygenated high temperature water. The IGSCC resistance of strain hardened nonsensitized austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water increases with increasing of nickel contents and SFE values. From this study, it is suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of non-sensitized strain hardened austenitic stainless steels. As an alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel, increased SFE value material, which is high nickel, high chromium, low silicon and low nitrogen material, is recommendable. (author)

  5. WC-3015 alloy (high-temperature alloy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    WC-3015 Nb alloy containing 28 to 30 Hf, 1 to 2 Zr, 13 to 16 W, 0 to 4 Ta, 0 to 5 Ti, 0.07 to 0.33 C, less than or equal to 0.02 N, less than or equal to 0.03 O, less than or equal to 0.001 H was developed for use at high temperature in oxidizing environments. Its composition can be tailored to meet specific requirements. When WC-3015 is exposed to O at elevated temperature, Hf and Nb oxidized preferentially and HfO 2 dissolves in Nb 2 O 5 to form 6HfO-Nb 2 O 5 . This complex oxide has a tight cubic lattice which resists the diffusion of O into the substrate. During 24-h exposure to air at 2400 0 F, the alloy oxidizes to a depth of approximately 0.035 in. with a surface recession of 0 to 0.004 in. Oxidation resistance of WC-3015 welds and base material can be further enhanced greatly by applying silicide coatings. WC-3015 alloy can be machined by conventional and electrical-discharge methods. It can be hot worked readily by extrusion, forging or rolling. Cold working can be used at room or elevated temperature. It can be welded by the electron-beam or Tig processes. Physical constants, typical mechanical properties at 75 to 2400 0 F, and effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile and stress-rupture properties of the alloy are tabulated

  6. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  7. Self-stabilization of untransformed austenite by hydrostatic pressure via martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Nobuo; Ishibashi, Yuji; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    For improving the understanding of austenite stability in steel, hydrostatic pressure in untransformed austenite that is generated via martensitic transformation was evaluated from macro- and micro-viewpoints, and its effect on austenite stability was investigated in a Fe-27%Ni austenitic alloy. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the lattice parameter of untransformed austenite is continuously decreased via martensitic transformation only when martensite becomes the dominant phase in the microstructure. This suggests that the untransformed austenite is isotropically compressed by the surrounding martensite grains, i.e., hydrostatic pressure is generated in untransformed austenite dynamically at a later stage of martensitic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic strain mapping using the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicated that a finer untransformed austenite grain has a higher hydrostatic pressure, while a high density of dislocations is also introduced in untransformed austenite near the austenite/martensite interface because of lattice-invariant shear characterized by non-thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Furthermore, it was experimentally demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure stabilizes the untransformed austenite; however, the austenite stabilization effect alone is not large enough to fully explain a large gap between martensite start and finish temperatures in steel.

  8. Nanotwin Formation in High-Manganese Austenitic Steels Under Explosive Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadinc, D.; Uzer, B.; Elmadagli, M.; Guner, F.

    2018-04-01

    The micro-deformation mechanisms active in a high-manganese austenitic steel were investigated upon explosive shock loading. Single system of nanotwins forming within primary twins were shown to govern the deformation despite the elevated temperatures attained during testing. The benefits of nanotwin formation for potential armor materials were demonstrated.

  9. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels under random loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1987-08-01

    To investigate reactor components, load control random fatigue tests were performed at 300 0 C and 550 0 C, on specimens from austenitic stainless steels plates in the transverse orientation. Random solicitations are produced on closed loop servo-hydraulic machines by a mini computer which generates random load sequence by the use of reduced Markovian matrix. The method has the advantage of taking into account the mean load for each cycle. The solicitations generated are those of a stationary gaussian process. Fatigue tests have been mainly performed in the endurance region of fatigue curve, with scattering determination using stair case method. Experimental results have been analysed aiming at determining design curves for components calculations, depending on irregularity factor and temperature. Analysis in term of mean square root fatigue limit calculation, shows that random loading gives more damage than constant amplitude loading. Damage calculations following Miner rule have been made using the probability density function for the case where the irregularity factor is nearest to 100 %. The Miner rule is too conservative for our results. A method using design curves including random loading effects with irregularity factor as an indexing parameter is proposed

  10. Hot Ductility Behaviors in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of Nitrogen-Alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Tae-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Uk

    2015-04-01

    Hot ductility behaviors in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of nitrogen-alloyed Fe-18Cr-10Mn austenitic stainless steels with different nitrogen contents were evaluated through hot tension tests using Gleeble simulator. The results of Gleeble simulations indicated that hot ductility in the HAZs deteriorated due to the formation of δ-ferrite and intergranular Cr2N particles. In addition, the amount of hot ductility degradation was strongly affected by the fraction of δ-ferrite.

  11. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  12. Crack growth in an austenitic stainless steel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polvora, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with crack propagation at 650 deg C on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17-12 (316L(NN)). It is based on an experimental work concerning two different cracked specimens: CT specimens tested at 650 deg C in fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue with load controlled conditions (27 tests), tube specimens containing an internal circumferential crack tested in four points bending with displacement controlled conditions (10 tests). Using the fracture mechanics tools (K, J and C* parameters), the purpose here is to construct a methodology of calculation in order to predict the evolution of a crack with time for each loading condition using a fracture mechanics global approach. For both specimen types, crack growth is monitored by using a specific potential drop technique. In continuous fatigue, a material Paris law at 650 deg C is used to correlate crack growth rate with the stress intensity factor range corrected with a factor U(R) in order to take into account the effects of crack closure and loading ratio R. In pure creep on CT specimens, crack growth rate is correlated to the evolution of the C* parameter (evaluated experimentally) which can be estimated numerically with FEM calculations and analytically by using a simplified method based on a reference stress approach. A modeling of creep fatigue growth rate is obtained from a simple summation of the fatigue contribution and the creep contribution to the total crack growth. Good results are obtained when C* parameter is evaluated from the simplified expression C* s . Concerning the tube specimens tested in 4 point bending conditions, a simulation based on the actual A 16 French guide procedure proposed at CEA. (authors)

  13. Hydrogen effects in nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels; Wirkung von Wasserstoff in stickstofflegierten austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, M.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Shehata, M.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen increases the yield strength of nitrogen-alloyed steels, but on the other hand adversely affects properties such as tensile strength and elongation to fracture. The effect is enhanced with increasing nitrogen and hydrogen contents. Under the effect of hydrogen addition, the discontinuous stress-strain characteristic and the distinct elongation limit of hydrogen-free, nitrogen containing steels is no longer observed in the material. This change of mechanical properties is attributed to an interatomic interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the lattice, which is shown for instance by such effects as reduction of hydrogen velocity, high solubility, and a particularly strong lattice expansion. The nature of this interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the fcc lattice remains to be identified. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wasserstoff fuehrt in stickstofflegierten Staehlen zu einer Erhoehung der Streckgrenze, aber gleichzeitig zu einer Abnahme der Zugfestigkeit und Bruchdehnung. Dieser Effekt verstaerkt sich mit zunehmenden Stickstoff- und Wasserstoffgehalten. Ein diskontinuierlicher Spannungs-Dehnungsverlauf mit einer ausgepraegten Streckgrenze in wasserstofffreien hochstickstoffhaltigen Staehlen wird nach Wasserstoffeinfluss nicht mehr beobachtet. Die Aenderung der mechanischen Eigenschaften, wird auf eine interatomare Wechselwirkung von Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im Gitter zurueckgefuehrt, die sich u.a. in geringer Wasserstoffdiffusionsgeschwindigkeit, hoher Loeslichkeit und vor allem in extremer Gitteraufweitung aeussert. Insgesamt ist die Natur der Wechselwirkung zwischen Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im kfz Gitter noch nicht aufgeklaert. (orig.)

  14. Manufacturing of High Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion they have high configurational entropy, and thus they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and phase stability. The present study investigates the microstructure of two single-phase face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs, CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn, with special attention given to melting, homogenization and thermo-mechanical processing. Large-scale ingots were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent in small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was applied to both alloys in order to eliminate segregation due to normal ingot solidification. The alloys fabricated well, with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters being employed.

  15. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  16. High temperature crack initiation in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 deg. C and 650 deg. C, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were updated in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the help of microstructural observations and finite element results. An identification of a 'Paris' law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C h * for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris' law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris' law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C h * parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates decrease when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue

  17. Crack initiation at high temperature on an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, L.

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 degrees Celsius and 650 degrees Celsius, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were update in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the helps of microstructural observations and finite elements results. An identification of a 'Paris'law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C * k for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris'law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris'law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C * k parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue Paris law predicted ones

  18. Microstructural development of diffusion-brazed austenitic stainless steel to magnesium alloy using a nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elthalabawy, Waled M.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2010-01-01

    The differences in physical and metallurgical properties of stainless steels and magnesium alloys make them difficult to join using conventional fusion welding processes. Therefore, the diffusion brazing of 316L steel to magnesium alloy (AZ31) was performed using a double stage bonding process. To join these dissimilar alloys, the solid-state diffusion bonding of 316L steel to a Ni interlayer was carried out at 900 deg. C followed by diffusion brazing to AZ31 at 510 deg. C. Metallographic and compositional analyses show that a metallurgical bond was achieved with a shear strength of 54 MPa. However, during the diffusion brazing stage B 2 intermetallic compounds form within the joint and these intermetallics are pushed ahead of the solid/liquid interface during isothermal solidification of the joint. These intermetallics had a detrimental effect on joint strengths when the joint was held at the diffusion brazing temperature for longer than 20 min.

  19. A Short review on wrought austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures: processing, microstructure, properties and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Lesley Plaut

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Wrought austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high temperature applications. This short review discusses initially the processing of this class of steels, with emphasis on solidification and hot working behavior. Following, a brief summary is made on the precipitation behavior and the numerous phases that may appear in their microstructures. Creep and oxidation resistance are, then, briefly discussed, and finalizing their performance is compared with other high temperature metallic materials.

  20. Modification of the Strength Anisotropy in an Austenitic ODS Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Jang, J.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, C. B.; Bae, C. S.; Kim, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    Among many candidate alloys for Gen IV reactors, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy is widely considered as a good candidate material for the in-reactor component, like cladding tube. The ODS alloy is well known due to its good high temperature strength, and excellent irradiation resistance. For the previous two decades in the nuclear community, the ODS alloy developments have been mostly focused on the ferritic martensitic (F-M) steel-based ones. On the other hand, the austenitic stainless steels (e.g. 316L or 316LN) have been used as a structural material due to its good high temperature strength and a good compatibility with a media. However, the austenitic stainless steel showed unfavorable characteristics in the dimensional stability under neutron irradiation and cracking behavior with the media. It is thus expected that the austenitic ODS steels restrain the dimension stability under neutron irradiation. However, the ODS alloys usually reveal the anisotropic characteristic in mechanical strength in the hoop and longitudinal directions, which is attributed to the grain morphology strongly developed parallel to the rolling direction with a high aspect ratio. This study focuses on a modification of the strength anisotropy of an austenitic ODS alloy by a recrystallization heat treatment

  1. Martensite shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy: The effect of interstitial alloying elements and degree of austenite stability on phase reversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Zhang, Z.; Venkatasurya, P.K.C. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Madison Hall Room 217, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-1430 (United States); Somani, M.C.; Karjalainen, L.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, Oulu 90014 (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of a novel process involving phase-reversion annealing process. {yields} Austensite stability strongly influences development of nanograined structure. {yields} Interstitial elements influence microstructural evolution during annealing. - Abstract: We describe here an electron microscopy study of microstructural evolution associated with martensitic shear phase reversion-induced nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) structure in an experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with very low interstitial content. The primary objective is to understand and obtain fundamental insights on the influence of degree of austenite stability (Fe-16Cr-10Ni, 301LN, and 301 have different austenite stability index) and interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) in terms of phase reversion process, microstructural evolution during reversion annealing, and temperature-time annealing sequence. A relative comparison of Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy with 301LN and 301 austenitic stainless steels indicated that phase reversion in Fe-16Cr-10Ni occurred by shear mechanism, which is similar to that observed for 301, but is different from the diffusional mechanism in 301LN steel. While the phase reversion in the experimental Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy and 301 austenitic stainless steel occurred by shear mechanism, there were fundamental differences between these two alloys. The reversed strain-free austenite grains in Fe-16Cr-10Ni alloy were characterized by nearly same crystallographic orientation, where as in 301 steel there was evidence of break-up of martensite laths during reversion annealing resulting in several regions of misoriented austenite grains in 301 steel. Furthermore, a higher phase reversion annealing temperature range (800-900 deg. C) was required to obtain a fully NG/UFG structure of grain size 200-600 nm. The difference in the phase reversion and the temperature-time sequence in the three stages is explained in terms of Gibbs free energy change that

  2. Investigation of a new methodology in high temperature oxidation application to commercial austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangeli, P.; Ivarsson, B. [Avesta Sheffield, R and D (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Avesta Sheffield R and D has evaluated a scaling temperature for heat resistant steels from laboratory gravimetric measurements of cyclic exposures. In this paper, this old method is described. A new methodology, based on the results of isothermal and cyclic tests, is proposed and discussed. It includes isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics of different commercial austenitic steels. Oxidation of Avesta Sheffield 153MA, 253MA and 353MA and standard commercial heat resistant steels 309S, 310S and A800 have been investigated under isothermal and cyclic conditions, in air, in the temperature range 800-1200 C. For all alloys, oxidation rates obey a parabolic law below a critical temperature. The activation energies have been calculated. Kinetics of the cyclic tests show that a critical mass change corresponding to a critical thickness of the oxide scale is responsible for the spallation start. This thickness depends on the composition of the alloys, and is very much increased by alloying minor elements like Ce. (orig.)

  3. Topological model of austenite-martensite interfaces in Cu-Al-Ni alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andriy; Zárubová, Niva; Paidar, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 493-496 ISSN 0587-4246. [International Symposium on Physics of Materials, ISPMA /12./. Praha, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : CuAlNi * alloy * experimental data * in-situ * topological models * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  4. Reversed austenite in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.Y., E-mail: songyuanyuan@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, X.Y.; Rong, L.J.; Li, Y.Y. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016 (China); Nagai, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    The austenite reversion process and the distribution of carbon and other alloying elements during tempering in 0Cr13Ni4Mo martensitic stainless steel have been investigated by in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The microstructure of the reversed austenite was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results revealed that the amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increased with the holding time. Direct experimental evidence supported carbon partitioning to carbides and Ni to the reversed austenite. The reversed austenite almost always nucleated in contact with lath boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides during tempering and the diffusion of Ni promoted its growth. The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size of the reversed austenite were considered to be the main factors that accounted for the stability of the reversed austenite. - Highlights: • The amount of the reversed austenite formed at high temperature increases with the holding time. • STEM results directly show that carbon is mainly partitioned into the carbides and Ni into the reversed austenite. • The Ni enrichment and the ultrafine size are the main factors leading to the stabilization of the reversed austenite.

  5. Magnetic properties near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transformation in the austenite phase of Ni43Mn44X2Sn11 (X = Fe and Co) Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, W. Z.; Thanh, T. D.; You, T. S.; Piao, H. G.; Yu, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we present a detail study on the magnetic properties in the austenitic phase (A phase) Ni43Mn44X2Sn11 alloy with X = Fe and Co, which were prepared by an arc-melting method in an argon atmosphere. The M(T) curves of two samples exhibits a single magnetic phase transition at the Curie temperature of the ferromagnetic (FM) austenitic phase with TCA = 298 K and 334k for (X = Fe and Co) respectively. Based on the Landau theory and M(H) data measured at different temperatures, we found that the FM-PM phase transitions around TCA in both samples were the second-order phase transition. Under an applied field change of 30 kOe, around TCA , the magnetic entropy changes were found to be 0.66 J Kg-1 K-1 and 1.62 J Kg-1 K-1 for (X = Fe and Co) respectively.

  6. High Versatility of Niobium Alloyed AHSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučerová L.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of processing parameters on the final microstructure and properties of advanced high strength CMnSiNb steel was investigated. Several processing strategies with various numbers of deformation steps and various cooling schedules were carried out, namely heat treatment without deformation, conventional quenching and TRIP steel processing with bainitic hold or continuous cooling. Obtained multiphase microstructures consisted of the mixture of ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and M-A constituent. They possessed ultimate tensile strength in the range of 780-970 MPa with high ductility A5mm above 30%. Volume fraction of retained austenite was for all the samples around 13%. The only exception was reference quenched sample with the highest strength 1186 MPa, lowest ductility A5mm = 20% and only 4% of retained austenite.

  7. Influence of Silicon on Swelling and Microstructure in Russian Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated to High Neutron Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For some applications in fusion devices austenitic stainless steels are still considered to be candidates for use as structural components, but high neutron exposures must be endured by the steels. Operational experience of fast reactors in Western Europe, USA and Japan provides evidence of the possible use of austenitic steels up to ∼ 150 dpa. Studies aimed at improvement of existing Russian austenitic steels are being carried out in Russia. For improvement of irradiation resistance of Russian steels it is necessary to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for deterioration of steel properties. This understanding can be achieved by continuing detailed investigations of the microstructure of cladding steels after irradiation to high doses. By investigating the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure in neutron irradiated steels of different chemical composition one can study the effect of chemical variations on steel properties. Silicon is one of the most important chemical elements that strongly influence the behavior of austenitic steel properties under irradiation. In this paper results are presented of investigations of the effect of silicon additions on void swelling and microstructure of base austenitic stainless steel EI-847 (0.06C-16Cr-15Ni- 3Mo-Nb) irradiated as fuel pin cladding of both regular and experimental assemblies in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors to neutron doses up to 49 dpa. The possible mechanisms of silicon's effect on void swelling in austenitic stainless steels are presented and analyzed. (authors)

  8. Radiation-induced evolution of austenite matrix in silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructures of a series of silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys irradiated to fast neutron fluences of about 2-3 and 10 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 600 0 C have been examined. The irradiation of AISI 316 leads to an extensive repartition of several elements, particularly nickel and silicon, between the matrix and various precipitate phases. The segregation of nickel at void and grain boundary surfaces at the expense of other faster-diffusing elements is a clear indication that one of the mechanisms driving the microchemical evolution is the Inverse Kirkendall effect. There is evidence that at one sink this mechanism is in competition with the solute drag process associated with interstitial gradients

  9. Oxidation behavior of austenitic iron-base ODS alloy in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnamian, Y.; Dong, Z.; Zahiri, R.; Kohandehghan, A.; Mitlin, D., E-mail: behnamia@ualberta.ca, E-mail: zdong@ualberta.ca, E-mail: kohandeh@ualberta.ca, E-mail: rzahiris@ualberta.ca, E-mail: dave.mitlin@ualberta.ca [Univ. of Alberta, Edmondon, AB (Canada); Zhou, Z., E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Univ. of Science and Tech. Beijing, Beijing (China); Chen, W.; Luo, J., E-mail: weixing.chen@ualberta.ca, E-mail: Jingli.luo@ualberta.ca [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Zheng, W., E-mail: wenyue@nrcan.gc.ca [Natural Resources Canada, Canmet MATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the effect of exposure time on the corrosion of the 304 stainless steel based oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, SS304ODS, in supercritical water was investigated at 650 {sup o}C with constant dissolved oxygen concentration. The results show that the oxidation of SS304ODS in supercritical water followed a parabolic law at 650 {sup o}C. Discontinuous oxide scale with two distinct layers has formed after 550 hours. The inner layer was chromium-rich while the outer layer was iron-rich (Magnetite). The oxide islands grow with increasing the exposure time. With increasing exposure time, the quantity of oxide islands increased in which major preferential growth along oxide-substrate interface was observed. The possible mechanism of SS304ODS oxidation in supercritical water was also discussed. (author)

  10. Modelling of radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe alloys at the atomistic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochaud, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, under irradiation internal structures are subject of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking which is influenced by radiation induced segregation (RIS). In this work RIS of 316 stainless steels is modelled considering a model ternary Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy. For this purpose we have built an Fe-Ni-Cr pair interaction model to simulate RIS at the atomistic level using an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The pair interactions have been deduced from density functional theory (DFT) data available in the pure fcc systems but also from DFT calculations we have performed in the Fe-10Ni-20Cr target alloy. Point defect formation energies were calculated and found to depend strongly on the local environment of the defect. As a consequence, a rather good estimation of these energies can be obtained from the knowledge of the number and respective positions of the Ni and Cr atoms in the vicinity of the defect. This work shows that a model based only on interaction parameters between elements positioned in perfect lattice sites (solute atoms and vacancy) cannot capture alone both the thermodynamic and the kinetic aspect of RIS. A more accurate of estimating the barriers encountered by the diffusing species is required than the one used in our model, which has to depend on the saddle point environment. This study therefore shows thus the need to estimate point defect migration energies using the DFT approach to calibrate a model that can be used in the framework of atomic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We also found that the reproduction by our pair interaction model of DFT data for the self-interstitial atoms was found to be incompatible with the modelling of RIS under electron irradiation. (author)

  11. Wear resistance of layers hard faced by the high-alloyed filler metal

    OpenAIRE

    Dušan Arsić; Vukić Lazić; Ruzica R. Nikolic; Milan Mutavdžić; Srbislav Aleksandrović; Milan Djordjević

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the wear resistance of layers hard faced by the high-alloyed filler metal, with or without the austenite inter-layer, on parts that operate at different sliding speeds in conditions without lubrication. The samples were hard faced with the filler metal E 10-UM-60-C with high content of C, Cr and W. Used filler metal belongs into group of alloys aimed for reparatory hard facing of parts damaged by abrasive and erosive wear and it is characterized by ...

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in high temperature and high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uragami, Ken

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels used in for equipment in chemical plants have failed owing to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). These failures brought about great problems in some cases. The failures were caused by chloride, sulfide and alkali solution environment, in particular, by chloride solution environment. It was known that SCC was caused not only by high content chloride solution such as 42% MgCl 2 solution but also by high temperature water containing Cl - ions as NaCl. In order to estimate quantitatively the effects of some factors on SCC in high temperature water environment, the effects of Cl - ion contents, oxygen partial pressure (increasing in proportion to dissolved oxygen), pH and temperature were investigated. Moreover SCC sensitivity owing to the difference of materials and heat treatments was also investigated. The experimental results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the effect of contaminant Cl - ions in proportion as Cl - ion contents increased, the material life extremely decreased owing to SCC. The tendency of decreasing was affected by the level of oxygen partial pressure. (2) Three regions of SCC sensitivity existed and they depended upon oxygen partial pressure. These were a region that did not show SCC sensitivity, a region of the highest SCC sensitivity and a region of somewhat lower SCC sensitivity. (3) In the case of SUS304 steel and 500 ppm Cl - ion contents SCC did not occur at 150 0 C, but it occurred and caused failures at 200 0 C and 250 0 C. (auth.)

  13. Development plan of austenitic Fe and Ni based alloys with improved corrosion resistance to sulfuric acid and HI fluids of industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Noriaki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Yan, Xing L.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, austenitic Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys was developed as candidate structural materials for equipment operated in sulfuric acid and hydrogen iodide (HI) environment, which exists in various industrial processes including iodine-sulfur (IS) hydrogen production process and geothermal power generation process. The objectives of the study are to achieve the corrosion resistance performance sufficient under the working condition of these processes and to overcome the practical scale-up difficulty of the ceramic (SiC) material that is presently used in the processes due to the manufacturing size limitation of the ceramic. The chemical composition development plan for the austenitic Fe based alloys is threefold: reinforcement of matrix by addition of Cu and Ta, strength compensation of the surface film by addition of Si and Ti, and prevention of peeling of surface oxide by addition of rare earth elements. Because addition of Cu and Si is known to reduce the ductility of the material and thus manufacturability of the component, it is important to determine the allowable amount of each element to be added. On the other hand, the chemical composition development plan for the Ni based alloys is reinforcement of matrix by addition of Mo, W and Ta, strength compensation of the surface film by addition of Ti, and prevention of peeling of surface oxide by addition of rare earth elements. In particular, the addition of Mo and W to the Ni based alloy is expected to be effective in preventing dimensional deviation of structures from increasing during heating and cooling of process equipment. Various material specimens will be fabricated based on the above chemical composition development plans and tests on these specimens will then be carried out to confirm the corrosion resistance performance under the fluid conditions simulating each industrial process. (author)

  14. High Ni austenite stainless steel resistant to neutron irradiation degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Kanasaki, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Koji; Nakata, Shizuo; Ajiki, Kazuhide; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro.

    1997-01-01

    The composition of the stainless steel of the present invention comprises from 0.005 to 0.08% of C, up to 3% of Mn, up to 0.2% of Si+P+S, from 25 to 40% of Ni, from 25 to 40% of Cr, up to 3% of Mo, up to 0.3% of Nb+Ta, up to 0.3% of Ti, up to 0.001% of B and the balance of Fe. A solid solubilization treatment at a temperature of from 1,000 to 1,150degC is applied to the stainless steel having the composition. The stainless steel is excellent in stress corrosion cracking-resistance at a working circumstance of a LWR type reactor (high temperature and high pressure water at from 270 to 350degC/from 70 to 160 atm even after undergoing neutron irradiation of about 1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>1 MeV) which is a maximum neutron irradiation amount undergone till the final stage of the working life of the LWR-type reactor. In addition, the average thermal expansion coefficient at from room temperature to 400degC ranges from 15x10 -6 - 19x10 -6 /K. (I.N.)

  15. Factors affecting the grain growth of austenite in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.D.; Storer, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of steels is linked to the metallurgical transformations which occur during manufacture. Clearly then the optimization of a fabrication procedure must be based on fundamental relationships linking specific thermal treatments with transformation behaviour. Optimized manufacture of thick-section, multipass welds is therefore particularly complex since the thermal cycles associated with fusion welding result in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures. Moreover, these transformations will take place under rapid heating and cooling conditions so that standard data based on equilibrium behaviour may not be directly relevant. The present study is part of an integrated research programme aimed at establishing the basic microstructural relationships required to optimize the manufacture and performance of weldments. Work to date demonstrates that utilization of a computer controlled Gleeble simulation system allows a wider range of heating and cooling rates to be applied than is possible with traditional heat treatment techniques. Additional advantages of this system include precise control of time at peak temperature and uniform temperatures within a defined work zone. Results presented for a CrMoV creep resistant low alloy steel indicate that grain growth behaviour in the range 955-1390 C can be related to the time at peak temperature. The effect of this transformation behaviour on weldment behaviour is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Radiation damage of austenitic stainless steels and zirconium alloys; Pregled radijacionog ostecenja austenitnih nerdjajucih celika i legura cirkonijuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This review contains analyses of available data concerning texture deformations and radiation damage of zirconium and zircaloy-2; radiation damage, influence of neutron radiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic, ferritic and other types of stainless steels.

  17. High-temperature steam oxidation testing of select advanced replacement alloys for potential core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Coupons from a total of fourteen commercial and custom fabricated alloys were exposed to 1 bar full steam with ~10 ppb oxygen content at 600 and 650°C. The coupons were weighed at 500-h intervals with a total exposure time of 5,000 h. The fourteen alloys are candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, which include three ferritic steels (Grade 92, 439, and 14YWT), three austenitic stainless steels (316L, 310, and 800), seven Ni-base superalloys (X750, 725, C22, 690, 625, 625 direct-aging, and 625- plus), and one Zr-alloy (Zr–2.5Nb). Among the alloys, 316L and X750 are served as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. The candidate Ni-base superalloy 718 was procured too late to be included in the tests. The corrosion rates of the candidate alloys can be approximately interpreted by their Cr, Ni and Fe content. The corrosion rate was significantly reduced with increasing Cr content and when Ni content is above ~15 wt%, but not much further reduced when Fe content is less than ~55 wt%. Simplified thermodynamics analyses of the alloy oxidation provided reasonable indications for the constituents of oxide scales formed on the alloys and explanations for the porosity and exfoliation phenomena because of the nature of specific types of oxides.

  18. New high strength technologically ecological and expedient economically advantageous alloys on Fe-C base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents framework a part of by now obtained results of the authors studies in the period 1967(68) - 2002 about possibilities for obtaining new high-strength and wear resistant cast alloys on, Fe-C base (complex alloyed steels and cast irons of different systems with different structure, reflected in over 125 articles, 15 inventions (patents) and other scientific studies. The paper includes summarized results and discussion. Key words: new austenite steels and cast irons, mechanical characteristics, wear resistance. (Original)

  19. Compatibility of graphite with a martensitic-ferritic steel, an austenitic stainless steel and a Ni-base alloy up to 1250 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1994-08-01

    To study the chemical interactions between graphite and a martensitic-ferritic steel (1.4914), an austenitic stainless steel (1.4919; AISI 316), and a Ni-base alloy (Hastelloy X) isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range between 900 and 1250 C. At higher temperatures a rapid and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions. The chemical interactions are diffusion-controlled processes and can be described by parabolic rate laws. The reaction behavior of the two steels is very similar. The chemical interactions of the steels with graphite are much faster above 1100 C than those for the Ni-base alloy. Below 1000 C the effect is opposite. (orig.) [de

  20. Effect of aging on the tribological and mechanical properties of a high-nitrogen stainless austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, L.G.; Chernenko, N.L.; Tereshchenko, N.A.; Uvarov, A.I.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of aging, associated with predominant precipitation of vanadium nitrides (VN), on tribological and mechanical properties of austenitic steel 10Kh18AG18N5MF hardened from 1100 Deg C is studied. Metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopical methods are used to study structural transformations proceeding in the steel on aging as well as on friction loading under conditions of dry slipping friction in steel-abrasive and steel-steel pairs. It is shown that the aging at temperatures of 600-700 Deg C resulting in a considerable increase of strength properties of the steel demonstrates a relatively weak positive effect on steel resistance to abrasive and adhesive wear. It is stated that the use of aging by continuous mechanism permits attaining favourable mechanical and tribological properties in vanadium-alloying nitrogen-bearing austenitic steels [ru

  1. Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Austenitic Stainless Steel JK2LB for ITER Central Solenoid Jacket Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toru; Kawano, Katsumi; Yamazaki, Toru; Ozeki, Hidemasa; Isono, Takaaki; Hamada, Kazuya; Devred, Arnaud; Vostner, Alexander

    A suite of advanced austenitic stainless steels are used for the ITER TF, CS and PF coil systems.These materials will be exposed to cyclic-stress at cryogenic temperature. Therefore, high manganese austenitic stainless steel JK2LB, which has high tensile strength, high ductility and high resistance to fatigue at 4 K has been chosen for the CS conductor. The cryogenic temperature mechanical property data of this material are very important for the ITER magnet design. This study is focused on mechanical characteristics of JK2LB and its weld joint.

  2. Stable and unstable fatigue crack propagation during high temperature creep-fatigue in austenitic steels: the role of precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.; Wareing, J.

