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Sample records for high affinity protein

  1. Global Geometric Affinity for Revealing High Fidelity Protein Interaction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Benjamin, William; Sun, Mengtian; Ramani, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis presents an essential role in understanding the functional relationship among proteins in a living biological system. Despite the success of current approaches for understanding the PPI network, the large fraction of missing and spurious PPIs and a low coverage of complete PPI network are the sources of major concern. In this paper, based on the diffusion process, we propose a new concept of global geometric affinity and an accompanying computational scheme to filter the uncertain PPIs, namely, reduce the spurious PPIs and recover the missing PPIs in the network. The main concept defines a diffusion process in which all proteins simultaneously participate to define a similarity metric (global geometric affinity (GGA)) to robustly reflect the internal connectivity among proteins. The robustness of the GGA is attributed to propagating the local connectivity to a global representation of similarity among proteins in a diffusion process. The propagation process is extremely fast as only simple matrix products are required in this computation process and thus our method is geared toward applications in high-throughput PPI networks. Furthermore, we proposed two new approaches that determine the optimal geometric scale of the PPI network and the optimal threshold for assigning the PPI from the GGA matrix. Our approach is tested with three protein-protein interaction networks and performs well with significant random noises of deletions and insertions in true PPIs. Our approach has the potential to benefit biological experiments, to better characterize network data sets, and to drive new discoveries. PMID:21559288

  2. Generation of high-performance binding proteins for peptide motifs by affinity clamping

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, Shohei; Huang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    We describe concepts and methodologies for generating “Affinity Clamps”, a new class of recombinant binding proteins that achieve high affinity and high specificity toward short peptide motifs of biological importance, which is a major challenge in protein engineering. The Affinity Clamping concept exploits the potential of nonhomologous recombination of protein domains in generating large changes in protein function and the inherent binding affinity and specificity of the so-called modular i...

  3. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus B Nissen

    Full Text Available PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  4. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  5. Affinity chromatography of phosphorylated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaga, Grigoriy S

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers the use of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for enrichment of phosphorylated proteins. Some requirements for successful enrichment of these types of proteins are discussed. An experimental protocol and a set of application data are included to enable the scientist to obtain high-yield results in a very short time with pre-packed phospho-specific metal ion affinity resin (PMAC).

  6. A novel gigaporous GSH affinity medium for high-speed affinity chromatography of GST-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongdong; Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Juan; Li, Qiang; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-03-01

    Novel GSH-AP (phenoxyl agarose coated gigaporous polystyrene, Agap-co-PSt) microspheres were successfully prepared by introducing GSH ligand into hydrophilic AP microspheres pre-activated with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether. The gigaporous structure and chromatographic properties of GSH-AP medium were evaluated and compared with commercial GSH Sepharose FF (GSH-FF) medium. The macropores (100-500nm) of gigaporous PSt microspheres were well maintained after coating with agarose and functionalized with GSH ligand. Hydrodynamic experiments showed that GSH-AP column had less backpressure and plate height than those of GSH-FF column at high flow velocity, which was beneficial for its use in high-speed chromatography. The presence of flow-through pores in GSH-AP microspheres also accelerated the mass transfer rate of biomolecules induced by convective flow, leading to high protein resolution and high dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of glutathione S-transferase (GST) at high flow velocity. High purity of GST and GST-tagged recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) were obtained from crude extract with an acceptable recovery yield within 1.5min at a velocity up to 1400cm/h. GSH-AP medium is promising for high-speed affinity chromatography for the purification of GST and GST-tagged proteins.

  7. Robotic high-throughput purification of affinity-tagged recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesler, Simone C; Weinzierl, Robert O J

    2015-01-01

    Affinity purification of recombinant proteins has become the method of choice to obtain good quantities and qualities of proteins for a variety of downstream biochemical applications. While manual or FPLC-assisted purification techniques are generally time-consuming and labor-intensive, the advent of high-throughput technologies and liquid handling robotics has simplified and accelerated this process significantly. Additionally, without the human factor as a potential source of error, automated purification protocols allow for the generation of large numbers of proteins simultaneously and under directly comparable conditions. The delivered material is ideal for activity comparisons of different variants of the same protein. Here, we present our strategy for the simultaneous purification of up to 24 affinity-tagged proteins for activity measurements in biochemical assays. The protocol described is suitable for the scale typically required in individual research laboratories.

  8. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Lewis, Karen A; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizo -saccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization.

  9. Practical strategies for the evaluation of high-affinity protein/nucleic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Altschuler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative evaluation of binding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids is highly sensitive to a variety of experimental conditions. Optimization of these conditions is critical for obtaining high quality, reproducible data, particularly in the context of very high affinity interactions. Here, we discuss the practical considerations involved in optimizing the apparent binding constant of an interaction as measured by two common quantitative assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and double-filter binding when measuring extremely tight protein/nucleic acid interactions with sub-nanomolar binding affinities. We include specific examples from two telomere end-binding protein systems, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc13, to demonstrate potential experimental pitfalls and some useful strategies for optimization.

  10. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Kedström, Linda Maria Haugaard; Wilbek, Theis S

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95...... of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG...

  11. Structures of the ultra-high-affinity protein–protein complexes of pyocins S2 and AP41 and their cognate immunity proteins from pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Amar; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Chen, Sabrina; Wojdyla, Justyna; Lowe, Edward; Kaminska, Renata; Sharp, Connor; McCaughey, Laura; Roszak, Aleksander; Cogdell, Richard; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-01-01

    How ultra-high-affinity protein–protein interactions retain high specificity is still poorly understood. The interaction between colicin DNase domains and their inhibitory immunity (Im) proteins is an ultra-high-affinity interaction that is essential for the neutralisation of endogenous DNase catalytic activity and for protection against exogenous DNase bacteriocins. The colicin DNase–Im interaction is a model system for the study of high-affinity protein–protein interactions. However, despit...

  12. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Brian H. Carrick

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  13. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-12-29

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  14. Quantitative assessment of RNA-protein interactions with high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Abdullah; Tome, Jacob M; Friedman, Robin C; Gheba, Dan; Schroth, Gary P; Lis, John T

    2015-08-01

    Because RNA-protein interactions have a central role in a wide array of biological processes, methods that enable a quantitative assessment of these interactions in a high-throughput manner are in great demand. Recently, we developed the high-throughput sequencing-RNA affinity profiling (HiTS-RAP) assay that couples sequencing on an Illumina GAIIx genome analyzer with the quantitative assessment of protein-RNA interactions. This assay is able to analyze interactions between one or possibly several proteins with millions of different RNAs in a single experiment. We have successfully used HiTS-RAP to analyze interactions of the EGFP and negative elongation factor subunit E (NELF-E) proteins with their corresponding canonical and mutant RNA aptamers. Here we provide a detailed protocol for HiTS-RAP that can be completed in about a month (8 d hands-on time). This includes the preparation and testing of recombinant proteins and DNA templates, clustering DNA templates on a flowcell, HiTS and protein binding with a GAIIx instrument, and finally data analysis. We also highlight aspects of HiTS-RAP that can be further improved and points of comparison between HiTS-RAP and two other recently developed methods, quantitative analysis of RNA on a massively parallel array (RNA-MaP) and RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), for quantitative analysis of RNA-protein interactions.

  15. Tsetse salivary gland proteins 1 and 2 are high affinity nucleic acid binding proteins with residual nuclease activity.

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    Guy Caljon

    Full Text Available Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2 display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with K(D values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents.

  16. Haptoglobin-related protein is a high-affinity hemoglobin-binding plasma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Petersen, Steen Vang; Jacobsen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) is a primate-specific plasma protein associated with apolipoprotein L-I (apoL-I)-containing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles shown to be a part of the innate immune defense. Despite the assumption hitherto that Hpr does not bind to hemoglobin, the present...

  17. Fc-Binding Ligands of Immunoglobulin G: An Overview of High Affinity Proteins and Peptides

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    Weonu Choe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing application of antibodies has inspired the development of several novel methods to isolate and target antibodies using smart biomaterials that mimic the binding of Fc-receptors to antibodies. The Fc-binding domain of antibodies is the primary binding site for e.g., effector proteins and secondary antibodies, whereas antigens bind to the Fab region. Protein A, G, and L, surface proteins expressed by pathogenic bacteria, are well known to bind immunoglobulin and have been widely exploited in antibody purification strategies. Several difficulties are encountered when bacterial proteins are used in antibody research and application. One of the major obstacles hampering the use of bacterial proteins is sample contamination with trace amounts of these proteins, which can invoke an immune response in the host. Many research groups actively develop synthetic ligands that are able to selectively and strongly bind to antibodies. Among the reported ligands, peptides that bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies are attractive tools in antibody research. Besides their use as high affinity ligands in antibody purification chromatography, Fc-binding peptides are applied e.g., to localize antibodies on nanomaterials and to increase the half-life of proteins in serum. In this review, recent developments of Fc-binding peptides are presented and their binding characteristics and diverse applications are discussed.

  18. High affinity anchoring of the decoration protein pb10 onto the bacteriophage T5 capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernhes, Emeline; Renouard, Madalena; Gilquin, Bernard; Cuniasse, Philippe; Durand, Dominique; England, Patrick; Hoos, Sylviane; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F.; Glukhov, Anatoly; Ksenzenko, Vladimir; Jacquet, Eric; Nhiri, Naïma; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Boulanger, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage capsids constitute icosahedral shells of exceptional stability that protect the viral genome. Many capsids display on their surface decoration proteins whose structure and function remain largely unknown. The decoration protein pb10 of phage T5 binds at the centre of the 120 hexamers formed by the major capsid protein. Here we determined the 3D structure of pb10 and investigated its capsid-binding properties using NMR, SAXS, cryoEM and SPR. Pb10 consists of an α-helical capsid-binding domain and an Ig-like domain exposed to the solvent. It binds to the T5 capsid with a remarkably high affinity and its binding kinetics is characterized by a very slow dissociation rate. We propose that the conformational exchange events observed in the capsid-binding domain enable rearrangements upon binding that contribute to the quasi-irreversibility of the pb10-capsid interaction. Moreover we show that pb10 binding is a highly cooperative process, which favours immediate rebinding of newly dissociated pb10 to the 120 hexamers of the capsid protein. In extreme conditions, pb10 protects the phage from releasing its genome. We conclude that pb10 may function to reinforce the capsid thus favouring phage survival in harsh environments. PMID:28165000

  19. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. (Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Case Western Reserve University, OH (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  20. Function and Regulation of the Plant COPT Family of High-Affinity Copper Transport Proteins

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    Sergi Puig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotes because it participates as a redox active cofactor in multiple biological processes, including mitochondrial respiration, photosynthesis, oxidative stress protection, and iron (Fe transport. In eukaryotic cells, Cu transport toward the cytoplasm is mediated by the conserved CTR/COPT family of high-affinity Cu transport proteins. This outlook paper reviews the contribution of our research group to the characterization of the function played by the Arabidopsis thaliana COPT1–6 family of proteins in plant Cu homeostasis. Our studies indicate that the different tissue specificity, Cu-regulated expression, and subcellular localization dictate COPT-specialized contribution to plant Cu transport and distribution. By characterizing lack-of-function Arabidopsis mutant lines, we conclude that COPT1 mediates root Cu acquisition, COPT6 facilitates shoot Cu distribution, and COPT5 mobilizes Cu from storage organelles. Furthermore, our work with copt2 mutant and COPT-overexpressing plants has also uncovered Cu connections with Fe homeostasis and the circadian clock, respectively. Future studies on the interaction between COPT transporters and other components of the Cu homeostasis network will improve our knowledge of plant Cu acquisition, distribution, regulation, and utilization by Cu-proteins.

  1. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng [Michigan; (HHMI)

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  2. Structures of the Ultra-High-Affinity Protein-Protein Complexes of Pyocins S2 and AP41 and Their Cognate Immunity Proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amar; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Chen, Sabrina; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Lowe, Edward D; Kaminska, Renata; Sharp, Connor; McCaughey, Laura; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-08-28

    How ultra-high-affinity protein-protein interactions retain high specificity is still poorly understood. The interaction between colicin DNase domains and their inhibitory immunity (Im) proteins is an ultra-high-affinity interaction that is essential for the neutralisation of endogenous DNase catalytic activity and for protection against exogenous DNase bacteriocins. The colicin DNase-Im interaction is a model system for the study of high-affinity protein-protein interactions. However, despite the fact that closely related colicin-like bacteriocins are widely produced by Gram-negative bacteria, this interaction has only been studied using colicins from Escherichia coli. In this work, we present the first crystal structures of two pyocin DNase-Im complexes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pyocin S2 DNase-ImS2 and pyocin AP41 DNase-ImAP41. These structures represent divergent DNase-Im subfamilies and are important in extending our understanding of protein-protein interactions for this important class of high-affinity protein complex. A key finding of this work is that mutations within the immunity protein binding energy hotspot, helix III, are tolerated by complementary substitutions at the DNase-Immunity protein binding interface. Im helix III is strictly conserved in colicins where an Asp forms polar interactions with the DNase backbone. ImAP41 contains an Asp-to-Gly substitution in helix III and our structures show the role of a co-evolved substitution where Pro in DNase loop 4 occupies the volume vacated and removes the unfulfilled hydrogen bond. We observe the co-evolved mutations in other DNase-Immunity pairs that appear to underpin the split of this family into two distinct groups.

  3. Analysis of high affinity self-association by fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation of labeled proteins: opportunities and limitations.

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    Huaying Zhao

    Full Text Available Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (SV is a powerful first-principle technique for the study of protein interactions, and allows a rigorous characterization of binding stoichiometry and affinities. A recently introduced commercial fluorescence optical detection system (FDS permits analysis of high-affinity interactions by SV. However, for most proteins the attachment of an extrinsic fluorophore is an essential prerequisite for analysis by FDS-SV. Using the glutamate receptor GluA2 amino terminal domain as a model system for high-affinity homo-dimerization, we demonstrate how the experimental design and choice of fluorescent label can impact both the observed binding constants as well as the derived hydrodynamic parameter estimates for the monomer and dimer species. Specifically, FAM (5,6-carboxyfluorescein was found to create different populations of artificially high-affinity and low-affinity dimers, as indicated by both FDS-SV and the kinetics of dimer dissociation studied using a bench-top fluorescence spectrometer and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. By contrast, Dylight488 labeled GluA2, as well as GluA2 expressed as an EGFP fusion protein, yielded results consistent with estimates for unlabeled GluA2. Our study suggests considerations for the choice of labeling strategies, and highlights experimental designs that exploit specific opportunities of FDS-SV for improving the reliability of the binding isotherm analysis of interacting systems.

  4. High affinity binding of proteins HMG1 and HMG2 to semicatenated DNA loops

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    Strauss François

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins HMG1 and HMG2 are two of the most abundant non histone proteins in the nucleus of mammalian cells, and contain a domain of homology with many proteins implicated in the control of development, such as the sex-determination factor Sry and the Sox family of proteins. In vitro studies of interactions of HMG1/2 with DNA have shown that these proteins can bind to many unusual DNA structures, in particular to four-way junctions, with binding affinities of 107 to 109 M-1. Results Here we show that HMG1 and HMG2 bind with a much higher affinity, at least 4 orders of magnitude higher, to a new structure, Form X, which consists of a DNA loop closed at its base by a semicatenated DNA junction, forming a DNA hemicatenane. The binding constant of HMG1 to Form X is higher than 5 × 1012 M-1, and the half-life of the complex is longer than one hour in vitro. Conclusions Of all DNA structures described so far with which HMG1 and HMG2 interact, we have found that Form X, a DNA loop with a semicatenated DNA junction at its base, is the structure with the highest affinity by more than 4 orders of magnitude. This suggests that, if similar structures exist in the cell nucleus, one of the functions of these proteins might be linked to the remarkable property of DNA hemicatenanes to associate two distant regions of the genome in a stable but reversible manner.

  5. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

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    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  6. High Affinity Immobilization of Proteins Using the CrAsH/TC Tag

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    Janine Schulte-Zweckel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein microarrays represent important tools for biomedical analysis. We have recently described the use of the biarsenical-tetracysteine (TC tag for the preparation of protein microarrays. The unique feature of this tag enables the site-specific immobilization of TC-containing proteins on biarsenical-modified surfaces, resulting in a fluorescence enhancement that allows the direct quantification of the immobilized proteins. Moreover, the reversibility of the binding upon incubation with large quantities of thiols permits the detachment of the proteins from the surface, thereby enabling recovery of the substrate to extend the life time of the slide. Herein, we describe our recent results that further extend the applicability of the CrAsH/TC tag to the fabrication of biochips. With this aim, the immobilization of proteins on surfaces has been investigated using two different spacers and two TC tags, the minimal TC sequence (CCPGCC and an optimized motif (FLNCCPGCCMEP. While the minimal peptide motif enables a rapid recycling of the slide, the optimized TC sequence reveals an increased affinity due to its greater resistance to displacement by thiols. Moreover, the developed methodology was applied to the immobilization of proteins via on-chip ligation of recombinant protein thioesters.

  7. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  8. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  9. High performance aptamer affinity chromatography for single-step selective extraction and screening of basic protein lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Zhao, Chao; Yin, Junfa; Wang, Hailin

    2012-08-15

    A DNA aptamer based high-performance affinity chromatography is developed for selective extraction and screening of a basic protein lysozyme. First, a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic column was synthesized in situ by thermally initiated radical polymerization, and then an anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer was covalently immobilized on the surface of the monolith through a 16-atom spacer arm. The target protein lysozyme but non-target proteins can be trapped by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. In contrast, lysozyme cannot be trapped by the immobilized oligodeoxynucleotide that does not contain the sequence of the anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer. The study clearly demonstrates the trapping of lysozyme by the immobilized anti-lysozyme DNA aptamer is mainly due to specific recognition rather than simple electrostatic interaction of positively charged protein and the negatively charged DNA. The inter-day precision was determined as 0.8% for migration time and 4.2% for peak area, respectively. By the use of aptamer affinity monolith, a screening strategy is developed to selectively extract lysozyme from chicken egg white, showing the advantages of high efficiency, low cost and ease-of-operation.

  10. Site-specific conjugation of an antibody-binding protein catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase creates a multivalent protein conjugate with high affinity to IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamihata, Kosuke; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linking proteins offers an approach to enhance the distinct function of proteins due to the multivalent effect. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of a multivalent antibody-binding protein possessing high affinity to IgG by conjugating a number of antibody-binding proteins using the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated protein conjugation method. By introducing a peptide tag containing a tyrosine (Y-tag) to the C-terminus of the model protein, a chimera protein of protein G and protein A (pG2 pA), the Tyr residue in the Y-tag was efficiently recognized by HRP and cross-linked with each other to yield a pG2 pA conjugate, composed of mainly two to three units of pG2 pA. The cross-linking occurred site specifically at the Tyr residue in the Y-tag and introduction of the Y-tag showed no effect on the function of pG2 pA. The affinity of the Y-tagged pG2 pA conjugate against IgG clearly increased because of the multivalent effect, demonstrating the benefit of this protein cross-linking reaction, which yields functional protein oligomers. Such multivalent protein conjugates created by this reaction should have potential to be used in ELISA and Western blotting applications in which highly sensitive detection of target molecules is desired.

  11. Structures of the Ultra-High-Affinity Protein–Protein Complexes of Pyocins S2 and AP41 and Their Cognate Immunity Proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amar; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Chen, Sabrina; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Lowe, Edward D.; Kaminska, Renata; Sharp, Connor; McCaughey, Laura; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-01-01

    How ultra-high-affinity protein–protein interactions retain high specificity is still poorly understood. The interaction between colicin DNase domains and their inhibitory immunity (Im) proteins is an ultra-high-affinity interaction that is essential for the neutralisation of endogenous DNase catalytic activity and for protection against exogenous DNase bacteriocins. The colicin DNase–Im interaction is a model system for the study of high-affinity protein–protein interactions. However, despite the fact that closely related colicin-like bacteriocins are widely produced by Gram-negative bacteria, this interaction has only been studied using colicins from Escherichia coli. In this work, we present the first crystal structures of two pyocin DNase–Im complexes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pyocin S2 DNase–ImS2 and pyocin AP41 DNase–ImAP41. These structures represent divergent DNase–Im subfamilies and are important in extending our understanding of protein–protein interactions for this important class of high-affinity protein complex. A key finding of this work is that mutations within the immunity protein binding energy hotspot, helix III, are tolerated by complementary substitutions at the DNase–Immunity protein binding interface. Im helix III is strictly conserved in colicins where an Asp forms polar interactions with the DNase backbone. ImAP41 contains an Asp-to-Gly substitution in helix III and our structures show the role of a co-evolved substitution where Pro in DNase loop 4 occupies the volume vacated and removes the unfulfilled hydrogen bond. We observe the co-evolved mutations in other DNase–Immunity pairs that appear to underpin the split of this family into two distinct groups. PMID:26215615

  12. Functional assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD protein demonstrates that it is a high-affinity nitrate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Rammyani; Salehin, Mohammad; Adeyemo, O Sarah; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    The Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD (for Numerous Infections and Polyphenolics/Lateral root-organ Defective) gene encodes a protein found in a clade of nitrate transporters within the large NRT1(PTR) family that also encodes transporters of dipeptides and tripeptides, dicarboxylates, auxin, and abscisic acid. Of the NRT1(PTR) members known to transport nitrate, most are low-affinity transporters. Here, we show that M. truncatula nip/latd mutants are more defective in their lateral root responses to nitrate provided at low (250 μm) concentrations than at higher (5 mm) concentrations; however, nitrate uptake experiments showed no discernible differences in uptake in the mutants. Heterologous expression experiments showed that MtNIP/LATD encodes a nitrate transporter: expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes conferred upon the oocytes the ability to take up nitrate from the medium with high affinity, and expression of MtNIP/LATD in an Arabidopsis chl1(nrt1.1) mutant rescued the chlorate susceptibility phenotype. X. laevis oocytes expressing mutant Mtnip-1 and Mtlatd were unable to take up nitrate from the medium, but oocytes expressing the less severe Mtnip-3 allele were proficient in nitrate transport. M. truncatula nip/latd mutants have pleiotropic defects in nodulation and root architecture. Expression of the Arabidopsis NRT1.1 gene in mutant Mtnip-1 roots partially rescued Mtnip-1 for root architecture defects but not for nodulation defects. This suggests that the spectrum of activities inherent in AtNRT1.1 is different from that possessed by MtNIP/LATD, but it could also reflect stability differences of each protein in M. truncatula. Collectively, the data show that MtNIP/LATD is a high-affinity nitrate transporter and suggest that it could have another function.

  13. Structure-based rational design of a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 decoy receptor with high binding affinity for a target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Han

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4 decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2. Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (K(D one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities.

  14. The occurrence and production of avidin: a new conception of the high-affinity biotin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, H A; Korpela, J

    1984-01-01

    The production of avidin, a high-affinity biotin-binding egg-white protein, is not restricted to the avian, amphibian and reptilian oviducts. In the acute phase of inflammation, avidin is synthesized and secreted by various injured tissues in the domestic fowl, both male and female. Also in other avian species and a lizard, injured tissues produce an avidin-like biotin-binding factor. The non-oviductal production of avidin in domestic fowl has a great variety of inducers, for example acute inflammation caused by mechanical or thermal tissue injury, septic bacterial infection and (toxic) drugs, and even retrovirus-induced cell transformation. In culture, chicken embryo fibroblasts and yolk sac macrophages synthesize and secrete avidin. Besides the albumen, avidin may act as an antibacterial protein also in the tissues.

  15. High affinity recognition of a Phytophthora protein by Arabidopsis via an RGD motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchou, V; Weide, R; Carrasco, A; Bouyssou, H; Pont-Lezica, R; Govers, F; Canut, H

    2004-02-01

    The RGD tripeptide sequence, a cell adhesion motif present in several extracellular matrix proteins of mammalians, is involved in numerous plant processes. In plant-pathogen interactions, the RGD motif is believed to reduce plant defence responses by disrupting adhesions between the cell wall and plasma membrane. Photoaffinity cross-linking of [125I]-azido-RGD heptapeptide in the presence of purified plasma membrane vesicles of Arabidopsis thaliana led to label incorporation into a single protein with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa. Incorporation could be prevented by excess RGD peptides, but also by the IPI-O protein, an RGD-containing protein secreted by the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Hydrophobic cluster analysis revealed that the RGD motif of IPI-O (positions 53-56) is readily accessible for interactions. Single amino acid mutations in the RGD motif in IPI-O (of Asp56 into Glu or Ala) resulted in the loss of protection of the 80-kDa protein from labelling. Thus, the interaction between the two proteins is mediated through RGD recognition and the 80-kDa RGD-binding protein has the characteristics of a receptor for IPI-O. The IPI-O protein also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions in plasmolysed A. thaliana cells, whereas IPI-O proteins mutated in the RGD motif (D56A and D56E) did not.

  16. Entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein in high-performance affinity columns for drug-protein binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Cong; Jackson, Abby; Vargas-Badilla, John; Li, Rong; Rada, Giana; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Hage, David S

    2016-05-15

    A slurry-based method was developed for the entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) for use in high-performance affinity chromatography to study drug interactions with this serum protein. Entrapment was achieved based on the physical containment of AGP in hydrazide-activated porous silica supports and by using mildly oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. The conditions needed for this process were examined and optimized. When this type of AGP column was used in binding studies, the association equilibrium constant (Ka) measured by frontal analysis at pH 7.4 and 37°C for carbamazepine with AGP was found to be 1.0 (±0.5)×10(5)M(-1), which agreed with a previously reported value of 1.0 (±0.1)×10(5)M(-1). Binding studies based on zonal elution were conducted for several other drugs with such columns, giving equilibrium constants that were consistent with literature values. An entrapped AGP column was also used in combination with a column containing entrapped HSA in a screening assay format to compare the binding of various drugs to AGP and HSA. These results also agreed with previous data that have been reported in literature for both of these proteins. The same entrapment method could be extended to other proteins and to the investigation of additional types of drug-protein interactions. Potential applications include the rapid quantitative analysis of biological interactions and the high-throughput screening of drug candidates for their binding to a given protein.

  17. High affinity recognition of a Phytophthora protein by Arabidopsis via an RGD motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senchou, V.; Weide, R.L.; Carrasco, A.; Bouyssou, H.; Pont-Lezica, R.; Govers, F.; Canut, H.

    2004-01-01

    The RGD tripeptide sequence, a cell adhesion motif present in several extracellular matrix proteins of mammalians, is involved in numerous plant processes. In plant-pathogen interactions, the RGD motif is believed to reduce plant defence responses by disrupting adhesions between the cell wall and pl

  18. High affinity human antibody fragments to dengue virus non-structural protein 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J Moreland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enzyme activities catalysed by flavivirus non-structural protein 3 (NS3 are essential for virus replication. They are distributed between the N-terminal protease domain in the first one-third and the C-terminal ATPase/helicase and nucleoside 5' triphosphatase domain which forms the remainder of the 618-aa long protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, dengue full-length NS3 protein with residues 49 to 66 of NS2B covalently attached via a flexible linker, was used as bait in biopanning with a naïve human Fab phage-display library. Using a range of truncated constructs spanning the NS2B cofactor region and the full-length NS3, 10 unique Fab were identified and characterized. Of these, monoclonal Fab 3F8 was shown to bind α3″ (residues 526 through 531 within subdomain III of the helicase domain. The antibody inhibits the ATPase and helicase activites of NS3 in biochemical assays and reduces DENV replication in HEK293 cells that were previously transfected with Fab 3F8 compared with mock transfected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Antibodies such as 3F8 are valuable tools for studying the molecular mechanisms of flaviviral replication and for the monospecific detection of replicating dengue virus in vivo.

  19. Capillary high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of proteins from affinity-purified plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingxin; Zhang, Wei; White, Michael A; Zhao, Yingming

    2003-08-01

    Proteomics analysis of plasma membranes is a potentially powerful strategy for the discovery of proteins involved in membrane remodeling under diverse cellular environments and identification of disease-specific membrane markers. A key factor for successful analysis is the preparation of plasma membrane fractions with low contamination from subcellular organelles. Here we report the characterization of plasma membrane prepared by an affinity-purification method, which involves biotinylation of cell-surface proteins and subsequent affinity enrichment with strepavidin beads. Western blotting analysis showed this method was able to achieve a 1600-fold relative enrichment of plasma membrane versus mitochondria and a 400-fold relative enrichment versus endoplasmic reticulum, two major contaminants in plasma membrane fractions prepared by conventional ultracentrifugation methods. Capillary-HPLC/MS analysis of 30 microg of affinity-purified plasma membrane proteins led to the identification of 918 unique proteins, which include 16.4% integral plasma membrane proteins and 45.5% cytosol proteins (including 8.6% membrane-associated proteins). Notable among the identified membrane proteins include 30 members of ras superfamily, receptors (e.g., EGF receptor, integrins), and signaling molecules. The low number of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria proteins (approximately 3.3% of the total) suggests the plasma membrane preparation has minimum contamination from these organelles. Given the importance of integral membrane proteins for drug design and membrane-associated proteins in the regulation cellular behaviors, the described approach will help expedite the characterization of plasma membrane subproteomes, identify signaling molecules, and discover therapeutic membrane-protein targets in diseases.

  20. Fragile X mental retardation protein recognition of G quadruplex structure per se is sufficient for high affinity binding to RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Medhavi; Menon, Lakshmi; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2008-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is caused by the expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene. The abnormal expansion of the CGG repeat causes hypermethylation and subsequent silencing of the fmr1 gene, resulting in the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to use its arginine-glycine-glycine rich region (RGG box) to bind to messenger RNAs that form G quadruplex structures. Several studies reported that the G quadruplex RNA recognition alone is not sufficient for FMRP RGG box binding and that an additional stem and/or a G quadruplex-stem junction region may also be important in recognition. In this study we have used biophysical methods such as fluorescence, UV, CD and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that the recognition of the RNA G quadruplex structure per se, in the absence of a stem region, is sufficient for the FMRP high affinity and specific binding. These findings indicate that the presence of a stem structure in some of the FMRP G quadruplex forming mRNAs is not a requirement for protein recognition as previously believed, but rather for the proper formation of the correct RNA G quadruplex structure recognized by FMRP.

  1. Is the LysM domain of L. monocytogenes p60 protein suitable for engineering a protein with high peptidoglycan binding affinity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minfeng; Yang, Jing; Guo, Minliang

    2016-11-01

    Lysin motif (LysM) is a highly conserved carbohydrate binding module that is widely present in proteins from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. LysM domains from many LysM-containing proteins can be taken out of their natural context and retain their ability to bind peptidoglycan. Therefore, LysM has enormous potential for applications in both industry and medicine. This potential has stimulated an intensive search for LysM modules with different evolutionary origins. The p60 protein (Lm-p60) is an NlpC/P60-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase secreted by Listeria monocytogenes. The N-terminus of Lm-p60 contains 2 LysM modules separated by an SH3 module. Our recent study of Lm-p60 demonstrates that the N-terminal half of Lm-p60, comprised of 2 LysM and 1 SH3 module, is able to recognize and bind peptidoglycan. The LysM domain of Lm-p60 contains only 2 LysM modules, which is the minimum number of LysM modules in most NlpC/P60-containing proteins, but it shows strong affinity for peptidoglycan. Moreover, these 2 LysM modules have only 38.64% similarity to each other. These data allowed us to conclude that the 2 LysM modules from Lm-p60 have different evolutionary origins, suggesting that they are suitable candidate peptidoglycan-binding modules for protein engineering in order to create a protein with a high binding affinity to peptidoglycan.

  2. Estimating affinities of calcium ions to proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Franke

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Franke, Julia Herfurth, Daniel HoffmannDepartment of Bioinformatics/Centre for Medical Biotechnology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, GermanyAbstract: Ca2+-ions have a range of affinities to different proteins, depending on the various functions of these proteins. This makes the determination of Ca2+-protein affinities an interesting subject for functional studies. We have investigated the performance of two methods – Fold-X and AutoDock vina – in the prediction of Ca2+-protein affinities. Both methods, although based on different energy functions, showed virtually the same correlation with experimental affinities. Guided by insight from experiment, we further derived a simple linear model based on thesolvent accessible surface of Ca2+ that had practically the same performance in terms of absolute errors as the more complex docking methods.Keywords: metal ions, binding, free energy, crystal structure, solvent accessible surface

  3. Estimating affinities of calcium ions to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Stefan; Herfurth, Julia; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+-ions have a range of affinities to different proteins, depending on the various functions of these proteins. This makes the determination of Ca2+-protein affinities an interesting subject for functional studies. We have investigated the performance of two methods – Fold-X and AutoDock vina – in the prediction of Ca2+-protein affinities. Both methods, although based on different energy functions, showed virtually the same correlation with experimental affinities. Guided by insight from experiment, we further derived a simple linear model based on the solvent accessible surface of Ca2+ that had practically the same performance in terms of absolute errors as the more complex docking methods. PMID:21918621

  4. High performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) as a high-throughput screening tool in drug discovery to study drug-plasma protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuignier, Karine; Guillarme, Davy; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Schappler, Julie

    2013-02-23

    Drug-plasma protein binding is an important parameter that, together with other physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity and pK(a), greatly influences drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME). Therefore, it is important for pharmaceutical companies to develop a rapid screening assay to examine plasma protein binding during the early stages of the drug discovery process. Human serum albumin (HSA) and α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) are the most important plasma proteins that are capable of binding drugs. In this work, an automated and high-throughput (high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) with commercial HSA and AGP columns to evaluate drug-plasma protein interactions for drug screening. A generic gradient was used throughout the study to separate drugs that were weakly and tightly bound to HSA and AGP. To accelerate the analysis time, the system was calibrated in a single run by pooling reference compounds without overloading the column. For both HSA and AGP studies, the developed methods were successfully transferred from HPAC-UV to HPAC-MS with single quadrupole MS detection and ammonium acetate, pH 7.0 as a volatile mobile phase. The MS detection enhanced the sensitivity, selectivity, and throughput of the method by pooling unknown compounds. For HSA analyses, the binding percentages obtained using HPAC were well correlated with the binding percentages from the literature. This method was also able to rank compounds based on their affinity for HSA. Concerning the AGP analyses, the quality of the correlation between the binding percentages obtained in HPAC and those from the literature was weaker. However, the method was able to classify compounds into weak, medium, and strong binders and rank compounds based on their affinity for AGP.

  5. High-affinity binding of southern African HIV type 1 subtype C envelope protein, gp120, to the CCR5 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Bernhard J; Coetsee, Marla; Van Der Watt, Pauline; Chan, Mei-Chi; Sperling, Karin M; Katz, Arieh A; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2008-12-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the fastest spreading subtype worldwide and predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor, showing minimal transition to the X4 phenotype. This raises the possibility that envelope proteins of HIV-1 subtype C have structural features that favor interaction with CCR5. Preference for CCR5 could arise from enhanced affinity of HIV-1 subtype C for CCR5. To test this, we have characterized the interaction of gp120 envelope proteins from HIV-1 subtype C clones with CD4 and CCR5. Recombinant gp120 proteins from isolates of HIV-1 subtypes B and C were expressed, purified, and assessed in a CD4 binding assay and a CCR5 chemokine competition binding assay. All gp120 proteins bound to CD4-expressing cells, except one, 97ZA347ts, which had Arg substituted for the Cys239 in the conserved C2 loop. Reconstitution of Cys239, using site-directed mutagenesis, restored CD4 binding, while introducing Arg or Ser into position 239 of the functional Du151 gp120 protein abrogated CD4 binding. This shows that the Cys228-Cys239 disulfide bond of gp120 is required for high-affinity binding to CD4. Recombinant gp120 proteins from two HIV-1 subtype B clones bound CCR5 in the presence of CD4, while gp120 from the X4-tropic, HxB2, clone did not bind CCR5. gp120 from two functional HIV-1 subtype C clones, Du151 and MOLE1, bound CCR5 with high affinity in the presence of CD4 and Du151 showed significant CCR5 binding in the absence of CD4. A gp120 from a nonfunctional subtype C clone had lower affinity for CCR5. These results indicate that HIV-1 subtype C proteins have high affinity for CCR5 with variable dependence on CD4.

  6. Negative Cooperativity and High Affinity in Chitooligosaccharide Binding by a Mycobacterium smegmatis Protein Containing LysM and Lectin Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Dhabaleswar; Mishra, Padmanabh; Vijayan, Mamannamana; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2016-01-12

    LysM domains have been recognized in bacteria and eukaryotes as carbohydrate-binding protein modules, but the mechanism of their binding to chitooligosaccharides has been underexplored. Binding of a Mycobacterium smegmatis protein containing a lectin (MSL) and one LysM domain to chitooligosaccharides has been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence titration that demonstrate the presence of two binding sites of nonidentical affinities per dimeric MSL-LysM molecule. The affinity of the molecule for chitooligosaccharides correlates with the length of the carbohydrate chain. Its binding to chitooligosaccharides is characterized by negative cooperativity in the interactions of the two domains. Apparently, the flexibility of the long linker that connects the LysM and MSL domains plays a facilitating role in this recognition. The LysM domain in the MSL-LysM molecule, like other bacterial domains but unlike plant LysM domains, recognizes equally well peptidoglycan fragments as well as chitin polymers. Interestingly, in the case presented here, two LysM domains are enough for binding to peptidoglycan in contrast to the three reportedly required by the LysM domains of Bacillus subtilis and Lactococcus lactis. Also, the affinity of the MSL-LysM molecule for chitooligosaccharides is higher than that of LysM-chitooligosaccharide interactions reported so far.

  7. Affinity filtration coupled with capillary-based affinity purification for the isolation of protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M S; Sheikh, Q I; Hill, R; Brown, P E; Dickman, M J; Tzokov, S B; Rice, D W; Gjerde, D T; Hornby, D P

    2013-08-01

    The isolation of complex macromolecular assemblies at the concentrations required for structural analysis represents a major experimental challenge. Here we present a method that combines the genetic power of site-specific recombination in order to selectively "tag" one or more components of a protein complex with affinity-based rapid filtration and a final step of capillary-based enrichment. This modified form of tandem affinity purification produces highly purified protein complexes at high concentrations in a highly efficient manner. The application of the method is demonstrated for the yeast Arp2/3 heptameric protein complex involved in mediating reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  8. Artificial Affinity Proteins as Ligands of Immunoglobulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mouratou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of natural proteins are known to have affinity and specificity for immunoglobulins. Some of them are widely used as reagents for detection or capture applications, such as Protein G and Protein A. However, these natural proteins have a defined spectrum of recognition that may not fit specific needs. With the development of combinatorial protein engineering and selection techniques, it has become possible to design artificial affinity proteins with the desired properties. These proteins, termed alternative scaffold proteins, are most often chosen for their stability, ease of engineering and cost-efficient recombinant production in bacteria. In this review, we focus on alternative scaffold proteins for which immunoglobulin binders have been identified and characterized.

  9. Affinity chromatography with pseudobiospecific ligands on high-performance supports for purification of proteins of biotechnological interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Iannucci

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available High-performance affinity matrices were obtained by attaching pseudobiospecific ligands to hollow-fibre membranes. The neutral protease contained in FlavourzymeTM was purified to homogeneity with Yellow 4R-HE affinity hollow-fibre membranes. Immobilisation of Red HE-3B allowed purification of a milk-clotting enzyme obtained by solid-state culture of Mucor bacilliformis. Copper immobilisation through iminodiacetic acid allowed fractionation of Biocon Bioconcentrated PlusTM to separate the pectinesterase-containing fraction. The productivity of the developed processes - 1900, 94 and 750 U/ml.min, respectively - was 10- to 15-fold higher than that achieved with the same ligands immobilised on agarose-based soft gels, mainly due to the shortening of the purification processes.

  10. On-column entrapment of alpha1-acid glycoprotein for studies of drug-protein binding by high-performance affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Bi, Cong; Koke, Michelle; Jackson, Abby; Hage, David S

    2016-08-01

    An on-column approach for protein entrapment was developed to immobilize alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) for drug-protein binding studies based on high-performance affinity chromatography. Soluble AGP was physically entrapped by using microcolumns that contained hydrazide-activated porous silica and by employing mildly oxidized glycogen as a capping agent. Three on-column entrapment methods were evaluated and compared to a previous slurry-based entrapment method. The final selected method was used to prepare 1.0 cm × 2.1 mm I.D. affinity microcolumns that contained up to 21 (±4) μg AGP and that could be used over the course of more than 150 sample applications. Frontal analysis and zonal elution studies were performed on these affinity microcolumns to examine the binding of various drugs with the entrapped AGP. Site-selective competition studies were also conducted for these drugs. The results showed good agreement with previous observations for these drug-protein systems and with binding constants that have been reported in the literature. The entrapment method developed in this study should be useful for future work in the area of personalized medicine and in the high-throughput screening of drug interactions with AGP or other proteins. Graphical abstract On-column protein entrapment using a hydrazide-activated support and oxidized glycogen as a capping agent.

  11. A high affinity RIM-binding protein/Aplip1 interaction prevents the formation of ectopic axonal active zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthias; Böhme, Mathias A; Driller, Jan H; Babikir, Husam; Mampell, Malou M; Rey, Ulises; Ramesh, Niraja; Matkovic, Tanja; Holton, Nicole; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Göttfert, Fabian; Kamin, Dirk; Quentin, Christine; Klinedinst, Susan; Andlauer, Till FM; Hell, Stefan W; Collins, Catherine A; Wahl, Markus C; Loll, Bernhard; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) fuse at active zones (AZs) covered by a protein scaffold, at Drosophila synapses comprised of ELKS family member Bruchpilot (BRP) and RIM-binding protein (RBP). We here demonstrate axonal co-transport of BRP and RBP using intravital live imaging, with both proteins co-accumulating in axonal aggregates of several transport mutants. RBP, via its C-terminal Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains, binds Aplip1/JIP1, a transport adaptor involved in kinesin-dependent SV transport. We show in atomic detail that RBP C-terminal SH3 domains bind a proline-rich (PxxP) motif of Aplip1/JIP1 with submicromolar affinity. Pointmutating this PxxP motif provoked formation of ectopic AZ-like structures at axonal membranes. Direct interactions between AZ proteins and transport adaptors seem to provide complex avidity and shield synaptic interaction surfaces of pre-assembled scaffold protein transport complexes, thus, favouring physiological synaptic AZ assembly over premature assembly at axonal membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06935.001 PMID:26274777

  12. A soluble, high-affinity, interleukin-4-binding protein is present in the biological fluids of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Botran, R.; Vitetta, E.S. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) play a key role in the regulation of immune responses, but little is known about how their multiple activities are regulated in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that an IL-4-binding protein (IL-4BP) is constitutively present in the biological fluids of mice (serum, ascites fluid, and urine). Binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to the IL-4BP is specific and saturable and can be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled IL-4 but not IL-2. The IL-4BP binds IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 receptor (K{sub d} {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M) and has a molecular mass of 30-40 kDa and pI values of 3.6-4.8. IL-4BP-containing biological fluids or purified IL-4BP competitively inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to mouse T or B cells and inhibit the biological activity of IL-4 but not IL-2. The serum levels of IL-4BP in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice are lower than those of normal mice. The above findings suggest that IL-4BP plays an important immunoregulatory role in vivo.

  13. Aluminium fluoride and magnesium, activators of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins, affect high-affinity binding of the fungal toxin fusicoccin to the fusicoccin-binding protein in oat root plasma membranes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, A.H.; Van der Molen, G.W.; Prins, H.B.A.; Korthout, H.A.A.J.; van der Hoeven, P.C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The fusicoccin-binding protein was solubilised from purified oat root plasma membranes. The solubilised protein retained full binding activity, provided that protease inhibitors were included. Sodium fluoride reduced the high-affinity [H-3]fusicoccin binding to almost zero in a concentration-depende

  14. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  15. Separation of Proteins by Electrophoretic Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邺韶骅; 刘铮; 丁富新; 袁乃驹

    1999-01-01

    A new kind of electrophoretic affinity chromatography (EAC) for bioseparation was proposed,Separation by EAC was conducted in a multicompartment electrolyzer in which the affinity gel media were packed in one of the central compartments.The presence of an electric field accelerated the migration of proteins inside the gel matrix during adsorption and descrption processes,This led to the increase of the overall speed of separation,The present study was focused on the effect of the strength of the electric field on adsorption and desorption processes.

  16. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research.

  17. An engineered high affinity Fbs1 carbohydrate binding protein for selective capture of N-glycans and N-glycopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minyong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Duke, Rebecca M.; Ruse, Cristian I.; Dai, Nan; Taron, Christopher H.; Samuelson, James C.

    2017-01-01

    A method for selective and comprehensive enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides was developed to facilitate detection of micro-heterogeneity of N-glycosylation. The method takes advantage of the inherent properties of Fbs1, which functions within the ubiquitin-mediated degradation system to recognize the common core pentasaccharide motif (Man3GlcNAc2) of N-linked glycoproteins. We show that Fbs1 is able to bind diverse types of N-linked glycomolecules; however, wild-type Fbs1 preferentially binds high-mannose-containing glycans. We identified Fbs1 variants through mutagenesis and plasmid display selection, which possess higher affinity and improved recovery of complex N-glycomolecules. In particular, we demonstrate that the Fbs1 GYR variant may be employed for substantially unbiased enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides from human serum. Most importantly, this highly efficient N-glycopeptide enrichment method enables the simultaneous determination of N-glycan composition and N-glycosites with a deeper coverage (compared to lectin enrichment) and improves large-scale N-glycoproteomics studies due to greatly reduced sample complexity. PMID:28534482

  18. An engineered high affinity Fbs1 carbohydrate binding protein for selective capture of N-glycans and N-glycopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minyong; Shi, Xiaofeng; Duke, Rebecca M; Ruse, Cristian I; Dai, Nan; Taron, Christopher H; Samuelson, James C

    2017-05-23

    A method for selective and comprehensive enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides was developed to facilitate detection of micro-heterogeneity of N-glycosylation. The method takes advantage of the inherent properties of Fbs1, which functions within the ubiquitin-mediated degradation system to recognize the common core pentasaccharide motif (Man3GlcNAc2) of N-linked glycoproteins. We show that Fbs1 is able to bind diverse types of N-linked glycomolecules; however, wild-type Fbs1 preferentially binds high-mannose-containing glycans. We identified Fbs1 variants through mutagenesis and plasmid display selection, which possess higher affinity and improved recovery of complex N-glycomolecules. In particular, we demonstrate that the Fbs1 GYR variant may be employed for substantially unbiased enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides from human serum. Most importantly, this highly efficient N-glycopeptide enrichment method enables the simultaneous determination of N-glycan composition and N-glycosites with a deeper coverage (compared to lectin enrichment) and improves large-scale N-glycoproteomics studies due to greatly reduced sample complexity.

  19. Contributions of the S100A9 C-terminal tail to high-affinity Mn(II) chelation by the host-defense protein human calprotectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Nakashige, Toshiki G; Gaillard, Aleth; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-27

    Human calprotectin (CP) is an antimicrobial protein that coordinates Mn(II) with high affinity in a Ca(II)-dependent manner at an unusual histidine-rich site (site 2) formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface. We present a 16-member CP mutant family where mutations in the S100A9 C-terminal tail (residues 96-114) are employed to evaluate the contributions of this region, which houses three histidines and four acidic residues, to Mn(II) coordination at site 2. The results from analytical size-exclusion chromatography, Mn(II) competition titrations, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy establish that the C-terminal tail is essential for high-affinity Mn(II) coordination by CP in solution. The studies indicate that His103 and His105 (HXH motif) of the tail complete the Mn(II) coordination sphere in solution, affording an unprecedented biological His6 site. These solution studies are in agreement with a Mn(II)-CP crystal structure reported recently (Damo, S. M.; et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2013, 110, 3841). Remarkably high-affinity Mn(II) binding is retained when either H103 or H105 are mutated to Ala, when the HXH motif is shifted from positions 103-105 to 104-106, and when the human tail is substituted by the C-terminal tail of murine S100A9. Nevertheless, antibacterial activity assays employing human CP mutants reveal that the native disposition of His residues is important for conferring growth inhibition against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Within the S100 family, the S100A8/S100A9 heterooligomer is essential for providing high-affinity Mn(II) binding; the S100A7, S100A9(C3S), S100A12, and S100B homodimers do not exhibit such Mn(II)-binding capacity.

