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Sample records for high adhesive force

  1. Superhydrophobic gecko feet with high adhesive forces towards water and their bio-inspired materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kesong; Du, Jiexing; Wu, Juntao; Jiang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Functional integration is an inherent characteristic for multiscale structures of biological materials. In this contribution, we first investigate the liquid-solid adhesive forces between water droplets and superhydrophobic gecko feet using a high-sensitivity micro-electromechanical balance system. It was found, in addition to the well-known solid-solid adhesion, the gecko foot, with a multiscale structure, possesses both superhydrophobic functionality and a high adhesive force towards water. The origin of the high adhesive forces of gecko feet to water could be attributed to the high density nanopillars that contact the water. Inspired by this, polyimide films with gecko-like multiscale structures were constructed by using anodic aluminum oxide templates, exhibiting superhydrophobicity and a strong adhesive force towards water. The static water contact angle is larger than 150° and the adhesive force to water is about 66 μN. The resultant gecko-inspired polyimide film can be used as a ``mechanical hand'' to snatch micro-liter liquids. We expect this work will provide the inspiration to reveal the mechanism of the high-adhesive superhydrophobic of geckos and extend the practical applications of polyimide materials.

  2. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic surface with high adhesive forces based carbon/silica composite films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruanbing Hu; Guohua Jiang; Xiaohong Wang; Xiaoguang Xi; Rijing Wang

    2013-11-01

    Glass substrates modified by carbon/silica composites are fabricated through a two-step process for the preparation of a superhydrophobic surface (water contact angle ≥ 150°). Carbon nanoparticles were first prepared through a deposition process on glass using a hydrothermal synthesis route, then the glass was modified by SiO2 using the hydrolysis reaction of tetraethylorthosilicate at room temperature. It is not only a facile method to create a superhydrophobic surface, but also helps to form a multi-functional surface with high adhesive forces.

  3. Analysis of adhesive binding forces between laminin-1 and C2C12 muscle cell membranes measured via high resolution force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, George; Gilbert, Richard; Ortiz, Christine

    2002-03-01

    Laminins are a family of glycoproteins that regulate cell differentiation, shape, and motility through interactions with various cell surface receptors. Here, we have directly measured the biomolecular adhesive binding forces between a cantilever / probe tip that was covalently attached with laminin-1 and membrane receptors on C2C12 muscle cells using the technique of high-resolution force spectroscopy (HRFS). On retraction of the probe tip away from the membrane surface, discrete, long-range adhesive unbinding events were always observed. Statistical analysis of the data revealed an initial broad distribution of heterogeneous unbinding events (occurring at separation distances, D=0-2µm from the point of maximum compression) of magnitude 92.23±37.87pN followed by a narrow distribution of homogeneous unbinding events (occurring at D > 2µm) of magnitude 38.16±9.10pN, which is suggestive of an individual biomolecular adhesive interaction. On-going studies include loading rate dependence and effect of dystroglycan mutation.

  4. Measurement of the adhesion force between particles for high gradient magnetic separation of pneumatic conveyed powder products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkawa, K., E-mail: senkawa@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, A1 Bldg, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakai, Y.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S. [Osaka University, A1 Bldg, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    In the industrial plants such as foods, medicines or industrial materials, there are big amount of issues on contamination by metallic wear debris originated from pipes of manufacturing lines. In this study, we developed a high gradient magnetic separation system (HGMS) under the dry process by using superconducting magnet to remove the ferromagnetic particles. One of the major problems of dry HGMS systems is, however, the blockage of magnetic filter caused by particle coagulation or deposition. In order to actualize the magnetic separation without blockage, we introduced pneumatic conveyance system as a new method to feed the powder. It is important to increase the drag force acting on the sufficiently dispersed particles, which require strong magnetic fields. To generate the strong magnetic fields, HGMS technique was examined which consists of a magnetic filter and a superconducting solenoid magnet. As a result of the magnetic separation experiment, it was shown that the separation efficiency changes due to the difference of the cohesive property of the particles. On the basis of the result, the adhesion force which acts between the ferromagnetic particles and the medium particles used for the magnetic separation was measured by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and cohesion of particles was studied from the aspect of interparticle interaction. We assessed a suitable flow velocity for magnetic separation according to the cohesive property of each particle based on the result.

  5. Influence of atomic force microscope (AFM) probe shape on adhesion force measured in humidity environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳丽; 涂育松; 谭惠丽

    2014-01-01

    In micro-manipulation, the adhesion force has very important influence on behaviors of micro-objects. Here, a theoretical study on the effects of humidity on the adhesion force is presented between atomic force microscope (AFM) tips and substrate. The analysis shows that the precise tip geometry plays a critical role on humidity depen-dence of the adhesion force, which is the dominant factor in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments. For a blunt (paraboloid) tip, the adhesion force versus humidity curves tends to the apparent contrast (peak-to-valley corrugation) with a broad range. This paper demonstrates that the abrupt change of the adhesion force has high correla-tion with probe curvatures, which is mediated by coordinates of solid-liquid-vapor contact lines (triple point) on the probe profiles. The study provides insights for further under-standing nanoscale adhesion forces and the way to choose probe shapes in manipulating micro-objects in AFM experiments.

  6. Capillary adhesion forces between flexible fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, Camille; Protière, Suzie

    2016-11-01

    We consider the capillary adhesion produced by a drop placed between two elastic fibers. We measure the force exerted by the drop as we vary the inter-fiber distance, and report two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. The weak adhesion is characterized by a force that increases linearly with the liquid length. With flexible fibers, the force exerted by the drop can induce deformation and rapid collapse, or zipping, of the fibers. This zipping results in a sudden increase of the wetted length and a force that departs from the linear evolution. As the inter-fiber distance is subsequently increased, the liquid length decreases while the fibers deformation increases, and the force actually reaches a plateau, i.e. remains constant until unzipping, or detachment of the fibers occurs. We measure the value of this plateau, i.e. the maximal adhesion force, as we vary the drop volume and the fibers elasticity. We also show that flexibility extends capillary adhesion to inter-fiber distances impossible to reach with rigid fibers, while keeping a constant pull-out force characteristic of the elastocapillary coupling.

  7. The nanoscale architecture of force-bearing focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Hedde; Harkes, Rolf; Spiesz, Ewa M; Storm, Cornelis; van Noort, Danny; Ladoux, Benoit; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-08-13

    The combination of micropillar array technology to measure cellular traction forces with super-resolution imaging allowed us to obtain cellular traction force maps and simultaneously zoom in on individual focal adhesions with single-molecule accuracy. We achieved a force detection precision of 500 pN simultaneously with a mean single-molecule localization precision of 30 nm. Key to the achievement was a two-step etching process that provided an integrated spacer next to the micropillar array that permitted stable and reproducible observation of cells on micropillars within the short working distance of a high-magnification, high numerical aperture objective. In turn, we used the technology to characterize the super-resolved structure of focal adhesions during force exertion. Live-cell imaging on MCF-7 cells demonstrated the applicability of the inverted configuration of the micropillar arrays to dynamics measurements. Forces emanated from a molecular base that was localized on top of the micropillars. What appeared as a single adhesion in conventional microscopy were in fact multiple elongated adhesions emanating from only a small fraction of the adhesion on the micropillar surface. Focal adhesions were elongated in the direction of local cellular force exertion with structural features of 100-280 nm in 3T3 Fibroblasts and MCF-7 cells. The combined measure of nanoscale architecture and force exerted shows a high level of stress accumulation at a single site of adhesion.

  8. Facile fabrication of functional PDMS surfaces with tunable wettablity and high adhesive force via femtosecond laser textured templating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlei Hu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser processing is emerged as a promising tool to functionalize surfaces of various materials, including metals, semiconductors, and polymers. However, the productivity of this technique is limited by the low efficiency of laser raster scanning. Here we report a facile approach for efficiently producing large-area functional polymer surfaces, by which metal is firstly textured by a femtosecond laser, and the as-prepared hierarchical structures are subsequently transferred onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surfaces. Aluminum pieces covered by laser induced micro/nano-structures act as template masters and their performance of displaying diverse colors are investigated. Polymer replicas are endowed with tunable wetting properties, which are mainly attributed to the multi-scale surface structures. Furthermore, the surfaces are found to have extremely high adhesive force for water drops because of the high water penetration depth and the resultant high contact angle hysteresis. This characteristic facilitates many potential applications like loss-free tiny water droplets transportation. The reusability of metal master and easiness of soft lithography make it to be a very simple, fast and cost-efficient way for mass production of functional polymeric surfaces.

  9. Adhesion force imaging in air and liquid by adhesion mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Kees; Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1994-01-01

    A new imaging mode for the atomic force microscope(AFM), yielding images mapping the adhesion force between tip and sample, is introduced. The adhesion mode AFM takes a force curve at each pixel by ramping a piezoactuator, moving the silicon‐nitride tip up and down towards the sample. During the

  10. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  11. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniou, A; Ellinas, K; Olziersky, A; Gogolides, E

    2014-01-24

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min(-1) using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing.