    1979-01-01

    The distinction between stable and unstable fatigue crack propagation during high temperature creep-fatigue in austenitic stainless steels is introduced. The transition from one class of behavior to the other is related to the precipitate distribution and to the nature of the prevailing crack path. It is shown by reference to new studies and examples drawn from the literature that this behavior is common to both high strain and predominantly elastic fatigue in austenitic stainless steels. The relevance of this distinction to a mechanistic approach to high temperature plant design is discussed

  3. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  4. Fatigue damage evolution of cold-worked austenitic nickel-free high-nitrogen steel X13CrMnMoN18-14-3 (1.4452)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhovskiy, I.; Weiss, S.; Fischer, A. [Univ. of Duisburg-Essen, Materials Science and Engineering II, Duisburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Due to the fact that the risk of Ni-allergies becomes more and more important for modern therapies, the necessity of Ni-free implant materials becomes increasingly important. Beside Co- and Ti-base alloys Ni-free high-nitrogen steels may offer an attractive alternative. The present work presents the austenitic high-nitrogen and nickel-free steel X13CrMnMoN18-14-3, (Material No.: 1.4452) after 20% cold-working. In addition this material was deformed under axial cyclic total strain controlled fatigue tests at room temperature. The development of dislocation structure due to different loading amplitudes was compared to none cyclically deformed material. The good mechanical und fatigue properties of these austenitic high-nitrogen steels as well as the better tribological, chemical and biological properties compared to CrNiMo-steels qualify these steels as a promising alternative in medical applications. (orig.)

  5. Combining gradient structure and TRIP effect to produce austenite stainless steel with high strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X.L.; Yang, M.X.; Yuan, F.P.; Chen, L.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design strategy to combine the benefits from both gradient structure and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP). The resultant TRIP-gradient steel takes advantage of both mechanisms, allowing strain hardening to last to a larger plastic strain. 304 stainless steel sheets were treated by surface mechanical attrition to synthesize gradient structure with a central coarse-grained layer sandwiched between two grain-size gradient layers. The gradient layer is composed of submicron-sized parallelepiped austenite domains separated by intersecting ε-martensite plates, with increasing domain size along the depth. Significant microhardness heterogeneity exists not only macroscopically between the soft coarse-grained core and the hard gradient layers, but also microscopically between the austenite domain and ε-martensite walls. During tensile testing, the gradient structure causes strain partitioning, which evolves with applied strain, and lasts to large strains. The γ → α′ martensitic transformation is triggered successively with an increase of the applied strain and flow stress. Importantly, the gradient structure prolongs the TRIP effect to large plastic strains. As a result, the gradient structure in the 304 stainless steel provides a new route towards a good combination of high strength and ductility, via the co-operation of both the dynamic strain partitioning and TRIP effect.

  6. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  7. Creep property of carbon and nitrogen free high strength new alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muneki, S., E-mail: ABE.Fujio@nims.go.j [Heat Resistant Design Group, Steel Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science (Japan); Okubo, H.; Abe, F. [Heat Resistant Design Group, Steel Research Center, National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    The carbon and nitrogen free new alloys which were composed of supersaturated martensitic microstructure with high dislocation density before the creep test have been investigated systematically. These alloys were produced from the new approach which raised creep strength by the utilization of the reverse transformed austenite phase as a matrix and intermetallic compounds such as Laves phase and mu-phase as precipitates during heating before the creep test. It is important that these alloys are independent of any carbides and nitrides as strengthening factors. The high temperature creep test over 700 {sup o}C exceeds 50,000 h, and the test is continuous. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The addition of boron to the alloy pulled the recrystallization temperature up in the high temperature, and it became a creep test in the un-recrystallization condition, and the creep property of high temperature over 700 {sup o}C was drastically improved. The minimum creep rates of Fe-Ni alloys at 700 {sup o}C are found to be much lower than those of the conventional high Cr ferritic heat resistant steels, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 {sup o}C in these alloys. As a result it became clear that the value for 100,000 h was exceeded at 700 {sup o}C and 100 MPa calculated from the Larson-Miller parameter at C = 20.

  8. Concurrent microstructural evolution of ferrite and austenite in a duplex stainless steel processed by high-pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Y.; Wang, Y.B.; An, X.H.; Liao, X.Z.; Kawasaki, M.; Ringer, S.P.; Langdon, T.G.; Zhu, Y.T.

    2014-01-01

    A duplex stainless steel with approximately equal volume fractions of ferrite and austenite was processed by high-pressure torsion. Nano-indentation, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the hardness and microstructure evolutions of the steel. Despite the different strain-hardening rates of individual ferrite and austenite, the microstructures of the two phases evolved concurrently in such a way that the neighbouring two phases always maintained similar hardness. While the plastic deformation and grain refinement of ferrite occurred mainly via dislocation activities, the plastic deformation and grain refinement process of austenite were more complicated and included deformation twinning and de-twinning in coarse grains, grain refinement by twinning and dislocation–twin interactions, de-twinning in ultrafine grains and twin boundary subdivision

  9. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuro, I., E-mail: innoshuro@martens.me.tut.ac.jp [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kuo, H.H. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Sasaki, T.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Sciences, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M. [Functional Materials Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-08-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-phase composition is a function of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe-18Cr-8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite ({alpha} Prime ). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% {alpha} Prime at room temperature. After annealing at 400 Degree-Sign C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn-Ni-Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography

  10. G-phase precipitation in austenitic stainless steel deformed by high pressure torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuro, I.; Kuo, H.H.; Sasaki, T.; Hono, K.; Todaka, Y.; Umemoto, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using TEM and APT analyses, G-phase precipitation was observed in HPTed SUS304 with no trace of spinodal decomposition. ► G-phase precipitation occurred much shorter time than previous studies probably due to the elimination of prior SD and enhanced diffusion by severe plastic deformation. ► G-phase composition is a function of aging time. ► Tensile tests showed that in SUS304 embrittlement occurs solely due to G-phase precipitation. - Abstract: G phase an intermetallic silicide has been observed in martensite of precipitation hardened stainless steels and in the ferrite of dual (austenite and ferrite) phase stainless steels. In both cases, before G-phase precipitates, the matrix composition changes due to spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning between ferrite and austenite. Thus in the present study, single bcc phase and high Ni content stainless steel, was selected to study G-phase precipitation expecting elimination of the interference from spinodal decomposition and solute partitioning. Fe–18Cr–8Ni (SUS304) austenitic stainless steel samples were deformed at room temperature by high pressure torsion to obtain 100% volume fraction of deformation induced martensite (α′). HPT deformation was chosen due to its ability to induce high strength by grain refinement and also attain 100% α′ at room temperature. After annealing at 400 °C for 500 h, G-phase precipitation was observed in the fully martensitic matrix without spinodal decomposition. Crystallographic analysis of annealed samples using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detected a Mn–Ni–Si rich G-phase with fcc crystal structure with lattice parameter of 1.16 nm. The value of lattice parameter corresponds well with previously reported values. Chemical analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) showed G-phase of composition Mn 21 Ni 50 Si 24 Fe 4 Cr. Tensile tests showed that G-phase precipitation leads to

  11. Effect of nitrogen on the stabilization of austenite in a tungsten-molybdenum high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popandopulo, A.N.; Zhukova, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of the tendency of steels R6M5 and R6Am5 to austenite stabilization after subzero treatment and high-temperature tempering in hot-rolled bars. Data indicate that in steel R6AM5 during quenching there is almost instantaneous austenite stabilization. The data was derived from a study of phase composition (exposure from a microsection in DRON-2.0 equipment in iron K /SUB alpha/ radiation), microstructure, and hardness. The authors conclude that in view of serious difficulties in metallurgical and tool production, steel R6AM5 should be supplied only at the request of the customer

  12. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  13. The influence of He on the high temperature fracture of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguees, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The Ti-stabilised DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel is an important candidate for high temperature - high neutron fluence applications which will create appreciable amounts of He within the matrix. In order to determine the mechanical effects associated with the presence of He alone a set of tensile specimens was cyclotron implanted to uniform He concentrations in the 10 -6 to 10 -4 at. range and later creep tested at 700 0 C and 800 0 C. The elongation to fracture values of the implanted specimens were reduced with respect to those of unimplanted controls. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) examination revealed that fracture starts as intergranular and subsequently propagates in a transgranular fashion, the intergranular part being much more extended in the implanted material. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) examination revealed He segregation at the grain boundary precipitates. A mechanism of He embrittlement is discussed in terms of the present results

  14. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys and austenitic stainless steel 304 after being exposed to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Nofrijon Bin Imam

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide used as a decontaminant agent on selected aircraft metallic materials has been investigated. The work is divided into three sections; bacterial attachment behavior onto an austenitic stainless steel 304 surface; effect of decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials of two aluminum alloys, i.e. 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, and an austenitic stainless steel 304 as used in galley and lavatory surfaces; and copper dissolution rate into hydrogen peroxide. With respect to bacterial attachment, the results show that surface roughness plays a role in the attachment of bacteria onto metallic surfaces at certain extent. However, when the contact angle of the liquid on a surface increased to a certain degree, detachment of bacteria on that surface became more difficult. In its relation to the decontamination process, the results show that a corrosion site, especially on the austenitic stainless steel 304 weld and its surrounding HAZ area, needs more attention because it could become a source or a harborage of bio-contaminant agent after either incidental or intentional bio-contaminant delivery. On the effect of the decontamination process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of aircraft metallic structural materials, the results show that microstructural effects are both relatively small in magnitude and confined to a region immediately adjacent to the exposed surface. No systematic effect is found on the tensile properties of the three alloys under the conditions examined. The results of this investigation are promising with respect to the application of vapor phase hydrogen peroxide as a decontaminant agent to civilian aircraft, in that even under the most severe circumstances that could occur; only very limited damage was observed. The results from the dissolution of copper by concentrated liquid hydrogen peroxide showed that the rate of copper dissolution increased for

  16. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  17. Stability of Retained Austenite in High-Al, Low-Si TRIP-Assisted Steels Processed via Continuous Galvanizing Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermid, J. R.; Zurob, H. S.; Bian, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Two galvanizable high-Al, low-Si transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-assisted steels were subjected to isothermal bainitic transformation (IBT) temperatures compatible with the continuous galvanizing (CGL) process and the kinetics of the retained austenite (RA) to martensite transformation during room temperature deformation studied as a function of heat treatment parameters. It was determined that there was a direct relationship between the rate of strain-induced transformation and optimal mechanical properties, with more gradual transformation rates being favored. The RA to martensite transformation kinetics were successfully modeled using two methodologies: (1) the strain-based model of Olsen and Cohen and (2) a simple relationship with the normalized flow stress, ( {{{σ_{{flow}} - σ_{YS} }/{σ_{YS }}}} ) . For the strain-based model, it was determined that the model parameters were a strong function of strain and alloy thermal processing history and a weak function of alloy chemistry. It was verified that the strain-based model in the present work agrees well with those derived by previous workers using TRIP-assisted steels of similar composition. It was further determined that the RA to martensite transformation kinetics for all alloys and heat treatments could be described using a simple model vs the normalized flow stress, indicating that the RA to martensite transformation is stress-induced rather than strain-induced for temperatures above the Ms^{σ }.

  18. Supercritical water corrosion of high Cr steels and Ni-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Sung; Han, Chang Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2004-01-01

    High Cr steels (9 to 12% Cr) have been widely used for high temperature high pressure components in fossil power plants. Recently the concept of SCWR (supercritical water-cooled reactor) has aroused a keen interest as one of the next generation (Generation IV) reactors. Consequently Ni-base (or high Ni) alloys as well as high Cr steels that have already many experiences in the field are among the potential candidate alloys for the cladding or reactor internals. Tentative inlet and outlet temperatures of the anticipated SCWR are 280 and 510 .deg. C respectively. Among many candidate alloys there are austenitic stainless steels, Ni base alloys, ODS alloys as well as high Cr steels. In this study the corrosion behavior of the high Cr steels and Ni base (or high Ni) alloys in the supercritical water were investigated. The corrosion behavior of the unirradiated base metals could be used in the near future as a guideline for the out-of-pile or in-pile corrosion evaluation tests

  19. Effects of alloying elements on defect structures in the incubation period for void swelling in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, M.; Yoshiie, T.; Huang, S.S.; Sato, K.; Cao, X.Z.; Xu, Q.; Troev, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were used to study the effects of alloying elements on the defect structure during the incubation period for void swelling in several fcc model alloys. Pure Ni, four model alloys (Fe–Cr–Ni, Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn, Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn–Si and Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo–Mn–Si–Ti), and four commercial alloys (SUS316LSS, SUS316SS, SUS304SS and Ti added modified SUS316SS) were irradiated with electrons and neutrons. Even at 363 and 573 K to a dose of 0.2 dpa, an effect of alloying elements was observed. At 363 K irradiation, voids were formed only in Ni and Fe–Cr–Ni. At 573 K irradiation, voids were formed in Ni and all model alloys, though the concentration depended on the alloying elements. In commercial alloys, precipitates were formed instead of vacancy clusters, which prevented void growth

  20. Nickel alloys and high-alloyed special stainless steels. Properties, manufacturing, applications. 4. compl. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubner, Ulrich; Kloewer, Jutta; Alves, Helena; Behrens, Rainer; Schindler, Claudius; Wahl, Volker; Wolf, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the following eight topics: 1. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels - Material overview and metallurgical principles (U. Heubner); 2. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (U. Heubner); 3. Welding of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels (T. Hoffmann, M. Wolf); 4. High-temperature materials for industrial plant construction (J. Kloewer); 5. Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels as hot roll clad composites-a cost-effective alternative (C. Schindler); 6. Selected examples of the use of nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels in chemical plants (H. Alves); 7. The use of nickel alloys and stainless steels in environmental engineering (V. Wahl); 8: Nickel alloys and high-alloy special stainless steels for the oil and gas industry (R. Behrens).

  1. Alloying effects on dissolution rate of crevice corrosion for austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl solution at 80 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.; Shinohara, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been a problem for austenitic stainless steel in aqueous environments containing chlorides. Studies have found that SCC initiates only from a dissolving surface and under the condition that the crack growth rate is higher than the dissolution rate of the dissolving surface. Research conducted to improve the resistance to SCC for Type 304 steels (UNS S30400) have revealed that while molybdenum and phosphorus are unfavored, the combined alloying of 3% aluminum with 2% copper can almost nullify their detrimental effect. Based on the mentioned criteria, this study was dedicated to clarify the mechanism behind these alloying effects by examining the relationship between the measured enhancements on SCC resistance and the dissolution rate observed via the moire technique. It was found that the addition of both molybdenum and phosphorus reduces the dissolution rate and therefore impaired SCC resistance; the addition of copper increases the dissolution rate of steady growth stage where crevice corrosion proceeds at a constant rate. Moreover this dissolution rate could further be increased when combined with the alloying of aluminum. These observed results correspond well to that of the measured behavior of the SCC critical temperature, T c , suggesting that the SCC susceptibility is influenced by anodic dissolution

  2. Microstructure and tribologic behaviour of metastable austenitic FeMn alloys as a function of chromium content; Gefuegeausbildung und Triboverhalten metastabiler austenitischer FeMn-Legierungen in Abhaengigkeit vom Chromgehalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethig, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungstechnik und Thermodynamik; Veit, P.; Strassburger, G.; Blaesing, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik; Heyse, H. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik und Werkstoffpruefung

    1997-12-31

    In FeMn20Cr alloys with chromium contents of up to 20%, the solidification process is primarily an eutectic process. The {delta}-ferrite becomes increasingly instable below a temperature of 900 C and gradually disintegrates during slow cooling into austenite and a sigma phase. Tempering of these microstructures at T=450 C (6hours) leads to formation of {epsilon}-martensite in the austenite. Fast quenching starting above 900 C freezes the {delta}-ferrite, so that in the case of chromium contents between 13 and 18%, austenitic-hexagonal-ferritic microstructures form and above 18%, austenitic-ferritic microstructures. Tempering does not remove the {delta}-ferrite, but induces formation of {epsilon}-martensite in the austenite. Trobologic examinations with solutionized and water-quenched alloys showed, as compared to an FeMn20Cr18 alloy, for various types of wear, a very good tribologic performance (except for the alloy FeMn20Cr18 and cavitation). As to abrasion or hot wear, the formation of a sigma-phase or intercalation of metalloid hard phases should be considered. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] FeMn20Cr-Legierungen mit Chromgehalten bis zu 20% erstarren primaer ferritisch. Der {delta}-Ferrit ist unterhalb 900 C nicht mehr stabil und zerfaellt bei langsamer Abkuehlung in Austenit und Sigmaphase. Ein Anlassen dieser Gefuege T=450 C (6 Stunden) fuehrt zur {epsilon}-Martensitbildung im Austenit. Schnelles Abschrecken von oberhalb 900 C friert den {delta}-Ferrit ein, so dass bei Chromgehalten zwischen 13 und 18% austenitisch-hexagonal-ferritische und >18% austenitisch-ferritische Gefuege entstehen. Durch Anlassen kann der {delta}-Ferrit nicht beseitigt werden. Im Austenit kommt es aber zur {epsilon}-Martensitbildung. Tribologische Untersuchungen mit loesungsgegluehten und in Wasser abgeschreckten Legierungen zeigten im Vergleich zu einer FeCrNi-Legierung bei verschiedenen Verschleissarten (mit Ausnahme FeMn20Cr18 bei Kavitation) ein sehr gutes Triboverhalten. Gegenueber Abrasion

  3. Optimization of HIP bonding conditions for ITER shielding blanket/first wall made from austenitic stainless steel and dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Hatano, T.; Kuroda, T.; Furuya, K.; Hara, S.; Enoeda, M.; Takatsu, H.

    1998-01-01

    Optimum bonding conditions were studied on the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonded joints of type 316L austenitic stainless steel and dispersion strengthened copper alloy (DSCu) for application to the ITER shielding blanket / first wall. HIP bonded joints were fabricated at temperatures in a 980-1050 C range, and a series of mechanical tests and metallurgical observations were conducted on the joints. Also, bondability of two grades of DSCu (Glidcop Al-25 trademark and Al-15 trademark ) with SS316L was examined in terms of mechanical properties of the HIP bonded joints. From those studies it was concluded that the HIP temperature of 1050 C was an optimal condition for obtaining higher ductility, impact values and fatigue strength. Also, SS316L/Al-15 joints showed better results in terms of ductility and impact values compared with SS316L/Al-25 joints. (orig.)

  4. A highly ductile magnesium alloy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, W; Liu, H

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are finding increasing applications in industry mainly due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. However, they have intrinsically poor plastic deformation ability at room temperature. Therefore, the vast majority of Mg alloys are used only in cast state, severely limiting the development of their applications. We have recently discovered a new Mg alloy system that possesses exceptionally high ductility as well as good mechanical strength. The superior plasticity allows this alloy system to be mechanically deformed at room temperature, directly from an as-cast alloy plate, sheet or ingot into working parts. This type of cold mechanical forming properties has never been reported with any other Mg alloy systems.

  5. INFLUENCE OF IMPULSE MAGNETIC FIELD ON GRAPHITE MORPHOLOGY OF HIGH-ALLOY IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Anisovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of change of microstructure of heavily alloyed austenitic cast-iron ChN1507 subjected to magnetoimpulse processing are given. It is established that microhardness rises on all section of the sample.

  6. The effect of alloyed nitrogen or dissolved nitrate ions on the anodic behaviour of austenitic stainless steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrabi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The anodic behaviour of high purity stainless steels, based on a 316L composition, has been studied at room temperature in HCl solutions from 1 to 6 M. For all acid concentrations, the presence of 0.22% nitrogen has little or no effect on the active dissolution kinetics at low over-potentials. The effect on the critical current density for passivation is also small for low HCl concentrations ( 4.5 M), no passivation occurs and again nitrogen has little effect. However, for HCl concentrations around 4 M nitrogen reversibly impedes active dissolution at a few hundred mA cm -2 . The effect does not appear to be an oxide passivation, but is more likely to be due to surface enrichment of nitrogen atoms. Implications for localized corrosion are discussed. An effect similar to that of nitrogen alloying is reproduced on a nitrogen free alloy by adding 2 M NaNO 3 to a 4M HCl solution. This effect is distinct from the passivation of salt-covered surfaces and may be preferable to the latter as an explanation of the increase in pitting potential by nitrate additions to NaCl solutions. Passivation under a salt film is retained to explain the passivation of growing pits above the inhibition potential. (authors)

  7. Corrosion behaviour of high manganese austenitic stainless steels: positive and negative aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    Stainless steel 304 has found use as a most versatile engineering material in many industrial applications. Recently, the Indian industries have developed high Mn stainless steels with low C and Ni contents and simultaneously introduced N and Cu in the system. Composition of some of the alloys which are prevalent in the market are given. Individually, the effect of Ni, C, Mn, N and Cu on various forms of corrosion is reasonably understood. However, it will be worthwhile to review the response of these alloys, containing all these elements, towards various forms of corrosion. The objective of this paper is preciously to do this

  8. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  9. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co 71 4 Fe 4 6 Si 9 6 B 14 4 were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400 0 C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400 0 C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation

  10. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  11. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  12. The Use of Austenitic Stainless Steel versus Monel (Ni-Cu) Alloy in Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Life Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Carbon Steel AISI 1025 2. AISI 4140 3. Ductile Iron 4. 304 Stainless Steel 5. 17-4 PH Stainless Steel 6. 410 Stainless Steel 7. Lead Babbit 8. Tin Babbit...9. Inconel 718 i0. Aluminum 1100 30 6- AISI 4140 steel, all the results were negative (no ignitions). The single exception was with a sample of 4140 ...rates for austenitic stainless steel ( AISI 316), Monel (63% Ni - 34% Cu) and carbon steel (AMS 5050) tubing in this environment. 12 - 14-660 A 7

  13. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  14. Design of Wear-Resistant Austenitic Steels for Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. N.; Casati, R.; Lecis, N.; Andrianopoli, C.; Varone, A.; Montanari, R.; Vedani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Type 316L stainless steel feedstock powder was modified by alloying with powders containing carbide/boride-forming elements to create improved wear-resistant austenitic alloys that can be readily processed by Selective Laser Melting. Fe-based alloys with high C, B, V, and Nb contents were thus produced, resulting in a microstructure that consisted of austenitic grains and a significant amount of hard carbides and borides. Heat treatments were performed to modify the carbide distribution and morphology. Optimal hard-phase spheroidization was achieved by annealing the proposed alloys at 1150 °C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The total increase in hardness of samples containing 20 pct of C/B-rich alloy powder was of 82.7 pct while the wear resistance could be increased by a factor of 6.

  15. Fatigue crack growth-Microstructure relationships in a high-manganese austenitic TWIP steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niendorf, T., E-mail: niendorf@mail.uni-paderborn.de [University of Paderborn, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), 33095 Paderborn (Germany); Rubitschek, F.; Maier, H.J. [University of Paderborn, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), 33095 Paderborn (Germany); Niendorf, J.; Richard, H.A. [University of Paderborn, Fachgruppe Angewandte Mechanik (Applied Mechanics), 33095 Paderborn (Germany); Frehn, A. [Benteler Automotive, Product Group Chassis Systems, An der Talle 27-31, 33102 Paderborn (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The crack growth behavior of a high-manganese austenitic steel, which exhibits the twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) effect, was investigated under positive stress ratios. An experimental study making use of miniature compact tension (CT) specimens and thorough microstructural analyses including transmission electron microscopy and fracture analyses demonstrated that the microstructural evolution in the plastic zone of the fatigued TWIP CT specimens is substantially different as compared to the monotonic plastic deformation case. Specifically, the twin density in the plastic zone of the CT specimens is very low, leading to the conclusion that the deformation mechanisms depend drastically on the loading conditions. The absence of twinning under cyclic loading in the plastic zone of the CT specimens indicates that even large accumulated plastic strains are not sufficient to cause substantial twinning in the TWIP steel. This lack of hardening preserves the ductile character of the TWIP steel in the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip and provides for a crack growth rate in the Paris regime lower than reported for other high strength steels.

  16. Microstructure of Al-Si Slurry Coatings on Austenitic High-Temperature Creep Resisting Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E. Kochmańska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of microstructural examinations on slurry aluminide coatings using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. Aluminide coatings were produced in air atmosphere on austenitic high-temperature creep resisting cast steel. The function of aluminide coatings is the protection of the equipment components against the high-temperature corrosion in a carburising atmosphere under thermal shock conditions. The obtained coatings had a multilayered structure composed of intermetallic compounds. The composition of newly developed slurry was powders of aluminium and silicon; NaCl, KCl, and NaF halide salts; and a water solution of a soluble glass as an inorganic binder. The application of the inorganic binder in the slurry allowed to produce the coatings in one single step without additional annealing at an intermediate temperature as it is when applied organic binder. The coatings were formed on both: the ground surface and on the raw cast surface. The main technological parameters were temperature (732–1068°C and time of annealing (3.3–11.7 h and the Al/Si ratio (4–14 in the slurry. The rotatable design was used to evaluate the effect of the production parameters on the coatings thickness. The correlation between the technological parameters and the coating structure was determined.

  17. High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless and TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S. [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P., E-mail: pentti.karjalainen@oulu.fi [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-08-20

    High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 17Cr-7Ni Type 301LN austenitic stainless and high-Mn Fe-22Mn-0.6C TWIP steels were investigated in a reversed plane bending fatigue and compared to the behavior of steels with conventional coarse grain (CG) size. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine fatigue damage mechanisms. Testing showed that the fatigue limits leading to fatigue life beyond 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles were about 630 MPa for 301LN while being 560 MPa for TWIP steel, and being 0.59 and 0.5 of the tensile strength respectively. The CG counterparts were measured to have the fatigue limits of 350 and 400 MPa. The primary damage caused by fatigue took place by grain boundary cracking in UFG 301LN, while slip band cracking occurred in CG 301LN. However, in the case of TWIP steel, the fatigue damage mechanism is similar in spite of the grain size. In the course of cycling neither the formation of a martensite structure nor mechanical twinning occurs, but intense slip bands are created with extrusions and intrusions. Fatigue crack initiates preferentially on grain and twin boundaries, and especially in the intersection sites of slip bands and boundaries.

  18. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4 0 K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs

  19. The Influence of Austenite Grain Size on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steel with Boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Białobrzeska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study forms part of the current research on modern steel groups with higher resistance to abrasive wear. In order to reduce the intensity of wear processes, and also to minimize their impact, the immediate priority seems to be a search for a correlation between the chemical composition and structure of these materials and their properties. In this paper, the correlation between prior austenite grain size, martensite packets and the mechanical properties were researched. The growth of austenite grains is an important factor in the analysis of the microstructure, as the grain size has an effect on the kinetics of phase transformation. The microstructure, however, is closely related to the mechanical properties of the material such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and impact strength, as well as morphology of occurred fracture. During the study, the mechanical properties were tested and a tendency to brittle fracture was analysed. The studies show big differences of the analysed parameters depending on the applied heat treatment, which should provide guidance to users to specific applications of this type of steel.

  20. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys, cobalt or nickel based super alloys, structurally hardened martensitic, Inconel, zircaloy, super austenitic, duplex and of Ni-Cr or NTi deposits in tritiated water. 3 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-01-01

    The redox potential of 3 H 2 O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from the behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. The steels that are most resistant to this behavior are the super austenitic and super Duplex. To avoid corrosion, another solution is to decompose the radiolytic products by imposing a slight reducing potential. Corrosion inhibitors, which are stable in tritiated water, can be used. (author). 69 refs., 421 figs., tabs

  1. Effect of triple ion beam irradiation on mechanical properties of high chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Nanjyo, Yoshiyasu; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Anegawa, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A high-chromium austenitic stainless steel has been developed for an advanced fuel cladding tube considering waterside corrosion and irradiation embrittlement. The candidate material was irradiated in triple ion (Ni, He, H) beam modes at 573 K up to 50 dpa to simulate irradiation damage by neutron and transmutation product. The change in hardness of the very shallow surface layer of the irradiated specimen was estimated from the slope of load/depth-depth curve which is in direct proportion to the apparent hardness of the specimen. Besides, the Swift's power low constitutive equation (σ=A(ε 0 + ε) n , A: strength coefficient, ε 0 : equivalent strain by cold rolling, n: strain hardening exponent) of the damaged parts was derived from the indentation test combined with an inverse analysis using a finite element method (FEM). For comparison, Type304 stainless steel was investigated as well. Though both Type304SS and candidate material were also hardened by ion irradiation, the increase in apparent hardness of the candidate material was smaller than that of Type304SS. The yield stress and uniform elongation were estimated from the calculated constitutive equation by FEM inverse analysis. The irradiation hardening of the candidate material by irradiation can be expected to be lower than that of Type304SS. (author)

  2. P2000 - a new austenitic high nitrogen steel for power generating equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, G.; Hucklenbroich, I.; Wagner, M.

    1999-01-01

    For over 40 years most retaining rings worldwide were manufactured from austenitic materials which met visually all the demands made by designers. In these days two properties however fell short: resistance to stress corrosion cracking and in some cases strength. The operating conditions in normal environment caused in recent years problems with retaining rings which ended in some cases in down times and even generator destructions. Ultrasonic inspection in most cases is difficult, due to the complex geometry on the inside surface of the finish-machined and shrink-fitted retaining ring. In addition, the most highly stressed areas on the inside surface of the ring are inaccessible, unless the ring is removed from the rotor. Even then it is still very difficult, to find surface cracks, because they may have become very narrow, as a result of relaxation, or be concealed by corrosion products. The situation changed when our company in the late seventies developed a new material which could close these gaps. Due to the existing coil insulating material the max. operating temperature for generators was about 90 C. This was the reason why many utilities have changed the old retaining rings against the new corrosion resistant retaining rings made out of our material P900 or in some cases P900 N. (orig.)

  3. Precipitation Kinetics of Cr2N in High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Feng; WANG Li-jun; CUI Wen-fang; LIU Chun-ming

    2008-01-01

    The precipitation behavior of Cr2N during isothermal aging in the temperature range from 700℃to 950℃ in Fe-18Cr-12Mn-0.48N(in mass percent)high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel,including morphology and content of precipitate,was investigated using optical microscopy,scanning electron microscopy,and transmission electron microscopy.The isothermal precipitation kinetics curve of Cr2N and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained.The results show that Cr2N phase precipitates in a cellular way and its morphology is transformed from initial granular precipitates to lamellar ones in the cell with increasing aging time.The nose temperature of Cr2N precipitation is about 800℃,with a corresponding incubation period of 30 min,and the ceiling temperature of Cr2N precipitation is 950℃.The diffusion activation energy of Cr2N precipitation is 296 kJ/mol.

  4. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  5. A Review on the Potential Use of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sümer; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2008-12-01

    Various engineering materials; austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys, refractory metals and composites have been suggested as candidate structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. Among these structural materials, austenitic steels have an advantage of extensive technological database and lower cost compared to other non-ferrous candidates. Furthermore, they have also advantages of very good mechanical properties and fission operation experience. Moreover, modified austenitic stainless (Ni and Mo free) have relatively low residual radioactivity. Nevertheless, they can't withstand high neutron wall load which is required to get high power density in fusion reactors. On the other hand, a protective flowing liquid wall between plasma and solid first wall in these reactors can eliminate this restriction. This study presents an overview of austenitic stainless steels considered to be used in fusion reactors.