  20. VNARs: An Ancient and Unique Repertoire of Molecules That Deliver Small, Soluble, Stable and High Affinity Binders of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Barelle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At 420 million years, the variable domain of New Antigen Receptors or VNARs are undoubtedly the oldest (and smallest antigen binding single domains identified in the vertebrate kingdom. Their role as an integral part of the adaptive immune system of sharks has been well established and has served to provide a greater understanding of the evolution of humoral immunity; their cellular components and processes as well as the underlying genetic organization and molecular control mechanisms. Intriguingly, unlike the variable domain of the camelid heavy chain antibodies or VHH, VNARs do not conform to all of the characteristic properties of classical antibodies with an ancestral origin that clearly distinguishes them from true immunoglobulin antibodies. However, this uniqueness of their origin only adds to their potential as next generation therapeutic biologics with their structural and functional attributes and commercial freedom all enhancing their profile and current success. In fact their small size, remarkable stability, molecular flexibility and solubility, together with their high affinity and selectivity for target, all reinforce the potential of these domains as drug candidates. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the existing basic biology of these unique domains, to highlight the drug-like properties of VNARs and describe current progress in their journey towards the clinic.

  1. Impaired signaling via the high-affinity IgE receptor in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-deficient mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivniouk, Vadim I; Snapper, Scott B; Kettner, Alexander; Alenius, Harri; Laouini, Dhafer; Falet, Hervé; Hartwig, John; Alt, Frederick W; Geha, Raif S

    2003-12-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is the product of the gene deficient in boys with X-linked Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. We assessed the role of WASP in signaling through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) using WASP-deficient mice. IgE-dependent degranulation and cytokine secretion were markedly diminished in bone marrow-derived mast cells from WASP-deficient mice. Upstream signaling events that include FcepsilonRI-triggered total protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation of FcepsilonRIbeta and Syk were not affected by WASP deficiency. However, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma and Ca(2+) mobilization were diminished. IgE-dependent activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, cell spreading and redistribution of cellular F-actin in mast cells were reduced in the absence of WASP. We conclude that WASP regulates FcepsilonRI-mediated granule exocytosis, cytokine production and cytoskeletal changes in mast cells.

  2. Dyes with high affinity for polylactide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang He; Shu Fen Zhang; Bing Tao Tang; Li Li Wang; Jin Zong Yang

    2007-01-01

    Attempts were made to develop dyes with high affinity for polylactide as an alternative to the existent commercial disperse dyes.The dyes synthesized according to the affinity concept of dye to polylactide exhibited excellent dyeing properties on polylactide compared with the commercial disperse dyes.

  3. Peptide-Based Protein Capture Agents with High Affinity, Selectivity, and Stability as Antibody Replacements in Biodetection Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    agent, peptide-based sensors, biological detection, antibody replacements 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...recombinant protein to that of Ricin, the F1 surface protein of Yersinia pestis required for effective internalization into cells [ref], the neurotoxin...ligand in addition to PA, including MS2 coat protein (MS2CP), Rivax, the F1 surface protein of Yersinia pestis, HS33A of Clostridium botulinum, and the

  4. Comparison of protein A affinity sorbents III. Life time study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Rainer; Shimahara, Kazumichi; Steindl, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2006-01-13

    Protein A affinity chromatography is a popular purification method for immunoglobulins applied at various scales, ranging from micro-tube up to 1000l column format. Three novel high capacity protein A affinity chromatography media have been subjected to a lifetime study using 50 consecutive purification cycles of a cell culture supernatant (CCS) containing a monoclonal antibody. Chromatographic conditions followed protocols used in industrial antibody processing, including stripping and cleaning-in-place of the resins. For all three media, no significant loss of purification performance (measured by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical size-exclusion chromatography (SEC)) could be observed over 50 cycles. Eluate samples were analyzed for leaked protein A and host cell protein (HCP) content. MabSelect SuRe, the first protein A affinity medium compatible with alkaline regeneration conditions, exhibited the lowest leakage levels, in the range of 1-3 ppm. For the media MabSelect Xtra and ProSep-vA Ultra, leakage levels were in the range of 30-40 ppm. Host cell protein content of eluates from MabSelect Xtra and SuRe were between 300 and 700 ppm, whereas for ProSep-vA Ultra 3000-4000 ppm was achieved.

  5. LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein of Medicago truncatula, interacts with LYK3, a key symbiotic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegmann, Judith; Jauneau, Alain; Pichereaux, Carole; Rosenberg, Charles; Gasciolli, Virginie; Timmers, Antonius C J; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Cullimore, Julie; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2016-05-01

    LYR3, LYK3, and NFP are lysin motif-containing receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs) from Medicago truncatula, involved in perception of symbiotic lipo-chitooligosaccharide (LCO) signals. Here, we show that LYR3, a high-affinity LCO-binding protein, physically interacts with LYK3, a key player regulating symbiotic interactions. In vitro, LYR3 is phosphorylated by the active kinase domain of LYK3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging/Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM/FRET) experiments in tobacco protoplasts show that the interaction between LYR3 and LYK3 at the plasma membrane is disrupted or inhibited by addition of LCOs. Moreover, LYR3 attenuates the cell death response, provoked by coexpression of NFP and LYK3 in tobacco leaves.

  6. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua;

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous......-level tagged proteins. Isolations of triple-FLAG and GFP-tagged fusion proteins involved in RNA metabolism are presented.......An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  7. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (A...

  8. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and the...

  9. Glycation of the high affinity NGF-receptor and RAGE leads to reduced ligand affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennmann, Dorit; Kannicht, Christoph; Fisseau, Claudine; Jacobs, Kathleen; Navarette-Santos, Alexander; Hofmann, Britt; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2015-09-01

    AGEs are posttranslational modifications generated by irreversible non-enzymatic crosslinking reactions between sugars and proteins - a reaction referred to as glycation. Glycation, a feature of ageing, can lead to non-degradable and less functional proteins and enzymes and can additionally induce inflammation and further pathophysiological processes such as neurodegeneration. In this study we investigated the influence of glycation on the high affinity NGF-receptor TrkA and the AGE-receptor RAGE. We quantified the binding affinity of the TrkA-receptor and RAGE to their ligands by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and compared these to the binding affinity after glycation. At the same time, we established a glycation procedure using SPR. We found that glycation of TrkA reduced the affinity to NGF by a factor of three, which could be shown to lead to a reduction of NGF-dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Glycation of RAGE reduced binding affinity of AGEs by 10-fold.

  10. Receptor-associated protein (RAP) has two high-affinity binding sites for the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP): consequences for the chaperone functions of RAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Schar, Christine; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-06-26

    RAP (receptor-associated protein) is a three domain 38 kDa ER (endoplasmic reticulum)-resident protein that is a chaperone for the LRP (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein). Whereas RAP is known to compete for binding of all known LRP ligands, neither the location, the number of binding sites on LRP, nor the domains of RAP involved in binding is known with certainty. We have systematically examined the binding of each of the three RAP domains (D1, D2 and D3) to tandem and triple CRs (complement-like repeats) that span the principal ligand-binding region, cluster II, of LRP. We found that D3 binds with low nanomolar affinity to all (CR)2 species examined. Addition of a third CR domain increases the affinity for D3 slightly. A pH change from 7.4 to 5.5 gave only a 6-fold increase in Kd for D3 at 37 degrees C, whereas temperature change from 22 degrees C to 37 degrees C has a similar small effect on affinity, raising questions about the recently proposed D3-destabilization mechanism of RAP release from LRP. Surprisingly, and in contrast to literature suggestions, D1 and D2 also bind to most (CR)2 and (CR)3 constructs with nanomolar affinity. Although this suggested that there might be three high-affinity binding sites in RAP for LRP, studies with intact RAP showed that only two binding sites are available in the intact chaperone. These findings suggest a new model for RAP to function as a folding chaperone and also for the involvement of YWTD domains in RAP release from LRP in the Golgi.

  11. Assessment of GM-CSF receptors by real-time RT-PCR on cell lines expressing high and low affinity receptors and their relation to cytotoxic effect of chimeric protein (StxA1-GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibi Roudkenar M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunotoxins, which are composed of both the cell targeting and the cell killing moieties are the new approach for targeted therapy of human disease .In all immunotoxins that GM-CSF has been used as cell targeting; only cell lines expressing high affinity receptor have been used for cytotoxicity studies. In the present study, various cell lines expressing high and low affinity receptors were used for assessment of the cytotoxic effect of hybrid chimeric protein. The expression of GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR was quantified by real-time RT- PCR. The cell lines K562 and THP1 expressing high affinity receptor and MC-7, PC-3 and DU145 expressing low affinity receptor were used for this study. The chimeric hybrid protein was found to be toxic for various cell lines used in this investigation and cytotoxicity was more effective in cell lines bearing high affinity receptors. Overall, our results showed that the recombinant hybrid protein could have wide range of application on various cancer cell lines even cells bearing low affinity receptors for GM-CSF.

  12. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  13. A C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas serves as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin with high binding affinity to LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Li, Hui; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Sun, Jinsheng; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    C1q proteins serve as pattern recognition receptors and involve in the pathogen recognition and complement pathway activation. In the present study, a novel C1q domain containing protein from Crassostrea gigas (designated CgC1qDC-1) was isolated by liposaccharide-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 gene was determined by performing a homologous search of eight tryptic peptides identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS against the genome of C. gigas. The coding sequence of CgC1qDC-1 was of 387 bp encoding a polypeptide of 128 amino acids containing a typical globular C1q domain. The globular C1q domain possessed eight β strands with a jelly-roll topology structure, which was similar to the structure of human gC1q domain. The mRNA transcripts of CgC1qDC-1 were dominantly expressed in mantle and hemocytes, while low expressed in hepatopancreas, gonad, gill and muscle. The expression level of CgC1qDC-1 increased drastically at 6 h after Vibrio splendidus stimulation, and then gradually fell to the normal level at about 24 h. ELISA assay quantified that CgC1qDC-1 bound to LPS with high binding affinity (Kd = 0.09 × 10(-6) M). Moreover, CgC1qDC-1 significantly enhanced the phagocytosis of oyster hemocytes towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. splendidus. These results collectively indicated that CgC1qDC-1 could serve as pattern recognition receptor and opsonin in the innate immune response against invading Gram-negative bacteria.

  14. Glucose Transport in the Extremely Thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus Involves a High-Affinity Membrane-Integrated Binding Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Sonja-V.; Elferink, Marieke G.L.; Charlebois, Robert L.; Sensen, Christoph W.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1999-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus grows optimally at 80°C and pH 2.5 to 3.5 on carbon sources such as yeast extracts, tryptone, and various sugars. Cells rapidly accumulate glucose. This transport activity involves a membrane-bound glucose-binding protein that interacts with its substrate with

  15. Tuning the Protein Corona of Hydrogel Nanoparticles: The Synthesis of Abiotic Protein and Peptide Affinity Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-06-21

    Nanomaterials, when introduced into a complex, protein-rich environment, rapidly acquire a protein corona. The type and amount of proteins that constitute the corona depend significantly on the synthetic identity of the nanomaterial. For example, hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs) such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPAm) have little affinity for plasma proteins; in contrast, carboxylated poly(styrene) NPs acquire a dense protein corona. This range of protein adsorption suggests that the protein corona might be "tuned" by controlling the chemical composition of the NP. In this Account, we demonstrate that small libraries of synthetic polymer NPs incorporating a diverse pool of functional monomers can be screened for candidates with high affinity and selectivity to targeted biomacromolecules. Through directed synthetic evolution of NP compositions, one can tailor the protein corona to create synthetic organic hydrogel polymer NPs with high affinity and specificity to peptide toxins, enzymes, and other functional proteins, as well as to specific domains of large proteins. In addition, many NIPAm NPs undergo a change in morphology as a function of temperature. This transformation often correlates with a significant change in NP-biomacromolecule affinity, resulting in a temperature-dependent protein corona. This temperature dependence has been used to develop NP hydrogels with autonomous affinity switching for the protection of proteins from thermal stress and as a method of biomacromolecule purification through a selective thermally induced catch and release. In addition to temperature, changes in pH or buffer can also alter a NP protein corona composition, a property that has been exploited for protein purification. Finally, synthetic polymer nanoparticles with low nanomolar affinity for a peptide toxin were shown to capture and neutralize the toxin in the bloodstream of living mice. While the development of synthetic polymer alternatives to protein affinity reagents is

  16. The Glucose Sensor-Like Protein Hxs1 Is a High-Affinity Glucose Transporter and Required for Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gregory M.; Fahmy, Hany; Jiang, Linghuo; Xue, Chaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcus is a major fungal pathogen that frequently causes systemic infection in patients with compromised immunity. Glucose, an important signal molecule and the preferred carbon source for Cryptococcus, plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. Cryptococcus contains more than 50 genes sharing high sequence homology with hexose transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, there is no report on their function in glucose sensing or transport. In this study, we investigated two hexose transporter-like proteins (Hxs1 and Hxs2) in Cryptococcus that share the highest sequence identity with the glucose sensors Snf3 and Rgt2 in S. cerevisiae. The expression of HXS1 is repressed by high glucose, while the HXS2 expression is not regulated by glucose. Functional studies showed that Hxs1 is required for fungal resistance to oxidative stress and fungal virulence. The hxs1Δ mutant exhibited a significant reduction in glucose uptake activity, indicating that Hxs1 is required for glucose uptake. Heterologous expression of Cryptococcus HXS1 rendered the S. cerevisiae mutant lacking all 20 hexose transporters a high glucose uptake activity, demonstrating that Hxs1 functions as a glucose transporter. Heterologous expression of HXS1 in the snf3Δ rgt2Δ double mutant did not complement its growth in YPD medium containing the respiration inhibitor antimycin A, suggesting that Hxs1 may not function as a glucose sensor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Hxs1 is a high-affinity glucose transporter and required for fungal virulence. PMID:23691177

  17. High-throughput calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities: modification and adaptation of the MM-PBSA protocol to enterprise grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott P; Muchmore, Steven W

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a system for performing computations on an enterprise grid using a freely available package for grid computing that allows us to harvest unused CPU cycles off of employee desktop computers. By modifying the traditional formulation of Molecular Mechanics with Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) methodology, in combination with a coarse-grain parallelized implementation suitable for deployment onto our enterprise grid, we show that it is possible to produce rapid physics-based estimates of protein-ligand binding affinities that have good correlation to experimental data. This is demonstrated by examining the correlation of our calculated binding affinities to experimental data and also by comparison to the correlation obtained from the binding-affinity calculations using traditional MM-PBSA that are reported in the literature.

  18. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-09-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  19. HAMS: High-Affinity Mass Spectrometry Screening. A High-Throughput Screening Method for Identifying the Tightest-Binding Lead Compounds for Target Proteins with No False Positive Identifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaduwage, Kasun P.; Go, Eden P.; Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2016-11-01

    A major challenge in drug discovery is the identification of high affinity lead compounds that bind a particular target protein; these leads are typically identified by high throughput screens. Mass spectrometry has become a detection method of choice in drug screening assays because the target and the ligand need not be modified. Label-free assays are advantageous because they can be developed more rapidly than assays requiring labels, and they eliminate the risk of the label interfering with the binding event. However, in commonly used MS-based screening methods, detection of false positives is a major challenge. Here, we describe a detection strategy designed to eliminate false positives. In this approach, the protein and the ligands are incubated together, and the non-binders are separated for detection. Hits (protein binders) are not detectable by MS after incubation with the protein, but readily identifiable by MS when the target protein is not present in the incubation media. The assay was demonstrated using three different proteins and hundreds of non-inhibitors; no false positive hits were identified in any experiment. The assay can be tuned to select for ligands of a particular binding affinity by varying the quantity of protein used and the immobilization method. As examples, the method selectively detected inhibitors that have Ki values of 0.2 μM, 50 pM, and 700 pM. These findings demonstrate that the approach described here compares favorably with traditional MS-based screening methods.

  20. A NOVEL METAL CHELATE AFFINITY ADSORBENT FOR PROTEIN UPTAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYongjian; BAIShu; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this article,a spherical chitosan gel crosslinked by epichlorohydrin was prepared.It was then loaded with copper ions to produce a metal chelate affinity adsorbent for protein.The uptake of bovine serum albumin(BSA)by the affinity adsorbent was investigated.and the adsorption capacity for BSA as high as 40mg/g-wet beads was observed.The adsorption equilibrium data was well correlated by the Langmuir equation.The adsorption was considerably affected by pH.In additio.The amount of BSA adsorbed onto the beads decreased with the increasing of aqueous phase ionic strength,so adsorbed BAS can be desorbed by adjusting pH orionic strength of the solution.

  1. Affinity Crystallography: A New Approach to Extracting High-Affinity Enzyme Inhibitors from Natural Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguda, Adeleke H; Lavallee, Vincent; Cheng, Ping; Bott, Tina M; Meimetis, Labros G; Law, Simon; Nguyen, Nham T; Williams, David E; Kaleta, Jadwiga; Villanueva, Ivan; Davies, Julian; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2016-08-26

    Natural products are an important source of novel drug scaffolds. The highly variable and unpredictable timelines associated with isolating novel compounds and elucidating their structures have led to the demise of exploring natural product extract libraries in drug discovery programs. Here we introduce affinity crystallography as a new methodology that significantly shortens the time of the hit to active structure cycle in bioactive natural product discovery research. This affinity crystallography approach is illustrated by using semipure fractions of an actinomycetes culture extract to isolate and identify a cathepsin K inhibitor and to compare the outcome with the traditional assay-guided purification/structural analysis approach. The traditional approach resulted in the identification of the known inhibitor antipain (1) and its new but lower potency dehydration product 2, while the affinity crystallography approach led to the identification of a new high-affinity inhibitor named lichostatinal (3). The structure and potency of lichostatinal (3) was verified by total synthesis and kinetic characterization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of isolating and characterizing a potent enzyme inhibitor from a partially purified crude natural product extract using a protein crystallographic approach.

  2. Analysis of the conformation and thermal stability of the high-affinity IgE Fc receptor β chain polymorphic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Tomoyoshi; Takahashi, Teppei; Arikawa, Hajime; Era, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    The high-affinity IgE Fc receptor (FcεRI) β chain acts as a signal amplifier through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in its C-terminal intracellular region. Polymorphisms in FcεRI β have been linked to atopy, asthma, and allergies. We investigated the secondary structure, conformation, and thermal stability of FcεRI β polymorphic (β-L172I, β-L174V, and β-E228G) proteins. Polymorphisms did not affect the secondary structure and conformation of FcεRI β. However, we calculated Gibbs free energy of unfolding (ΔGunf) and significant differences were observed in ΔGunf values between the wild-type FcεRI β (β-WT) and β-E228G. These results suggested that β-E228G affected the thermal stability of FcεRI β. The role of β-E228G in biological functions and its involvement in allergic reactions have not yet been elucidated in detail; therefore, differences in the thermal stability of β-E228G may affect the function of FcεRI β.

  3. Affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed t...

  4. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  5. Molecular recognition in helix-loop-helix and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper domains. Design of repertoires and selection of high affinity ligands for natural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarapica, Roberta; Rosati, Jessica; Cesareni, Gianni; Nasi, Sergio

    2003-04-04

    Helix-loop-helix (HLH) and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (HLHZip) are dimerization domains that mediate selective pairing among members of a large transcription factor family involved in cell fate determination. To investigate the molecular rules underlying recognition specificity and to isolate molecules interfering with cell proliferation and differentiation control, we assembled two molecular repertoires obtained by directed randomization of the binding surface in these two domains. For this strategy we selected the Heb HLH and Max Zip regions as molecular scaffolds for the randomization process and displayed the two resulting molecular repertoires on lambda phage capsids. By affinity selection, many domains were isolated that bound to the proteins Mad, Rox, MyoD, and Id2 with different levels of affinity. Although several residues along an extended surface within each domain appeared to contribute to dimerization, some key residues critically involved in molecular recognition could be identified. Furthermore, a number of charged residues appeared to act as switch points facilitating partner exchange. By successfully selecting ligands for four of four HLH or HLHZip proteins, we have shown that the repertoires assembled are rather general and possibly contain elements that bind with sufficient affinity to any natural HLH or HLHZip molecule. Thus they represent a valuable source of ligands that could be used as reagents for molecular dissection of functional regulatory pathways.

  6. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  7. Displacement affinity chromatography of protein phosphatase one (PP1 complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourlay Robert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein phosphatase one (PP1 is a ubiquitously expressed, highly conserved protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates target protein serine and threonine residues. PP1 is localized to its site of action by interacting with targeting or regulatory proteins, a majority of which contains a primary docking site referred to as the RVXF/W motif. Results We demonstrate that a peptide based on the RVXF/W motif can effectively displace PP1 bound proteins from PP1 retained on the phosphatase affinity matrix microcystin-Sepharose. Subsequent co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that each identified binding protein was either a direct PP1 interactor or was in a complex that contains PP1. Our results have linked PP1 to numerous new nuclear functions and proteins, including Ki-67, Rif-1, topoisomerase IIα, several nuclear helicases, NUP153 and the TRRAP complex. Conclusion This modification of the microcystin-Sepharose technique offers an effective means of purifying novel PP1 regulatory subunits and associated proteins and provides a simple method to uncover a link between PP1 and additional cellular processes.

  8. APPLICATION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN-BINDING PROTEINS A, G, L IN THE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Sviatenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteins A, G and L are native or recombinant proteins of microbial origin that bind to mammalian immunoglobulins. Preferably recombinant variants of proteins A, G, L are used in biotechnology for affinity sorbents production. Сomparative characteristics of proteins A, G, L and affinity sorbents on the basis of them, advantages and disadvantages of these proteins application as ligands in the affinity chromatography are done. Analysis of proteins A, G, L properties is presented. Binding specificities and affinities of these proteins differ between species and antibody subclass. Protein А has high affinity to human IgG1, IgG2, IgG4, mouse IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3, goat and sheep IgG2, dog, cat, guinea pig, rabbit IgG. Protein G binds strongly to human, mouse, cow, goat, sheep and rabbit IgG. Protein L has ability of strong binding to immunoglobulin kappa-chains of human, mouse, rat and pig. Expediency of application of affinity chromatography with usage of sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are shown for isolation and purification of antibodies different classes. Previously mentioned method is used as an alternative to conventional methods of protein purification, such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interactions, metal affinity chromatography, ethanol precipitation due to simplicity in usage, possibility of one-step purification process, obtaining of proteins high level purity, multiuse at maintenance of proper storage and usage conditions. Affinity sorbents on the basis of immobilized proteins A, G, L are used not only for antibodies purification, but also for extraction of different antibodies fractions from blood serum.

  9. Affinity of Doripenem and Comparators to Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Doripenem, a parenteral carbapenem, exhibited high affinity for penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) and PBP3 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and PBP2 in Escherichia coli, the primary PBPs whose inhibition leads to cell death. This PBP affinity profile correlates with the broad-spectrum gram-negative activity observed with doripenem.

  10. 2-O-[2-(Methylthio)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide: An Analog of 2-O-[2-(Methoxy)ethyl]-Modified Oligonucleotide with Improved Protein Binding Properties and High Binding Affinity to Target RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, T.P.; Manoharan, M.; Fraser, A.S.; Kawasaki, A.M.; Lesnik, E.; Sioufi, N.; Leeds, J.M.; Teplova, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    A novel 2'-modification, 2'-O-[2-(methylthio)ethyl] or 2'-O-MTE, has been incorporated into oligonucleotides and evaluated for properties relevant to antisense activity. The results were compared with the previously characterized 2'-O-[2-(methoxy)ethyl] 2'-O-MOE modification. As expected, the 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides exhibited improved binding to human serum albumin compared to the 2'-O-MOE modified oligonucleotides. The 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides maintained high binding affinity to target RNA. Nuclease digestion of 2'-O-MTE oligonucleotides showed that they have limited resistance to exonuclease degradation. We analyzed the crystal structure of a decamer DNA duplex containing the 2'-O-MTE modifcation. Analysis of the crystal structure provides insight into the improved RNA binding affinity, protein binding affinity and limited resistance of 2'-O-MTE modified oligonucleotides to exonuclease degradation.

  11. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-08

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  12. Identification of native Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) proteins that bind to immobilized metal affinity chromatography under high imidazole conditions and use of 2D-DIGE to evaluate contamination pools with respect to recombinant protein expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlow, Patrick; Uechi, Guy T; Cardamone, John J; Sultana, Tamanna; Fruchtl, McKinzie; Beitle, Robert R; Ataai, Mohammad M

    2011-08-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a widely used purification tool for the production of active, soluble recombinant proteins. Escherichia coli proteins that routinely contaminate IMAC purifications have been characterized to date. The work presented here narrows that focus to the most problematic host proteins, those retaining nickel affinity under elevated imidazole conditions, using a single bind-and-elute step. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, a favored technique for resolving complex protein mixtures and evaluating their expression, here discerns variation in the soluble extract pools that are loaded in IMAC and the remaining contaminants with respect to varied levels of recombinant protein expression. Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase SlyD and catabolite activator protein (CAP) are here shown to be the most persistent contaminants and have greater prevalence at low target protein expression.

  13. The HLA-DP2 protein binds the immunodominant epitope from myelin basic protein, MBP85-99, with high affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B E; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Madsen, H O;

    2011-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant epitope for T-cell responses is assigned to the amino acid sequence MBP84-102, which binds to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR2a (DRB5*0101) and HLA-DR2b (DRB1*1501) of the HLA-DR2 haplotype...

  14. Affinity Purification of Protein Complexes Using TAP Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    This protocol is used for the isolation and analysis of protein complexes using the tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag system. The protocol describes the purification of a protein fused to a TAP tag comprised of two protein A domains and the calmodulin binding peptide separated by a TEV cleavage site. This is a powerful technique for rapid purification of protein complexes and the analysis of their stoichiometric composition, posttranslational modifications, structure, and functional activities. PMID:26096502

  15. Creating Protein Affinity Reagents by Combining Peptide Ligands on Synthetic DNA Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Berea A. R.; Diehnelt, Chris W.; Belcher, Paul; Greving, Matthew; Woodbury, Neal W.; Johnston, Stephen A.; Chaput, John C.

    2009-01-01

    A full understanding of the proteome will require ligands to all of the proteins encoded by genomes. While antibodies represent the principle affinity reagents used to bind proteins, their limitations have created a need for new ligands to large numbers of proteins. Here we propose a general concept to obtain protein affinity reagents that avoids animal immunization and iterative selection steps. Central to this process is the idea that small peptide libraries contain sequences that will bind to independent regions on a protein surface, and that these ligands can be combined on synthetic scaffolds to create high affinity bivalent reagents. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, an array of 4,000 unique 12-mer peptides was screened to identify sequences that bind to non-overlapping sites on the yeast regulatory protein Gal80. Individual peptide ligands were screened at different distances using a novel DNA linking strategy to identify the optimal peptide pair and peptide pair separation distance required to transform two weaker ligands into a single high affinity protein capture reagent. A synthetic antibody or synbody was created with 5 nM affinity to Gal80 that functions in conventional ELISA and pull-down assays. We validated our synthetic antibody approach by creating a second synbody to human transferrin. In both cases, we observed an increase in binding affinity of ∼1000-fold (ΔΔG = ∼4.1 kcal/mol) between the individual peptides and final bivalent synbody construct. PMID:19894711

  16. Protein purification by aminosquarylium cyanine dye-affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M S; Graça, V C; Reis, L V; Santos, P F; Almeida, P; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2013-12-01

    The most selective purification method for proteins and other biomolecules is affinity chromatography. This method is based on the unique biological-based specificity of the biomolecule-ligand interaction and commonly uses biological ligands. However, these ligands may present some drawbacks, mainly because of their cost and lability. Dye-affinity chromatography overcomes the limitations of biological ligands and is widely used owing to the low cost of synthetic dyes and to their resistance to biological and chemical degradation. In this work, immobilized aminosquarylium cyanine dyes are used in order to exploit affinity interactions with standard proteins such as lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin. These studies evaluate the affinity interactions occurring between the immobilized ligand and the different proteins, as a reflection of the sum of several molecular interactions, namely ionic, hydrophobic and van der Waals, spread throughout the structure, in a defined spatial manner. The results show the possibility of using an aminosquarylium cyanine dye bearing a N-hexyl pendant chain, with a ligand density of 1.8 × 10(-2) mmol of dye/g of chromatographic support, to isolate lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin from a mixture. The application of a decreasing ammonium sulfate gradient resulted in the recovery of lysozyme in the flowthrough. On the other hand, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin were retained, involving different interactions with the ligand. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential applicability of ligands such as aminosquarylium cyanine dyes for the separation and purification of proteins by affinity chromatography.

  17. Affinity Pull-Down of Proteins Using Anti-FLAG M2 Agarose Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    FLAG is an affinity tag widely used for rapid and highly specific one-step protein purification. Native elution of protein from anti-FLAG antibody resins allows the identification of protein and nucleic acid binding partners and functional analysis using biochemical activity assays. PMID:26096505

  18. Polysaccharide zeta-potentials and protein-affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comert, Fatih; Azarikia, Fatemeh; Dubin, Paul L

    2017-08-09

    The ζ-potential, a parameter typically obtained by model-dependent transformation of the measured electrophoretic mobility, is frequently used to understand polysaccharide-protein complexation. We tested the hypothesis that two anionic polysaccharides with identical ζ-potentials would show equal binding affinity to the protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG). We selected two polysaccharide polyelectrolytes (PE) with very different structures: hyaluronic acid (HA) and tragacanthin (TG). Highly precise (±0.1%) turbidimetric titrations were performed to determine critical pH values of complex formation; and PE ζ-potentials were measured for different ionic strengths I at those critical pH values. While phase boundaries (pHcvs. I) showed that HA binds to BLG more strongly (e.g. at a lower pH, for fixed I), comparisons made at fixed ζ-potential indicated that TG binds more strongly. The source of this contradiction is the effect of the bulky side chains of TG on its friction coefficient which diminishes its mobility and hence the resultant ζ-potential; while having a distinctly separate effect on the interaction between BLG and the carboxylated backbone of TG. Thus, unless the locus of the bound protein coincides with the shear plane, the ζ-potential does not directly contribute to the electrostatic PE-protein interaction.

  19. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  20. A high-affinity interaction with ADP-actin monomers underlies the mechanism and in vivo function of Srv2/cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Pieta K; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Kugler, Jamie; Moseley, James B; Almo, Steven C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP), also called Srv2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved actin monomer-binding protein that promotes cofilin-dependent actin turnover in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this function. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae CAP binds with strong preference to ADP-G-actin (Kd 0.02 microM) compared with ATP-G-actin (Kd 1.9 microM) and competes directly with cofilin for binding ADP-G-actin. Further, CAP blocks actin monomer addition specifically to barbed ends of filaments, in contrast to profilin, which blocks monomer addition to pointed ends of filaments. The actin-binding domain of CAP is more extensive than previously suggested and includes a recently solved beta-sheet structure in the C-terminus of CAP and adjacent sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we define evolutionarily conserved residues that mediate binding to ADP-G-actin and demonstrate that these activities are required for CAP function in vivo in directing actin organization and polarized cell growth. Together, our data suggest that in vivo CAP competes with cofilin for binding ADP-actin monomers, allows rapid nucleotide exchange to occur on actin, and then because of its 100-fold weaker binding affinity for ATP-actin compared with ADP-actin, allows other cellular factors such as profilin to take the handoff of ATP-actin and facilitate barbed end assembly.

  1. Effects of Midgut-Protein-Preparative and Ligand Binding Procedures on the Toxin Binding Characteristics of BT-R1, a Common High-Affinity Receptor in Manduca sexta for Cry1A Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Timothy P.; Francis, Brian R.; Maaty, Walid S. A.; Bulla, Lee A.

    1998-01-01

    The identity of the physiologically important Cry1A receptor protein(s) in the lepidopteran Manduca sexta has been a matter of dispute due to the multiple proteins which bind the Cry1Ac toxin. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac exhibit essentially identical toxicities toward M. sexta larvae and show a high degree of sequence and presumed structural identities. These similarities make it likely that there is a common mechanism of toxicity in these lepidopteran-specific toxins in terms of both mode of action and the receptor proteins through which these toxins exert their lepidopteran-specific toxicity. Investigators in our laboratory previously demonstrated that the cloned 210-kDa glycoprotein BT-R1 binds all three Cry1A toxins (T. P. Keeton and L. A. Bulla, Jr., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3419–3425, 1997). This protein remains a common binding protein even after being subjected to various midgut membrane preparation and processing protocols. The method used to isolate proteins from the M. sexta larval midgut in no significant way affects the results of ligand binding and vacuum blotting experiments, and we have been unable to detect specific, high-affinity binding of any Cry1A toxin to Cry1Ac binding proteins other than BT-R1. Alterations in blot substrate and blocking, hybridization, and washing buffers support these conclusions. Collectively, these results indicate that in M. sexta the cadherin-like BT-R1 protein is a common high-affinity receptor protein for the Cry1A family of toxins. PMID:9603829

  2. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O;

    1998-01-01

    degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  3. A linker peptide with high affinity towards silica-containing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunna, Anwar; Chi, Fei; Bergquist, Peter L

    2013-06-25

    A peptide sequence with affinity to silica-containing materials was fused to a truncated form of Streptococcus strain G148 Protein G. The resulting recombinant Linker-Protein G (LPG) was produced in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. It displayed high affinity towards two natural clinoptilolite zeolites. The LPG also displayed high binding affinity towards commercial-grade synthetic zeolite, silica and silica-containing materials. A commercial sample of the truncated Protein G and a basic protein, both without the linker, did not bind to natural or synthetic zeolites or silica. We conclude that the zeolite-binding affinity is mediated by the linker peptide sequence. As a consequence, these data may imply that the binding affinity is directed to the SiO2 component rather than to the atomic orientation on the zeolite crystal surface as previously assumed.

  4. Enzyme-amplified protein micorarray and a fluidic renewable surface fluorescence immunoassay for botulinum neurotoxin detection using high-affinity recombinant antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2006-06-16

    With the use of high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), two separate immunoassay platforms were developed for either the sensitive or the rapid detection of BoNT/A. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of BoNT in buffer and clinical fluids. This assay has the sensitivity to detect BoNT in diverse samples down to 14 fM (1.4 pg/mL). Using the recombinant monoclonal antibodies, a renewable surface microcolumn sensor was developed for the rapid detection of BoNT/A in an automated fluidic system. While the ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers an alternative to the mouse bioassay, the renewable surface assay has potential as a rapid screening assay for the analysis of complex environmental samples.

  5. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  6. Chelating peptide-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. A new concept in affinity chromatography for recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M C; Furman, T C; Ingolia, T D; Pidgeon, C

    1988-05-25

    We report our experimental results supporting the hypothesis that a specific metal-chelating peptide (CP) on the NH2 terminus of a protein can be used to purify that protein using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). The potential utility of this approach resides with recombinant proteins since the nucleotide sequence that codes for the protein can be extended to include codons for the chelating peptide and thereby generate the gene for a chimeric CP-protein that can be cloned, expressed, and affinity-purified with immobilized metal ions. The chelating peptide purification handle could then be removed chemically or enzymatically after purification has been achieved to generate a protein with the natural amino acid sequence. The feasibility of using a chelating peptide as a purification handle has been demonstrated using a leuteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog, 2-10 LHRH, which contains the previously identified chelating peptide, His-Trp, on the NH2 terminus. 2-10 LHRH had a high affinity for a Ni(II) IMAC column due to the NH2-terminal dipeptide sequence His-Trp, forming a coordination complex with Ni(II), whereas the controls, 3-10 LHRH and 4-10 LHRH, lacking the CP sequence, did not bind. Furthermore, 2-10 LHRH could be purified from a mixture of histidine-containing peptides on a Ni(II) IMAC column in one step. His-Trp proinsulin was used as a model of a recombinant CP-protein. The S-sulfonates of His-Trp-proinsulin and proinsulin were isolated from Escherichia coli engineered to overproduce these proteins as trpLE' fusion proteins. His-Trp-proinsulin(SSO3-)6 had a higher affinity for immobilized Ni(II) than proinsulin (SSO3-)6. Both proteins were eluted by decreasing the pH or by introducing a displacing ligand into the buffer. Ni(II) eluted from the column with much higher concentrations of displacing ligand than the proteins.

  7. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  8. The extrinsic PsbO protein modulates the oxidation/reduction rate of the exogenous Mn cation at the high-affinity Mn-binding site of Mn-depleted PSII membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, Boris K; Podkovirina, Tatiana E; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B

    2015-08-01

    The oxidation of exogenous Mn(II) cations at the high-affinity (HA) Mn-binding site in Mn-depleted photosystem II (PSII) membranes with or without the presence of the extrinsic PsbO polypeptide was studied by EPR. The six-lines EPR spectrum of Mn(II) cation disappears in the absence of the PsbO protein in membranes under illumination, but there was no effect when PSII preparations bound the PsbO protein. Our study demonstrates that such effect is determined by significant influence of the PsbO protein on the ratio between the rates of Mn oxidation and reduction at the HA site when the membranes are illuminated.

  9. Desired alteration of protein affinities: competitive selection of protein variants using yeast signal transduction machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misato Kaishima

    Full Text Available Molecules that can control protein-protein interactions (PPIs have recently drawn attention as new drug pipeline compounds. Here, we report a technique to screen desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. We previously constructed a screening system based on a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto lacking membrane localization ability. This ability, required for signal transmission, is restored by recruiting Gγcyto into the membrane only when the target protein interacts with an artificially membrane-anchored candidate protein, thereby allowing interacting partners (Gγ recruitment system to be searched and identified. In the present study, the Gγ recruitment system was altered by integrating the cytosolic expression of a third protein as a competitor to set a desirable affinity threshold. This enabled the reliable selection of both affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated protein variants. The presented approach may facilitate the development of therapeutic proteins that allow the control of PPIs.

  10. Chromatography on DEAE ion-exchange and Protein G affinity columns in tandem for the separation and purification of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y; Yan, Z; Huang, J

    2001-10-30

    A high-performance liquid-chromatographic method based on coupled DEAE anion-exchange and Protein G affinity columns has been developed for the simultaneous separation and purification of immunoglobulin G and albumin from mouse serum. The diluted mouse serum was injected directly into this system, and the proteins were eluted separately from the DEAE and Protein G columns, coupled in series, by the column-switching technique. The advantages of this method are that IgG and albumin can be separated and purified simultaneously, the expensive affinity column is protected from contamination by the impurities in the mouse serum, and it is fast, selective, robust, and reproducible.

  11. Affinity purification of copper chelating peptides from chickpea protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-05-16

    Chickpea protein hydrolysates obtained with alcalase and flavourzyme were used for purification of copper chelating peptides by affinity chromatography using copper immobilized on solid supports. The chelating activity of purified peptides was indirectly measured by the inhibition of beta-carotene oxidation in the presence of copper. Two protein hydrolysates, obtained after 10 and 100 min of hydrolysis, were the most inhibitory of beta-carotene oxidation. Purified copper chelating peptides from these protein hydrolysates contained 19.7 and 35.1% histidine, respectively, in comparison to 2.7 and 2.6% in the protein hydrolysates. Chelating peptides from hydrolysate obtained after 10 min of hydrolysis were the most antioxidative being 8.3 times more antioxidative than the hydrolysate, while chelating peptides purified from protein hydrolysate obtained after 100 min were 3.1 times more antioxidative than its hydrolysate. However, the histidine content was higher in peptides derived from the 100 min hydrolysate (19.7 against 35.1% in 10 min hydrolysate), indicating that this amino acid is not the only factor involved in the antioxidative activity, and other factors such as peptide size or amino acid sequence are also determinant. This manuscript shows that affinity chromatography is a useful procedure for purification of copper chelating peptides. This method can be extended to other metals of interest in nutrition, such as calcium, iron, or zinc. Purified chelating peptides, in addition to their antioxidative properties, may also be useful in food mineral fortification for increasing the bioavailability of these metals.

  12. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  13. Virus inactivation by protein denaturants used in affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Peter L; Lloyd, David

    2007-10-01

    Virus inactivation by a number of protein denaturants commonly used in gel affinity chromatography for protein elution and gel recycling has been investigated. The enveloped viruses Sindbis, herpes simplex-1 and vaccinia, and the non-enveloped virus polio-1 were effectively inactivated by 0.5 M sodium hydroxide, 6 M guanidinium thiocyanate, 8 M urea and 70% ethanol. However, pH 2.6, 3 M sodium thiocyanate, 6 M guanidinium chloride and 20% ethanol, while effectively inactivating the enveloped viruses, did not inactivate polio-1. These studies demonstrate that protein denaturants are generally effective for virus inactivation but with the limitation that only some may inactivate non-enveloped viruses. The use of protein denaturants, together with virus reduction steps in the manufacturing process should ensure that viral cross contamination between manufacturing batches of therapeutic biological products is prevented and the safety of the product ensured.

  14. Performance of a new protein A affinity membrane for the primary recovery of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana; Dimartino, Simone; Sarti, Giulio C

    2008-01-01

    Recovery of antibodies with Protein A affinity chromatography columns has become the standard for the biotechnology industry. Membrane affinity chromatography has not yet experienced extensive application due to the lower capacity of membrane supports compared to chromatographic beads. In this work, new affinity membranes endowed with an interesting binding capacity for human IgG are studied in view of their application in the capturing step of a monoclonal antibody production process. The membranes have been extensively tested with pure IgG solutions and with a cell culture supernatant containing IgG1. The effects of feed flow rate and IgG concentration on the separation performances have been studied in detail, considering in particular binding capacity, selectivity and recovery. These new high capacity affinity membranes appear good candidates to avoid the throughput limitations and other well-known drawbacks of traditional bead-based chromatographic columns.

  15. Generation of an affinity column for antibody purification by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2003-11-01

    Coupling an antigenic peptide to a solid support is a crucial step in the affinity purification of a peptide-specific antibody. Conventional methods for generating reactive agarose, cellulose or other matrices for peptide conjugation are laborious and can result in a significant amount of chemical waste. In this report, we present a novel method for the facile production of a peptide affinity column by employing intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) in conjunction with chitin affinity chromatography. A reactive thioester was generated at the C-terminal of the chitin binding domain (CBD) from the chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-2 by thiol-induced cleavage of the peptide bond between the CBD and a modified intein. Peptide epitopes possessing an N-terminal cysteine were ligated to the chitin bound CBD tag. We demonstrate that the resulting peptide columns permit the highly specific and efficient affinity purification of antibodies from animal sera.

  16. An affinity-directed protein missile system for targeted proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Luke J.; Macartney, Thomas; Bozatzi, Polyxeni; Hornberger, Annika; Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein serves to recruit the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF1α) protein under normoxia to the CUL2 E3 ubiquitin ligase for its ubiquitylation and degradation through the proteasome. In this report, we modify VHL to engineer an affinity-directed protein missile (AdPROM) system to direct specific endogenous target proteins for proteolysis in mammalian cells. The proteolytic AdPROM construct harbours a cameloid anti-green fluorescence protein (aGFP) nanobody that is fused to VHL for either constitutive or tetracycline-inducible expression. For target proteins, we exploit CRISPR/Cas9 to rapidly generate human kidney HEK293 and U2OS osteosarcoma homozygous knock-in cells harbouring GFP tags at the VPS34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) and protein associated with SMAD1 (PAWS1, aka FAM83G) loci, respectively. Using these cells, we demonstrate that the expression of the VHL-aGFP AdPROM system results in near-complete degradation of the endogenous GFP-VPS34 and PAWS1-GFP proteins through the proteasome. Additionally, we show that Tet-inducible destruction of GFP-VPS34 results in the degradation of its associated partner, UVRAG, and reduction in levels of cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. PMID:27784791

  17. In vitro affinity screening of protein and peptide binders by megavalent bead surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamante, Letizia; Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro; Schaerli, Yolanda; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-10-01

    The advent of protein display systems has provided access to tailor-made protein binders by directed evolution. We introduce a new in vitro display system, bead surface display (BeSD), in which a gene is mounted on a bead via strong non-covalent (streptavidin/biotin) interactions and the corresponding protein is displayed via a covalent thioether bond on the DNA. In contrast to previous monovalent or low-copy bead display systems, multiple copies of the DNA and the protein or peptide of interest are displayed in defined quantities (up to 10(6) of each), so that flow cytometry can be used to obtain a measure of binding affinity. The utility of the BeSD in directed evolution is validated by library selections of randomized peptide sequences for binding to the anti-hemagglutinin (HA) antibody that proceed with enrichments in excess of 10(3) and lead to the isolation of high-affinity HA-tags within one round of flow cytometric screening. On-bead K(d) measurements suggest that the selected tags have affinities in the low nanomolar range. In contrast to other display systems (such as ribosome, mRNA and phage display) that are limited to affinity panning selections, BeSD possesses the ability to screen and rank binders by their affinity in vitro, a feature that hitherto has been exclusive to in vivo multivalent cell display systems (such as yeast display).

  18. Identification of protein interacting partners using tandem affinity purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Dalan; Urena, Luis; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2012-02-25

    A critical and often limiting step in understanding the function of host and viral proteins is the identification of interacting cellular or viral protein partners. There are many approaches that allow the identification of interacting partners, including the yeast two hybrid system, as well as pull down assays using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins followed by mass spectrometry identification(1). Recent studies have highlighted the utility of double-affinity tag mediated purification, coupled with two specific elution steps in the identification of interacting proteins. This approach, termed Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP), was initially used in yeast(2,3) but more recently has been adapted to use in mammalian cells(4-8). As proof-of-concept we have established a tandem affinity purification (TAP) method using the well-characterized eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E(9,10).The cellular translation factor eIF4E is a critical component of the cellular eIF4F complex involved in cap-dependent translation initiation(10). The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. The TAP tag used in the current study is composed of two Protein G units and a streptavidin binding peptide separated by a Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence(8). To forgo the need for the generation of clonal cell lines, we developed a rapid system that relies on the expression of the TAP-tagged bait protein from an episomally maintained plasmid based on pMEP4 (Invitrogen). Expression of tagged murine eIF4E from this plasmid was controlled using the cadmium chloride inducible metallothionein promoter. Lysis of the expressing cells and subsequent affinity purification via binding to rabbit IgG agarose, TEV protease cleavage, binding to streptavidin linked agarose and subsequent biotin elution identified numerous

  19. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    affinity labeling method and allows for real-time monitoring of protein activity. With the high target specificity and biocompatibility of this technique, we have achieved individual labeling and imaging of endogenously expressed proteins in samples of high biological complexity. We also highlight applications in which our current approach enabled the monitoring of important biological events, such as ligand binding, in living cells. These novel chemical labeling techniques are expected to provide a molecular toolbox for studying a wide variety of proteins and beyond in living cells.

  20. Virtual Screening of Plant Volatile Compounds Reveals a High Affinity of Hylamorpha elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Odorant-Binding Proteins for Sesquiterpenes From Its Native Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, Angélica; Palma-Millanao, Rubén; Yáñez, Osvaldo; Rojas, Maximiliano; Mutis, Ana; Venthur, Herbert; Quiroz, Andrés; Ramírez, Claudio C

    2016-01-01

    Hylamorpha elegans(Burmeister) is a native Chilean scarab beetle considered to be a relevant agricultural pest to pasture and cereal and small fruit crops. Because of their cryptic habits, control with conventional methods is difficult; therefore, alternative and environmentally friendly control strategies are highly desirable. The study of proteins that participate in the recognition of odorants, such as odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), offers interesting opportunities to identify new compounds with the potential to modify pest behavior and computational screening of compounds, which is commonly used in drug discovery, may help to accelerate the discovery of new semiochemicals. Here, we report the discovery of four OBPs inH. elegans as well as six new volatiles released by its native host Nothofagus obliqua(Mirbel). Molecular docking performed between OBPs and new and previously reported volatiles from N. oblique revealed the best binding energy values for sesquiterpenic compounds. Despite remarkable divergence at the amino acid level, three of the four OBPs evaluated exhibited the best interaction energy for the same ligands. Molecular dynamics investigation reinforced the importance of sesquiterpenes, showing that hydrophobic residues of the OBPs interacted most frequently with the tested ligands, and binding free energy calculations demonstrated van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions to be the most important. Altogether, the results suggest that sesquiterpenes are interesting candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their potential application in pest management strategies.