  12. Ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires fabricated with plasma etching: plasma processing, mechanical stability analysis against adhesion and capillary forces and oleophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniou, A.; Ellinas, K.; Olziersky, A.; Gogolides, E.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature deep Si etching using time-multiplexed deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) processes is investigated to fabricate ultra-high aspect ratio Si nanowires (SiNWs) perpendicular to the silicon substrate. Nanopatterning is achieved using either top-down techniques (e.g. electron beam lithography) or colloidal polystyrene (PS) sphere self-assembly. The latter is a faster and more economical method if imperfections in diameter and position can be tolerated. We demonstrate wire radii from below 100 nm to several micrometers, and aspect ratios (ARs) above 100:1 with etching rates above 1 μm min-1 using classical mass flow controllers with pulsing rise times of seconds. The mechanical stability of these nanowires is studied theoretically and experimentally against adhesion and capillary forces. It is shown that above ARs of the order of 50:1 for spacing 1 μm, SiNWs tend to bend due to adhesion forces between them. Such large adhesion forces are due to the high surface energy of silicon. Wetting the SiNWs with water and drying also gives rise to capillary forces. We find that capillary forces may be less important for SiNW collapse/bending compared to adhesion forces of dry SiNWs, contrary to what is observed for polymeric nanowires/nanopillars which have a much lower surface energy compared to silicon. Finally we show that SiNW arrays have oleophobic and superoleophobic properties, i.e. they exhibit excellent anti-wetting properties for a wide range of liquids and oils due to the re-entrant profile produced by the DRIE process and the well-designed spacing.

  13. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  14. AFM measurements of adhesive forces between carbonaceous particles and the substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianqi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Peng, Wei, E-mail: pengwei@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Ke [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Educations, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Adhesive force of spherical carbonaceous particle MCMBs and HTR-10 graphite matrix debris were measured for the first time. • The measured equivalent works of adhesion were much smaller than the ideal values. • The shape factor and the particle morphology reduce the adhesive force. • The adhesion effect does not change directly with the asperity size. - Abstract: Graphite dust is carbonaceous particles generated during operation of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTR). Graphite dust resuspension is the key behavior associated with HTR source term analyses and environmental safety assessment. The adhesive force is the key factor that determines the resuspension rate. The present study used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure the adhesive force between a single carbonaceous particle and the substrate. The measurements were performed on mica, graphite IG110 and Inconel 800H. The prepared “probe cantilevers” were mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), fuel element debris from HTR-10 and graphite NBG18. The equivalent work of adhesion was derived from the measured adhesive force and calculated based on substrate profile approximation and the JKR theoretical model. The measured work was smaller than the ideal work of adhesion, most likely due to the rough particle morphology and the rough substrate surface. Additionally, a shape factor imposes a constraint on the lateral deformation of the particles. Furthermore, surface roughness could reduce the adhesive force some depending on the particle size. Once the particle was too small to be trapped into a trough, the adhesive force would not be further reduced.

  15. Probing living bacterial adhesion by single cell force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Regina, Viduthalai R.

    /Dead fluorescence staining at the end of each experiment. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time of contact. The single-cell probe offers control of the cell immobilization, thus holds advantages over the commonly used multi-cell probes where...... random immobilization is obtained by submerging the cantilever in a bacterial suspension. The reported method provides a general platform for investigating single cell interactions of bacteria with different surfaces and other cells by AFM force spectroscopy, thus improving our understanding...... density PLL-g-PEG coatings were about eight times as thick as the conventional PLL-g-PEG coatings. Adhesion forces toward high density PLL-g-PEG coatings were low (P. aeruginosa) or close to zero (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) compared to bare titanium surface. However, no decrease in adhesion force...

  16. The capillary adhesion technique: a versatile method for determining the liquid adhesion force and sample stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gandyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel, practical technique for the concerted, simultaneous determination of both the adhesion force of a small structure or structural unit (e.g., an individual filament, hair, micromechanical component or microsensor to a liquid and its elastic properties. The method involves the creation and development of a liquid meniscus upon touching a liquid surface with the structure, and the subsequent disruption of this liquid meniscus upon removal. The evaluation of the meniscus shape immediately before snap-off of the meniscus allows the quantitative determination of the liquid adhesion force. Concurrently, by measuring and evaluating the deformation of the structure under investigation, its elastic properties can be determined. The sensitivity of the method is remarkably high, practically limited by the resolution of the camera capturing the process. Adhesion forces down to 10 µN and spring constants up to 2 N/m were measured. Three exemplary applications of this method are demonstrated: (1 determination of the water adhesion force and the elasticity of individual hairs (trichomes of the floating fern Salvinia molesta. (2 The investigation of human head hairs both with and without functional surface coatings (a topic of high relevance in the field of hair cosmetics was performed. The method also resulted in the measurement of an elastic modulus (Young’s modulus for individual hairs of 3.0 × 105 N/cm2, which is within the typical range known for human hair. (3 Finally, the accuracy and validity of the capillary adhesion technique was proven by examining calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilevers, reproducing the spring constants calibrated using other methods.

  17. Binding Strength Between Cell Adhesion Proteoglycans Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammer, Ulrich; Popescu, Octavian; Wagner, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario; Guntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Misevic, Gradimir N.

    1995-02-01

    Measurement of binding forces intrinsic to adhesion molecules is necessary to assess their contribution to the maintenance of the anatomical integrity of multicellular organisms. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the binding strength between cell adhesion proteoglycans from a marine sponge. Under physiological conditions, the adhesive force between two cell adhesion molecules was found to be up to 400 piconewtons. Thus a single pair of molecules could hold the weight of 1600 cells. High intermolecular binding forces are likely to form the basis for the integrity of the multicellular sponge organism.

  18. Adhesion Force Measurements of Polymer Particles by Detachment Field Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masashi Nagayama; Nobuyasu Sakurai; Tatsuaki Wada; Manabu Takeuchi

    2004-01-01

    The adhesion force distributions of polymer particles to aluminum substrates were measured by the detachment field method. Polymer particles with conducting surface treatment were used for the measurements.Further the conventional detachment field method was modified to be applicable to the adhesion force measurements of a single particle. The adhesion force of the polymer particles increased with an increase in relative humidity. The surface roughness of the substrate influenced the adhesion forces of particles significantly. The influence of the CF4 plasma treatment of the polymer particles and thin layer coating of the substrate surface on the adhesion forces of the polymer particles was also studied, and factors affecting adhesion forces of polymer particles are discussed.

  19. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  20. MEASUREMENT OF ADHESION FORCES IN AIR WITH THE VIBRATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siegfried Ripperger; Konrad Hein

    2005-01-01

    The vibration method represents a practical method for the measurement of adhesion forces and adhesion force distributions. This method causes sinusoidally altemating stresses and yields detachment and contact forces between particles and substrate of the same order of magnitude. Alternating contact forces of the vibration method can cause an adhesion force intensification through flattening of asperities. The measuring principle of the vibration method and the analysis of experimental results are described in the article. Normal adhesion forces (pull-off forces) are measured using the vibration method and the colloidal probe technique. The results of both methods show good agreement for small particle sizes. The influence of the detachment force direction is shown by comparing tangential and normal adhesion forces measured using particle reentrainment in a turbulent air flow and the vibration method, respectively. The surface roughness of the substrate and the relative humidity are shown to significantly influence the measured adhesion forces. For the calculation of the adhesion forces, an approach by Rabinovich was combined with approximations of plastic micro asperity flattening. The Rabinovich approach accounts for roughness effects on the van der Waals force by incorporating the rms roughness of the interacting surfaces. rms-values of the particles and substrates were measured with atomic force microscopy at different scanning areas.

  1. The Role of the Electrostatic Force in Spore Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunhyea [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lee, Ida [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic force is investigated as one of the components of the adhesion force between Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) spores and planar surfaces. The surface potentials of a Bt spore and a mica surface are experimentally obtained using a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-scanning surface potential microscopy technique. On the basis of experimental information, the surface charge density of the spores is estimated at 0.03 {micro}C/cm{sup 2} at 20% relative humidity and decreases with increasing humidity. The Coulombic force is introduced for the spore-mica system (both charged, nonconductive surfaces), and an electrostatic image force is introduced to the spore-gold system because gold is electrically conductive. The Coulombic force for spore-mica is repulsive because the components are similarly charged, while the image force for the spore-gold system is attractive. The magnitude of both forces decreases with increasing humidity. The electrostatic forces are added to other force components, e.g., van der Waals and capillary forces, to obtain the adhesion force for each system. The adhesion forces measured by AFM are compared to the estimated values. It is shown that the electrostatic (Coulombic and image) forces play a significant role in the adhesion force between spores and planar surfaces.