  6. Structure–mechanical property relationship in a high strength low carbon alloy steel processed by two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, W.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Wang, X.L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Venkatsurya, P.K.C. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Guo, H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Shang, C.J., E-mail: cjshang@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Misra, R.D.K. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The influence of annealing and tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in a low carbon alloy steel that was processed by a two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering heat treatment. In general, the microstructure of the processed steel comprises intercritical lath-like ferrite, bainitic/martensitic lath and acicular-type retained austenite. The lower intercritical annealing temperature resulted in lower fraction of intercritical ferrite with finer grain size and consequently higher strength. On the other hand, the intercritical tempering temperature significantly influenced retained austenite content and precipitation. High fraction of retained austenite was obtained at a temperature slightly above Ac{sub 1} temperature and retained austenite content decreased with increase in tempering temperature. This behavior is attributed to the competition between the enrichment of Mn and Ni and the fraction of reversed austenite. Fine niobium carbide precipitates of size ∼2–6 nm and copper precipitates of size range ∼10–30 nm were obtained. The optimal intercritical annealing and tempering temperatures to obtain the product of tensile strength and elongation % of ∼30 GPa% were 780 °C and 660 °C, respectively and the volume fraction of retained austenite was ∼29%.

  7. Structure–mechanical property relationship in a high strength low carbon alloy steel processed by two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, W.H.; Wang, X.L.; Venkatsurya, P.K.C.; Guo, H.; Shang, C.J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of annealing and tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in a low carbon alloy steel that was processed by a two-step intercritical annealing and intercritical tempering heat treatment. In general, the microstructure of the processed steel comprises intercritical lath-like ferrite, bainitic/martensitic lath and acicular-type retained austenite. The lower intercritical annealing temperature resulted in lower fraction of intercritical ferrite with finer grain size and consequently higher strength. On the other hand, the intercritical tempering temperature significantly influenced retained austenite content and precipitation. High fraction of retained austenite was obtained at a temperature slightly above Ac 1 temperature and retained austenite content decreased with increase in tempering temperature. This behavior is attributed to the competition between the enrichment of Mn and Ni and the fraction of reversed austenite. Fine niobium carbide precipitates of size ∼2–6 nm and copper precipitates of size range ∼10–30 nm were obtained. The optimal intercritical annealing and tempering temperatures to obtain the product of tensile strength and elongation % of ∼30 GPa% were 780 °C and 660 °C, respectively and the volume fraction of retained austenite was ∼29%

  8. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...... precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic...

  9. Phonon broadening in high entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmann, Fritz; Ikeda, Yuji; Grabowski, Blazej; Sluiter, Marcel H. F.

    2017-09-01

    Refractory high entropy alloys feature outstanding properties making them a promising materials class for next-generation high-temperature applications. At high temperatures, materials properties are strongly affected by lattice vibrations (phonons). Phonons critically influence thermal stability, thermodynamic and elastic properties, as well as thermal conductivity. In contrast to perfect crystals and ordered alloys, the inherently present mass and force constant fluctuations in multi-component random alloys (high entropy alloys) can induce significant phonon scattering and broadening. Despite their importance, phonon scattering and broadening have so far only scarcely been investigated for high entropy alloys. We tackle this challenge from a theoretical perspective and employ ab initio calculations to systematically study the impact of force constant and mass fluctuations on the phonon spectral functions of 12 body-centered cubic random alloys, from binaries up to 5-component high entropy alloys, addressing the key question of how chemical complexity impacts phonons. We find that it is crucial to include both mass and force constant fluctuations. If one or the other is neglected, qualitatively wrong results can be obtained such as artificial phonon band gaps. We analyze how the results obtained for the phonons translate into thermodynamically integrated quantities, specifically the vibrational entropy. Changes in the vibrational entropy with increasing the number of elements can be as large as changes in the configurational entropy and are thus important for phase stability considerations. The set of studied alloys includes MoTa, MoTaNb, MoTaNbW, MoTaNbWV, VW, VWNb, VWTa, VWNbTa, VTaNbTi, VWNbTaTi, HfZrNb, HfMoTaTiZr.

  10. Influence of austenization temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties of a new ultra-high strength low alloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ya-Ya; Xu, Chi; Su, Xiang; Sun, Yu-Lin; Pan, Xi; Cao, Yue-De; Chen, Guang [Nanjing Univ. of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China). Engineering Research Center of Materials Behavior and Design

    2017-07-01

    The effects of austenization temperature on the microstructures and mechanical properties of a newly designed ultra-high strength low alloy martensitic steel were systematically studied. The microstructures of the martensitic steels which were quenched from different temperatures between 860 and 980 C were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and discussed. The results showed that the martensite laths were found to coarsen slowly and the carbide precipitates dissolved gradually with increasing austenization temperature. As the austenization temperature increased from 860 to 980 C, the volume of retained austenite and the numerical ratio of high angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) were observed to increase while the numerical ratio of low angle grain boundaries (LAGBs) decreased. Rockwell C hardness (HRC), tensile strength and yield strength increased at first and then decreased, while impact toughness was greatly improved with increasing austenization temperature. The fracture mechanism was brittle fracture when austenitized at low temperatures, while it was ductile fracture when austenitized at high temperatures. The mechanical properties were significantly influenced by the formation of retained austenite, the dissolution of carbides, and the numerical ratio of HAGBs and LAGBs.

  11. In Situ Local Measurement of Austenite Mechanical Stability and Transformation Behavior in Third-Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Farha, Fadi; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Hector, Louis G.; Thomas, Grant; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-05-01

    Austenite mechanical stability, i.e., retained austenite volume fraction (RAVF) variation with strain, and transformation behavior were investigated for two third-generation advanced high-strength steels (3GAHSS) under quasi-static uniaxial tension: a 1200 grade, two-phase medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel, and a 980 grade, three-phase TRIP steel produced with a quenching and partitioning heat treatment. The medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel deforms inhomogeneously via propagative instabilities (Lüders and Portevin Le Châtelier-like bands), while the 980 grade TRIP steel deforms homogenously up to necking. The dramatically different deformation behaviors of these steels required the development of a new in situ experimental technique that couples volumetric synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement of RAVF with surface strain measurement using stereo digital image correlation over the beam impingement area. Measurement results with the new technique are compared to those from a more conventional approach wherein strains are measured over the entire gage region, while RAVF measurement is the same as that in the new technique. A determination is made as to the appropriateness of the different measurement techniques in measuring the transformation behaviors for steels with homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation behaviors. Extension of the new in situ technique to the measurement of austenite transformation under different deformation modes and to higher strain rates is discussed.

  12. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a new type of austempered boron alloyed high silicon cast steel has been developed, and its microstructures and mechanical properties at different temperatures were investigated. The experimental results indicate that the boron alloyed high silicon cast steel comprises a dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic borides in as-cast condition. The dendritic matrix is made up of pearlite, ferrite, and the interdendritic eutectic boride is with a chemical formula of M2B (M represents Fe, Cr, Mn or Mo which is much like that of carbide in high chromium white cast iron. Pure ausferrite structure that consists of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite can be obtained in the matrix by austempering treatment to the cast steel. No carbides precipitate in the ausferrite structure and the morphology of borides remains almost unchanged after austempering treatments. Secondary boride particles precipitate during the course of austenitizing. The hardness and tensile strength of the austempered cast steel decrease with the increase of the austempering temperature, from 250 篊 to 400 篊. The impact toughness is 4-11 J昪m-2 at room temperature and the impact fracture fractogragh indicates that the fracture is caused by the brittle fracture of the borides.

  13. Mechanical characterization of alloys in extreme conditions of high strain rates and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, Ezio

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the description of the mechanical characterization of alloys under extreme conditions of temperature and loading. In fact, in the frame of the Cost Action CA15102 “Solutions for Critical Raw Materials Under Extreme Conditions (CRM-EXTREME)” this aspect is crucial and many industrial applications have to consider the dynamic response of materials. Indeed, for a reduction and substitution of CRMs in alloys is necessary to design the materials and understand if the new materials behave better or if the substitution or reduction badly affect their performance. For this reason, a deep knowledge of the mechanical behaviour at high strain-rates of considered materials is required. In general, machinery manufacturing industry or transport industry as well as energy industry have important dynamic phenomena that are simultaneously affected by extended strain, high strain-rate, damage and pressure, as well as conspicuous temperature gradients. The experimental results in extreme conditions of high strain rate and high temperature of an austenitic stainless steel as well as a high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 are presented.

  14. Deformation mechanisms induced under high cycle fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, J.J., E-mail: joan.josep.roa@upc.edu [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fargas, G. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jiménez-Piqué, E. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Campus Diagonal Sud, Edificio C’, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, C/ Pascual i Vila 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Mateo, A. [CIEFMA-Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    Advanced techniques were used to study the deformation mechanisms induced by fatigue tests in a metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301LN. Observations by Atomic Force Microscopy were carried out to study the evolution of a pre-existing martensite platelet at increasing number of cycles. The sub-superficial deformation mechanisms of the austenitic grains were studied considering the cross-section microstructure obtained by Focused Ion Beam and analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results revealed no deformation surrounding the pre-existing martensitic platelet during fatigue tests, only the growth on height was observed. Martensite formation was associated with shear bands on austenite, mainly in the {111} plane, and with the activation of the other intersecting austenite {111}〈110〉 slip system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy results showed that the nucleation of ε-martensite follows a two stages phase transformation (γ{sub fcc}→ε{sub hcp}→α'{sub bcc})

  15. Fine structure characterization of martensite/austenite constituent in low-carbon low-alloy steel by transmission electron forward scatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C W; Han, L Z; Luo, X M; Liu, Q D; Gu, J F

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction and other characterization techniques were used to investigate the fine structure and the variant relationship of the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent of the granular bainite in low-carbon low-alloy steel. The results demonstrated that the M/A constituents were distributed in clusters throughout the bainitic ferrite. Lath martensite was the main component of the M/A constituent, where the relationship between the martensite variants was consistent with the Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship and only three variants were found in the M/A constituent, suggesting that the variants had formed in the M/A constituent according to a specific mechanism. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundaries in the M/A constituent were much longer than their counterparts in the bainitic ferrite region. The results indicate that transmission electron forward scatter diffraction is an effective method of crystallographic analysis for nanolaths in M/A constituents. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Correlation between Mechanical Behavior and Actuator-type Performance of Ni-Ti-Pd High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A., II; Garg, Anita; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloys in the NiTiPd system are being investigated as lower cost alternatives to NiTiPt alloys for use in compact solid-state actuators for the aerospace, automotive, and power generation industries. A range of ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% Pd has been processed and actuator mimicking tests (thermal cycling under load) were used to measure transformation temperatures, work behavior, and dimensional stability. With increasing Pd content, the work output of the material decreased, while the amount of permanent strain resulting from each load-biased thermal cycle increased. Monotonic isothermal tension testing of the high-temperature austenite and low temperature martensite phases was used to partially explain these behaviors, where a mismatch in yield strength between the austenite and martensite phases was observed at high Pd levels. Moreover, to further understand the source of the permanent strain at lower Pd levels, strain recovery tests were conducted to determine the onset of plastic deformation in the martensite phase. Consequently, the work behavior and dimensional stability during thermal cycling under load of the various NiTiPd alloys is discussed in relation to the deformation behavior of the materials as revealed by the strain recovery and monotonic tension tests.

  17. Severe Embrittlement of Neutron Irradiated Austenitic Steels Arising from High Void Swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neustroev, V.S.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Data are presented from BOR-60 irradiations showing that significant radiation-induced swelling causes severe embrittlement in austenitic stainless steels, reducing the service life of structural components. Similar loss of ductility is expected when swelling arises in fusion and light water reactor environments. Above 7-16% swelling there is complete loss of ductility, with the onset of ductility loss beginning at lower swelling in ring-pull tensile tests than for flat tensile specimens. For steels that develop extensive precipitation during irradiation, the critical swelling level is even lower. A model is presented to demonstrate the effect of voids acting alone to produce the embrittlement. Although voids are not very effective hardeners, they are very effective to generate stress concentrations between voids. The stress concentration ratio increases strongly when the void diameter exceeds ∼40% of the void-to-void separation distance. When the volume fraction of voids is rather high (about 16 % and higher), a geometric situation develops where it is possible to create an intense field of deformation glide planes residing at an angle of 45 deg. to the void-to-void axis. Significant localized flow then proceeds on these planes for specimen stress levels that are significantly lower than the yield stress. Voids also segregate nickel to their surfaces such that flow localization occurs in the low-nickel inter-void regions to produce strain-induced martensite, which is further accelerated by stress concentrations at the advancing crack tip, leading to catastrophic failure. (authors)

  18. Anisotropy of fracture toughness of austenitic high nitrogen chromium-manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitskii, A.I.; Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Diener, M.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1999-01-01

    The anisotropy of mechanical properties, in particular of the fracture toughness measured by the J-integral method, is demonstrated for industrially manufactured high strength retaining rings made from the nitrogen alloyed steel 18Mn18Cr. The RT-orientation turns out to be the weakest with regard to the resistance of the material to stable crack growth. The fracture toughness results are compared with results from calorimetric measurements. Here, also an orientation dependence of the heat irradiation energy is observed, clearly showing the same ranking of specimen orientation as the toughness data suggest. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of austenitic stainless steels for transpassive corrosion by metal purification technology. Synergistic effect of Si and P on intergranular corrosion of Fe-18Cr-14Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Joji; Kako, Kenji; Kawakami, Eishi

    2001-01-01

    The synergistic effect of Si, Mn, C, P, and S on the transpassive corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys was studied in 13N nitric acid. The specimens were fabricated using a cold crucible method in a high-vacuum chamber to reduce contamination. The additions of Si<1% and Mn<2% had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys, and the addition of Si<1% also had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn alloys, although 1% Si induced intergranular corrosion in both the alloys. Thus, HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys were selected to evaluate the effects of C, P and S (100 ppm each). The addition of P, and the co-addition of C, P, and S to HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si induced intergranular corrosion of the same degree in the solution annealed condition. This result suggests the synergistic effect of Si and P to induce intergranular corrosion, since the single addition of Si or P to this level did not lead to intergranular corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys. HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys containing C, P, and S at the 100 ppm level each showed superior corrosion resistance compared to a commercial Type 304L in 13N nitric acid. (author)

  20. Developing precipitation hardenable high entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwalani, Bharat

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) is a concept wherein alloys are constructed with five or more elements mixed in equal proportions; these are also known as multi-principle elements (MPEs) or complex concentrated alloys (CCAs). This PhD thesis dissertation presents research conducted to develop precipitation-hardenable high entropy alloys using a much-studied fcc-based equi-atomic quaternary alloy (CoCrFeNi). Minor additions of aluminium make the alloy amenable for precipitating ordered intermetallic phases in an fcc matrix. Aluminum also affects grain growth kinetics and Hall-Petch hardenability. The use of a combinatorial approach for assessing composition-microstructure-property relationships in high entropy alloys, or more broadly in complex concentrated alloys; using laser deposited compositionally graded AlxCrCuFeNi 2 (0 mechanically processed via conventional techniques. The phase stability and mechanical properties of these alloys have been investigated and will be presented. Additionally, the activation energy for grain growth as a function of Al content in these complex alloys has also been investigated. Change in fcc grain growth kinetic was studied as a function of aluminum; the apparent activation energy for grain growth increases by about three times going from Al0.1CoCrFeNi (3% Al (at%)) to Al0.3CoCrFeNi. (7% Al (at%)). Furthermore, Al addition leads to the precipitation of highly refined ordered L12 (gamma') and B2 precipitates in Al0.3CoCrFeNi. A detailed investigation of precipitation of the ordered phases in Al0.3CoCrFeNi and their thermal stability is done using atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Synchrotron X-ray in situ and ex situ analyses. The alloy strengthened via grain boundary strengthening following the Hall-Petch relationship offers a large increment of strength with small variation in grain size. Tensile strength of the Al0.3CoFeNi is increased by 50% on precipitation fine-scale gamma' precipitates

  1. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels; Recristallisation dynamique d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques de haute purete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavard, L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  2. Thermal stability and thermal property characterisation of Fe–14.4Cr–15.4Ni–2.4Mo–2.36Mn–0.25Ti–1.02Si–0.042C–0.04P–0.005B (mass%) austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► High temperature enthalpy, specific heat, lattice thermal expansion of Alloy D9I determined. ► Melting and solidification studied by thermal analysis. ► Integrated modelling by Debye–Grüneisen quasiharmonic formalism. ► Comprehensive thermal property assessment for austenitic stainless steel. -- Abstract: High temperature measurements of enthalpy increment (ΔH{sub T}°) and lattice parameter have been carried out on Alloy D9I by means of drop calorimetry and high temperature X-ray diffraction techniques, respectively. In addition, the thermal stability during heating and cooling from the melting range has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that under near equilibrium cooling conditions (3 K min{sup −1}), Alloy D9I exhibits L → γ austenite → L + γ + δ ferrite → γ + δ → γ solidification mode. However, the phase fraction of δ ferrite and the temperature region of γ + δ two phase domain are found to be small. The on-cooling liquidus and solidus temperatures are found to be 1684 and 1631 ± 5 K, respectively. The latent heat of solidification is found to be in the range, 190–220 J g{sup −1}. The thermal analysis study has revealed that solution treated Alloy D9I exhibits an endothermic dissolution of Ti(C,N) particles at about 1323 ± 2 K, with an associated heat effect of 16–20 J g{sup −1}. The specific heat C{sub p} and coefficient of linear thermal expansion α{sub l} at 298.15 K are estimated to be 486 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 1.15 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1}, respectively. The measured temperature dependencies of C{sub p} and α{sub l} for Alloy D9I are in good agreement with the general trend exhibited by many austenitic steels. Further, an empirical linear correlation has been found between the measured temperature dependent molar volume and molar enthalpy values. The measured thermal property data have been modelled through Debye–Grüneisen formalism to obtain an

  3. Carbon transfer between 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo alloy and austenitic steels (experiments in anisothermal loops)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Besson, M.; Champeix, L.; Donati, J.R.; Oberlin, C.; Saint-Paul, P.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on carbon transfer between the ferritic steel 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo and the austenitic steels 316L and 321H have shown that there is not any measurable carbon transfer in the operating conditions of the secondary circuit of PHENIX (475 deg C was the maximal temperature of the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel). A significant carbon transfer has been observed between the ferritic steel and the 316L steel when the 321H was replaced by the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel in the same thermohydraulic conditions (the ferritic steel was then used up to 545 deg C). This experiment has demonstrated the importance of the temperature and the initial carbon content of the ferritic steel as parameters in the decarburization process. It appears that decarburization may not be sensitive to the thermohydraulic conditions at least in the range investigated in those experiments. In the other hand the 316L steel is observed to have been carburized, the degree of carburization remaining appreciably constant and independent on the temperature between 400 deg C and 550 deg C [fr

  4. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the austenite-to-ferrite transformation under high magnetic field in medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yudong; He Changshu; Zhao Xiang; Zuo Liang; Esling, Claude

    2005-01-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in medium carbon steel in the high magnetic fields were investigated. Results showed that the magnetic field could obviously change the γ/α+γ phase equilibrium-by increasing the amount of ferrite obtained during cooling-and greatly accelerate the transformation. Thus the microstructure obtained under fast cooling with high magnetic field was still ferritic and pearlitic, while that obtained without the magnetic field under the same cooling conditions was bainitic. Exploration in this area contributes both to enriching the new theory on electromagnetic processing of materials (EPM) and in establishing new techniques for materials processing

  6. Deformation-Induced Dissolution and Precipitation of Nitrides in Austenite and Ferrite of a High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabashov, V. A.; Makarov, A. V.; Kozlov, K. A.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Zamatovskii, A. E.; Volkova, E. G.; Luchko, S. N.

    2018-02-01

    Methods of Mössbauer spectroscopy and electron microscopy have been used to study the effect of the severe plastic deformation by high pressure torsion in Bridgman anvils on the dissolution and precipitation of chromium nitrides in the austenitic and ferritic structure of an Fe71.2Cr22.7Mn1.3N4.8 high-nitrogen steel. It has been found that an alternative process of dynamic aging with the formation of secondary nitrides affects the kinetics of the dissolution of chromium nitrides. The dynamic aging of ferrite is activated with an increase in the deformation temperature from 80 to 573 K.

  7. The influence of nickel content on microstructures of Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys irradiated with nickel ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Garner, F.A.

    1990-11-01

    The objectives of this effort is to identify the mechanisms involved in the radiation-induced evolution of microstructure in materials intended for fusion applications. The results of this study are useful in interpreting the results of several other ongoing experiments involving either spectral or isotopic tailoring to study the effects of helium on microstructure evolution. Ion-irradiated Fe-15Cr-XNi (X = 20, 35, 45, 60, 75) ternary alloys and a 15Cr-85Ni binary alloy were examined after bombardment at 675 degree C and compared to earlier observations made on these same alloys after irradiation in EBR-II at 510 or 538 degree C. The response of the ion-irradiated microstructures to nickel content appears to be very consistent with that of neutron irradiation even though there are four orders of magnitude difference in displacement rate and over 200 degree C difference in temperature. It appears that the transition to higher rates of swelling during both types of irradiation is related to the operation of some mechanisms that is not directly associated with void nucleation. 6 refs., 8 figs

  8. Study on high-cycle fatigue behavior of candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys for SCWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yuxiang; Liu Guiliang; Tang Rui; Xiong Ru; Qiao Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    In the design for supercritical water reactor (SCWR), the operating temperature, pressure, burn up and irradiation damage are very high, so it seems vital to make correct choice of structural materials in core and obtain their key application behavior which would beneficial the research and development of SCWR. In this paper, the high cycle fatigue (HCF) tests of commerce austenite alloys including 6XN and 825 were conducted under bending and rotating loads at room temperature (RT) as well as at 550 ℃ in air. The experimental data were analyzed and the S-N curves were processed, the fracture morphology was also observed by SEM. The results indicate that the fatigue limited stresses at RT for the 2 Fe-Cr-Ni alloy were in such order of 825 < 6XN, which consistent with the order of their tensile strength. Elevated temperature would accelerate the oxidation of the specimen and therefore the fatigue life would decrease, among them 6XN was more sensitive to high temperature with the larger decreasing tendency which make the fatigue limited stress of the two alloys more closer at 550 ℃. While 825 is more sensitive to the stress cycles. All the two alloys have good resistance to high cycle fatigue when comparing their experimental data with the calculated value from the empirical formula. The fracture morphology presents areas of crack initiation, crack growth and fracture, the fracture area has much dimples. This work can be applied to the conceptional design for SCWR. (authors)

  9. Progress in Preparation and Research of High Entropy Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yong-xing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The current high entropy alloys' studies are most in block, powder, coating, film and other areas. There are few studies of high entropy alloys in other areas and they are lack of unified classification. According to the current high entropy alloys' research situation, The paper has focused on the classification on all kinds of high entropy alloys having been researched, introduced the selecting principle of elements, summarized the preparation methods, reviewed the research institutions, research methods and research contents of high entropy alloys, prospected the application prospect of high entropy alloys, put forward a series of scientific problems of high entropy alloys, including less research on mechanism, incomplete performance research, unsystematic thermal stability study, preparation process parameters to be optimized, lightweight high entropy alloys' design, the expansion on the research field, etc, and the solutions have been given. Those have certain guiding significance for the expansion of the application of high entropy alloys subjects in the future research direction.

  10. High density tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt alloys having improved hardness and method for making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrice, T.W.; Bost, J.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process of making high density alloy containing about 85 to 98 weight percent tungsten and the balance of the alloy being essentially a binder of nickel, iron and cobalt, and wherein the cobalt is present in an amount within the range of about 5 to 47.5 weight percent of the binder, comprising: blending powders of the tungsten, nickel, iron and cobalt into a homogeneous composition, compacting the homogeneous composition into a shaped article, heating the shaped article to a temperature and for a time sufficient to sinter the article, subjecting the sintered article to a temperature sufficient to enable the intermetallic phase formed at the matrix to tungsten interface to diffuse into the gamma austenitic phase whereby the alpha tungsten/gamma austenite boundaries are essentially free of such intermetallic phase, quenching the article, and swaging the article to a reduction in area of about 5 to 40 percent, the article having improved mechanical properties, including improved tensile strength and hardness while maintaining suitable ductility for subsequent working thereof

  11. The metallurgy of high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, J. K.; Purushothaman, S.

    1976-01-01

    Nickel-base, cobalt-base, and high nickel and chromium iron-base alloys are dissected, and their microstructural and chemical components are assessed with respect to the various functions expected of high temperature structural materials. These functions include the maintenance of mechanical integrity over the strain-rate spectrum from creep resistance through fatigue crack growth resistance, and such alloy stability expectations as microstructural coarsening resistance, phase instability resistance and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Special attention will be given to the perennial conflict and trade-off between strength, ductility and corrosion and oxidation resistance. The newest developments in the constitution of high temperature alloys will also be discussed, including aspects relating to materials conservation.

  12. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold ...

  13. The effect of cold work, heat treatment, and composition on the austenite to R-phase transformation temperature of Ni-Ti shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, P.E.; Angst, D.R.; Schachner, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of cold work (CW) and heat treatment (HT) on the austenite to R-Phase (A→R) transformation temperature (TT) of a near equiatomic and three other Ti rich NiTi SMA is examined. For the SMA having a near equiatomic composition, the A→R TT increases with increasing CW at low HT temperatures. For the SMA having the maximum possible Ti content, the A→R TT decreases with increasing CW at low HT temperatures. For all compositions, the A→R TT is not sensitive to CW at high HT temperatures. At a Ti content slightly below the maximum possible, the A→R TT is relatively insensitive to CW and HT temperature. For all of the SMA investigated, the A→R TT increases with increasing Ti content for a specific CW and HT temperature, and this effect is greatest at low CW and at high HT temperatures. (orig.)

  14. Phase Equilibrium and Austenite Decomposition in Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the phase equilibrium analysis and austenite decomposition of two Nb-microalloyed medium-Mn steels containing 3% and 5% Mn. The pseudobinary Fe-C diagrams of the steels were calculated using Thermo-Calc. Thermodynamic calculations of the volume fraction evolution of microstructural constituents vs. temperature were carried out. The study comprised the determination of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of the investigated steels. The diagrams were used to determine continuous and isothermal cooling paths suitable for production of bainite-based steels. It was found that the various Mn content strongly influences the hardenability of the steels and hence the austenite decomposition during cooling. The knowledge of CCT diagrams and the analysis of experimental dilatometric curves enabled to produce bainite-austenite mixtures in the thermomechanical simulator. Light microscopy (LM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to assess the effect of heat treatment on morphological details of produced multiphase microstructures.

  15. Effect of Nb and Cu on the high temperature creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu-Ho; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Huh, Joo-Youl; Park, Dae-Bum; Hong, Sung-Min; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2013-01-01

    The effect of Nb and Cu addition on the creep properties of a high Mn–N austenitic stainless steel was investigated at 600 and 650 °C. In the original high Mn–N steel, which was initially precipitate-free, the precipitation of M 23 C 6 (M = Cr, Fe) and Cr 2 N took place mostly on grain boudaries during creep deformation. On the other hand, the minor addition of Nb resulted in high number density of Z-phases (CrNbN) and MX (M = Nb; X = C, N) carbonitrides inside grains by combining with a high content of N, while suppressing the formation of Cr 2 N. The addition of Cu gave rise to the independent precipitation of nanometer-sized metallic Cu particles. The combination of the different precipitate-forming mechanisms associated with Z-phase, MX and Cu-rich precipitates turned out to improve the creep-resistance significantly. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the precipitation were discussed using thermo-kinetic simulations. - Highlights: • The creep rupture life was improved by Nb and Cu addition. • The creep resistance of the steel A2 in this study was comparable to that of TP347HFG. • The size of Z-phase and MX carbonitride did not change significantly after creep test. • The nanometer sized Cu-rich precipitate was observed after creep. • The predicted size of precipitates by MatCalc agreed well with measured size

  16. High strength cast aluminum alloy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druschitz, Edward A.

    The goal of this research was to understand how chemistry and processing affect the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of high strength cast aluminum alloys. Two alloy systems were investigated including the Al-Cu-Ag and the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu systems. Processing variables included solidification under pressure (SUP) and heat treatment. This research determined the range in properties that can be achieved in BAC 100(TM) (Al-Cu micro-alloyed with Ag, Mn, Zr, and V) and generated sufficient property data for design purposes. Tensile, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue testing were performed. CuAl2 and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallics were identified as the ductility limiting flaws. A solution treatment of 75 hours or longer was needed to dissolve most of the intermetallic CuAl 2. The Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic was unaffected by heat treatment. These results indicate that faster cooling rates, a reduction in copper concentration and a reduction in iron concentration might increase the ductility of the alloy by decreasing the size and amount of the intermetallics that form during solidification. Six experimental Al-Zn-Mg-Cu series alloys were produced. Zinc concentrations of 8 and 12wt% and Zn/Mg ratios of 1.5 to 5.5 were tested. Copper was held constant at 0.9%. Heat treating of the alloys was optimized for maximum hardness. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu samples were solution treated at 441°C (826°F) for 4 hours before ramping to 460°C (860°F) for 75 hours and then aged at 120°C (248°F) for 75 hours. X-ray diffraction showed that the age hardening precipitates in most of these alloys was the T phase (Mg32Zn 31.9Al17.1). Tensile testing of the alloys showed that the best mechanical properties were obtained in the lowest alloy condition. Chilled Al-8.2Zn-1.4Mg-0.9Cu solidified under pressure resulted in an alloy with a yield strength of 468MPa (68ksi), tensile strength of 525MPa (76ksi) and an elongation of 9%.

  17. Deformation mechanism maps for pure iron, corrosion resistant austenitic steels and a low-alloy carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, H.Y.; Ashby, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of construction of deformation mechanisms charts for iron base alloys are presented. Deformation mechanisms charts for pure iron, 316 and 314 stainless steels, a ferritic steel with 1% Cr, Mo, V are given, examples of the charts application being provided. The charts construction is based, when it is possible, on the state equations, deduced from theoretical models and satisfying experimental data. The charts presented should be considered as an attempt to unite the main regularities of the theory of dislocations and diffusion with the observed experimental picture of plastic deformation and creep of commercial steels [ru

  18. High temperature mechanical forming of Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwembela, A.; McQueen, H.J.; Myshlyaev, M.