  1. Virtual Screening of Plant Volatile Compounds Reveals a High Affinity of Hylamorpha elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Odorant-Binding Proteins for Sesquiterpenes From Its Native Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Millanao, Rubén; Yáñez, Osvaldo; Rojas, Maximiliano; Mutis, Ana; Venthur, Herbert; Quiroz, Andrés; Ramírez, Claudio C.

    2016-01-01

    Hylamorpha elegans (Burmeister) is a native Chilean scarab beetle considered to be a relevant agricultural pest to pasture and cereal and small fruit crops. Because of their cryptic habits, control with conventional methods is difficult; therefore, alternative and environmentally friendly control strategies are highly desirable. The study of proteins that participate in the recognition of odorants, such as odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), offers interesting opportunities to identify new compounds with the potential to modify pest behavior and computational screening of compounds, which is commonly used in drug discovery, may help to accelerate the discovery of new semiochemicals. Here, we report the discovery of four OBPs in H. elegans as well as six new volatiles released by its native host Nothofagus obliqua (Mirbel). Molecular docking performed between OBPs and new and previously reported volatiles from N. obliqua revealed the best binding energy values for sesquiterpenic compounds. Despite remarkable divergence at the amino acid level, three of the four OBPs evaluated exhibited the best interaction energy for the same ligands. Molecular dynamics investigation reinforced the importance of sesquiterpenes, showing that hydrophobic residues of the OBPs interacted most frequently with the tested ligands, and binding free energy calculations demonstrated van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions to be the most important. Altogether, the results suggest that sesquiterpenes are interesting candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their potential application in pest management strategies. PMID:27012867

  2. Interplay between binding affinity and kinetics in protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huaiqing; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-07-01

    To clarify the interplay between the binding affinity and kinetics of protein-protein interactions, and the possible role of intrinsically disordered proteins in such interactions, molecular simulations were carried out on 20 protein complexes. With bias potential and reweighting techniques, the free energy profiles were obtained under physiological affinities, which showed that the bound-state valley is deep with a barrier height of 12 - 33 RT. From the dependence of the affinity on interface interactions, the entropic contribution to the binding affinity is approximated to be proportional to the interface area. The extracted dissociation rates based on the Arrhenius law correlate reasonably well with the experimental values (Pearson correlation coefficient R = 0.79). For each protein complex, a linear free energy relationship between binding affinity and the dissociation rate was confirmed, but the distribution of the slopes for intrinsically disordered proteins showed no essential difference with that observed for ordered proteins. A comparison with protein folding was also performed. Proteins 2016; 84:920-933. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Community Standard Format for the Representation of Protein Affinity Reagents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David E. Gloriam; Sandra Orchard; Daniela Bertinetti; Erik Björling; Erik Bongcam-Rudloff; Carl A. K. Borrebaeck; Julie Bourbeillon; Andrew R. M. Bradbury; Antoine de Daruvar; Stefan Dübel; Ronald Frank; Toby J. Gibson; Larry Gold; Niall Haslam; Friedrich W. Herberg; Tara Hiltke; Jörg D. Hoheisel; Samuel Kerrien; Manfred Koegl; Zoltán Konthur; Bernhard Korn; Ulf Landegren; Luisa Montecchi-Palazzi; Sandrine Palcy; Henry Rodriguez; Sonja Schweinsberg; Volker Sievert; Oda Stoevesandt; Michael J. Taussig; Marius Ueffing; Mathias Uhlén; Silvère van der Maarel; Christer Wingren; Peter Woollard; David J. Sherman; Henning Hermjakob

    2010-01-01

    Protein affinity reagents (PARs), most commonly antibodies, are essential reagents for protein characterization in basic research, biotechnology, and diagnostics as well as the fastest growing class of therapeutics...

  4. A community standard format for the representation of protein affinity reagents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gloriam, David E; Orchard, Sandra; Bertinetti, Daniela; Bjorling, Erik; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Borrebaeck, Carl; Bourbeillon, Julie; Bradbury, Andrew R. M; de Daruvar, Antoine; Duebel, Stefan; Frank, Ronald; Gibson, Toby J; Gold, Larry; Haslam, Niall; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hiltke, Tara; Hoheisel, Joerg D; Kerrien, Samuel; Koegl, Manfred; Konthur, Zoltan; Korn, Bernhard; Landegren, Ulf; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Palcy, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Henry; Schweinsberg, Sonja; Sievert, Volker; Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J; Ueffing, Marius; Uhlen, Mathias; van der Maarel, Silvere; Wingren, Christer; Woollard, Peter; Sherman, David J; Hermjakob, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Protein affinity reagents (PARs), most commonly antibodies, are essential reagents for protein characterization in basic research, biotechnology, and diagnostics as well as the fastest growing class of therapeutics...

  5. A High-Affinity Metal-Binding Peptide From Escherichia Coli Hypb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K.C.Chan; Cao, L.; Dias, A.V.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Zamble, D.B.

    2009-05-12

    The high-affinity nickel-binding site of the Escherichia coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase accessory protein HypB was localized to residues at the immediate N-terminus of the protein. Modification of a metal-binding fusion protein, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and DFT calculations were used to identify the N-terminal amine as a ligand as well as the three cysteine residues in the CXXCGCXXX motif. This sequence can be removed from the protein and both a synthesized peptide and a protein fusion bind nickel with a similar affinity and the same structure as the parent metalloprotein, indicating the self-sufficiency of this high-affinity nickel-binding sequence.

  6. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  7. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  8. Observations on different resin strategies for affinity purification mass spectrometry of a tagged protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Sujina; Moree, Wilna J; Mitchell, Morgan; Widger, William; Bark, Steven J

    2016-12-15

    Co-affinity purification mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a highly effective method for identifying protein complexes from a biological sample and inferring important interactions, but the impact of the solid support is usually not considered in design of such experiments. Affinity purification (AP) experiments typically utilize a bait protein expressing a peptide tag such as FLAG, c-Myc, HA or V5 and high affinity antibodies to these peptide sequences to facilitate isolation of a bait protein to co-purify interacting proteins. We observed significant variability for isolation of tagged bait proteins between Protein A/G Agarose, Protein G Dynabeads, and AminoLink resins. While previous research identified the importance of tag sequence and their location, crosslinking procedures, reagents, dilution, and detergent concentrations, the effect of the resin itself has not been considered. Our data suggest the type of solid support is important and, under the conditions of our experiments, AminoLink resin provided a more robust solid-support platform for AP-MS.

  9. High affinity ligands for 'diazepam-insensitive' benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G; Skolnick, P

    1992-01-14

    Structurally diverse compounds have been shown to possess high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors in their 'diazepam-sensitive' (DS) conformations. In contrast, only the imidazobenzodiazepinone Ro 15-4513 has been shown to exhibit a high affinity for the 'diazepam-insensitive' (DI) conformation of benzodiazepine receptors. We examined a series of 1,4-diazepines containing one or more annelated ring systems for their affinities at DI and DS benzodiazepine receptors, several 1,4-diazepinone carboxylates including Ro 19-4603, Ro 16-6028 and Ro 15-3505 were found to possess high affinities (Ki approximately 2.6-20 nM) for DI. Nonetheless, among the ligands examined, Ro 15-4513 was the only substance with a DI/DS potency ratio approximately 1; other substances had ratios ranging from 13 to greater than 1000. Ligands with high to moderate affinities at DI were previously classified as partial agonists, antagonists, or partial inverse agonists at DS benzodiazepine receptors, but behaved as 'GABA neutral' (antagonist) substances at DI. The identification of several additional high affinity ligands at DI benzodiazepine receptors may be helpful in elucidating the pharmacological and physiological importance of these sites.

  10. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  11. Serotriflin, a CRISP family protein with binding affinity for small serum protein-2 in snake serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Narumi; Sakiyama, Akie; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Kohda, Daisuke; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2008-04-01

    Habu (Trimeresurus flavoviridis) serum contains 3 small serum proteins (SSP-1, SSP-2, and SSP-3) with molecular masses of 6.5 to 10 kDa. Gel filtration analysis showed that all the SSPs exist in high molecular mass forms of approximately 60 kDa in the serum. Ultrafiltration of Habu serum showed that SSPs dissociated from the complex below a pH of 4. An SSP-binding protein was purified from Habu serum by gel filtration, ion exchange, and reverse-phase HPLC. N-terminal sequencing yielded a 39-amino acid sequence, similar to the N-terminal region of triflin, which is a snake venom-derived Ca2+ channel blocker that suppresses smooth muscle contraction. The amino acid sequence of this protein, termed serotriflin, was established by peptide analysis and cDNA cloning. Serotriflin is a glycosylated protein and consists of 221 amino acids. Among the 3 SSPs, only SSP-2 formed a noncovalent complex with serotriflin. It was bound to triflin and serotriflin with high affinity, as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance. SSP-2 is considered to be a protein that prevents self injury by accidental leaking of venom into the blood.

  12. Flexible Molybdenum Electrodes towards Designing Affinity Based Protein Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakoti, Vikramshankar; Panneer Selvam, Anjan; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Prasad, Shalini

    2016-07-18

    Molybdenum electrode based flexible biosensor on porous polyamide substrates has been fabricated and tested for its functionality as a protein affinity based biosensor. The biosensor performance was evaluated using a key cardiac biomarker; cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI). Molybdenum is a transition metal and demonstrates electrochemical behavior upon interaction with an electrolyte. We have leveraged this property of molybdenum for designing an affinity based biosensor using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have evaluated the feasibility of detection of cTnI in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and human serum (HS) by measuring impedance changes over a frequency window from 100 mHz to 1 MHz. Increasing changes to the measured impedance was correlated to the increased dose of cTnI molecules binding to the cTnI antibody functionalized molybdenum surface. We achieved cTnI detection limit of 10 pg/mL in PBS and 1 ng/mL in HS medium. The use of flexible substrates for designing the biosensor demonstrates promise for integration with a large-scale batch manufacturing process.

  13. A High-affinity Interaction with ADP-Actin Monomers Underlies the Mechanism and In Vivo Function of Srv2/cyclase-associated ProteinD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Kugler, Jamie; Moseley, James B.; Almo, Steven C.; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP), also called Srv2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved actin monomer-binding protein that promotes cofilin-dependent actin turnover in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this function. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae CAP binds with strong preference to ADP-G-actin (Kd 0.02 μM) compared with ATP-G-actin (Kd 1.9 μM) and competes directly with cofilin for binding ADP-G-actin. Further, CAP blocks actin monomer additi...

  14. The High Affinity Binding Site on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) for the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Is Composed of Four Basic Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettins, Peter G W; Dolmer, Klavs

    2016-01-08

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) is a serpin inhibitor of the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue plasminogen activator, which binds tightly to the clearance and signaling receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in both proteinase-complexed and uncomplexed forms. Binding sites for PAI-1 within LRP1 have been localized to CR clusters II and IV. Within cluster II, there is a strong preference for the triple CR domain fragment CR456. Previous mutagenesis studies to identify the binding site on PAI-1 for LRP1 have given conflicting results or implied small binding contributions incompatible with the high affinity PAI-1/LRP1 interaction. Using a highly sensitive solution fluorescence assay, we have examined binding of CR456 to arginine and lysine variants of PAI-1 and definitively identified the binding site as composed of four basic residues, Lys-69, Arg-76, Lys-80, and Lys-88. These are highly conserved among mammalian PAI-1s. Individual mutations result in a 13-800-fold increase in Kd values. We present evidence that binding involves engagement of CR4 by Lys-88, CR5 by Arg-76 and Lys-80, and CR6 by Lys-69, with the strongest interactions to CR5 and CR6. Collectively, the individual binding contributions account quantitatively for the overall PAI-1/LRP1 affinity. We propose that the greater efficiency of PAI-1·uPA complex binding and clearance by LRP1, compared with PAI-1 alone, is due solely to simultaneous binding of the uPA moiety in the complex to its receptor, thereby making binding of the PAI-1 moiety to LRP1 a two-dimensional surface-localized association.

  15. Agonist high- and low-affinity states of dopamine D-2 receptors : methods of detection and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, Jan-Peter; Booij, Jan; Shalgunov, Vladimir; Elsinga, Philip; Michel, Martin C.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine D-2 receptors, similar to other G-protein-coupled receptors, exist in a high- and low-affinity state for agonists. Based upon a review of the methods for detecting D-2 receptor agonist high-affinity states, we discuss alterations of such states in animal models of disease and the implicatio

  16. Identification and functional assay of the interaction motifs in the partner protein OsNAR2.1 of the two-component system for high-affinity nitrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Daimin; Tao, Jinyuan; Miller, Anthony J; Fan, Xiaorong; Xu, Guohua

    2014-10-01

    A partner protein, NAR2, is essential for high-affinity nitrate transport of the NRT2 protein in plants. However, the NAR2 motifs that interact with NRT2s for their plasma membrane (PM) localization and nitrate transporter activity have not been functionally characterized. In this study, OsNAR2.1 mutations with different carbon (C)-terminal deletions and nine different point mutations in the conserved regions of NAR2 homologs in plants were generated to explore the essential motifs involved in the interaction with OsNRT2.3a. Screening using the membrane yeast two-hybrid system and Xenopus oocytes for nitrogen-15 ((15)N) uptake demonstrated that either R100G or D109N point mutations impaired the OsNAR2.1 interaction with OsNRT2.3a. Western blotting and visualization using green fluorescent protein fused to either the N- or C-terminus of OsNAR2.1 indicated that OsNAR2.1 is expressed in both the PM and cytoplasm. The split-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)/BiFC analyses indicated that OsNRT2.3a was targeted to the PM in the presence of OsNAR2.1, while either R100G or D109N mutation resulted in the loss of OsNRT2.3a-YFP signal in the PM. Based on these results, arginine 100 and aspartic acid 109 of the OsNAR2.1 protein are key amino acids in the interaction with OsNRT2.3a, and their interaction occurs in the PM but not cytoplasm.

  17. The fourth dimension in immunological space: how the struggle for nutrients selects high-affinity lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensveen, Felix M; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Eldering, Eric

    2012-09-01

    Lymphocyte activation via the antigen receptor is associated with radical shifts in metabolism and changes in requirements for nutrients and cytokines. Concomitantly, drastic changes occur in the expression of pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins that alter the sensitivity of lymphocytes to limiting concentrations of key survival factors. Antigen affinity is a primary determinant for the capacity of activated lymphocytes to access these vital resources. The shift in metabolic needs and the variable access to key survival factors is used by the immune system to eliminate activated low-affinity cells and to generate an optimal high-affinity response. In this review, we focus on the control of apoptosis regulators in activated lymphocytes by nutrients, cytokines, and costimulation. We propose that the struggle among individual clones that leads to the formation of high-affinity effector cell populations is in effect an 'invisible' fourth signal required for effective immune responses.

  18. SCM, a novel M-like protein from Streptococcus canis, binds (mini)-plasminogen with high affinity and facilitates bacterial transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulde, Marcus; Rohde, Manfred; Hitzmann, Angela; Preissner, Klaus T; Nitsche-Schmitz, D Patric; Nerlich, Andreas; Chhatwal, Gursharan Singh; Bergmann, Simone

    2011-03-15

    Streptococcus canis is an important zoonotic pathogen capable of causing serious invasive diseases in domestic animals and humans. In the present paper we report the binding of human plasminogen to S. canis and the recruitment of proteolytically active plasmin on its surface. The binding receptor for plasminogen was identified as a novel M-like protein designated SCM (S. canis M-like protein). SPR (surface plasmon resonance) analyses, radioactive dot-blot analyses and heterologous expression on the surface of Streptococcus gordonii confirmed the plasminogen-binding capability of SCM. The binding domain was located within the N-terminus of SCM, which specifically bound to the C-terminal part of plasminogen (mini-plasminogen) comprising kringle domain 5 and the catalytic domain. In the presence of urokinase, SCM mediated plasminogen activation on the bacterial surface that was inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and lysine amino acid analogues. Surface-bound plasmin effectively degraded purified fibrinogen as well as fibrin clots, resulting in the dissolution of fibrin thrombi. Electron microscopic illustration and time-lapse imaging demonstrated bacterial transmigration through fibrinous thrombi. The present study has led, for the first time, to the identification of SCM as a novel receptor for (mini)-plasminogen mediating the fibrinolytic activity of S. canis.

  19. High affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghrabi, E.A.; Calligaro, D.O.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    )/sup 3/H)cocaine bound reversible, with high affinity and stereospecificity to rat liver microsomes. Little binding was detected in the lysosomal, mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. The binding kinetics were slow and the kinetically calculated K/sub D/ was 2 nM. Induction of mixed function oxidases by phenobarbital did not produce significant change in (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding. On the other hand, chronic administration of cocaine reduced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding drastically. Neither treatment affected the affinity of the liver binding protein for cocaine. Microsomes from mouse and human livers had less cocaine-binding protein and lower affinity for cocaine than those from rat liver. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cocaine to rat liver microsomes was insensitive to monovalent cations and > 10 fold less sensitive to biogenic amines than the cocaine receptor in rat striatum. However, the liver protein had higher affinity for cocaine and metabolites except for norcocaine. Amine uptake inhibitors displaced (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to liver with a different rank order of potency than their displacement of (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding to striatum. This high affinity (/sup 3/H)cocaine binding protein in liver is not likely to be monooxygenase, but may have a role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity

  20. Batch affinity adsorption of His-tagged proteins with EDTA-based chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weiwei; Lou, Yimin; Xu, Weiyuan; Cheng, Zhixian; Gong, Xingwen; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Affinity adsorption purification of hexahistidine-tagged (His-tagged) proteins using EDTA-chitosan-based adsorption was designed and carried out. Chitosan was elaborated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the resulting polymer was characterized by FTIR, TGA, and TEM. Different metals including Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were immobilized with EDTA-chitosan, and their capability to the specific adsorption of His-tagged proteins were then investigated. The results showed that Ni(2+)-EDTA-chitosan and Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan had high affinity toward the His-tagged proteins, thus isolating them from protein mixture. The target fluorescent-labeled hexahistidine protein remained its fluorescent characteristic throughout the purification procedure when Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan was used as a sorbent, wherein the real-time monitor was performed to examine the immigration of fluorescent-labeled His-tagged protein. Comparatively, Zn(2+)-EDTA-chitosan showed more specific binding ability for the target protein, but with less binding capacity. It was further proved that this purification system could be recovered and reused at least for 5 times and could run on large scales. The presented M(2+)-EDTA-chitosan system, with the capability to specifically bind His-tagged proteins, make the purification of His-tagged proteins easy to handle, leaving out fussy preliminary treatment, and with the possibility of continuous processing and a reduction in operational cost in relation to the costs of conventional processes.

  1. Tandem affinity purification of functional TAP-tagged proteins from human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregan, Juraj; Riedel, Christian G; Petronczki, Mark; Cipak, Lubos; Rumpf, Cornelia; Poser, Ina; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Nasmyth, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is a generic two-step affinity purification protocol for isolation of TAP-tagged proteins together with associated proteins. We used bacterial artificial chromosome to heterologously express TAP-tagged murine Sgo1 protein in human HeLa cells. This allowed us to tes

  2. Tandem affinity purification of functional TAP-tagged proteins from human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregan, Juraj; Riedel, Christian G; Petronczki, Mark; Cipak, Lubos; Rumpf, Cornelia; Poser, Ina; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Nasmyth, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is a generic two-step affinity purification protocol for isolation of TAP-tagged proteins together with associated proteins. We used bacterial artificial chromosome to heterologously express TAP-tagged murine Sgo1 protein in human HeLa cells. This allowed us to tes

  3. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected.

  4. Properties of the Affine Invariant Ensemble Sampler in high dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Huijser, David; Brewer, Brendon J

    2015-01-01

    We present theoretical and practical properties of the affine-invariant ensemble sampler Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In high dimensions the affine-invariant ensemble sampler shows unusual and undesirable properties. We demonstrate this with an $n$-dimensional correlated Gaussian toy problem with a known mean and covariance structure, and analyse the burn-in period. The burn-in period seems to be short, however upon closer inspection we discover the mean and the variance of the target distribution do not match the expected, known values. This problem becomes greater as $n$ increases. We therefore conclude that the affine-invariant ensemble sampler should be used with caution in high dimensional problems. We also present some theoretical results explaining this behaviour.

  5. A high-affinity molybdate transporter in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Llamas, Angel; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio

    2007-12-11

    Molybdenum is an essential element for almost all living beings, which, in the form of a molybdopterin-cofactor, participates in the active site of enzymes involved in key reactions of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism. This metal is taken up by cells in form of the oxyanion molybdate. Bacteria acquire molybdate by an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transport system in a widely studied process, but how eukaryotic cells take up molybdenum is unknown because molybdate transporters have not been identified so far. Here, we report a eukaryotic high-affinity molybdate transporter, encoded by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gene MoT1. An antisense RNA strategy over the MoT1 gene showed that interference of the expression of this gene leads to the inhibition of molybdate transport activity and, in turn, of the Mo-containing enzyme nitrate reductase, indicating a function of MoT1 in molybdate transport. MOT1 functionality was also shown by heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molybdate uptake mediated by MOT1 showed a K(m) of approximately 6 nM, which is the range of the lowest K(m) values reported and was activated in the presence of nitrate. Analysis of deduced sequence from the putative protein coded by MoT1 showed motifs specifically conserved in similar proteins present in the databases, and defines a family of membrane proteins in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes probably involved in molybdate transport and distantly related to plant sulfate transporters SULTR. These findings represent an important step in the understanding of molybdate transport, a crucial process in eukaryotic cells.

  6. DNA condensation by high-affinity interaction with avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Margherita; Radu, Aurelian; Bayer, Edward A; Wilchek, Meir

    2004-01-01

    Avidin, the basic biotin-binding glycoprotein from chicken egg white, is known to interact with DNA, whereas streptavidin, its neutral non-glycosylated bacterial analog, does not. In the present study we investigated the DNA-binding properties of avidin. Its affinity for DNA in the presence and absence of biotin was compared with that of other positively charged molecules, namely the protein lysozyme, the cationic polymers polylysine and polyarginine and an avidin derivative with higher isoelectric point (pI approximately 11) in which most of the lysine residues were converted to homoarginines. Gel-shift assays, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated an unexpectedly strong interaction between avidin and DNA. The most pronounced gel-shift retardation occurred with the avidin-biotin complex, followed by avidin alone and then guanidylated avidin. Furthermore, ultrastructural and light-scattering studies showed that avidin assembles on the DNA molecule in an organized manner. The assembly leads to the formation of nanoparticles that are about 50-100 nm in size (DNA approximately 5 kb) and have a rod-like or toroidal shape. In these particles the DNA is highly condensed and one avidin is bound to each 18 +/- 4 DNA base pairs. The complexes are very stable even at high dilution ([DNA] =10 pM) and are not disrupted in the presence of buffers or salt (up to 200 mM NaCl). The other positively charged molecules also condense DNA and form particles with a globular shape. However, in this case, these particles disassemble by dilution or in the presence of low salt concentration. The results indicate that the interaction of avidin with DNA may also occur under physiological conditions, further enhanced by the presence of biotin. This DNA-binding property of avidin may thus shed light on a potentially new physiological role for the protein in its natural environment.

  7. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this end, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to 1,000 domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from human papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human 'PDZome'. We obtained sharply sequence-dependent binding profiles that quantitatively describe the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes.

  8. EGL-1 BH3 mutants reveal the importance of protein levels and target affinity for cell-killing potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E F; Chen, L; Yang, H; Colman, P M; Huang, D C S; Fairlie, W D

    2008-10-01

    Studies of the cell death pathway in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans provided the first evidence of the evolutionary conservation of apoptosis signalling. Here we show that the worm Bcl-2 homology domain-3 (BH3)-only protein EGL-1 binds mammalian pro-survival proteins very poorly, but can be converted into a high-affinity ligand for Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) by subtle mutation of the cysteine residue at position 62 within the BH3 domain. A 100-fold increase in affinity was observed following a single atom change (cysteine to serine substitution), and a further 10-fold increase by replacement with glycine. The low affinity of wild-type EGL-1 for mammalian pro-survival proteins and its poor expression correlates with its weak killing activity in mammalian cells whereas the high-affinity C62G mutant is a very potent killer of cells lacking Mcl-1. Cell killing by the C62S mutant with intermediate affinity only occurs when this EGL-1 BH3 domain is placed in a more stable context, namely that of Bim(S), which allows higher expression, though the kinetics of cell death now vary depending on whether Mcl-1 is neutralized by Noxa or genetically deleted. These results demonstrate how levels of BH3-only proteins, target affinity and the spectrum of neutralization of pro-survival proteins all contribute to killing activity.

  9. Enrichment of Two Isomeric Heparin Oligosaccharides Exhibiting Different Affinities toward Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca L; Dykstra, Andrew B; Wei, Wei; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Leary, Julie A

    2016-12-06

    Chemokine-GAG interactions are crucial to facilitate chemokine immobilization, resulting in the formation of chemokine gradients that guide cell migration. Here we demonstrate chromatographic isolation and purification of two heparin hexasaccharide isomers that interact with the oligomeric chemokine Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 with different binding affinities. The sequences of these two hexasaccharides were deduced from unique MS/MS product ions and HPLC compositional analysis. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) showed that the two isolated oligosaccharides have different conformations and both displayed preferential binding for one of the two distinct conformations known for MCP-1 dimers. A significant shift in arrival time distribution of close to 70 Å(2) was observed, indicating a more compact protein:hexasaccharide conformation. Clear differences in the MS spectra between bound and unbound protein allowed calculation of Kd values from the resulting data. The structural difference between the two hexasaccharides was defined as the differential location of a single sulfate at either C-6 of glucosamine or C-2 of uronic acid in the reducing disaccharide, resulting in a 200-fold difference in binding affinity for MCP-1. These data indicate sequence specificity for high affinity binding, supporting the view that sulfate position, and not simply the number of sulfates, is important for heparan sulfate protein binding.

  10. Isolation and cloning of the gene encoding high affinity phosphate transporter in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    High affinity phosphate transporter plays an important role in plant adapting to low phosphorus. Isolation of genes coding this kind of protein has attracted worldwide scholars to accomplish. We aimed to isolate the gene and transfer it to target plants for breeding.

  11. NK1 receptor fused to beta-arrestin displays a single-component, high-affinity molecular phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martini, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Holst, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    with low affinity against antagonists. In contrast, in the NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion protein, all ligands bound with similar affinity independent of the choice of radioligand and with Hill coefficients near unity. We conclude that the NK1 receptor in complex with arrestin is in a high-affinity, stable......Arrestins are cytosolic proteins that, upon stimulation of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors, terminate signaling by binding to the receptor, displacing the G protein and targeting the receptor to clathrin-coated pits. Fusion of beta-arrestin1 to the C-terminal end of the neurokinin NK1 receptor...... Gq/G11 and Gs pathways. The NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion construct bound nonpeptide antagonists with increased affinity but surprisingly also bound two types of agonists, substance P and neurokinin A, with high, normal affinity. In the wild-type NK1 receptor, neurokinin A (NKA) competes for binding...

  12. Unraveling the Roots of Selectivity of Peptide Affinity Reagents for Structurally Similar Ribosomal Inactivating Protein Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Sarkes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peptide capture agents have become increasingly useful tools for a variety of sensing applications due to their ease of discovery, stability, and robustness. Despite the ability to rapidly discover candidates through biopanning bacterial display libraries and easily mature them to Protein Catalyzed Capture (PCC agents with even higher affinity and selectivity, an ongoing challenge and critical selection criteria is that the peptide candidates and final reagent be selective enough to replace antibodies, the gold-standard across immunoassay platforms. Here, we have discovered peptide affinity reagents against abrax, a derivative of abrin with reduced toxicity. Using on-cell Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS assays, we show that the peptides are highly selective for abrax over RiVax, a similar derivative of ricin originally designed as a vaccine, with significant structural homology to abrax. We rank the newly discovered peptides for strongest affinity and analyze three observed consensus sequences with varying affinity and specificity. The strongest (Tier 1 consensus was FWDTWF, which is highly aromatic and hydrophobic. To better understand the observed selectivity, we use the XPairIt peptide–protein docking protocol to analyze binding location predictions of the individual Tier 1 peptides and consensus on abrax and RiVax. The binding location profiles on the two proteins are quite distinct, which we determine is due to differences in pocket size, pocket environment (including hydrophobicity and electronegativity, and steric hindrance. This study provides a model system to show that peptide capture candidates can be quite selective for a structurally similar protein system, even without further maturation, and offers an in silico method of analysis for understanding binding and down-selecting candidates.

  13. Induced binding of proteins by ammonium sulfate in affinity and ion-exchange column chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke; Kita, Yoshiko; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Tokunaga, Masao

    2007-04-10

    In general, proteins bind to affinity or ion-exchange columns at low salt concentrations, and the bound proteins are eluted by raising the salt concentration, changing the solvent pH, or adding competing ligands. Blue-Sepharose is often used to remove bovine serum albumin (BSA) from samples, but when we applied BSA to Blue-Sepharose in 20 mM phosphate, pH 7.0, 50%-60% of the protein flowed through the column; however, complete binding of BSA was achieved by the addition of 2 M ammonium sulfate (AS) to the column equilibration buffer and the sample. The bound protein was eluted by decreasing the AS concentration or by adding 1 M NaCl or arginine. AS at high concentrations resulted in binding of BSA even to an ion-exchange column, Q-Sepharose, at pH 7.0. Thus, although moderate salt concentrations elute proteins from Blue-Sepharose or ion-exchange columns, proteins can be bound to these columns under extreme salting-out conditions. Similar enhanced binding of proteins by AS was observed with an ATP-affinity column.

  14. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  15. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  16. A novel protein complex identification algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; He, Tingting; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    A novel algorithm based on Connected Affinity Clique Extension (CACE) for mining overlapping functional modules in protein interaction network is proposed in this paper. In this approach, the value of protein connected affinity which is inferred from protein complexes is interpreted as the reliability and possibility of interaction. The protein interaction network is constructed as a weighted graph, and the weight is dependent on the connected affinity coefficient. The experimental results of our CACE in two test data sets show that the CACE can detect the functional modules much more effectively and accurately when compared with other state-of-art algorithms CPM and IPC-MCE.

  17. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in 3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  18. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  19. Isolation of serpin-interacting proteins in C. elegans using protein affinity purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedel, Mark T; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A; Silverman, Gary A; Luke, Cliff J

    2014-08-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model organism for combining multiple imaging, genetic, and biochemical methodologies to gain more insight into the biological function of specific proteins. Combining both biochemical and genetic analyses can lead to a better understanding of how a given protein may function within the context of a network of other proteins or specific pathway. Here, we describe a protocol for the biochemical isolation of serpin-interacting proteins using affinity purification and proteomic analysis. As the knowledge of in vivo serpin interacting partners in C. elegans has largely been obtained using genetic and in vitro recombinant protein studies, this protocol serves as a complementary approach to provide insight into the biological function and regulation of serpins.

  20. Taking Advantage: High Affinity B cells in the Germinal Center Have Lower Death Rates, But Similar Rates of Division Compared to Low Affinity Cells1

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocytes producing high affinity antibodies (Abs) are critical for protection from extracellular pathogens, such as bacteria and parasites. The process by which high affinity B cells are selected during the immune response has never been elucidated. Though it has been shown that high affinity cells directly outcompete low affinity cells in the germinal center (GC)2, whether there are also intrinsic differences between these cells has not been addressed. It could be that higher affinity c...

  1. Calculating protein-ligand binding affinities with MMPBSA: Method and error analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhao; Nguyen, Peter H; Pham, Kevin; Huynh, Danielle; Le, Thanh-Binh Nancy; Wang, Hongli; Ren, Pengyu; Luo, Ray

    2016-10-15

    Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MMPBSA) methods have become widely adopted in estimating protein-ligand binding affinities due to their efficiency and high correlation with experiment. Here different computational alternatives were investigated to assess their impact to the agreement of MMPBSA calculations with experiment. Seven receptor families with both high-quality crystal structures and binding affinities were selected. First the performance of nonpolar solvation models was studied and it was found that the modern approach that separately models hydrophobic and dispersion interactions dramatically reduces RMSD's of computed relative binding affinities. The numerical setup of the Poisson-Boltzmann methods was analyzed next. The data shows that the impact of grid spacing to the quality of MMPBSA calculations is small: the numerical error at the grid spacing of 0.5 Å is already small enough to be negligible. The impact of different atomic radius sets and different molecular surface definitions was further analyzed and weak influences were found on the agreement with experiment. The influence of solute dielectric constant was also analyzed: a higher dielectric constant generally improves the overall agreement with experiment, especially for highly charged binding pockets. The data also showed that the converged simulations caused slight reduction in the agreement with experiment. Finally the direction of estimating absolute binding free energies was briefly explored. Upon correction of the binding-induced rearrangement free energy and the binding entropy lost, the errors in absolute binding affinities were also reduced dramatically when the modern nonpolar solvent model was used, although further developments were apparently necessary to further improve the MMPBSA methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  3. El receptor de la hormona de crecimiento humana (hGH y la proteína de transporte de alta afinidad de la hGH Human Growth Hormone (GH Receptor and the High Affinity GH-Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Ballerini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La hormona de crecimiento humana (hGH circula parcialmente unida a su proteína de transporte de alta afinidad (GHBP la cual resulta del clivaje proteolítico del dominio extracelular del receptor de GH. Recientemente la enzima TACE se identificó como la metaloproteasa responsable del clivaje y liberación de GHBP a circulación. Aunque aún se desconoce la función específica de esta proteína de transporte, distintos trabajos en la literatura demuestran efectos que potencian y efectos inhibitorios sobre la acción de GH. Por otro lado, existen evidencias que demuestran una fuerte relación entre la GHBP y el nivel de receptor de GH en el hígado en situaciones fisiológicas y patológicas. Esto permitió proponer a la determinación de GHBP en suero como un marcador periférico de la abundancia del receptor de GH en los tejidos. La determinación de la concentración de GHBP sería de especial interés para evaluar pacientes con diagnóstico probable de insensibilidad a la acción de GH y orientar el posterior estudio de anormalidades en el gen del receptor de GH. En la presente revisión, también se abordan dificultades metodológicas relacionadas a la medición de GHBP sérica.Human circulating growth hormone (GH is partly bound to a high-affinity binding protein (GHBP which is derived from proteolytical cleavage of the extracellular domain of the GH receptor. Recently, the metalloproteinase TACE has been identified as an important enzyme responsive for inducing GHBP shedding. Although the specific function of GHBP is not fully known, both enhancing and inhibitory roles of this binding protein on GH action have been proposed. Many reports have demonstrated a close relationship between GHBP and the liver GH receptor status in physiological conditions and diseases. Moreover, serum GHBP measurement has been proposed as an useful peripheral index of the GH receptor abundance. Related to the latter, circulating GHBP concentration would be of

  4. Extension of the selection of protein chromatography and the rate model to affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, G; Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2010-01-01

    The rational selection of optimal protein purification sequences, as well as mathematical models that simulate and allow optimization of chromatographic protein purification processes have been developed for purification procedures such as ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. This paper investigates the extension of such analysis to affinity chromatography both in the selection of chromatographic processes and in the use of the rate model for mathematical modelling and simulation. Two affinity systems were used: Blue Sepharose and Protein A. The extension of the theory developed previously for ion-exchange and HIC chromatography to affinity separations is analyzed in this paper. For the selection of operations two algorithms are used. In the first, the value of η, which corresponds to the efficiency (resolution) of the actual chromatography and, Σ, which determines the amount of a particular contaminant eliminated after each separation step, which determines the purity, have to be determined. It was found that the value of both these parameters is not generic for affinity separations but will depend on the type of affinity system used and will have to be determined on a case by case basis. With Blue Sepharose a salt gradient was used and with Protein A, a pH gradient. Parameters were determined with individual proteins and simulations of the protein mixtures were done. This approach allows investigation of chromatographic protein purification in a holistic manner that includes ion-exchange, HIC, gel filtration and affinity separations for the first time.

  5. Microbial polyhydroxyalkanote synthesis repression protein PhaR as an affinity tag for recombinant protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PhaR which is a repressor protein for microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA biosynthesis, is able to attach to bacterial PHA granules in vivo, was developed as an affinity tag for in vitro protein purification. Fusion of PhaR-tagged self-cleavable Ssp DnaB intein to the N-terminus of a target protein allowed protein purification with a pH and temperature shift. During the process, the target protein was released to the supernatant while PhaR-tagged intein was still immobilized on the PHA nanoparticles which were then separated by centrifugation. Results Fusion protein PhaR-intein-target protein was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli. The cell lysates after sonication and centrifugation were collected and then incubated with PHA nanoparticles to allow sufficient absorption onto the PHA nanoparticles. After several washing processes, self-cleavage of intein was triggered by pH and temperature shift. As a result, the target protein was released from the particles and purified after centrifugation. As target proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP, maltose binding protein (MBP and β-galactosidase (lacZ, were successfully purified using the PhaR based protein purification method. Conclusion The successful purification of EGFP, MBP and LacZ indicated the feasibility of this PhaR based in vitro purification system. Moreover, the elements used in this system can be easily obtained and prepared by users themselves, so they can set up a simple protein purification strategy by themselves according to the PhaR method, which provides another choice instead of expensive commercial protein purification systems.

  6. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  7. Molecular basis for the wide range of affinity found in Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duss, Olivier; Michel, Erich; Diarra dit Konté, Nana; Schubert, Mario; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2014-04-01

    The carbon storage regulator/regulator of secondary metabolism (Csr/Rsm) type of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) is widespread throughout bacteria and acts by sequestering the global translation repressor protein CsrA/RsmE from the ribosome binding site of a subset of mRNAs. Although we have previously described the molecular basis of a high affinity RNA target bound to RsmE, it remains unknown how other lower affinity targets are recognized by the same protein. Here, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structures of five separate GGA binding motifs of the sRNA RsmZ of Pseudomonas fluorescens in complex with RsmE. The structures explain how the variation of sequence and structural context of the GGA binding motifs modulate the binding affinity for RsmE by five orders of magnitude (∼10 nM to ∼3 mM, Kd). Furthermore, we see that conformational adaptation of protein side-chains and RNA enable recognition of different RNA sequences by the same protein contributing to binding affinity without conferring specificity. Overall, our findings illustrate how the variability in the Csr/Rsm protein-RNA recognition allows a fine-tuning of the competition between mRNAs and sRNAs for the CsrA/RsmE protein.

  8. Identification of protein partners in mycobacteria using a single-step affinity purification method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Płociński

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death in developing countries. Efforts are being made to both prevent its spread and improve curability rates. Understanding the biology of the bacteria causing the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, is thus vital. We have implemented improved screening methods for protein-protein interactions based on affinity purification followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. This method can be efficiently applied to both medium- and high-throughput studies aiming to characterize protein-protein interaction networks of tubercle bacilli. Of the 4 tested epitopes FLAG, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, protein A and haemagglutinin, the eGFP tag was found to be most useful on account of its easily monitored expression and its ability to function as a simultaneous tool for subcellular localization studies. It presents a relatively low background with cost-effective purification. RNA polymerase subunit A (RpoA was used as a model for investigation of a large protein complex. When used as bait, it co-purified with all remaining RNA polymerase core subunits as well as many accessory proteins. The amount of RpoA strongly correlated with the amount of quantification peptide used as part of the tagging system in this study (SH, making it applicable for semi-quantification studies. Interactions between the components of the RpoA-eGFP protein complex were further confirmed using protein cross-linking. Dynamic changes in the composition of protein complexes under induction of UV damage were observed when UvrA-eGFP expressing cells treated with UV light were used to co-purify UvrA interaction partners.

  9. Identification of protein partners in mycobacteria using a single-step affinity purification method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płociński, Przemysław; Laubitz, Daniel; Cysewski, Dominik; Stoduś, Krystian; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death in developing countries. Efforts are being made to both prevent its spread and improve curability rates. Understanding the biology of the bacteria causing the disease, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), is thus vital. We have implemented improved screening methods for protein-protein interactions based on affinity purification followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry. This method can be efficiently applied to both medium- and high-throughput studies aiming to characterize protein-protein interaction networks of tubercle bacilli. Of the 4 tested epitopes FLAG, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), protein A and haemagglutinin, the eGFP tag was found to be most useful on account of its easily monitored expression and its ability to function as a simultaneous tool for subcellular localization studies. It presents a relatively low background with cost-effective purification. RNA polymerase subunit A (RpoA) was used as a model for investigation of a large protein complex. When used as bait, it co-purified with all remaining RNA polymerase core subunits as well as many accessory proteins. The amount of RpoA strongly correlated with the amount of quantification peptide used as part of the tagging system in this study (SH), making it applicable for semi-quantification studies. Interactions between the components of the RpoA-eGFP protein complex were further confirmed using protein cross-linking. Dynamic changes in the composition of protein complexes under induction of UV damage were observed when UvrA-eGFP expressing cells treated with UV light were used to co-purify UvrA interaction partners.

  10. Detection of Waterborne Viruses Using High Affinity Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Zeynep; Gittens, Micah; Guerreiro, Antonio; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Walker, Jimmy; Piletsky, Sergey; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-07-07

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptor ligands which can recognize and specifically bind to a target molecule. They are more resistant to chemical and biological damage and inactivation than antibodies. Therefore, target specific-MIP nanoparticles are aimed to develop and implemented to biosensors for the detection of biological toxic agents such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi toxins that cause many diseases and death due to the environmental contamination. For the first time, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting the bacteriophage MS2 as the template was investigated using a novel solid-phase synthesis method to obtain the artificial affinity ligand for the detection and removal of waterborne viruses through optical-based sensors. A high affinity between the artificial ligand and the target was found, and a regenerative MIP-based virus detection assay was successfully developed using a new surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-biosensor which provides an alternative technology for the specific detection and removal of waterborne viruses that lead to high disease and death rates all over the world.

  11. Precise, fast, and flexible determination of protein interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis: part 3: anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanhong; Redweik, Sabine; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Preu, Lutz; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    The binding of physiologically anionic species or negatively charged drug molecules to proteins is of great importance in biochemistry and medicine. Since affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has already proven to be a suitable analytical tool to study the influence of ions on proteins, this technique was applied here for comprehensively studying the influence of various anions on proteins of BSA, β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, myoglobin, and lysozyme. The analysis was performed using different selected anions of succinate, glutamate, phosphate, acetate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and pharmaceuticals (salicylic acid, aspirin, and ibuprofen) that exist in the anionic form at physiological pH 7.4. Due to the excellent repeatability and precision of the ACE measurements, not necessarily strong but significant influences of the anions on the proteins were found in many cases. Different influences in the observed bindings indicated change of charge, mass, or conformational changes of the proteins due to the binding with the studied anions. Combining the mobility-shift and pre-equilibrium ACE modes, rapidity and reversibility of the protein-anion bindings were discussed. Further, circular dichroism has been used as an orthogonal approach to characterize the interactions between the studied proteins and anions to confirm the ACE results. Since phosphate and various anions from amino acids and small organic acids such as succinate or acetate are present in very high concentrations in the cellular environment, even weak influences are certainly relevant as well.

  12. Designer protein delivery: From natural to engineered affinity-controlled release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulska, Malgosia M; Miersch, Shane; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-03-18

    Exploiting binding affinities between molecules is an established practice in many fields, including biochemical separations, diagnostics, and drug development; however, using these affinities to control biomolecule release is a more recent strategy. Affinity-controlled release takes advantage of the reversible nature of noncovalent interactions between a therapeutic protein and a binding partner to slow the diffusive release of the protein from a vehicle. This process, in contrast to degradation-controlled sustained-release formulations such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, is controlled through the strength of the binding interaction, the binding kinetics, and the concentration of binding partners. In the context of affinity-controlled release--and specifically the discovery or design of binding partners--we review advances in in vitro selection and directed evolution of proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides (aptamers), aided by computational design.

  13. Tandem affinity purification to identify cytosolic and nuclear gβγ-interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campden, Rhiannon; Pétrin, Darlaine; Robitaille, Mélanie; Audet, Nicolas; Gora, Sarah; Angers, Stéphane; Hébert, Terence E

    2015-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric proteins serve broad roles in the regulation of cellular activity and interact with many proteins in different subcellular locations including the nucleus. Protein affinity purification is a common method to identify and confirm protein interactions. When used in conjugation with mass spectrometry it can be used to identify novel protein interactions with a given bait protein. The tandem affinity purification (TAP) technique identifies partner proteins bound to tagged protein bait. Combined with protocols to enrich the nuclear fraction of whole cell lysate through sucrose cushions, TAP allows for purification of interacting proteins found specifically in the nucleus. Here we describe the use of the TAP technique on cytosolic and nuclear lysates to identify candidate proteins, through mass spectrometry, that bind to Gβ1 subunits.

  14. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  15. The Monitoring and Affinity Purification of Proteins Using Dual Tags with Tetracysteine Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Richard J.; Liu, Yie; Wang, Yisong

    Identification and characterization of protein-protein interaction networks is essential for the elucidation of biochemical mechanisms and cellular function. Affinity purification in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a very powerful tactic for the identification of specific protein-protein interactions. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive methodology that uses our recently developed dual-tag affinity purification system for the enrichment and identification of mammalian protein complexes. The protocol covers a series of separate but sequentially related techniques focused on the facile monitoring and purification of a dual-tagged protein of interest and its interacting partners via a system built with tetracysteine motifs and various combinations of affinity tags. Using human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) as an example, we demonstrate the power of the system in terms of bait protein recovery after dual-tag affinity purification, detection of bait protein subcellular localization and expression, and successful identification of known and potentially novel TRF2 interacting proteins. Although the protocol described here has been optimized for the identification and characterization of TRF2-associated proteins, it is, in principle, applicable to the study of any other mammalian protein complexes that may be of interest to the research community.

  16. Biotin-Streptavidin Affinity Purification of RNA-Protein Complexes Assembled In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuai; Shi, Lei; Lei, Haixin

    2016-01-01

    RNA-protein complexes are essential for the function of different RNAs, yet purification of specific RNA-protein complexes can be complicated and is a major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of regulatory RNAs. Here we present a protocol to purify RNA-protein complexes assembled in vitro based on biotin-streptavidin affinity. In vitro transcribed RNA is labeled with (32)P and biotin, ribonucleoprotein particles or RNPs are assembled by incubation of RNA in nuclear extract and fractionated using gel filtration, and RNP fractions are pooled for biotin-streptavidin affinity purification. The amount of RNA-protein complexes purified following this protocol is sufficient for mass spectrometry.

  17. Recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue for preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and immunosensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbatiuk O. B.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Engineering of recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue (SPA-Cys for preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and formation of bioselective element of immunosensor. Methods. DNA sequences encoding IgG-binding region of SPA, His-tag and cysteine were genetically fused and expressed in E. coli. SPA-Cys was immobilized on maleimide-functionalized silica beads for affinity chromatography stationary phase preparation and on a gold sensor surface as a bioselective element of immunosensor. Results. SPA-Cys was expressed at a high-level in a soluble form. The target protein was purified and showed a high IgG-binding activity. The capacity of the obtained SPA-Cys-based affinity chromatography stationary phase was 10–12 mg of IgG /ml. The purity of eluted IgG was more than 95 % in one-step purification procedure. The developed SPA-Cys-based bioselective element of immunosensor selectively interacted with human IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. Conclusions. The recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue was successfully used for the preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and formation of the bioselective element of immunosensor.