  2. The Adhesive System and Anisotropic Shear Force of Guizhou Gastromyzontidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Wang, Jinrong; Ji, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The Guizhou gastromyzontidae (Beaufortia kweichowensis) can adhere to slippery and fouled surfaces in torrential streams. A unique adhesive system utilized by the fish was observed by microscope and CLSM as an attachment disc sealed by a round belt of micro bubbles. The system is effective in wet or underwater environments and can resist a normal pulling force up to 1000 times the fish’s weight. Moreover, a mechanism for passive anisotropic shear force was observed. The shear forces of the fish under different conditions were measured, showing that passive shear force plays an important role in wet environments. The adhesive system of the fish was compared with other biological adhesion principles, from which we obtained potential values for the system that refer to the unique micro sealing and enhanced adhesion in a wet environment.

  3. Analysis of intraocular lens surface adhesiveness by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Marco; Carbone, Giovanni; Lombardo, Giuseppe; De Santo, Maria P; Barberi, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    To analyze intraocular lens (IOL) optic surface adhesiveness using atomic force microscopy (AFM). LiCryL Laboratory, University of Calabria, Rende, Italy. The surface adhesive properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), silicone, hydrophilic acrylic, and hydrophobic acrylic IOLs were evaluated by AFM. Analysis was performed at room temperature (21 degrees C) in a liquid environment using the force-versus-distance mode of a commercial instrument (NanoScope III). Measurements were acquired with rectangular silicon cantilevers of a nominal elastic constant of 10 Newton/m. The nominal value of the tip's radius of curvature was 1 mum, and the scanning speed during the acquisitions ranged from 10 to 400 nm/s. The adhesion force measurements showed different characteristics for the various types of IOLs (Pdevelopment and the interface interactions between the IOL and capsule, the results in this study may bolster the theory of manufacturing more-adhesive materials to prevent PCO.

  4. Nanoscale adhesion forces between enamel pellicle proteins and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljevic, D; Hutter, J L; Helmerhorst, E J; Xiao, Y; Custodio, W; Zaidan, F C; Oppenheim, F G; Siqueira, W L

    2014-05-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle (AEP) is important for minimizing the abrasion caused by parafunctional conditions as they occur, for instance, during bruxism. It is a remarkable feature of the AEP that a protein/peptide film can provide enough protection in normofunction to prevent teeth from abrasion and wear. Despite its obvious critical role in the protection of tooth surfaces, the essential adhesion features of AEP proteins on the enamel surface are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to measure the adhesion force between histatin 5, a primary AEP component, and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. Both biotinylated histatin 5 and biotinylated human serum albumin were allowed to adsorb to streptavidin-coated silica microspheres attached to atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. A multimode AFM with a Nanoscope IIIa controller was used to measure the adhesion force between protein-functionalized silica microspheres attached to cantilever tips and the HA surface. The imaging was performed in tapping mode with a Si3N4 AFM cantilever, while the adhesion forces were measured in AFM contact mode. A collection of force-distance curves (~3,000/replicate) was obtained to generate histograms from which the adhesion forces between histatin 5 or albumin and the HA surface were measured. We found that histatin 5 exhibited stronger adhesion forces (90% >1.830 nN) to the HA surface than did albumin (90% > 0.282 nN). This study presents an objective approach to adhesion force measurements between histatin 5 and HA, and provides the experimental basis for measuring the same parameters for other AEP constituents. Such knowledge will help in the design of synthetic proteins and peptides with preventive and therapeutic benefits for tooth enamel.

  5. Modeling of the intermolecular Force-Induced Adhesion in Freestanding Nanostructures Made of Nano-beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Yekrangi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the intermolecular interactions, the Casimir and van der Waals forces are the most important forces that highly affect the behavior of nanostructures. This paper studies the effect of such forces on the adhesion of cantilever freestanding nanostructures. The nanostructures are made of a freestanding nano-beam which is suspended between two upper and lower conductive surfaces. The linear spring model is applied to derive the elastic force. The Lumped Parameter Model (LPM is used to obtain constitutive equations of the systems. The maximum length of the nano-beam which prevents the adhesion is computed. Results of this study are useful for design and development of miniature devices.

  6. Adhesive properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis probed by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yifan; Ulstrup, Jens; Zhang, Jingdong;

    2011-01-01

    Mapping of the surface properties of Staphylococcus epidermidis and of biofilm forming bacteria in general is a key to understand their functions, particularly their adhesive properties. To gain a comprehensive view of the structural and chemical properties of S. epidermidis, four different strains...... are not the driving forces for adhesion of the four strains. Rather, the observation of sawtooth force–distance patterns on the surface of biofilm positive strains documents the presence of modular proteins such as Aap that may mediate cell adhesion. Treatment of two biofilm positive strains with two chemical...

  7. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo N. Oliveira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS, it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  8. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  9. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen, E-mail: abderrahmen_merghni@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Kammoun, Dorra [Laboratoire de Biomatériaux et Biotechnologie, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire, Monastir (Tunisia); Hentati, Hajer [Laboratoire de Recherche en Santé Orale et Réhabilitation Bucco-Faciale (LR12ES11), Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Janel, Sébastien [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Popoff, Michka [Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Lafont, Frank [BioImaging Center Lille-FR3642, Lille (France); Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection-CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille University (France); Aouni, Mahjoub [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Mastouri, Maha [Laboratoire des Maladies Transmissibles et Substances biologiquement actives (LR99ES27) Faculté de Pharmacie de Monastir, Université de Monastir (Tunisia); Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • 4 dental restorative materials were characterized for roughness, angle contact water and surface free energy. • AFM adhesion forces of S. aureus to tested materials were achieved in presence and absence of salivary conditioning film. • S. aureus initial adhesion is dependent on the surface free energy and roughness. - Abstract: In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  10. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Norde, W.; Meil, H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F-prev) and to detach adhering bacteria (F-det) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the

  11. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the

  12. Friction-controlled traction force in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Tilo; Kaufmann, Martin; Kasimir, Maria; Johne, Stephanie; Glorius, Stefan; Renner, Lars; Bobeth, Manfred; Pompe, Wolfgang; Werner, Carsten

    2011-10-19

    The force balance between the extracellular microenvironment and the intracellular cytoskeleton controls the cell fate. We report a new (to our knowledge) mechanism of receptor force control in cell adhesion originating from friction between cell adhesion ligands and the supporting substrate. Adherent human endothelial cells have been studied experimentally on polymer substrates noncovalently coated with fluorescent-labeled fibronectin (FN). The cellular traction force correlated with the mobility of FN during cell-driven FN fibrillogenesis. The experimental findings have been explained within a mechanistic two-dimensional model of the load transfer at focal adhesion sites. Myosin motor activity in conjunction with sliding of FN ligands noncovalently coupled to the surface of the polymer substrates is shown to result in a controlled traction force of adherent cells. We conclude that the friction of adhesion ligands on the supporting substrate is important for mechanotransduction and cell development of adherent cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Norde, W.; Meil, H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F-prev) and to detach adhering bacteria (F-det) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the fol

  14. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the f

  15. Oral bacterial adhesion forces to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Chen, Yangxi; de Vries, Joop; Ren, Yijin

    2009-08-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction represents a growing problem in orthodontics, because bacteria can adversely affect treatment by causing demineralization of the enamel surface around the brackets. It is important to know the forces with which bacteria adhere to the surfaces of these junction materials, as the strength of these forces will determine how easy it will be to remove the bacteria. We compared the adhesion forces of five initially colonizing and four cariogenic strains of bacteria to an orthodontic adhesive, stainless steel, and enamel, with and without a salivary conditioning film. Adhesion forces were determined using atomic force microscopy and a bacterial probe. In the absence of a salivary conditioning film, the strongest bacterial adhesion forces occurred to the adhesive surface (-2.9 to -6.9 nN), while adhesion forces to the enamel surfaces were lowest (-0.8 to -2.7 nN). In the presence of a salivary conditioning film, adhesion forces were reduced strongly, to less than 1 nN, and the differences between the various materials were reduced. Generally, however, initial colonizers of dental hard surfaces presented stronger adhesion forces to the different materials (-4.7 and -0.6 nN in the absence and presence of a salivary conditioning film, respectively) than cariogenic strains (-1.8 and -0.5 nN).

  16. Adhesion forces in liquid media: effect of surface topography and wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serro, A P; Colaço, R; Saramago, B

    2008-09-15

    This work was motivated by the unexpected values of adhesion forces measured between an atomic force microscopy tip and the hydrophobic surface of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. Two types of samples with different roughness but similar wettability were tested. Adhesion forces of similar magnitude were obtained in air and in polar liquids (water and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution, a saline solution) with the rougher sample. In contrast, the adhesion forces measured on the smoother sample in air were much higher than those measured in water or in the aqueous solution. Those experimental results suggested the presence of nanobubbles at the interface between the rough sample and the polar liquids. The existence of the nanobubbles was further confirmed by the images of the interface obtained in noncontact tapping mode. The adhesion forces measured in a nonpolar liquid (hexadecane) were small and of the same order of magnitude for both samples and their values were in good agreement with the predictions of the London-Hamaker approach for the van der Waals interactions. Finally, we correlate the appearance of nanobubbles with surface topography. The conclusion of this work is that adhesion forces measured in aqueous media may be strongly affected by the presence of nanobubbles if the surface presents topographical accidents.