    2002-01-01

    Mg alloys are hot worked in the range 180-450 o C and 0.0-10 s -1 ; the present project data are compared with a wide selection of published results. The flow stresses and their dependence on temperature and strain rate are fairly similar to simple Al alloys: however, the hot ductility is much lower (≤3 in torsion). Twinning plays a significant role in Mg alloys almost independently of temperature; the twins initiate at low strains in grains poorly oriented for basal slip and in consequence become well disposed for such slip. As T rises, there is increasing formation of subgrains that spread toward the grain centers from grain and twin boundaries: this is indicative of stress concentrations inducing non-basal sup which helps provide the geometrically necessary dislocations. Above about 240 o C, dynamic (DRX) nucleates at grain and twin boundaries, preferentially at intersections; this again is evidence of non-basal slip that provides the highly misoriented cells. The boundaries in which further strain concentrates producing further DRX. The microstructure remains very heterogeneous compared to the uniform dynamically recovered substructure in Al alloys, thus giving rise to the reduced ductility. These results are employed to interpret the mechanical and microstructural behavior of Mg alloys in extrusion, rolling and forging. (author)

  19. Alloy model for high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissmann, M.; Saul, A.

    1991-07-01

    An alloy model is proposed for the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. It is based on the assumption that holes and extra electrons are localized in small copper oxygen clusters, that would be the components of such alloy. This model, when used together with quantum chemical calculations on small clusters, can explain the structure observed in the experimental densities of states of both hole and electron superconductors close to the Fermi energy. The main point is the strong dependence of the energy level distribution and composition on the number of electrons in a cluster. The alloy model also suggests a way to correlate Tc with the number of holes, or extra electrons, and the number of adequate clusters to locate them. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Phase transformation and hardness of SS 316 L steel cast alloy after heat treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidayat, S.; Prayitno, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    Heat treatment Study of SS 316 L cast alloy at high temperature was conducted. The alloy of SS 316 L was melted by arc melting furnace in argon atmosphere. Heat treatment of SS 316 L casting alloy was carried out in tube furnace at 1400 o C for period of 1/2, 1, and 2 hours. The optical microscopic characterization showed that SS 316 L cast has got dendritic micro structure with ferrite as the primary phase. After the heat treatment, the ferrite phase underwent gradual decrease followed by an increase of the austenite phase. The heat treatment process also resulted in the formation of the new grain boundary. The hardness examination revealed that for longer period of the heat treatment, the hardness of SS 316 L increased. (author)

  1. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of single and double austenitization treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 16Cr-2Ni steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, K. P.; Reddy, A. Venugopal; Sarma, D. S.

    1999-06-01

    Double austenitization (DA) treatment is found to yield the best combination of strength and toughness in both low-temperature as well as high-temperature tempered conditions as compared to single austenitization (SA) treatments. Obtaining the advantages of double austenitization (DA) to permit dissolution of alloy carbides without significant grain coarsening was attempted in AISI 431 type martensitic stainless steel. Structure-property correlation after low-temperature tempering (200 °C) as well as high-temperature double tempering (650+600 °C) was carried out for three austenitization treatments through SA at 1000 °C, SA at 1070 °C, and DA at 1070+1000 °C. While the increase in strength after DA treatment and low-temperature tempering at 200 °C is due to the increased amount of carbon in solution as a result of dissolution of alloy carbides during first austenitization, the increased toughness is attributable to the increased quantity of retained austenite. After double tempering (650+600 °C), strength and toughness are mainly found to depend on the precipitation and distribution of carbides in the microstructure and the grain size effect.

  3. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  4. Development and Characterization of Improved NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys by Solid-Solution Strengthening and Thermomechanical Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen; Noebe, Ronald; Padula, Santo, II; Garg, Anita; Olson, David

    2006-01-01

    The need for compact, solid-state actuation systems for use in the aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries is currently motivating research in high-temperature shape-memory alloys (HTSMA) with transformation temperatures greater than 100 C. One of the basic high-temperature alloys investigated to fill this need is Ni(19.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30. Initial testing has indicated that this alloy, while having acceptable work characteristics, suffers from significant permanent deformation (or ratcheting) during thermal cycling under load. In an effort to overcome this deficiency, various solid-solution alloying and thermomechanical processing schemes were investigated. Solid-solution strengthening was achieved by substituting 5at% gold or platinum for palladium in Ni(19.5)Ti(50.5)Pd30, the so-called baseline alloy, to strengthen the martensite and austenite phases against slip processes and improve thermomechanical behavior. Tensile properties, work behavior, and dimensional stability during repeated thermal cycling under load for the ternary and quaternary alloys were compared. The relative difference in yield strength between the martensite and austenite phases and the dimensional stability of the alloy were improved by the quaternary additions, while work output was only minimally impacted. The three alloys were also thermomechanically processed by cycling repeatedly through the transformation range under a constant stress. This so-called training process dramatically improved the dimensional stability in these samples and also recovered the slight decrease in work output caused by quaternary alloying. An added benefit of the solid-solution strengthening was maintenance of enhanced dimensional stability of the trained material to higher temperatures compared to the baseline alloy, providing a greater measure of over-temperature capability.

  5. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  6. Applications of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundvall, J.; Olsson, J. [Avesta Sheffield AB (Sweden); Holmberg, B. [Avesta Welding AB (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A selected number of applications for different types of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels are described. The applications and grades are based on how nitrogen improves different properties. Conventional austenitic grades of type 304 and 316 can be alloyed with nitrogen to increase the strength and to maintain the austenite stability after cold deformation when exposed to cryogenic temperatures. Such examples are presented. The addition of nitrogen to duplex grades of stainless steel such as 2205 improves the pitting resistance, among other things, and also enables faster reformation of the austenite in the heat affected zone. This means that heavy plate can be welded without pre-heating or post-weld heating. Such applications are covered. Modern highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels almost always contain nitrogen and all reasons for this are covered, i.e. to stabilise the austenite, to increase the strength, and to improve the pitting resistance. The increased strength is the characteristic exemplified the least, since the higher strength of duplex grades is well known, but examples on austenite stability and improved pitting resistance are presented. (orig.)

  7. Influence of prior cold rolling reduction on microstructure and mechanical properties of a reversion annealed high-Mn austenitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behjati, P., E-mail: p.behjatipournaki@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karjalainen, L.P.; Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M. [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Samaei Baghbadorani, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Foulad Institute of Technology, Fouladshahr, Isfahan 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamada, A. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, Suez 43721 (Egypt)

    2016-01-05

    The martensitic reversion is known to be effective in refining the grain size of metastable austenitic stainless steels. However, severe cold rolling reductions are generally required for this process. In this study, the influence of the degree of prior cold rolling and subsequent annealing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a metastable high-Mn austenitic steel was investigated. Three cold rolling reductions of 20%, 35% and 50% were applied at ambient temperature before the annealing at 700 °C for the durations of 10, 100 and 1000 s. Microstructures were examined by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties were measured by hardness and tensile tests. The microstructure changes were followed by magnetic measurements and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that a relatively small reduction of 35% and 100 s annealing could provide efficient grain refinement (the average size of 0.5 µm) and accordingly an outstanding combination of strength-ductility properties with the yield strength 890 MPa, tensile strength 1340 MPa and elongation 41% was achieved. The occurrence of martensite reversion and recrystallization processes with different contributions in dependence on degree of prior deformation before annealing was discussed.

  8. The stability of retained austenite at different locations during straining of I&Q&P steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chenghao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Lili; Zhou, Tao; Lu, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xihui [Qingzhou Construction Quality and Safety Supervision Station, Shandong 262500 (China)

    2016-07-18

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the transformation behavior of retained austenite at different locations of intercritical heating, quenching and partitioning (I&Q&P) steel. The consumption of retained austenite at different strains is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results indicate that retained austenite can transform into martensite progressively during the whole deformation process, which is in favor of a good combination of strength and ductility, contributing to a high product of strength and elongation (PSE) of 31.9 GPa%. The transformation characteristics of retained austenite at different locations after different strains are characterized by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results show that the transformation preferentially occurs in the retained austenite at ferrite grain boundaries, subsequently the one within ferrite grains (at 10% strain) and eventually the one between martensite laths (at 15% strain). In FCC phase, the average local misorientations are 0.547° and 0.674° at 5% and 10% strain, respectively; however, the values are not more than 0.7° at 15% and 20% strain due to the TRIP effect. For the retained austenite within ferrite grains, the interior part preferentially transforms into twin martensite, while the interface still remains due to alloying elements segregation.

  9. Martensitic transformations, structure, and strengthness of processed high-nitrogen and high-carbon ferrous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Prokoshkina, V. G.

    2003-10-01

    Structures and properties of metastable austenitic alloys Fe-18Cr-16Ni-I2Mn-(0.17 to 0. 50)N, Fe-18Cr-12Mn-(0.48 to 1.12)N, Fe-18Cr-(0.1 to 1.18)N, and Fe-(12 to 20)Ni-(0.6 to 1.3)C, Fe-(6 to 8)Mn-(0.6 to 1.0)C, Fe-(5 to 6)Cr-(4 to 5)Mn-(0.6 to 0.8)C, Fe-6Cr-(1.0 to 1.3)C resulting from martensitic transformations under cooling and cold deformation (CD), as well as following tempering processes, were studied by magnetometry, X-ray and electron microscopy analyses, hardness measurements and mechanical properties tests. Martensite with a b.c.t. lattice was formed in all alloys with M_s{>}-196^circC during cooling. Under CD transformations of γ{to}α, γ{to}\\varepsilon{to}α, or γ{to}\\varepsilon types were realized depending on the alloy composition. Carbon increased but nitrogen decreased stacking fault energy. Thus carbon assists α-martensite formation but nitrogen promotese. As CD level and/or concentration of carbon and nitrogen increase residual stresses resulting from the CD also increase. The martensitic transformation during CD can decrease the residual stresses. Kinetic of tempering of b.c.t. thermal martensite differs from those of CD-induced martensite. In the second case, deformation aging, texture, and residual stresses are more visible. The maximal strengthening under CD takes place in (Mn+N)-steels. (Cr+N) and (Cr+Mn+N)-steels are high-strength, non-magnetic and corrosion resistant and are easily hardened by a low level of plastic deformation.

  10. Comparison of three Ni-Hard I alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Rice, J. (Texaloy Foundry Co., Inc., Floresville, Texas)

    2004-09-01

    This report documents the results of an investigation which was undertaken to reveal the similarities and differences in the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of three Ni-Hard I alloys. One alloy (B1) is ASTM A532 class IA Ni-Hard containing 4.2 wt. pct. Ni. The second alloy (B2) is similar to B1 but higher in Cr, Si, and Mo. The third alloy (T1) also falls in the same ASTM specification, but it contains 3.3 wt. pct. Ni. The alloys were evaluated in both as-cast and stress-relieved conditions except for B2, which was evaluated in the stress-relieved condition only. While the matrix of the high Ni alloys is composed of austenite and martensite in both conditions, the matrix of the low Ni alloy consists of a considerable amount of bainite, in addition to the martensite and the retained austenite in as cast condition, and primarily bainite, with some retained austenite, in the stress relieved condition. It was found that the stress relieving treatment does not change the tensile strength of the high Ni alloy. Both the as cast and stress relieved high Ni alloys had a tensile strength of about 350 MPa. On the other hand, the tensile strength of the low Ni alloy increased from 340 MPa to 452 MPa with the stress relieving treatment. There was no significant difference in the wear resistance of these alloys in both as-cast and stressrelieved conditions.

  11. Design of Refractory High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, M. C.; Carney, C. S.; Doğan, Ö. N.; Jablonksi, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.; Alman, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    This report presents a design methodology for refractory high-entropy alloys with a body-centered cubic (bcc) structure using select empirical parameters (i.e., enthalpy of mixing, atomic size difference, Ω-parameter, and electronegativity difference) and CALPHAD approach. Sixteen alloys in equimolar compositions ranging from quinary to ennead systems were designed with experimental verification studies performed on two alloys using x-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Two bcc phases were identified in the as-cast HfMoNbTaTiVZr, whereas multiple phases formed in the as-cast HfMoNbTaTiVWZr. Observed elemental segregation in the alloys qualitatively agrees with CALPHAD prediction. Comparisons of the thermodynamic mixing properties for liquid and bcc phases using the Miedema model and CALPHAD are presented. This study demonstrates that CALPHAD is more effective in predicting HEA formation than empirical parameters, and new single bcc HEAs are suggested: HfMoNbTiZr, HfMoTaTiZr, NbTaTiVZr, HfMoNbTaTiZr, HfMoTaTiVZr, and MoNbTaTiVZr.

  12. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by High-Temperature Gas Nitriding Plus Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Dongling; Li, Minsong; Ding, Hongzhen; Qiu, Wanqi; Luo, Chengping

    2018-02-01

    The low-alloy steel was nitrided in a pure NH3 gas atmosphere at 640 660 °C for 2 h, i.e., high-temperature gas nitriding (HTGN), followed by tempering at 225 °C, which can produce a high property surface coating without brittle compound (white) layer. The steel was also plasma nitriding for comparison. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the nitrided and tempered specimens were examined, and their tribological behavior investigated. The results showed that the as-gas-nitrided layer consisted of a white layer composed of FeN0.095 phase (nitrided austenite) and a diffusional zone underneath the white layer. After tempering, the white layer was decomposed to a nano-sized (α-Fe + γ'-Fe4N + retained austenite) bainitic microstructure with a high hardness of 1150HV/25 g. Wear test results showed that the wear resistance and wear coefficient yielded by the complex HTGN plus tempering were considerably higher and lower, respectively, than those produced by the conventional plasma nitriding.

  13. 'In-beam' simulation of high temperature helium embrittlement of DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.; Batfalsky, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work describes a facility for high temperature creep rupture tests during homogeneous helium implantation. This 'in-beam' creep testing facility is used to simulate helium embrittlement effects which will be very important for first wall materials of future fusion reactors operated at high temperatures. First results for DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel clearly demonstrate differences between samples 'in-beam' tested at 1073 K and those creep tested at the same temperature after room temperature helium implantation. The specimens ruptured 'in-beam' have much shorter lifetimes and lower ductility than the specimens tested after room temperature implantation. There are also differences in the microstructures, concerning helium bubble sizes and densities in matrix and grain boundaries. These microstructural differences may be a key for the understanding of the more severe helium embrittlement effects 'in-beam' as compared to creep tests performed after room temperature implantation. (orig.)

  14. Reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels: The Fe--Mn--Cr--C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel-free manganese-stabilized steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications. As the first part of this effort, the austenite-stable region in the Fe--Mn--Cr--C system was determined. Results indicated that the Schaeffler diagram developed for Fe--Ni--Cr--C alloys cannot be used to predict the constituents expected for high-manganese steels. This is true because manganese is not as strong an austenite stabilizer relative to δ-ferrite formation as predicted by the diagram, but it is a stronger austenite stabilizer relative to martensite than predicted. Therefore, the austenite-stable region for Ne--Mn--Cr--C alloys occurs at lower chromium and hugher combinations of manganese and carbon than predicted by the Schaeffler diagram. Development of a manganese-stabilized stainless steel should be possible in the composition range of 20 to 25% Mn, 10 to 15% Cr, and 0.01 to 0.25%C. Tensile behavior of an Fe--20%Mn--12%Cr--0.25%C alloy was determined. The strength and ductility of this possible base composition was comparable to type 316 stainless steel in both the solution-annealed and cold-worked condition

  15. Low-activation Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel with further reduced content of long-lived radioactive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Saida, T.; Hirai, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Ind. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Kusuhashi, M.; Sato, I.; Hatakeyama, T. [The Japan Steel Works Ltd., Chatsu-machi 4, Muroran 051-8505 (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steel based on Mn-Cr non-magnetic steels has been developed. The alloying elements of long-life activation, such as Ni, Mo and Co, were eliminated and substituted with Mn along with an addition of N. A Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel, 24.5Mn-13.5Cr-0.02C-0.2N, has been developed successfully. Examined material properties, including mechanical, thermal and magnetic properties, as well as weldability and characteristics of corrosion resistance, are presented. It was found that the alloy has excellent material properties virtually equivalent to those of 316SS. In this study, the applicability of the Schaeffler, DeLong and Hull constitution diagrams for the stainless steels with low Ni and high Mn contents was also examined. The boundary conditions distinguishing the single austenite phase from the others have been identified for the Mn-Cr steels. (orig.) 22 refs.

  16. Low-activation Mn Cr austenitic stainless steel with further reduced content of long-lived radioactive elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Saida, Tomikane; Hirai, Shouzou; Kusuhashi, Mikio; Sato, Ikuo; Hatakeyama, Tsuyoshi

    1998-06-01

    Low-activation austenitic stainless steel based on Mn-Cr non-magnetic steels has been developed. The alloying elements of long-life activation, such as Ni, Mo and Co, were eliminated and substituted with Mn along with an addition of N. A Mn-Cr austenitic stainless steel, 24.5Mn-13.5Cr-0.02C-0.2N, has been developed successfully. Examined material properties, including mechanical, thermal and magnetic properties, as well as weldability and characteristics of corrosion resistance, are presented. It was found that the alloy has excellent material properties virtually equivalent to those of 316SS. In this study, the applicability of the Schaeffler, DeLong and Hull constitution diagrams for the stainless steels with low Ni and high Mn contents was also examined. The boundary conditions distinguishing the single austenite phase from the others have been identified for the Mn-Cr steels.

  17. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO 2 along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar + ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000 0 C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450 0 C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150 0 C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures

  18. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  19. [Compressive and bend strength of experimental admixed high copper alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourai, P; Paximada, H; Lagouvardos, P; Douvitsas, G

    1988-01-01

    Mixed alloys for dental amalgams have been used mainly in the form of admixed alloys, where eutectic spheres are blend with conventional flakes. In the present study the compressive strength, bend strength and microstructure of two high-copper alloys (Tytin, Ana-2000) is compared with three experimental alloys prepared of the two high copper by mixing them in proportions of 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 by weight. The results revealed that experimental alloys inherited high early and final strength values without any significant change in their microstructure.

  20. Pulsed magnetic welding application of fast breeder austenitic pins plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallizzi, H.; Colombe, G.

    1986-11-01

    For specific nuclear needs, we had to develop pulsed magnetic welding on high resistivity coefficient alloys as austenitic steels. The magnetic force produced by an explosive inductor is transmitted on weld pieces by the use of an aluminium driver. A theoretical work carried out permitted to compare pulsed magnetic welding with explosive welding. With specific recordings, it was possible to study electrical and magnetical behavior during the active welding phase. By means of these informations, we are able to specify and to realize, with the financial help of ANVAR organization, a low impedance high velocity generator permitting to weld with a non destructible inductor. 6 refs [fr

  1. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  2. An experience with in-service fabrication and inspection of austenitic stainless steel piping in high temperature sodium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@igcar.gov.in; Laha, K.; Sakthy, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Procedure for changing 304L SS pipe to 316L SS in sodium loop has been established. • Hot leg made of 304L SS was isolated from existing cold leg made of 316LN SS. • Innovative welding was used in joining the new 316L SS pipe with existing 316LN SS. • The old components of 304L SS piping have been integrated with the new piping. - Abstract: A creep testing facility along with dynamic sodium loop was installed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India to assess the creep behavior of fast reactor structural materials in flowing sodium. Type 304L austenitic stainless steel was used in the low cross section piping of hot-leg whereas 316LN austenitic stainless steel in the high cross section cold-leg of the sodium loop. The intended service life of the sodium loop was 10 years. The loop has performed successfully in the stipulated time period. To enhance its life time, it has been decided to replace the 304L piping with 316L piping in the hot-leg. There were more than 300 welding joints involved in the integration of cold-leg with the new 316L hot-leg. Continuous argon gas flow was maintained in the loop during welding to avoid contamination of sodium residue with air. Several innovative welding procedures have been adopted for joining the new hot-leg with the existing cold-leg in the presence of sodium residue adopting TIG welding technique. The joints were inspected for 100% X-ray radiography and qualified by performing tensile tests. The components used in the discarded hot-leg were retrieved, cleaned and integrated in the renovated loop. A method of cleaning component of sodium residue has been established. This paper highlights the in-service fabrication and inspection of the renovation.

  3. The corrosion of austenitic steel in flowing high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmundis, C. de; Weisgerber, P.; Mazzocchi, N.; Plog, C.

    1981-01-01

    This work represents an attempt to obtain data on the corrosion product formation, including corrosion products which are released to the water, of austenitic steel. AISI 316 or DIN Werkstoff No. 14401. The oxidation experiments were carried out in a small laboratory test loop, which was designed for this study. In the stainless water system considered during an oxidation time of 1800 h at 300 0 C, five zones of differing composition developed. 1. The base metal (for comparison) Fe/Cr/Ni = 67/20/13. 2. The metal at the metal/oxide interface nickel enriched, chromium and iron decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 64/19/17. 3. The inner oxide chromium enriched and iron and nickel decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 53/32/14. 4. The outer oxide iron enriched, chromium decreased Fe/Cr/Ni = 70/17/13. 5. The corrosion products released to the water, in total, i.e. particulate and dispersed matter, a Fe/Cr/Ni ratio rather close to that base metal: Fe/Cr/Ni = 68/19/13. (80% particulate: Fe/Cr/Ni = 72/23/5, 20% dispersed: Fe/Cr/Ni = 55/1/44)

  4. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R B; Solly, B

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  5. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  6. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  7. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  8. Comparison of high temperature steam oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 versus austenitic and ferritic steels under light water reactor safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leistikow, S.; Schanz, G.; Zurek, Z.

    1985-12-01

    A comparative study of the oxidation behavior of Zy-4 versus steel No. 1.4914 and steel No. 1.4970 was performed in high temperature steam. Reactor typical tube sections of all three materials were exposed on both sides to superheated steam at temperatures ranging from 600 to 1300 0 C for up to 6 h. The specimens were evaluated by gravimetry, metallography, and other methods. The results are presented in terms of weight gain, corresponding metal (wall) penetration and consumption as function of time and temperature. Concerning the corrosion resistance the ranking position of Zy-4 was between the austenitic and the ferritic steel. Because of the chosen wall dimensions Zy-4 and the austenitic steel behaved similarly in that the faster oxidation of the thicker Zy-4 cladding consumed the total wall thickness in a time equivalent to the slower oxidation of the thinner austenitic steel cladding. The ferritic steel cladding however was faster consumed because of the lower oxidation resistance and the thinner wall thickness compared to the austenitic steel. So besides oxide scale formation, oxygen diffusion into the bulk of the metal forming various oxygen-containing phases were evaluated - also in respect to their influence on mechanical cladding properties and the dimensional changes. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Effect of the Thermomechanical Treatment on Structural and Phase Transformations in Cu-14Al-3Ni Shape Memory Alloy Subjected to High-Pressure Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, A. V.; Pushin, V. G.; Kuranova, N. N.; Svirid, A. E.; Uksusnikov, A. N.; Ustyugov, Yu. M.; Gunderov, D. V.

    2018-04-01

    The possibilities of controlling the structure and properties of a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy due to the use of different schemes of the thermomechanical treatment, including forging, homogenizing in the austenitic state and subsequent quenching, and high-pressure torsion have been found. For the first time, an ultrafine-grain structure has been produced in this alloy via severe plastic deformation using high-pressure torsion. It has been detected that high-pressure torsion using ten revolutions of the anvils leads to the formation of a nanocrystalline structure with a grain size of less than 100 nm. The subsequent short-term heating of the alloy to 800°C (10 s) in the temperature region of the existence of the homogeneous β phase made it possible to form an ultrafine-grain structure with predominant sizes of recrystallized grains of 1 and 8 μm. The quenching after heating prevented the decomposition of the solid solution. The refinement of the grain structure changed the deformation behavior of the alloy, having provided the possibility of the significant plastic deformation upon mechanical tensile tests. The coarse-grained hot-forged quenched alloy was brittle, and fracture occurred along the boundaries of former austenite grains and martensite packets. The highstrength ultrafine-grained alloy also experienced mainly the intercrystalline fracture along the high-angle boundaries of elements of the structure, the grain size of which was less by two orders than that in the initial alloy. This determined an increase in its relative elongation upon mechanical tests.

  10. A computational study of high entropy alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Gao, Michael; Widom, Michael; Hawk, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    As a new class of advanced materials, high-entropy alloys (HEAs) exhibit a wide variety of excellent materials properties, including high strength, reasonable ductility with appreciable work-hardening, corrosion and oxidation resistance, wear resistance, and outstanding diffusion-barrier performance, especially at elevated and high temperatures. In this talk, we will explain our computational approach to the study of HEAs that employs the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. The KKR-CPA method uses Green's function technique within the framework of multiple scattering theory and is uniquely designed for the theoretical investigation of random alloys from the first principles. The application of the KKR-CPA method will be discussed as it pertains to the study of structural and mechanical properties of HEAs. In particular, computational results will be presented for AlxCoCrCuFeNi (x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0, 1.3, 2.0, 2.8, and 3.0), and these results will be compared with experimental information from the literature.

  11. Symmetry Groups of the Austenite Lattice and Construction of Self-Accommodation Complexes of Martensite Crystals in Alloys with the Shape-Memory Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khundjua, A. G.; Ptitsin, A. G.; Brovkina, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    The internal structure of experimentally observed self-accommodation complexes of martensite crystals, which is determined by the system of twinning planes, is studied in this work. The direct correlation of the construction type of the complexes with the subgroups of the austenite lattice symmetry group is shown.

  12. High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of laser micro-processing on a Cu-Zr-based shape memory alloy (SMA), which is suitable for high-temperature (HT) applications, is discussed. A first evaluation of the interaction between a laser beam and Zr50Cu28Ni7Co15 HT SMA is highlighted. Single laser pulses at various levels of power and pulse duration were applied to evaluate their effect on the sample surfaces. Blind and through microholes were produced with sizes on the order of a few hundreds of microns; the results were characterized from the morphological viewpoint using a scanning electron microscope. The high beam quality allows the holes to be created with good circularity and little melted material around the hole periphery. An analysis of the chemical composition was performed using energy dispersive spectroscopy, revealing that compositional changes were limited, while important oxidation occurred on the hole surfaces. Additionally, laser micro-cutting tests were also proposed to evaluate the cut edge morphology and dimensions. The main result of this paper concerned the good behavior of the material upon interaction with the laser beam, which suggests that microfeatures can be successfully produced in this alloy.

  13. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafeie, Samrand [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guo, Sheng, E-mail: sheng.guo@chalmers.se [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Hu, Qiang [Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Fahlquist, Henrik [Bruker AXS Nordic AB, 17067 Solna (Sweden); Erhart, Paul [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Anders, E-mail: anders.palmqvist@chalmers.se [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-11-14

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  14. Transformation in austenitic stainless steel sheet under different loading directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  15. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress

  16. Challenges and Progress in the Development of High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys Based on NiTiX Compositions for High-Force Actuator Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II; Bigelow, Glen; Noebe, Ronald; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Interest in high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) has been growing in the aerospace, automotive, process control, and energy industries. However, actual materials development has seriously lagged component design, with current commercial NiTi alloys severely limited in their temperature capability. Additions of Pd, Pt, Au, Hf, and Zr at levels greater than 10 at.% have been shown to increase the transformation temperature of NiTi alloys, but with few exceptions, the shape memory behavior (strain recovery) of these NiTiX systems has been determined only under stress free conditions. Given the limited amount of basic mechanical test data and general lack of information regarding the work attributes of these materials, a program to investigate the mechanical behavior of potential HTSMAs, with transformation temperatures between 100 and 500 C, was initiated. This paper summarizes the results of studies, focusing on both the practical temperature limitations for ternary TiNiPd and TiNiPt systems based on the work output of these alloys and the ability of these alloys to undergo repeated thermal cycling under load without significant permanent deformation or "walking". These issues are ultimately controlled by the detwinning stress of the martensite and resistance to dislocation slip of the individual martensite and austenite phases. Finally, general rules that govern the development of useful, high work output, next-generation HTSMA materials, based on the lessons learned in this work, will be provided

  17. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dec, Weronika [Institute of Industrial Organic Chemistry, Branch Pszczyna, Doświadczalna Street 27, 43-200 Pszczyna (Poland); Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P. [Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry PAS, Niezapominajek Street 8, 30-239 Kraków (Poland); Jaworska-Kik, Marzena [Department of Biopharmacy, Medical University of Silesia, Jedności Street 8, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland); Simka, Wojciech [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Michalska, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.k.michalska@polsl.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, B. Krzywoustego 6 Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  19. Characterization of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans biofilm on high-alloyed stainless steel: XPS and electrochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dec, Weronika; Mosiałek, Michał; Socha, Robert P.; Jaworska-Kik, Marzena; Simka, Wojciech; Michalska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Results on D. desulfuricans biofilm formation on austenitic-ferritic duplex (2205 DSS) and superaustenitic (904L) stainless steels are presented. Surface characterization including the structure, configuration and chemical composition of biofilms were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were used to monitor the attachment activity of bacteria on the steels' surface and to determine the effect of bacteria on passivity. It was proved that investigated steels are rapidly colonized by bacteria. The presence of biofilm caused significant ennoblement of 904L steel surface, while retarded the attainment of high passive state of 2205 DSS. XPS analysis revealed significant sulphidation of the biofilm and its layered structure. Accumulation of sulphides and hydroxides was proved in the outermost layer, while the increasing contents of disulphides, organometallic and C-N bonds were detected in the internal part of the biofilm. Irreversible bondings between steel matrix and biofilm had also been observed. - Highlights: • High-alloyed steels are rapidly colonized by sulphate-reducing bacteria. • Higher Ni content stimulates more intensive biofilm growth. • Extracellular polymeric substances indelibly bind to the high-alloyed steels. • Sulphate-reducing bacteria caused irreversible sulphidation of passive films.

  20. Wear resistance of layers hard faced by the high-alloyed filler metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Arsić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the wear resistance of layers hard faced by the high-alloyed filler metal, with or without the austenite inter-layer, on parts that operate at different sliding speeds in conditions without lubrication. The samples were hard faced with the filler metal E 10-UM-60-C with high content of C, Cr and W. Used filler metal belongs into group of alloys aimed for reparatory hard facing of parts damaged by abrasive and erosive wear and it is characterized by high hardness and wear resistance. In experiments, the sliding speed and the normal loading were varied and the wear scar was monitored, based on which the volume of the worn material was calculated analytically. The contact duration time was monitored over the sliding path of 300 mm. The most intensive wear was established for the loading force of 100 N and the sliding speed of 1 m.s-1, though the significant wear was also noticed in conditions of the small loading and speed of 0.25 m.s-1, which was even greater that at larger speeds.

  1. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co Alloy Synthesis by High Speed Electrodeposition

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Jamaliah; Christian, Chukwuekezie; Gaius, Eyu

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposition of nanocrystals is economically and technologically viable production path for the synthesis of pure metals and alloys both in coatings and bulk form. The study presents nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloy synthesis by high speed electrodeposition. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloys coatings were prepared by direct current (DC) and deposited directly on steel and aluminum substrates without any pretreatment, using high speed electrodeposition method. The influence of the electrolysis par...

  2. Microcapillary Features in Silicon Alloyed High-Strength Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Hasanli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study explores features of silicon micro capillary in alloyed high-strength cast iron with nodular graphite (ductile iron produced in metal molds. It identified the nature and mechanism of micro liquation of silicon in a ductile iron alloyed with Nickel and copper, and demonstrated significant change of structural-quality characteristics. It was concluded that the matrix of alloyed ductile iron has a heterogeneous structure with cross reinforcement and high-silicon excrement areas.

  3. On the cryogenic magnetic transition and martensitic transformation of the austenite phase of 7MoPLUS duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.H., E-mail: KHLO@umac.m [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Lai, J.K.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-08-15

    The magnetic behaviour and martensitic transformation at cryogenic temperatures (down to 4 K) of the austenite phase of the duplex stainless steel (DSS), 7MoPLUS, were studied. As regards the prediction of Neel temperature, the empirical expressions for austenitic stainless steels are not applicable to the austenite phase of 7MoPLUS, although the composition of the austenite phase falls within the composition ranges within which the expressions were developed. Regarding the prediction of martensitic point Ms, the applicability of 'old' and recently developed expressions has been examined. The recently developed expressions, which take into account more alloying elements and their interactions, are not suitable for the austenite phase of 7MoPLUS. But for the 'old', simpler expressions, they seem to be valid in the sense that they all predict high stability of the austenite phase. Results obtained from 7MoPLUS were qualitatively the same as those obtained from another DSS, designated as 2205. Reasons for the applicability and inapplicability of these empirical expressions are suggested.