  18. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  19. A comparison of two strategies for affinity maturation of a BH3 peptide toward pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyan; Long, Angel; Link, A James

    2012-03-16

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulates apoptosis at the level of mitochondrial permeabilization. Pro-death members of the family, including Bak and Bax, initiate apoptosis, whereas pro-survival members such as Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1 antagonize the function of Bak and Bax via heterodimeric interactions. These heterodimeric interactions are primarily mediated by the binding of the helical amphipathic BH3 domain from a pro-death protein to a hydrophobic cleft on the surface of the pro-survival protein. Since high levels of pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins are present in many cancers, peptides corresponding to pro-death BH3 domains hold promise as therapeutics. Here we apply a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to engineer the Bak BH3 domain for improved affinity toward the pro-survival proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Two strategies, engineering the hydrophobic face of the Bak BH3 peptide and increasing its overall helicity, are successful in identifying Bak BH3 variants with improved affinity to Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Hydrophobic face engineering of the Bak BH3 peptide led to variants with up to a 15-fold increase in affinity for Bcl-x(L) and increased specificity toward Bcl-x(L). Engineering of the helicity of Bak BH3 led to modest (3- to 4-fold) improvements in affinity with retention of promiscuous binding to all pro-survival proteins. HeLa cell killing studies demonstrate that the affinity matured Bak BH3 variants retain their expected biological function.

  20. Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation to Isolate Endogenous Protein Complexes after Affinity Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; LaCava, John; Rout, Michael P

    2016-07-01

    This protocol describes the isolation of native protein complexes by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The outcome of an affinity capture and native elution experiment is generally a mixture of (1) the complex(es) associated with the protein of interest under the specific conditions of capture, (2) fragments of the complex generated by degradation or disassembly during the purification procedure, and (3) the protease or reagent used to natively elute the sample. To separate these components and isolate a homogeneous complex, an additional step of purification is required. Rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation is a reliable and powerful technique for separating particles based on their hydrodynamic volume. The density gradient is generated by mixing low- and high-density solutions of a suitable low-molecular-weight inert solute (e.g., sucrose or glycerol). The gradient is formed in a solvent that could be any of the solvents used for the affinity capture and native elution and should help to preserve the structure and activity of the assembly.

  1. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  2. The high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor as pharmacological target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Ulrich; Charles, Nicolas; Benhamou, Marc

    2016-05-05

    The high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E is expressed mainly on mast cells and basophils, but also on neutrophils, eosinophils, platelets, monocytes, Langerhans and dendritic cells, airway smooth muscle cells and some nerve cells. Its main function is, upon its engagement by IgE and specific antigen, to trigger a powerful defense against invading pathogens and a rapid neutralization of dangerous toxic substances introduced in the body. This powerful response could be wielded against tumors. But, when control over this receptor is lost, its unchecked activation can induce an array of diseases, some of which can lead to death. In this review we will summarize the pharmacological approaches and strategies that are currently used, or under study, to harness or wield activation of this receptor for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Affinity of ceftobiprole for penicillin-binding protein 2b in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with various susceptibilities to penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Todd A; He, Wenping; Bush, Karen; Flamm, Robert K

    2010-10-01

    Wild-type penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2b from penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae had high affinity for ceftobiprole and penicillin (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC(50)s] of ≤0.15 μg/ml) but not ceftriaxone (IC(50) of >8 μg/ml). In clinical isolates, ceftobiprole and PBP 2b affinities were reduced 15- to 30-fold with a Thr-446-Ala substitution and further still with an additional Ala-619-Gly PBP 2b substitution. Ceftobiprole remained active (MICs of ≤1 μg/ml) against all strains tested and behaved more like penicillin than ceftriaxone with respect to PBP 2b binding.

  4. Discovery of protein complexes with core-attachment structures from Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong; Wong, Limsoon

    2012-09-01

    Many cellular functions involve protein complexes that are formed by multiple interacting proteins. Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) is a popular experimental method for detecting such multi-protein interactions. However, current computational methods that predict protein complexes from TAP data require converting the co-complex relationships in TAP data into binary interactions. The resulting pairwise protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is then mined for densely connected regions that are identified as putative protein complexes. Converting the TAP data into PPI data not only introduces errors but also loses useful information about the underlying multi-protein relationships that can be exploited to detect the internal organization (i.e., core-attachment structures) of protein complexes. In this article, we propose a method called CACHET that detects protein complexes with Core-AttaCHment structures directly from bipartitETAP data. CACHET models the TAP data as a bipartite graph in which the two vertex sets are the baits and the preys, respectively. The edges between the two vertex sets represent bait-prey relationships. CACHET first focuses on detecting high-quality protein-complex cores from the bipartite graph. To minimize the effects of false positive interactions, the bait-prey relationships are indexed with reliability scores. Only non-redundant, reliable bicliques computed from the TAP bipartite graph are regarded as protein-complex cores. CACHET constructs protein complexes by including attachment proteins into the cores. We applied CACHET on large-scale TAP datasets and found that CACHET outperformed existing methods in terms of prediction accuracy (i.e., F-measure and functional homogeneity of predicted complexes). In addition, the protein complexes predicted by CACHET are equipped with core-attachment structures that provide useful biological insights into the inherent functional organization of protein complexes. Our supplementary material can

  5. Taking advantage: high-affinity B cells in the germinal center have lower death rates, but similar rates of division, compared to low-affinity cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shannon M; Khalil, Ashraf; Uduman, Mohamed; Hershberg, Uri; Louzoun, Yoram; Haberman, Ann M; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2009-12-01

    B lymphocytes producing high-affinity Abs are critical for protection from extracellular pathogens, such as bacteria and parasites. The process by which high-affinity B cells are selected during the immune response has never been elucidated. Although it has been shown that high-affinity cells directly outcompete low-affinity cells in the germinal center (GC), whether there are also intrinsic differences between these cells has not been addressed. It could be that higher affinity cells proliferate more rapidly or are more likely to enter cell cycle, thereby outgrowing lower affinity cells. Alternatively, higher affinity cells could be relatively more resistant to cell death in the GC. By comparing high- and low-affinity B cells for the same Ag, we show here that low-affinity cells have an intrinsically higher death rate than do cells of higher affinity, even in the absence of competition. This suggests that selection in the GC reaction is due at least in part to the control of survival of higher affinity B cells and not by a proliferative advantage conferred upon these cells compared with lower affinity B cells. Control over survival rather than proliferation of low- and high-affinity B cells in the GC allows greater diversity not only in the primary response but also in the memory response.

  6. Rational tailoring of substrate and inhibitor affinity via ATRP polymer-based protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Hironobu; Cummings, Chad S; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2014-07-14

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)-based protein engineering of chymotrypsin with a cationic polymer was used to tune the substrate specificity and inhibitor binding. Poly(quaternary ammonium) was grown from the surface of the enzyme using ATRP after covalent attachment of a protein reactive, water-soluble ATRP-initiator. This "grafting from" conjugation approach generated a high density of cationic ammonium ions around the biocatalytic core. Modification increased the surface area of the protein over 40-fold, and the density of modification on the protein surface was approximately one chain per 4 nm(2). After modification, bioactivity was increased at low pH relative to the activity of the native enzyme. In addition, the affinity of the enzyme for a peptide substrate was increased over a wide pH range. The massively cationic chymotrypsin, which included up to 2000 additional positive charges per molecule of enzyme, was also more stable at extremes of temperature and pH. Most interestingly, we were able to rationally control the binding of two oppositely charged polypeptide protease inhibitors, aprotinin and the Bowman-Birk trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from Glycine max, to the cationic derivative of chymotrypsin. This study expands upon our efforts to use polymer-based protein engineering to predictably engineer enzyme properties without the need for molecular biology.

  7. A tandem affinity purification tag of TGA2 for isolation of interacting proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Henrik U; Findling, Simone; Nukarinen, Ella; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2014-08-19

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging provides a powerful tool for isolating interacting proteins in vivo. TAP-tag purification offers particular advantages for the identification of stimulus-induced protein interactions. Type II bZIP transcription factors (TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6) play key roles in pathways that control salicylic acid, ethylene, xenobiotic and reactive oxylipin signaling. Although proteins interacting with these transcription factors have been identified through genetic and yeast two-hybrid screening, others are still elusive. We have therefore generated a C-terminal TAP-tag of TGA2 to isolate additional proteins that interact with this transcription factor. Three lines most highly expressing TAP-tagged TGA2 were functional in that they partially complemented reactive oxylipin-responsive gene expression in a tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant. TAP-tagged TGA2 in the most strongly overexpressing line was proteolytically less stable than in the other two lines. Only this overexpressing line could be used in a two-step purification process, resulting in isolation of co-purifying bands of larger molecular weight than TGA2. TAP-tagged TGA2 was used to pull down NPR1, a protein known to interact with this transcription factor. Mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides that co-purified with TAP-tagged TGA2. Having generated this TGA2 TAP-tag line will therefore be an asset to researchers interested in stimulus-induced signal transduction processes.

  8. A Robust Workflow for Native Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Affinity-Isolated Endogenous Protein Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Dunn, Amelia D; Padovan, Júlio C; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T

    2016-03-01

    The central players in most cellular events are assemblies of macromolecules. Structural and functional characterization of these assemblies requires knowledge of their subunit stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity. One of the most direct means for acquiring such information is so-called "native mass spectrometry (MS)", wherein the masses of the intact assemblies and parts thereof are accurately determined. It is of particular interest to apply native MS to the study of endogenous protein assemblies-i.e., those wherein the component proteins are expressed at endogenous levels in their natural functional states, rather than the overexpressed (sometimes partial) constructs commonly employed in classical structural studies, whose assembly can introduce stoichiometry artifacts and other unwanted effects. To date, the application of native MS to the elucidation of endogenous protein complexes has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining pristine cell-derived assemblies at sufficiently high concentrations for effective analysis. Here, to address this challenge, we present a robust workflow that couples rapid and efficient affinity isolation of endogenous protein complexes with a sensitive native MS readout. The resulting workflow has the potential to provide a wealth of data on the stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity of endogenous protein assemblies-information that is key to successful integrative structural elucidation of biological systems.

  9. A tandem affinity purification tag of TGA2 for isolation of interacting proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Henrik U; Findling, Simone; Nukarinen, Ella; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Mueller, Martin J; Berger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging provides a powerful tool for isolating interacting proteins in vivo. TAP-tag purification offers particular advantages for the identification of stimulus-induced protein interactions. Type II bZIP transcription factors (TGA2, TGA5 and TGA6) play key roles in pathways that control salicylic acid, ethylene, xenobiotic and reactive oxylipin signaling. Although proteins interacting with these transcription factors have been identified through genetic and yeast 2-hybrid screening, others are still elusive. We have therefore generated a C-terminal TAP-tag of TGA2 to isolate additional proteins that interact with this transcription factor. Three lines most highly expressing TAP-tagged TGA2 were functional in that they partially complemented reactive oxylipin-responsive gene expression in a tga2 tga5 tga6 triple mutant. TAP-tagged TGA2 in the most strongly overexpressing line was proteolytically less stable than in the other 2 lines. Only this overexpressing line could be used in a 2-step purification process, resulting in isolation of co-purifying bands of larger molecular weight than TGA2. TAP-tagged TGA2 was used to pull down NPR1, a protein known to interact with this transcription factor. Mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides that co-purified with TAP-tagged TGA2. Having generated this TGA2 TAP-tag line will therefore be an asset to researchers interested in stimulus-induced signal transduction processes.

  10. A tailor-made "tag-receptor" affinity pair for the purification of fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana S; Guilherme, Márcia; Pereira, Alice S; Fernandes, Cláudia S F M; Branco, Ricardo J F; El Khoury, Graziella; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2014-07-07

    A novel affinity "tag-receptor" pair was developed as a generic platform for the purification of fusion proteins. The hexapeptide RKRKRK was selected as the affinity tag and fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). The DNA fragments were designed, cloned in Pet-21c expression vector and expressed in E. coli host as soluble protein. A solid-phase combinatorial library based on the Ugi reaction was synthesized: 64 affinity ligands displaying complementary functionalities towards the designed tag. The library was screened by affinity chromatography in a 96-well format for binding to the RKRKRK-tagged GFP protein. Lead ligand A7C1 was selected for the purification of RKRKRK fusion proteins. The affinity pair RKRKRK-tagged GFP with A7C1 emerged as a promising solution (Ka of 2.45×10(5)  M(-1) ). The specificity of the ligand towards the tag was observed experimentally and theoretically through automated docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  12. Development and characterization of high affinity leptins and leptin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-02-11

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin.

  13. Development and Characterization of High Affinity Leptins and Leptin Antagonists*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin. PMID:21119198

  14. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered.

  15. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  16. Fluorous-assisted metal chelate affinity extraction technique for analysis of protein kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Tadashi; Kiyokawa, Ena; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Imakyure, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Nohta, Hitoshi

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a fluorous affinity-based extraction method for measurement of protein kinase activity. In this method, a fluorescent peptide substrate was phosphorylated by a protein kinase, and the obtained phosphopeptide was selectively captured with Fe(III)-immobilized perfluoroalkyliminodiacetic acid reagent via a metal chelate affinity technique. Next, the captured phosphopeptide was selectively extracted into a fluorous solvent mixture, tetradecafluorohexane and 1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluoro-1-n-octanol (3:1, v/v), using the specificity of fluorous affinity (fluorophilicity). In contrast, the remained substrate peptide in the aqueous (non-fluorous) phase was easily measured fluorimetrically. Finally, the enzyme activity could be assayed by measuring the decrease in fluorescence. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated by applying the method for measurement of the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using its substrate peptide (kemptide) pre-labeled with carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA).

  17. Affinity of ceftaroline and other beta-lactams for penicillin-binding proteins from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, K; McGhee, P L; Appelbaum, P C

    2010-05-01

    We compared the affinities of ceftaroline for all penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) with those of ceftriaxone and cefotaxime in 6 Staphylococcus aureus and 7 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with various resistance phenotypes. Ceftaroline MICs were pneumoniae. Ceftaroline affinities for penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae strains were in the order PBP2X and -3 > PBP1A, -1B, and -2A > PBP2B, and ceftaroline had >or=4-fold higher 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) (0.1 to 4 microg/ml) for PBP2X, -2A, -2B, and -3 than those for the other cephalosporins tested. Among 3 penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains, ceftaroline had a high affinity for PBP2X (IC(50), 0.1 to 1 microg/ml), a primary target for cephalosporin PBP binding activity, and high affinities for PBP2B (IC(50), 0.5 to 4 microg/ml) and PBP1A (IC(50), 0.125 to 0.25 microg/ml) as well, both of which are also known as major targets for PBP binding activity of cephalosporins. Ceftaroline PBP affinities in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were greater than or equal to those of the 3 other beta-lactams tested. Ceftaroline bound to PBP2a in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC(50), 0.01 to 1 microg/ml) with up to 256-fold-higher affinity than those of other agents. Ceftaroline demonstrated very good PBP affinity against all S. aureus and S. pneumoniae strains tested, including resistant isolates.

  18. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Deng-Liang [The First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, and Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie [The First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Yao, Pei-Sen [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Pan, Ru-Jun [The First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Yang, Chaoyong James, E-mail: cyyang@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, and Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Kang, De-Zhi, E-mail: kdzy99988@163.com [The First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  19. Structure-affinity properties of a high-affinity ligand of FKBP12 studied by molecular simulations of a binding intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Olivieri

    Full Text Available With a view to explaining the structure-affinity properties of the ligands of the protein FKBP12, we characterized a binding intermediate state between this protein and a high-affinity ligand. Indeed, the nature and extent of the intermolecular contacts developed in such a species may play a role on its stability and, hence, on the overall association rate. To find the binding intermediate, a molecular simulation protocol was used to unbind the ligand by gradually decreasing the biasing forces introduced. The intermediate was subsequently refined with 17 independent stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulations that provide a consistent picture of the intermediate state. In this state, the core region of the ligand remains stable, notably because of the two anchoring oxygen atoms that correspond to recurrent motifs found in all FKBP12 ligand core structures. Besides, the non-core regions participate in numerous transient intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The dynamic aspect of most of the contacts seems important both for the ligand to retain at least a part of its configurational entropy and for avoiding a trapped state along the binding pathway. Since the transient and anchoring contacts contribute to increasing the stability of the intermediate, as a corollary, the dissociation rate constant [Formula: see text] of this intermediate should be decreased, resulting in an increase of the affinity constant [Formula: see text]. The present results support our previous conclusions and provide a coherent rationale for explaining the prevalence in high-affinity ligands of (i the two oxygen atoms found in carbonyl or sulfonyl groups of dissimilar core structures and of (ii symmetric or pseudo-symmetric mobile groups of atoms found as non-core moieties. Another interesting aspect of the intermediate is the distortion of the flexible 80 s loop of the protein, mainly in its tip region, that promotes the accessibility to the bound state.

  20. Protein-protein interactions: general trends in the relationship between binding affinity and interfacial buried surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieming; Sawyer, Nicholas; Regan, Lynne

    2013-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in many cellular processes and their affinities and specificities are finely tuned to the functions they perform. Here, we present a study on the relationship between binding affinity and the size and chemical nature of protein-protein interfaces. Our analysis focuses on heterodimers and includes curated structural and thermodynamic data for 113 complexes. We observe a direct correlation between binding affinity and the amount of surface area buried at the interface. For a given amount of surface area buried, the binding affinity spans four orders of magnitude in terms of the dissociation constant (Kd ). Across the entire dataset, we observe no obvious relationship between binding affinity and the chemical composition of the interface. We also calculate the free energy per unit surface area buried, or "surface energy density," of each heterodimer. For interfacial surface areas between 500 and 2000 Å(2) , the surface energy density decreases as the buried surface area increases. As the buried surface area increases beyond about 2000 Å(2) , the surface energy density levels off to a constant value. We believe that these analyses and data will be useful for researchers with an interest in understanding, designing or inhibiting protein-protein interfaces.

  1. High-Affinity Glucose Transport in Aspergillus nidulans Is Mediated by the Products of Two Related but Differentially Expressed Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; MacCabe, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  2. High-affinity glucose transport in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by the products of two related but differentially expressed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep V Forment

    Full Text Available Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation.

  3. Protein purification-free method of binding affinity determination by microscale thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavrutskii, Lyuba; Yeh, Joanna; Timofeeva, Olga; Tarasov, Sergey G; Pritt, Samuel; Stefanisko, Karen; Tarasova, Nadya

    2013-08-15

    Quantitative characterization of protein interactions is essential in practically any field of life sciences, particularly drug discovery. Most of currently available methods of KD determination require access to purified protein of interest, generation of which can be time-consuming and expensive. We have developed a protocol that allows for determination of binding affinity by microscale thermophoresis (MST) without purification of the target protein from cell lysates. The method involves overexpression of the GFP-fused protein and cell lysis in non-denaturing conditions. Application of the method to STAT3-GFP transiently expressed in HEK293 cells allowed to determine for the first time the affinity of the well-studied transcription factor to oligonucleotides with different sequences. The protocol is straightforward and can have a variety of application for studying interactions of proteins with small molecules, peptides, DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  4. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briers, Yves [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zuerich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Volckaert, Guido [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lavigne, Rob, E-mail: rob.lavigne@biw.kuleuven.be [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  5. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity GluK5 kainate receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møllerud, Stine; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-10-05

    Mouse GluK5 was expressed in Sf9 insect cells and radiolabelled with [(3)H]-kainate in receptor binding assays (Kd=6.9nM). Western immunoblotting indicated an Sf9 GluK5 band doublet corresponding to the glycosylated (128kDa) and deglycosylated (111kDa) protein, which was identical to the band pattern of native rat brain GluK5. A pharmacological profile of the high-affinity kainate receptor GluK5 is described which is distinct from the profiles of other kainate receptors (GluK1-3). The 27 tested ligands generally show a preferential affinity to GluK1 over GluK5, the exceptions being: dihydrokainate, (S)-5-fluorowillardiine, (S)-glutamate and quisqualate, where the affinity is similar at GluK1 and GluK5. In contrast, quisqualate shows 40-fold higher affinity at GluK5 over GluK3 whereas (S)-1-(2'-amino-2'-caboxyethyl)thienol[3,4-d]pyrimidin-2,4-dione (NF1231), (RS)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)propionate (ATPA), dihydrokainate and (2S,4R)-4-methyl-glutamate (SYM2081) have higher affinity at GluK3 compared to GluK5. Since some studies have indicated that GluK5 is associated with various diseases in the central nervous system (e.g. schizophrenia, temporal lobe epilepsy, bipolar disorder), selective GluK5 ligands could have therapeutic potential. The distinct pharmacological profile of GluK5 suggests that it would be possible to design ligands with selectivity towards GluK5.

  6. Presence of proteolipid protein in coelacanth brain myelin demonstrates tetrapod affinities and questions a chondrichthyan association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waehneldt, T V; Malotka, J

    1989-06-01

    The protein and glycoprotein compositions of CNS myelin from the living coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An unglycosylated component of 25 kilodaltons showed substantially stronger immunoblot reactivity with antibodies against mammalian proteolipid protein (PLP) than lungfish glycosylated PLP. DM-20 (intermediate protein) was not detectable in either fish. The presence of unglycosylated PLP in CNS myelin of the actinistian coelacanth contradicts an association with cartilaginous fishes but supports tetrapod affinities closer than those of lungfish.

  7. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydro......Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use...

  8. Mapping Protein–Protein Interactions of the Resistance-Related Bacterial Zeta Toxin–Epsilon Antitoxin Complex (ε2ζ2 with High Affinity Peptide Ligands Using Fluorescence Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Fernández-Bachiller

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Toxin–antitoxin systems constitute a native survival strategy of pathogenic bacteria and thus are potential targets of antibiotic drugs. Here, we target the Zeta–Epsilon toxin–antitoxin system, which is responsible for the stable maintenance of certain multiresistance plasmids in Gram-positive bacteria. Peptide ligands were designed on the basis of the ε2ζ2 complex. Three α helices of Zeta forming the protein–protein interaction (PPI site were selected and peptides were designed conserving the residues interacting with Epsilon antitoxin while substituting residues binding intramolecularly to other parts of Zeta. Designed peptides were synthesized with an N-terminal fluoresceinyl-carboxy-residue for binding assays and provided active ligands, which were used to define the hot spots of the ε2ζ2 complex. Further shortening and modification of the binding peptides provided ligands with affinities <100 nM, allowing us to determine the most relevant PPIs and implement a robust competition binding assay.

  9. Identification of proteins interacting with ammodytoxins in Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom by immuno-affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brgles, Marija; Kurtović, Tihana; Kovačič, Lidija; Križaj, Igor; Barut, Miloš; Lang Balija, Maja; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their function, proteins frequently interact with other proteins. Various methods are used to reveal protein interacting partners, and affinity chromatography is one of them. Snake venom is composed mostly of proteins, and various protein complexes in the venom have been found to exhibit higher toxicity levels than respective components separately. Complexes can modulate envenomation activity of a venom and/or potentiate its effect. Our previous data indicate that the most toxic components of the Vipera ammodytes ammodytes (Vaa) venom isolated so far-ammodytoxins (Atxs)-are contributing to the venom's toxicity only moderately; therefore, we aimed to explore whether they have some interacting partner(s) potentiating toxicity. For screening of possible interactions, immuno-affinity chromatography combined with identification by mass spectrometry was used. Various chemistries (epoxy, carbonyldiimidazole, ethylenediamine) as well as protein G functionality were used to immobilize antibodies on monolith support, a Convective Interaction Media disk. Monoliths have been demonstrated to better suit the separation of large biomolecules. Using such approach, several proteins were indicated as potential Atx-binding proteins. Among these, the interaction of Atxs with a Kunitz-type inhibitor was confirmed by far-Western dot-blot and surface plasmon resonance measurement. It can be concluded that affinity chromatography on monolithic columns combined with mass spectrometry identification is a successful approach for screening of protein interactions and it resulted with detection of the interaction of Atx with Kunitz-type inhibitor in Vaa venom for the first time.

  10. Engineering high-affinity PD-1 variants for optimized immunotherapy and immuno-PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, Roy L; Gordon, Sydney R; Mayer, Aaron T; McCracken, Melissa N; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Ring, Nan Guo; Kimura, Richard; Tsai, Jonathan M; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Weissman, Irving L; Ring, Aaron M

    2015-11-24

    Signaling through the immune checkpoint programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) enables tumor progression by dampening antitumor immune responses. Therapeutic blockade of the signaling axis between PD-1 and its ligand programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) with monoclonal antibodies has shown remarkable clinical success in the treatment of cancer. However, antibodies have inherent limitations that can curtail their efficacy in this setting, including poor tissue/tumor penetrance and detrimental Fc-effector functions that deplete immune cells. To determine if PD-1:PD-L1-directed immunotherapy could be improved with smaller, nonantibody therapeutics, we used directed evolution by yeast-surface display to engineer the PD-1 ectodomain as a high-affinity (110 pM) competitive antagonist of PD-L1. In contrast to anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies, high-affinity PD-1 demonstrated superior tumor penetration without inducing depletion of peripheral effector T cells. Consistent with these advantages, in syngeneic CT26 tumor models, high-affinity PD-1 was effective in treating both small (50 mm(3)) and large tumors (150 mm(3)), whereas the activity of anti-PD-L1 antibodies was completely abrogated against large tumors. Furthermore, we found that high-affinity PD-1 could be radiolabeled and applied as a PET imaging tracer to efficiently distinguish between PD-L1-positive and PD-L1-negative tumors in living mice, providing an alternative to invasive biopsy and histological analysis. These results thus highlight the favorable pharmacology of small, nonantibody therapeutics for enhanced cancer immunotherapy and immune diagnostics.

  11. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  12. Crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating on the affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yaw-Jen; Chen, Sheng-Zheng; Ho, Ching-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    The principle of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) has been recently implemented for protein microarrays for the study of protein abundance and function. Ni-Co film fabricated by electrodeposition is a novel microarray surface in an alloy type for immobilizing histidine-tagged proteins based on IMAC. In this paper, the effects of crystallographic structures and surface properties of Ni-Co coatings, with and without the annealing process, on the immobilization of histidine-tagged proteins were systematically investigated. The experimental results reveal that the stronger hcp texture, due to a higher Co content, results in better affinity adsorption for histidine-tagged biotin. Nevertheless, the allotropic phase transformation from hcp to fcc, due to the annealing process, leads to the decrease of affinity adsorption. The wettability property and the surface roughness of Ni-Co coating are, however, not important factors. Obviously, the crystallographic structure of Ni-Co coating is the dominant factor for the specific affinity adsorption of histidine-tagged protein.

  13. Human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor:gene cloning, high-level expression, affinity maturation and bioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using antibody phage display technique,a human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been cloned.The antibody expression reached 45% of the total bacterial proteins.The purification and refolding of the antibody were completed in one step by using gel filtration chromatograph.ELISA analysis showed that the antibody not only specifically bound to human VEGF,but also competitively inhibited VEGF reacting with its receptors.In order to raise the affinity of the single chain antibody,its heavy chain variable region was randomly mutated using error-prone PCR and an antibody mutant library was constructed,from which a mutant with higher affinity was screened out.The three-dimensional structure and binding affinity of wild type and mutant antibody were compared.Our study provided a potential reagent for tumor angiogenic therapy and a significant model for antibody high-level expression and affinity maturation.

  14. Human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor: gene cloning, high-level expression, affinity maturation and bioactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎锡蕴[1; 汤健[2; 吴小平[3; 王凤采[4; 李建生[5; 杨东玲[6

    2000-01-01

    Using antibody phage display technique, a human single chain antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been cloned. The antibody expression reached 45% of the total bacterial proteins. The purification and refolding of the antibody were completed in one step by using gel filtration chromatograph. ELISA analysis showed that the antibody not only specifically bound to human VEGF, but also competitively inhibited VEGF reacting with its receptors. In order to raise the affinity of the single chain antibody, its heavy chain variable region was randomly mutated using error-prone PCR and an antibody mutant library was constructed, from which a mutant with higher affinity was screened out. The three-dimensional structure and binding affinity of wild type and mutant antibody were compared. Our study provided a potential reagent for tumor angiogenic therapy and a significant model for antibody high-level expression and affinity maturation.

  15. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikegami Toru

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand for immunoglobulins, and undertook the investigation on the binding between mannosylerythritol lipid A (MEL-A and human immunoglobulin G (HIgG. Results In ELISA assay, MEL-A showed nearly the same binding affinity towards HIgG as that of bovine ganglioside GM1. Fab of human IgG was considered to play a more important role than Fc in the binding of HIgG by MEL-A. The bound amount of HIgG increased depending on the attached amount of MEL-A onto poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (polyHEMA beads, whereas the amount of human serum albumin slightly decreased. Binding-amount and -selectivity of HIgG towards MEL-A were influenced by salt species, salt concentration and pH in the buffer solution. The composite of MEL-A and polyHEMA, exhibited a significant binding constant of 1.43 × 106 (M-1 for HIgG, which is approximately 4-fold greater than that of protein A reported. Conclusions MEL-A shows high binding-affinity towards HIgG, and this is considered to be due to "multivalent effect" based on the binding molar ratio. This is the first report on the binding of a natural human antibody towards a yeast glycolipid.

  16. Molecular identification of high and low affinity receptors for nicotinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Alan; Foord, Steven M; Fraser, Neil J; Barnes, Ashley A; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Eilert, Michelle; Ignar, Diane M; Murdock, Paul R; Steplewski, Klaudia; Green, Andrew; Brown, Andrew J; Dowell, Simon J; Szekeres, Philip G; Hassall, David G; Marshall, Fiona H; Wilson, Shelagh; Pike, Nicholas B

    2003-03-14

    Nicotinic acid has been used clinically for over 40 years in the treatment of dyslipidemia producing a desirable normalization of a range of cardiovascular risk factors, including a marked elevation of high density lipoprotein and a reduction in mortality. The precise mechanism of action of nicotinic acid is unknown, although it is believed that activation of a G(i)-G protein-coupled receptor may contribute. Utilizing available information on the tissue distribution of nicotinic acid receptors, we identified candidate orphan receptors. The selected orphan receptors were screened for responses to nicotinic acid, in an assay for activation of G(i)-G proteins. Here we describe the identification of the G protein-coupled receptor HM74 as a low affinity receptor for nicotinic acid. We then describe the subsequent identification of HM74A in follow-up bioinformatics searches and demonstrate that it acts as a high affinity receptor for nicotinic acid and other compounds with related pharmacology. The discovery of HM74A as a molecular target for nicotinic acid may facilitate the discovery of superior drug molecules to treat dyslipidemia.

  17. A cleavable silica-binding affinity tag for rapid and inexpensive protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François

    2014-10-01

    We describe a new affinity purification tag called Car9 that confers proteins to which it is fused micromolar affinity for unmodified silica. When appended to the C-terminus of GFPmut2 through a flexible linker, Car9 promotes efficient adsorption to silica gel and the fusion protein can be released from the particles by incubation with L-lysine. Using a silica gel column and the lysine elution approach in fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) mode, Car9-tagged versions of GFPmut2, mCherry and maltose binding protein (MBP) can be recovered from clarified lysates with a purity of 80-90%. Capitalizing on silica's ability to handle large pressure drops, we further show that it is possible to go from cell lysates to purified protein in less than 15 min using a fully disposable device. Finally, we demonstrate that the linker-Car9 region is susceptible to proteolysis by E. coli OmpT and take advantage of this observation to excise the C-terminal extension of GFPmut2-Car9 by incubating purified fusion protein with cells that overproduce the outer membrane protease OmpT. The set of strategies described herein, should reduce the cost of affinity purification by at least 10-fold, cut down purification times to minutes, and allow for the production of proteins with native (or nearly native) termini from their C-terminally-tagged versions.

  18. Protein-binding affinity of leucaena condensed tannins of differing molecular weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Liang, Juan Boo; Tan, Hui Yin; Yahya, Rosiyah; Long, Ruijun; Ho, Yin Wan

    2011-10-12

    Depending on their source, concentration, chemical structure, and molecular weight, condensed tannins (CTs) form insoluble complexes with protein, which could lead to ruminal bypass protein, benefiting animal production. In this study, CTs from Leuceana leucocephala hybrid were fractionated into five fractions by a size exclusion chromatography procedure. The molecular weights of the CT fractions were determined using Q-TOF LC-MS, and the protein-binding affinities of the respective CT fractions were determined using a protein precipitation assay with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the standard protein. The calculated number-average molecular weights (M(n)) were 1348.6, 857.1, 730.1, 726.0, and 497.1, and b values (the b value represents the CT quantity that is needed to bind half of the maximum precipitable BSA) of the different molecular weight fractions were 0.381, 0.510, 0.580, 0.636, and 0.780 for fractions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The results indicated that, in general, CTs of higher molecular weight fractions have stronger protein-binding affinity than those of lower molecular weights. However, the number of hydroxyl units within the structure of CT polymers also affects the protein-binding affinity.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of high affinity Σ1 receptor selective compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Robert R; Perez, Evelyn; Yang, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Tu, Zhude; Mach, Robert H; Simpkins, James W

    2012-03-02

    We previously reported that the antipsychotic drug haloperidol, a multifunctional D2-like dopamine and sigma receptor subtype antagonist, has neuroprotective properties. In this study we further examined the association between neuroprotection and receptor antagonism by evaluating a panel of novel compounds with varying affinity at sigma and D2-like dopamine receptors. These compounds were evaluated using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay that utilizes a hippocampal-derived cell line, HT-22, in the presence or absence of varying concentrations (5 to 20 mM) of glutamate. While haloperidol was found to be a potent neuroprotective agent in this in vitro cell assay, the prototypic sigma 1 receptor agonist (+)-pentazocine was found not to be neuroprotective. Subsequently, the potency for the neuroprotection of HT-22 cells was evaluated for a) three SV series indoles which have nMolar affinity at D2-like receptors but varying affinity at sigma 1 receptor and b) two benzyl phenylacetamides sigma 1 receptor selective compounds which bind with low affinity at D2-like receptors but have nMolar affinity for the sigma 1 receptor. We observed that cytoprotection correlated with the affinity of the compounds for sigma 1 receptors. Based upon results from the HT-22 cell-based in vitro assay, two phenylacetamides, LS-127 and LS-137, were further evaluated in vivo using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (t-MCAO) model of stroke. At a dose of 100 μg/kg, both LS-127 and LS-137 attenuated infarct volume by approximately 50%. These studies provide further evidence that sigma 1 receptor selective compounds can provide neuroprotection in cytotoxic situations. These results also demonstrate that sigma 1 receptor selective benzyl phenylacetamides are candidate pharmacotherapeutic agents that could be used to minimize neuronal death after a stroke or head trauma.

  20. Affinity chromatography for the purification of therapeutic proteins from transgenic maize using immobilized histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platis, Dimitris; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2008-03-01

    Plant molecular pharming is a technology that uses plants as bioreactors to produce recombinant molecules of medical and veterinary importance. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of histamine (HIM), tryptamine (TRM), phenylamine (PHEM) and tyramine (TYRM) coupled to Sepharose CL-4B via a 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether spacer to bind and purify human monoclonal anti-HIV antibody 2F5 (mAb 2F5) from spiked maize seed and tobacco leaf extracts. Detailed studies were carried out to determine the factors that affect the chromatographic behaviour of mAb 2F5 and also maize seed and tobacco leaf proteins. All affinity adsorbents showed a reduced capacity to bind and a reduced ability to purify proteins from tobacco extract compared to maize extract. Under optimal conditions, HIM exhibited high selectivity for mAb 2F5 and allowed a high degree of purification (>95% purity) and recovery (>90%) in a single step with salt elution (0.4 M KCl) from spiked maize seed extract. Analysis of the purified antibody fraction by ELISA and Western blot showed that the antibody was fully active and free of degraded variants or modified forms. The efficacy of the system was assessed further using a second therapeutic antibody (human monoclonal anti-HIV antibody mAb 2G12) and a therapeutic enzyme (alpha-chymotrypsin). HIM may find application in the purification of a wide range of biopharmaceuticals from transgenic plants.

  1. Soluble T cell receptor Vβ domains engineered for high-affinity binding to staphylococcal or streptococcal superantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Wang, Ningyan; Kranz, David M

    2014-01-28

    Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs), so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual's T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR) on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V) of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1) or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC) have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinityproteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  2. Soluble T Cell Receptor Vβ Domains Engineered for High-Affinity Binding to Staphylococcal or Streptococcal Superantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and group A Streptococcus secrete a collection of toxins called superantigens (SAgs, so-called because they stimulate a large fraction of an individual’s T cells. One consequence of this hyperactivity is massive cytokine release leading to severe tissue inflammation and, in some cases, systemic organ failure and death. The molecular basis of action involves the binding of the SAg to both a T cell receptor (TCR on a T cell and a class II product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC on an antigen presenting cell. This cross-linking leads to aggregation of the TCR complex and signaling. A common feature of SAgs is that they bind with relatively low affinity to the variable region (V of the beta chain of the TCR. Despite this low affinity binding, SAgs are very potent, as each T cell requires only a small fraction of their receptors to be bound in order to trigger cytokine release. To develop high-affinity agents that could neutralize the activity of SAgs, and facilitate the development of detection assays, soluble forms of the Vβ regions have been engineered to affinities that are up to 3 million-fold higher for the SAg. Over the past decade, six different Vβ regions against SAgs from S. aureus (SEA, SEB, SEC3, TSST-1 or S. pyogenes (SpeA and SpeC have been engineered for high-affinity using yeast display and directed evolution. Here we review the engineering of these high-affinityproteins, structural features of the six different SAgs and the Vβ proteins, and the specific properties of the engineered Vβ regions that confer high-affinity and specificity for their SAg ligands.

  3. A community standard format for the representation of protein affinity reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Orchard, Sandra; Bertinetti, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Protein affinity reagents (PARs), most commonly antibodies, are essential reagents for protein characterization in basic research, biotechnology, and diagnostics as well as the fastest growing class of therapeutics. Large numbers of PARs are available commercially; however, their quality is often......Binders by building on a mature proteomics standard format, PSI-molecular interaction, which is a widely accepted and established community standard for molecular interaction data. Further information and documentation are available on the PSI-PAR web site....

  4. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  5. A novel method for protein-ligand binding affinity prediction and the related descriptors exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyan; Xi, Lili; Wang, Chengqi; Li, Jiazhong; Lei, Beilei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2009-04-30

    In this study, a novel method was developed to predict the binding affinity of protein-ligand based on a comprehensive set of structurally diverse protein-ligand complexes (PLCs). The 1300 PLCs with binding affinity (493 complexes with K(d) and 807 complexes with K(i)) from the refined dataset of PDBbind Database (release 2007) were studied in the predictive model development. In this method, each complex was described using calculated descriptors from three blocks: protein sequence, ligand structure, and binding pocket. Thereafter, the PLCs data were rationally split into representative training and test sets by full consideration of the validation of the models. The molecular descriptors relevant to the binding affinity were selected using the ReliefF method combined with least squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs) modeling method based on the training data set. Two final optimized LS-SVMs models were developed using the selected descriptors to predict the binding affinities of K(d) and K(i). The correlation coefficients (R) of training set and test set for K(d) model were 0.890 and 0.833. The corresponding correlation coefficients for the K(i) model were 0.922 and 0.742, respectively. The prediction method proposed in this work can give better generalization ability than other recently published methods and can be used as an alternative fast filter in the virtual screening of large chemical database. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cellulose affinity purification of fusion proteins tagged with fungal family 1 cellulose-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naohisa; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    N- or C-terminal fusions of red-fluorescent protein (RFP) with various fungal cellulose-binding domains (CBDs) belonging to carbohydrate binding module (CBM) family 1 were expressed in a Pichia pastoris expression system, and the resulting fusion proteins were used to examine the feasibility of large-scale affinity purification of CBD-tagged proteins on cellulose columns. We found that RFP fused with CBD from Trichoderma reesei CBHI (CBD(Tr)(CBHI)) was expressed at up to 1.2g/l in the culture filtrate, which could be directly injected into the cellulose column. The fusion protein was tightly adsorbed on the cellulose column in the presence of a sufficient amount of ammonium sulfate and was efficiently eluted with pure water. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was not captured under these conditions, whereas both BSA and the fusion protein were adsorbed on a phenyl column, indicating that the cellulose column can be used for the purification of not only hydrophilic proteins but also for hydrophobic proteins. Recovery of various fusion proteins exceeded 80%. Our results indicate that protein purification by expression of a target protein as a fusion with a fungal family 1 CBD tag in a yeast expression system, followed by affinity purification on a cellulose column, is simple, effective and easily scalable.

  7. Binding affinity of hydrolyzable tannins to parotid saliva and to proline-rich proteins derived from it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J R; Rhodes, M J

    2000-03-01

    Proline-rich proteins (PRP) in human parotid saliva have a high affinity for dietary polyphenolic compounds (tannins), forming stable complexes that may modulate the biological and nutritional properties of the tannin. The formation of such complexes may also have an important role in the modulation or promotion of the sensation of oral astringency perceived when tannin-rich foods and beverages are consumed. The major classes of PRP (acidic, basic, and glycosylated) have been isolated from human saliva, and the relative binding affinities of a series of hydrolyzable tannins, which are found in a number of plant-derived foods and beverages, to these PRP classes have been determined using a competition assay. All of the classes of PRP have a high capacity for hydrolyzable tannins. Within the narrow range of binding affinities exhibited, structure/binding relationships with the levels of tannin galloylation, hexahydroxydiphenoyl esterification, and degree of polymerization were identified. No individual class of human salivary PRP appears to have an exclusive affinity for a particular type of hydrolyzable tannin.

  8. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply.

  9. Affinity Association Between Polynucleotide, Glycoprotein, or Sulfated Polysaccharides and Disease-Associated Prion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tsukui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase-K resistant prion protein (PrPres has the property to aggregate in TSE-injured animal tissues. We have developed a test method to discriminate scrapie-infected and mock-infected hamsters by detecting the PrPres in plasma. It seemed that aggregation of the PrPres with some heterogeneous molecule(s enabled successful detection by this method. In order to investigate which molecule became the partner in the PrPres aggregates; we examined some molecules that could presumably have this ability. As a result, we found synthetic Poly-A RNA, especially in its denatured form, to be the most effective entity although glycoprotein, sulfated polysaccharide showed less effectiveness. DNA in the denatured form also has a high affinity, although in the presence of protein the effectiveness unsuccessful. On the basis of this result, it is possible that the PrPres aggregate in scrapie-infected hamster plasma is composed of PrPres and RNA.

  10. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity (albumin

  11. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity

  12. Understanding ligand-protein interactions in affinity membrane chromatography for antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana; Busini, Valentina; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo; Sarti, Giulio C

    2009-12-11

    Affinity chromatography with Protein A beads has become the conventional unit operation for the primary capture of monoclonal antibodies. However, Protein A activated supports are expensive and ligand leakage is an issue to be considered. In addition, the limited production capabilities of the chromatographic process drive the research towards feasible alternatives. The use of synthetic ligands as Protein A substitutes has been considered in this work. Synthetic ligands, that mimic the interaction between Protein A and the constant fragment (Fc) of immunoglobulins, have been immobilized on cellulosic membrane supports. The resulting affinity membranes have been experimentally characterized with pure immunoglobulin G (IgG). The effects of the membrane support and of the spacer arm on the ligand-ligate interaction have been studied in detail. Experimental data have been compared with molecular dynamic simulations with the aim of better understanding the interaction mechanisms. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed in explicit water, modelling the membrane as a matrix of overlapped glucopyranose units. Electrostatic charges of the ligand and spacer were calculated through ab initio methods to complete the force field used to model the membrane. The simulations enabled to elucidate how the interactions of surface, spacer and ligand with IgG, contribute to the formation of the bond between protein and affinity membrane.

  13. Affinity chromatography of chaperones based on denatured proteins: Analysis of cell lysates of different origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, N Yu; Sikorskaya, E V; Marchenkov, V V; Kashparov, I A; Semisotnov, G V

    2016-03-01

    Molecular chaperones are involved in folding, oligomerization, transport, and degradation of numerous cellular proteins. Most of chaperones are heat-shock proteins (HSPs). A number of diseases of various organisms are accompanied by changes in the structure and functional activity of chaperones, thereby revealing their vital importance. One of the fundamental properties of chaperones is their ability to bind polypeptides lacking a rigid spatial structure. Here, we demonstrate that affinity chromatography using sorbents with covalently attached denatured proteins allows effective purification and quantitative assessment of their bound protein partners. Using pure Escherichia coli chaperone GroEL (Hsp60), the capacity of denatured pepsin or lysozyme-based affinity sorbents was evaluated as 1 mg and 1.4 mg of GroEL per 1 ml of sorbent, respectively. Cell lysates of bacteria (E. coli, Thermus thermophilus, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis), archaea (Halorubrum lacusprofundi) as well as the lysate of rat liver mitochondria were analyzed using affinity carrier with denatured lysozyme. It was found that, apart from Hsp60, other proteins with a molecular weight of about 100, 50, 40, and 20 kDa are able to interact with denatured lysozyme.

  14. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  15. Protein electrophoretic markers in Israel: compilation of data and genetic affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoossmann-Diskin, A; Joel, A; Liron, M; Kerem, B; Shohat, M; Peleg, L

    2002-01-01

    A considerable body of data has been accumulated since the 1960s on protein electrophoretic markers in the Jewish populations of Israel. However, in some Jewish communities and for some markers insufficient information has been available. In addition, studies that tried to explore the genetic affinities of various Jewish populations mainly employed antigenic markers and frequently used a small and unrepresentative number of non-Jewish populations as comparisons. The primary objectives of the present study were to create a comprehensive database for protein electrophoretic markers in Israel and thereby to explore the genetic affinities of different Jewish populations. Published information on red cell enzyme and serum protein polymorphisms in Israeli Jewish populations was combined with new data obtained by protein electrophoresis and DNA PCR (polymerase chain reaction) methods to create the database. The genetic affinities were investigated by two methods. Ten Jewish populations were classified in a discriminant analysis based on nine markers and 65 non-Jewish populations. The same markers and populations were also used in a genetic distance analysis. The database contains new information on 15 protein electrophoretic markers in 14 Israeli populations, including three Jewish populations from Turkey, Tunisia and the Caucasus region, for which no or only scarce data were previously available. The discriminant analysis resulted in only two Jewish populations, from Iraq and Yemen, being classified within the Middle Eastern group. According to their genetic distances, no particular genetic similarity was observed between the various Jewish study populations. In contrast to the conclusions of several previous studies, there was no evidence for close genetic affinities among the Jewish populations or for a Middle Eastern origin for most of them. Since the study is the first to use only the more reliable protein electrophoretic markers, and an appropriately comprehensive

  16. The antenna-specific odorant-binding protein AlinOBP13 of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus is expressed specifically in basiconic sensilla and has high binding affinity to terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Xiao, H-J; Gu, S-H; Zhou, J-J; Guo, Y-Y; Liu, Z-W; Zhang, Y-J

    2014-08-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are crucial in the olfactory pathway of insects. In the present study, the antenna-enriched OBP AlinOBP13 was investigated because of its potential contribution to the peripheral olfactory perception in the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus. The results of quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that the transcript level of AlinOBP13 was higher in the adult stage than in the nymph stages. The transcript levels of AlinOBP13 in the male and female antennae significantly increased after 4 and 8 h of starvation, respectively. Fine ultrastructures of different types of chemosensilla in both female and male antennae were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and immunocytochemical labelling. The results revealed that the anti-AlinOBP13 antiserum strongly and specifically labelled short basiconic sensilla; this antiserum was restricted to the inner lumen and the cavities below the sensillum base of the sensilla. By contrast, multiporous sensilla trichodea, medium long sensilla basiconica, and aporous sensilla chaetica were not labelled. The present study is the first to report an OBP showing specific expression in the short basiconic sensilla of a member of the Hemipteran species. The results of a fluorescence displacement binding assay indicated that recombinant AlinOBP13 showed a more specific binding preference to terpenoids than to sex pheromones and other classes of chemicals. This binding ability was dramatically affected by pH; higher binding affinities were displayed at pH 10.0 than at pH 7.4 and 5.0. In addition, the results of dose-dependent electroantennogram recordings from the antennae showed that both female and male adult bugs responded to the terpenoids tested, suggesting an apparent physiological relevance of AlinOBP13 in A. lineolatus chemoreception. The results of this study suggest that AlinOBP13 functions as a specific carrier of terpenoids and provide insights into the mechanism of A

  17. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  18. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  19. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervey, IV, William Judson [ORNL; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K [ORNL; Lankford, Patricia K [ORNL; Owens, Elizabeth T [ORNL; McKeown, Catherine K [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Foote, Linda J [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  20. Towards understanding of Nipah virus attachment protein assembly and the role of protein affinity and crowding for membrane curvature events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Hayden, Carl C.; Negrete, Oscar.; Davis, Ryan Wesley; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2013-10-01

    Pathogenic viruses are a primary threat to our national security and to the health and economy of our world. Effective defense strategies to combat viral infection and spread require the development of understanding of the mechanisms that these pathogens use to invade the host cell. We present in this report results of our research into viral particle recognition and fusion to cell membranes and the role that protein affinity and confinement in lipid domains plays in membrane curvature in cellular fusion and fission events. Herein, we describe 1) the assembly of the G attachment protein of Nipah virus using point mutation studies to define its role in viral particle fusion to the cell membrane, 2) how lateral pressure of membrane bound proteins induce curvature in model membrane systems, and 3) the role of membrane curvature in the selective partitioning of molecular receptors and specific affinity of associated proteins.