  17. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  18. Adhesive Forces between A1 Domain of von Willebrand Factor and N-terminus Domain of Glycoprotein Ibα Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobimatsu, Hiroaki; Nishibuchi, Yuichiro; Sudo, Ryo; Goto, Shinya; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) plays an important role in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis formation, particularly under a high shear rate. However, the adhesive force due to the molecular interaction between VWF and glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) has not been fully explored. Thus, we employed atomic force microscopy to directly measure the adhesive force between VWF and GPIbα. We measured the adhesive force between VWF and GPIbα at the molecular level using an atomic force microscope (AFM). An AFM cantilever was coated with recombinant N-terminus VWF binding site of GPIbα, whereas a cover glass was coated with native VWF. The adhesive force at the molecular level was measured using an AFM. In the presence of 1 μg/mL VWF, the adhesion force was nearly 200 pN. As per the Gaussian fit analysis, the adhesive force of a single bond could have been 54 or 107 pN. Our consideration with the Gaussian fit analysis proposed that the adhesive force of a single bond could be 54 pN, which is very close to that obtained by optical tweezers (50 pN).

  19. Adhesion forces due to nano-triboelectrification between similar materials

    CERN Document Server

    Guerret-Piecourt, Christelle; Ségault, Frédéric; Juvé, Denyse; Tréheux, Daniel; Tonck, André

    2004-01-01

    Contact electrification and triboelectrification are well-known in the case of dissimilar materials, however the case of charge exchange during friction between nominally identical insulating materials is less documented. We experimentally investigated the triboelectrification between two smooth monocrystalline α-Al 2O 3 (sapphire) antagonists by surface force measurements with a Surface Force Apparatus (SFA). The force between a sphere and a plane, both in sapphire, was measured as a function of the sphere-plane distance D, before and after nano-friction tests, under dry argon atmosphere. Respective contributions of van der Waals, water meniscus and electrostatic forces were determined. The estimated Hamaker constant was in good agreement with the Lifshitz theory, and the dominant meniscus attraction at low separation could be overcome with small radius sphere. We demonstrated that electrostatic forces were generated by the nano-friction test and we quantified the adhesion that results from this con...

  20. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boks, Niels P; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-10-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the following three hypotheses. 1. A strong hydrodynamic shear force to prevent adhesion relates to a strong hydrodynamic shear force to detach an adhering organism. 2. A weak hydrodynamic shear force to detach adhering bacteria implies that more bacteria will be stimulated to detach by passing an air-liquid interface (an air bubble) through the flow chamber. 3. DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) interactions determine the characteristic hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent adhesion and to detach adhering micro-organisms as well as the detachment induced by a passing air-liquid interface. F(prev) varied from 0.03 to 0.70 pN, while F(det) varied from 0.31 to over 19.64 pN, suggesting that after initial contact, strengthening of the bond occurs. Generally, it was more difficult to detach bacteria from DDS-coated glass than from hydrophilic glass, which was confirmed by air bubble detachment studies. Calculated attractive forces based on the DLVO theory (F(DLVO)) towards the secondary interaction minimum were higher on glass than on DDS-coated glass. In general, all three hypotheses had to be rejected, showing that it is important to distinguish between forces acting parallel (hydrodynamic shear) and perpendicular (DLVO, air-liquid interface passages) to the substratum surface.

  1. Force mapping during the formation and maturation of cell adhesion sites with multiple optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingel, Melanie; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Focal contacts act as mechanosensors allowing cells to respond to their biomechanical environment. Force transmission through newly formed contact sites is a highly dynamic process requiring a stable link between the intracellular cytoskeleton and the extracellular environment. To simultaneously investigate cellular traction forces in several individual maturing adhesion sites within the same cell, we established a custom-built multiple trap optical tweezers setup. Beads functionalized with fibronectin or RGD-peptides were placed onto the apical surface of a cell and trapped with a maximum force of 160 pN. Cells form adhesion contacts around the beads as demonstrated by vinculin accumulation and start to apply traction forces after 30 seconds. Force transmission was found to strongly depend on bead size, surface density of integrin ligands and bead location on the cell surface. Highest traction forces were measured for beads positioned on the leading edge. For mouse embryonic fibroblasts, traction forces acting on single beads are in the range of 80 pN after 5 minutes. If two beads were positioned parallel to the leading edge and with a center-to-center distance less than 10 µm, traction forces acting on single beads were reduced by 40%. This indicates a spatial and temporal coordination of force development in closely related adhesion sites. We also used our setup to compare traction forces, retrograde transport velocities, and migration velocities between two cell lines (mouse melanoma and fibroblasts) and primary chick fibroblasts. We find that maximal force development differs considerably between the three cell types with the primary cells being the strongest. In addition, we observe a linear relation between force and retrograde transport velocity: a high retrograde transport velocity is associated with strong cellular traction forces. In contrast, migration velocity is inversely related to traction forces and retrograde transport velocity.

  2. Force Mapping during the Formation and Maturation of Cell Adhesion Sites with Multiple Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingel, Melanie; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Focal contacts act as mechanosensors allowing cells to respond to their biomechanical environment. Force transmission through newly formed contact sites is a highly dynamic process requiring a stable link between the intracellular cytoskeleton and the extracellular environment. To simultaneously investigate cellular traction forces in several individual maturing adhesion sites within the same cell, we established a custom-built multiple trap optical tweezers setup. Beads functionalized with fibronectin or RGD-peptides were placed onto the apical surface of a cell and trapped with a maximum force of 160 pN. Cells form adhesion contacts around the beads as demonstrated by vinculin accumulation and start to apply traction forces after 30 seconds. Force transmission was found to strongly depend on bead size, surface density of integrin ligands and bead location on the cell surface. Highest traction forces were measured for beads positioned on the leading edge. For mouse embryonic fibroblasts, traction forces acting on single beads are in the range of 80 pN after 5 minutes. If two beads were positioned parallel to the leading edge and with a center-to-center distance less than 10 µm, traction forces acting on single beads were reduced by 40%. This indicates a spatial and temporal coordination of force development in closely related adhesion sites. We also used our setup to compare traction forces, retrograde transport velocities, and migration velocities between two cell lines (mouse melanoma and fibroblasts) and primary chick fibroblasts. We find that maximal force development differs considerably between the three cell types with the primary cells being the strongest. In addition, we observe a linear relation between force and retrograde transport velocity: a high retrograde transport velocity is associated with strong cellular traction forces. In contrast, migration velocity is inversely related to traction forces and retrograde transport velocity. PMID:23372781

  3. Force mapping during the formation and maturation of cell adhesion sites with multiple optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Schwingel

    Full Text Available Focal contacts act as mechanosensors allowing cells to respond to their biomechanical environment. Force transmission through newly formed contact sites is a highly dynamic process requiring a stable link between the intracellular cytoskeleton and the extracellular environment. To simultaneously investigate cellular traction forces in several individual maturing adhesion sites within the same cell, we established a custom-built multiple trap optical tweezers setup. Beads functionalized with fibronectin or RGD-peptides were placed onto the apical surface of a cell and trapped with a maximum force of 160 pN. Cells form adhesion contacts around the beads as demonstrated by vinculin accumulation and start to apply traction forces after 30 seconds. Force transmission was found to strongly depend on bead size, surface density of integrin ligands and bead location on the cell surface. Highest traction forces were measured for beads positioned on the leading edge. For mouse embryonic fibroblasts, traction forces acting on single beads are in the range of 80 pN after 5 minutes. If two beads were positioned parallel to the leading edge and with a center-to-center distance less than 10 µm, traction forces acting on single beads were reduced by 40%. This indicates a spatial and temporal coordination of force development in closely related adhesion sites. We also used our setup to compare traction forces, retrograde transport velocities, and migration velocities between two cell lines (mouse melanoma and fibroblasts and primary chick fibroblasts. We find that maximal force development differs considerably between the three cell types with the primary cells being the strongest. In addition, we observe a linear relation between force and retrograde transport velocity: a high retrograde transport velocity is associated with strong cellular traction forces. In contrast, migration velocity is inversely related to traction forces and retrograde transport velocity.

  4. Experimental Investigation of the Velocity Effect on Adhesion Forces with an Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏征; 赵亚溥

    2004-01-01

    Capillary forces are significantly dominant in adhesive forces measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM)in ambient air, which are always thought to be dependent on water film thickness, relative humidity, and the free energy of water film. We study the nature of the pull-off force on a variety of surfaces as a function of tip velocity.It is found that the capillary forces are of relatively strong dependence on tip velocity. The present experiment is expected to provide a better understanding of the work mechanism of AFM in ambient air.