  4. Mechanical stability of individual austenite grains in TRIP steel studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondé, R. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Zhao, L. [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wright, J.P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van, E-mail: N.H.vanDijk@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-11-17

    The stability of individual metastable austenite grains in low-alloyed TRIP steels has been studied during tensile loading using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The carbon concentration, grain volume and grain orientation with respect to the loading direction was monitored for a large number of individual grains in the bulk microstructure. Most austenite grains transform into martensite in a single transformation step once a critical load is reached. The orientation-dependent stability of austenite grains was found to depend on their Schmid factor with respect to the loading direction. Under the applied tensile stress the average Schmid factor decreased from an initial value of 0.44 to 0.41 at 243 MPa. The present study reveals the complex interplay of microstructural parameters on the mechanical stability of individual austenite grains, where the largest grains with the lowest carbon content tend to transform first. Under the applied tensile stress the average carbon concentration of the austenite grains increased from an initial value of 0.90 to 1.00 wt% C at 243 MPa, while the average grain volume of the austenite grains decreased from an initial value of 19 to 15 µm{sup 3} at 243 MPa.

  5. Effects of laser peening treatment on high cycle fatigue and crack propagation behaviors in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Kiyotaka; Ochi, Yasuo; Matsumura, Takashi; Ikarashi, Takaaki; Sano, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Laser peening without protective coating (LPwC) treatment is one of surface enhancement techniques using an impact wave of high pressure plasma induced by laser pulse irradiation. High compressive residual stress was induced by the LPwC treatment on the surface of low-carbon type austenitic stainless steel SUS316L. The affected depth reached about 1mm from the surface. High cycle fatigue tests with four-points rotating bending loading were carried out to confirm the effects of the LPwC treatment on fatigue strength and surface fatigue crack propagation behaviors. The fatigue strength was remarkably improved by the LPwC treatment over the whole regime of fatigue life up to 10 8 cycles. Specimens with a pre-crack from a small artificial hole due to fatigue loading were used for the quantitative study on the effect of the LPwC treatment. The fracture mechanics investigation on the pre-cracked specimens showed that the LPwC treatment restrained the further propagation of the pre-crack if the stress intensity factor range ΔK on the crack tip was less than 7.6 MPa√m. Surface cracks preferentially propagated into the depth direction as predicted through ΔK analysis on the crack by taking account of the compressive residual stresses due to the LPwC treatment. (author)

  6. Behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel due to repeated impact loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Akira; Miyagawa, Hideaki

    1985-01-01

    Explosion hardened high manganese austenitic cast steel is being tried for rail crossing recently. From the previous studies, it became clear that high tensile residual stress was generated in the hardened surface layer by explosion and microcracks were observed. In this study, therefore, the behavior of surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel due to repeated impact loads was examined and compared with those of the original and shot peened steels. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) In the initial stage of the repetition of impact, high tensile surface residual stress in explosion hardened steel decreased rapidly with the repetition of impact, while those of the original and shot peened steels increased rapidly. This difference was attributed to the difference in depth of the work hardened layer in three testing materials. (2) Beyond 20 impacts the residual stress of three test specimens decreased gradually, and at more than 2000 impacts the compressive stress of about 500 MPa was produced regardless of the histories of working of testing materials. (3) The linear law in the second stage of residual stress fading was applicable to this case, and the range of the linear relationship was related to the depth of the work hardened layer of testing material. (4) From the changes in half-value breadth and peak intensity of diffraction X-ray, it was supposed that a peculiar microscopic strain exists in explosion hardened steel. (author)

  7. Microstructural Evolutions During Reversion Annealing of Cold-Rolled AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-06-01

    Microstructural evolutions during reversion annealing of a plastically deformed AISI 316 stainless steel were investigated and three distinct stages were identified: the reversion of strain-induced martensite to austenite, the primary recrystallization of the retained austenite, and the grain growth process. It was found that the slow kinetics of recrystallization at lower annealing temperatures inhibit the formation of an equiaxed microstructure and might effectively impair the usefulness of this thermomechanical treatment for the objective of grain refinement. By comparing the behavior of AISI 316 and 304 alloys, it was found that the mentioned slow kinetics is related to the retardation effect of solute Mo in the former alloy. At high reversion annealing temperature, however, an equiaxed austenitic microstructure was achieved quickly in AISI 316 stainless steel due to the temperature dependency of retardation effect of molybdenum, which allowed the process of recrystallization to happen easily. Conclusively, this work can shed some light on the issues of this efficient grain refining approach for microstructural control of austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talha, Mohd; Kumar, Sanjay; Behera, C.K.; Sinha, O.P.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. - Graphical abstract: Effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized Ni-free nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels was explored using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line. Cell proliferation and cell adhesion increase by increasing the degree of cold working and nitrogen content in steel indicating that indigenized material is more biocompatible and no negative effect of cold working on these steels. - Highlights: • Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free austenitic stainless steels • Cell proliferation and adhesion increase with nitrogen and degree of cold working. • Contact angle values decrease with nitrogen and degree of cold working

  9. Investigation of the applicability of some pre expressions for austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonsson, E.; Qvarfort, R.

    1992-01-01

    The alloying elements known to be most important for the pitting resistance of austenitic stainless steels are chromium, molybdenum and nitrogen. Several authors have tried to quantify the influence of these elements by expressions giving the relative influence of each element. By such an expression a ''pitting resistance equivalent, PRE'', can be calculated for a certain alloy. Recently it has become rather common among both producers and users of stainless steels to discuss pitting resistance in terms of PRE. In the present work, critical pitting temperatures, CPT, was determined in 1 M NaCl for a wide spectrum of austenitic stainless steels. With a newly developed electrochemical cell, the CPT can be determined with high accuracy as crevice corrosion in the specimen mount can be completely eliminated during test. The correlation between the experimental results and some PRE expressions from the literature is discussed

  10. A comparison of the iraddiated tensile properties of a high-manganese austenitic steel and type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The USSR steel EP-838 is a high-manganese, low-nickel steel that also has lower chromium and molybdenum than type 316 stainless steel. Tensile specimens of 20%-cold-worked EP-838 and type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the coolant temperature (approx.=50 0 C). A displacement damage level of 5.2 dpa was reached for the EP-838 and up to 9.5 dpa for the type 316 stainless steel. Tensile tests at room temperature and 300 0 C on the two steels indicated that the irradiation led to increased strength and decreased ductility compared to the unirradiated steels. Although the 0.2% yield stress of the type 316 stainless steel in the unirradiated condition was greater than that for the EP-838, after irradiation there was essentially no difference between the strength or ductility of the two steels. The results indicate that the replacement of the majority of the nickel by manganese and a reduction of chromium and molybdenum in an austenitic stainless steel of composition near that for type 316 stainless steel has little effect on the irradiated and unirradiated tensile properties at low temperatures. (orig.)

  11. Grain boundary characteristics and texture formation in a medium carbon steel during its austenitic decomposition in a high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.D.; Esling, C.; Lecomte, J.S.; He, C.S.; Zhao, X.; Zuo, L.

    2005-01-01

    A 12-T magnetic field has been applied to a medium plain carbon steel during the diffusional decomposition of austenite and the effect of a high magnetic field on the distribution of misorientation angles, grain boundary characteristics and texture formation in the ferrite produced has been investigated. The results show that a high magnetic field can cause a considerable decrease in the frequency of low-angle misorientations and an increase in the occurrence of low Σ coincidence boundaries, in particular the Σ3 of ferrite. This may be attributed to the elevation in the transformation temperature caused by the magnetic field and, therefore, the reduction of the transformation stress. The wider temperature range for grain growth offers longer time to the less mobile Σ boundaries to enlarge their areas. Moreover, the magnetic field can enhance the transverse field-direction fiber ( parallel TFD). It can be assumed that the effects of the field were caused by the dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of Fe atoms

  12. Non-equiatomic high entropy alloys: Approach towards rapid alloy screening and property-oriented design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradeep, K.G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr.10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Tasan, C.C., E-mail: c.tasan@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Yao, M.J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Deng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Department of Engineering Design and Materials, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, No-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Springer, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-str.1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-11-11

    The high entropy alloy (HEA) concept has triggered a renewed interest in alloy design, even though some aspects of the underlying thermodynamic concepts are still under debate. This study addresses the short-comings of this alloy design strategy with the aim to open up new directions of HEA research targeting specifically non-equiatomic yet massively alloyed compositions. We propose that a wide range of massive single phase solid solutions could be designed by including non-equiatomic variants. It is demonstrated by introducing a set of novel non-equiatomic multi-component CoCrFeMnNi alloys produced by metallurgical rapid alloy prototyping. Despite the reduced configurational entropy, detailed characterization of these materials reveals a strong resemblance to the well-studied equiatomic single phase HEA: The microstructure of these novel alloys exhibits a random distribution of alloying elements (confirmed by Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy and Atom Probe Tomography) in a single face-centered-cubic phase (confirmed by X-ray Diffraction and Electron Backscatter Diffraction), which deforms through planar slip (confirmed by Electron-Channeling Contrast Imaging) and leads to excellent ductility (confirmed by uniaxial tensile tests). This approach widens the field of HEAs to non-equiatomic multi-component alloys since the concept enables to tailor the stacking fault energy and associated transformation phenomena which act as main mechanisms to design useful strain hardening behavior.

  13. Non-equiatomic high entropy alloys: Approach towards rapid alloy screening and property-oriented design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, K.G.; Tasan, C.C.; Yao, M.J.; Deng, Y.; Springer, H.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    The high entropy alloy (HEA) concept has triggered a renewed interest in alloy design, even though some aspects of the underlying thermodynamic concepts are still under debate. This study addresses the short-comings of this alloy design strategy with the aim to open up new directions of HEA research targeting specifically non-equiatomic yet massively alloyed compositions. We propose that a wide range of massive single phase solid solutions could be designed by including non-equiatomic variants. It is demonstrated by introducing a set of novel non-equiatomic multi-component CoCrFeMnNi alloys produced by metallurgical rapid alloy prototyping. Despite the reduced configurational entropy, detailed characterization of these materials reveals a strong resemblance to the well-studied equiatomic single phase HEA: The microstructure of these novel alloys exhibits a random distribution of alloying elements (confirmed by Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy and Atom Probe Tomography) in a single face-centered-cubic phase (confirmed by X-ray Diffraction and Electron Backscatter Diffraction), which deforms through planar slip (confirmed by Electron-Channeling Contrast Imaging) and leads to excellent ductility (confirmed by uniaxial tensile tests). This approach widens the field of HEAs to non-equiatomic multi-component alloys since the concept enables to tailor the stacking fault energy and associated transformation phenomena which act as main mechanisms to design useful strain hardening behavior.

  14. Application of in-situ nano-scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction to characterize Ni–Ti–Hf high-temperature shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluskey, Patrick J., E-mail: mccluske@ge.com [GE Global Research, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States); Xiao, Kechao [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gregoire, John M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dale, Darren [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Vlassak, Joost J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Combinatorial nanocalorimetry and synchrotron X-ray diffraction were combined to study the martensite–austenite (M–A) phase transformation behavior of Ni–Ti–Hf shape memory alloys. A thin-film library of Ni–Ti–Hf samples with a range of compositions was deposited on a parallel nano-scanning calorimeter device using sputter deposition. Crystallization of each amorphous as-deposited sample by local heating at approximately 10{sup 4} K/s produced a nanoscale grain structure of austenite and martensite. Individual samples were then cycled through the M–A transformation, while the transformation enthalpy was measured by nanocalorimetry and the low- and high-temperature phase compositions were determined by X-ray diffraction. The techniques enable correlation of the observed behavior during thermal cycling with the thermodynamic and structural properties of the samples.

  15. Probing the electronic structure of Ni–Mn–In–Si based Heusler alloys thin films using magneto-optical spectra in martensitic and austenitic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Sokolov, A., E-mail: asokol@unlserve.unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Gan’shina, E.A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Quetz, Abdiel; Dubenko, I.S. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Stadler, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Ali, N. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Titov, I.S.; Rodionov, I.D. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 (Finland); Zhukov, A. [Dpto. de Física de Materiales, Fac. Químicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Granovsky, A.B. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Sabirianov, R. [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Magneto-optical properties of NiMnIn thin films with a magnetostructural transition. • Comparative analysis of magnetic properties in martensitic and austenite phases. • DFT calculations of the MO Kerr effect and site-resolved DOS agree with experiment. • The electronic structure does not change significantly with Martensitic transition. - Abstract: Thin films of Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 35−x}In{sub 11+x}Si{sub 2} were fabricated by magnetron sputtering on MgO (0 0 1) single crystal substrates. Magnetization as function of temperature for Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 11}Si{sub 2} exhibits features consistent with a magnetostructural transition (MST) from an austenitic phase to a martensitic phase, similar to the bulk material. We observed that the martensitic transformation is externally sensitive to small changes in chemical composition and stoichiometry. It has been found that thin films of Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 34−x}In{sub 11+x}Si{sub 2} with x = 0 and 1 undergo a temperature-induced MST or remain in a stable austenitic phase, respectively. Comparison of magneto-optical transverse Kerr effect spectra obtained at 0.5–4.0 eV in the 35–300 K temperature interval reveal insignificant differences between the martensitic and austenite phases. We found that the field and temperature dependencies of the transverse Kerr effect are quite different from the magnetization behavior, which is attributed to magnetic inhomogeneity across the films. To elucidate the effects of magnetostructural phase transitions on the electronic properties, we performed density functional calculations of the magneto-optical Kerr effect.

  16. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Janssen, Niels; Smith, Stefan; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with

  17. High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) Mg-Zn-Ca Alloys with Excellent Biodegradation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, J.; Becker, M.; Martinelli, E.; Weinberg, A. M.; Mingler, B.; Kilian, H.; Pogatscher, S.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    This article deals with the development of fine-grained high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) magnesium alloys intended for use as biodegradable implant material. The alloys contain solely low amounts of Zn and Ca as alloying elements. We illustrate the development path starting from the high-Zn-containing ZX50 (MgZn5Ca0.25) alloy with conventional purity, to an ultrahigh-purity ZX50 modification, and further to the ultrahigh-purity Zn-lean alloy ZX10 (MgZn1Ca0.3). It is shown that alloys with high Zn-content are prone to biocorrosion in various environments, most probably because of the presence of the intermetallic phase Mg6Zn3Ca2. A reduction of the Zn content results in (Mg,Zn)2Ca phase formation. This phase is less noble than the Mg-matrix and therefore, in contrast to Mg6Zn3Ca2, does not act as cathodic site. A fine-grained microstructure is achieved by the controlled formation of fine and homogeneously distributed (Mg,Zn)2Ca precipitates, which influence dynamic recrystallization and grain growth during hot forming. Such design scheme is comparable to that of HSLA steels, where low amounts of alloying elements are intended to produce a very fine dispersion of particles to increase the material's strength by refining the grain size. Consequently our new, ultrapure ZX10 alloy exhibits high strength (yield strength R p = 240 MPa, ultimate tensile strength R m = 255 MPa) and simultaneously high ductility (elongation to fracture A = 27%), as well as low mechanical anisotropy. Because of the anodic nature of the (Mg,Zn)2Ca particles used in the HSLA concept, the in vivo degradation in a rat femur implantation study is very slow and homogeneous without clinically observable hydrogen evolution, making the ZX10 alloy a promising material for biodegradable implants.

  18. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  19. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle

  20. Multi-scale Modeling of the Impact Response of a Strain Rate Sensitive High-Manganese Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun eÖnal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial tensile loading. The equivalent stress – equivalent strain response was then incorporated into the FE model for the sake of a more representative hardening rule under impact loading. The current results demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained by proper coupling of crystal plasticity and FE analysis even if the experimental flow rule of the material is acquired under uniaxial loading and at moderate strain rates that are significantly slower than those attained during impact loading. Furthermore, the current findings also demonstrate the need for an experiment-based multi-scale modeling approach for the sake of reliable predictions of the impact response.

  1. High-temperature mechanical properties of high-purity 70 mass% Cr-Fe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asahina, M.; Harima, N.; Takaki, S.; Abiko, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    2002-01-16

    An ingot of high-purity 70 mass% Cr-Fe alloy was prepared by high-frequency induction melting in a high-purity argon atmosphere using a cold copper crucible. Its tensile properties such as hot-ductility and tensile strength were measured, and compared with the results for a high-purity 50 mass% Cr-Fe alloy, a high-purity 60 mass% Cr-Fe alloy and a Ni-based super-alloy. The formation of {sigma}-phase was also examined. The purity of a 70Cr-Fe alloy (70 mass% Cr-Fe alloy) ingot is more than 99.98 mass% and the total amount of gaseous impurities (C, N, O, S, H) in the 70Cr-Fe alloy is 69.9 mass ppm. The strength of the 70Cr-Fe alloy is higher than those of the 60Cr-Fe alloy and the 50Cr-Fe alloy at the temperatures between 293 and 1573 K, without decrease in ductility with increasing Cr content. The 70Cr-Fe alloy also possesses excellent high-temperature ductility. The {sigma}-phase was not observed after aging of 3.6 Ms at 873 K. Consequently, the 70Cr-Fe alloy is an excellent alloy as the base of super heat-resistant alloys. (orig.)

  2. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in impure helium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Masami; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1986-01-01

    Corrosion tests with Ni-base high temperature alloys were carried out at 900 and 950 0 C in simulated high temperature reactor helium environments. It is shown that the carburization and decarburization behaviour is strongly affected by the Cr and Ti(Al) contents of the alloys. In carburizing environments, additions of Ti, alone or in combination with Al, significantly improve the carburization resistance. In oxidizing environment, the alloys with high Cr and Al(Ti) contents are the most resistant against decarburization. In this environment alloys with additions of Ti and Al show poor oxidation resistance. The experimental results obtained are compared with a recently developed theory describing corrosion of high temperature alloys in high temperature reactor helium environments. (orig.)

  3. Phase martensitic transformation study in mechanically alloyed Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 25}Fe{sub 25} alloy via high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Joao Cardoso de; Ferreira, Ailton da Silva, E-mail: joao.cardoso.lima@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis (Brazil); Rovani, Pablo Roberto; Pereira, Altair Soria [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Alloys based on titanium and nickel with shape memory effect (SME) have been widely investigated due to potential use in different areas of science and technology, such as electronics, medicine, and space.1 Among them, the superalloys Ti-Ni-Fe show high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties even at high temperatures that make them suitable for use in applications such as power plant components that work under aggressive conditions. At room temperature, the TiNi alloy has a monoclinic (B19'), known as the martensitic phase. With increasing temperature, the B19' phase transforms into a trigonal/hexagonal (B19) phase, known as the R- or pre martensitic phase, which, in its turn, transforms into a cubic (B2) structure, known as the austenitic phase. On cooling to room temperature, the reverse B2→B19→B19' phase transformations are observed. Since the B19↔B19' transformation occurs at a temperature low enough to inhibit diffusion-controlled processes, it belongs to a class of diffusionless phase transformations known as martensitic transformations. For this study, a Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 25}Fe{sub 25} (B2) alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying, and the effects of high pressures up to 18 GPa will be presented. The structural changes with increasing pressure were followed by recording in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD) diffractograms, in transmission geometry, using a long fine focus Mo X-ray tube and an imaging plate detector. The obtained results were already reported in Ref [1]. (1) A. S. Ferreira, P. R. Rovani, J. C. de Lima, A. S. Pereira, J. Appl. Phys. 117 (2015). (author)

  4. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.; Daud, A. R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surface morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.

  5. High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Strengthened by Multiply Nanoscale Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y. F.; Zuo, L.

    Recently, we have being focused on improving the strength without sacrificing ductility of High-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels by designing nanostructures. Several developments have been obtained, summarized as the following three parts: (a) Depressively nanoscale precipitates: A ferritic steel with finely dispersed precipitates reveals a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. The finely dispersed TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa. The effects of the particle size, particle distribution and intrinsic particle strength have been investigated through dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations. The DD results show that strengthening is not only a function of the density of the nano-scale precipitates but also of their size. (b) Ultrafinely ferritic plate: An interstitial-free (IF) steel sheet with a cold-rolling reduction of 75% shows a high tensile strength (710MPa) while preserving a considerable plastic strain (13%). The ductility recovery with increasing the rolling reduction up to 75% is related with the decreasing both in lamellar spacings and cell blocks sizes. (c) Parallel nano-laminated austenite: A composite microstructure consisting of ferrite, bainitic ferrite (BF) laths and retained austenite (RA) platelets has been found for the steel with a chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (in mass fraction), processed with annealing and bainitic holding. The sample annealed at 820oC (for 120s) and partitioned at 400oC (for 300s) has the best combination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS, 682 MPa) and elongation to failure ( 70%) with about 26% of BF plates 16% RA in its microstructure.

  6. Dualism of precipitation morphology in high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chih-Yuan, Chen; Chien-Chon, Chen; Jer-Ren, Yang

    2015-01-01

    While the role of microalloying elements on precipitation strengthening in ferrite matrix during austenite/ferrite transformation is quite clear, some uncertainty still exists concerning the variability of the microhardness distribution of ferrite grains in the isothermal holding condition. The objective of the present study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of carbide precipitation morphology in the ferrite matrix under different processing temperatures and times and to correlate it with austenite decomposition kinetics to elucidate why a large microhardness distribution occurs at low isothermal holding temperature. Better understanding of carbide precipitation behavior can help researchers to determine the root cause of variation in microhardness distribution, which would allow metallurgists to produce high quality steels. Measurement with a Vickers hardness indenter revealed that, in specimens isothermally held at 625 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 240–420 after 5 min of isothermal holding, and 270–340 after 60 min. For specimens isothermally held at 725 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 200–330 for 5 min of isothermal holding, and 200–250 for 60 min. Therefore, the average microhardness decreased with the isothermal holding temperature and time, and a larger range of distribution occurred with short isothermal holding times. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that interface precipitation and random precipitation can occur within the same ferrite grain. The reason is that the austenite decomposition rate varies with transformation temperature and time. An excessively fast austenite/ferrite interface movement velocity, which usually happens in small ferrite grains, would cause these ferrite grains with microalloying elements to exceed their solubility. Furthermore, these microalloying elements will be precipitated randomly after isothermal holding at longer times. Consequently, a large

  7. Dualism of precipitation morphology in high strength low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chih-Yuan, Chen, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chien-Chon, Chen [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Jer-Ren, Yang, E-mail: jryang@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-25

    While the role of microalloying elements on precipitation strengthening in ferrite matrix during austenite/ferrite transformation is quite clear, some uncertainty still exists concerning the variability of the microhardness distribution of ferrite grains in the isothermal holding condition. The objective of the present study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of carbide precipitation morphology in the ferrite matrix under different processing temperatures and times and to correlate it with austenite decomposition kinetics to elucidate why a large microhardness distribution occurs at low isothermal holding temperature. Better understanding of carbide precipitation behavior can help researchers to determine the root cause of variation in microhardness distribution, which would allow metallurgists to produce high quality steels. Measurement with a Vickers hardness indenter revealed that, in specimens isothermally held at 625 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 240–420 after 5 min of isothermal holding, and 270–340 after 60 min. For specimens isothermally held at 725 °C, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 200–330 for 5 min of isothermal holding, and 200–250 for 60 min. Therefore, the average microhardness decreased with the isothermal holding temperature and time, and a larger range of distribution occurred with short isothermal holding times. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that interface precipitation and random precipitation can occur within the same ferrite grain. The reason is that the austenite decomposition rate varies with transformation temperature and time. An excessively fast austenite/ferrite interface movement velocity, which usually happens in small ferrite grains, would cause these ferrite grains with microalloying elements to exceed their solubility. Furthermore, these microalloying elements will be precipitated randomly after isothermal holding at longer times. Consequently, a large

  8. High resolution orientation mapping of secondary phases in ATI 718Plus® alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakow Robert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The polycrystalline superalloy ATI 718Plus ® (hereafter 718Plus has been developed to replace the established alloy Inconel 718 by offering higher temperature capability for applications in gas turbines. The alloy exhibits two secondary phases in the austenitic matrix; it is strengthened by the γ′-phase with η-phase discontinuously precipitated at the grain boundaries. It can be utilized to control grain growth during forging. Generally, hexagonal η phase has been reported to possess a defined crystallographic orientation with the matrix. However, the material studied here exhibits blocky η-phase that has been precipitated and grown during thermo-mechanical processing. Therefore a measurable change in orientation relationship is expected. The standard technique for orientation mapping is electron back-scattered diffraction with spatial resolution of 100 nm. That is insufficient for studying η-phase in 718Plus. By applying high resolution orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope (Philips CM 300 FEGTEM equipped with a Nanomegas ASTARTM system a resolution of 3 nm was achieved. The indexed diffraction data was analysed using the Matlab Toolbox Mtex. The analysis included grain reconstruction and exclusion of low confidence measurements. The data set allows generating phase boundary maps indicating interfaces characteristics. Quantitative assessment shows that only 19% of the γ-η-interfaces fulfil the orientation relationship.

  9. High strength tungsten heavy alloys with molybdenum additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Sims, D.M.; German, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are candidates for numerous applications based on the unique combination of high density, high strength, and high ductility coupled with excellent machinability. Though there has been considerable research on heavy alloys, the primary focus has been on the ductility. These alloys are well suited for ballistic uses due to their high densities and it is expected that for superior ballistic performance, a high hardness, high strength and moderate ductility alloy would be ideal. The major goal of this investigation was to obtain heavy alloys with hardness greater than HRA 72. It is evident from the phase diagrams that molybdenum, which goes into solution in tungsten, nickel and iron, could act as a potential strengthening addition. With this in view, tungsten heavy alloys with molybdenum additions were fabricated from mixed elemental powders. A baseline composition of 90W-7Ni-3Fe was chosen to its good elongation and moderate strength. The molybdenum additions were made by replacing the tungsten. Compared to the baseline properties with no molybdenum addition, the strength and hardness showed a continuous increase with molybdenum addition. The ductility of the alloy continued to decrease with increasing molybdenum content, but even with 16% wt. % molybdenum of the elongation was still around 6%. An interesting facet of these alloying additions is the grain refinement that is brought about by adding to molybdenum to the system. The grain refinement is related to the lower solubility of tunbsten in the matrix due to partial displacement by molybdenum

  10. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-01-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1,5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the interstitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects. (orig.)

  11. Excessively High Vapor Pressure of Al-based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Im Jeong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-based amorphous alloys exhibited an abnormally high vapor pressure at their approximate glass transition temperatures. The vapor pressure was confirmed by the formation of Al nanocrystallites from condensation, which was attributed to weight loss of the amorphous alloys. The amount of weight loss varied with the amorphous alloy compositions and was inversely proportional to their glass-forming ability. The vapor pressure of the amorphous alloys around 573 K was close to the vapor pressure of crystalline Al near its melting temperature, 873 K. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of fabricating nanocrystallites or thin films by evaporation at low temperatures.

  12. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  13. High conductivity Be-Cu alloys for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilley, E.A.; Adachi, Takao; Ishibashi, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    The optimum material has not yet been identified. This will result in heat from plasma to the first wall and divertor. That is, because of cracks and melting by thermal power and shock. Today, it is considered to be some kinds of copper, alloys, however, for using, it must have high conductivity. And it is also needed another property, for example, high strength and so on. We have developed some new beryllium copper alloys with high conductivity, high strength, and high endurance. Therefore, we are introducing these new alloys as suitable materials for the heat sink in fusion reactors

  14. GRINDABILITY OF SELECTED GRADES OF LOW-ALLOY HIGH-SPEED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jaworski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presents the results of investigations studied the cutting ability and grindability of selected high-speed steels. We analysed the effect of the austenitization temperature on the grain size, the amount of retained austenite and percentage of retained austenite in HS3-1-1 steel. Furthermore, the investigations concerned on the efficiency of the keyway broaches during the whole period of operation were carried out. It was found that the value of average roughness parameter increases together with increases in the grinding depth. The investigations also show the influence of tempering conditions on the volume of carbide phases in HS3-1-1 steel.

  15. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  16. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  17. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H; Klevtsov, I [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  18. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  19. Grain boundary segregation and intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, T.; Yamaki, K.; Ballinger, R.G.; Hwang, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of grain boundary segregation on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water have been examined as a function of heat treatment. The materials investigated were: (1) two commercial purity Type 304; (2) low sulfur Type 304; (3) nuclear grade Type 304; (4) ultra high purity Type 304L; and (5) Type 316L and Type 347L. Specimens were solution treated at 1050 degrees C for 0.5 hour and given a sensitization heat treatment at 650 degrees C for 50 hours. Some of the specimens were then subjected to an aging heat treatment at 850 degrees C for from one to ten hours to cause Cr recovery at the grain boundaries. The effects of heat treatments on degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation were evaluated by Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) and Coriou tests, respectively. The susceptibility to stress corrosion (SCC) was evaluated using slow strain rate tests technique (SSRT) in high temperature water. SSRT tests were performed in an aerated pure water (8 ppm dissolved oxygen) at 288 degrees C at a strain rate of 1.33 x 10 -6 /sec. Susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking was compared with degree of sensitization and grain boundary segregation. The results of the investigation indicate that EPR is not always an accurate indicator of SCC susceptibility. The Coriou test provides a more reliable measure of SCC susceptibility especially for 304L, 304NG, 316L, and 347L stainless steels. The results also indicate that grain boundary segregation as well as degree of sensitization must be considered in the determination of SCC susceptibility

  20. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of high quality alloy Cdx S ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    In the present study, we report the synthesis of high quality CdxZn1–xS nanocrystals alloy at. 150°C with .... (XRD) using a Siemens model D 500, powder X-ray ... decays were analysed using IBH DAS6 software. 3. ... This alloying process is.

  1. Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water was studied. The IASCC failure has been considered as a degradation phenomenon potential not only in the present light water reactors but rather common in systems where the materials are exposed simultaneously to radiation and water environments. In this study, effects of the material and environmental factors on the IASCC of austenitic stainless steels were investigated in order to understand the underlying mechanism. The following three types of materials were examined: a series of model alloys irradiated at normal water-cooled research reactors (JRR-3M and JMTR), the material irradiated at a spectrally tailored mixed-spectrum research reactor (ORR), and the material sampled from a duct tube of a fuel assembly used in the experimental LMFBR (JOYO). Post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in a high-temperature water, electrochemical corrosion tests, etc., were performed at hot laboratories. Based on the results obtained, analyses were made on the effects of alloying/impurity elements, irradiation/testing temperatures and material processing, (i.e., post-irradiation annealing and cold working) on the cracking behavior. On the basis of the analyses, possible remedies against IASCC in the core internals were discussed from viewpoints of complex combined effects among materials, environment and processing factors. (author). 156 refs.