  1. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  2. Isolation, identification and characterisation of starch-interacting proteins by 2-D affinity electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Irwin, Jennifer A; Higgins, Jody; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew K

    2006-05-01

    A 2-D affinity electrophoretic technique (2-DAE) has been used to isolate proteins that interact with various starch components from total barley endosperm extracts. In the first dimension, proteins are separated by native PAGE. The second-dimensional gel contains polysaccharides such as amylopectin and glycogen. The migration of starch-interacting proteins in this dimension is determined by their affinity towards a particular polysaccharide and these proteins are therefore spatially separated from the bulk of proteins in the crude extract. Four distinct proteins demonstrate significant affinity for amylopectin and have been identified as starch branching enzyme I (SBEI), starch branching enzyme IIa (SBEIIa), SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase using polyclonal antibodies and zymogram activity analysis. In the case of starch phosphorylase, a protein spot was excised from a 2-DAE polyacrylamide gel and analysed using Q-TOF MS/MS, resulting in the alignment of three internal peptide sequences with the known sequence of the wheat plastidic starch phosphorylase isoform. This assignment was confirmed by the determination of the enzyme's function using zymogram analysis. Dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated for the three enzymes at 4 degrees C and values of 0.20, 0.21 and 1.3 g/L were determined for SBEI, SBEIIa and starch phosphorylase, respectively. Starch synthase I could also be resolved from the other proteins in the presence of glycogen and its identity was confirmed using a polyclonal antibody and by activity analysis. The 2-DAE method described here is simple, though powerful, enabling protein separation from crude extracts on the basis of function.

  3. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications.

  4. Characterization of receptor proteins using affinity cross-linking with biotinylated ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Tomonori; Osada, Tomohiko; Desaki, Yoshitake; Hatamoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Takai, Ryota; Che, Fang-Sik; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2010-02-01

    The plant genome encodes a wide range of receptor-like proteins but the function of most of these proteins is unknown. We propose the use of affinity cross-linking of biotinylated ligands for a ligand-based survey of the corresponding receptor molecules. Biotinylated ligands not only enable the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions without the use of radioactive compounds but also the isolation and identification of receptor molecules by a simple affinity trapping method. We successfully applied this method for the characterization, isolation and identification of the chitin elicitor binding protein (CEBiP). A biocytin hydrazide conjugate of N-acetylchitooctaose (GN8-Bio) was synthesized and used for the detection of CEBiP in the plasma or microsomal membrane preparations from rice and carrot cells. Binding characteristics of CEBiP analyzed by inhibition studies were in good agreement with the previous results obtained with the use of a radiolabeled ligand. The biotin-tagged CEBiP could be purified by avidin affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MALDI-MS/MS after tryptic digestion. We also used this method to detect OsFLS2, a rice receptor-like kinase for the perception of the peptide elicitor flg22, in membrane preparations from rice cells overexpressing OsFLS2. This work demonstrates the applicability of this method to the purification and identification of plant receptor proteins.

  5. Integrin alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity receptor for coxsackievirus A9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Outi; Susi, Petri; Stanway, Glyn; Hyypiä, Timo

    2009-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A9 (CAV9), a member of the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae, possesses an integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif in the C terminus of VP1 capsid protein. CAV9 has been shown to utilize integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6 as primary receptors for cell attachment. While CAV9 RGD-mutants (RGE and RGDdel) are capable of infecting rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell line, they grow very poorly in an epithelial lung carcinoma cell line (A549). In this study, the relationships between CAV9 infectivity in A549 and RD cells, receptor expression and integrin binding were analysed. A549 cells were shown to express both integrins alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6, whereas alphaVbeta6 expression was not detected on the RD cells. Native CAV9 but not RGE and RGDdel mutants bound efficiently to immobilized alphaVbeta3 and alphaVbeta6. Adhesion of CAV9 but not RGE/RGDdel to A549 cells was also significantly higher than to RD cells. In contrast, no affinity or adhesion of bacterially produced VP1 proteins to the integrins or to the cells was detected. Function-blocking antibodies against alphaV-integrins blocked CAV9 but not CAV9-RGDdel infectivity, indicating that the viruses use different internalization routes; this may explain the differential infection kinetics of CAV9 and RGDdel. In an affinity assay, soluble alphaVbeta6, but not alphaVbeta3, bound to immobilized CAV9. Similarly, only soluble alphaVbeta6 blocked virus infectivity. These data suggest that CAV9 binding to alphaVbeta6 is a high-affinity interaction, which may indicate its importance in clinical infections; this remains to be determined.

  6. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  7. Devices and approaches for generating specific high-affinity nucleic acid aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Kylan; Craighead, Harold G.

    2014-09-01

    High-affinity and highly specific antibody proteins have played a critical role in biological imaging, medical diagnostics, and therapeutics. Recently, a new class of molecules called aptamers has emerged as an alternative to antibodies. Aptamers are short nucleic acid molecules that can be generated and synthesized in vitro to bind to virtually any target in a wide range of environments. They are, in principal, less expensive and more reproducible than antibodies, and their versatility creates possibilities for new technologies. Aptamers are generated using libraries of nucleic acid molecules with random sequences that are subjected to affinity selections for binding to specific target molecules. This is commonly done through a process called Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, in which target-bound nucleic acids are isolated from the pool, amplified to high copy numbers, and then reselected against the desired target. This iterative process is continued until the highest affinity nucleic acid sequences dominate the enriched pool. Traditional selections require a dozen or more laborious cycles to isolate strongly binding aptamers, which can take months to complete and consume large quantities of reagents. However, new devices and insights from engineering and the physical sciences have contributed to a reduction in the time and effort needed to generate aptamers. As the demand for these new molecules increases, more efficient and sensitive selection technologies will be needed. These new technologies will need to use smaller samples, exploit a wider range of chemistries and techniques for manipulating binding, and integrate and automate the selection steps. Here, we review new methods and technologies that are being developed towards this goal, and we discuss their roles in accelerating the availability of novel aptamers.

  8. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher's attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with Kd 56±7.3nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  9. A high-affinity, dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95 bivalently interacts with PDZ1-2 and protects against ischemic brain damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders*; Clausen, Bettina H; Møller, Magda;

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of the ternary protein complex of the synaptic scaffolding protein postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a potential strategy for treating ischemic brain damage, but high-affinity inhibitors...

  10. Twin-column CaptureSMB: a novel cyclic process for protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarita, Monica; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Baur, Daniel; Lievrouw, Roel; Lissens, Geert; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-04-10

    A twin-column counter-current chromatography processes, CaptureSMB, was used for the protein A affinity capture of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). By means of sequential loading, the process improves the utilization of the stationary phase by achieving loadings much closer to the static binding capacity of the resin in comparison to batch chromatography. Using a mAb capture case study with protein A affinity chromatography, the performance and product quality obtained from CaptureSMB and batch processes were compared. The effect of the flow rate, column length and titer concentration on the process performance and product quality were evaluated. CaptureSMB showed superior performance compared to batch chromatography with respect to productivity, capacity utilization, product concentration and buffer consumption. A simplified economic evaluation showed that CaptureSMB could decrease resin costs of 10-30% depending on the manufacturing scenario.

  11. Single-step affinity purification of recombinant proteins using a self-excising module from Neisseria meningitidis FrpC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadilkova, Lenka; Osicka, Radim; Sulc, Miroslav; Linhartova, Irena; Novak, Petr; Sebo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins is often a challenging process involving several chromatographic steps that must be optimized for each target protein. Here, we developed a self-excising module allowing single-step affinity chromatography purification of untagged recombinant proteins. It consists of a 250-residue-long self-processing module of the Neisseria meningitidis FrpC protein with a C-terminal affinity tag. The N terminus of the module is fused to the C terminus of a target protein of interest. Upon binding of the fusion protein to an affinity matrix from cell lysate and washing out contaminating proteins, site-specific cleavage of the Asp–Pro bond linking the target protein to the self-excising module is induced by calcium ions. This results in the release of the target protein with only a single aspartic acid residue added at the C terminus, while the self-excising affinity module remains trapped on the affinity matrix. The system was successfully tested with several target proteins, including glutathione-S-transferase, maltose-binding protein, β-galactosidase, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, and adenylate cyclase, and two different affinity tags, chitin-binding domain or poly-His. Moreover, it was demonstrated that it can be applied as an alternative to two currently existing systems, based on the self-splicing intein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sortase A of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:18662906

  12. A generic protocol for the purification and characterization of water-soluble complexes of affinity-tagged proteins and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenji; Poletto, Mattia; Chiapparino, Antonella; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between lipids and proteins in the aqueous phases of cells contribute to many aspects of cell physiology. Here we describe a detailed protocol to systematically characterize in vivo-assembled complexes of soluble proteins and lipids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing physiological amounts of a protein of interest fused to the tandem-affinity purification (TAP) tag are first lysed in the absence of detergent to capture intact protein-lipid complexes. The affinity-purified complexes (typically 30-50 kDa) are subjected to analytical size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) to remove contaminating lipids that elute at the void volume (>600 kDa), in order to achieve sufficient signal-to-background lipid ratios. Proteins in the SEC fractions are then analyzed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Lipidomics techniques such as high-performance thin-layer chromatography or gas or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry can then be applied to measure the elution profiles of lipids and to pinpoint the true interactors co-eluting with the TAP fusions. The procedure (starting from cell lysis) requires 2 d, and it can easily be adapted to other organisms.

  13. Synthesis and performance of megaporous immobilized metal-ion affinity cryogels for recombinant protein capture and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Noor Shad; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Dsouza, Roy N; Aasim, Muhammad; Fernández-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-01-11

    Megaporous cryogels with metal-ion affinity functionality, which possess enhanced protein-binding ability, were synthesized and their properties were investigated. These highly porous materials (pore sizes up to 100 μm) allowed the direct capture of a recombinant His(6)-tagged protein from a partially clarified extract. The total ligand density of the material was found to be 770 μmol/g. Application of a partially clarified cell extract in order to recover a His(6)-tagged protein (NAD(P)H-dependent 2-cyclohexen-1-one-reductase) yielded 12 mg of highly purified recombinant product per gram of adsorbent. Increased dynamic binding capacities were observed upon larger degrees of grafting, although some reduction in the quality of the system hydrodynamics was also observed. Nevertheless, these immobilized metal-ion affinity cryogels show potential for a convenient single-step purification of recombinant proteins from raw cell extracts without the need for laborious pre-chromatographic sample clean-up procedures.

  14. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Koefoed, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture...... of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein...... complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor...

  15. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  16. Acylated heptapeptide binds albumin with high affinity and application as tag furnishes long-acting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Middendorp, Simon J.; Wilbs, Jonas; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The rapid renal clearance of peptides in vivo limits this attractive platform for the treatment of a broad range of diseases that require prolonged drug half-lives. An intriguing approach for extending peptide circulation times works through a `piggy-back' strategy in which peptides bind via a ligand to the long-lived serum protein albumin. In accordance with this strategy, we developed an easily synthesized albumin-binding ligand based on a peptide-fatty acid chimera that has a high affinity for human albumin (Kd=39 nM). This ligand prolongs the elimination half-life of cyclic peptides in rats 25-fold to over seven hours. Conjugation to a peptide factor XII inhibitor developed for anti-thrombotic therapy extends the half-life from 13 minutes to over five hours, inhibiting coagulation for eight hours in rabbits. This high-affinity albumin ligand could potentially extend the half-life of peptides in human to several days, substantially broadening the application range of peptides as therapeutics.

  17. High affinity binding site-mediated prevention of chemical absorption across the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, M V; Barker, T T; Silbart, L K

    2001-12-15

    Preventing mucosal absorption of low-molecular weight compounds such as carcinogens, toxins and drugs could help prevent many diseases. To characterize the effects of dose and timing on high-affinity binding site mediated sequestration of specific chemical ligands in the gastrointestinal tract, avidin was perorally-administered to mice either prior to or mixed with 3H-biotin. Avidin enhanced fecal 3H-biotin excretion in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with the accepted mechanism of egg white-induced biotin deficiency syndrome. Avidin administration up to 4 h before 3H-biotin administration also enhanced fecal 3H-biotin excretion. Activated charcoal (AC) reduced 3H-biotin absorption when mixed with 3H-biotin before ingestion, but was ineffective when ingested prior to 3H-biotin. These studies suggest that ingestion of high-affinity protein binding sites can establish an absorptive barrier at the gastrointestinal mucosa to prevent the uptake of unwanted low molecular-weight chemicals.

  18. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  19. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. (Centre de Biochimie, Nice (France))

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  20. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S

    2016-01-01

    analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations......, (3)H-HOCPCA displays excellent signal-to-noise ratios using rodent brain autoradiography, which makes it a valuable ligand for anatomical quantification of native GHB binding site levels. Our data confirmed that (3)H-HOCPCA labels only the high-affinity specific GHB binding site, found in high...... density in cortical and hippocampal regions. The experiments revealed markedly stronger binding at pH 6.0 (Kd 73.8 nM) compared to pH 7.4 (Kd 2312 nM), as previously reported for other GHB radioligands but similar Bmax values. Using (3)H-HOCPCA we analyzed the GHB binding protein profile during mouse...

  1. Engineering Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) derivative strains to minimize E. coli protein contamination after purification by immobilized metal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichon, Carine; Luo, Jianying; Causey, Thomas B; Benner, Jack S; Samuelson, James C

    2011-07-01

    Recombinant His-tagged proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) are commonly coeluted with native E. coli proteins, especially if the recombinant protein is expressed at a low level. The E. coli contaminants display high affinity to divalent nickel or cobalt ions, mainly due to the presence of clustered histidine residues or biologically relevant metal binding sites. To improve the final purity of expressed His-tagged protein, we engineered E. coli BL21(DE3) expression strains in which the most recurring contaminants are either expressed with an alternative tag or mutated to decrease their affinity to divalent cations. The current study presents the design, engineering, and characterization of two E. coli BL21(DE3) derivatives, NiCo21(DE3) and NiCo22(DE3), which express the endogenous proteins SlyD, Can, ArnA, and (optionally) AceE fused at their C terminus to a chitin binding domain (CBD) and the protein GlmS, with six surface histidines replaced by alanines. We show that each E. coli CBD-tagged protein remains active and can be efficiently eliminated from an IMAC elution fraction using a chitin column flowthrough step, while the modification of GlmS results in loss of affinity for nickel-containing resin. The "NiCo" strains uniquely complement existing methods for improving the purity of recombinant His-tagged protein.

  2. Cadmium inhibits the induction of high-affinity nitrate uptake in maize (Zea mays L.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardo, Cecilia; Tomasi, Nicola; Monte, Rossella; Varanini, Zeno; Nocito, Fabio F; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) detoxification involves glutathione and phytochelatins biosynthesis: the higher need of nitrogen should require increased nitrate (NO(3)(-)) uptake and metabolism. We investigated inducible high-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake across the plasma membrane (PM) in maize seedlings roots upon short exposure (10 min to 24 h) to low Cd concentrations (0, 1 or 10 μM): the activity and gene transcript abundance of high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters, NO(3)(-) reductases and PM H(+)-ATPases were analyzed. Exposure to 1 mM NO(3)(-) led to a peak in high-affinity (0.2 mM) NO(3)(-) uptake rate (induction), which was markedly lowered in Cd-treated roots. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity was also strongly limited, while internal NO(3)(-) accumulation and NO(3)(-) reductase activity in extracts of Cd treated roots were only slightly lowered. Kinetics of high- and low-affinity NO(3)(-) uptake showed that Cd rapidly (10 min) blocked the inducible high-affinity transport system; the constitutive high-affinity transport system appeared not vulnerable to Cd and the low-affinity transport system appeared to be less affected and only after a prolonged exposure (12 h). Cd-treatment also modified transcript levels of genes encoding high-affinity NO(3)(-) transporters (ZmNTR2.1, ZmNRT2.2), PM H(+)-ATPases (ZmMHA3, ZmMHA4) and NO(3)(-) reductases (ZmNR1, ZmNADH:NR). Despite an expectable increase in NO(3)(-) demand, a negative effect of Cd on NO(3)(-) nutrition is reported. Cd effect results in alterations at the physiological and transcriptional levels of NO(3)(-) uptake from the external solution and it is particularly severe on the inducible high-affinity anion transport system. Furthermore, Cd would limit the capacity of the plant to respond to changes in NO(3) (-) availability.

  3. Application of coupled affinity-sizing chromatography for the detection of proteolyzed HSA-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Anne Serdakowski; Patel, Kunal; Quinn, Lisa; Lemmerer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Coupled affinity liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography (ALC-SEC) is a technique that has been shown to successfully report product quality of proteins during cell expression and prior to the commencement of downstream processing chromatography steps. This method was applied to monitoring the degradation and subsequent partial remediation of a HSA-tagged protein which showed proteolysis, allowing for rapid cell line development to address this product quality dilemma. This paper outlines the novel application of this method for measuring and addressing protease-induced proteolysis.

  4. Influence of Sulfolane on ESI-MS Measurements of Protein-Ligand Affinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuyu; Richards, Michele R.; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-03-01

    The results of an investigation into the influence of sulfolane, a commonly used supercharging agent, on electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements of protein-ligand affinities are described. Binding measurements carried out on four protein-carbohydrate complexes, lysozyme with β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→4)- d-GlcNAc, a single chain variable fragment and α- d-Gal-(1→2)-[α- d-Abe-(1→3)]-α- d-Man-OCH3, cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer with β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GalNAc-(1→4)[α- d-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, and a fragment of galectin 3 and α- l-Fuc-(1→2)-β- d-Gal-(1→3)-β- d-GlcNAc-(1→3)-β- d-Gal-(1→4)-β- d-Glc, revealed that sulfolane generally reduces the apparent (as measured by ESI-MS) protein-ligand affinities. To establish the origin of this effect, a detailed study was undertaken using the lysozyme-tetrasaccharide interaction as a model system. Measurements carried out using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies reveal that sulfolane reduces the binding affinity in solution but does not cause any significant change in the higher order structure of lysozyme or to the intermolecular interactions. These observations confirm that changes to the structure of lysozyme in bulk solution are not responsible for the supercharging effect induced by sulfolane. Moreover, the agreement between the ESI-MS and ITC-derived affinities indicates that there is no dissociation of the complex during ESI or in the gas phase (i.e., in-source dissociation). This finding suggests that supercharging of lysozyme by sulfolane is not related to protein unfolding during the ESI process. Binding measurements performed using liquid sample desorption ESI-MS revealed that protein supercharging with sulfolane can be achieved without a reduction in affinity.

  5. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinityproteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection.

  6. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  7. Affinity enhancement of antibodies: how low-affinity antibodies produced early in immune responses are followed by high-affinity antibodies later and in memory B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Herman N

    2014-05-01

    The antibodies produced initially in response to most antigens are high molecular weight (MW) immunoglobulins (IgM) with low affinity for the antigen, while the antibodies produced later are lower MW classes (e.g., IgG and IgA) with, on average, orders of magnitude higher affinity for that antigen. These changes, often termed affinity maturation, take place largely in small B-cell clusters (germinal center; GC) in lymphoid tissues in which proliferating antigen-stimulated B cells express the highly mutagenic cytidine deaminase that mediates immunoglobulin class-switching and sequence diversification of the immunoglobulin variable domains of antigen-binding receptors on B cells (BCR). Of the large library of BCR-mutated B cells thus rapidly generated, a small minority with affinity-enhancing mutations are selected to survive and differentiate into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. BCRs are also endocytic receptors; they internalize and cleave BCR-bound antigen, yielding peptide-MHC complexes that are recognized by follicular helper T cells. Imperfect correlation between BCR affinity for antigen and cognate T-cell engagement may account for the increasing affinity heterogeneity that accompanies the increasing average affinity of antibodies. Conservation of mechanisms underlying mutation and selection of high-affinity antibodies over the ≈200 million years of evolution separating bird and mammal lineages points to the crucial role of antibody affinity enhancement in adaptive immunity.

  8. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Korin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Mueller, Ryan [University of California, Berkeley; Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  10. Cyclic GMP-AMP Containing Mixed Phosphodiester Linkages Is An Endogenous High Affinity Ligand for STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2′-OH of GMP and 5′-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3′-OH of AMP and 5′-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2′3′-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2′3′-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation. PMID:23747010

  11. Expression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity hexose transporter STP13 correlates with programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norholm, Morten H H; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Brodersen, Peter; Mundy, John; Halkier, Barbara A

    2006-04-17

    We report the biochemical characterization in Xenopus oocytes of the Arabidopsis thaliana membrane protein, STP13, as a high affinity, hexose-specific H(+)-symporter. Studies with kinase activators suggest that it is negatively regulated by phosphorylation. STP13 promoter GFP reporter lines show GFP expression only in the vascular tissue in emerging petals under non-stressed conditions. Quantitative PCR and the pSTP13-GFP plants show induction of STP13 in programmed cell death (PCD) obtained by treatments with the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. A role for STP13 in PCD is supported by microarray data from e.g. plants undergoing senescence and a strong correlation between STP13 transcripts and the PCD phenotype in different accelerated cell death (acd11) mutants.

  12. An Arabidopsis thaliana high-affinity molybdate transporter required for efficient uptake of molybdate from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Hajime; Takano, Junpei; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Shibagaki, Nakako; Fujiwara, Toru

    2007-11-20

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element essential for living organisms, however no molybdate transporter has been identified in eukaryotes. Here, we report the identification of a molybdate transporter, MOT1, from Arabidopsis thaliana. MOT1 is expressed in both roots and shoots, and the MOT1 protein is localized, in part, to plasma membranes and to vesicles. MOT1 is required for efficient uptake and translocation of molybdate and for normal growth under conditions of limited molybdate supply. Kinetics studies in yeast revealed that the K(m) value of MOT1 for molybdate is approximately 20 nM. Furthermore, Mo uptake by MOT1 in yeast was not affected by coexistent sulfate, and MOT1 did not complement a sulfate transporter-deficient yeast mutant strain. These data confirmed that MOT1 is specific for molybdate and that the high affinity of MOT1 allows plants to obtain scarce Mo from soil.

  13. Experimental conditions can obscure the second high-affinity site in LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Zehnpfennig, Britta; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2012-01-15

    Neurotransmitter:Na(+) symporters (NSSs), the targets of antidepressants and psychostimulants, recapture neurotransmitters from the synapse in a Na(+)-dependent symport mechanism. The crystal structure of the NSS homolog LeuT from Aquifex aeolicus revealed one leucine substrate in an occluded, centrally located (S1) binding site next to two Na(+) ions. Computational studies combined with binding and flux experiments identified a second substrate (S2) site and a molecular mechanism of Na(+)-substrate symport that depends upon the allosteric interaction of substrate molecules in the two high-affinity sites. Here we show that the S2 site, which has not yet been identified by crystallographic approaches, can be blocked during preparation of detergent-solubilized LeuT, thereby obscuring its crucial role in Na(+)-coupled symport. This finding points to the need for caution in selecting experimental environments in which the properties and mechanistic features of membrane proteins can be delineated.

  14. Cooperative binding of LysM domains determines the carbohydrate affinity of a bacterial endopeptidase protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2014-02-01

    Cellulose, chitin and peptidoglycan are major long-chain carbohydrates in living organisms, and constitute a substantial fraction of the biomass. Characterization of the biochemical basis of dynamic changes and degradation of these β,1-4-linked carbohydrates is therefore important for both functional studies of biological polymers and biotechnology. Here, we investigated the functional role of multiplicity of the carbohydrate-binding lysin motif (LysM) domain that is found in proteins involved in bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. The Bacillus subtilis peptidoglycan-hydrolysing NlpC/P60 D,L-endopeptidase, cell wall-lytic enzyme associated with cell separation, possesses four LysM domains. The contribution of each LysM domain was determined by direct carbohydrate-binding studies in aqueous solution with microscale thermophoresis. We found that bacterial LysM domains have affinity for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNac) polymers in the lower-micromolar range. Moreover, we demonstrated that a single LysM domain is able to bind carbohydrate ligands, and that LysM domains act additively to increase the binding affinity. Our study reveals that affinity for GlcNAc polymers correlates with the chain length of the carbohydrate, and suggests that binding of long carbohydrates is mediated by LysM domain cooperativity. We also show that bacterial LysM domains, in contrast to plant LysM domains, do not discriminate between GlcNAc polymers, and recognize both peptidoglycan fragments and chitin polymers with similar affinity. Finally, an Ala replacement study suggested that the carbohydrate-binding site in LysM-containing proteins is conserved across phyla. © 2013 FEBS.

  15. Development of immobilized membrane-based affinity columns for use in the online characterization of membrane bound proteins and for targeted affinity isolations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moaddel, Ruin [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States); Wainer, Irving W. [Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, 5600 Nathan Shock Drive, Baltimore, MD 21224-6825 (United States)]. E-mail: Wainerir@grc.nia.nih.gov

    2006-03-30

    Membranes obtained from cell lines that express or do not express a target membrane bound protein have been immobilized on a silica-based liquid chromatographic support or on the surface of an activated glass capillary. The resulting chromatographic columns have been placed in liquid chromatographic systems and used to characterize the target proteins and to identify small molecules that bind to the target. Membranes containing ligand gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and drug transporters have been prepared and characterized. If a marker ligand has been identified for the target protein, frontal or zonal displacement chromatographic techniques can be used to determine binding affinities (K {sub d} values) and non-linear chromatography can be used to assess the association (k {sub on}) and dissociation (k {sub off}) rate constants and the thermodynamics of the binding process. Membrane-based affinity columns have been created using membranes from a cell line that does not express the target protein (control) and the same cell line that expresses the target protein (experimental) after genomic transfection. The resulting columns can be placed in a parallel chromatography system and the differential retention between the control and experimental columns can be used to identify small molecules and protein that bind to the target protein. These applications will be illustrated using columns created using cellular membranes containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

  16. Bacteriophage lambda terminase: alterations of the high-affinity ATPase affect viral DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Alok; Feiss, Michael

    2005-03-18

    DNA packaging by large DNA viruses such as the tailed bacteriophages and the herpesviruses involves DNA translocation into a preformed protein shell, called the prohead. Translocation is driven by an ATP hydrolysis-powered DNA packaging motor. The bacteriophages encode a heterodimeric viral DNA packaging protein, called terminase. The terminases have an ATPase center located in the N terminus of the large subunit implicated in DNA translocation. In previous work with phage lambda, lethal mutations that changed ATP-reactive residues 46 and 84 of gpA, the large terminase subunit, were studied. These mutant enzymes retained the terminase endonuclease and helicase activities, but had severe defects in virion assembly, and lacked the terminase high-affinity ATPase activity. Surprisingly, in the work described here, we found that enzymes with the conservative gpA changes Y46F and Y46A had only mild packaging defects. These mild defects contrast with their profound virion assembly defects. Thus, these mutant enzymes have, in addition to the mild DNA packaging defects, a severe post-DNA packaging defect. In contrast, the gpA K84A enzyme had similar virion assembly and DNA packaging defects. The DNA packaging energy budget, i.e. DNA packaged/ATP hydrolyzed, was unchanged for the mutant enzymes, indicating that DNA translocation is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. A model is proposed in which gpA residues 46 and 84 are important for terminase's high-affinity ATPase activity. Assembly of the translocation complex remodels this ATPase so that residues 46 and 84 are not crucial for the activated translocation ATPase. Changing gpA residues 46 and 84 primarily affects assembly, rather than the activity, of the translocation complex.

  17. Identification of Drosophila centromere associated proteins by quantitative affinity purification-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Teresa K.; Schade, Georg O.M.; Schmidt, Andreas; Vetter, Irene; Wirth, Marc; Heun, Patrick; Imhof, Axel; Thomae, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Centromeres of higher eukaryotes are epigenetically defined by the centromere specific histone H3 variant CENP-ACID. CENP-ACID builds the foundation for the assembly of a large network of proteins. In contrast to mammalian systems, the protein composition of Drosophila centromeres has not been comprehensively investigated. Here we describe the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster centromeres as analyzed by quantitative affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS). The AP-MS input chromatin material was prepared from D. melanogaster cell lines expressing CENP-ACID or H3.3 fused to EGFP as baits. Centromere chromatin enriched proteins were identified based on their relative abundance in CENP-ACID–GFP compared to H3.3-GFP or mock affinity-purifications. The analysis yielded 86 proteins specifically enriched in centromere chromatin preparations. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Barth et al., 2015, Proteomics 14:2167-78, DOI: 10.1002/pmic.201400052) has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000758. PMID:26306323

  18. Insights into structural features determining odorant affinities to honey bee odorant binding protein 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Pechlaner, Maria; Oostenbrink, Chris; Kotlowski, Caroline; Araman, Can; Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Pelosi, Paolo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Nowak, Christoph; Larisika, Melanie

    2014-04-18

    Molecular interactions between odorants and odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are of major importance for understanding the principles of selectivity of OBPs towards the wide range of semiochemicals. It is largely unknown on a structural basis, how an OBP binds and discriminates between odorant molecules. Here we examine this aspect in greater detail by comparing the C-minus OBP14 of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) to a mutant form of the protein that comprises the third disulfide bond lacking in C-minus OBPs. Affinities of structurally analogous odorants featuring an aromatic phenol group with different side chains were assessed based on changes of the thermal stability of the protein upon odorant binding monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Our results indicate a tendency that odorants show higher affinity to the wild-type OBP suggesting that the introduced rigidity in the mutant protein has a negative effect on odorant binding. Furthermore, we show that OBP14 stability is very sensitive to the position and type of functional groups in the odorant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The AFT1 transcriptional factor is differentially required for expression of high-affinity iron uptake genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, C; Aldea, M; Espinet, C; Gallego, C; Gil, R; Herrero, E

    1997-06-15

    High-affinity iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the extracytoplasmic reduction of ferric ions by FRE1 and FRE2 reductases. Ferrous ions are then transported across the plasma membrane through the FET3 oxidase-FTR1 permease complex. Expression of the high-affinity iron uptake genes is induced upon iron deprivation. We demonstrate that AFT1 is differentially involved in such regulation. Aft1 protein is required for maintaining detectable non-induced level of FET3 expression and for induction of FRE2 in iron starvation conditions. On the contrary, FRE1 mRNA induction is normal in the absence of Aft1, although the existence of AFT1 point mutations causing constitutive expression of FRE1 (Yamaguchi-Iwai et al., EMBO J. 14: 1231-1239, 1995) indicates that Aft1 may also participate in FRE1 expression in a dispensable way. The alterations in the basal levels of expression of the high-affinity iron uptake genes may explain why the AFT1 mutant is unable to grow on respirable carbon sources. Overexpression of AFT1 leads to growth arrest of the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Aft1 is a transcriptional activator that would be part of the different transcriptional complexes interacting with the promoter of the high-affinity iron uptake genes. Aft1 displays phosphorylation modifications depending on the growth stage of the cells, and it might link induction of genes for iron uptake to other metabolically dominant requirement for cell growth.

  20. Purification of prenylated proteins by affinity chromatography on cyclodextrin-modified agarose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinhwa A.; Wollack, James W.; Hovlid, Marisa L.; Okesli, Ayse; Chen, Yan; Mueller, Joachim D.; Distefano, Mark D.; Taton, T. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although protein prenylation is widely studied, there are few good methods for isolating prenylated proteins from their non-prenylated relatives. We report that crosslinked agarose (e.g., Sepharose) chromatography media that has been chemically functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is extremely effective in affinity chromatography of prenylated proteins. In this study, a variety of proteins with C-terminal prenylation target (“CAAX box”) sequences were enzymatically prenylated in vitro with natural and non-natural prenyl diphosphate substrates. The prenylated protein products could then be isolated from starting materials by gravity chromatography or fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a β-CD-Sepharose column. One particular prenylation reaction—farnesylation of a mCherry-CAAX fusion construct—was studied in detail. In this case, purified farnesylated product was unambiguously identified by electrospray mass spectrometry. In addition, when mCherry-CAAX was prenylated with a non-natural, functional isoprenoid substrate, the functional group was maintained by chromatography on β-CD-Sepharose, such that the resulting protein could be selectively bound at its C terminus to complementary functionality on a solid substrate. Finally, β-CD-Sepharose FPLC was used to isolate prenylated mCherry-CAAX from crude HeLa cell lysate, as a model for purifying prenylated proteins from cell extracts. We propose that this method could be generally useful to the community of researchers studying protein prenylation. PMID:18834849

  1. Mannosylerythritol lipid, a yeast extracellular glycolipid, shows high binding affinity towards human immunoglobulin G

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami Toru; Yanagishita Hiroshi; Nakane Takashi; Im Jae Hong; Kitamoto Dai

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Background There have been many attempts to develop new materials with stability and high affinity towards immunoglobulins. Some of glycolipids such as gangliosides exhibit a high affinity toward immunoglobulins. However, it is considerably difficult to develop these glycolipids into the practical separation ligand due to their limited amounts. We thus focused our attention on the feasible use of "mannosylerythritol lipid A", a yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, as an alternative ligand...

  2. Affinity Purification of a Recombinant Protein Expressed as a Fusion with the Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of fusion proteins such as MBP fusions can be used as a way to improve the solubility of the expressed protein in E. coli (Fox and Waugh, 2003; Nallamsetty et al., 2005; Nallamsetty and Waugh, 2006) and as a way to introduce an affinity purification tag. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors as a first step in the purification of a recombinant protein fused with MBP, using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Cells should have been thawed, resuspended in binding buffer, and lysed by sonication or microfluidization before mixing with the amylose resin or loading on the column. Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:26096500

  3. Markov clustering versus affinity propagation for the partitioning of protein interaction graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasblom James

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome scale data on protein interactions are generally represented as large networks, or graphs, where hundreds or thousands of proteins are linked to one another. Since proteins tend to function in groups, or complexes, an important goal has been to reliably identify protein complexes from these graphs. This task is commonly executed using clustering procedures, which aim at detecting densely connected regions within the interaction graphs. There exists a wealth of clustering algorithms, some of which have been applied to this problem. One of the most successful clustering procedures in this context has been the Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL, which was recently shown to outperform a number of other procedures, some of which were specifically designed for partitioning protein interactions graphs. A novel promising clustering procedure termed Affinity Propagation (AP was recently shown to be particularly effective, and much faster than other methods for a variety of problems, but has not yet been applied to partition protein interaction graphs. Results In this work we compare the performance of the Affinity Propagation (AP and Markov Clustering (MCL procedures. To this end we derive an unweighted network of protein-protein interactions from a set of 408 protein complexes from S. cervisiae hand curated in-house, and evaluate the performance of the two clustering algorithms in recalling the annotated complexes. In doing so the parameter space of each algorithm is sampled in order to select optimal values for these parameters, and the robustness of the algorithms is assessed by quantifying the level of complex recall as interactions are randomly added or removed to the network to simulate noise. To evaluate the performance on a weighted protein interaction graph, we also apply the two algorithms to the consolidated protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae, derived from genome scale purification experiments and to versions of

  4. Recombinant Passenger Proteins Can Be Conveniently Purified by One-Step Affinity Chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-zhen Wang

    Full Text Available Fusion tag is one of the best available tools to date for enhancement of the solubility or improvement of the expression level of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Typically, two consecutive affinity purification steps are often necessitated for the purification of passenger proteins. As a fusion tag, acyl carrier protein (ACP could greatly increase the soluble expression level of Glucokinase (GlcK, α-Amylase (Amy and GFP. When fusion protein ACP-G2-GlcK-Histag and ACP-G2-Amy-Histag, in which a protease TEV recognition site was inserted between the fusion tag and passenger protein, were coexpressed with protease TEV respectively in E. coli, the efficient intracellular processing of fusion proteins was achieved. The resulting passenger protein GlcK-Histag and Amy-Histag accumulated predominantly in a soluble form, and could be conveniently purified by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. However, the fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag was processed incompletely by the protease TEV coexpressed in vivo, and a large portion of the resulting target protein GFP-Histag aggregated in insoluble form, indicating that the intracellular processing may affect the solubility of cleaved passenger protein. In this context, the soluble fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag, contained in the supernatant of E. coli cell lysate, was directly subjected to cleavage in vitro by mixing it with the clarified cell lysate of E. coli overexpressing protease TEV. Consequently, the resulting target protein GFP-Histag could accumulate predominantly in a soluble form, and be purified conveniently by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. The approaches presented here greatly simplify the purification process of passenger proteins, and eliminate the use of large amounts of pure site-specific proteases.

  5. Recombinant Passenger Proteins Can Be Conveniently Purified by One-Step Affinity Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-zhen; Chu, Zhi-zhan; Chen, Chang-chao; Cao, Ao-cheng; Tong, Xin; Ouyang, Can-bin; Yuan, Qi-hang; Wang, Mi-nan; Wu, Zhong-kun; Wang, Hai-hong; Wang, Sheng-bin

    2015-01-01

    Fusion tag is one of the best available tools to date for enhancement of the solubility or improvement of the expression level of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Typically, two consecutive affinity purification steps are often necessitated for the purification of passenger proteins. As a fusion tag, acyl carrier protein (ACP) could greatly increase the soluble expression level of Glucokinase (GlcK), α-Amylase (Amy) and GFP. When fusion protein ACP-G2-GlcK-Histag and ACP-G2-Amy-Histag, in which a protease TEV recognition site was inserted between the fusion tag and passenger protein, were coexpressed with protease TEV respectively in E. coli, the efficient intracellular processing of fusion proteins was achieved. The resulting passenger protein GlcK-Histag and Amy-Histag accumulated predominantly in a soluble form, and could be conveniently purified by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. However, the fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag was processed incompletely by the protease TEV coexpressed in vivo, and a large portion of the resulting target protein GFP-Histag aggregated in insoluble form, indicating that the intracellular processing may affect the solubility of cleaved passenger protein. In this context, the soluble fusion protein ACP-GFP-Histag, contained in the supernatant of E. coli cell lysate, was directly subjected to cleavage in vitro by mixing it with the clarified cell lysate of E. coli overexpressing protease TEV. Consequently, the resulting target protein GFP-Histag could accumulate predominantly in a soluble form, and be purified conveniently by one-step Ni-chelating chromatography. The approaches presented here greatly simplify the purification process of passenger proteins, and eliminate the use of large amounts of pure site-specific proteases.

  6. Advance chromatin extraction improves capture performance of protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Lihan; Lee, Jeremy; Bi, Xeuzhi; Yang, Yuansheng; Gan, Hui Theng; Gagnon, Pete

    2016-01-29

    Practical effects of advance chromatin removal on performance of protein A affinity chromatography were evaluated using a caprylic acid-allantoin-based extraction method. Lacking this treatment, the practice of increasing loading residence time to increase capacity was shown to increase host protein contamination of the eluted IgG. Advance chromatin extraction suspended that compromise. Protein A ligand leakage from columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest was half the level observed on protein A columns loaded with non-extracted harvest. Columns loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest were cleaned more effectively by 50-100mM NaOH than columns loaded with non-extracted harvest that were cleaned with 250-500mM NaOH. Two protein A media with IgG capacities in excess of 50g/L were loaded with chromatin-extracted harvest, washed with 2.0M NaCl before elution, and the eluted IgG fraction titrated to pH 5.5 before microfiltration. Host protein contamination in the filtrate was reduced to protein A leakage to 0.5ppm, and aggregates to 1.0%. Caprylic acid and allantoin were both reduced below 5ppm. Step recovery of IgG was 99.4%. Addition of a single polishing step reduced residual protein A beneath the level of detection and aggregates to <0.1%. Overall process recovery including chromatin extraction was 90%.

  7. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  8. Profiling of drug binding proteins by monolithic affinity chromatography in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuepei; Wang, Tongdan; Zhang, Hanzhi; Han, Bing; Wang, Lishun; Kang, Jingwu

    2014-09-12

    A new approach for proteome-wide profiling drug binding proteins by using monolithic capillary affinity chromatography in combination with HPLC-MS/MS is reported. Two immunosuppresive drugs, namely FK506 and cyclosporin A, were utilized as the experimental models for proof-of-concept. The monolithic capillary affinity columns were prepared through a single-step copolymerization of the drug derivatives with glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate. The capillary chromatography with the affinity monolithic column facilitates the purification of the drug binding proteins from the cell lysate. By combining the capillary affinity column purification and the shot-gun proteomic analysis, totally 33 FK506- and 32 CsA-binding proteins including all the literature reported target proteins of these two drugs were identified. Among them, two proteins, namely voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 and serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5 were verified by using the recombinant proteins. The result supports that the monolithic capillary affinity chromatography is likely to become a valuable tool for profiling of binding proteins of small molecular drugs as well as bioactive compounds.

  9. Affinity and Western blotting reveal homologies between ovine intervertebral disc serine proteinase inhibitory proteins and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, J; Shen, B; Ghosh, P

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess any similarities between ovine intervertebral disc (IVD) serine proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIs) and known mammalian IVD SPIs. Ovine IVDs were dissected into the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus and the tissue finely diced then extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The tissue extracts were subjected to caesium chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation to separate the large high buoyant density (rho > 1.5 g/mL) proteoglycans from the SPI proteins of low buoyant density (rho top two ultracentrifuge fractions containing the SPIs of interest were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA) and also examined by Western and Affinity blotting using an antibody to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and biotinylated trypsin respectively for detection and an alkaline phosphatase 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium system for visualisation. The major SPI proteins present in the Western and Affinity blots were 34-36 kDa species, minor 12 and 16, and 85 and 120 kDa species were also present. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for each respective tissue zone of the lumbar and lumbosacral disc specimens examined. Densitometric analysis of the major 34-36 kDa SPI bands visualised on Western and Affinity blots using NIH 1.61.1 image analysis software indicated that lumbar IVD samples contained higher levels of this SPI species than lumbosacral IVD samples. ELISA confirmed that lumbar IVD extracts contained quantitatively higher levels of BPTI equivalents per g of tissue extracted than lumbosacral IVDs. This study therefore has demonstrated that the ovine disc contains a range of SPI species which share some homology with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and in this respect are similar to SPIs previously demonstrated in canine IVDs.

  10. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  11. Autoradiographic imaging and quantification of the high-affinity GHB binding sites in rodent brain using (3)H-HOCPCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A B; Bay, T; Villumsen, I S; Falk-Petersen, C B; Marek, A; Frølund, B; Clausen, R P; Hansen, H D; Knudsen, G M; Wellendorph, P

    2016-11-01

    GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) is a compound endogenous to mammalian brain with high structural resemblance to GABA. GHB possesses nanomolar-micromolar affinity for a unique population of binding sites, but the exact nature of these remains elusive. In this study we utilized the highly selective GHB analogue, 3-hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA) as a tritiated version ((3)H-HOCPCA) to radioactively label the specific GHB high-affinity binding site and gain further insight into the density, distribution and developmental profile of this protein. We show that, in low nanomolar concentrations, (3)H-HOCPCA displays excellent signal-to-noise ratios using rodent brain autoradiography, which makes it a valuable ligand for anatomical quantification of native GHB binding site levels. Our data confirmed that (3)H-HOCPCA labels only the high-affinity specific GHB binding site, found in high density in cortical and hippocampal regions. The experiments revealed markedly stronger binding at pH 6.0 (Kd 73.8 nM) compared to pH 7.4 (Kd 2312 nM), as previously reported for other GHB radioligands but similar Bmax values. Using (3)H-HOCPCA we analyzed the GHB binding protein profile during mouse brain development. Due to the high sensitivity of this radioligand, we were able to detect low levels of specific binding already at E15 in mouse brain, which increased progressively until adulthood. Collectively, we show that (3)H-HOCPCA is a highly sensitive radioligand, offering advantages over the commonly used radioligand (3)H-NCS-382, and thus a very suitable in vitro tool for qualitative and quantitative autoradiography of the GHB high-affinity site.

  12. The high-affinity maltose switch MBP317-347 has low affinity for glucose: implications for targeting tumors with metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Schulte, Reinhard W; Ostermeier, Marc; Iwamoto, Keisuke S

    2014-03-01

    Development of agents with high affinity and specificity for tumor-specific markers is an important goal of molecular-targeted therapy. Here, we propose a shift in paradigm using a strategy that relies on low affinity for fundamental metabolites found in different concentrations in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues: glucose and lactate. A molecular switch, MBP317-347, originally designed to be a high-affinity switch for maltose and maltose-like polysaccharides, was demonstrated to be a low-affinity switch for glucose, that is, able to be activated by high concentrations (tens of millimolar) of glucose. We propose that such a low-affinity glucose switch could be used as a proof of concept for a new prodrug therapy strategy denominated metabolically directed enzyme prodrug therapy (MDEPT) where glucose or, preferably, lactate serves as the activator. Accordingly, considering the typical differential concentrations of lactate found in tumors and in healthy tissues, a low-affinity lactate-binding switch analogous to the low-affinity glucose-binding switch MBP317-347 would be an order of magnitude more active in tumors than in normal tissues and therefore can work as a differential activator of anticancer drugs in tumors.

  13. Toward the complete characterization of host cell proteins in biotherapeutics via affinity depletions, LC-MS/MS, and multivariate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, James A; Farutin, Victor; Carbeau, Theresa; Wudyka, Steve; Yin, Yan; Smith, Stephen; Anderson, James; Capila, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Host cell protein (HCP) impurities are generated by the host organism during the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins, and are difficult to remove completely. Though commonly present in small quantities, if levels are not controlled, HCPs can potentially reduce drug efficacy and cause adverse patient reactions. A high resolution approach for thorough HCP characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is presented herein. In this method, antibody samples are first depleted via affinity enrichment (e.g., Protein A, Protein L) using milligram quantities of material. The HCP-containing flow-through is then enzymatically digested, analyzed using nano-UPLC-MS/MS, and proteins are identified through database searching. Nearly 700 HCPs were identified from samples with very low total HCP levels (Multivariate analysis tools were utilized to assess similarities between HCP profiles by: 1) quantifying overlaps between HCP identities; and 2) comparing correlations between individual protein abundances as calculated by spectral counts. Clustering analysis using these measures of dissimilarity between HCP profiles enabled high resolution differentiation of commercial grade monoclonal antibody samples generated from different cell lines, cell culture, and purification processes. PMID:26291024

  14. High-affinity small molecule-phospholipid complex formation: binding of siramesine to phosphatidicacid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu

    2008-01-01

    , comparable to the affinities for the binding of small molecule ligands to proteins, was measured for phosphatidic acid (PA, mole fraction of XPA ) 0.2 in phosphatidylcholine vesicles), yielding a molecular partition coefficient of 240 ( 80 × 106. An MD simulation on the siramesine:PA interaction...

  15. A High-affinity Activator of G551D-CFTR Chloride Channel Identified By High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lu; HE Cheng-yan; LIU Yan-li; ZHOU Hong-lan; ZHOU Jin-song; SHANG De-jing; YANG Hong

    2004-01-01

    A stably transfected CHO cell line coexpressing G551D-CFTR and iodide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein mutant EYFP-H148Q-I152L was successfully established and used as assay model to identify small-molecule activators of G551D-CFTR chloride channel from 100000 diverse combinatorial compounds by high throughput screening on a customized Beckman robotic system. A bicyclooctane compound was identified to activate G551D-CFTR chloride channel with high-affinity(Kd=1.8 μmol/L). The activity of the bicyclooctane compound is G551D-CFTR-specific, reversible and non-toxic. The G551D-CFTR activator may be useful as a tool to study the mutant G551D-CFTR chloride channel structure and transport properties and as a candidate drug to cure cystic fibrosis caused by G551D-CFTR mutation.