  5. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  6. Measuring cell adhesion forces of primary gastrulating cells from zebrafish using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puech, Pierre-Henri; Taubenberger, Anna; Ulrich, Florian; Krieg, Michael; Muller, Daniel J; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2005-09-15

    During vertebrate gastrulation, progenitor cells of different germ layers acquire specific adhesive properties that contribute to germ layer formation and separation. Wnt signals have been suggested to function in this process by modulating the different levels of adhesion between the germ layers, however, direct evidence for this is still lacking. Here we show that Wnt11, a key signal regulating gastrulation movements, is needed for the adhesion of zebrafish mesendodermal progenitor cells to fibronectin, an abundant extracellular matrix component during gastrulation. To measure this effect, we developed an assay to quantify the adhesion of single zebrafish primary mesendodermal progenitors using atomic-force microscopy (AFM). We observed significant differences in detachment force and work between cultured mesendodermal progenitors from wild-type embryos and from slb/wnt11 mutant embryos, which carry a loss-of-function mutation in the wnt11 gene, when tested on fibronectin-coated substrates. These differences were probably due to reduced adhesion to the fibronectin substrate as neither the overall cell morphology nor the cell elasticity grossly differed between wild-type and mutant cells. Furthermore, in the presence of inhibitors of fibronectin-integrin binding, such as RGD peptides, the adhesion force and work were strongly decreased, indicating that integrins are involved in the binding of mesendodermal progenitors in our assay. These findings demonstrate that AFM can be used to quantitatively determine the substrate-adhesion of cultured primary gastrulating cells and provide insight into the role of Wnt11 signalling in modulating cell adhesion at the single cell scale.

  7. Unraveling the Secrets of Bacterial Adhesion Organelles Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Björnham, Oscar; Castelain, Mickaël; Koutris, Efstratios; Schedin, Staffan; Fällman, Erik; Andersson, Magnus

    Many types of bacterium express micrometer-long attachment organelles (so-called pili) whose role is to mediate adhesion to host tissue. Until recently, little was known about their function in the adhesion process. Force-measuring optical tweezers (FMOT) have since then been used to unravel the biomechanical properties of various types of pili, primarily those from uropathogenic E. coli, in particular their force-vs.-elongation response, but lately also some properties of the adhesin are situated at the distal end of the pilus. This knowledge provides an understanding of how piliated bacteria can sustain external shear forces caused by rinsing processes, e.g., urine flow. It has been found that many types of pilus exhibit unique and complex force-vs.-elongation responses. It has been conjectured that their dissimilar properties impose significant differences in their ability to sustain external forces and that different types of pilus therefore have dissimilar predisposition to withstand different types of rinsing conditions. An understanding of these properties is of high importance since it can serve as a basis for finding new means to combat bacterial adhesion, including that caused by antibiotic-resistance bacteria. This work presents a review of the current status of the assessment of biophysical properties of individual pili on single bacteria exposed to strain/stress, primarily by the FMOT technique. It also addresses, for the first time, how the elongation and retraction properties of the rod couple to the adhesive properties of the tip adhesin.

  8. Construction of force measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and investigations of biophysical properties of bacterial adhesion organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a technique in which microscopic-sized particles, including living cells and bacteria, can be non-intrusively trapped with high accuracy solely using focused light. The technique has therefore become a powerful tool in the field of biophysics. Optical tweezers thereby provide outstanding manipulation possibilities of cells as well as semi-transparent materials, both non-invasively and non-destructively, in biological systems. In addition, optical tweezers can measure minute forces (< 10-12 N), probe molecular interactions and their energy landscapes, and apply both static and dynamic forces in biological systems in a controlled manner. The assessment of intermolecular forces with force measuring optical tweezers, and thereby the biomechanical structure of biological objects, has therefore considerably facilitated our understanding of interactions and structures of biological systems. Adhesive bacterial organelles, so called pili, mediate adhesion to host cells and are therefore crucial...

  9. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  10. Spatiotemporal Constraints on the Force-Dependent Growth of Focal Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Jonathan; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Oakes, Patrick W.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are the predominant mechanism by which cells mechanically couple to and exert traction forces on their extracellular matrix (ECM). It is widely presumed that FA size is modulated by force to mediate changes in adhesion strength at different levels of cellular tension. However, previous studies seeking correlations between force and FA morphology have yielded variable and often conflicting results. Here we show that a strong correlation between adhesion size and traction force exists only during the initial stages of myosin-mediated adhesion maturation and growth. For mature adhesions, no correlation between traction stress and size is observed. Rather, the tension that is sustained at mature adhesions is more strongly influenced by proximity to the cell edge, with peripheral adhesions transmitting higher tension than adhesions near the cell center. Finally, we show that mature adhesions can withstand sixfold increases in tension without changes in size. Thus, although a strong correlation between adhesion size and mechanical tension is observed during the initial stages of myosin-mediated adhesion maturation, no correlation is observed in mature, elongated adhesions. This work places spatiotemporal constraints on the force-dependent growth of adhesions and provides insight into the mechanical regulation of cell-ECM adhesion. PMID:21689521

  11. [Influence of surface roughness on oral streptococcal adhesion forces to dental filling materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainan, Zheng; Li, Jiang; Lei, Zhang; Liying, Hao; Lu, Ye; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This study is to determine the common oral streptococcal adhesion forces by using composite resin and glass ionomer cement (GIC) with different degrees of surface roughness via atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. The influence of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion force is also discussed. Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain 300, 200, 100, and 10 nm surfaces of light-cured composite resin and GIC samples. Surface topography was assessed by AFM analysis. Initial colonizers (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis) and cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) were used to obtain bacteria-modified AFM probes. The force-distance curves were also measured by AFM analysis to determine the adhesion forces of bacteria on the surfaces of the composite resin and GIC. Material surface roughness was analyzed using ANOVA, and adhesion forces were subjected to nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test). Comparison among groups was performed by Dunn's test. Material surface roughness and bacterial adhesion forces were subjected to correlation analysis. Bacterial adhesion forces increased with increasing material roughness. The adhesion forces of the four bacterial species reached the maximum on the material surface of 300 nm. The adhesion force of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.578 nN to 2.876 nN on GIC surfaces with 10 and 300 nm roughness. The adhesion forces of the four species on the surface of the composite resin were stronger than that of GIC. The initial colonizers exhibited stronger adhesion forces to different materials than the cariogenic strains. Intergroup differences were evident on the 200 and 300 nm material surfaces. The surface roughness of the material significantly affected the bacterial adhesion forces, and a significant linear correlation existed between both factors. The bacterial adhesion forces of the GIC were lower than that of the composite resin. Furthermore, surface roughness

  12. Oral bacterial adhesion forces to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction in orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Chen, Yangxi; de Vries, Joop; Ren, Yijin

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction represents a growing problem in orthodontics, because bacteria can adversely affect treatment by causing demineralization of the enamel surface around the brackets. It is important to know the forces with wh

  13. Oral bacterial adhesion forces to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction in orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Chen, Yangxi; de Vries, Joop; Ren, Yijin

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterial surfaces constituting the bracket-adhesive-enamel junction represents a growing problem in orthodontics, because bacteria can adversely affect treatment by causing demineralization of the enamel surface around the brackets. It is important to know the forces with

  14. Cell Adhesion on Dynamic Supramolecular Surfaces Probed by Fluid Force Microscopy-Based Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Jaatinen, Leena; Brinkmann, Jenny; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vörös, Janos; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2017-04-25

    Biomimetic and stimuli-responsive cell-material interfaces are actively being developed to study and control various cell-dynamics phenomena. Since cells naturally reside in the highly dynamic and complex environment of the extracellular matrix, attempts are being made to replicate these conditions in synthetic biomaterials. Supramolecular chemistry, dealing with noncovalent interactions, has recently provided possibilities to incorporate such dynamicity and responsiveness in various types of architectures. Using a cucurbit[8]uril-based host-guest system, we have successfully established a dynamic and electrochemically responsive interface for the display of the integrin-specific ligand, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), to promote cell adhesion. Due to the weak nature of the noncovalent forces by which the components at the interface are held together, we expected that cell adhesion would also be weaker in comparison to traditional interfaces where ligands are usually immobilized by covalent linkages. To assess the stability and limitations of our noncovalent interfaces, we performed single-cell force spectroscopy studies using fluid force microscopy. This technique enabled us to measure rupture forces of multiple cells that were allowed to adhere for several hours on individual substrates. We found that the rupture forces of cells adhered to both the noncovalent and covalent interfaces were nearly identical for up to several hours. We have analyzed and elucidated the reasons behind this result as a combination of factors including the weak rupture force between linear Arg-Gly-Asp and integrin, high surface density of the ligand, and increase in effective concentration of the supramolecular components under spread cells. These characteristics enable the construction of highly dynamic biointerfaces without compromising cell-adhesive properties.