  2. The significance of ultrafine film-like retained austenite in governing very high cycle fatigue behavior in an ultrahigh-strength MN–SI–Cr–C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, P.; Zhang, B.; Cheng, C.; Misra, R.D K.; Gao, G.; Bai, B.; Weng, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We elucidate here the very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) behavior of an ultrahigh-strength medium carbon Mn–Si–Cr–C steel processed using the approach of bainite-based quenching and partitioning (BQ&P). The microstructure of BQ&P process comprised of bainite, carbon-depleted martensite, retained austenite (RA) and small amount of martensite/austenite island (M/A). The tensile strength (R m ) and fatigue limit strength after 10 9 cycles (σ w9 ) and in the non-failed condition were 1688 MPa and 875 MPa, respectively such that σ w9 /R m exceeded conventional steels and was 0.52. Two types of failure modes were observed depending on the surface and microstructure, notably surface-induced failure and non-inclusion-induced failure, where the non-inclusion-induced failure was influenced by the microstructure. Inclusion-induced failure was absent. The study underscores that film-like retained austenite was the underlying reason for superior fatigue properties, hitherto not previously obtained

  3. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  4. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  5. Quantification by image analysis of grain size of the high temperature phase (austenite) of martensitic steels 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In martensitic steels, the austenitic grain size before transformation may influence mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo steel (EM10) is used in hexagonal pipes fabrication in fast neutrons reactors. Image analysis allows to quantify the older grain size in function of the austenization heat treatment conditions. (A.B.). 2 figs

  6. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M.; Singh, B.N.; Toft, P.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  7. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co Alloy Synthesis by High Speed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaliah Idris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of nanocrystals is economically and technologically viable production path for the synthesis of pure metals and alloys both in coatings and bulk form. The study presents nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloy synthesis by high speed electrodeposition. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloys coatings were prepared by direct current (DC and deposited directly on steel and aluminum substrates without any pretreatment, using high speed electrodeposition method. The influence of the electrolysis parameters, such as cathodic current density and temperature at constant pH, on electrodeposition and microstructure of Ni-Co alloys were examined. A homogeneous surface morphology was obtained at all current densities of the plated samples, and it was evident that the current density and temperature affect the coating thickness of Ni-Co alloy coatings.

  8. Copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of copper alloys are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high heat flux structural applications in fusion reactors. High heat flux structural materials must possess a combination of high thermal conductivity and high mechanical strength. The three most promising copper alloys at the present time are oxide dispersion-strengthened copper (Cu-Al 2 O 3 ) and two precipitation-hardened copper alloys (Cu-Cr-Zr and Cu-Ni-Be). These three alloys are capable of room temperature yield strengths >400 MPa and thermal conductivities up to 350 W/m-K. All of these alloys require extensive cold working to achieve their optimum strength. Precipitation-hardened copper alloys such Cu-Cr-Zr are susceptible to softening due to precipitate overaging and recrystallization during brazing, whereas the dislocation structure in Cu-Al 2 O 3 remains stabilized during typical high temperature brazing cycles. All three alloys exhibit good resistance to irradiation-induced softening and void swelling at temperatures below 300 degrees C. The precipitation-strengthened allows typically soften during neutron irradiation at temperatures above about 300 degrees C and therefore should only be considered for applications operating at temperatures 2 O 3 ) is considered to be the best candidate for high heat flux structural applications

  9. Local approach: fracture at high temperature in an austenitic stainless steel submitted to thermomechanical loadings. Calculations and experimental validations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poquillon, D.

    1997-10-01

    Usually, for the integrity assessment of defective components, well established rules are used: global approach to fracture. A more fundamental way to deal with these problems is based on the local approach to fracture. In this study, we choose this way and we perform numerical simulations of intergranular crack initiation and intergranular crack propagation. This type of damage can be find in components of fast breeder reactors in 316 L austenitic stainless steel which operate at high temperatures. This study deals with methods coupling partly the behaviour and the damage for crack growth in specimens submitted to various thermomechanical loadings. A new numerical method based on finite element computations and a damage model relying on quantitative observations of grain boundary damage is proposed. Numerical results of crack initiation and growth are compared with a number of experimental data obtained in previous studies. Creep and creep-fatigue crack growth are studied. Various specimen geometries are considered: compact Tension Specimens and axisymmetric notched bars tested under isothermal (600 deg C) conditions and tubular structures containing a circumferential notch tested under thermal shock. Adaptative re-meshing technique and/or node release technique are used and compared. In order to broaden our knowledge on stress triaxiality effects on creep intergranular damage, new experiments are defined and conducted on sharply notched tubular specimens in torsion. These isothermal (600 deg C) Mode II creep tests reveal severe intergranular damage and creep crack initiation. Calculated damage fields at the crack tip are compared with the experimental observations. The good agreement between calculations and experimental data shows the damage criterion used can improve the accuracy of life prediction of components submitted to intergranular creep damage. (author)

  10. Grain-orientation-dependent of γ–ε–α′ transformation and twinning in a super-high-strength, high ductility austenitic Mn-steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari, M., E-mail: m.eskandari@scu.ac.ir [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A. [Hot Deformation & Thermo-mechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohtadi-Bonab, M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bonab, Velayat Highway (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Onuki, Y. [Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University (Japan); Basu, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, ITM University, Gurgaon (India); Asghari, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Texas at San Antonio, Texas (United States); Szpunar, J.A. [Advanced Materials for Clean Energy, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-09-30

    A newly developed, austenitic lightweight steel, containing a low-density element, Al, exhibits tensile elongation up to 50% as well as high ultimate-tensile stress (tensile fracture at 1800 MPa) without necking behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis is carried out to investigate the orientation dependence of the martensitic transformation in tensile testing to 30% strain at 323 K (25 °C). A pronounced γ→ε→α′ transformation is observed in <111> and <110>∥TD (TD: tensile direction) γ-grains. The α′-transformation textures is analyzed. Large misorientation spreads is seen in the <100>∥TD γ-grains. Interestingly, twin-assisted martensitic transformation is detected in the <111>∥TD followed by the twin boundary directly moving to a γ/α′ phase boundary. These phenomena are related to a change of Schmid factor for different orientations of grains.

  11. Thermal Plasma Spheroidization of High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel Powder Alloys Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Wang, QingSheng

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a thermal plasma. Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys were prepared by MA in the attritor under an argon atmosphere. For spheroidization of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, the TekSphero 15 plant manufactured by Tekna Plasma Systems Inc was used. The studies have shown the possibility of obtaining Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen spherical powders steel alloys from the powder obtained by MA. According to the results of a series of experiments, it was found that the results of plasma spheroidization of powders essentially depend on the size of the fraction due to some difference in the particle shape and flowability, and on the gas regime of the plasma torch. It is established that during the plasma spheroidization process, some of the nitrogen leaves the alloy. The loss rate of nitrogen depends on the size of the initial particles.

  12. Effect of alloying composition on low-cycle fatigue properties and microstructure of Fe–30Mn–(6−x)Si–xAl TRIP/TWIP alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikulin, Ilya, E-mail: nikulin.i.a@gmail.com [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Belgorod State University, Pobeda 85, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Sawaguchi, Takahiro [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-12-10

    The change in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) properties and deformation microstructure due to the alteration of aluminum and silicon contents was studied in relation with the tensile properties in Fe–30Mn–(6−x)Si–xAl (x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 wt%) alloys, which are high-Mn austenitic TRIP/TWIP alloys. Austenite to ε-martensite transformation took place during LCF deformation in the TRIP alloys with x≤2 while mechanical twinning was not observed by electron-backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis in the TWIP alloys with x>2 after LCF deformation. The fatigue resistance of the alloys was shown to be correlated with the tensile proof strength and the hardening rate. Superior fatigue life of 8×10{sup 3} cycles at a total strain range Δε=2% was found in the Fe–30Mn–4Si–2Al TRIP alloy with a low fraction of ε-martensite, high tensile proof strength and low hardening rate at both tensile and fatigue deformations. On the other hand, a considerable decrease in the fatigue properties was observed in the alloys with decreasing proof strength and increasing hardening rate. Proof strength provided by the solid solution of Al and Si, represents the hampering of plastic deformation, and the hardening rate reflects the strain reversibility affected by the stacking fault energy (SFE) through the rate of austenite to martensite transformation in the TRIP alloys and the substructure formation in the TWIP alloys.

  13. Continuous cooling transformations and microstructures in a low-carbon, high-strength low-alloy plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. W.; Vin, D. J., Col; Krauss, G.

    1990-06-01

    A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was determined for a high-strength low-alloy plate steel containing (in weight percent) 0.06 C, 1.45 Mn, 1.25 Cu, 0.97 Ni, 0.72 Cr, and 0.42 Mo. Dilatometric measurements were supplemented by microhardness testing, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CCT diagram showed significant suppression of polygonal ferrite formation and a prominent transformation region, normally attributed to bainite formation, at temperatures intermediate to those of polygonal ferrite and martensite formation. In the intermediate region, ferrite formation in groups of similarly oriented crystals about 1 μm in size and containing a high density of dislocations dominated the transformation of austenite during continuous cooling. The ferrite grains assumed two morphologies, elongated or acicular and equiaxed or granular, leading to the terms “acicular ferrite” and “granular ferrite,” respectively, to describe these structures. Austenite regions, some transformed to martensite, were enriched in carbon and retained at interfaces between ferrite grains. Coarse interfacial ledges and the nonacicular morphology of the granular ferrite grains provided evidence for a phase transformation mechanism involving reconstructive diffusion of substitutional atoms. At slow cooling rates, polygonal ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite formed. These latter structures contained low dislocation densities and e-copper precipitates formed by an interphase transformation mechanism.

  14. High damping Fe-Mn martensitic alloys for engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, S.-H.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing vibration in engineering designs (i.e. by stiffening or detuning) may be undesirable or inadequate in conditions where size or weight must be minimized or where complex vibration spectra exist. Alloys which combine high damping capacity with good mechanical properties can provide attractive technical and economic solutions to problems involving seismic, shock and vibration isolation. To meet these trends, we have developed a new high damping Fe-17%Mn alloy. Also, the alloy has advantages of good mechanical properties and is more economical than any other known damping alloys (a quarter the cost of non-ferrous damping alloy). Thus, the high damping Fe-17%Mn alloy can be widely applied to household appliances, automobiles, industrial facilities and power plant components with its excellent damping capacity (SDC, 30%) and mechanical property (T.S. 700 MPa). It is the purpose of this paper to introduce the characterization of the high damping Fe-17%Mn alloy and the results of retrofit of several such applications. (orig.)

  15. High temperature coatings from post processing Fe-based chips and Ni-based alloys as a solution for critical raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, T.; Olbrycht, A.; Polkowska, A.; Boron, L.; Skierski, P.; Wypych, A.; Ambroziak, A.; Krezel, A.

    2018-03-01

    Due to shortage of natural resources worldwide, it is a need to develop innovative technologies, to save natural resources and secure Critical Raw Materials (CRM). On the other hand, these new technologies should move forward materials engineering in order to develop better materials for extreme conditions. One way to develop new materials is to use post processing chips of austenitic steels (i.e. 304L stainless steel: 18/10 Cr/Ni) and other materials such as Ni-based alloy with high Cr content. In this work, the results of the preliminary study on the High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF) coatings developed from 304L stainless steel chips and Haynes® 282® Ni- based alloys are shown. The study obeys development of the powder for HVOF technology. The produced coatings were exposed at high temperature at 500 and 700 °C for 100 and 300 hours respectively to assess corrosion behaviour.

  16. Phase transformation, oxidation and shape memory properties of Ti–50Au–10Zr alloy for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadood, A.; Hosoda, H.; Yamabe-Mitarai, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ti–50Au–10Zr exhibited better thermo-mechanical and shape memory properties than Ti–50Au. • Improvement was related to solid solution and precipitation strengthening. • No oxidation problem as oxidation was observed at 100 K higher than A f . • TMA was used not only for thermo-mechanical but also for shape memory and oxidation. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the phase transformation, oxidation and high temperature mechanical and shape memory properties of Ti–50Au–10Zr (all compositions in atomic%) alloy. Thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA) was used not only for phase transformation but also for the measurement of shape memory effect and oxidation behavior in air environment. Ti–50Au–10Zr exhibited lower martensitic transformation temperature of 758 K than TiAu stoichiometric alloy exhibiting 870 K since Zr addition stabilizes B2 parent phase. Oxidation was initiated at 873 K that was about 100 K higher than the austenite finish temperature, indicating no such oxidation problems for practical use. Shape memory effect was improved by partial substitution of Ti with Zr in Ti–50Au–10Zr alloy. Compression test of Ti–50Au–10Zr revealed high compressive strength of 1239 MPa of martensite at 691 K (=M f − 50 K) and 924 MPa of B2 parent phase at 834 K (=A f + 50 K) in comparison with Ti–50Au. It is concluded that Zr is effective to improve the mechanical and shape memory properties of TiAu alloy, and that Ti–50Au–10Zr shape memory alloy has potential for high temperature (∼650–850 K) practical applications

  17. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  19. Dependence of the relative stability between austenite and martensite phases on the atomic order in a Ni–Mn–In Metamagnetic Shape Memory Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyze the influence of the atomic order on the transformations in Ni-Mn-In MSMA. ► Ordering decreases the martensitic transformation and increases the Curie temperature. ► The transformation entropy change depends on the atomic order. ► The shift of the transformation with the magnetic field depends on the atomic order. - Abstract: The influence of the atomic order on the magnetic properties and the relative stability between phases in a Ni–Mn–In Metamagnetic Shape Memory Alloy has been studied through the analysis of the effect of the different quenching treatments on the magnetic and structural transformation temperatures. As a consequence of the variation on the degree of long-range atomic order, the martensitic transformation temperature highly increases with the increasing quenching temperature whereas the Curie temperature slightly decreases. The modification of the atomic order brought by the quenching process also promotes a reduction of the entropy change linked to the martensitic transformation. In turn, no evolution of the magnetization change at the martensitic transformation is detected. According to the Claussius–Clapeyron equation, the achievable shift of the martensitic transformation temperature with the applied magnetic field also depends on the degree of atomic order.

  20. High resolution TEM study of Ni4Ti3 precipitates in austenitic Ni51Ti49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirry, Wim; Schryvers, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Binary NiTi with a composition of 51 at.% Ni was heat treated to form lens-shaped Ni 4 Ti 3 precipitates that are coherent or semi-coherent with the B2 matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the internal structure of the precipitates, precipitate-precipitate and matrix-precipitate interfaces and the deformation of the B2 matrix near a precipitate. Observations were made in the B2 and B2 zones and compared with computer simulated high resolution images. The B2 observations made it possible to study the [0 0 1] H zone orientation of Ni 4 Ti 3 (direction defined according to the hexagonal unit cell of Ni 4 Ti 3 ) which corresponds to the normal of the central plane of the discs. In these images the superperiodicity of the 4:3 ordering is clearly visible confirming the known atomic structure. Close to the precipitate the B2 matrix is deformed, as determined by measuring the interplanar spacing from the HRTEM images. The observed deformations are compared with theoretical models for the stress field

  1. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  2. X-ray fractography on fatigue fracture surface of high manganese austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Koichi; Misawa, Hiroshi; Kodama, Shotaro; Saito, Tetsuro.

    1997-01-01

    Fatigue tests were carried out under constant stress amplitude, using a non-magnetic high manganese Mn-Cr steel. X-ray fractography was applied on the fatigue fractured surface to investigate the relationship between stress intensity factor and residual stress or half-value breadth of the X-ray diffraction profile. The fatigue crack propagation rate of this non-magnetic Mn-Cr steel had the same tendency as in the ordinary structural ferritic steels. The relationship between stress intensity factor and the residual stress or half-value breadth of the steel was almost the same as that of the ferritic cyclic work hardening steels. No stress induced transformation was observed on the fracture surface, but the residual stress on the fractured surface was compressive in the high stress intensity factors range, which is typical in the cyclic work hardening steels. The half-value breadth on the fractured surface increased with increasing effective stress intensity factor range. The relationship between the half-value breadth and stress intensity factor range was represented by a linear line regardless of the stress ratio. Therefore, the acting stress intensity factor range at the time of fracture can be estimated from the half-value breadth. The depth of monotonic plastic zone was estimated from the distribution of half-value breadth beneath the fractured surface. The relationship between the maximum stress intensity factor and half-value breadth was expressed by the equation ω m α(K max /σ y ) 2 , where the value of α was 0.025. This is about one sixth of the value for ferritic steels, and the fact shows the severe work hardening occuring in the plastic zone in this manganese steel. (author)

  3. Boron content effect on the high-temperature plasticity of corrosion resistant low-carbon austenite type steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, Ya.E.; Shmatko, M.N.; Chuvatina, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    With the concept that the state of grain and subgrain boundaries influences the hot plasticity of corrosion resistant steel as a starting point, the study was undertaken of the effect of boron microalloying up on the intergranular strength and of the action boron exerts upon the distribution (redistribution) of other phases present in austenitic 03Kh16N14M3 steels. An electron microscope study of the composition of redundant phases and that of the fine structure of steel have shown the effect of small additions of boron upon the hot plasticity of steel to be linked directly to its influence upon austenite disintegration and the precipitation along the boundaries of crystals of redundant phases in the course of hot plastic deformation. The action of boron upon the process plasticity of steel depends on the temperature and the rate of deformation which govern the kinetics of the precipitation of the redundant phases

  4. Effect of Temperature on the Deformation Behavior of B2 Austenite in a Polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at.Percent) Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.; Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Superelasticity in austenitic B2-NiTi is of great technical interest and has been studied in the past by several researchers [1]. However, investigation of temperature dependent deformation in B2-NiTi is equally important since competing mechanisms of stress-induced martensite (SIM), retained martensite, plastic and deformation twinning can lead to unusual mechanical behaviors. Identification of the role of various mechanisms contributing to the overall deformation response of B2-NiTi is imperative to understanding and maturing SMA-enabled technologies. Thus, the objective of this work was to study the deformation of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) above A(sub f) (105 C) in the B2 state at temperatures between 165-440 C, and generate a B2 deformation map showing active deformation mechanisms in different temperature-stress regimes.

  5. Low cycle fatigue: high cycle fatigue damage accumulation in a 304L austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehericy, Y.

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of a Low Cycle Fatigue pre-damage on the subsequent fatigue limit of a 304L stainless steel. The effects of hardening and severe roughness (grinding) have also been investigated. In a first set of tests, the evolution of the surface damage induced by the different LCF pre-cycling was characterized. This has permitted to identify mechanisms and kinetics of damage in the plastic domain for different surface conditions. Then, pre-damaged samples were tested in the High Cycle Fatigue domain in order to establish the fatigue limits associated with each level of pre-damage. Results evidence that, in the case of polished samples, an important number of cycles is required to initiate surface cracks ant then to affect the fatigue limit of the material but, in the case of ground samples, a few number of cycles is sufficient to initiate cracks and to critically decrease the fatigue limit. The fatigue limit of pre-damaged samples can be estimated using the stress intensity factor threshold. Moreover, this detrimental effect of severe surface conditions is enhanced when fatigue tests are performed under a positive mean stress (author)

  6. Structural mechanisms of high-temperature shape changes in titanium-nickel alloys after low-temperature thermomechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Turenne, S.; Khmelevskaya, I.Yu.; Brailovski, V.; Trochu, F.

    2000-01-01

    High-Temperature Shape Memory Effect (HTSME) in Ti-Ni alloys and corresponding structural and internal stress changes were studied using dilatometry, in situ electron microscope and X-ray diffractometry. The HTSME induced by the Low Temperature Thermomechanical Treatment (LTMT) consists of two stages. The temperature range of the first stage is limited to 250 o C, while the second stage extends to 400-500 o C. The first stage is caused by the oriented reverse martensite transformation. The heterogeneous residual stress field causes a different thermal stability for the different martensite orientations. During the reverse transformation an anisotropic shift of martensite and austenite X-ray lines is observed that can be due to a relaxation of the orientated stresses and to changes in the martensite lattice. The second stage of HTSME is caused by internal stress relaxation during recovery and polygonization of austenite that are not typical shape memory mechanisms. The possible reasons for the martensite stabilization induced by LTMT will be discussed. (author)

  7. Correlation between physical and mechanical properties changes of austenitic steel ChS-68 under high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershova, O.V.; Shcherbakov, E.N.; Evseev, M.V.; Shihkalev, V.S.; Kozlov, A.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It is well known that void swelling at high levels exerts significant influence on physical, mechanical and creep properties of austenitic steels. For many fusion or fission reactor concepts it is desirable not only to characterize these relationships but also to develop nondestructive measurements to measure swelling without removing components from the reactor. Previous studies at this institute have shown that swelling can be estimated using changes in elastic moduli via ultrasonic techniques and electrical resistivity via electro-resistive methods. In this study we examined two pin claddings of ChS-68 (Fe-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si irradiated at somewhat different dpa rates in the high-flux BN-600 fast reactor, with temperatures ranging from 370-590 deg. C to maximum doses of 69 and 78 dpa. After removing the fuel, ring specimens were cut and used to conduct tensile tests using a standardized ring-pull test. Changes in density, elastic moduli and electrical resistivity were performed prior to tensile testing. Maximum swelling levels in the two pins reached ∼7 and 12%, with strong consequences observed in mechanical properties. At the higher swelling level there was a total loss of ductility over a significant middle portion of the pin. In both the lower swelling and higher swelling pins there was a clear correlation between the local swelling along the pin length with declining ultimate strength and total elongation, providing clear evidence of void-induced embrittlement. Changes in electrical resistivity and elastic moduli correlated well with predictions based on void swelling at lower irradiation temperatures where precipitates were not a dominant part of the radiation-induced microstructure. At higher temperatures large precipitates of Ni-rich radiation-stable phases are a large portion of the microstructure and void-based predictions of elastic moduli and electrical resistivity do not agree well with the measurements

  8. PM alloy 625M for high strength corrosion resistant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, F.J.; Floreen, S.

    1997-06-01

    In applications where the combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance are required, there have been only a few alloys of choice. A new powder metallurgy alloy has been developed, PM 625M, a niobium modification of Alloy 625, as a material to fill this need. One area of particular interest is the nuclear power industry, where many problems have been encountered with bolts, springs, and guidepins. Mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking data of PM 625M are presented in this paper

  9. Change of austenite state before martensite transformation and Msub(el) temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.

    1978-01-01

    The N31 alloy austenite behaviour in the premartensite temperature range is investigated. To study the austenite state the method of resistance to microplastic deformation sensitive to the structural state of metals is used. The resistance to microplastic deformation was determined by amplitude dependence of internal friction. The Msub(el) temperature is found at which the change of austenite state is observed due to the appearence of elastic nuclei of martensite below the Msub(el) temperature

  10. Model Predictive Control of the Exit Part Temperature for an Austenitization Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quench hardening is the process of strengthening and hardening ferrous metals and alloys by heating the material to a specific temperature to form austenite (austenitization, followed by rapid cooling (quenching in water, brine or oil to introduce a hardened phase called martensite. The material is then often tempered to increase toughness, as it may decrease from the quench hardening process. The austenitization process is highly energy-intensive and many of the industrial austenitization furnaces were built and equipped prior to the advent of advanced control strategies and thus use large, sub-optimal amounts of energy. The model computes the energy usage of the furnace and the part temperature profile as a function of time and position within the furnace under temperature feedback control. In this paper, the aforementioned model is used to simulate the furnace for a batch of forty parts under heuristic temperature set points suggested by the operators of the plant. A model predictive control (MPC system is then developed and deployed to control the the part temperature at the furnace exit thereby preventing the parts from overheating. An energy efficiency gain of 5.3 % was obtained under model predictive control compared to operation under heuristic temperature set points tracked by a regulatory control layer.

  11. Functional aluminum alloys for ultra high vacuum use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Kenji; Isoyama, Eizo

    1985-01-01

    Ultra high vacuum systems made of aluminum alloys are actively developed. The reasons for using aluminum alloys are low residual radioactivity, light weight, good machinability, good thermal conductivity, non-magnetism. The important function required for ultra high vacuum materials is low outgassing rate, but surface gas on ordinary aluminum is much. Then the research on aluminum surface structure with low outgassing rate has been made and the special extrusion method, that is, extrusion method with the conditions of preventing air from entering inside of pipe and of taking in mixture gas of Ar + O 2 , was developed. 6063 alloy obtained by special extrusion method showed low outgassing rate (2 x 10 -13 Torr. 1/s. cm 2 ) by only 150 deg C, 24 h baking. For the future it will be important to develop aluminum alloys with low dynamic outgassing rate as well as low static outgassing rate. (author)

  12. Fundamental corrosion characterization of high-strength titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, R.W.; Grauman, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Many commercially available and several developmental high-strength titanium alloys were evaluated for application in chloride-containing environments with respect to general, crevice, and stress corrosion resistance. Studies in boiling reducing and oxidizing acid chloride media permitted identification of certain high-strength titanium alloys, containing ≥4 weight % molybdenum, which are significantly more resistant than unalloyed titanium with respect to general and crevice attack. Data regression analysis suggests that molybdenum and vanadium impart a significant positive effect on alloy corrosion resistance under reducing acid chloride conditions, whereas aluminum is detrimental. Little effect of metallurgical condition (that is, annealed versus aged) on corrosion behavior of the higher molybdenum-containing alloys was noted. No obvious susceptibility to chloride and sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was detected utilizing U-bend specimens at 177 0 C

  13. Investigation of sulphides in iron alloys of high purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyjadlowski, T.

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the morphology and composition of sulphides in iron alloys with respect to metal composition and to the nature of impurities. In order to understand the specific action of each addition on inclusion morphology, this work has started with high-purity alloys (binary alloys and then ternary alloys). The author studied whether solubility variations would entail either intergranular or intragranular or hybrid iron sulphide precipitation. He examined whether sulphide morphology is depending on thermal treatment, and whether equilibrium precipitates were different in terms of morphology and composition at high and room temperature. He studied the influence of addition elements on sulphide morphology and composition, an important issue as some elements may reduce brittleness. These elements are classified in terms of affinity with sulphur

  14. High-strength shape memory steels alloyed with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullakko, K.; Jakovenko, P.T.; Gavriljuk, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    Since shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si systems was observed, increasing attention has been paid to iron based shape memory alloys due to their great technological potential. Properties of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys have been improved by alloying with Cr, Ni, Co and C. A significant improvement on shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties is attained by introducing nitrogen in Fe-Mn-Si based systems. By increasing the nitrogen content, strength of the matrix increases and the stacking fault energy decreases, which promote the formation of stress induced martensite and decrease permanent slip. The present authors have shown that nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels exhibit recoverable strains of 2.5--4.2% and recovery stresses of 330 MPa. In some cases, stresses over 700 MPa were attained at room temperature after cooling a constrained sample. Yield strengths of these steels can be as high as 1,100 MPa and tensile strengths over 1,500 MPa with elongations of 30%. In the present study, effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties of Fe-Mn-Si, Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni and Fe-Mn-Cr-Ni-V alloys is studied. Nitrogen alloying is shown to exhibit a beneficial effect on shape memory properties and strength of these steels

  15. High resisting alloy without Co used in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balleret, Alain.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a high resistance alloy characterised in that it includes by weight 5 to 14% molybdenum, 19 to 32% chromium, 2 to 8% tungsten, 6 to 50% nickel, 0.2 to 2.8% carbon, 0 to 5% vanadium, 0 to 5% zirconium, 0 to 5% niobium-tantalum, 0 to 3% manganese, 0 to 3% silicon, 0 to 1.5% boron and iron in an amount to ensure the global balance of this alloy [fr

  16. High-temperature brazing, present situation and development trends - brazing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.

    1980-01-01

    The range of application of high-temperature brazing is described. The process is defined. High-temperature nickel-base brazing alloys (alloying constituents, types of products. properties of the brazing alloys) and high-temperature brazing alloys for special metals and ceramics are dealt with. (orig.) [de

  17. Comparison of high temperature wear behaviour of plasma sprayed WC–Co coated and hard chromium plated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamurugan, G.M.; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan; Anandakrishnan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► WC–12wt.%Co powders were deposited to a thickness of 300 μm on to steel substrates. ► The micro hardness of the above coatings was lower than that of chromium plating. ► Wear resistance of chromium coating was increased up to five times of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel. ► Wear resistance of chromium coat higher than plasma coat at different temperatures. -- Abstract: The wear behaviour of plasma sprayed coating and hard chrome plating on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel substrate is experimentally investigated in unlubricated conditions. Experiments were conducted at different temperatures (room temp, 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C) with 50 N load and 1 m/s sliding velocity. Wear tests were carried out by dry sliding contact of EN-24 medium carbon steel pin as counterpart on a pin-on-disc wear testing machine. In both coatings, specimens were characterised by hardness, microstructure, coating density and sliding wear resistance. Wear studies showed that the hard chromium coating exhibited improved tribological performance than that of the plasma sprayed WC–Co coating. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) of the coatings showed that the better wear resistance at high temperature has been attributed to the formation of a protective oxide layer at the surface during sliding. The wear mechanisms were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. It was observed that the chromium coating provided higher hardness, good adhesion with the substrate and nearly five times the wear resistance than that obtained by uncoated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  18. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  19. Producing titanium-niobium alloy by high energy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkeev, Yu. P., E-mail: sharkeev@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Av., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M. G., E-mail: golkoski@mail.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Akademika Lavrentiev Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Glukhov, I. A., E-mail: gia@ispms.tsc.ru; Eroshenko, A. Yu., E-mail: eroshenko@ispms.tsc.ru; Fortuna, S. V., E-mail: s-fortuna@mail.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheski Prosp., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Bataev, V. A., E-mail: bataev@vadm.ustu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Prosp., Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The research is involved in producing a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer on titanium substrate by high energy beam method, as well as in examining their structures and mechanical properties. Applying electron-beam cladding it was possible to produce a Ti-Nb alloy surface layer of several millimeters, where the niobium concentration was up to 40% at. and the structure itself could be related to martensite quenching structure. At the same time, a significant microhardness increase of 3200-3400 MPa was observed, which, in its turn, is connected with the formation of martensite structure. Cladding material of Ti-Nb composition could be the source in producing alloys of homogeneous microhardness and desired concentration of alloying niobium element.

  20. High-alloy steels and nickel alloys for construction of industrial plants. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Vol. 2 of the 8. Dresden Corrosion Protection Seminar comprises eight papers, most of which are in the form of PowerPoint presentations: High-temperature materials and their applications in chemical engineering (J. Kloever); Alloy 602 CA in metal dusting conditions; Material requirements in future power plants (H. Schneider); Status report on material qualification for the 700 C technology in coal power plants (R. Mohrmann); Materials for nuclear fusion (M. Paju); The degradation mechanism relaxation cracking as exemplified by the alloys 800 H and 617 (H.C. van Wortel); Specific requirements on the design of a pressurised manifold of Alloy 800 H in refineries, a case study (I. Rommerskirchen et al.); Materials for electro-surfacing for corrosion protection in conditions of high-temperature corrosion (M.Spiegel) [de

  1. Processing of fine grained AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel by cold rolling and high-temperature short-term annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-05-01

    An advanced thermomechanical process based on the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite was used to refine the grain size and enhance the hardness of an AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel. Both low and high reversion annealing temperatures and also the repetition of the whole thermomechanical cycle were considered. While a microstructure with average austenite grain size of a few micrometers was achieved based on cold rolling and high-temperature short-term annealing, an extreme grain refinement up to submicrometer regime was obtained by cold rolling followed by low-temperature long-term annealing. However, the required annealing time was found to be much longer, which negates its appropriateness for industrial production. While a magnificent grain refinement was achieved by one pass of the high-temperature thermomechanical process, the reduction in grain size was negligible by the repetition of the whole cycle. It was found that the hardness of the thermomechanically processed material is much higher than that of the as-received material. The results of the present work were shown to be compatible with the general trend of grain size dependence of hardness for AISI 304L stainless steel based on the Hall-Petch relationship. The results were also discussed based on the X-ray evaluation of dislocation density by modified Williamson-Hall plots.