  16. Affinity polymers tailored for the protein A binding site of immunoglobulin G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latza, Patricia; Gilles, Patrick; Schaller, Torsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Rational design in combination with a screening process was used to develop affinity polymers for a specific binding site on the surface of immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins. The concept starts with the identification of critical amino acid residues on the protein interface and their topological arrangement. Appropriate binding monomers were subsequently synthesized. Together with a sugar monomer (2-5 equiv) for water solubility and a dansyl monomer (0.5 equiv) as a fluorescent label, they were subjected in aqueous solution to linear radical copolymerization in various compositions (e.g., azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN), homogeneous water/DMF mixtures). After ultrafiltration and lyophilization, colorless dry water-soluble powders were obtained. NMR spectroscopic and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) characterization indicated molecular weights between 30 and 500 kD and confirmed retention of monomer composition as well as the absence of monomers. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screen of the polymer libraries (20-50 members), few copolymers qualified as strong and selective binders for the protein A binding site on the Fc fragment of the antibody. Their monomer composition precisely reflected the critical amino acids found at the interface. The simple combination of a charged and a nonpolar binding monomer sufficed for selective submicromolar IgG recognition by the synthetic polymer. Affinities were confirmed by fluorescence titrations; they increased with decreasing salt load but remained largely unaltered at lowered pH. Other proteins, including those of similar size and isoelectric point (pI), were bound 10-1000 times less tightly. This example indicates that interaction domains in other proteins may also be targeted by synthetic polymers if their comonomer composition reflects the nature and arrangement of amino acid residues on the protein surface.

  17. Gene Structure and Expression of the High-affinity Nitrate Transport System in Rice Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Cai; Jun-Yi Wang; Yong-Guan Zhu; Qi-Rong Shen; Bin Li; Yi-Ping Tong; Zhen-Sheng Li

    2008-01-01

    Rice has a preference for uptake of ammonium over nitrate and can use ammonium-N efficiently. Consequently, transporters mediating ammonium uptake have been extensively studied, but nitrate transporters have been largely ignored. Recently,some reports have shown that rice also has high capacity to acquire nitrate from growth medium, so understanding the nitrate transport system in rice roots is very important for improving N use efficiency in rice. The present study identified four putative NRT2 and two putative NAR2 genes that encode components of the high-affinity nitrate transport system (HATS) in the rice (Oryza sativa L. subsp, japonica cv. Nipponbare) genome. OsNRT2.1 and OsNRT2.2 share an identical coding region sequence, and their deduced proteins are closely related to those from monocotyledonous plants. The two NAR2 proteins are closely related to those from mono-cotyledonous plants as well. However, OsNRT2.3 and OsNRT2.4 are more closely related to Arabidopsis NRT2 proteins. Relative quantitative reverse tranecdption-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that all of the six genes were rapidly upregulated and then downregulated in the roots of N-starved rice plants after they were re-supplied with 0.2 mM nitrate, but the response to nitrate differed among gene members.The results from phylogenetic tree, gene structure and expression analysis implied the divergent roles for the individual members of the rice NRT2 and NAR2 families. High-affinity nitrate influx rates associated with nitrate induction in rice roots were investigated and were found to be regulated by external pH. Compared with the nitrate influx rates at pH 6.5, alkaline pH (pH 8.0) inhibited nitrate Influx, and acidic pH (pH 5.0) enhanced the nitrate influx In I h nitrate induced roots, but did not significantly affect that in 4 to 8 h nitrate induced roots.

  18. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Häussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Kinetics and autoradiography of high affinity uptake of serotonin by primary astrocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, D.M.; Kimelberg, H.K.

    1985-07-01

    Primary astrocyte cultures prepared from the cerebral cortices of neonatal rats showed significant accumulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; (/sup 3/H)-5-HT). At concentrations in the range of 0.01 to 0.7 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT, this uptake was 50 to 85% Na+ dependent and gave a Km of 0.40 +/- 0.11 microM (/sup 3/H)-5-HT and a Vmax of 6.42 +/- 0.85 (+/- SEM) pmol of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT/mg of protein/4 min for the Na+-dependent component. In the absence of Na+ the uptake was nonsaturable. Omission of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline markedly reduced the Na+-dependent component of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake but had a negligible effect on the Na+-independent component. This suggest significant oxidative deamination of serotonin after it has been taken up by the high affinity system, followed by release of its metabolite. The authors estimated that this system enabled the cells to concentrate (/sup 3/H)-5-HT up to 44-fold at an external (/sup 3/H)-5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake by a number of clinically effective antidepressants was also consistent with a specific high affinity uptake mechanism for 5-HT, the order of effectiveness of inhibition being chlorimipramine greater than fluoxetine greater than imipramine = amitriptyline greater than desmethylimipramine greater than iprindole greater than mianserin. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT was dependent on the presence of Cl- as well as Na+ in the medium, and the effect of omission of both ions was nonadditive. Varying the concentration of K+ in the media from 1 to 50 mM had a limited effect on (/sup 3/H)-5-HT uptake.

  20. Optimization of affinity capillary electrophoresis for routine investigations of protein-metal ion interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Hassan A; Deeb, Sami El; Nachbar, Markus; Redweik, Sabine; Albishri, Hassan M; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2015-10-01

    To facilitate the implementation of affinity capillary electrophoresis into routine binding screening studies of proteins with metal ions, method acceleration, transfer and precision improvement were investigated. Affinity capillary electrophoresis was accelerated by using shorter capillaries, employing lower sample concentrations and smaller injection volumes. Intra- and inter-instrument method transfers were investigated considering the temperature setting of the capillary cooling system. For intra-instrument method transfer, similar results were obtained when transferring a method from a long (62 cm) to a short (31 cm) capillary. The analysis time was reduced from 9 to 4 min. In case of inter-instrument method transfer, interaction results showed small variation on the capillary electrophoresis instrument with inefficient capillary cooling system. Binding measurement precision was enhanced by slightly pushing the sample above the beginning of the capillary. Changing the buffer vials after each 30 runs and employing extra flushing after each 60 subsequent runs further enhanced the precision. The use of 0.1 molar ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in the rinsing solution successfully desorbs the remaining metal ions from the capillary wall. Excellent precision for apparent mobility ratio measurements was achieved for different protein-metal ion interactions (relative standard deviation of 0.16-0.89%, 15 series, 12 runs for each).

  1. Affinity purification of copper-chelating peptides from sunflower protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías, Cristina; Pedroche, Justo; Yust, Maria M; Girón-Calle, Julio; Alaiz, Manuel; Millan, Francisco; Vioque, Javier

    2007-08-08

    Copper-chelating peptides were purified from sunflower protein hydrolysates by affinity chromatography using immobilized copper. A variety of protein hydrolysates were obtained by incubation with the proteases Alcalase and Flavourzyme for different periods of time. Chelating activity was indirectly determined by measuring the inhibitory effect of hydrolysates on the oxidation of beta-carotene by copper. Copper-binding peptides purified from the two hydrolysates that inhibited oxidation by copper the most contained 25.4 and 42.0% histidine and inhibited beta-carotene oxidation 8 and 3 times more than the original hydrolysates, which had 2.4 and 2.6% histidine, respectively. Thus, histidine content is not the only factor involved in antioxidant activity, and probably other factors such as peptide size and amino acid sequence are also important. This work shows that affinity chromatography can be used for the purification of copper-chelating peptides and probably other metals of nutritional interest such as calcium, iron, and zinc. In addition to their antioxidant potential, chelating peptides are of nutritional interest because they increase bioavailability of minerals.

  2. Experimental characterization of the transport phenomena, adsorption, and elution in a protein A affinity monolithic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herigstad, M Omon; Dimartino, Simone; Boi, Cristiana; Sarti, Giulio C

    2015-08-14

    A commercially available convective interaction media (CIM) Protein A monolithic column was fully characterized in view of its application for the affinity capture of IgG in monoclonal antibody production processes. By means of moment analysis, the interstitial porosity and axial dispersion coefficient were determined. The frontal analysis method of characteristic points was employed, for the first time with monolithic media, to determine the dynamic binding capacity. The effects of the flow rate and pH on the total recovery of polyclonal IgG and elution profile were evaluated. A comparison with literature data for Protein A chromatography beads demonstrate the superior bed utilization of monolithic media, which gave better performance at lower residence times.

  3. Contamination of ribosome inactivating proteins with ribonucleases, separated by affinity chromatography on red sepharose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B; Cheng, C H K; Fong, W P

    2003-05-01

    Three preparations of type 1 ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), namely, agrostin, saporin, and luffin, were subjected to affinity chromatography on Red Sepharose and eluted with a linear concentration gradient of NaCl in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4). The eluate was assayed for ability to inhibit translation in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte lysate system which measures RIP activity, and for ability to hydrolyze yeast transfer RNA which measures RNase activity. It was found that, in all three RIP preparations, the peak of RIP activity, which coincided with the peak of absorbance at 280 nm, was eluted earlier than the peak of RNase activity. It appears that RNase is a possible contaminant of ribosome inactivating protein preparations and that this contamination can be minimized by using Red Sepharose.

  4. Relative binding affinities of chlorophylls in peridinin-chlorophyll-protein reconstituted with heterochlorophyllous mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotosudarmo, T H P; Mackowski, S; Hofmann, E; Hiller, R G; Bräuchle, C; Scheer, H

    2008-01-01

    Peridinin-chlorophyll-protein (PCP), containing differently absorbing chlorophyll derivatives, are good models with which to study energy transfer among monomeric chlorophylls (Chls) by both bulk and single-molecule spectroscopy. They can be obtained by reconstituting the N-terminal domain of the protein (N-PCP) with peridinin and chlorophyll mixtures. Upon dimerization of these "half-mers", homo- and heterochlorophyllous complexes are generated, that correspond structurally to monomeric protomers of native PCP from Amphidinium carterae. Heterochlorophyllous complexes contain two different Chls in the two halves of the complete structure. Here, we report reconstitution of N-PCP with binary mixtures of Chl a, Chl b, and [3-acetyl]-Chl a. The ratios of the pigments were varied in the reconstitution mixture, and relative binding constants were determined from quantification of these pigments in the reconstituted PCPs. We find higher affinities for both Chl b and [3-acetyl]-Chl a than for the native pigment, Chl a.

  5. Efficient and versatile one-step affinity purification of in vivo biotinylated proteins: Expression, characterization and structure analysis of recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tykvart, J.; Sacha, P.; Barinka, C.; Knedlik, T.; Starkova, J.; Lubkowski, J.; Konvalinka, J. (Gilead); (NCI); (Czech Academy)

    2012-02-07

    Affinity purification is a useful approach for purification of recombinant proteins. Eukaryotic expression systems have become more frequently used at the expense of prokaryotic systems since they afford recombinant eukaryotic proteins with post-translational modifications similar or identical to the native ones. Here, we present a one-step affinity purification set-up suitable for the purification of secreted proteins. The set-up is based on the interaction between biotin and mutated streptavidin. Drosophila Schneider 2 cells are chosen as the expression host, and a biotin acceptor peptide is used as an affinity tag. This tag is biotinylated by Escherichia coli biotin-protein ligase in vivo. We determined that localization of the ligase within the ER led to the most effective in vivo biotinylation of the secreted proteins. We optimized a protocol for large-scale expression and purification of AviTEV-tagged recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (Avi-GCPII) with milligram yields per liter of culture. We also determined the 3D structure of Avi-GCPII by X-ray crystallography and compared the enzymatic characteristics of the protein to those of its non-tagged variant. These experiments confirmed that AviTEV tag does not affect the biophysical properties of its fused partner. Purification approach, developed here, provides not only a sufficient amount of highly homogenous protein but also specifically and effectively biotinylates a target protein and thus enables its subsequent visualization or immobilization.

  6. Reaction of Native and Denatured Brucella abortus (S19 Proteins with Antibody Using Affinity Chromatography and Immunoblotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karimi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western blotting or immunoblotting commonly use for study of reaction between antigens and antibodies. Denaturation of many proteins in immunoblotting can affect greatly the reactivity of antibodies and outcome of the procedure.In this study proteins of Brucella abortus (S19 was extracted by a mild method and reaction of the extracted proteins with serum of infected human and goat and immunized rabbit compared by affinity chromatography and immunoblotting. Gamma globulin (mostly IgG fraction of the sera was precipitated by half saturation of ammonium sulfate and linked to activated sepharose 4B. The extracted proteins were loaded on the affinity column. Attached proteins was eluted by low pH and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Reaction of the total extract and eluted fractions with IgG fraction of sera was evaluated by Western blotting.Upon the results of affinity chromatography and immunoblotting, Brucella proteins can be classified in four groups: 1- The proteins that adsorbed to the affinity column and react with IgG in westernblotting. 2- Proteins that react with IgG in native state but no in denatured state. 3- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native state but react in denatured state. 4- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native and denatured state.

  7. Coordination features and affinity of the Cu²+ site in the α-synuclein protein of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Christopher G; Walter, Eric D; Millhauser, Glenn L

    2011-03-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, affecting >1% of the population over the age of 60. PD pathology is marked by intracellular inclusions composed primarily of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn). These inclusions also contain copper, and the interaction of Cu(2+) with α-syn may play an important role in PD fibrillogenesis. Here we report the stoichiometry, affinity, and coordination structure of the Cu(2+)-α-syn complex. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) titrations show that monomeric α-syn binds 1.0 equiv of Cu(2+) at the protein N-terminus. Next, an EPR competition technique demonstrates that α-syn binds Cu(2+) with a K(d) of ≈0.10 nM. Finally, EPR and electron spin echo modulation (ESEEM) applied to a suite of mutant and truncated α-syn constructs reveal a coordination sphere arising from the N-terminal amine, the Asp2 amide backbone and side chain carboxyl group, and the His50 imidazole. The high binding affinity identified here, in accord with previous measurements, suggests that copper uptake and sequestration may be a part of α-syn's natural function, perhaps modulating copper's redox properties. The findings further suggest that the long-range interaction between the N-terminus and His50 may have a weakening effect on the interaction of α-syn with lipid membranes, thereby mobilizing monomeric α-syn and hastening fibrillogenesis.

  8. High throughput protein-protein interaction data: clues for the architecture of protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Chi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput techniques are becoming widely used to study protein-protein interactions and protein complexes on a proteome-wide scale. Here we have explored the potential of these techniques to accurately determine the constituent proteins of complexes and their architecture within the complex. Results Two-dimensional representations of the 19S and 20S proteasome, mediator, and SAGA complexes were generated and overlaid with high quality pairwise interaction data, core-module-attachment classifications from affinity purifications of complexes and predicted domain-domain interactions. Pairwise interaction data could accurately determine the members of each complex, but was unexpectedly poor at deciphering the topology of proteins in complexes. Core and module data from affinity purification studies were less useful for accurately defining the member proteins of these complexes. However, these data gave strong information on the spatial proximity of many proteins. Predicted domain-domain interactions provided some insight into the topology of proteins within complexes, but was affected by a lack of available structural data for the co-activator complexes and the presence of shared domains in paralogous proteins. Conclusion The constituent proteins of complexes are likely to be determined with accuracy by combining data from high-throughput techniques. The topology of some proteins in the complexes will be able to be clearly inferred. We finally suggest strategies that can be employed to use high throughput interaction data to define the membership and understand the architecture of proteins in novel complexes.

  9. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenping; Xiong, Xiaolu; Qi, Yong; Jiao, Jun; Duan, Changsong; Wen, Bohai

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein) of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC) were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs), which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  10. Immunoproteomics Using Polyclonal Antibodies and Stable Isotope–labeled Affinity-purified Recombinant Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope–labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A–coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope–labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed. PMID:24722731

  11. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Gong

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs, which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  12. Immunoproteomics using polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled affinity-purified recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed.

  13. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  14. Affinity Purification of O-Acetylserine(thiollyase from Chlorella sorokiniana by Recombinant Proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Salbitani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the unicellular green alga Chlorella sorokiniana (211/8 k, the protein O-acetylserine(thiollyase (OASTL, representing the key-enzyme in the biosynthetic cysteine pathway, was isolated and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification was carried out in cells grown in the presence of all nutrients or in sulphate (S deprived cells. After 24 h of S-starvation, a 17-fold increase in the specific activity of OASTL was measured. In order to enable the identification of OASTL proteins from non-model organisms such as C. sorokiniana, the recombinant his-tagged SAT5 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana was immobilized by metal chelate chromatography. OASTL proteins from C. sorokiniana were affinity purified in one step and activities were enhanced 29- and 41-fold, from S-sufficient and S-starved (24 h cells, respectively. The successful application of SAT/OASTL interaction for purification confirms for the first time the existence of the cysteine synthase complexes in microalgae. The purified proteins have apparent molecular masses between 32–34 kDa and are thus slightly larger compared to those found in Arabidopsis thaliana and other vascular plants. The enhanced OASTL activity in S-starved cells can be attributed to increased amounts of plastidic and the emergence of cytosolic OASTL isoforms. The results provide proof-of-concept for the biochemical analysis of the cysteine synthase complex in diverse microalgal species.

  15. Towards full Quantum-Mechanics-based Protein-Ligand Binding Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Stephan; Göller, Andreas H; Grimme, Stefan

    2017-01-29

    Computational methods play a key role in modern drug design in the pharmaceutical industry but are mostly based on force fields, which are limited in accuracy when describing non-classical binding effects, proton transfer, or metal coordination. Here, we propose a general fully quantum mechanical (QM) scheme for the computation of protein-ligand affinities. It works on a single protein cutout (of about 1000 atoms) and evaluates all contributions (interaction energy, solvation, thermostatistical) to absolute binding free energy on the highest feasible QM level. The methodology is tested on two different protein targets: activated serine protease factor X (FXa) and tyrosine-protein kinase 2 (TYK2). We demonstrate that the geometry of the model systems can be efficiently energy-minimized by using general purpose graphics processing units, resulting in structures that are close to the co-crystallized protein-ligand structures. Our best calculations at a hybrid DFT level (PBEh-3c composite method) for the FXa ligand set result in an overall mean absolute deviation as low as 2.1 kcal mol(-1) . Though very encouraging, an analysis of outliers indicates that the structure optimization level, conformational sampling, and solvation treatment require further improvement.

  16. High affinity germinal center B cells are actively selected into the plasma cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tri Giang; Paus, Didrik; Chan, Tyani D; Turner, Marian L; Nutt, Stephen L; Basten, Antony; Brink, Robert

    2006-10-30

    A hallmark of T cell-dependent immune responses is the progressive increase in the ability of serum antibodies to bind antigen and provide immune protection. Affinity maturation of the antibody response is thought to be connected with the preferential survival of germinal centre (GC) B cells that have acquired increased affinity for antigen via somatic hypermutation of their immunoglobulin genes. However, the mechanisms that drive affinity maturation remain obscure because of the difficulty in tracking the affinity-based selection of GC B cells and their differentiation into plasma cells. We describe a powerful new model that allows these processes to be followed as they occur in vivo. In contrast to evidence from in vitro systems, responding GC B cells do not undergo plasma cell differentiation stochastically. Rather, only GC B cells that have acquired high affinity for the immunizing antigen form plasma cells. Affinity maturation is therefore driven by a tightly controlled mechanism that ensures only antibodies with the greatest possibility of neutralizing foreign antigen are produced. Because the body can sustain only limited numbers of plasma cells, this "quality control" over plasma cell differentiation is likely critical for establishing effective humoral immunity.

  17. Structural Basis for High-Affinity Peptide Inhibition of Human Pin1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Daum, Sebastian; Wildemann, Dirk; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Verdecia, Mark A.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Lücke, Christian; Hunter, Tony; Lu, Kun-Ping; Fischer, Gunter; Noel, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Human Pin1 is a key regulator of cell-cycle progression and plays growth-promoting roles in human cancers. High-affinity inhibitors of Pin1 may provide a unique opportunity for disrupting oncogenic pathways. Here we report two high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of human Pin1 bound to non-natural peptide inhibitors. The structures of the bound high-affinity peptides identify a type-I β-turn conformation for Pin1 prolyl peptide isomerase domain–peptide binding and an extensive molecular interface for high-affinity recognition. Moreover, these structures suggest chemical elements that may further improve the affinity and pharmacological properties of future peptide-based Pin inhibitors. Finally, an intramolecular hydrogen bond observed in both peptide complexes mimics the cyclic conformation of FK506 and rapamycin. Both FK506 and rapamycin are clinically important inhibitors of other peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases. This comparative discovery suggests that a cyclic peptide polyketide bridge, like that found in FK506 and rapamycin or a similar linkage, may significantly improve the binding affinity of structure-based Pin1 inhibitors. PMID:17518432

  18. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Kwon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jung, Kyung-Sik [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Son, Cagdas D [ORNL; Kim, Heejung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Arshava, Boris [College of Staten Island; Naider, Fred [College of Staten Island; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  19. Hemoglobin-oxygen affinity in high-altitude vertebrates: is there evidence for an adaptive trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Jay F

    2016-10-15

    In air-breathing vertebrates at high altitude, fine-tuned adjustments in hemoglobin (Hb)-O2 affinity provide an energetically efficient means of mitigating the effects of arterial hypoxemia. However, it is not always clear whether an increased or decreased Hb-O2 affinity should be expected to improve tissue O2 delivery under different degrees of hypoxia, due to the inherent trade-off between arterial O2 loading and peripheral O2 unloading. Theoretical results indicate that the optimal Hb-O2 affinity varies as a non-linear function of environmental O2 availability, and the threshold elevation at which an increased Hb-O2 affinity becomes advantageous depends on the magnitude of diffusion limitation (the extent to which O2 equilibration at the blood-gas interface is limited by the kinetics of O2 exchange). This body of theory provides a framework for interpreting the possible adaptive significance of evolved changes in Hb-O2 affinity in vertebrates that have colonized high-altitude environments. To evaluate the evidence for an empirical generalization and to test theoretical predictions, I synthesized comparative data in a phylogenetic framework to assess the strength of the relationship between Hb-O2 affinity and native elevation in mammals and birds. Evidence for a general trend in mammals is equivocal, but there is a remarkably strong positive relationship between Hb-O2 affinity and native elevation in birds. Evolved changes in Hb function in high-altitude birds provide one of the most compelling examples of convergent biochemical adaptation in vertebrates. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Population Studies of Intact Vitamin D Binding Protein by Affinity Capture ESI-TOF-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Chad R.; Jarvis, Jason W.; Oran, Paul E.; Rogers, Stephen P.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Blood plasma proteins with molecular weights greater than approximately 30 kDa are refractory to comprehensive, high-throughput qualitative characterization of microheterogeneity across human populations. Analytical techniques for obtaining high mass resolution for targeted, intact protein characterization and, separately, high sample throughput exist, but efficient means of coupling these assay characteristics remain rather limited. This article discusses the impetus for analyzing intact proteins in a targeted manner across populations and describes the methodology required to couple mass spectrometric immunoassay with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the purpose of qualitatively characterizing a prototypical large plasma protein, vitamin D binding protein, across populations. PMID:19137103

  1. Lipids are co-eluted with immunoglobulins G during purification by recombinant streptococcal protein G affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiouli, Eirini; Lekka, Marilena E; Nakos, George; Cassagne, Claude; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly

    2002-12-20

    The efficiency of recombinant streptococcal protein G (rec-spG) affinity column chromatography in purifying immunoglobulins G (IgG) from lipids has been studied, with particular reference to IgG fractions from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum samples from different sources. It was found that the IgG fractions purified by rec-spG affinity column chromatography also contained cholesterol and phospholipids.

  2. D3R grand challenge 2015: Evaluation of protein-ligand pose and affinity predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathiaka, Symon; Liu, Shuai; Chiu, Michael; Yang, Huanwang; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Kang, You Na; Delproposto, Jim; Kubish, Ginger; Dunbar, James B.; Carlson, Heather A.; Burley, Stephen K.; Walters, W. Patrick; Amaro, Rommie E.; Feher, Victoria A.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2016-09-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) ran Grand Challenge 2015 between September 2015 and February 2016. Two targets served as the framework to test community docking and scoring methods: (1) HSP90, donated by AbbVie and the Community Structure Activity Resource (CSAR), and (2) MAP4K4, donated by Genentech. The challenges for both target datasets were conducted in two stages, with the first stage testing pose predictions and the capacity to rank compounds by affinity with minimal structural data; and the second stage testing methods for ranking compounds with knowledge of at least a subset of the ligand-protein poses. An additional sub-challenge provided small groups of chemically similar HSP90 compounds amenable to alchemical calculations of relative binding free energy. Unlike previous blinded Challenges, we did not provide cognate receptors or receptors prepared with hydrogens and likewise did not require a specified crystal structure to be used for pose or affinity prediction in Stage 1. Given the freedom to select from over 200 crystal structures of HSP90 in the PDB, participants employed workflows that tested not only core docking and scoring technologies, but also methods for addressing water-mediated ligand-protein interactions, binding pocket flexibility, and the optimal selection of protein structures for use in docking calculations. Nearly 40 participating groups submitted over 350 prediction sets for Grand Challenge 2015. This overview describes the datasets and the organization of the challenge components, summarizes the results across all submitted predictions, and considers broad conclusions that may be drawn from this collaborative community endeavor.

  3. UO₂²⁺ uptake by proteins: understanding the binding features of the super uranyl binding protein and design of a protein with higher affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Samuel O; Bondarevsky, Gary D; Karpus, Jason; Cui, Qiang; He, Chuan; Spezia, Riccardo; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-12-17

    The capture of uranyl, UO2(2+), by a recently engineered protein (Zhou et al. Nat. Chem. 2014, 6, 236) with high selectivity and femtomolar sensitivity has been examined by a combination of density functional theory, molecular dynamics, and free-energy simulations. It was found that UO2(2+) is coordinated to five carboxylate oxygen atoms from four amino acid residues of the super uranyl binding protein (SUP). A network of hydrogen bonds between the amino acid residues coordinated to UO2(2+) and residues in its second coordination sphere also affects the protein's uranyl binding affinity. Free-energy simulations show how UO2(2+) capture is governed by the nature of the amino acid residues in the binding site, the integrity and strength of the second-sphere hydrogen bond network, and the number of water molecules in the first coordination sphere. Alteration of any of these three factors through mutations generally results in a reduction of the binding free energy of UO2(2+) to the aqueous protein as well as of the difference between the binding free energies of UO2(2+) and other ions (Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)), a proxy for the protein's selectivity over these ions. The results of our free-energy simulations confirmed the previously reported experimental results and allowed us to discover a mutant of SUP, specifically the GLU64ASP mutant, that not only binds UO2(2+) more strongly than SUP but that is also more selective for UO2(2+) over other ions. The predictions from the computations were confirmed experimentally.

  4. Selection of substrate recognition sequence of protein kinase with ferric chelation affinity chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈长征; 夏其昌; 李伯良; 王应睐

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase substrate phage (PKS phage) was constructed by fusing the substrate recognition consensus sequence of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) with bacteriophage minor coat protein g3p and by dis-playing it on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage fd. Phosphorylation in vitro by cAPK showed a unique labelled band of approximately 60 ku, which was consistent with the molecular weight of the PKS-g3p fusion protein. Some weakly phosphorylated bands for both PKS phage and wild-type phage were also observed. Phage display random 15-mer peptide library phosphorylated by cAPK was selected with ferric (Fe3+ ) chelalion affinity resin. After 4 rounds of screening, phage clones were picked out to determine the displayed peptide sequences by DNA sequencing. The results showed that 5 of 14 sequenced phages displayed the cAPK recognition sequence motif (R)RXS/T. Their in vitro phosphorylation analyses revealed the specific labelled bands corresponding to the positive PKS phages with and without the typ

  5. Changes in Binding of [(123)I]CLINDE, a High-Affinity Translocator Protein 18 kDa (TSPO) Selective Radioligand in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donat, Cornelius K; Gaber, Khaled; Meixensberger, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), secondary injuries develop, including neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to long-lasting impairments. These secondary injuries represent potential targets for treatment and diagnostics. The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is expressed in activated...... microglia cells and upregulated in response to brain injury and therefore a potential biomarker of the neuroinflammatory processes. Second-generation radioligands of TSPO, such as [(123)I]CLINDE, have a higher signal-to-noise ratio as the prototype ligand PK11195. [(123)I]CLINDE has been employed in human...... and sacrificed at 6, 24, 72 h and 28 days post surgery. TSPO expression was assessed in brain sections employing [(123)I]CLINDE in vitro autoradiography. From 24 h to 28 days post surgery, injured animals exhibited a marked and time-dependent increase in [(123)I]CLINDE binding in the ipsilateral motor...

  6. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar 125I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited 125I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  7. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuade, R.; Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Nayfeh, S.N.

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimdiyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar /sup 125/I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited /sup 125/I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  8. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Rouvinen, J. (Univ. of Joensuu (Finland))

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  9. PHOENIX: a scoring function for affinity prediction derived using high-resolution crystal structures and calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yat T; Marshall, Garland R

    2011-02-28

    Binding affinity prediction is one of the most critical components to computer-aided structure-based drug design. Despite advances in first-principle methods for predicting binding affinity, empirical scoring functions that are fast and only relatively accurate are still widely used in structure-based drug design. With the increasing availability of X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank and continuing application of biophysical methods such as isothermal titration calorimetry to measure thermodynamic parameters contributing to binding free energy, sufficient experimental data exists that scoring functions can now be derived by separating enthalpic (ΔH) and entropic (TΔS) contributions to binding free energy (ΔG). PHOENIX, a scoring function to predict binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes, utilizes the increasing availability of experimental data to improve binding affinity predictions by the following: model training and testing using high-resolution crystallographic data to minimize structural noise, independent models of enthalpic and entropic contributions fitted to thermodynamic parameters assumed to be thermodynamically biased to calculate binding free energy, use of shape and volume descriptors to better capture entropic contributions. A set of 42 descriptors and 112 protein-ligand complexes were used to derive functions using partial least-squares for change of enthalpy (ΔH) and change of entropy (TΔS) to calculate change of binding free energy (ΔG), resulting in a predictive r2 (r(pred)2) of 0.55 and a standard error (SE) of 1.34 kcal/mol. External validation using the 2009 version of the PDBbind "refined set" (n = 1612) resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(p)) of 0.575 and a mean error (ME) of 1.41 pK(d). Enthalpy and entropy predictions were of limited accuracy individually. However, their difference resulted in a relatively accurate binding free energy. While the development of an accurate and applicable

  10. High affinity antigen recognition of the dual specific variants of herceptin is entropy-driven in spite of structural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Bostrom

    Full Text Available The antigen-binding site of Herceptin, an anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2 antibody, was engineered to add a second specificity toward Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF to create a high affinity two-in-one antibody bH1. Crystal structures of bH1 in complex with either antigen showed that, in comparison to Herceptin, this antibody exhibited greater conformational variability, also called "structural plasticity". Here, we analyzed the biophysical and thermodynamic properties of the dual specific variants of Herceptin to understand how a single antibody binds two unrelated protein antigens. We showed that while bH1 and the affinity-improved bH1-44, in particular, maintained many properties of Herceptin including binding affinity, kinetics and the use of residues for antigen recognition, they differed in the binding thermodynamics. The interactions of bH1 and its variants with both antigens were characterized by large favorable entropy changes whereas the Herceptin/HER2 interaction involved a large favorable enthalpy change. By dissecting the total entropy change and the energy barrier for dual interaction, we determined that the significant structural plasticity of the bH1 antibodies demanded by the dual specificity did not translate into the expected increase of entropic penalty relative to Herceptin. Clearly, dual antigen recognition of the Herceptin variants involves divergent antibody conformations of nearly equivalent energetic states. Hence, increasing the structural plasticity of an antigen-binding site without increasing the entropic cost may play a role for antibodies to evolve multi-specificity. Our report represents the first comprehensive biophysical analysis of a high affinity dual specific antibody binding two unrelated protein antigens, furthering our understanding of the thermodynamics that drive the vast antigen recognition capacity of the antibody repertoire.

  11. Affinity Purification of Insulin by Peptide-Ligand Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The affinity heptapeptide (HWWWPAS) for insulin, selected from phage display library,was coupled to EAH Sepharose 4B gel and packed to a 1-mL column. The column was used for the affinity purification of insulin from protein mixture and commercial insulin preparation. It was observed that the minor impurity in the commercial insulin was removed by the affinity chromatography. Nearly 40 mg of insulin could be purified with the 1-mL affinity column. The results revealed the high specificity and capacity of the affinity column for insulin purification. Moreover, based on the analysis of the amino acids in the peptide sequence, shorter peptides were designed and synthesized for insulin chromatography. As a result, HWWPS was found to be a good alternative to HWWWPAS, while the other two peptides with three or four amino acids showed weak affinity for insulin. The results indicated that the peptide sequence of HWWWPAS was quite conservative for specific binding of insulin.

  12. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  13. Selection and design of high affinity DNA ligands for mutant single-chain derivatives of the bacteriophage 434 repressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Single-chain repressor RRTRES is a derivative of bacteriophage 434 repressor, which contains covalently dimerized DNA-binding domains (amino acids 1-69) of the phage 434 repressor. In this single-chain molecule, the wild type domain R is connected to the mutant domain RTRES by a recombinant linker in a head-to-tail arrangement. The DNA-contacting amino acids of RTRES at the -1, 1, 2, and 5 positions of the a3 helix are T, R, E, S respectively. By using a randomized DNA pool containing the central sequence -CATACAAGAAAGNNNNNNTTT-, a cyclic, in vitro DNA-binding site selection was performed. The selected population was cloned and the individual members were characterized by determining their binding affinities to RRTRES. The results showed that the optimal operators contained the TTAC or TTCC sequences in the underlined positions as above, and that the Kd values were in the 1×10-12 mol/L-1×10-11mol/L concentration range. Since the affinity of the natural 434 repressor to its natural operator sites is in the 1×10-9 mol/L range, the observed binding affinity increase is remarkable. It was also found that binding affinity was strongly affected by the flanking bases of the optimal tetramer binding sites, especially by the base at the 5′ position. We constructed a new homodimeric single-chain repressor RTRESRTRES and its DNA-binding specificity was tested by using a series of new operators designed according to the recog-nition properties previously determined for the RTRES domain. These operators containing the con-sensus sequence GTAAGAAARNTTACN or GGAAGAAARNTTCCN (R is A or G) were recognized by RTRESRTRES specifically, and with high binding affinity. Thus, by using a combination of random selection and rational design principles, we have discovered novel, high affinity protein-DNA inter-actions with new specificity. This method can potentially be used to obtain new binding specificity for other DNA-binding proteins.

  14. Molecular cloning, expression profile, odorant affinity, and stability of two odorant-binding proteins in Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-02-01

    The polyembryonic endoparasitoid wasp Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is deployed successfully as a biocontrol agent for corn pest insects from the Lepidopteran genus Ostrinia in Europe and throughout Asia, including Japan, Korea, and China. The odorants are recognized, bound, and solubilized by odorant-binding protein (OBP) in the initial biochemical recognition steps in olfaction that transport them across the sensillum lymph to initiate behavioral response. In the present study, we examine the odorant-binding effects on thermal stability of McinOBP2, McinOBP3, and their mutant form that lacks the third disulfide bonds. Real-time PCR experiments indicate that these two are expressed mainly in adult antennae, with expression levels differing by sex. Odorant-binding affinities of aldehydes, terpenoids, and aliphatic alcohols were measured with circular dichroism spectroscopy based on changes in the thermal stability of the proteins upon their affinities to odorants. The obtained results reveal higher affinity of trans-caryophelle, farnesene, and cis-3-Hexen-1-ol exhibits to both wild and mutant McinOBP2 and McinOBP3. Although conformational flexibility of the mutants and shape of binding cavity make differences in odorant affinity between the wild-type and mutant, it suggested that lacking the third disulfide bond in mutant proteins may have chance to incorrect folded structures that reduced the affinity to these odorants. In addition, CD spectra clearly indicate proteins enriched with α-helical content.

  15. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the high-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ali J; Chung, Chun-Wa; Curry, Stephen

    2011-04-18

    Iophenoxic acid is an iodinated radiocontrast agent that was withdrawn from clinical use because of its exceptionally long half-life in the body, which was due in part to its high-affinity binding to human serum albumin (HSA). It was replaced by Iopanoic acid, which has an amino rather than a hydroxyl group at position 3 on the iodinated benzyl ring and, as a result, binds to albumin with lower affinity and is excreted more rapidly from the body. To understand how iophenoxic acid binds so tightly to albumin, we wanted to examine the structural basis of its interaction with HSA. We have determined the co-crystal structure of HSA in complex with iophenoxic acid at 2.75 Å resolution, revealing a total of four binding sites, two of which--in drugs sites 1 and 2 on the protein--are likely to be occupied at clinical doses. High-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid occurs at drug site 1. The structure reveals that polar and apolar groups on the compound are involved in its interactions with drug site 1. In particular, the 3-hydroxyl group makes three hydrogen bonds with the side-chains of Tyr 150 and Arg 257. The mode of binding to drug site 2 is similar except for the absence of a binding partner for the hydroxyl group on the benzyl ring of the compound. The HSA-iophenoxic acid structure indicates that high-affinity binding to drug site 1 is likely to be due to extensive desolvation of the compound, coupled with the ability of the binding pocket to provide a full set of salt-bridging or hydrogen bonding partners for its polar groups. Consistent with this interpretation, the structure also suggests that the lower-affinity binding of iopanoic acid arises because replacement of the 3-hydroxyl by an amino group eliminates hydrogen bonding to Arg 257. This finding underscores the importance of polar interactions in high-affinity binding to albumin.

  16. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the high-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid to human serum albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Chun-wa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iophenoxic acid is an iodinated radiocontrast agent that was withdrawn from clinical use because of its exceptionally long half-life in the body, which was due in part to its high-affinity binding to human serum albumin (HSA. It was replaced by Iopanoic acid, which has an amino rather than a hydroxyl group at position 3 on the iodinated benzyl ring and, as a result, binds to albumin with lower affinity and is excreted more rapidly from the body. To understand how iophenoxic acid binds so tightly to albumin, we wanted to examine the structural basis of its interaction with HSA. Results We have determined the co-crystal structure of HSA in complex with iophenoxic acid at 2.75 Å resolution, revealing a total of four binding sites, two of which - in drugs sites 1 and 2 on the protein - are likely to be occupied at clinical doses. High-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid occurs at drug site 1. The structure reveals that polar and apolar groups on the compound are involved in its interactions with drug site 1. In particular, the 3-hydroxyl group makes three hydrogen bonds with the side-chains of Tyr 150 and Arg 257. The mode of binding to drug site 2 is similar except for the absence of a binding partner for the hydroxyl group on the benzyl ring of the compound. Conclusions The HSA-iophenoxic acid structure indicates that high-affinity binding to drug site 1 is likely to be due to extensive desolvation of the compound, coupled with the ability of the binding pocket to provide a full set of salt-bridging or hydrogen bonding partners for its polar groups. Consistent with this interpretation, the structure also suggests that the lower-affinity binding of iopanoic acid arises because replacement of the 3-hydroxyl by an amino group eliminates hydrogen bonding to Arg 257. This finding underscores the importance of polar interactions in high-affinity binding to albumin.

  17. Identification of 9-fluoro substituted (-)-cytisine derivatives as ligands with high affinity for nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houllier, Nicolas; Gopisetti, JaganMohan; Lestage, Pierre; Lasne, Marie-Claire; Rouden, Jacques

    2010-11-15

    (-)-9-Fluorocytisine, (-)-9-methylcytisine and (-)-9-trifluoromethylcytisine were synthesized from the natural product (-)-cytisine. 9-Methyl and 9-trifluoromethyl cytisines display a remarkable affinity at the α(4)β(2) nicotinic receptor subtype (0.2 nM) with a high selectivity versus the α(7) nAChR subtype. Comparison of the affinity values suggests that the size of the substituent at the 9 position of (-)-cytisine seems more important than electronic factors for efficient binding and selectivity at α(4)β(2) nAChRs.

  18. Molecular evolutionary analysis of the high-affinity K+ transporter gene family in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P; Hua, C; Zhou, F; Zhang, B-J; Cai, X-N; Chen, Q-Z; Wang, R-L

    2016-07-15

    The high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT) family comprises a group of multifunctional cation transporters widely distributed in organisms ranging from Bacteria to Eukarya. In angiosperms, the HKT family consists primarily of nine types, whose evolutionary relationships are not fully understood. The available sequences from 31 plant species were used to perform a comprehensive evolutionary analysis, including an examination of selection pressure and estimating phylogenetic tree and gene duplication events. Our results show that a gene duplication in the HKT1;5/HKT1;4 cluster might have led to the divergence of the HKT1;5 and HKT1;4 subfamilies. Additionally, maximum likelihood analysis revealed that the HKT family has undergone a strong purifying selection. An analysis of the amino acids provided strong statistical evidence for a functional divergence between subfamilies 1 and 2. Our study was the first to provide evidence of this functional divergence between these two subfamilies. Analysis of co-evolution in HKT identified 25 co-evolved groups. These findings expanded our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms driving functional diversification of HKT proteins.

  19. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  20. A low-affinity penicillin-binding protein 2x variant is required for heteroresistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Hansjürg; Mika, Moana; Denapaite, Dalia; Hakenbeck, Regine; Mühlemann, Kathrin; Heller, Manfred; Hathaway, Lucy J; Hilty, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Heteroresistance to penicillin in Streptococcus pneumoniae is the ability of subpopulations to grow at a higher antibiotic concentration than expected from the MIC. This may render conventional resistance testing unreliable and lead to therapeutic failure. We investigated the role of the primary β-lactam resistance determinants, penicillin-binding protein 2b (PBP2b) and PBP2x, and the secondary resistance determinant PBP1a in heteroresistance to penicillin. Transformants containing PBP genes from the heteroresistant strain Spain(23F) 2349 in the nonheteroresistant strain R6 background were tested for heteroresistance by population analysis profiling (PAP). We found that pbp2x, but not pbp2b or pbp1a alone, conferred heteroresistance to R6. However, a change of pbp2x expression was not observed, and therefore, expression does not correlate with an increased proportion of resistant subpopulations. In addition, the influence of the CiaRH system, mediating PBP-independent β-lactam resistance, was assessed by PAP on ciaR disruption mutants but revealed no heteroresistant phenotype. We also showed that the highly resistant subpopulations (HOM*) of transformants containing low-affinity pbp2x undergo an increase in resistance upon selection on penicillin plates that partially reverts after passaging on selection-free medium. Shotgun proteomic analysis showed an upregulation of phosphate ABC transporter subunit proteins encoded by pstS, phoU, pstB, and pstC in these highly resistant subpopulations. In conclusion, the presence of low-affinity pbp2x enables certain pneumococcal colonies to survive in the presence of β-lactams. Upregulation of phosphate ABC transporter genes may represent a reversible adaptation to antibiotic stress.

  1. High-affinity olfactory receptor for the death-associated odor cadaverine

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cadaverine and putrescine, two diamines emanating from decaying flesh, are strongly repulsive odors to humans but serve as innate attractive or social cues in other species. Here we show that zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, exhibit powerful and innate avoidance behavior to both diamines, and identify a high-affinity olfactory receptor for cadaverine.

  2. Influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient of rubber at high sliding velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2004-01-01

    In this work we investigate the influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient of a rubber body onto a solid surface at high speeds. The roughness is characterized by the rms amplitude w, the correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent H. It is shown that the friction

  3. Supramolecular surface immobilization of knottin derivatives for dynamic display of high affinity binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; Ruiter, de M.V.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Jonkheijm, P.

    2015-01-01

    Knottins are known as a robust and versatile class of miniprotein scaffolds for the presentation of high-affinity binding peptides; however, to date their application in biomaterials, biological coatings, and surface applications have not been explored. We have developed a strategy to recombinantly

  4. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: Focus on high-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura Friis; Klein, Anders Bue;

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects...

  5. N-Oxide analogs of WAY-100635 : new high affinity 5-HT (1A) receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler - Marchais, Sandrine; Nowicki, B; Pike, VW; Halldin, C; Sandell, J; Chou, YH; Gulyas, B; Brennum, LT; Farde, L; Wikstrom, H V

    2005-01-01

    WAY-100635 [N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide] 1 and its O-des-methyl derivative DWAY 2 are well-known high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists. which when labeled with carbon-II (beta(+): t(1/2) 20.4min) in the carbonyl group are effective radiol

  6. N-Oxide analogs of WAY-100635 : new high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchais-Oberwinkler, S; Nowicki, B; Pike, VW; Halldin, C; Sandell, J; Chou, YH; Gulyas, B; Brennum, LT; Farde, L; Wikstrom, HV

    2005-01-01

    WAY-100635 [N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide] 1 and its O-des-methyl derivative DWAY 2 are well-known high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists. which when labeled with carbon-II (beta(+): t(1/2) 20.4min) in the carbonyl group are effective radiol

  7. Supramolecular surface immobilization of knottin derivatives for dynamic display of high affinity binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankaran, S.; de Ruiter, Mark Vincent; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Knottins are known as a robust and versatile class of miniprotein scaffolds for the presentation of high-affinity binding peptides; however, to date their application in biomaterials, biological coatings, and surface applications have not been explored. We have developed a strategy to recombinantly

  8. High affinity, bioavailable 3-amino-1,4-benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Andrew P; Nadin, Alan; Talbot, Adam C; Clarke, Earl E; Harrison, Timothy; Lewis, Huw D; Reilly, Michael; Wrigley, Jonathan D J; Castro, José L

    2003-11-17

    In this paper, we describe the development of a novel series of high affinity, orally bioavailable 3-amino-1,4 benzodiazepine-based gamma-secretase inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We disclose structure-activity relationships based around the 1, 3 and 5 positions of the benzodiazepine core structure.

  9. High Affinity Iron Permease is Required for Virulence of Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus oryzae is the most common cause of mucormycosis. Clinical and animal model data clearly demonstrate that the presence of elevated available serum iron predisposes the host to develop mucormycosis. The high affinity iron permease gene (rFTR1) is required for R. oryzae iron transport in iro...

  10. The dual aptamer approach: rational design of a high-affinity FAD aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, T; Holder, I T; Hartig, J S

    2016-01-14

    A design strategy for high-affinity aptamers of complex biomolecules is presented. We developed an RNA with FAD-binding properties by combining known ATP- and FMN-aptamers. Cooperative binding of FAD was shown by SPR spectroscopy and fluorescence assays. The strategy should be transferable to several other biomolecules.

  11. Triazoloquinazolinediones as novel high affinity ligands for the benzodiazepine site of GABA(A) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob; Gidlöf, Ritha; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard

    2011-01-01

    Based on a pharmacophore model of the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABA(A) receptors, a series of 2-aryl-2,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]quinazoline-3,5-diones (structure type I) were designed, synthesized, and identified as high-affinity ligands of the binding site. For several compounds, K...

  12. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecium adherence to collagen by antibodies against high-affinity binding subdomains of Acm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus; Murray, Barbara E

    2007-06-01

    Strains of Enterococcus faecium express a cell wall-anchored protein, Acm, which mediates adherence to collagen. Here, we (i) identify the minimal and high-affinity binding subsegments of Acm and (ii) show that anti-Acm immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) purified against these subsegments reduced E. faecium TX2535 strain collagen adherence up to 73 and 50%, respectively, significantly more than the total IgGs against the full-length Acm A domain (28%) (P Acm adherence with functional subsegment-specific antibodies raises the possibility of their use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents.

  13. (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine selectively identifies a high affinity population of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1982-11-01

    The specific binding of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine was investigated in homogenates of rat cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, and heart. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine in the cerebral cortex as defined by displacement with atropine sulfate (1..mu..M) was of high affinity (K/sub d/ = 4-10 nM, receptor density = 1.06 pmoles/mg protein), stereoselective, and competitive with drugs specific for the muscarinic receptor. In contrast, few (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine binding sites were demonstrated in cerebellar and heart homogenates.