  15. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Migliorini, Elisa; Palma, Anita; Pucer, Anja; Skrap, Miran; Scoles, Giacinto; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG) that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG) favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  16. Investigation of adhesion and mechanical properties of human glioma cells by single cell force spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Andolfi

    Full Text Available Active cell migration and invasion is a peculiar feature of glioma that makes this tumor able to rapidly infiltrate into the surrounding brain tissue. In our recent work, we identified a novel class of glioma-associated-stem cells (defined as GASC for high-grade glioma--HG--and Gasc for low-grade glioma--LG that, although not tumorigenic, act supporting the biological aggressiveness of glioma-initiating stem cells (defined as GSC for HG and Gsc for LG favoring also their motility. Migrating cancer cells undergo considerable molecular and cellular changes by remodeling their cytoskeleton and cell interactions with surrounding environment. To get a better understanding about the role of the glioma-associated-stem cells in tumor progression, cell deformability and interactions between glioma-initiating stem cells and glioma-associated-stem cells were investigated. Adhesion of HG/LG-cancer cells on HG/LG-glioma-associated stem cells was studied by time-lapse microscopy, while cell deformability and cell-cell adhesion strengths were quantified by indentation measurements by atomic force microscopy and single cell force spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that for both HG and LG glioma, cancer-initiating-stem cells are softer than glioma-associated-stem cells, in agreement with their neoplastic features. The adhesion strength of GSC on GASC appears to be significantly lower than that observed for Gsc on Gasc. Whereas, GSC spread and firmly adhere on Gasc with an adhesion strength increased as compared to that obtained on GASC. These findings highlight that the grade of glioma-associated-stem cells plays an important role in modulating cancer cell adhesion, which could affect glioma cell migration, invasion and thus cancer aggressiveness. Moreover this work provides evidence about the importance of investigating cell adhesion and elasticity for new developments in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

  17. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B.; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10-18 J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  18. Atomic force microscopy measurements of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation onto clay-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoyun; Wu, Huayong; Cai, Peng; Fein, Jeremy B; Chen, Wenli

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial adhesion onto mineral surfaces and subsequent biofilm formation play key roles in aggregate stability, mineral weathering, and the fate of contaminants in soils. However, the mechanisms of bacteria-mineral interactions are not fully understood. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the adhesion forces between bacteria and goethite in water and to gain insight into the nanoscale surface morphology of the bacteria-mineral aggregates and biofilms formed on clay-sized minerals. This study yields direct evidence of a range of different association mechanisms between bacteria and minerals. All strains studied adhered predominantly to the edge surfaces of kaolinite rather than to the basal surfaces. Bacteria rarely formed aggregates with montmorillonite, but were more tightly adsorbed onto goethite surfaces. This study reports the first measured interaction force between bacteria and a clay surface, and the approach curves exhibited jump-in events with attractive forces of 97 ± 34 pN between E. coli and goethite. Bond strengthening between them occurred within 4 s to the maximum adhesion forces and energies of -3.0 ± 0.4 nN and -330 ± 43 aJ (10(-18) J), respectively. Under the conditions studied, bacteria tended to form more extensive biofilms on minerals under low rather than high nutrient conditions.

  19. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; de Baat, C.; Arikan, A.; Ucankale, M.

    2005-01-01

    : PURPOSE: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application. MATERIALS AND

  20. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Özcan (Behiye); Y. Kulak (Yasemin); C. de Baat; A. Arikan (Ayla); M. Ucankale (Mert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application.

  1. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-08-17

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour.

  2. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  3. Nano-mechanics of Tunable Adhesion using Non Covalent Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Liechti

    2012-09-08

    The objective of this program was to examine, via experiment and atomistic and continuum analysis, coordinated noncovalent bonding over a range of length scales with a view to obtaining modulated, patterned and reversible bonding at the molecular level. The first step in this project was to develop processes for depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) bearing carboxylic acid and amine moieties on Si (111) surfaces and probe tips of an interfacial force microscope (IFM). This allowed the adhesive portion of the interactions between functionalized surfaces to be fully captured in the force-displacement response (force profiles) that are measured by the IFM. The interactionswere extracted in the form of traction-separation laws using combined molecular and continuum stress analyses. In this approach, the results of molecular dynamics analyses of SAMs subjected to simple stress states are used to inform continuum models of their stress-strain behavior. Continuum analyses of the IFM experiment were then conducted, which incorporate the stress-strain behavior of the SAMs and traction-separation relations that represent the interactions between the tip and functionalized Si surface. Agreement between predicted and measured force profiles was taken to imply that the traction-separation relations have been properly extracted. Scale up to larger contact areas was considered by forming Si/SAM/Si sandwiches and then separating them via fracture experiments. The mode 1 traction-separation relations have been extracted using fracture mechanics concepts under mode 1 and mixed-mode conditions. Interesting differences were noted between the three sets of traction-separation relations.

  4. Effect of ambient humidity on the strength of the adhesion force of single yeast cell inside environmental-SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yajing, E-mail: shen@robo.mein.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Nakajima, Masahiro [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ridzuan Ahmad, Mohd [Department of Mechatronics and Robotics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310 (Malaysia); Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Fukuda, Toshio [Department of Micro-Nano Systems Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    A novel method for measuring an adhesion force of single yeast cell is proposed based on a nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The effect of ambient humidity on a single yeast cell adhesion force was studied. Ambient humidity was controlled by adjusting the chamber pressure and temperature inside the ESEM. It has been demonstrated that a thicker water film was formed at a higher humidity condition. The adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a tungsten probe which later on known as a substrate was evaluated at various humidity conditions. A micro-puller was fabricated from an AFM cantilever by use of focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The adhesion force of a single yeast cell (W303) to the substrate was measured using the micro-puller at the three humidity conditions: 100%, 70%, and 40%. The results showed that the adhesion force between the single yeast cell and the substrate is much smaller at higher humidity condition. The yeast cells were still alive after being observed and manipulated inside ESEM based on the result obtained from the re-culturing of the single yeast cell. The results from this work would help us to understand the ESEM system better and its potential benefit to the single cell analysis research. -- Research highlights: {yields} A nanorobotic manipulation system was developed inside an ESEM. {yields} A micro-puller was designed for single yeast cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} Yeast cells were still alive after being observed and manipulated inside ESEM. {yields} Yeast cell adhesion force to substrate is smaller at high humidity condition than at low humidity condition.

  5. DNA-based digital tension probes reveal integrin forces during early cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng; Salaita, Khalid

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stimuli profoundly alter cell fate, yet the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain obscure because of a lack of methods for molecular force imaging. Here to address this need, we develop a new class of molecular tension probes that function as a switch to generate a 20- to 30-fold increase in fluorescence upon experiencing a threshold piconewton force. The probes employ immobilized DNA hairpins with tunable force response thresholds, ligands and fluorescence reporters. Quantitative imaging reveals that integrin tension is highly dynamic and increases with an increasing integrin density during adhesion formation. Mixtures of fluorophore-encoded probes show integrin mechanical preference for cyclized RGD over linear RGD peptides. Multiplexed probes with variable guanine-cytosine content within their hairpins reveal integrin preference for the more stable probes at the leading tip of growing adhesions near the cell edge. DNA-based tension probes are among the most sensitive optical force reporters to date, overcoming the force and spatial resolution limitations of traction force microscopy.

  6. Adhesive forces and surface properties of cold gas plasma treated UHMWPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preedy, Emily Callard; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Evans, Sam L; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-10-20

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment was used on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a common articulating counter material employed in hip and knee replacements. UHMWPE is a biocompatible polymer with low friction coefficient, yet does not have robust wear characteristics. CAP effectively cross-links the polymer chains of the UHMWPE improving wear performance (Perni et al., Acta Biomater. 8(3) (2012) 1357). In this work, interactions between CAP treated UHMWPE and spherical borosilicate sphere (representing model material for bone) were considered employing AFM technique. Adhesive forces increased, in the presence of PBS, after treatment with helium and helium/oxygen cold gas plasmas. Furthermore, a more hydrophilic surface of UHMWPE was observed after both treatments, determined through a reduction of up to a third in the contact angles of water. On the other hand, the asperity density also decreased by half, yet the asperity height had a three-fold decrease. This work shows that CAP treatment can be a very effective technique at enhancing the adhesion between bone and UHMWPE implant material as aided by the increased adhesion forces. Moreover, the hydrophilicity of the CAP treated UHMWPE can lead to proteins and cells adhesion to the surface of the implant stimulating osseointegration process.

  7. Adhesion force measurements on the two wax layers of the waxy zone in Nepenthes alata pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorb, Elena V; Purtov, Julia; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-06-03

    The wax coverage of the waxy zone in Nepenthes alata pitchers consists of two clearly distinguishable layers, designated the upper and lower wax layers. Since these layers were reported to reduce insect attachment, they were considered to have anti-adhesive properties. However, no reliable adhesion tests have been performed with these wax layers. In this study, pull-off force measurements were carried out on both wax layers of the N. alata pitcher and on two reference polymer surfaces using deformable polydimethylsiloxane half-spheres as probes. To explain the results obtained, roughness measurements were performed on test surfaces. Micro-morphology of both surface samples and probes tested was examined before and after experiments. Pull-off forces measured on the upper wax layer were the lowest among surfaces tested. Here, contamination of probes by wax crystals detached from the pitcher surface was found. This suggests that low insect attachment on the upper wax layer is caused primarily by the breaking off of wax crystals from the upper wax layer, which acts as a separation layer between the insect pad and the pitcher surface. High adhesion forces obtained on the lower wax layer are explained by the high deformability of probes and the particular roughness of the substrate.