  2. Single-phase high-entropy alloys. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, Roksolana; Steurer, Walter [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. of Crystallography; Sologubenko, Alla [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. of Nanotechnology

    2015-02-01

    The term 'high-entropy alloys (HEAs)' first appeared about 10 years ago defining alloys composed of n=5-13 principal elements with concentrations of approximately 100/n at.% each. Since then many equiatomic (or near equiatomic) single- and multi-phase multicomponent alloys were developed, which are reported for a combination of tunable properties: high hardness, strength and ductility, oxidation and wear resistance, magnetism, etc. In our paper, we focus on probably single-phase HEAs (solid solutions) out of all HEAs studied so far, discuss ways of their prediction, mechanical properties. In contrast to classical multielement/multiphase alloys, only single-phase multielement alloys (solid solutions) represent the basic concept underlying HEAs as mixing-entropy stabilized homogenous materials. The literature overview is complemented by own studies demonstrating that the alloys CrFeCoNi, CrFeCoNiAl{sub 0.3} and PdFeCoNi homogenized at 1300 and 1100 C, respectively, for 1 week are not single-phase HEAs, but a coherent mixture of two solid solutions.

  3. Effect of Chemical Composition on The Microstructure and High-Temperature Properties of Ti-Ni-Hf High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong-Woo; Lee, Hak-Sung; Jeon, Yeong-Min; Yeom, Jong-Taek; Kim, Seong-Woong; Park, Chan-Hee; Hong, Jae-Keun; Oh, Chang-Seok [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Tae-Hyun [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeoung Han [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The effect of Ni and Hf content on the microstructure, phase transformation, and hot workability of Ti-Ni-Hf high-temperature shape memory alloys (SMAs) were investigated. Twelve different Ti-xNi (x=49, 50.2, 50.5, 50.8 at%)-yHf (y=10, 12, 14 at%) SMA ingots were prepared by vacuum arc re-melting, and then analyzed by SEM, DSC, TEM, and XRD after heat treatment. Precipitation behavior was mostly dependent on Ni content rather than Hf content. The effect of homogenization treatment on the particle precipitation and phase transformation behavior was studied. We also found that hot workability was greatly dependent on the solidification structure of the austenite phase.

  4. Structural stability of high entropy alloys under pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Azkar S.; Su, Y.; Liu, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) is a key issue before their selection for industrial applications. In this study, in-situ high-pressure and high-temperature synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on three typical HEAs Ni20Co20Fe20Mn20Cr20, Hf25Nb25Zr25Ti...

  5. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  6. Applicability of copper alloys for DEMO high heat flux components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2016-02-01

    The current state of knowledge of the mechanical and thermal properties of high-strength, high conductivity Cu alloys relevant for fusion energy high heat flux applications is reviewed, including effects of thermomechanical and joining processes and neutron irradiation on precipitation- or dispersion-strengthened CuCrZr, Cu-Al2O3, CuNiBe, CuNiSiCr and CuCrNb (GRCop-84). The prospects for designing improved versions of wrought copper alloys and for utilizing advanced fabrication processes such as additive manufacturing based on electron beam and laser consolidation methods are discussed. The importance of developing improved structural materials design criteria is also noted.

  7. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications. I. Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation

  8. High-throughput computational search for strengthening precipitates in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirklin, S.; Saal, James E.; Hegde, Vinay I.; Wolverton, C.

    2016-01-01

    The search for high-strength alloys and precipitation hardened systems has largely been accomplished through Edisonian trial and error experimentation. Here, we present a novel strategy using high-throughput computational approaches to search for promising precipitate/alloy systems. We perform density functional theory (DFT) calculations of an extremely large space of ∼200,000 potential compounds in search of effective strengthening precipitates for a variety of different alloy matrices, e.g., Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, Co, and Ti. Our search strategy involves screening phases that are likely to produce coherent precipitates (based on small lattice mismatch) and are composed of relatively common alloying elements. When combined with the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD), we can computationally screen for precipitates that either have a stable two-phase equilibrium with the host matrix, or are likely to precipitate as metastable phases. Our search produces (for the structure types considered) nearly all currently known high-strength precipitates in a variety of fcc, bcc, and hcp matrices, thus giving us confidence in the strategy. In addition, we predict a number of new, currently-unknown precipitate systems that should be explored experimentally as promising high-strength alloy chemistries.

  9. Internal hydrogen-induced subcritical crack growth in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. H.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1991-11-01

    The effects of small amounts of dissolved hydrogen on crack propagation were determined for two austenitic stainless steel alloys, AISI 301 and 310S. In order to have a uniform distribution of hydrogen in the alloys, they were cathodically charged at high temperature in a molten salt electrolyte. Sustained load tests were performed on fatigue precracked specimens in air at 0 ‡C, 25 ‡C, and 50 ‡C with hydrogen contents up to 41 wt ppm. The electrical potential drop method with optical calibration was used to continuously monitor the crack position. Log crack velocity vs stress intensity curves had definite thresholds for subcritical crack growth (SCG), but stage II was not always clearly delineated. In the unstable austenitic steel, AISI 301, the threshold stress intensity decreased with increasing hydrogen content or increasing temperature, but beyond about 10 wt ppm, it became insensitive to hydrogen concentration. At higher concentrations, stage II became less distinct. In the stable stainless steel, subcritical crack growth was observed only for a specimen containing 41 wt ppm hydrogen. Fractographic features were correlated with stress intensity, hydrogen content, and temperature. The fracture mode changed with temperature and hydrogen content. For unstable austenitic steel, low temperature and high hydrogen content favored intergranular fracture while microvoid coalescence dominated at a low hydrogen content. The interpretation of these phenomena is based on the tendency for stress-induced phase transformation, the different hydrogen diffusivity and solubility in ferrite and austenite, and outgassing from the crack tip. After comparing the embrittlement due to internal hydrogen with that in external hydrogen, it is concluded that the critical hydrogen distribution for the onset of subcritical crack growth is reached at a location that is very near the crack tip.

  10. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  11. Phase Transformation and Shape Memory Effect of Ti-Pd-Pt-Zr High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko; Takebe, Wataru; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    To understand the potential of high-temperature shape memory alloys, we have investigated the phase transformation and shape memory effect of Ti-(50 - x)Pt- xPd-5Zr alloys ( x = 0, 5, and 15 at.%), which present the B2 structure in the austenite phase and B19 structure in the martensite phase. Their phase transformation temperatures are very high; A f and M f of Ti-50Pt are 1066 and 1012 °C, respectively. By adding Zr and Pd, the phase transition temperatures decrease, ranging between 804 and 994 °C for A f and 590 and 865 °C for M f. Even at the high phase transformation temperature, a maximum recovery ratio of 70% was obtained for one cycle in a thermal cyclic test. A work output of 1.2 J/cm3 was also obtained. The recovery ratio obtained by the thermal cyclic test was less than 70% because the recovery strain was training effect was also investigated.

  12. Effect of microalloying elements (Nb, V and Ti) on the hot flow behavior of high-Mn austenitic twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Calderón, F.; Mejía, I.; Boulaajaj, A.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This research work studies the effect of microalloying elements such as Nb, V and Ti on the hot flow behavior of high-Mn austenitic TWIP steel. For this purpose, isothermal uniaxial hot compression tests were carried out at three temperatures (900, 1000 and 1100 °C) and four constant strain rates (10 −1 , 10 −2 , 10 −3 and 10 −4 s −1 ). Experimental results revealed that hot flow curves of microalloyed TWIP steels show single peak curves for all test conditions. Results are discussed in terms of the peak stress (σ p ) and peak strain (ε p ) and its dependence on the strain rate (ε) and temperature. The addition of microalloying elements such as Nb, V and Ti in TWIP steels generates a slight increase in the σ p value, and Ti microalloyed TWIP steel exhibits the highest σ p value. Hot deformed microstructures were analyzed by the Electron Back-Scattering Diffraction Technique (EBSD). The most important results of the austenitic recrystallized grain refinement were obtained for V and Ti microalloyed TWIP steels.

  13. Fast Slip Velocity in a High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, Q.; Sparks, G.; Maaß, R.

    2018-04-01

    Due to fluctuations in nearest-neighbor distances and chemistry within the unit cell, high-entropy alloys are believed to have a much higher resistance to dislocation motion than pure crystals. Here, we investigate the coarse-grained dynamics of a number of dislocations being active during a slip event. We found that the time-resolved dynamics of slip is practically identical in Au and an Al0.3CoCrFeNi high-entropy alloy, but much faster than in Nb. Differences between the FCC-crystals are seen in the spatiotemporal velocity profile, with faster acceleration and slower velocity relaxation in the high-entropy alloy. Assessing distributions that characterize the intermittently evolving plastic flow reveals material-dependent scaling exponents for size, duration, and velocity-size distributions. The results are discussed in view of the underlying dislocation mobility.

  14. Analysis of creep effective stress in austenitic heat resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, In Duck; Nam, Ki Woo

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the comparison of calculated effective stress with experimental one in austenitic heat resistant steels, STS310J1TB and STS310S with and without a small amount of Nb and N. Based on a solute atoms diffusion model, contribution from soluble nitrogen to the high-temperature strength was numerically examined for austenitic heat-resisting Fe-Cr-Ni-N(STS310J1TB) and Fe-Cr-Ni(STS310S) alloys. The solute atmosphere dragging stress of dislocation was calculated in optional dislocation velocity of STS310J1TB and STS310S at 650 degree C, 675 degree C and 700 degree C. As a result of the numerical calculation, the solute atmosphere dragging stress of STS310J1TB was about 50 times larger than that of STS310S. When the temperature became high, the maximum value of solute atmosphere dragging stress was small and the velocity of moving dislocation was fast. From the relationship between the dislocation rate and the solute atmosphere dragging stress, the relation of both was proportional and the inclination is about 1 in the level with low velocity of moving dislocation. From above results, the mechanism of dislocation movement in STS310J1TB was the solute atmosphere dragging stress. The solute atmosphere dragging stress, which was calculated from the numerical calculation was close to the effect stress in stress relaxation tests

  15. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izaki, Takashi; Nakai, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shigeki; Murakami, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm 2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  16. Bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys for reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Jayaraj, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in materials engineering have generated complex alloys that retain a glassy state in bulk form (bulk metallic glasses or BMGs) via ingot casting. High corrosion resistance is expected for BMGs (amorphous) as they are free from defects associated with the crystalline state such as grain boundaries, dislocations and stacking faults. Compared with conventional alloys containing one or two principal elements, the recently developed HEAs are usually composed of five or more elements with equimolar or near equimolar elemental fractions, which forms single solid solution phase. These HEAs exhibit excellent microstructural stability with better mechanical, wear and corrosion resistance properties as they are essentially single phase. Reprocessing of spent fuel from the fast breeder reactor involves the use of high concentration of (11.5 M) nitric acid under boiling conditions for the dissolution of the fuel. Conventional AISI type 304LSS and nitric acid grade 304L stainless steel would undergo inter-granular corrosion under these conditions and cannot be used for the fabrication of dissolver vessel. Currently titanium is used and zirconium alloys are proposed for future dissolver applications. Thus searching for newer materials with higher corrosion resistance suggests metallic glasses and HEAs for critical components of the dissolver application. Several Zr-based glassy alloys with different microstructural states and Ni-Nb based glassy alloys and TiZrHfNbTa HEA were cast and characterized for microstructure and corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. From these studies, factors such as the corrosive environment (nitric acid, chloride and fluoride), and the presence of passivating elements in the alloy were emphasized for better corrosion resistance of BMGs and HEA. Attempts were also made to prepare coatings of Zr-and Ni-based glassy alloys on 304LSS by laser based deposition technique and their corrosion properties were evaluated. (author)

  17. Corrosion-Resistant High-Entropy Alloys: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhu Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion destroys more than three percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Therefore, the design of highly corrosion-resistant materials is urgently needed. By breaking the classical alloy-design philosophy, high-entropy alloys (HEAs possess unique microstructures, which are solid solutions with random arrangements of multiple elements. The particular locally-disordered chemical environment is expected to lead to unique corrosion-resistant properties. In this review, the studies of the corrosion-resistant HEAs during the last decade are summarized. The corrosion-resistant properties of HEAs in various aqueous environments and the corrosion behavior of HEA coatings are presented. The effects of environments, alloying elements, and processing methods on the corrosion resistance are analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the possible directions of future work regarding the corrosion behavior of HEAs are suggested.

  18. XHM-1 alloy as a promising structural material for water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Alekseev, A.B.; Kazennov, Yu.I.; Khramtsov, V.F.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Rechitsky, V.N.; Stepankov, V.N.; Votinov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experience gained in utilizing austenitic stainless steel components in water-cooled power reactors indicates that the main cause of their failure is the steel's propensity for corrosion cracking. In search of a material immune to this type of corrosion, different types of austenitic steels and chromium-nickel alloys were investigated and tested at VNIINM. This paper presents the results of studying physical and mechanical properties, irradiation and corrosion resistance in a water coolant at <350 C of the alloy XHM-1 as compared with austenitic stainless steels 00Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, 00Cr20Ni25Nb and alloy 00Cr20Ni40Mo5Nb. Analysis of the results shows that, as distinct from the stainless steels studied, the XHM-1 alloy is completely immune to corrosion cracking (CC). Not a single induced damage was encountered within 50 to 350 C in water containing different amounts of chlorides and oxygen under tensile stresses up to the yield strength of the material. One more distinctive feature of the alloy compared to steels is that no change in the strength or total elongation is encountered in the alloy specimens irradiated to 32 dpa at 350 C. The XHM-1 alloy has adequate fabricability and high weldability characteristics. As far as its properties are concerned, the XHM-1 alloy is very promising as a material for water-cooled fusion reactor components. (orig.)

  19. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-01-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo Sentalloy F

  20. High Work Output Ni-Ti-Pt High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys and Associated Processing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Garg, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    According to the invention, compositions of Ni-Ti-Pt high temperature, high force, shape memory alloys are disclosed that have transition temperatures above 100 C.; have narrow hysteresis; and produce a high specific work output.

  1. Characteristics of oxide scale formed on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel during early stages of high temperature oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan, E-mail: swaminathan@kist.re.kr [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of); Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Metallurgy & Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kim, Dong-Ik, E-mail: dongikkim@kist.re.kr [High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136 791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Initial oxidation characteristics of Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel at 650 °C were studied. • Strong segregation and oxidation of Mn and Nb were found in the entire oxide scale. • Surface coverage by metallic Cu-rich precipitates increases with exposure time. • Chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale revealed initial oxidation to be non-selective. • Fe-Cr and Mn-Cr mixed oxides were realized along with binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. - Abstract: Oxide scale evolution on Cu-bearing austenitic stainless steel 304H at 650 °C, in ambient air, for exposure times 100, 300, 500 and 1000 h, has been investigated. Surface morphology and chemistry of the oxide scale grown were examined using SEM/EDX and XPS. The oxidation kinetics was determined by measuring the weight change using an electronic balance. At the initial stage, up to 500 h of exposure time, the oxidation rate was rapid due to surface reactions governed primarily by oxygen ingress, and then, dropped to a low rate after prolonged oxidation for 1000 h. The diffusion of reactants through the initially formed oxide scale limits the oxidation rate at longer times, thus, the progress of reaction followed the parabolic kinetics. The formed oxide scale was enriched significantly with segregation and subsequent oxidation of Nb, and finely dispersed metallic Cu particles. Within the time frame of oxidation, the oxide scale was mainly composed of mixed oxides such as FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} along with the binary oxides of Fe, Cr and Mn. Moreover, the precipitation fraction of Cu-rich particles on the oxide scale increased markedly with increase of exposure times. The chemical heterogeneity of oxide scale suggests that the oxidation occurred in a non-selective manner.

  2. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  3. Fabrication of spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys by mechanical alloying and thermal plasma spheroidization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, Nikolay G.; Wang, Qing Sheng; Popovich, Anatoly A.; Shamshurin, Aleksey I.

    2018-04-01

    This paper describes the results of experimental studies on the treatment of Fe-23Cr-11Mn-1N high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloys, synthesized by the mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental powders in the flow of a radio frequency thermal plasma. The as-milled powder with irregular particles were successfully converted into spherical high-nitrogen stainless steel powder alloy. Measurement of the residual nitrogen content in the obtained powder, shown that during the plasma spheroidization process, part of the nitrogen escapes from the alloy.

  4. Improving the casting properties of high-strength aluminium alloys:

    OpenAIRE

    Ekrt, Ondřej; Šerák, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2004-01-01

    Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys are examples of high-strength alloys. After age-hardening they often possess tensile strengths of more than 500 MPa. However, their casting properties are relatively poor as a result of solidification intervals that are too wide. Therefore, they often require an extrusion, rolling, or forging treatment, and the production of small series of special parts can, as a consequence, be very expensive. In this study, an improvement in the castability and a reduction of the hot-tea...

  5. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of 233 U from a gas (UF 6 ) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U 3 O 8 ). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF 6 converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in 233 U is 232 U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the 233 U difficult. Traps of 233 U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been proven to have a finite life due to failure

  6. Hydrofluoric Acid Corrosion Study of High-Alloy Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    A corrosion study involving high-alloy materials and concentrated hydrofluoric acid (HF) was conducted in support of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Conversion Project (CP). The purpose of the test was to obtain a greater understanding of the corrosion rates of materials of construction currently used in the CP vs those of proposed replacement parts. Results of the study will help formulate a change-out schedule for CP parts. The CP will convert slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U from a gas (UF{sub 6}) sorbed on sodium fluoride pellets to a more stable oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). One by-product of the conversion is the formation of concentrated HF. Six moles of highly corrosive HF are produced for each mole of UF{sub 6} converted. This acid is particularly corrosive to most metals, elastomers, and silica-containing materials. A common impurity found in {sup 233}U is {sup 232}U. This impurity isotope has several daughters that make the handling of the {sup 233}U difficult. Traps of {sup 233}U may have radiation fields of up to 400 R at contact, a situation that makes the process of changing valves or working on the CP more challenging. It is also for this reason that a comprehensive part change-out schedule must be established. Laboratory experiments involving the repeated transfer of HF through 1/2-in. metal tubing and valves have proven difficult due to the corrosivity of the HF upon contact with all wetted parts. Each batch of HF is approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt% HF and is transferred most often as a vapor under vacuum and at temperatures of up to 250 C. Materials used in the HF side of the CP include Hastelloy C-276 and Monel 400 tubing, Haynes 230 and alloy C-276 vessels, and alloy 400 valve bodies with Inconel (alloy 600) bellows. The chemical compositions of the metals discussed in this report are displayed in Table 1. Of particular concern are the almost 30 vendor-supplied UG valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. These valves have been

  7. Variations of color with alloying elements in Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Takanobu; Takuma, Yasuko; Miura, Eri; Fujita, Takeshi; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2007-01-01

    The effects of alloying addition of a small amount of base metals (In, Sn, Fe, Zn) on color variations in Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys were investigated in terms of rectilinear and polar color coordinates. The ternary Au-Pt-X (X = In, Sn, Fe, Zn) and quaternary Au-Pt-In-Y (Y = Sn, Fe, Zn) alloys were prepared from high purity component metals. The amount of alloying base metals, X and Y, were restricted up to 2 at.%. The alloying addition of a small amount of Fe, In, Sn, to a binary Au-10 at.% Pt alloy (referred to as AP10) effectively increased chroma, C *. On the other hand, the addition of Zn to the parent alloy AP10 did not change color coordinates greatly. The increase in chroma in the present Au-Pt-based high noble alloys was attributed to the increase in the slope of spectral reflectance curve at its absorption edge near 515 nm. It was found that the addition of a small amount of Fe to the parent alloy AP10 markedly increased lightness, L *, and the addition of Sn gave a very light tint of red to the parent alloy. Although red-green chromaticity index a * contributed to chroma to some extent, contribution of yellow-blue chromaticity index b * was much greater in determining chroma in this Pd-free Au-Pt-based multi-component alloys. The present results are expected to be valuable in case color is to be taken into account in designing Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys

  8. Variations of color with alloying elements in Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Takanobu [Department of Dental and Biomedical Materials Science, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan)]. E-mail: siraisi@nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Takuma, Yasuko [Department of Dental and Biomedical Materials Science, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Miura, Eri [Department of Dental and Biomedical Materials Science, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Fujita, Takeshi [Department of Dental and Biomedical Materials Science, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan); Hisatsune, Kunihiro [Department of Dental and Biomedical Materials Science, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8588 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    The effects of alloying addition of a small amount of base metals (In, Sn, Fe, Zn) on color variations in Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys were investigated in terms of rectilinear and polar color coordinates. The ternary Au-Pt-X (X = In, Sn, Fe, Zn) and quaternary Au-Pt-In-Y (Y = Sn, Fe, Zn) alloys were prepared from high purity component metals. The amount of alloying base metals, X and Y, were restricted up to 2 at.%. The alloying addition of a small amount of Fe, In, Sn, to a binary Au-10 at.% Pt alloy (referred to as AP10) effectively increased chroma, C *. On the other hand, the addition of Zn to the parent alloy AP10 did not change color coordinates greatly. The increase in chroma in the present Au-Pt-based high noble alloys was attributed to the increase in the slope of spectral reflectance curve at its absorption edge near 515 nm. It was found that the addition of a small amount of Fe to the parent alloy AP10 markedly increased lightness, L *, and the addition of Sn gave a very light tint of red to the parent alloy. Although red-green chromaticity index a * contributed to chroma to some extent, contribution of yellow-blue chromaticity index b * was much greater in determining chroma in this Pd-free Au-Pt-based multi-component alloys. The present results are expected to be valuable in case color is to be taken into account in designing Pd-free Au-Pt-based high noble dental alloys.

  9. The stress-rupture behavior of tubes made from austenitic stainless steels and Ni-based alloys subjected to internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, L.; Kempe, H.

    1983-12-01

    The report outlines the stress-rupture results obtained on tubes tested as possible fuel rod cladding tubes for fast breeder reactors cooled with sodium, steam or gas. For the rupture elongations of some specimens showing a pronounced burst, higher values than in earlier reports are now indicated because of better evaluation techniques. The choice and comparisons of materials are explained, the calculations of stresses and strains are described, and reference is made to the own studies carried out to date of the parameters influencing creep-rupture behaviour. Minor modifications of the composition of an alloy and of the mechanical-thermal treatment of materials, respectively, are seen to produce clearcut changes in the stress-rupture properties. (orig.) [de

  10. High-Energy Ball-Milling of Alloys and Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Caer, G.; Delcroix, P.; Begin-Colin, S.; Ziller, T.

    2002-01-01

    After outlining some characteristics of high-energy ball-milling, we discuss selected examples of phase transformation and of alloy synthesis which focus on deviations from archetypal behaviours and throw light on the milling mechanisms. Some contributions of Moessbauer spectrometry to the characterization of ground materials are described.

  11. Corrosion properties of plasma deposited high-alloy steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Pražák, M.; Kalabisová, E.; Kreislová, K.; Neufuss, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2002), s. 243-254 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma deposits, high-alloy steel, polarization curves, corrosion test Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  12. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  13. High-strength and high-RRR Al-Ni alloy for aluminum-stabilized superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Wada, K; Sakamoto, H; Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y

    2000-01-01

    The precipitation type aluminum alloys have excellent performance as the increasing rate in electric resistivity with additives in the precipitation state is considerably low, compared to that of the aluminum alloy with additives in the solid-solution state. It is possible to enhance the mechanical strength without remarkable degradation in residual resistivity ratio (RRR) by increasing content of selected additive elements. Nickel is the suitable additive element because it has very low solubility in aluminum and low increasing rate in electric resistivity, and furthermore, nickel and aluminum form intermetallic compounds which effectively resist the motion of dislocations. First, Al-0.1wt%Ni alloy was developed for the ATLAS thin superconducting solenoid. This alloy achieved high yield strength of 79 MPa (R.T.) and 117 MPa (4.2 K) with high RRR of 490 after cold working of 21% in area reduction. These highly balanced properties could not be achieved with previously developed solid-solution aluminum alloys. ...

  14. Development of high temperature property database for Alloy 800H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Norio; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Hajime.

    1993-07-01

    JAERI Material Performance Database (JMPD) has been developed since 1989 in JAERI with a view to utilizing the various kinds of characteristic data of nuclear materials efficiently. Using relational database management system, PLANNER on the mainframe, the JMPD provides the retrieval supporting system, graphic and statistical analyses system. The data obtained with 7868 sets on characteristic data of metallic materials including fatigue crack growth data, etc. have been stored in the JMPD at the end of March in 1993. A ferritic superalloy, Alloy 800H is used for the structural material of the control rods of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). Thermal stress generates which might cause a severe creep damage at a reactor scram. It therefore needs to be designed with consideration on the fracture modes induced by creep deformation after neutron irradiation. The creep data (approximately 240 sets) and tensile data (approximately 100 sets) of Alloy 800H including the effects of test environment, aging treatment and neutron irradiation have been stored in the JMPD. Furthermore, using a personal computer, high temperature property database for Alloy 800H has been developed. The present report outlines the development of high temperature property database for Alloy 800H. (author)

  15. Mass transfer behavior of a modified austenitic stainless steel in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that was developed to resist neutron damage was exposed to lithium in the high-temperature part of a thermal convection loop for 6700 h. Specimens of this Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) composed of 65.0 Fe-15.9 Ni-13.0 Cr-1.9 Mo-1.9 Mn-1.7 Si-0.5 Ti-0.05 C (wt %) were exposed at 600 and 570 0 C in both solution annealed and cold worked forms. The dissolution process was found to be similar to other austenitic alloys in flowing lithium: weight losses of PCA eventually became linearly proportional to exposure time with the specimen surfaces exhibiting porous layers depleted in nickel and chromium. However, the measured weight losses and dissolution rates of these PCA specimens were higher than those of type 316 stainless steel exposed under similar conditions and can be attributed to the higher nickel concentration of the former alloy. The effect of cold work on dissolution rates was less definitive, particularly at 570 0 C. At longer exposure times, the annealed PCA specimen exposed at 600 0 C suffered greater dissolution than the cold worked material, while no effect of prior deformation was observed by analysis of the respective surfaces

  16. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  17. 3D printing of high-strength aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H; Yahata, Brennan D; Hundley, Jacob M; Mayer, Justin A; Schaedler, Tobias A; Pollock, Tresa M

    2017-09-20

    Metal-based additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a potentially disruptive technology across multiple industries, including the aerospace, biomedical and automotive industries. Building up metal components layer by layer increases design freedom and manufacturing flexibility, thereby enabling complex geometries, increased product customization and shorter time to market, while eliminating traditional economy-of-scale constraints. However, currently only a few alloys, the most relevant being AlSi10Mg, TiAl6V4, CoCr and Inconel 718, can be reliably printed; the vast majority of the more than 5,500 alloys in use today cannot be additively manufactured because the melting and solidification dynamics during the printing process lead to intolerable microstructures with large columnar grains and periodic cracks. Here we demonstrate that these issues can be resolved by introducing nanoparticles of nucleants that control solidification during additive manufacturing. We selected the nucleants on the basis of crystallographic information and assembled them onto 7075 and 6061 series aluminium alloy powders. After functionalization with the nucleants, we found that these high-strength aluminium alloys, which were previously incompatible with additive manufacturing, could be processed successfully using selective laser melting. Crack-free, equiaxed (that is, with grains roughly equal in length, width and height), fine-grained microstructures were achieved, resulting in material strengths comparable to that of wrought material. Our approach to metal-based additive manufacturing is applicable to a wide range of alloys and can be implemented using a range of additive machines. It thus provides a foundation for broad industrial applicability, including where electron-beam melting or directed-energy-deposition techniques are used instead of selective laser melting, and will enable additive manufacturing of other alloy systems, such as non-weldable nickel

  18. 3D printing of high-strength aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John H.; Yahata, Brennan D.; Hundley, Jacob M.; Mayer, Justin A.; Schaedler, Tobias A.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2017-09-01

    Metal-based additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, is a potentially disruptive technology across multiple industries, including the aerospace, biomedical and automotive industries. Building up metal components layer by layer increases design freedom and manufacturing flexibility, thereby enabling complex geometries, increased product customization and shorter time to market, while eliminating traditional economy-of-scale constraints. However, currently only a few alloys, the most relevant being AlSi10Mg, TiAl6V4, CoCr and Inconel 718, can be reliably printed; the vast majority of the more than 5,500 alloys in use today cannot be additively manufactured because the melting and solidification dynamics during the printing process lead to intolerable microstructures with large columnar grains and periodic cracks. Here we demonstrate that these issues can be resolved by introducing nanoparticles of nucleants that control solidification during additive manufacturing. We selected the nucleants on the basis of crystallographic information and assembled them onto 7075 and 6061 series aluminium alloy powders. After functionalization with the nucleants, we found that these high-strength aluminium alloys, which were previously incompatible with additive manufacturing, could be processed successfully using selective laser melting. Crack-free, equiaxed (that is, with grains roughly equal in length, width and height), fine-grained microstructures were achieved, resulting in material strengths comparable to that of wrought material. Our approach to metal-based additive manufacturing is applicable to a wide range of alloys and can be implemented using a range of additive machines. It thus provides a foundation for broad industrial applicability, including where electron-beam melting or directed-energy-deposition techniques are used instead of selective laser melting, and will enable additive manufacturing of other alloy systems, such as non-weldable nickel

  19. Review of creep resistant alloys for power plant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A paper describes the most popular alloys for power plant application as well as the most promising alloys for future application in that technology. The components in power plants operate in severe conditions (high temperatures and pressures and they are expected reliable service for 30 years and more. The correct choice of the material is, thus, of a very importance. The paper describes the development as well as advantages and disadvantages of convenient ferritic/martensitic steels, ferritic/bainitic steels, austenitic stainless steels and the new alloys for the application at temperatures of 650°C and more.