  14. A human β-III-spectrin spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 mutation causes high-affinity F-actin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Adam W.; Crain, Jonathan; Thomas, David D.; Hays, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) is a human neurodegenerative disease that stems from mutations in the SPTBN2 gene encoding the protein β-III-spectrin. Here we investigated the molecular consequence of a SCA5 missense mutation that results in a L253P substitution in the actin-binding domain (ABD) of β-III-spectrin. We report that the L253P substitution in the isolated β-III-spectrin ABD causes strikingly high F-actin binding affinity (Kd = 75.5 nM) compared to the weak F-actin binding affinity of the wild-type ABD (Kd = 75.8 μM). The mutation also causes decreased thermal stability (Tm = 44.6 °C vs 59.5 °C). Structural analyses indicate that leucine 253 is in a loop at the interface of the tandem calponin homology (CH) domains comprising the ABD. Leucine 253 is predicted to form hydrophobic contacts that bridge the CH domains. The decreased stability of the mutant indicates that these bridging interactions are probably disrupted, suggesting that the high F-actin binding affinity of the mutant is due to opening of the CH domain interface. These results support a fundamental role for leucine 253 in regulating opening of the CH domain interface and binding of the ABD to F-actin. This study indicates that high-affinity actin binding of L253P β-III-spectrin is a likely driver of neurodegeneration. PMID:26883385

  15. Isolation and partial characterization of gypsy moth BTR-270, an anionic brush border membrane glycoconjugate that binds Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins with high affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algimantas P. Valaitis; Jeremy L. Jenkins; Mi Kyong Lee; Donald H. Dean; Karen J. Garner

    2001-01-01

    BTR-270, a gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) brush border membrane molecule that binds Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A toxins with high affinity, was purified by preparative gel electrophoresis. Rabbit antibodies specific for the Bt toxin-binding molecule were raised. Attempts to label BTR-270 by protein-directed techniques were...

  16. Novel column-based protein refolding strategy using dye-ligand affinity chromatography based on macroporous biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Dong, Ping-Jun; Zhuang, Qian-Fen

    2009-05-15

    A novel column-based chromatographic protein refolding strategy was developed using dye-ligand affinity chromatography (DLAC) based on macroporous biomaterial. Chitosan-silica (CS-silica) biomaterial with macroporous surface was used as the supporting matrix for the preparation of the DLAC material. The dye-ligand Cibacron Blue F3GA (CBF) was selected as affinity handle and could be covalently immobilized to form dye-ligand affinity adsorbent (CBF-CS-silica) using the reactivity of NH(2) on CS-silica biomaterial. After the model protein catalase was denatured with 6mol/L urea, the denaturant could be rapidly removed and catalase could be successfully refolded as facilitated by the adsorption of CBF-CS-silica. The urea denaturation process and the elute condition for the chromatographic refolding were optimized by measuring tryptophan fluorescence and activity of catalase. The refolding performance of the proposed DLAC was compared with dilution refolding. The protein concentration during the proposed chromatographic refolding increased by a factor of 20 without reducing the yield achieved as compared to dilution refolding. The column-based protein refolding strategy based on dye-ligand affinity chromatography with porous biomaterial being matrix possessed potential in chromatographic refolding of protein.

  17. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  18. The Dac-tag, an affinity tag based on penicillin-binding protein 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David Wei; Peggie, Mark; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Gage, Zoe Olivia; Wood, Nicola; Schilde, Christina; Kurz, Thimo; Knebel, Axel

    2012-09-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5), a product of the Escherichia coli gene dacA, possesses some β-lactamase activity. On binding to penicillin or related antibiotics via an ester bond, it deacylates and destroys them functionally by opening the β-lactam ring. This process takes several minutes. We exploited this process and showed that a fragment of PBP5 can be used as a reversible and monomeric affinity tag. At ambient temperature (e.g., 22°C), a PBP5 fragment binds rapidly and specifically to ampicillin Sepharose. Release can be facilitated either by eluting with 10mM ampicillin or in a ligand-free manner by incubation in the cold (1-10°C) in the presence of 5% glycerol. The "Dac-tag", named with reference to the gene dacA, allows the isolation of remarkably pure fusion protein from a wide variety of expression systems, including (in particular) eukaryotic expression systems.

  19. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is a high-affinity apolipoprotein A-I receptor facilitating endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Kristiansen, M; Gerdes, C; Jacobsen, C; Cui, S; Christensen, E I; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-06-01

    Cubilin is the intestinal receptor for the endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. However, several lines of evidence, including a high expression in kidney and yolk sac, indicate it may have additional functions. We isolated apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), using cubilin affinity chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a high-affinity binding of apoA-I and HDL to cubilin, and cubilin-expressing yolk sac cells showed efficient 125I-HDL endocytosis that could be inhibited by IgG antibodies against apoA-I and cubilin. The physiological relevance of the cubilin-apoA-I interaction was further emphasized by urinary apoA-I loss in some known cases of functional cubilin deficiency. Therefore, cubilin is a receptor in epithelial apoA-I/HDL metabolism.

  20. Structure-based identification of new high-affinity nucleosome binding sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistini, Federica; Hunter, Christopher A; Moore, Irene K; Widom, Jonathan

    2012-06-29

    The substrate for the proteins that express genetic information in the cell is not naked DNA but an assembly of nucleosomes, where the DNA is wrapped around histone proteins. The organization of these nucleosomes on genomic DNA is influenced by the DNA sequence. Here, we present a structure-based computational approach that translates sequence information into the energy required to bend DNA into a nucleosome-bound conformation. The calculations establish the relationship between DNA sequence and histone octamer binding affinity. In silico selection using this model identified several new DNA sequences, which were experimentally found to have histone octamer affinities comparable to the highest-affinity sequences known. The results provide insights into the molecular mechanism through which DNA sequence information encodes its organization. A quantitative appreciation of the thermodynamics of nucleosome positioning and rearrangement will be one of the key factors in understanding the regulation of transcription and in the design of new promoter architectures for the purposes of tuning gene expression dynamics.

  1. Insights from the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum Point to High Affinity Glucose Transporters as Targets for Enhancing Ethanol Production from Lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S.; Nugent, Brian; Mullins, Ewen; Doohan, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt) from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km(glucose) was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing. PMID:23382943

  2. Insights from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum point to high affinity glucose transporters as targets for enhancing ethanol production from lignocellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin S Ali

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the most-widely used biofuel in the world today. Lignocellulosic plant biomass derived from agricultural residue can be converted to ethanol via microbial bioprocessing. Fungi such as Fusarium oxysporum can simultaneously saccharify straw to sugars and ferment sugars to ethanol. But there are many bottlenecks that need to be overcome to increase the efficacy of microbial production of ethanol from straw, not least enhancement of the rate of fermentation of both hexose and pentose sugars. This research tested the hypothesis that the rate of sugar uptake by F. oxysporum would enhance the ethanol yields from lignocellulosic straw and that high affinity glucose transporters can enhance ethanol yields from this substrate. We characterized a novel hexose transporter (Hxt from this fungus. The F. oxysporum Hxt represents a novel transporter with homology to yeast glucose signaling/transporter proteins Rgt2 and Snf3, but it lacks their C-terminal domain which is necessary for glucose signalling. Its expression level decreased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium and in a glucose uptake study the Km((glucose was 0.9 mM, which indicated that the protein is a high affinity glucose transporter. Post-translational gene silencing or over expression of the Hxt in F. oxysporum directly affected the glucose and xylose transport capacity and ethanol yielded by F. oxysporum from straw, glucose and xylose. Thus we conclude that this Hxt has the capacity to transport both C5 and C6 sugars and to enhance ethanol yields from lignocellulosic material. This study has confirmed that high affinity glucose transporters are ideal candidates for improving ethanol yields from lignocellulose because their activity and level of expression is high in low glucose concentrations, which is very common during the process of consolidated processing.

  3. 苹果果实细胞质中依赖活体组织的ABA高亲和力特异结合蛋白%In Vivo Tissue-dependent Abscisic Acid Specific-binding Proteins with High Affinity in Cytosol of Developing Apple Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张大鹏; 陈尚武

    2001-01-01

    The in vivo highly tissue-dependent abscisic acid (ABA) specific-binding sit es localized in cytosol were identified and characterized in the flesh of develo ping apple (Malus pumila L. cv. Starkrimon) fruits. ABA binding activity was scarcely detectable in the microsomes and the cytosolic fraction isolated from the freshly harvested fruits via an in vitro ABA binding incubation of the s ubcellular fractions. If, however, instead that the subcellular fractions were in vitro incubated in 3H-ABA binding medium, the flesh tissue discs we re directly in vivo incubated in 3H-ABA binding medium, a high ABA bin ding activity to the cytosolic fraction isolated from these tissue discs was detect ed. The in vivo ABA binding capacity of the cytosolic fraction was lost if the tissue discs had been pretreated with boiling water, indicating that the ABA bin ding needs a living state of tissue. The in vivo tissue-dependent binding si tes were shown to possess protein nature with both active serine residua and thiol-g roup of cysteine residua in their functional binding center. The ABA binding of the in vivo tissue-dependent ABA binding sites to the cytosolic fraction was shown to be saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. The scatchard plotting g ave evidence of two different classes of ABA binding proteins, one with a higher affinity (Kd=2.9 nmol/L) and the other with lower affinity (Kd=71.4 nmo l/L). Ph aseic acid, 2-trans-4-trans-ABA or cis-trans-(-)-ABA had substantia lly no affinity to the binding proteins, indicating their stereo-specificity to bind physiologically active ABA. The time course, pH- and temperature-dependence of the in vivo tissue-dependent binding proteins were determined. It is hyp othesized that the detected ABA-binding proteins may be putative ABA-receptors t hat mediate ABA signals during fruit development.%将苹果(Malus pumila L. cv. Starkrimon)果肉微粒体和细胞可溶组分在含有 3H-ABA的缓冲介质中分别温育,仅在细胞

  4. Recombinant human nerve growth factor is biologically active and labels novel high-affinity binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altar, C.A.; Burton, L.E.; Bennett, G.L.; Dugich-Djordjevic, M. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Iodinated recombinant human nerve growth factor (125I-rhNGF) stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cell cultures with a half-maximal potency of 35-49 pg/ml, compared with 39-52 pg/ml for rhNGF. In quantitative ligand autoradiography, the in vitro equilibrium binding of 125I-rhNGF to brain sections showed a 10-fold regional variation in density and was saturable, reversible, and specifically displaced by up to 74% with rhNGF or murine NGF (muNGF). At equilibrium, 125I-rhNGF bound to these sites with high affinity and low capacity (Bmax less than or equal to 13.2 fmol/mg of protein). Calculation of 125I-rhNGF binding affinity by kinetic methods gave average Kd values of 24 and 31 pM. Computer-generated maps revealed binding in brain regions not identified previously with 125I-muNGF, including hippocampus; dentate gyrus; amygdala; paraventricular thalamus; frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate cortices; nucleus accumbens; olfactory tubercle; subiculum; pineal gland; and medial geniculate nucleus. NGF binding sites were distributed in a 2-fold increasing medial-lateral gradient in the caudate-putamen and a 2-fold lateral-medial gradient in the nucleus accumbens. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were also found in most areas labeled by 125I-muNGF, including the interpedunucular nucleus, cerebellum, forebrain cholinergic nuclei, caudoventral caudate-putamen, and trigeminal nerve nucleus. 125I-rhNGF binding sites were absent from areas replete with low-affinity NGF binding sites, including circumventricular organs, myelinated fiber bundles, and choroid plexus. The present analysis provides an anatomical differentiation of high-affinity 125I-rhNGF binding sites and greatly expands the number of brain structures that may respond to endogenous NGF or exogenously administered rhNGF.

  5. Sertraline and its metabolite desmethylsertraline, but not bupropion or its three major metabolites, have high affinity for P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Gibson, Bryan Bradford; Markowitz, John Seth; Donovan, Jennifer Lyn; DeVane, Carl Lindsay

    2008-02-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein subfamily B1 line (ABCB1) transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays an important role in the blood-brain barrier limiting a broad spectrum of substrates from entering the central nervous system. In the present study, the transport activity of P-gp for sertraline, desmethylsertraline, bupropion, and the major metabolites of bupropion, threo-amino alcohol (TB), erythro-amino alcohol (EB), and hydroxy metabolite (HB) was studied using an ATPase assay in expressed human P-gp membranes by measuring concentrations of inorganic P(i) in expressed human P-gp membranes. Verapamil was included as a positive control. The Michaelis-Menten equation was used for characterizing the kinetic data. Sertraline and desmethylsertraline showed high affinity for P-gp. The V(max)/K(m) values of sertraline (1.6 min(-1) x 10(-3)) and desmethylsertraline (1.4 min(-1) x 10(-3)) were comparable with that of verapamil (1.7 min(-1) x 10(-3)). Bupropion and its three metabolites showed very weak affinity for P-gp, with V(max)/K(m) values lower than 0.01 min(-1) x 10(-3). The results of the present study indicate that sertraline and desmethylsertraline have high affinity for P-gp, whereas bupropion and its three major metabolites TB, EB, and HB have very weak affinity for P-gp. These findings may help to explain observed drug-drug interactions among antidepressants.

  6. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII.

  7. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  8. Fundamental and practical studies on high-performance liquid affinity chromatography of biopolymers with novel stationary phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacolod, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigid microparticulate stationary phases having surface-bound metal chelating functions were developed and evaluated in high performance metal chelate affinity chromatography of proteins. Silica- and polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based metal chelate sorbents were produced in wide pore and in non-porous type of column packings. A major effort has been placed on development of non-porous highly crosslinked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PSDVB). These PSDVB microparticles were produced by a two-step swelling polymerization, and exhibited excellent mechanical strength over a wide range of flow-rates and composition used in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Simple and reproducible hydrophilic coatings were developed for the surface modification of hydrophobic PSDVB supports. A tetradentate metal chelating ligand, ethylenediamine-N, N[prime]-diacetic acid (EDDA), was covalently bound to the surface of the various supports. Sorbents having iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal chelating functions were also evaluated. The hydrophilic character and surface coverage of various stationary phases were assessed chromatographically. Studies concerning the effects of eluent pH as well as the nature and concentration of salts on retention and selectivity with different metal chelate stationary phases having various immobilized metal ions were carried out. Elution schemes were developed for rapid separation of proteins in metal chelate affinity chromatography. EDDA stationary phases in metal forms can be viewed as complementary to IDA stationary phases since they afforded different selectivity and retentivity toward proteins. Hydrophilic PSDVB could be functionalized with IDA or EDDA metal chelating ligands or lectins. The non-porous metal chelate stationary phases afforded rapid separation of proteins by the development of multiple gradient systems, which permitted higher column peak capacity, enabling the separation of a greater number of proteins in a single chromatographic run.

  9. Structural characterization of a high affinity mononuclear site in the copper(II)-α-synuclein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolus, Marco; Bisaglia, Marco; Zoleo, Alfonso; Fittipaldi, Maria; Benfatto, Maurizio; Bubacco, Luigi; Maniero, Anna Lisa

    2010-12-29

    Human α-Synuclein (aS), a 140 amino acid protein, is the main constituent of Lewy bodies, the cytoplasmatic deposits found in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients, where it is present in an aggregated, fibrillar form. Recent studies have shown that aS is a metal binding protein. Moreover, heavy metal ions, in particular divalent copper, accelerate the aggregation process of the protein. In this work, we investigated the high affinity binding mode of truncated aS (1-99) (aS99) with Cu(II), in a stoichiometric ratio, to elucidate the residues involved in the binding site and the role of copper ions in the protein oligomerization. We used Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy on the Cu(II)-aS99 complex at pH 6.5, performing both multifrequency continuous wave experiments and pulsed experiments at X-band. The comparison of 9.5 and 95 GHz data showed that at this pH only one binding mode is present. To identify the nature of the ligands, we performed Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation, Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation Spectroscopy, and pulsed Davies Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (Davies-ENDOR) experiments. We determined that the EPR parameters are typical of a type-II copper complex, in a slightly distorted square planar geometry. Combining the results from the different pulsed techniques, we obtained that the equatorial coordination is {N(Im), N(-), H(2)O, O}, where N(im) is the imino nitrogen of His50, N(-) a deprotonated amido backbone nitrogen that we attribute to His50, H(2)O an exchangeable water molecule, and O an unidentified oxygen ligand. Moreover, we propose that the free amino terminus (Met1) participates in the complex as an axial ligand. The MXAN analysis of the XAS k-edge absorption data allowed us to independently validate the structural features proposed on the basis of the magnetic parameters of the Cu(II)-aS99 complex and then to further refine the quality of the proposed structural model.

  10. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM.

  11. Proteome-wide identification of novel binding partners to the oncogenic fusion gene protein, NPM-ALK, using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Wang, Peng; Young, Leah C; Lai, Raymond; Li, Liang

    2009-02-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), an oncogenic fusion gene protein that is characteristically found in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphomas, promotes tumorigenesis through its functional and physical interactions with various biologically important proteins. The identification of these interacting proteins has proven to be useful to further our understanding of NPM-ALK-mediated tumorigenesis. For the first time, we performed a proteome-wide identification of NPM-ALK-binding proteins using tandem affinity purification and a highly sensitive mass spectrometric technique. Tandem affinity purification is a recently developed method that carries a lower background and higher sensitivity compared with the conventional immunoprecipitation-based protein purification protocols. The NPM-ALK gene was cloned into an HB-tagged vector and expressed in GP293 cells. Three independent experiments were performed and the reproducibility of the data was 68%. The vast majority of the previously reported NPM-ALK-binding proteins were detected. We also identified proteins that are involved in various cellular processes that were not previously described in association with NPM-ALK, such as MCM6 and MSH2 (DNA repair), Nup98 and importin 8 (subcellular protein transport), Stim1 (calcium signaling), 82Fip (RNA regulation), and BAG2 (proteosome degradation). We believe that these data highlight the functional diversity of NPM-ALK and provide new research directions for the study of the biology of this oncoprotein.

  12. Detection of Protein Carbonyls by Means of Biotin Hydrazide-Streptavidin Affinity Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative posttranslational protein modifications occur as a normal process of cell biology and to a greater extent during pathogenic conditions. The detection and quantitation of protein oxidation has posed a continuing challenge to bioanalytical chemists because of the following reasons: The products of oxidative protein damage are chemically diverse; protein oxidation generally occurs at low background levels; and the complexity of biological samples introduces high background noise when standard techniques such as immunolabeling are applied to "dirty" tissue extracts containing endogenous immunoglobulins or small molecular weight, chemically reactive compounds has been developed which circumvents these difficulties by incorporating a biotin label at sites of protein carbonylation. Biotin hydrazide-labeled proteins are detectable using standard streptavidin-coupled detection techniques such as peroxidase-catalyzed chemiluminescence of immunoblots. Advantages of the biotin hydrazide-labeling technique are its sensitivity and its lack of reliance upon antibodies that inevitably suffer from nonspecific background noise and contaminating endogenous immunoglobulins.

  13. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  14. When is Mass Spectrometry Combined with Affinity Approaches Essential? A Case Study of Tyrosine Nitration in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar KD values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  15. When is mass spectrometry combined with affinity approaches essential? A case study of tyrosine nitration in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar K(D) values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  16. Phenylboronic acid-salicylhydroxamic acid bioconjugates. 2. Polyvalent immobilization of protein ligands for affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J P; Hughes, K A; Kaiser, R J; Kesicki, E A; Lund, K P; Stolowitz, M L

    2001-01-01

    Phenylboronic acid bioconjugates prepared from alkaline phosphatase by reaction with either 2,5-dioxopyrrolidinyl 3-[N-[3-(1,3,2-dioxaboran-2-yl)phenyl]carbamoyl]propanoate (PBA-XX-NHS) or 2,5-dioxopyrrolidinyl 6-[[3,5-di-(1,3,2-dioxaboran-2-yl)phenyl]carbonylamino]hexanoate (PDBA-X-NHS) were compared with respect to the efficiency with which they were immobilized on salicylhydroxamic acid-modified Sepharose (SHA-X-Sepharose) by boronic acid complex formation. When immobilized on moderate capacity SHA-X-Sepharose (5.4 micromol of SHA/mL of gel), PDBA-alkaline phosphatase conjugates were shown to be stable with respect to both the alkaline (pH 11.0) and acidic (pH 2.5) buffers utilized to recover anti-alkaline phosphatase during affinity chromatography. Boronic acid complex formation was compared to covalent immobilization of alkaline phosphatase on Affi-Gel 10 and Affi-Gel 15. PDBA-AP.SHA-X-Sepharose was shown to afford superior performance to both Affi-Gel 10 and Affi-Gel 15 with respect to immobilization of alkaline phosphatase, retention of anti-alkaline phosphatase and recovery of anti-alkaline phosphatase under alkaline conditions. High capacity SHA-X-Sepharose (> or = 7 micromol of SHA/mL of gel) was shown to afford superior performance to moderate capacity SHA-X-Sepharose (4.5 micromol of SHA/mL of gel) with respect to stability at pH 11.0 and pH 2.5 when a PDBA-alphaHuman IgG conjugate with a low incorporation ratio of only 1.5:1 was immobilized on SHA-X-Sepharose and subsequently utilized for affinity chromatography of Human IgG. The results are interpreted in terms of either a bivalent or trivalent interaction involving boronic acid complex formation.

  17. Determining the ice-binding planes of antifreeze proteins by fluorescence-based ice plane affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms.

  18. Direct visualization of spruce budworm antifreeze protein interacting with ice crystals: basal plane affinity confers hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2008-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) protect certain organisms from freezing by adhering to ice crystals, thereby preventing their growth. All AFPs depress the nonequilibrium freezing temperature below the melting point; however AFPs from overwintering insects, such as the spruce budworm (sbw) are 10-100 times more effective than most fish AFPs. It has been proposed that the exceptional activity of these AFPs depends on their ability to prevent ice growth at the basal plane. To test the hypothesis that the hyperactivity of sbwAFP results from direct affinity to the basal plane, we fluorescently tagged sbwAFP and visualized it on the surface of ice crystals using fluorescence microscopy. SbwAFP accumulated at the six prism plane corners and the two basal planes of hexagonal ice crystals. In contrast, fluorescently tagged fish type III AFP did not adhere to the basal planes of a single-crystal ice hemisphere. When ice crystals were grown in the presence of a mixture of type III AFP and sbwAFP, a hybrid crystal shape was produced with sbwAFP bound to the basal planes of truncated bipyramidal crystals. These observations are consistent with the blockage of c-axial growth of ice as a result of direct interaction of sbwAFP with the basal planes.

  19. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Noy-Porat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1 that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  20. Novel cyclen-based linear polymer as a high-affinity binding material for DNA condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG YongZhe; WANG Na; ZHANG Ji; LI Kun; ZHANG ZhongWei; LIN HongHui; YU XiaoQi

    2009-01-01

    A novel cyclen-based linear polyamine (POGEC) was designed and synthesized from the reaction be-tween 1,3-propanediol diglycidyl ether and 1,7-bis(diethoxyphosphory)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclod- odecane.High-affinity binding between POGEC and DNA was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the formed POGEC/DNA complex (termed polyplex) could be disassociated to release the free DNA through addition of the physiological concentration of NaCl solution. Fluorescence spectrum was used to measure the high-affinity binding and DNA con-densation capability of POGEC. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrum indicates that the DNA conformation did not change after binding to POEGC.

  1. Novel cyclen-based linear polymer as a high-affinity binding material for DNA condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A novel cyclen-based linear polyamine (POGEC) was designed and synthesized from the reaction between 1,3-propanediol diglycidyl ether and 1,7-bis(diethoxyphosphory)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclod-odecane. High-affinity binding between POGEC and DNA was demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover,the formed POGEC/DNA complex (termed polyplex) could be disassociated to release the free DNA through addition of the physiological concentration of NaCl solution. Fluorescence spectrum was used to measure the high-affinity binding and DNA condensation capability of POGEC. Circular dichroism (CD) spectrum indicates that the DNA conformation did not change after binding to POEGC.

  2. Enhanced Binding Affinity for an i-Motif DNA Substrate Exhibited by a Protein Containing Nucleobase Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaoguang; Talukder, Poulami; Daskalova, Sasha M; Roy, Basab; Chen, Shengxi; Li, Zhongxian; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2017-03-17

    Several variants of a nucleic acid binding motif (RRM1) of putative transcription factor hnRNP LL containing nucleobase amino acids at specific positions have been prepared and used to study binding affinity for the BCL2 i-motif DNA. Molecular modeling suggested a number of amino acids in RRM1 likely to be involved in interaction with the i-motif DNA, and His24 and Arg26 were chosen for modification based on their potential ability to interact with G14 of the i-motif DNA. Four nucleobase amino acids were introduced into RRM1 at one or both of positions 24 and 26. The introduction of cytosine nucleobase 2 into position 24 of RRM1 increased the affinity of the modified protein for the i-motif DNA, consistent with the possible Watson-Crick interaction of 2 and G14. In comparison, the introduction of uracil nucleobase 3 had a minimal effect on DNA affinity. Two structurally simplified nucleobase analogues (1 and 4) lacking both the N-1 and the 2-oxo substituents were also introduced in lieu of His24. Again, the RRM1 analogue containing 1 exhibited enhanced affinity for the i-motif DNA, while the protein analogue containing 4 bound less tightly to the DNA substrate. Finally, the modified protein containing 1 in lieu of Arg26 also bound to the i-motif DNA more strongly than the wild-type protein, but a protein containing 1 both at positions 24 and 26 bound to the DNA less strongly than wild type. The results support the idea of using nucleobase amino acids as protein constituents for controlling and enhancing DNA-protein interaction. Finally, modification of the i-motif DNA at G14 diminished RRM1-DNA interaction, as well as the ability of nucleobase amino acid 1 to stabilize RRM1-DNA interaction.

  3. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones.

  4. Identification of low abundance polyA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplast using polyA-affinity column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui-Juan; Shen, Zhuo; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wu, Ya-Dan; Bi, Ying-Dong; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2010-02-01

    Proteins could be well separated and further identified by the use of 2-DE and related techniques. Yet, there are many proteins could not be detected even by more effective dyes because of their inherent low abundance or their low resolution. As a result, polyA-affinity column was used as a method to enrich polyA-binding proteins and then identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. In this study, 23 Arabidopsis chloroplast protein spots coded by 18 genes were identified, and majority of these proteins were classified into three related categories according to their annotations in the Swiss-Prot database, including NAD-, RNA-, and ATP-binding motifs, respectively. The major goal of the present Arabidopsis chloroplast proteomics project was to identify novel polyA-binding proteins or protein isoforms located in Arabidopsis chloroplasts and the specific research of cellular proteins with extremely low transcription levels could be fulfilled.

  5. In silico analysis of high affinity potassium transporter (HKT) isoforms in different plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Babgohari, Mahbobeh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Niazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    High affinity potassium transporters (HKTs) are located in the plasma membrane of the vessels and have significant influence on salt tolerance in some plants. They exclude Na(+) from the parenchyma cells to reduce Na(+) concentration. Despite many studies, the underlying regulatory mechanisms and the exact functions of HKTs within different genomic backgrounds are relatively unknown. In this study, various bioinformatics techniques, including promoter analysis, identification of HKT-surrounding genes, and construction of gene networks, were applied to investigate the HKT regulatory mechanism. Promoter analysis showed that rice HKTs carry ABA response elements. Additionally, jasmonic acid response elements were detected on promoter region of TmHKT1;5. In silico synteny highlighted several unknown and new loci near rice, Arabidopsis thaliana and Physcomitrella patent HKTs, which may play a significant role in salt stress tolerance in concert with HKTs. Gene network prediction unravelled that crosstalk between jasmonate and ethylene reduces AtHKT1;1 expression. Furthermore, antiporter and transferase proteins were found in AtHKT1;1 gene network. Interestingly, regulatory elements on the promoter region of HKT in wild genotype (TmHKT1;5) were more frequent and variable than the ones in cultivated wheat (TaHKT1;5) which provides the possibility of rapid response and better understanding of environmental conditions for wild genotype. Detecting ABA and jasmonic acid response elements on promoter regions of HKTs provide valuable clues on underlying regulatory mechanisms of HKTs. In silico synteny and pathway discovery indicated several candidates which act in concert with HKTs in stress condition. We highlighted different arrangement of regulatory elements on promoter region of wild wheat (TmHKT1;5) compared to bread wheat (TaHKT1;5) in this study.

  6. Nuclear Choline Acetyltransferase Activates Transcription of a High-affinity Choline Transporter*

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Akinori; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Nishimura, Masaki; YASUHARA, Osamu; Saito, Naoaki; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) synthesizes the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at cholinergic nerve terminals. ChAT contains nuclear localization signals and is also localized in the nuclei of neural and non-neuronal cells. Nuclear ChAT might have an as yet unidentified function, such as transcriptional regulation. In this study, we investigated the alteration of candidate gene transcription by ChAT. We chose high affinity choline transporter (CHT1) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter ...

  7. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such that occupancy of the S2 site is required for the cytoplasmic release of substrate from the S1 site. Here we address this controversy by performing direct measurement of substrate binding to wild-type LeuT and to S2 site mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis and scintillation proximity assays. In addition, we perform uptake experiments to determine whether the proposed allosteric coupling between the putative S2 site and the S1 site manifests itself in the kinetics of substrate flux. We conclude that LeuT harbours a single, centrally located, high-affinity substrate-binding site and that transport is well described by a simple, single-substrate kinetic mechanism.

  8. Isolation of mRNAs encoding peroxisomal proteins from yeast using a combined cell fractionation and affinity purification procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipor, Gadi; Brocard, Cecile; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2011-01-01

    Targeted mRNA localization to distinct subcellular sites occurs throughout the eukaryotes and presumably allows for the localized translation of proteins near their site of function. Specific mRNAs have been localized in cells using a variety of reliable methods, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization with labeled RNA probes, mRNA tagging using RNA aptamers and fluorescent proteins that recognize these aptamers, and quenched fluorescent RNA probes that become activated upon binding to mRNAs. However, fluorescence-based RNA localization studies can be strengthened when coupled with cell fractionation and membrane isolation techniques in order to identify mRNAs associated with specific organelles or other subcellular structures. Here we describe a novel method to isolate mRNAs associated with peroxisomes in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This method employs a combination of density gradient centrifugation and affinity purification to yield a highly enriched peroxisome fraction suitable for RNA isolation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of mRNAs bound to peroxisome membranes. The method is presented for the analysis of peroxisome-associated mRNAs; however it is applicable to studies on other subcellular compartments.

  9. Enhanced selection of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells following cyclophosphamide treatment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kawabata

    Full Text Available A major goal for the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with cytotoxic therapies is the induction of long-term remission. There is, however, a paucity of information concerning the effects of these therapies on the reconstituting B cell repertoire. Since there is recent evidence suggesting that B cell lymphopenia might attenuate negative selection of autoreactive B cells, we elected to investigate the effects of cyclophosphamide on the selection of the re-emerging B cell repertoire in wild type mice and transgenic mice that express the H chain of an anti-DNA antibody. The reconstituting B cell repertoire in wild type mice contained an increased frequency of DNA-reactive B cells; in heavy chain transgenic mice, the reconstituting repertoire was characterized by an increased frequency of mature, high affinity DNA-reactive B cells and the mice expressed increased levels of serum anti-DNA antibodies. This coincided with a significant increase in serum levels of BAFF. Treatment of transgene-expressing mice with a BAFF blocking agent or with DNase to reduce exposure to autoantigen limited the expansion of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells during B cell reconstitution. These studies suggest that during B cell reconstitution, not only is negative selection of high affinity DNA-reactive B cells impaired by increased BAFF, but also that B cells escaping negative selection are positively selected by autoantigen. There are significant implications for therapy.

  10. [3H]ATPA: a high affinity ligand for GluR5 kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, K; Legutko, B; Rizkalla, G; Deverill, M; Hawes, C R; Ellis, G J; Stensbol, T B; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Skolnick, P; Bleakman, D

    1999-12-01

    The pharmacological properties of [3H]ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid) are described. ATPA is a tert-butyl analogue of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid) that has been shown to possess high affinity for the GluR5 subunit of kainate receptors. [3H]ATPA exhibits saturable, high affinity binding to membranes expressing human GluR5 (GluR5) kainate receptors (Kd approximately 13 nM). No specific binding was observed in membranes expressing GluR2 and GluR6 receptors. Several compounds known to interact with the GluR5 kainate receptor inhibited [3H]ATPA binding with potencies similar to those obtained for competition of [3H]kainate binding to GluR5. Saturable, high affinity [3H]ATPA binding (Kd approximately 4 nM) was also observed in DRG neuron (DRG) membranes isolated from neonatal rats. The rank order potency of compounds to inhibit [3H]ATPA binding in rat DRG and GluR5 membranes were in agreement. These finding demonstrate that [3H]ATPA can be used as a radioligand to examine the pharmacological properties of GluR5 containing kainate receptors.

  11. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  12. Characterization of a genetically reconstituted high-affinity system for serotonin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.S.S.; Lam, D.M.K. (Baylor College of Medicine, Woodlands, TX (USA) Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Frnka, J.V.; Chen, D. (Baylor College of Medicine, Woodlands, TX (USA))

    1989-12-01

    By transfecting mouse fibroblast L-M cells with human genomic DNA, the authors have established and identified several clonal cell lines that stably express a high-affinity serotonin (5-HT)-uptake mechanism absent in untransfected host cells. One such cell line, L-S1, possesses features of 5-({sup 3}H)HT uptake similar to those previously characterized in the central nervous system and blood platelets: (i) specificity for 5-HT; (ii) antagonism by imipramine, a known inhibitor of high-affinity 5-HT uptake; (iii) both Na{sup +} and temperature dependence; (iv) kinetic saturability; and (v) high affinity for 5-HT. This cell line can be used to compare the relative efficacies of known blockers of 5-HT uptake and thereby offers a rapid and reliable assay system for testing novel inhibitors of this system. Since L-S1 contains stably integrated human DNA in its genome, they postulate that the observed 5-HT-uptake system resulted from the expression of human gene(s) coding for the 5-HT transporter. Thus, cell lines such as L-S1 may represent novel means for screening and developing therapeutic agents specific for neutrotransmitter-uptake systems as well as substrate for the cloning and elucidation of the genes encoding the various neurotransmitter transporters.

  13. In-house preparation of hydrogels for batch affinity purification of glutathione S-transferase tagged recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhrman Jason S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many branches of biomedical research find use for pure recombinant proteins for direct application or to study other molecules and pathways. Glutathione affinity purification is commonly used to isolate and purify glutathione S-transferase (GST-tagged fusion proteins from total cellular proteins in lysates. Although GST affinity materials are commercially available as glutathione immobilized on beaded agarose resins, few simple options for in-house production of those systems exist. Herein, we describe a novel method for the purification of GST-tagged recombinant proteins. Results Glutathione was conjugated to low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA via thiol-ene “click” chemistry. With our in-house prepared PEGDA:glutathione (PEGDA:GSH homogenates, we were able to purify a glutathione S-transferase (GST green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion protein (GST-GFP from the soluble fraction of E. coli lysate. Further, microspheres were formed from the PEGDA:GSH hydrogels and improved protein binding to a level comparable to purchased GSH-agarose beads. Conclusions GSH containing polymers might find use as in-house methods of protein purification. They exhibited similar ability to purify GST tagged proteins as purchased GSH agarose beads.

  14. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p PBS over 60 min of circulation. The high adsorption capacity towards anthrax toxin PA of the

  15. High-affinity accumulation of a maytansinoid in cells via weak tubulin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmacher, Victor S; Audette, Charlene A; Guan, Yinghua; Sidhom, Eriene-Heidi; Shah, Jagesh V; Whiteman, Kathleen R; Kovtun, Yelena V

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-targeting maytansinoids accumulate in cells and induce mitotic arrest at 250- to 1000-fold lower concentrations than those required for their association with tubulin or microtubules. To identify the mechanisms of this intracellular accumulation and exceptional cytotoxicity of maytansinoids we studied interaction of a highly cytotoxic maytansinoid, S-methyl DM1 and several other maytansinoids with cells. S-methyl DM1 accumulated inside the cells with a markedly higher apparent affinity than to tubulin or microtubules. The apparent affinities of maytansinoids correlated with their cytotoxicities. The number of intracellular binding sites for S-methyl DM1 in MCF7 cells was comparable to the number of tubulin molecules per cell (~ 4-6 × 10(7) copies). Efflux of 3[H]-S-methyl DM1 from cells was enhanced in the presence of an excess of non-labeled S-methyl DM1, indicating that re-binding of 3 [H]-S-methyl DM1 to intracellular binding sites contributed to its intracellular retention. Liposomes loaded with non-polymerized tubulin recapitulated the apparent high-affinity association of S-methyl DM1 to cells. We propose a model for the intracellular accumulation of maytansinoids in which molecules of the compounds diffuse into a cell and associate with tubulin. Affinities of maytansinoids for individual tubulin molecules are weak, but the high intracellular concentration of tubulin favors, after dissociation of a compound-tubulin complex, their re-binding to a tubulin molecule, or to a tip of a microtubule in the same cell, over their efflux. As a result, a significant fraction of microtubule tips is occupied with a maytansinoid when added to cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, inducing mitotic arrest and cell death.

  16. High affinity melatonin receptors in the vertebrate brain: implications for the control of the endogenous oscillatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschini, F; Stankov, B

    1994-01-01

    Currently, the melatonin receptor is depicted as a membrane-associated protein, linked to a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein), and thus the melatonin receptor represents a member of a receptor superfamily, acting through G-proteins in the first step of their signal-transduction pathways. Although on a number of occasions specific binding of radioactive melatonin has been demonstrated in a wide variety of tissues and organs, to date, high affinity G-protein-regulated melatonin binding sites, suggestive for a functional melatonin receptor, have been convincingly confirmed in the brain only. There is a significant species variation in the distribution of the melatonin receptor in the vertebrate brain. The limited number of studies prevents any definitive conclusion in terms of phylogeny, though generally speaking, the lower vertebrates' brains tend to express melatonin receptors with wider distribution. Two sites have been consistently found to express high density of melatonin receptors: the pars tuberalis of the adenohypophysis and the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). It must be pointed out, however, that there are some exceptions. Binding in the human pars tuberalis has not been reported, and apparently, the sheep and the mustelids' suprachiasmatic nuclei do not express detectable binding. The function of melatonin in pars tuberalis is unclear, and the control of the synthesis (and release) of paracrine factors that act at site(s) distant from the melatonin target cells, have been suggested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Bodilisant-a novel fluorescent, highly affine histamine h3 receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2013-02-14

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (K i hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R.

  18. Cytisine derivatives as high affinity nAChR ligands: synthesis and comparative molecular field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolotti, O; Canu Boido, C; Sparatore, F; Carotti, A

    2002-06-01

    A number of new N-substituted cytisine derivatives were prepared and tested, along with similar compounds already described by us and others, as high affinity neuronal acetylcholine receptor ligands. Structure-affinity relationships were discussed in the light of our recently proposed pharmacophore model for nicotinic receptor agonists. The most significant physicochemical interactions modulating the receptor-ligand binding were detected at the three dimensional (3D) level by means of comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). The best predictive PLS model was a single-field steric model showing good statistical figures: n = 17, Q2 = 0.717, s(ev) = 0.566, r2 = 0.942, s = 0.275.

  19. Expression of a Hybrid Human Superoxide Dismutase with a High Affinity for Heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A designed heparin-affinity of human Cu, Zn-SOD is described. The natural leader peptide of P.leiognathi Cu, Zn-SOD and a heparin-binding peptide containing a stretch of 7 Arg were fused to the N-terminal and the C-terminal of human Cu, Zn-SOD respectively. The resulted hybrid enzyme had not only a normal SOD activity but also a high affinity for heparin eluted on the heparin-Sepharose column at 0.4 mol/L NaCl. Some properties, such as the optimum pH, the thermostability and the half-life in the circulation of rats, were also analyzed.

  20. High sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor: Label-free detection of human norovirus using affinity peptide as molecular binder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Ryu, Myung Yi; Park, Chan Young; Ahn, Junki; Park, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Changsun; Ha, Sang-Do; Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil

    2017-01-15

    Norovirus is known as the major cause of highly infection for gastrointestinal tracts. In this study, robust and highly sensitive biosensors for detecting human norovirus by employing a recognition affinity peptide-based electrochemical platform were described. A series of amino acid-substituted and cysteine-incorporated recognition peptides isolated from evolutionary phage display technique was chemically synthesized and immobilized to a gold sensor layer, the detection performance of the gold-immobilized synthetic peptide-based sensor system was assessed using QCM, CV and EIS. Using EIS, the limit of detection with Noro-1 as a molecular binder was found to be 99.8nM for recombinant noroviral capsid proteins (rP2) and 7.8copies/mL for human norovirus, thereby demonstrating a high degree of sensitivity for their corresponding targets. These results suggest that a biosensor which consists of affinity peptides as a molecular binder and miniaturized microdevices as diagnostic tool could be served as a new type of biosensing platform for point-of-care testing.

  1. The integration of genomic and structural information in the development of high affinity plasmepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezami, Azin; Freire, Ernesto

    2002-12-04

    The plasmepsins are key enzymes in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria. Since plasmepsin inhibition leads to parasite death, these enzymes have been acknowledged to be important targets for the development of new antimalarial drugs. The development of effective plasmepsin inhibitors, however, is compounded by their genomic diversity which gives rise not to a unique target for drug development but to a family of closely related targets. Successful drugs will have to inhibit not one but several related enzymes with high affinity. Structure-based drug design against heterogeneous targets requires a departure from the classic 'lock-and-key' paradigm that leads to the development of conformationally constrained molecules aimed at a single target. Drug molecules designed along those principles are usually rigid and unable to adapt to target variations arising from naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms or drug-induced resistant mutations. Heterogeneous targets need adaptive drug molecules, characterised by the presence of flexible elements at specific locations that sustain a viable binding affinity against existing or expected polymorphisms. Adaptive ligands have characteristic thermodynamic signatures that distinguish them from their rigid counterparts. This realisation has led to the development of rigorous thermodynamic design guidelines that take advantage of correlations between the structure of lead compounds and the enthalpic and entropic components of the binding affinity. In this paper, we discuss the application of the thermodynamic approach to the development of high affinity (K(i) - pM) plasmepsin inhibitors. In particular, a family of allophenylnorstatine-based compounds is evaluated for their potential to inhibit a wide spectrum of plasmepsins.

  2. Production and Identification of High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Against Pesticide Carbofuran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To produce high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against pesticide carbofuran, and the develop immunochemical assays for people's health and environmental protection, the hapten 4-[[(2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyloxy) carbonyl]-amino]-butanoic acid (BFNB) of carbofuran was synthesized and Balb/c mice were immunized by the hapten-carrier (BFNB-bovine serum albumin, BFNB-BSA) conjugates. The splenocytes of immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 cells and the cultural supernatants of hybridoma cells were screened by the indirect enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), based on BFNB-ovoalbumin conjugates (BFNB-OVA). Purified monoclonal antibody (McAb) was obtained from fluids of ascites, deposited by octanoic acid and ammonium sulfate. The affinity and the specificity of McAb were characterized by ELISA or indirect competitive ELISA. A hybridoma cell line (5D3) secreting anti-carbofuran McAb had been established. The titer of culture medium and ascites was up to 1:2.048 × 103 and 1:1.024 × 106, respectively, and the subtype of the McAb was IgG1. The affinity constant of the McAb was about 2.54 × 109 L mol-1, with an IC50 value of 1.18 ng mL-1 and a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL-1. Cross-reactivity studies showed that the McAb was quiet specific for carbofuran, as among the four analogous compounds, they were all hardly recognized (4.59 × 10-4% for 2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranol and less than 3.0 × 10-4% for others). The prepared McAb had a very high affinity and specificity,and it could be used to develop ELISA for rapid determination of carbofuran.

  3. Cyr61/CCN1 displays high-affinity binding to the somatomedin B(1-44 domain of vitronectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo M B Francischetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyr61 is a member of the CCN (Cyr61, connective tissue growth, NOV family of extracellular-associated (matricellular proteins that present four distinct functional modules, namely insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP, von Willebrand factor type C (vWF, thrombospondin type 1 (TSP, and C-terminal growth factor cysteine knot (CT domain. While heparin sulphate proteoglycans reportedly mediate the interaction of Cyr61 with the matrix and cell surface, the role of other extracellular associated proteins has not been revealed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this report, surface plasmon resonance (SPR experiments and solid-phase binding assays demonstrate that recombinant Cyr61 interacts with immobilized monomeric or multimeric vitronectin (VTNC with K(D in the nanomolar range. Notably, the binding site for Cyr61 was identified as the somatomedin B domain (SMTB(1-44 of VTNC, which mediates its interaction with PAI-1, uPAR, and integrin alphav beta3. Accordingly, PAI-1 outcompetes Cyr61 for binding to immobilized SMTB(1-44, and Cyr61 attenuates uPAR-mediated U937 adhesion to VTNC. In contrast, isothermal titration calorimetry shows that Cyr61 does not display high-affinity binding for SMTB(1-44 in solution. Nevertheless, competitive ELISA revealed that multimeric VTNC, heat-modified monomeric VTNC, or SMTB(1-44 at high concentrations attenuate Cyr61 binding to immobilized VTNC, while monomeric VTNC was ineffective. Therefore, immobilization of VTNC exposes cryptic epitopes that recognize Cyr61 with high affinity, as reported for a number of antibodies, beta-endorphin, and other molecules. CONCLUSIONS: The finding that Cyr61 interacts with the SMTB(1-44 domain suggests that VTNC represent a point of anchorage for CCN family members to the matrix. Results are discussed in the context of the role of CCN and VTNC in matrix biology and angiogenesis.

  4. Immobilized palladium(II) ion affinity chromatography for recovery of recombinant proteins with peptide tags containing histidine and cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikot, Pamela; Polat, Aise; Achilli, Estefania; Fernandez Lahore, Marcelo; Grasselli, Mariano

    2014-11-01

    Fusion of peptide-based tags to recombinant proteins is currently one of the most used tools for protein production. Also, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) has a huge application in protein purification, especially in research labs. The combination of expression systems of recombinant tagged proteins with this robust chromatographic system has become an efficient and rapid tool to produce milligram-range amounts of proteins. IMAC-Ni(II) columns have become the natural partners of 6xHis-tagged proteins. The Ni(II) ion is considered as the best compromise of selectivity and affinity for purification of a recombinant His-tagged protein. The palladium(II) ion is also able to bind to side chains of amino acids and form ternary complexes with iminodiacetic acid and free amino acids and other sulfur-containing molecules. In this work, we evaluated two different cysteine- and histidine-containing six amino acid tags linked to the N-terminal group of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and studied the adsorption and elution conditions using novel eluents. Both cysteine-containing tagged GFPs were able to bind to IMAC-Pd(II) matrices and eluted successfully using a low concentration of thiourea solution. The IMAC-Ni(II) system reaches less than 20% recovery of the cysteine-containing tagged GFP from a crude homogenate of recombinant Escherichia coli, meanwhile the IMAC-Pd(II) yields a recovery of 45% with a purification factor of 13.

  5. Fluorescence Enhancement of Fluorescein Isothiocyanate-Labeled Protein A Caused by Affinity Binding with Immunoglobulin G in Bovine Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sakai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence enhancement of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled protein A (FITC-protein A caused by the binding with immunoglobulin G (IgG in bovine plasma was studied. FITC-protein A was immobilized onto a glass surface by covalent bonds. An increase in fluorescence intensity was dependent on IgG concentration ranging from 20 to 78 μg/mL in both phosphate buffer saline and bovine plasma. This method requires no separation procedure, and the reaction time is less than 15 min. A fluorescence enhancement assay by the affinity binding of fluorescence-labeled reagent is thus available for the rapid determination of biomolecules in plasma.