  8. Workshop on Adhesion and Intermolecular Forces Held in Alexandria, Virginia on 18-19 June 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-18

    films on the fluorinated polyimide 6FDA -ODA have the largest grain size and surface roughness. Q4 Characterization of Interface Chemistry and Adhesion...Interfacial Adhesion Studies of Polyimides with the Atom ic Force M icroscope ............................................. 93 J. P. Lu, P. V. Nagarkar, D...Maine Interfacial adhesion studies of polyimides with the scanning force microscope Jiong-Ping Lu, Massachussetts Institute of Technology

  9. Bond-Strengthening in Staphylococcal Adhesion to Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent bacterial adhesion forces of four strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were investigated. Initial adhesion forces differed significantly between the two surfaces and hovered around -0.4 nN. No unambiguous effect of substratum surface

  10. Bacterial Adhesion Forces to Ag-Impregnated Contact Lens Cases and Transmission to Contact Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, Wenwen; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure adhesion forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Serratia marcescens to a rigid contact lens (CL), standard polypropylene, and Ag-impregnated lens cases using atomic force microscopy and determine bacterial transmission from lens case to CL. Methods: Adhesion

  11. Bond-Strengthening in Staphylococcal Adhesion to Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, Niels P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent bacterial adhesion forces of four strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were investigated. Initial adhesion forces differed significantly between the two surfaces and hovered around -0.4 nN. No unambiguous effect of substratum surface hydrophobi

  12. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  13. Adhesion, unfolding forces, and molecular elasticity of fibronectin coatings: An atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarokova, Maria; Iturri, Jagoba; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2017-10-07

    Fibronectin is an extracellular matrix protein that is involved in cell adhesion, growth, migration, differentiation, and wound healing. Fibronectin coatings are currently used in many laboratories for biomedical and biotechnology purposes. In this study we have investigated the adhesion and mechanical properties of fibronectin coatings. The coatings were also used to study the role of the residence time and the influence of the loading rate in nonspecific interactions. The results showed that the adhesion force between silica and fibronectin increased with loading rate delivering similar values for residence times of 1 and 2 s. Further analysis indicated that the distance to the transition state was about 0.5 nm. Moreover, the adhesion force did not vary with the loading rate for contact time of 0 s. The unfolding of fibronectin domains also depended of the Dwell time (no unfolding events were observed for zero residence time). Applied loads of 2 nN were able to stretch the fibronectin layer up to 200 nm and to unfold the three fibronectin domains, which were similar for a Dwell time of 1 and 2 s. However, the unfolding length increased with loading rate: below 2.5 µm s(-1) the obtained lengths matched the value of FN I (13.5 nm), while for higher speeds the measured values corresponded to the lengths of FN II (18 nm) and FN III (27 nm). This investigation has answered and opened new questions about the mechanical stability and function of fibronectin coatings. The results have also raised theoretical questions about the difference between specific and nonspecific interactions to be addressed in future work. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Measurement of nano particle adhesion by atomic force microscopy using probability theory based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, D.; Schrezenmeier, I.; Roos, M.; Neckernuss, T.; Lehn, M.; Marti, O.

    2017-05-01

    We present a method to detect adhesive forces of nano particles by analysis of the distribution of measured lateral forces. The measurement protocol is suitable for all types of atomic force microscopes with a lateral force channel. Lateral forces are measured, in constant normal force contact mode, by scanning of substrates decorated with nano beads. By using probability theory, geometry based measurement errors are compensated and the real adhesion force is determined within a given confidence interval. The theoretical model can be adapted for particles with arbitrary shape and distribution of adhesion forces. It is applied to the adhesion problem of spherical particles with a Gaussian distribution of adhesion forces. We analyze the measured force distribution qualitatively and quantitatively. The theory predicts a systematic underestimation of the mean value of any particle adhesion measurement done by lateral pushing. Real measurement data of 50 nm diameter silica nano beads on silicon substrate is used to test the theoretical model for plausibility by means of information theory.

  15. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  16. Spatial organization of adhesion: force-dependent regulation and function in tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papusheva, Ekaterina; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-08-18

    Integrin- and cadherin-mediated adhesion is central for cell and tissue morphogenesis, allowing cells and tissues to change shape without loosing integrity. Studies predominantly in cell culture showed that mechanosensation through adhesion structures is achieved by force-mediated modulation of their molecular composition. The specific molecular composition of adhesion sites in turn determines their signalling activity and dynamic reorganization. Here, we will review how adhesion sites respond to mecanical stimuli, and how spatially and temporally regulated signalling from different adhesion sites controls cell migration and tissue morphogenesis.

  17. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  18. Glycoprotein Ib-IX-V Complex Transmits Cytoskeletal Forces That Enhance Platelet Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Munday, Adam D; Tooley, Wes W; Rajsekar, Shreya; Fura, Adriane M; Kulman, John D; López, Jose A; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-08-09

    Platelets bind to exposed vascular matrix at a wound site through a highly specialized surface receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, which recognizes von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the matrix. GPIb-IX-V is a catch bond for it becomes more stable as force is applied to it. After attaching to the wound site, platelets generate cytoskeletal forces to compact and reinforce the hemostatic plug. Here, we evaluated the role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the transmission of cytoskeletal forces. We used arrays of flexible, silicone nanoposts to measure the contractility of individual platelets on VWF. We found that a significant proportion of cytoskeletal forces were transmitted to VWF through GPIb-IX-V, an unexpected finding given the widely held notion that platelet forces are transmitted exclusively through its integrins. In particular, we found that the interaction between GPIbα and the A1 domain of VWF mediates this force transmission. We also demonstrate that the binding interaction between GPIbα and filamin A is involved in force transmission. Furthermore, our studies suggest that cytoskeletal forces acting through GPIbα are involved in maintaining platelet adhesion when external forces are absent. Thus, the GPIb-IX-V/VWF bond is able to transmit force, and uses this force to strengthen the bond through a catch-bond mechanism. This finding expands our understanding of how platelets attach to sites of vascular injury, describing a new, to the best of our knowledge, mechanism in which the catch bonds of GPIb-IX-V/VWF can be supported by internal forces produced by cytoskeletal tension.

  19. Effect of humidity on the sur-face adhesion force of inor-ganic crystals by the force spectrum method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Effect of relative humidity on the surface adhesion force of several inorganic crystals of mica, CaF2 and KCl was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the magnitude of surface adhesion force is mainly dependent on the surface free energy of the adsorbed liquid film, but almost independent of the thickness of the film. Furthermore, the deliquescence on the crystal surface was investigated, which demonstrated the capability of the force spectrum method to monitor changes in ionic concentrations of adsorbed liquid film in real-time.

  20. Highly durable and unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs for gecko-like dry adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyeon Seong; Kwon, Ki Yoon; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Kwang Su; Yi, Hoon; Yoo, Pil J.; Pang, Changhyun; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kim, Tae-il

    2015-10-01

    Gecko-like dry adhesive using high aspect ratio polymeric nanohairs has insuperable limitations, although it has huge potential in many applications. Repeated harsh contacts on a target substrate lead to physical collapse of nanohairs and significant degradation of the adhesion property, because the polymeric nanohairs are quite fragile due to poor mechanical robustness. Herein, we demonstrate a highly robust gecko-like dry adhesive with unidirectionally stooped polymeric nanohairs (diameter 100 nm) with a high aspect ratio (∼9) using an ultrathin metal coating. 100 cycles of repeated adhesion tests with 1 N preloading force did not significantly degrade adhesion or cause collapse of nanohairs. We believe that this approach allows gecko-like dry adhesive to be utilized in many related applications and diverse industry interests.

  1. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-10-01

    Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 μm long, 0.5-1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m2, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  2. Adhesion forces between cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans or Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jiao, Weifeng; Jiang, Hao; Sand, Wolfgang; Xia, Jinlan; Liu, Xueduan; Qin, Wenqing; Qiu, Guanzhou; Hu, Yuehua; Chai, Liyuan

    2012-06-01

    The efficiency of copper leaching is improved by bacteria attached to chalcopyrite. Therefore, the study of the attachment mechanism to control leaching is important. The adhesion of three species of leaching microorganisms including Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans to chalcopyrite was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The forces were measured with tip-immobilized cells approached to and retracted from the mineral. The results show that both the surface charge and the hydrophobicity of bacteria cells influence the adhesion force. Furthermore, the adhesion force decreased in case the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) had been removed. In addition, the data indicate that the amount of attached cells increased with increasing adhesion force.