  20. High temperature cathodic charging of hydrogen in zirconium alloys and iron and nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.T.; De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    These investigations lead to the development of a new technique for charging hydrogen into metals and alloys. In this technique a mixture of sulfates and bisulfates of sodium and potassium is kept saturated with water at 250-300degC in an open pyrex glass beaker and electrolysed using platinum anode and the material to be charged as the cathode. Most of the studies were carried out on Zr alloys. It is shown that because of the high hydrogen flux available at the surface and the high diffusivity of hydrogen in metals at these temperatures the materials pick up hydrogen faster and more uniformly than the conventional electrolytic charging at room temperature and high temperature autoclaving in LiOH solutions. Chemical analysis, metallographic examination and XRD studies confirm this. This technique has been used to charge hydrogen into many iron and nickel base austentic alloys, which are very resistant to hydrogen pick up and to H-embrittlement. Since this involved a novel method of electrolysing water, the hydrogen/deuterium isotopic ratio has been studied. At this temperatures the D/H ratio in the evolved hydrogen gas was found to be closer to the value in the liquid water, which means a smaller separation factor. This confirm the earlier observation that separation factor decreases with increase of temperature. (author). 16 refs., 21 fi gs., 6 tabs

  1. An evaluation of a lathe-cut high-copper amalgam alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbs, P J; Plant, C G; Shovelton, D S; Jones, P A

    1987-09-01

    Modification of an amalgam alloy may give rise to improved physical properties. The physical properties of a newly formulated, single-composition lathe-cut amalgam alloy were studied and found to be superior to those of a conventional lathe-cut amalgam alloy. However, such modification in formulation may result in changes in the clinical handling properties of the material. The high-copper amalgam alloy was assessed by a panel of general practitioners who found that the general handling properties of the material were similar to those of conventional lathe-cut amalgam alloys. The longer term performance of the high-copper alloy was assessed by means of a blind, controlled clinical trial carried out by two operators. A 1-year assessment of the resulting restorations and tooth replicas could not distinguish between the high-copper alloy and a conventional alloy. The two alloys had both given good clinical results.

  2. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  3. Investigation on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel to AISI 4140 low alloy steel dissimilar joints by gas tungsten arc, electron beam and friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Beneficial effects of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints of dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. → Comparative study of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints on mechanical properties. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: This paper presents the investigations carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel and AISI 4140 low alloy steel joints by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Welding (FRW). For each of the weldments, detailed analysis was conducted on the phase composition, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties. The results of the analysis shows that the joint made by EBW has the highest tensile strength (681 MPa) than the joint made by GTAW (635 Mpa) and FRW (494 Mpa). From the fractographs, it could be observed that the ductility of the EBW and GTA weldment were higher with an elongation of 32% and 25% respectively when compared with friction weldment (19%). Moreover, the impact strength of weldment made by GTAW is higher compared to EBW and FRW.

  4. Characterization of a New Phase and Its Effect on the Work Characteristics of a Near-Stoichiometric Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A.; Gaydosh, D.; Noebe, R.D.; Padula II, Santo; Bigelow, G.S.; Kaufman, M.; Kovarik, L.; Mills, M.J.; Diercks, D.; McMurray, S.

    2008-01-01

    A new phase observed in a nominal Ni30Pt20Ti50 (at.%) high temperature shape memory alloy has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy and 3-D atom probe tomography. This phase forms homogeneously in the B2 austenite matrix by a nucleation and growth mechanism and results in a concomitant increase in the martensitic transformation temperature of the base alloy. Although the structure of this phase typically contains a high density of faults making characterization difficult, it appears to be trigonal (-3m point group) with a(sub o) approx. 1.28 nm and c(sub o) approx. 1.4 nm. Precipitation of this phase increases the microhardness of the alloy substantially over that of the solution treated and quenched single-phase material. The effect of precipitation strengthening on the work characteristics of the alloy has been explored through load-biased strain-temperature testing in the solution-treated condition and after aging at 500 C for times ranging from 1 to 256 hours. Work output was found to increase in the aged alloy as a result of an increase in transformation strain, but was not very sensitive to aging time. The amount of permanent deformation that occurred during thermal cycling under load was small but increased with increasing aging time and stress. Nevertheless, the dimensional stability of the alloy at short aging times (1-4 hours) was still very good making it a potentially useful material for high-temperature actuator applications.

  5. Electron backscatter and X-ray diffraction studies on the deformation and annealing textures of austenitic stainless steel 310S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nezakat, Majid, E-mail: majid.nezakat@usask.ca [Canadian Light Source Inc., 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2V3 (Canada); Akhiani, Hamed [Westpower Equipment Ltd., 4451 54 Avenue South East, Calgary, AB T2C 2A2 (Canada); Sabet, Seyed Morteza [Department of Ocean and Mechanical Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (United States); Szpunar, Jerzy [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    We studied the texture evolution of thermo-mechanically processed austenitic stainless steel 310S. This alloy was cold rolled up to 90% reduction in thickness and subsequently annealed at 1050 °C. At the early stages of deformation, strain-induced martensite was formed from deformed austenite. By increasing the deformation level, slip mechanism was found to be insufficient to accommodate higher deformation strains. Our results demonstrated that twinning is the dominant deformation mechanism at higher deformation levels. Results also showed that cold rolling in unidirectional and cross rolling modes results in Goss/Brass and Brass dominant textures in deformed samples, respectively. Similar texture components are observed after annealing. Thus, the annealing texture was greatly affected by texture of the deformed parent phase and martensite did not contribute as it showed an athermal reversion during annealing. Results also showed that when the fraction of martensite exceeds a critical point, its grain boundaries impeded the movement of austenite grain boundaries during annealing. As a result, recrystallization incubation time would increase. This caused an incomplete recrystallization of highly deformed samples, which led to a rational drop in the intensity of the texture components. - Highlights: •Thermo-mechanical processing through different cold rolling modes can induce different textures. •Martensite reversion is athermal during annealing. •Higher fraction of deformation-induced martensite can increase the annealing time required for complete recrystallization. •Annealing texture is mainly influenced by the deformation texture of austenite.

  6. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials-CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M-were thermally aged for 1500 h at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/α‧, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. The low C, high Mo CF3M alloys experienced the most spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation coinciding the largest reduction in impact properties.

  7. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  8. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  9. Discovery of a Superconducting High-Entropy Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Kozelj P.; Vrtnik S.; Jelen A.; Jazbec S.; Jaglicic Z.; Maiti S.; Feuerbacher M.; Steurer W.; Dolinsek J.

    2014-01-01

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) are multicomponent mixtures of elements in similar concentrations where the high entropy of mixing can stabilize disordered solid solution phases with simple structures like a bodycentered cubic or a face centered cubic in competition with ordered crystalline intermetallic phases. We have synthesized an HEA with the composition Ta34Nb33Hf8Zr14Ti11 (in at. ) which possesses an average body centered cubic structure of lattice parameter a = 3.36 Å. The measurements of ...

  10. Precipitation reactions caused by nitrogen uptake during service at high temperatures of a niobium stabilised austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erneman, J.; Schwind, M.; Liu, P.; Nilsson, J.-O.; Andren, H.-O.; Aagren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation phenomena in type 347 austenitic stainless steels have been investigated after long-term heat treatment and creep in air at 700 and 800 deg. C. Nitrogen uptake was observed during long-term creep testing at 800 deg. C. No such effect was observed at 700 deg. C although times up to about 70,000 h were used. The major phases precipitated after long time exposure at 800 deg. C were primary Nb(C,N), Z-phase, Cr 2 N and M 23 C 6 , while primary Nb(C,N), secondary Nb(C,N) and σ-phase were the major phases at 700 deg. C. Z-phase precipitated in both intragranular and intergranular form at 800 deg. C. Large precipitates exhibiting a core/rim structure showed a rim of Z-phase surrounding undissolved primary Nb(C,N). The microstructural evolution during creep deformation in air at 800 deg. C was modelled thermodynamically. The model satisfactorily predicts nitrogen uptake and the essential features of the evolution of the microstructure with time. The precipitation sequence could be qualitatively described, although it was not possible to model the formation of all precipitates

  11. Highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy for reactor structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoichi.

    1996-01-01

    The alloy of the present invention is a zirconium based alloy comprising tin (Sn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) in zirconium (Zr). The amount of silicon (Si) as an impurity is not more than 60ppm. It is preferred that Sn is from 0.9 to 1.5wt%, that of Cr is from 0.05 to 0.15wt%, and (Fe + Ni) is from 0.17 to 0.5wt%. If not less than 0.12wt% of Fe is added, resistance against nodular corrosion is improved. The upper limit of Fe is preferably 0.40wt% from a view point of uniform suppression for the corrosion. The nodular corrosion can be suppressed by reducing the amount of Si-rich deposition product in the zirconium based alloy. Accordingly, a highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy improved for the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 and usable for a fuel cladding tube of a BWR type reactor can be obtained. (I.N.)

  12. Alloying behavior of iron, gold and silver in AlCoCrCuNi-based equimolar high-entropy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, U.S.; Hung, U.D.; Yeh, J.W.; Chen, S.K.; Huang, Y.S.; Yang, C.C.

    2007-01-01

    High-entropy alloys are newly developed alloys that are composed, by definition, of at least five principal elements with concentrations in the range of 5-35 at.%. Therefore, the alloying behavior of any given principal element is significantly affected by all the other principal elements present. In order to elucidate this further, the influence of iron, silver and gold addition on the microstructure and hardness of AlCoCrCuNi-based equimolar alloys has been examined. The as-cast AlCoCrCuNi base alloy is found to have a dendritic structure, of which only solid solution FCC and BCC phases can be observed. The BCC dendrite has a chemical composition close to that of the nominal alloy, with a deficiency in copper however, which is found to segregate and form a FCC Cu-rich interdendrite. The microstructure of the iron containing alloys is similar to that of the base alloy. It is found that both of these aforementioned alloys have hardnesses of about 420 HV, which is equated to their similar microstructures. The as-cast ingot forms two layers of distinct composition with the addition of silver. These layers, which are gold and silver in color, are determined to have a hypoeutectic Ag-Cu composition and a multielement mixture of the other principal elements, respectively. This indicates the chemical incompatibility of silver with the other principal elements. The hardnesses of the gold (104 HV) and silver layers (451 HV) are the lowest and highest of the alloy systems studied. This is attributed to the hypoeutectic Ag-Cu composition of the former and the reduced copper content of the latter. Only multielement mixtures, i.e. without copper segregation, form in the gold containing alloy. Thus, it may be said that gold acts as a 'mixing agent' between copper and the other elements. Although several of the atom pairs in the gold containing alloy have positive enthalpies, thermodynamic considerations show that the high entropy contribution is sufficient to counterbalance

  13. Evaluation of welds on a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleva, J.; Johansson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Five different welding methods for the ferritic-austenitic steel 22Cr6Ni3MoN have been evaluated on mill welded heavy wall pipes. The corrosion resistance of the weld joints has been tested both in standard tests and in special environments, related to certain oil and gas wells. The tests were conclusive in that a welding procedure with the addition of sufficient amounts of filler metal should be employed. TIG welds without or with marginal filler addition showed poor resistance to pitting, and to boiling nitric acid. Contents of main alloying elements in ferrite and austenite phases have been measured and causes of corrosion attack in welds are discussed

  14. Preparation of a high strength Al–Cu–Mg alloy by mechanical alloying and press-forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Huaguo; Cheng Zhiqiang; Liu Jianwei; Ma Xianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A high strength aluminum alloy of Al–2 wt.%Mg–2 wt.%Cu has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. ► The alloy only consists of solid solution α-Al. ► The grains size of α-Al was about 300 nm–5 μm. ► The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening are the main reasons for such a high strength. - Abstract: A high strength aluminum alloy, with the ratio of 96 wt.%Al–2 wt.%Mg–2 wt.%Cu, has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. The alloy exhibited a high tensile strength of 780 MPa and a high microhardness of 180 HV. X-ray diffraction characterizations confirmed that the alloy only consists of a solid solution α-Al. Microstructure characterizations revealed that the grain size of α-Al was about 300 nm–5 μm. The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening were considered to be the reason for such a high strength.

  15. Preparation of a high strength Al-Cu-Mg alloy by mechanical alloying and press-forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Huaguo [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Cheng Zhiqiang [College of Resources and Environment, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun 130118 (China); Liu Jianwei [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Ma Xianfeng, E-mail: xfma@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high strength aluminum alloy of Al-2 wt.%Mg-2 wt.%Cu has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloy only consists of solid solution {alpha}-Al. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grains size of {alpha}-Al was about 300 nm-5 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening are the main reasons for such a high strength. - Abstract: A high strength aluminum alloy, with the ratio of 96 wt.%Al-2 wt.%Mg-2 wt.%Cu, has been prepared by mechanical alloying and press-forming. The alloy exhibited a high tensile strength of 780 MPa and a high microhardness of 180 HV. X-ray diffraction characterizations confirmed that the alloy only consists of a solid solution {alpha}-Al. Microstructure characterizations revealed that the grain size of {alpha}-Al was about 300 nm-5 {mu}m. The solid solution strengthening and the grain refinement strengthening were considered to be the reason for such a high strength.

  16. High temperature alloys and ceramic heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masaharu

    1984-04-01

    From the standpoint of energy saving, the future operating temperatures of process heat and gas turbine plants will become higher. For this purpose, ceramics is the most promissing candidate material in strength for application to high-temperature heat exchangers. This report deals with a servey of characteristics of several high-temperature metallic materials and ceramics as temperature-resistant materials; including a servey of the state-of-the-art of ceramic heat exchanger technologies developed outside of Japan, and a study of their application to the intermediate heat exchanger of VHTR (a very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactor). (author)

  17. Study on corrosion resistance of high - entropy alloy in medium acid liquid and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florea, I; Buluc, G; Florea, R M; Carcea, I; Soare, V

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloy is a new alloy which is different from traditional alloys. The high entropy alloys were started in Tsing Hua University of Taiwan since 1995 by Yeh et al. Consisting of a variety of elements, each element occupying a similar compared with other alloy elements to form a high entropy. We could define high entropy alloys as having approximately equal concentrations, made up of a group of 5 to 11 major elements. In general, the content of each element is not more than 35% by weight of the alloy. During the investigation it turned out that this alloy has a high hardness and is also corrosion proof and also strength and good thermal stability. In the experimental area, scientists used different tools, including traditional casting, mechanical alloying, sputtering, splat-quenching to obtain the high entropy alloys with different alloying elements and then to investigate the corresponding microstructures and mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electronic performances. The present study is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance in a different medium acid and try to put in evidence the mechanical properties. Forasmuch of the wide composition range and the enormous number of alloy systems in high entropy alloys, the mechanical properties of high entropy alloys can vary significantly. In terms of hardness, the most critical factors are: hardness/strength of each composing phase in the alloy, distribution of the composing phases. The corrosion resistance of an high entropy alloy was made in acid liquid such as 10%HNO 3 -3%HF, 10%H 2 SO 4 , 5%HCl and then was investigated, respectively with weight loss experiment. Weight loss test was carried out by put the samples into the acid solution for corrosion. The solution was maintained at a constant room temperature. The liquid formulations used for tests were 3% hydrofluoric acid with 10% nitric acid, 10% sulphuric acid, 5% hydrochloric acid. Weight loss of the samples was measured by electronic scale. (paper)

  18. Low-temperature nitriding of austenitic steel in a vibrofluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraz, V. R.; Grachev, S. V.

    1999-11-01

    The prospects for use of a vibrofluidized bed (VFB) for low-temperature nitrogen saturation of high-strength austenitic steel based on Cr-Ni-Mn (12Kh17N8G2S2MF) are considered. The positive effect of preliminary plastic deformation on the intensity of nitriding is described. The temperature and time parameters of nitriding in a VFB for strain-aging austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF are shown to be adequate for the regimes of the final heat-treatment operation of aging. This creates the possibility of combining the operations of surface alloying and strain aging into a single cycle. This combined treatment increases substantially the resistance of the steel to cyclic loads while preserving the strength parameters. It is shown that the presented method of low-temperature nitriding in a VFB is expedient for improving the service characteristics of austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF used for production of force springs of automobile brake systems.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW VALVE STEELS FOR APPLICATION IN HIGH PERFORMANCE ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bellegard Farina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available UNS N07751 and UNS N07080 alloys are commonly applied for automotive valves production for high performance internal combustion engines. These alloys present high hot resistance to mechanical strength, oxidation, corrosion, creep and microstructural stability. However, these alloys presents low wear resistance and high cost due to the high nickel contents. In this work it is presented the development of two new Ni-based alloys for application in high performance automotive valve as an alternative to the alloys UNS N07751 and UNS N07080. The new developed alloys are based on a high nickel-chromium austenitic matrix with dispersion of γ’ and γ’’ phases and containing different NbC contents. Due to the nickel content reduction in the developed alloys in comparison with these actually used alloys, the new alloys present an economical advantage for substitution of UNS N07751 and UNS N0780 alloys.

  20. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki, E-mail: uwaba.tomoyuki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: > We evaluated diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins irradiated to 130 GWd/t. > The strain was due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. > The irradiation creep was caused by internal gas pressure and PCMI. > The PCMI was associated with pellet swelling by rim structure or by cesium uranate. > The latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction of the cladding. - Abstract: The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, 'Joyo', demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, 'Monju'. The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and {sup 137}Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  1. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  2. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  3. Local corrosion of high alloy steels under biodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovyakova, M.D.; Nikitin, V.M.; Speshneva, N.V.

    1999-01-01

    Impact of the bacteriozenosis different structural-functional state under biodeposits on corrosion resistance of the 12Kh18N10T and Kh18N10T high-alloy steels in the natural seawater is studied. It is shown that saturation of natural micro communities by separate aerobic and facultative-anaerobic bacterial monocultures increases corrosion resistance of these steels by their overgrow with biodeposits [ru

  4. Application of High Entropy Alloys in Stent Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagarsamy, Karthik

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) are alloys with five or more principal elements. Due to these distinct concept of alloying, the HEA exhibits unique and superior properties. The outstanding properties of HEA includes higher strength/hardness, superior wear resistance, high temperature stability, higher fatigue life, good corrosion and oxidation resistance. Such characteristics of HEA has been significant interest leading to researches on these emerging field. Even though many works are done to understand the characteristic of these HEAs, very few works are made on how the HEAs can be applied for commercial uses. This work discusses the application of High entropy alloys in biomedical applications. The coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States kills more than 350,000 persons/year and it costs $108.9 billion for the nation each year in spite of significant advancements in medical care and public awareness. A cardiovascular disease affects heart or blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) or both by blocking the blood flow. As a surgical interventions, stent implants are deployed to cure or ameliorate the disease. However, the high failure rate of stents has lead researchers to give special attention towards analyzing stent structure, materials and characteristics. Many works related to alternate material and/or design are carried out in recent time. This paper discusses the feasibility of CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs in stent implant application. This work is based on the speculation that CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs are biocompatible material. These HEAs are characterized to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties. Computational modeling and analysis were carried out on stent implant by applying CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs as material to understand the structural behavior.

  5. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  6. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Denis, E-mail: thibault.denis@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Bocher, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.bocher@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Thomas, Marc, E-mail: marc.thomas@etsmtl.ca [Ecole de technologie superieure, 1100, rue Notre-Dame Ouest, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1K3 (Canada); Lanteigne, Jacques, E-mail: lanteigne.jacques@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Hovington, Pierre, E-mail: hovington.pierre@ireq.ca [Institut de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), 1800, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada); Robichaud, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.robichaud@riotinto.com [Centre de recherche et de developpement Arvida (CRDA), 1955, boul. Mellon, Jonquiere, Quebec, G7S 4K8 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. {yields} Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. {yields} XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  7. Reformed austenite transformation during fatigue crack propagation of 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, Denis; Bocher, Philippe; Thomas, Marc; Lanteigne, Jacques; Hovington, Pierre; Robichaud, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Reformed austenite in 13%Cr-4%Ni stainless steel transforms during fatigue crack growth. → Low cycle fatigue tests showed that this transformation to martensite is gradual. → XRD spectrums obtained on the fracture surface and have been correlated to LCF results. - Abstract: In the as-quenched state, 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels are essentially 100% martensitic. However, a certain amount of austenite is formed during the tempering of this alloy. This reformed austenite is thermally stable at room temperature but can transform to martensite under stress. This transformation is known to happen during impact testing but it has never been established if it occurs during fatigue crack propagation. This study presents the results of X-ray diffraction measurements of reformed austenite before and after crack growth testing. It has been found that reformed austenite does transform to martensite at the crack tip and that this transformation occurs even at a low stress intensity factor. Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted to verify austenite transformation under cyclic straining. It was found that reformed austenite transforms only partially during the first strain reversal but that essentially all austenite has disappeared after 100 cycles. The relation between austenite transformation under low-cycle fatigue and its transformation during crack growth is also discussed.

  8. High Frequency Vibration Based Fatigue Testing of Developmental Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holycross, Casey M.; Srinivasan, Raghavan; George, Tommy J.; Tamirisakandala, Seshacharyulu; Russ, Stephan M.

    Many fatigue test methods have been previously developed to rapidly evaluate fatigue behavior. This increased test speed can come at some expense, since these methods may require non-standard specimen geometry or increased facility and equipment capability. One such method, developed by George et al, involves a base-excited plate specimen driven into a high frequency bending resonant mode. This resonant mode is of sufficient frequency (typically 1200 to 1700 Hertz) to accumulate 107 cycles in a few hours. One of the main limitations of this test method is that fatigue cracking is almost certainly guaranteed to be surface initiated at regions of high stress. This brings into question the validity of the fatigue test results, as compared to more traditional uniaxial, smooth-bar testing, since high stresses are subjecting only a small volume to fatigue damage. This limitation also brings into question the suitability of this method to screen developmental alloys, should their initiation life be governed by subsurface flaws. However, if applicable, the rapid generation of fatigue data using this method would facilitate faster design iterations, identifying more quickly, material and manufacturing process deficiencies. The developmental alloy used in this study was a powder metallurgy boron-modified Ti-6Al-4V, a new alloy currently being considered for gas turbine engine fan blades. Plate specimens were subjected to fully reversed bending fatigue. Results are compared with existing data from commercially available Ti-6Al-4V using both vibration based and more traditional fatigue test methods.

  9. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  10. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, Kale J., E-mail: kalejs@umich.edu; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Dislocation loops were the prominent defect, but neutron irradiation caused higher loop density. • Grain boundaries had similar amounts of radiation-induced segregation. • The increment in hardness and yield stress due to irradiation were very similar. • Relative IASCC susceptibility was nearly identical. • The effect of dislocation channel step height on IASCC was similar. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni–Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed

  11. Improved the microstructures and properties of M3:2 high-speed steel by spray forming and niobium alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road 30, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Hou, L.G., E-mail: lghou@skl.ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road 30, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, J.X.; Wang, H.B.; Cui, H.; Huang, J.F. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road 30, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Y.A. [State Key Laboratory of Non-Ferrous Metals and Process, General Research Institute for Non-Ferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhang, J.S. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Xueyuan Road 30, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The microstructures and properties of spray formed (SF) high-speed steels (HSSs) with or without niobium (Nb) addition were studied. Particular emphasis was placed on the effect of Nb on the solidification microstructures, decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides, thermal stability and mechanical properties. The results show that spray forming can refine the cell size of eutectic carbides due to the rapid cooling effect during atomization. With Nb addition, further refinement of the eutectic carbides and primary austenite grains are obtained. Moreover, the Nb addition can accelerate the decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides and increase the thermal stability of high-speed steel, and also can improve the hardness and bending strength with slightly decrease the impact toughness. The high-speed steel made by spray forming and Nb alloying can give a better tool performance compared with powder metallurgy M3:2 and commercial AISI M2 high-speed steels. - Highlights: • Spray forming can effectively refine the microstructure of M3:2 steel. • Niobium accelerates the decomposition of M{sub 2}C carbides. • Niobium increases the hardness and bending strength of spray formed M3:2 steel. • Spray-formed niobium-containing M3:2 steel has the best tool performance.

  12. Combining thermodynamic modeling and 3D printing of elemental powder blends for high-throughput investigation of high-entropy alloys – Towards rapid alloy screening and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, Christian; Tang, Florian; Wilms, Markus B.; Weisheit, Andreas; Hallstedt, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    High-entropy alloys have gained high interest of both academia and industry in recent years due to their excellent properties and large variety of possible alloy systems. However, so far prediction of phase constitution and stability is based on empirical rules that can only be applied to selected alloy systems. In the current study, we introduce a methodology that enables high-throughput theoretical and experimental alloy screening and design. As a basis for thorough thermodynamic calculations, a new database was compiled for the Co–Cr–Fe–Mn–Ni system and used for Calphad and Scheil simulations. For bulk sample production, laser metal deposition (LMD) of an elemental powder blend was applied to build up the equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi Cantor alloy as a first demonstrator. This production approach allows high flexibility in varying the chemical composition and, thus, renders itself suitable for high-throughput alloy production. The microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the material processed were characterized using optical microscopy, EBSD, EDX, XRD, hardness and compression testing. The LMD-produced alloy revealed full density, strongly reduced segregation compared to conventionally cast material, pronounced texture, and excellent mechanical properties. Phase constitution and elemental distribution were correctly predicted by simulations. The applicability of the introduced methodology to high-entropy alloys and extension to compositionally complex alloys is discussed.

  13. Combining thermodynamic modeling and 3D printing of elemental powder blends for high-throughput investigation of high-entropy alloys – Towards rapid alloy screening and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Christian, E-mail: christian.haase@iehk.rwth-aachen.de [Department of Ferrous Metallurgy, RWTH Aachen University, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Tang, Florian [Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Wilms, Markus B.; Weisheit, Andreas [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hallstedt, Bengt [Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2017-03-14

    High-entropy alloys have gained high interest of both academia and industry in recent years due to their excellent properties and large variety of possible alloy systems. However, so far prediction of phase constitution and stability is based on empirical rules that can only be applied to selected alloy systems. In the current study, we introduce a methodology that enables high-throughput theoretical and experimental alloy screening and design. As a basis for thorough thermodynamic calculations, a new database was compiled for the Co–Cr–Fe–Mn–Ni system and used for Calphad and Scheil simulations. For bulk sample production, laser metal deposition (LMD) of an elemental powder blend was applied to build up the equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi Cantor alloy as a first demonstrator. This production approach allows high flexibility in varying the chemical composition and, thus, renders itself suitable for high-throughput alloy production. The microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of the material processed were characterized using optical microscopy, EBSD, EDX, XRD, hardness and compression testing. The LMD-produced alloy revealed full density, strongly reduced segregation compared to conventionally cast material, pronounced texture, and excellent mechanical properties. Phase constitution and elemental distribution were correctly predicted by simulations. The applicability of the introduced methodology to high-entropy alloys and extension to compositionally complex alloys is discussed.

  14. Corrosion considerations of high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1991-07-01

    Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project's high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. High nickel alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessments of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns of involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250 degrees C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 31 refs., 1 tab

  15. Characterization and understanding of ion irradiation effect on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volgin, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in nuclear industry for internal structures. These structures are located close to the fuel assemblies, inside the pressure vessel. The exposure of these elements to high irradiation doses (the accumulated dose, after 40 years of operation, can reach 80 dpa), at temperature close to 350 C, modifies the macroscopic behavior of the steel: hardening, swelling, creep and corrosion are observed. Moreover, in-service inspections of some of the reactor internal structures have revealed the cracking of some baffle bolts. This cracking has been attributed to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). In order to understand this complex phenomenon, a first step is to identify the microstructural changes occurring during irradiation, and to understand the mechanisms at the origin of this evolution. In this framework, a large part of the European project 'PERFORM 60' is dedicated to the study of the irradiation damage in austenitic stainless steels. The objective of this PhD work is to bring comprehensive data on the irradiation effects on microstructure. To reach this goal, two model alloys (FeNiCr and FeNiCrSi) and an industrial austenitic stainless steel (316 steel) are studied using Atom Probe Tomography (APT), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS). They are irradiated by Ni ions in CSNSM (Orsay) at two temperatures (200 and 450 C) and three doses (0.5, 1 and 5 dpa). TEM observations have shown the appearance of dislocation loops, cavities and staking fault tetrahedra. The dislocation loops in 316 steel were preferentially situated in the vicinity of dislocations, while they were randomly distributed in the FeNiCr alloy. APT study has shown the redistribution of Ni and Si under irradiation in FeNiCrSi model alloy and 316 steel, leading to the appearance of (a) Cottrell clouds along dislocation lines, dislocation loops and other non-identified crystalline defects and (b

  16. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  17. High speed cutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using LBR-370 numerical control lathe, high speed cutting was applied to AZ31 magnesium alloy. The influence of cutting parameters on microstructure, surface roughness and machining hardening were investigated by using the methods of single factor and orthogonal experiment. The results show that the cutting parameters have an important effect on microstructure, surface roughness and machine hardening. The depth of stress layer, roughness and hardening present a declining tendency with the increase of the cutting speed and also increase with the augment of the cutting depth and feed rate. Moreover, we established a prediction model of the roughness, which has an important guidance on actual machining process of magnesium alloy.

  18. Carbothermal shock synthesis of high-entropy-alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yonggang; Huang, Zhennan; Xie, Pengfei; Lacey, Steven D.; Jacob, Rohit Jiji; Xie, Hua; Chen, Fengjuan; Nie, Anmin; Pu, Tiancheng; Rehwoldt, Miles; Yu, Daiwei; Zachariah, Michael R.; Wang, Chao; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Li, Ju; Hu, Liangbing

    2018-03-01

    The controllable incorporation of multiple immiscible elements into a single nanoparticle merits untold scientific and technological potential, yet remains a challenge using conventional synthetic techniques. We present a general route for alloying up to eight dissimilar elements into single-phase solid-solution nanoparticles, referred to as high-entropy-alloy nanoparticles (HEA-NPs), by thermally shocking precursor metal salt mixtures loaded onto carbon supports [temperature ~2000 kelvin (K), 55-millisecond duration, rate of ~105 K per second]. We synthesized a wide range of multicomponent nanoparticles with a desired chemistry (composition), size, and phase (solid solution, phase-separated) by controlling the carbothermal shock (CTS) parameters (substrate, temperature, shock duration, and heating/cooling rate). To prove utility, we synthesized quinary HEA-NPs as ammonia oxidation catalysts with ~100% conversion and >99% nitrogen oxide selectivity over prolonged operations.

  19. Dimensional changes in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] austenitic cladding and ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.; Chastain, S.A.; Gneiting, B.C.

    1990-11-01

    As the standard cladding and duct material for the Fast Flux Test Facility driver fuel, 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel has provided good service up to a fast fluence of 16 x 10 22 n/cm 2 in extreme cases. The titanium-stabilized variant of 316 SS, called D9, has extended the useful life of the austenitic alloys by increasing the incubation fluence necessary for the onset of volumetric swelling. Duct flat-to-flat, length and bow, pin bundle distortion, fuel pin diameter and length, as well as cladding volumetric swelling have been examined for high fluence components representing both alloys. These data emphasize the importance of the swelling process, the superiority of D9, and the interrelation between deformations in the duct, bundle, and individual pins. 8 refs., 10 figs

  20. Anelastic mechanical loss spectrometry of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Andronova, E.; Ivanchenko, M.; Haenninen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic distribution of hydrogen, its elemental diffusion jumps and its interaction with dislocations in a number of austenitic stainless steels are studied with anelastic mechanical loss (AML) spectrometry in combination with the hydrogen thermal desorption method. Austenitic stainless steels of different chemical composition, namely, AISI 310, AISI 201, and AISI 301LN, as well as LDX 2101 duplex stainless steel are studied to clarify the role of different alloying elements on the hydrogen behavior. Activation analyses of the hydrogen Snoek-like peaks are performed with their decomposition to sets of Gaussian components. Fine structure of the composite hydrogen peaks is analyzed under the assumption that each component corresponds to diffusion transfer of hydrogen between octahedral positions with certain atomic compositions of the nearest neighbouring lattice sites. An additional component originating from hydrogen-dislocation interaction is considered. Binding energies for hydrogen-dislocation interaction are also estimated for the studied austenitic stainless steels.

  1. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  2. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841