  6. The development of an affinity evaluation and prediction system by using protein–protein docking simulations and parameter tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Tsukamoto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Koki Tsukamoto1, Tatsuya Yoshikawa1,2, Kiyonobu Yokota1, Yuichiro Hourai1, Kazuhiko Fukui11Computational Biology Research Center (CBRC, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Bioinformatic Engineering, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A system was developed to evaluate and predict the interaction between protein pairs by using the widely used shape complementarity search method as the algorithm for docking simulations between the proteins. We used this system, which we call the affinity evaluation and prediction (AEP system, to evaluate the interaction between 20 protein pairs. The system first executes a “round robin” shape complementarity search of the target protein group, and evaluates the interaction between the complex structures obtained by the search. These complex structures are selected by using a statistical procedure that we developed called ‘grouping’. At a prevalence of 5.0%, our AEP system predicted protein–protein interactions with a 50.0% recall, 55.6% precision, 95.5% accuracy, and an F-measure of 0.526. By optimizing the grouping process, our AEP system successfully predicted 10 protein pairs (among 20 pairs that were biologically relevant combinations. Our ultimate goal is to construct an affinity database that will provide cell biologists and drug designers with crucial information obtained using our AEP system.Keywords: protein–protein interaction, affinity analysis, protein–protein docking, FFT, massive parallel computing

  7. Methylated-antibody affinity purification to improve proteomic identification of plant RNA polymerase Pol V complex and the interacting proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guochen; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xiaomei; Chu, Zhaoqing; She, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Affinity purification followed by enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry has been widely utilized for the sensitive detection of interacting proteins and protein complexes in various organisms. In plants, the method is technically challenging due to the low abundance proteins, non-specific binding and difficulties of eluting interacting proteins from antibody beads. In this report, we describe a strategy to modify antibodies by reductive methylation of lysines without affecting their binding properties, followed by on-bead digestion of bound proteins with endoproteinase Lys-C. By this method, the antibody remains intact and does not interfere with the downstream identification of interacting proteins. Non-specific binding proteins were excluded using 14N/15N-metabolic labeling of wild-type and the transgenic plant counterparts. The method was employed to identify 12 co-immunoprecipitated protein subunits in Pol V complex and to discover 17 potential interacting protein targets in Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the modification of antibodies by reductive dimethylation can improve the reliability and sensitivity of identifying low-abundance proteins through on-bead digestion and mass spectrometry. We also show that coupling this technique with chemical crosslinking enables in-depth characterization of endogenous protein complexes and the protein-protein interaction networks including mapping the surface topology and post-translational modifications of interacting proteins. PMID:28224978

  8. Diversity selection of compounds based on 'protein affinity fingerprints' improves sampling of bioactive chemical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha P; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin; Drakakis, Georgios; Maciejewski, Mateusz; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Diversity selection is a frequently applied strategy for assembling high-throughput screening libraries, making the assumption that a diverse compound set increases chances of finding bioactive molecules. Based on previous work on experimental 'affinity fingerprints', in this study, a novel diversity selection method is benchmarked that utilizes predicted bioactivity profiles as descriptors. Compounds were selected based on their predicted activity against half of the targets (training set), and diversity was assessed based on coverage of the remaining (test set) targets. Simultaneously, fingerprint-based diversity selection was performed. An original version of the method exhibited on average 5% and an improved version on average 10% increase in target space coverage compared with the fingerprint-based methods. As a typical case, bioactivity-based selection of 231 compounds (2%) from a particular data set ('Cutoff-40') resulted in 47.0% and 50.1% coverage, while fingerprint-based selection only achieved 38.4% target coverage for the same subset size. In conclusion, the novel bioactivity-based selection method outperformed the fingerprint-based method in sampling bioactive chemical space on the data sets considered. The structures retrieved were structurally more acceptable to medicinal chemists while at the same time being more lipophilic, hence bioactivity-based diversity selection of compounds would best be combined with physicochemical property filters in practice.

  9. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  10. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Aleš; Bay, Tina; Wellendorph, Petrine; Kehler, Jan; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Frølund, Bente; Pedersen, Martin H. F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide. Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affin...

  11. Neuroimaging of the serotonin reuptake site requires high-affinity ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, Betina; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2007-11-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop suitable radiolabeled tracers for positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography imaging of the serotonin transporter (SERT), but most often, negative outcomes are reported. The aim of this study is to define characteristics of a good SERT radioligand and to investigate species differences. We examined seven different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and that except for one all have been previously tested as emission tomography ligands. The outcome of the ligands as emission tomography tracers was compared in relation with receptor density (Bmax) and/or ligand affinity (Kd) in rat and monkey cerebrum and cerebellum (reference region) membranes. [3H]-(S)-Citalopram and [3H]-(+)-McN5652 display statistically significantly lower affinity, whereas [3H]paroxetine displays statistically significantly higher affinity for SERT in monkey cortex when compared with the rat cerebrum. The affinity of [3H]MADAM, [123I]ADAM, and [11C]DASB for SERT obtained with rat cerebrum and monkey cortex are similar. In monkey cortex, Kd and Bmax could not be determined with [3H]fluoxetine. Of the seven SSRIs, [3H]-(S)-citalopram, [3H]MADAM, and [11C]DASB displayed significant specific binding to SERT in monkey cerebellum, with Bmax cortex:cerebellum ratios being 17, 3, and 4, respectively. In rat brain tissue the ratios were 12, 6, and 3, respectively. In conclusion, it can be estimated that imaging of the human SERT in a high-density region requires radioligands with Kd values between 0.03 and a maximum of 0.3 nM (at 37 degrees C). The differential specific cerebellar binding raises the question of the suitability of cerebellum as a reference region for nonspecific binding.

  12. A simple detection method for low-affinity membrane protein interactions by baculoviral display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Sakihama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane protein interactions play an important role in cell-to-cell recognition in various biological activities such as in the immune or neural system. Nevertheless, there has remained the major obstacle of expression of the membrane proteins in their active form. Recently, we and other investigators found that functional membrane proteins express on baculovirus particles (budded virus, BV. In this study, we applied this BV display system to detect interaction between membrane proteins important for cell-to-cell interaction in immune system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected Sf9 cells with recombinant baculovirus encoding the T cell membrane protein CD2 or its ligand CD58 and recovered the BV. We detected specific interaction between CD2-displaying BV and CD58-displaying BV by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Using this system, we also detected specific interaction between two other membrane receptor-ligand pairs, CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L, and glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein (GITR-GITR ligand (GITRL. Furthermore, we observed specific binding of BV displaying CD58, CD40L, or GITRL to cells naturally expressing their respective receptors by flowcytometric analysis using anti-baculoviral gp64 antibody. Finally we isolated CD2 cDNA from a cDNA expression library by magnetic separation using CD58-displaying BV and anti-gp64 antibody. CONCLUSIONS: We found the BV display system worked effectively in the detection of the interaction of membrane proteins. Since various membrane proteins and their oligomeric complexes can be displayed on BV in the native form, this BV display system should prove highly useful in the search for natural ligands or to develop screening systems for therapeutic antibodies and/or compounds.

  13. cDNA heterogeneity suggests structural variants related to the high-affinity IgE receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F T; Albrandt, K; Robertson, M W

    1988-08-01

    The high-affinity IgE receptor present on mast cells and basophils is responsible for the IgE-mediated activation of these cells. The current model for this receptor depicts a four-subunit structure, alpha beta gamma 2. A cDNA for the alpha subunit was recently cloned and predicts a structure consisting of two homologous extracellular domains, a transmembrane segment, and a cytoplasmic tail. Using a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to the amino-terminal sequence of the alpha subunit, we identified a number of cDNA clones from a rat basophilic leukemia cell cDNA library. Nucleotide sequencing established four different forms of cDNA: one is nearly identical to the published cDNA; the second differs from the first in the 5' untranslated sequence; the other two forms use either one or the other of the 5'-end sequences as above and lack 163 base pairs in the region coding for the second extracellular domain. RNase protection analysis with radioactive RNA probes established the heterogeneity of rat basophilic leukemia cell mRNA with regard to both the 5' and the internal sequences. Our results suggest the existence of at least four different protein forms related to the alpha subunit of the high-affinity IgE receptor.

  14. CaRuby-Nano: a novel high affinity calcium probe for dual color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Mayeul; Wilms, Christian D; Bentkhayet, Asma; Marcaggi, Païkan; Couchman, Kiri; Charpak, Serge; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Häusser, Michael; Feltz, Anne; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2015-03-31

    The great demand for long-wavelength and high signal-to-noise Ca(2+) indicators has led us to develop CaRuby-Nano, a new functionalizable red calcium indicator with nanomolar affinity for use in cell biology and neuroscience research. In addition, we generated CaRuby-Nano dextran conjugates and an AM-ester variant for bulk loading of tissue. We tested the new indicator using in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrating the high sensitivity of CaRuby-Nano as well as its power in dual color imaging experiments.

  15. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the Formation of a High-Affinity Transporter-TonB Complex†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Lukasik, Stephen M.; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In the present study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33–239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB to the outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33–239) was found to bind with high-affinity (tens of nM) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding was observed to FecA. In BtuB, the high affinity binding of TonB(33–239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33–239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33–239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33–239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle. PMID:23517233

  16. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the formation of a high-affinity transporter-TonB complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M; Lukasik, Stephen M; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S

    2013-04-16

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In this study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33-239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB for outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA, and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33-239) was found to bind with high affinity (tens of nanomolar) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding to FecA was observed. In BtuB, the high-affinity binding of TonB(33-239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33-239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33-239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When the TonB(33-239) dimer is bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33-239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle.

  17. High-aluminum-affinity silica is a nanoparticle that seeds secondary aluminosilicate formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravin Jugdaohsingh

    Full Text Available Despite the importance and abundance of aluminosilicates throughout our natural surroundings, their formation at neutral pH is, surprisingly, a matter of considerable debate. From our experiments in dilute aluminum and silica containing solutions (pH ~ 7 we previously identified a silica polymer with an extraordinarily high affinity for aluminium ions (high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer, HSP. Here, further characterization shows that HSP is a colloid of approximately 2.4 nm in diameter with a mean specific surface area of about 1,000 m(2 g(-1 and it competes effectively with transferrin for Al(III binding. Aluminum binding to HSP strongly inhibited its decomposition whilst the reaction rate constant for the formation of the β-silicomolybdic acid complex indicated a diameter between 3.6 and 4.1 nm for these aluminum-containing nanoparticles. Similarly, high resolution microscopic analysis of the air dried aluminum-containing silica colloid solution revealed 3.9 ± 1.3 nm sized crystalline Al-rich silica nanoparticles (ASP with an estimated Al:Si ratio of between 2 and 3 which is close to the range of secondary aluminosilicates such as imogolite. Thus the high-aluminum-affinity silica polymer is a nanoparticle that seeds early aluminosilicate formation through highly competitive binding of Al(III ions. In niche environments, especially in vivo, this may serve as an alternative mechanism to polyhydroxy Al(III species binding monomeric silica to form early phase, non-toxic aluminosilicates.

  18. Determination of immunoglobulin G in bovine colostrum and milk powders, and in dietary supplements of bovine origin by protein G affinity liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Grant; Otter, Don; Arnold, K; Austad, J; Christiansen, S; Ferreira, I; Irvine, F; Marsh, C; Massom, L R; Otter, D; Pearce, K; Stevens, J; Szpylka, J; Vyas, P; Woollard, D; Wu, C

    2010-01-01

    An AOAC collaborative study was conducted to evaluate an affinity LC procedure for measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) in selected dairy powders. The powders were extracted with 0.15 M sodium chloride solution and the pH was adjusted to 4.6 to precipitate caseins, which would otherwise lead to an overestimation of IgG. The analyte was then bound to a commercially available Protein G affinity cartridge and selectively eluted with a glycine buffer at pH 2.5. Detection was at 280 nm and quantification was made against a calibration curve prepared from bovine serum IgG. The samples analyzed included the likely matrixes for which this assay will find commercial use, namely, high- and low-protein-content colostrum powders, tablets containing colostrum powder, and some IgG-containing dairy powders; milk protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, and skim milk powder. Eleven laboratories provided data for the study and assayed blind duplicates of six materials. The repeatability RSD values ranged from 2.1 to 4.2% and the reproducibility RSD values ranged from 6.4 to 18.5%. The Protein G method with casein removal has adequate reproducibility for measuring IgG in colostrum-derived powders that are traded on the basis of IgG content as a colostral marker.

  19. Exploring binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin, to nucleoprotein structure of chromatin: spectroscopic study and histone proteins as a target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soori, Hosna; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Davoodi, Jamshid

    2015-01-07

    Platinum drugs are potent chemotherapeutic agents widely used in cancer therapy. They exert their biological activity by binding to DNA, producing DNA adducts; however, in the cell nucleus, DNA is complexed with histone proteins into a nucleoprotein structure known as chromatin. The aim of this study was to explore the binding affinity of oxaliplatin and carboplatin to chromatin using spectroscopic as well as thermal denaturation and equilibrium dialysis techniques. The results showed that the drugs quenched with chromophores of chromatin and the quenching effect for oxaliplatin (Ksv = 3.156) was higher than carboplatin (Ksv = 0.28). The binding of the drugs exhibited hypochromicity both in thermal denaturation profiles and UV absorbance at 210 nm. The binding was positive cooperation with spontaneous reaction and oxaliplatin (Ka = 5.3 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.7) exhibited higher binding constant and number of binding sites than carboplatin (Ka = 0.33 × 10(3) M(-1), n = 1.0) upon binding to chromatin. Also secondary structure of chromatin proteins was altered upon drugs binding. It is concluded that oxaliplatin represents higher binding affinity to chromatin compared to carboplatin. In chromatin where DNA is compacted into nucleosomes structure with histones, the affinity of the platinated drugs is reduced and histone proteins may play a fundamental role in this binding process. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Immobilized fusion protein affinity chromatography combined with HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS for rapid screening of PPARγ ligands from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junfeng; Yi, Xiaojiao; Liu, Wenhui; Xu, Yingchun; Chen, Shuqing; Wu, Yongjiang

    2017-04-01

    Screening agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) from natural products is particularly motivated by the need for effective anti-diabetic agents. However, method for direct identification of PPARγ ligands from a complex sample is rarely reported. Here we propose a novel immobilized fusion protein affinity chromatography (IFPAC) to achieve rapid multicomponent screening. First, functional human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγLBD) was bacterially produced by fusion to glutathione S-transferase (GST). The unpurified GST-hPPARγLBD was directly applied to a 96-well filter plate prepacked with glutathione sepharose. Due to the strong affinity between GST and glutathione, the fusion protein could selectively attach to the glutathione matrix with an oriented immobilization, which was rapidly purified under non-denaturing conditions. Experimental results indicated that the prepared 96-affinity column array exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity for fishing novel interacting compounds. The proposed approach was applied in the high-throughput screening of PPARγ ligands from natural products, followed by rapid characterization of active compounds using HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS. Isochlorogenic acid A in Dendranthema indicum flowers was found to be a PPARγ ligand. Our findings suggested the IFPAC could be a powerful tool for drug discovery from natural products.

  1. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (Cornell); (UAB); (Florida)

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  2. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aweda, Tolulope A.; Meares, Claude F.

    2011-01-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (KA >108 M−1; KD calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate. PMID:21964396

  3. Improving binding mode and binding affinity predictions of docking by ligand-based search of protein conformations: evaluation in D3R grand challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of protein-ligand complex structures, particularly the structures of proteins co-bound with different ligands, in the Protein Data Bank helps us tackle two major challenges in molecular docking studies: the protein flexibility and the scoring function. Here, we introduced a systematic strategy by using the information embedded in the known protein-ligand complex structures to improve both binding mode and binding affinity predictions. Specifically, a ligand similarity calculation method was employed to search a receptor structure with a bound ligand sharing high similarity with the query ligand for the docking use. The strategy was applied to the two datasets (HSP90 and MAP4K4) in recent D3R Grand Challenge 2015. In addition, for the HSP90 dataset, a system-specific scoring function (ITScore2_hsp90) was generated by recalibrating our statistical potential-based scoring function (ITScore2) using the known protein-ligand complex structures and the statistical mechanics-based iterative method. For the HSP90 dataset, better performances were achieved for both binding mode and binding affinity predictions comparing with the original ITScore2 and with ensemble docking. For the MAP4K4 dataset, although there were only eight known protein-ligand complex structures, our docking strategy achieved a comparable performance with ensemble docking. Our method for receptor conformational selection and iterative method for the development of system-specific statistical potential-based scoring functions can be easily applied to other protein targets that have a number of protein-ligand complex structures available to improve predictions on binding.

  4. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  5. Separation of Binding Protein of Celangulin V from the Midgut of Mythimna separata Walker by Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Celangulin V, an insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet, can affect the digestive system of insects. However, the mechanism of how Celangulin V induces a series of symptoms is still unknown. In this study, affinity chromatography was conducted through coupling of Celangulin V-6-aminoacetic acid ester to the CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the collected fraction eluted by Celangulin V. Eight binding proteins (Zinc finger protein, Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2, Transmembrane protein 1, Actin, APN and V-ATPase were obtained and identified by LC/Q-TOF-MS from the midgut of Mythimna separata larvae. The potential of these proteins to serve as target proteins involved in the insecticidal activity of Celangulin V is discussed.

  6. Hexa-arginine enhanced uptake and residualization of selective high affinity ligands by Raji lymphoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirick Gary

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of arginine-rich peptide sequences similar to those found in viral proteins have been conjugated to other molecules to facilitate their transport into the cytoplasm and nucleus of targeted cells. The selective high affinity ligand (SHAL (DvLPBaPPP2LLDo, which was developed to bind only to cells expressing HLA-DR10, has been conjugated to one of these peptide transduction domains, hexa-arginine, to assess the impact of the peptide on SHAL uptake and internalization by Raji cells, a B-cell lymphoma. Results An analog of the SHAL (DvLPBaPPP2LLDo containing a hexa-arginine peptide was created by adding six D-arginine residues sequentially to a lysine inserted in the SHAL's linker. SHAL binding, internalization and residualization by Raji cells expressing HLA-DR10 were examined using whole cell binding assays and confocal microscopy. Raji cells were observed to bind two fold more 111In-labeled hexa-arginine SHAL analog than Raji cells treated with the parent SHAL. Three fold more hexa-arginine SHAL remained associated with the Raji cells after washing, suggesting that the peptide also enhanced residualization of the 111In transported into cells. Confocal microscopy showed both SHALs localized in the cytoplasm of Raji cells, whereas a fraction of the hexa-arginine SHAL localized in the nucleus. Conclusion The incorporation of a hexa-D-arginine peptide into the linker of the SHAL (DvLPBaPPP2LLDo enhanced both the uptake and residualization of the SHAL analog by Raji cells. In contrast to the abundant cell surface binding observed with Lym-1 antibody, the majority of (DvLPBaPPP2LArg6AcLLDo and the parent SHAL were internalized. Some of the internalized hexa-arginine SHAL analog was also associated with the nucleus. These results demonstrate that several important SHAL properties, including uptake, internalization, retention and possibly intracellular distribution, can be enhanced or modified by conjugating the SHALs to a

  7. ZipA binds to FtsZ with high affinity and enhances the stability of FtsZ protofilaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Kuchibhatla

    Full Text Available A bacterial membrane protein ZipA that tethers FtsZ to the membrane is known to promote FtsZ assembly. In this study, the binding of ZipA to FtsZ was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. ZipA was found to bind to FtsZ with high affinities at three different (6.0, 6.8 and 8.0 pHs, albeit the binding affinity decreased with increasing pH. Further, thick bundles of FtsZ protofilaments were observed in the presence of ZipA under the pH conditions used in this study indicating that ZipA can promote FtsZ assembly and stabilize FtsZ polymers under unfavorable conditions. Bis-ANS, a hydrophobic probe, decreased the interaction of FtsZ and ZipA indicating that the interaction between FtsZ and ZipA is hydrophobic in nature. ZipA prevented the dilution induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers suggesting that it stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled ZipA was found to be uniformly distributed along the length of the FtsZ protofilaments indicating that ZipA stabilizes FtsZ protofilaments by cross-linking them.

  8. Human epidermal Langerhans cells express the high affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (Fc epsilon RI)

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    It has been suggested that epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) bearing immunoglobulin E (IgE) may be involved in the genesis of atopic disease. The identity of the IgE receptor(s) on LC remained unclear, although it represents a crucial point in understanding cellular events linked to the binding of allergens to LC via IgE. In this report, we demonstrate that epidermal LC express the high affinity receptor for the Fc fragment of IgE (Fc epsilon RI) which has, so far, only been described on mast c...

  9. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis high-affinity iron importer, IrtA, contains an FAD-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryndak, Michelle B; Wang, Shuishu; Smith, Issar; Rodriguez, G Marcela

    2010-02-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient not freely available to microorganisms infecting mammals. To overcome iron deficiency, bacteria have evolved various strategies including the synthesis and secretion of high-affinity iron chelators known as siderophores. The siderophores produced and secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, exomycobactins, compete for iron with host iron-binding proteins and, together with the iron-regulated ABC transporter IrtAB, are required for the survival of M. tuberculosis in iron deficient conditions and for normal replication in macrophages and in mice. This study further characterizes the role of IrtAB in M. tuberculosis iron acquisition. Our results demonstrate a role for IrtAB in iron import and show that the amino terminus domain of IrtA is a flavin-adenine dinucleotide-binding domain essential for iron acquisition. These results suggest a model in which the amino terminus of IrtA functions to couple iron transport and assimilation.

  10. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  11. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  12. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  13. Exploration of cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channel-interacting proteins using affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Matveev, Alexander; Singh, Anil; Komori, Naoka; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Photopic (cone) vision essential for color sensation, central vision, and visual acuity is mediated by the activation of photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. Naturally occurring mutations in the cone channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. This work investigated the functional modulation of cone CNG channel by exploring the channel-interacting proteins. Retinal protein extracts prepared from cone-dominant Nrl (- / -) mice were used in CNGA3 antibody affinity purification, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. The peptide mass fingerprinting of the tryptic digests and database search identified a number of proteins including spectrin alpha-2, ATPase (Na(+)/K(+) transporting) alpha-3, alpha and beta subunits of ATP synthase (H(+) transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex), and alpha-2 subunit of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. In addition, the affinity-binding assays demonstrated an interaction between cone CNG channel and calmodulin but not cone Na(+)/Ca(2+)-K(+) exchanger in the mouse retina. Results of this study provide insight into our understanding of cone CNG channel-interacting proteins and the functional modulations.

  14. Contamination from an affinity column: an encounter with a new villain in the world of membrane-protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Pankaj; Deniaud, Aurélien; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva

    2012-10-01

    Attempts to crystallize AtNTT1, a chloroplast ATP/ADP transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana, revealed an unexpected contaminant, Strep-Tactin, a variant of streptavidin that was used during purification of the protein. Although it was present in very small amounts, crystals of Strep-Tactin were reproducibly grown from the AtNTT1 solution. AtNTT1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified from detergent-solubilized membrane fractions using Strep-Tactin affinity chromatography based on an engineered streptavidin. The contamination of protein solutions purified on Strep-Tactin columns has never been described previously and seems to be specific to membrane proteins solubilized in detergents. Trace amounts of Strep-Tactin were observed to be eluted from a Strep-Tactin column using several routinely used detergents, illustrating their possible role in the contamination. This finding raises an alarm and suggests caution in membrane-protein purification using Strep-Tactin affinity columns, where detergents are essential components. The small crystals of contaminant protein led to the structure at 1.9 Å resolution of Strep-Tactin in complex with desthiobiotin.

  15. Calculation of Absolute Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity Using Path and Endpoint Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    an explicit solvent layer width of 10 Å. The hybrid solvent model (35) involves encapsulating a biological solute by a layer of water molecules...of cyclodextrin binding affinities: energy, entropy, and implications for drug design. Biophys. J. 87:3035–3049. 42. Janezic, D., R. M. Venable, and

  16. Functionalised ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVAL) membranes for affinity protein separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avramescu, M.E.; Sager, W.F.C.; Wessling, M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrophilic microfiltration membranes with functional groups that can be used as coupling sites for ligands are of central interest in affinity separation, especially in view of biomedical applications. In this study we investigate covalent coupling of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model ligand onto

  17. Use of surface plasmon resonance for the measurement of low affinity binding interactions between HSP72 and measles virus nucleocapsid protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinsheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 is a molecular chaperone that binds native protein with low affinity. These interactions can alter function of the substrate, a property known as HSP-mediated activity control. In the present work, BIAcore instrumentation was used to monitor binding reactions between HSP72 and naturally occurring sequence variants of the measles virus (MV nucleocapsid protein (N, a structural protein regulating transcription/replication of the viral genome. Binding reactions employed synthetic peptides mimicking a putative HSP72 binding motif of N. Sequences were identified that bound HSP72 with affinities comparable to well-characterized activity control reactions. These sequences, but not those binding with lesser affinity, supported HSP72 activity control of MV transcription/replication. BIAcore instrumentation thus provides an effective way to measure biologically relevant low affinity interactions with structural variants of viral proteins.

  18. Affinity purification of human factor H on polypeptides derived from streptococcal m protein: enrichment of the Y402 variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Rickard Nilsson

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that defective activity of complement factor H (FH is associated with several human diseases, suggesting that pure FH may be used for therapy. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate human FH, based on the specific interaction between FH and the hypervariable region (HVR of certain Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins. Special interest was focused on the FH polymorphism Y402H, which is associated with the common eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD and has also been implicated in the binding to M protein. Using a fusion protein containing two copies of the M5-HVR, we found that the Y402 and H402 variants of FH could be efficiently purified by single-step affinity chromatography from human serum containing the corresponding protein. Different M proteins vary in their binding properties, and the M6 and M5 proteins, but not the M18 protein, showed selective binding of the FH Y402 variant. Accordingly, chromatography on a fusion protein derived from the M6-HVR allowed enrichment of the Y402 protein from serum containing both variants. Thus, the exquisite binding specificity of a bacterial protein can be exploited to develop a simple and robust procedure to purify FH and to enrich for the FH variant that protects against AMD.

  19. Affinity purification of human factor H on polypeptides derived from streptococcal m protein: enrichment of the Y402 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, O Rickard; Lannergård, Jonas; Morgan, B Paul; Lindahl, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Mattias C U

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that defective activity of complement factor H (FH) is associated with several human diseases, suggesting that pure FH may be used for therapy. Here, we describe a simple method to isolate human FH, based on the specific interaction between FH and the hypervariable region (HVR) of certain Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins. Special interest was focused on the FH polymorphism Y402H, which is associated with the common eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and has also been implicated in the binding to M protein. Using a fusion protein containing two copies of the M5-HVR, we found that the Y402 and H402 variants of FH could be efficiently purified by single-step affinity chromatography from human serum containing the corresponding protein. Different M proteins vary in their binding properties, and the M6 and M5 proteins, but not the M18 protein, showed selective binding of the FH Y402 variant. Accordingly, chromatography on a fusion protein derived from the M6-HVR allowed enrichment of the Y402 protein from serum containing both variants. Thus, the exquisite binding specificity of a bacterial protein can be exploited to develop a simple and robust procedure to purify FH and to enrich for the FH variant that protects against AMD.

  20. Yeast surface display for directed evolution of protein expression, affinity, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D

    2000-01-01

    The described protocols enable thorough screening of polypeptide libraries with high confidence in the isolation of improved clones. It should be emphasized that the protocols have been fashioned for thoroughness, rather than speed. With library plasmid DNA in hand, the time to plated candidate yeast display mutants is typically 2-3 weeks. Each of the experimental approaches required for this method is fairly standard: yeast culture, immunofluorescent labeling, flow cytometry. Protocols that are more rapid could conceivably be developed by using solid substrate separations with magnetic beads, for instance. However, loss of the two-color normalization possible with flow cytometry would remove the quantitative advantage of the method. Yeast display complements existing polypeptide library methods and opens the possibility of examining extracellular eukaryotic proteins, an important class of proteins not generally amenable to yeast two-hybrid or phage display methodologies.

  1. Rapid and efficient cancer cell killing mediated by high-affinity death receptor homotrimerizing TRAIL variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, C R; van der Sloot, A M; Natoni, A; Szegezdi, E; Setroikromo, R; Meijer, M; Sjollema, K; Stricher, F; Cool, R H; Samali, A; Serrano, L; Quax, W J

    2010-10-21

    The tumour necrosis factor family member TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells through the activation of death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) and is considered a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. As apoptosis seems to occur primarily via only one of the two death receptors in many cancer cells, the introduction of DR selectivity is thought to create more potent TRAIL agonists with superior therapeutic properties. By use of a computer-aided structure-based design followed by rational combination of mutations, we obtained variants that signal exclusively via DR4. Besides an enhanced selectivity, these TRAIL-DR4 agonists show superior affinity to DR4, and a high apoptosis-inducing activity against several TRAIL-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines in vitro. Intriguingly, combined treatment of the DR4-selective variant and a DR5-selective TRAIL variant in cancer cell lines signalling by both death receptors leads to a significant increase in activity when compared with wild-type rhTRAIL or each single rhTRAIL variant. Our results suggest that TRAIL induced apoptosis via high-affinity and rapid-selective homotrimerization of each DR represent an important step towards an efficient cancer treatment.

  2. Discovery of Compounds that Positively Modulate the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Parul; Armstrong, Emma J.; Jorgensen, Csilla C.; Piotrowski, Mary; Barthmes, Maria; Torella, Rubben; Johnston, Sarah E.; Maruyama, Yuya; Janiszewski, John S.; Storer, R. Ian; Skerratt, Sarah E.; Benn, Caroline L.

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic hypofunction is associated with decreased attention and cognitive deficits in the central nervous system in addition to compromised motor function. Consequently, stimulation of cholinergic neurotransmission is a rational therapeutic approach for the potential treatment of a variety of neurological conditions. High affinity choline uptake (HACU) into acetylcholine (ACh)-synthesizing neurons is critically mediated by the sodium- and pH-dependent high-affinity choline transporter (CHT, encoded by the SLC5A7 gene). This transporter is comparatively well-characterized but otherwise unexplored as a potential drug target. We therefore sought to identify small molecules that would enable testing of the hypothesis that positive modulation of CHT mediated transport would enhance activity-dependent cholinergic signaling. We utilized existing and novel screening techniques for their ability to reveal both positive and negative modulation of CHT using literature tools. A screening campaign was initiated with a bespoke compound library comprising both the Pfizer Chemogenomic Library (CGL) of 2,753 molecules designed specifically to help enable the elucidation of new mechanisms in phenotypic screens and 887 compounds from a virtual screening campaign to select molecules with field-based similarities to reported negative and positive allosteric modulators. We identified a number of previously unknown active and structurally distinct molecules that could be used as tools to further explore CHT biology or as a starting point for further medicinal chemistry. PMID:28289374

  3. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaval Kaur

    Full Text Available Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus.

  4. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kaval; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Smith, Kenneth; Huang, Min; Li, Lie; Pauli, Noel T.; Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Morrissey, Michael; Wu, Yixuan; Joachims, Michelle L.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Lau, Denise; Qu, Xinyan; Krammer, Florian; Wrammert, Jens; Palese, Peter; Ahmed, Rafi; James, Judith A.; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC) reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus. PMID:25951191

  5. High affinity mouse-human chimeric Fab against Hepatitis B surface antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biplab Bose; Navin Khanna; Subrat K Acharya; Subrata Sinha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Passive immunotherapy using antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been advocated in certain cases of Hepatitis B infection. We had earlier reported on the cloning and expression of a high affinity scFv derived from a mouse monoclonal (5S) against HBsAg. However this mouse antibody cannot be used for therapeutic purposes as it may elicit anti-mouse immune responses. Chimerization by replacing mouse constant domains with human ones can reduce the immunogenicity of this antibody.METHODS: We cloned the VH and VL genes of this mouse antibody; and fused them with CH1 domain of human IgG1 and CL domain of human kappa chain respectively. These chimeric genes were cloned into a phagemid vector. After initial screening using the phage display system, the chimeric Fab was expressed in soluble form in E. Coli.RESULTS: The chimeric Fab was purified from the bacterial periplasmic extract. We characterized the chimeric Fab using several in vitro techniques and it was observed that the chimeric molecule retained the high affinity and specificity of the original mouse monoclonal.This chimeric antibody fragment was further expressed in different strains of E> coli to increase the yield.CONCLUSION: We have generated a mouse-human chimeric Fab against HBsAg without any significant loss in binding and epitope specificity. This chimeric Fab fragment can be further modified to generate a fulllength chimeric antibody for therapeutic uses.

  6. A high-affinity, radioiodinatable neuropeptide FF analogue incorporating a photolabile p-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Lauriane; Moulédous, Lionel; Tafani, Jean A M; Germanier, Maryse; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-05-15

    A new radioiodinated photoaffinity compound, [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFNH2, derived from a peptide present in the rat neuropeptide FF (NPFF) precursor was synthesized, and its binding characteristics were investigated on a neuroblastoma clone, SH-SY5Y, stably expressing rat NPFF2 receptors tagged with the T7 epitope. The binding of the probe was saturable and revealed a high-affinity interaction (KD=0.24nM) with a single class of binding sites. It was also able to affinity label NPFF2 receptor in a specific and efficient manner given that 38% of the bound radioligand at saturating concentration formed a wash-resistant binding after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Photoaffinity labeling with [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide showed two molecular forms of NPFF2 receptor with apparent molecular weights of 140 and 95kDa in a 2:1 ratio. The comparison of the results between photoaffinity labeling and Western blot analysis suggests that all receptor forms bind the probe irreversibly with the same efficiency. On membranes of mouse olfactory bulb, only the high molecular weight form of NPFF2 receptor is observed. [(125)I]YE(Bpa)WSLAAPQRFamide is an excellent radioiodinated peptidic ligand for direct and selective labeling of NPFF2 receptors in vitro.

  7. AGP2 encodes the major permease for high affinity polyamine import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Leduc, Anick; Poulin, Richard; Ramotar, Dindial

    2005-06-24

    Polyamines play essential functions in many aspects of cell biology. Plasma membrane transport systems for the specific uptake of polyamines exist in most eukaryotic cells but have been very recently identified at the molecular level only in the parasite Leishmania. We now report that the high affinity polyamine permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is identical to Agp2p, a member of the yeast amino acid transporter family that was previously identified as a carnitine transporter. Deletion of AGP2 dramatically reduces the initial velocity of spermidine and putrescine uptake and confers strong resistance to the toxicity of exogenous polyamines, and transformation with an AGP2 expression vector restored polyamine transport in agp2delta mutants. Yeast mutants deficient in polyamine biosynthesis required >10-fold higher concentrations of exogenous putrescine to restore cell proliferation upon deletion of the AGP2 gene. Disruption of END3, a gene required for an early step of endocytosis, increased the abundance of Agp2p, an effect that was paralleled by a marked up-regulation of spermidine transport velocity. Thus, AGP2 encodes the first eukaryotic permease that preferentially uses spermidine over putrescine as a high affinity substrate and plays a central role in the uptake of polyamines in yeast.

  8. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid.

  9. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally.

  10. Development of Phage-Based Antibody Fragment Reagents for Affinity Enrichment of Bacterial Immunoglobulin G Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, Anna; Sjöholm, Kristoffer; Waldemarson, Sofia; Happonen, Lotta; Karlsson, Christofer; Persson, Helena; Malmström, Johan

    2015-11-06

    Disease and death caused by bacterial infections are global health problems. Effective bacterial strategies are required to promote survival and proliferation within a human host, and it is important to explore how this adaption occurs. However, the detection and quantification of bacterial virulence factors in complex biological samples are technically demanding challenges. These can be addressed by combining targeted affinity enrichment of antibodies with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-SRM MS). However, many virulence factors have evolved properties that make specific detection by conventional antibodies difficult. We here present an antibody format that is particularly well suited for detection and analysis of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-binding virulence factors. As proof of concept, we have generated single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies that specifically target the IgG-binding surface proteins M1 and H of Streptococcus pyogenes. The binding ability of the developed scFv is demonstrated against both recombinant soluble protein M1 and H as well as the intact surface proteins on a wild-type S. pyogenes strain. Additionally, the capacity of the developed scFv antibodies to enrich their target proteins from both simple and complex backgrounds, thereby allowing for detection and quantification with LC-SRM MS, was demonstrated. We have established a workflow that allows for affinity enrichment of bacterial virulence factors.

  11. Plant High-Affinity Potassium (HKT Transporters Involved in Salinity Tolerance: Structural Insights to Probe Differences in Ion Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hrmova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High-affinity Potassium Transporters (HKTs belong to an important class of integral membrane proteins (IMPs that facilitate cation transport across the plasma membranes of plant cells. Some members of the HKT protein family have been shown to be critical for salinity tolerance in commercially important crop species, particularly in grains, through exclusion of Na+ ions from sensitive shoot tissues in plants. However, given the number of different HKT proteins expressed in plants, it is likely that different members of this protein family perform in a range of functions. Plant breeders and biotechnologists have attempted to manipulate HKT gene expression through genetic engineering and more conventional plant breeding methods to improve the salinity tolerance of commercially important crop plants. Successful manipulation of a biological trait is more likely to be effective after a thorough understanding of how the trait, genes and proteins are interconnected at the whole plant level. This article examines the current structural and functional knowledge relating to plant HKTs and how their structural features may explain their transport selectivity. We also highlight specific areas where new knowledge of plant HKT transporters is needed. Our goal is to present how knowledge of the structure of HKT proteins is helpful in understanding their function and how this understanding can be an invaluable experimental tool. As such, we assert that accurate structural information of plant IMPs will greatly inform functional studies and will lead to a deeper understanding of plant nutrition, signalling and stress tolerance, all of which represent factors that can be manipulated to improve agricultural productivity.

  12. Plant High-Affinity Potassium (HKT) Transporters involved in salinity tolerance: structural insights to probe differences in ion selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Shane; Gilliham, Matthew; Hrmova, Maria

    2013-04-09

    High-affinity Potassium Transporters (HKTs) belong to an important class of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) that facilitate cation transport across the plasma membranes of plant cells. Some members of the HKT protein family have been shown to be critical for salinity tolerance in commercially important crop species, particularly in grains, through exclusion of Na+ ions from sensitive shoot tissues in plants. However, given the number of different HKT proteins expressed in plants, it is likely that different members of this protein family perform in a range of functions. Plant breeders and biotechnologists have attempted to manipulate HKT gene expression through genetic engineering and more conventional plant breeding methods to improve the salinity tolerance of commercially important crop plants. Successful manipulation of a biological trait is more likely to be effective after a thorough understanding of how the trait, genes and proteins are interconnected at the whole plant level. This article examines the current structural and functional knowledge relating to plant HKTs and how their structural features may explain their transport selectivity. We also highlight specific areas where new knowledge of plant HKT transporters is needed. Our goal is to present how knowledge of the structure of HKT proteins is helpful in understanding their function and how this understanding can be an invaluable experimental tool. As such, we assert that accurate structural information of plant IMPs will greatly inform functional studies and will lead to a deeper understanding of plant nutrition, signalling and stress tolerance, all of which represent factors that can be manipulated to improve agricultural productivity.

  13. Microscale thermophoresis for the assessment of nuclear protein-binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Duhr, Stefan; Baaske, Philipp; Laue, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advance in our knowledge of cellular regulatory mechanisms, including those involving chromatin-based processes, stems in part from the development of biophysical techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Despite their widespread utility, each of these techniques has its pros and cons, and new techniques are still required. Here we describe the application of microscale thermophoresis (MST), a novel technique based on thermophoresis, to characterize the binding between histone peptides and a histone chaperone protein, in free solution, with high sensitivity and low sample consumption.

  14. A KDP-LIKE, HIGH-AFFINITY, K+-TRANSLOCATING ATPASE IS EXPRESSED DURING GROWTH OF RHODOBACTER-SPHAEROIDES IN LOW POTASSIUM MEDIA - DISTRIBUTION OF THIS K+-ATPASE AMONG PURPLE NONSULFUR PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ABEE, T; HELLINGWERF, KJ; BAKKER, EP; SIEBERS, A; KONINGS, WN

    1992-01-01

    Cells of the purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides express a high-affinity K+ uptake system when grown in media with low K+ concentrations. Antibodies against the catalytic KdpB protein or the whole KdpABC complex of Escherichia coli cross-react with a 70.0 kDa R. sphaeroides protein

  15. [Prospects of application of the chitin-binding domains to isolation and purification of recombinant proteins by affinity chromatography: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, D V; Lopatin, S A; Varlamov, V P

    2009-01-01

    Properties of substrate-binding domains, some parameters of affinity sorbents, and a number of other special features that were necessary to take into account during creation of chromatographic system for isolation and purification of proteins with incorporated chitin-binding domain were discussed in this review. This method was shown to be successfully used along with metal-chelate affinity chromatography. The metal-chelate affinity chromatography with the use of polyhistidine peptides as affinity labels is successfully applied to isolation, purification, and investigation of recombinant proteins. However, this system had some disadvantages. At present, scientists attracted more and more attention to substrate-binding domains, including those chitin-binding, because they had a number of advantages being used as affinity label.

  16. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  17. Ga(+) Basicity and Affinity Scales Based on High-Level Ab Initio Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Oriana; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2015-10-26

    The structure, relative stability and bonding of complexes formed by the interaction between Ga(+) and a large set of compounds, including hydrocarbons, aromatic systems, and oxygen-, nitrogen-, fluorine and sulfur-containing Lewis bases have been investigated through the use of the high-level composite ab initio Gaussian-4 theory. This allowed us to establish rather accurate Ga(+) cation affinity (GaCA) and Ga(+) cation basicity (GaCB) scales. The bonding analysis of the complexes under scrutiny shows that, even though one of the main ingredients of the Ga(+) -base interaction is electrostatic, it exhibits a non-negligible covalent character triggered by the presence of the low-lying empty 4p orbital of Ga(+) , which favors a charge donation from occupied orbitals of the base to the metal ion. This partial covalent character, also observed in AlCA scales, is behind the dissimilarities observed when GaCA are compared with Li(+) cation affinities, where these covalent contributions are practically nonexistent. Quite unexpectedly, there are some dissimilarities between several Ga(+) -complexes and the corresponding Al(+) -analogues, mainly affecting the relative stability of π-complexes involving aromatic compounds.

  18. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  19. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF ANIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDES CONTAINING DIRECT DYE WITH A HIGH AFFINITY FOR CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yokota

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct dye with a high affinity for cellulose substrate was utilized as a cellulose anchor to promote retention of paper strengthening additives under various conditions associated with the wet end of a paper machine. Direct Red 28 (DR was covalently linked to anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM via a condensation reaction using water-soluble carbodiimide. The DR-conjugated A-PAM (DR-A-PAM demonstrated good retention efficiency, resulting in strength enhancement of handsheets. Anionic trash showed no interference with the performance of DR-A-PAM in the wet end, while the additive performance was sensitive to calcium ions. Surface plasmon resonance analysis gave useful information on the cellulose-anchoring ability of DR-A-PAM. Dye molecules were irreversibly adsorbed onto the cellulose substrate under aqueous conditions, while A-PAM possessed no significant affinity for cellulose. These results suggest that anionic DR moieties in DR-A-PAM molecules served as a cellulose-anchor, possibly due to multiple CH-π interaction between hydrophobic face of cellulose substrate and π-conjugated system of dye molecules. Such a unique interaction of direct dye and cellulose provides a new insight into the wet end system, and does not depend on conventional electrostatic attraction.

  20. Neutrophil recruitment limited by high-affinity bent β2 integrin binding ligand in cis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhichao; McArdle, Sara; Marki, Alex; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Gutierrez, Edgar; Engelhardt, Britta; Deutsch, Urban; Ginsberg, Mark; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-08-31

    Neutrophils are essential for innate immunity and inflammation and many neutrophil functions are β2 integrin-dependent. Integrins can extend (E(+)) and acquire a high-affinity conformation with an 'open' headpiece (H(+)). The canonical switchblade model of integrin activation proposes that the E(+) conformation precedes H(+), and the two are believed to be structurally linked. Here we show, using high-resolution quantitative dynamic footprinting (qDF) microscopy combined with a homogenous conformation-reporter binding assay in a microfluidic device, that a substantial fraction of β2 integrins on human neutrophils acquire an unexpected E(-)H(+) conformation. E(-)H(+) β2 integrins bind intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) in cis, which inhibits leukocyte adhesion in vitro and in vivo. This endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanism inhibits neutrophil aggregation, accumulation and inflammation.

  1. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  2. Generation of high-affinity fully human anti-interleukin-8 antibodies from its cDNA by two-hybrid screening and affinity maturation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ling; Azam, Mark; Lin, Yu-Huei; Sheridan, James; Wei, Shuanghong; Gupta, Gigi; Singh, Rakesh K; Pauling, Michelle H; Chu, Waihei; Tran, Antares; Yu, Nai-Xuan; Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Wei; Long, Hao; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Li; Hua, Shao-Bing

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a technology for rapidly generating novel and fully human antibodies by simply using the antigen DNA. A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was constructed in a yeast two-hybrid vector with high complexity. After cloning cDNA encoding the mature sequence of human interleukin-8 (hIL8) into the yeast two-hybrid system vector, we have screened the human scFv antibody library and obtained three distinct scFv clones that could specifically bind to hIL8. One clone was chosen for further improvement by a novel affinity maturation process using the error-prone PCR of the scFv sequence followed by additional rounds of yeast two-hybrid screening. The scFv antibodies of both primary and affinity-matured scFv clones were expressed in E. coli. All purified scFvs showed specific binding to hIL8 in reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and ELISA assays. All scFvs, as well as a fully human IgG antibody converted from one of the scFv clones and expressed in the mammalian cells, were able to effectively inhibit hIL8 in neutrophil chemotaxis assays. The technology described can generate fully human antibodies with high efficiency and low cost.

  3. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. (Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  4. G196 epitope tag system: a novel monoclonal antibody, G196, recognizes the small, soluble peptide DLVPR with high affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kasumi; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kato, Hiroaki; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Sugiyama, Kanako; Park, Sam-Yong; Sekine, Joji; Urano, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The recognition specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has made mAbs among the most frequently used tools in both basic science research and in clinical diagnosis and therapies. Precise determination of the epitope allows the development of epitope tag systems to be used with recombinant proteins for various purposes. Here we describe a new family of tag derived from the epitope recognized by a highly specific mAb G196. The minimal epitope was identified as the five amino acid sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Pro-Arg. Permutation analysis was used to characterize the binding requirements of mAb G196, and the variable regions of the mAb G196 were identified and structurally analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the high affinity (Kd = 1.25 nM) of the mAb G196/G196-epitope peptide interaction, and G196-tag was used to detect several recombinant cytosolic and nuclear proteins in human and yeast cells. mAb G196 is valuable for developing a new peptide tagging system for cell biology and biochemistry research. PMID:28266535

  5. Molecular Weight, Protein Binding Affinity and Methane Mitigation of Condensed Tannins from Mangosteen-peel (Garcinia mangostana L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paengkoum, P; Phonmun, T; Liang, J B; Huang, X D; Tan, H Y; Jahromi, M F

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the molecular weight of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) peel, its protein binding affinity and effects on fermentation parameters including total gas, methane (CH4) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. The average molecular weight (Mw) of the purified CT was 2,081 Da with a protein binding affinity of 0.69 (the amount needed to bind half the maximum bovine serum albumin). In vitro gas production declined by 0.409, 0.121, and 0.311, respectively, while CH4 production decreased by 0.211, 0.353, and 0.549, respectively, with addition of 10, 20, and 30 mg CT/500 mg dry matter (DM) compared to the control (pmangosteen-peel on in vitro DM degradability (IVDMD) and in vitro N degradability was negative and linear (pmangosteen-peel is lower than those reported for Leucaena forages, however, the former has stronger negative effect on IVDMD. Therefore, the use of mangosteen-peel as protein source and CH4 mitigating agent in ruminant feed requires further investigations.

  6. Using affinity capillary electrophoresis and computational models for binding studies of heparinoids with p-selectin and other proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Mona; Balasupramaniam, Shantheya; Preu, Lutz; El Deeb, Sami; Reiter, Christian G; Wätzig, Hermann

    2017-03-03

    A fast and precise affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method has been developed and applied for the investigation of the binding interactions between P-selectin and heparinoids as potential P-selectin inhibitors in the presence and absence of calcium ions. Furthermore, model proteins and vitronectin were used to appraise the binding behavior of P-selectin. The normalized mobility ratios (∆R/Rf ), wh