  3. Nascent Focal Adhesions Are Responsible for the Generation of Strong Propulsive Forces in Migrating Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Fibroblast migration involves complex mechanical interactions with the underlying substrate. Although tight substrate contact at focal adhesions has been studied for decades, the role of focal adhesions in force transduction remains unclear. To address this question, we have mapped traction stress generated by fibroblasts expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-zyxin. Surprisingly, the overall distribution of focal adhesions only partially resembles the distribution of traction stress. In ...

  4. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion

  5. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  6. General methodology for evaluating the adhesion force of drops and bubbles on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Carmona, F J; Pierce, E; Marengo, M; Amirfazli, A

    2009-06-01

    The shortcomings of the current formulation for calculating the adhesion force for drops and bubbles with noncircular contact lines are discussed. A general formulation to evaluate the adhesion force due to surface forces is presented. Also, a novel methodology, that is, IBAFA, image based adhesion force analysis, was developed to allow implementation of the general formulation. IBAFA is based on the use of multiple profile images of a drop. The images are analyzed (1) to accurately reconstruct the contact line shape, which is analytically represented by a Fourier cosine series, and (2) to measure contact angles at multiple locations along the contact line and determine the contact angle distribution based on a linear piecewise interpolation routine. The contact line shape reconstruction procedure was validated with both actual experiments and simulated experiments. The procedure for the evaluation of the adhesion force was tested using simulated experiments with synthetic drops of known shapes. A comparison with current methods showed that simplifying assumptions (e.g., elliptical contact line or linear contact angle distribution) used in these methods result in errors up to 76% in the estimated adhesion force. However, the drop adhesion force evaluated using IBAFA results in small errors on the order of 1%.

  7. Influence of removal time and particle size on the particle substrate adhesion force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Felicetti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted on influence of removal time on the particle substrate adhesive force. The centrifuge technique was used to determine the adhesion force at different compression and removal rates. A microcentrifuge with a maximum rotation of 14000 rpm was used to both compress upon particles and remove them from the surface of the substrate. An image analysis program (Image-Pro Plus 4.5 was employed to monitor the number of particles adhering to and removed from the surface of the substrate after each increase in angular speed. The influence of removal time on the adhesion force was investigated, using removal times of 1, 3 and 5 minutes, which indicated that removal time does not interfere with the adhesion force within the diameter range analyzed here.

  8. Adhesion Forces and Coaggregation between Vaginal Staphylococci and Lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, Jessica A.; van der Mei, Henny C.; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Busscher, Henk J.; Reid, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Urogenital infections are the most common ailments afflicting women. They are treated with dated antimicrobials whose efficacy is diminishing. The process of infection involves pathogen adhesion and displacement of indigenous Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii. An alternative therape

  9. Adhesion forces in interactive mixtures for dry powder inhalers--evaluation of a new measuring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrmann, Maike; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Urbanetz, Nora Anne; Lippold, Bernhard Christian

    2007-09-01

    Dry powder inhalers mostly contain carrier based formulations where micronized drug particles are adhered to coarse carrier particles. The performance of the dry powder inhaler depends on the inhaler device, the inhalation manoeuvre and the formulation. The most important factor influencing the behaviour of the formulation is the adhesion force acting between the active ingredient and the carrier particles, which can be measured using different methods, for example the centrifuge technique or atomic force microscopy. In this study the tensile strength method, usually applied to determine cohesion forces between powder particles of one material, is optimized for adhesion force measurements between powder particles of unlike materials. Adhesion force measurements between the carrier materials lactose or mannitol and the drug substance salbutamol sulphate using the tensile strength method and the atomic force microscopy show higher values with increasing relative humidity. Consequently, the fine particle fraction determined using the Next Generation Impactor decreases with increasing relative humidity as a result of the enhanced interparticle interactions.

  10. Lock-in technique for concurrent measurement of adhesion and friction with the scanning force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotil, H.-U.; Stifter, Th.; Marti, O.

    2001-01-01

    Regardless of all the great progress in new scanning probe microscopy techniques, the concurrent measurement of adhesive and frictional forces with local resolution using scanning force microscopy (SFM) has not been possible until now. In this paper, we present a novel scanning probe microscopy mode, called combined dynamic x mode or CODYMode®. In CODYMode® SFM at least two oscillations with sufficiently different frequencies and amplitudes are superimposed and interact with the sample surface. This enables the concurrent measurement of the topography, adhesive and frictional forces beside further mechanical surface properties of the sample. By means of the characterization of plasma treated biaxially oriented polypropylene foils the benefits of the new modulation technique are pointed out where common SFM techniques are not adequate. As second application high-velocity friction experiments (in the range of several centimeters per second) on silicon under controlled environmental conditions are introduced and the role of the native water film on it is discussed under friction and viscoelastic aspects.

  11. Role of eDNA on the Adhesion Forces between Streptococcus mutans and Substratum Surfaces : Influence of Ionic Strength and Substratum Hydrophobicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) on the adhesion strength of Streptococcus mutans LT11 on substrata with different hydrophobicities at high and low ionic strengths. AFM adhesion forces to a hydrophilic and hydrophobic substratum increased with increasing

  12. Rapid and serial quantification of adhesion forces of yeast and Mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Potthoff

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM. In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for HEK cells.

  13. Measurement of Giardia lamblia adhesion force using an integrated microfluidic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Zheng, Guo-Xia; Yang, Yu-Suo; Feng, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Yun-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms how Giardias attach to the intestinal epithelium remain unclear. None of the methods currently being used to measure the attachment force could provide a continuous nutrition supply and a micro-aerobic atmosphere to the Giardia. Besides, they are all labor-intensive. In the present research, a microfluidic method based on electric circuit analogy was developed. The input fluid flowed through the inlet channel with different lengths and was distributed in four assay chambers. Shear force gradients were generated in chambers, too. This allowed an easy control of fluids and the shear forces. Most importantly, the shear stress large enough to detach Giardia could be generated in laminar flow regime. Moreover, analysis could be accomplished in one single test. By applying inlet flow rates of 30, 60, and 120 μL ml(-1), shear force gradients ranging from 19.47 to 60.50 Pa were generated. The adhesion forces of trophozoites were analyzed and the EC50 of the force that caused 50% trophozoites detachment was calculated as 36.60 Pa. This paper presents a novel method for measurement of Giardia adhesion force. Graphical Abstract Measurement of Giardia adhesion force. Various of flow rates were applied to generate different shear forces and Giardia trophozoites remaining attached were counted (a-c). The percentages of attachment vs shear stress were plotted and the EC50 of adhesion force was calculated (d).

  14. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung I., E-mail: ByungKim@boisestate.edu [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States); Boehm, Ryan D. [Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive Boise, ID 83725-1570, United States of America (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force–distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2 s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. - Highlights: ► We investigated the imaging stability of force-feedback HSAFM. ► Stable–unstable imaging transitions rely on applied force and sample hydrophilicity. ► The stable–unstable transitions are found to be independent of imaging rate.

  15. Single molecule force measurements delineate salt, pH and surface effects on biopolymer adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzer, T.; Geisler, M.; Scheibel, T.; Hugel, T.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we probe the influence of surface properties, pH and salt on the adhesion of recombinant spider silk proteins onto solid substrates with single molecule force spectroscopy. A single engineered spider silk protein (monomeric C16 or dimeric (QAQ)8NR3) is covalently bound with one end to an AFM tip, which assures long-time measurements for hours with one and the same protein. The tip with the protein is brought into contact with various substrates at various buffer conditions and then retracted to desorb the protein. We observe a linear dependence of the adhesion force on the concentration of three selected salts (NaCl, NaH2PO4 and NaI) and a Hofmeister series both for anions and cations. As expected, the more hydrophobic C16 shows a higher adhesion force than (QAQ)8NR3, and the adhesion force rises with the hydrophobicity of the substrate. Unexpected is the magnitude of the dependences—we never observe a change of more than 30%, suggesting a surprisingly well-regulated balance between dispersive forces, water-structure-induced forces as well as co-solute-induced forces in biopolymer adhesion.

  16. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  17. Determination of adhesion forces between smooth and structured solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Gelinck, E.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Surfaces tend to be made smoother in order to gain flatness or in order to fulfill the need for more precise and reproducible positioning of parts. Adhesion or even sticking of the surfaces is a major showstopper for these applications. There are several measures that can be taken in order to reduce

  18. Effect of enamel morphology on nanoscale adhesion forces of streptococcal bacteria : An AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanyong; Zhao, Yongqi; Zheng, Sainan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jinglin; Tang, Yi; Jiang, Li; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We explore the influence of enamel surface morphology on nanoscale bacterial adhesion forces. Three dimensional morphology characteristics of enamel slices, which were treated with phosphoric acid (for 0 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s, and 30 s), were acquired. Adhesion forces of three initial colonizers (Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Streptococcus mitis) and two cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) with etched enamel surfaces were determined. Comparison of the forces was made by using bacterial probe method under atomic force microscope (AFM) in adhesion buffer. The results showed that enamel morphology was significantly altered by etching treatment. The roughness, peak-to-valley height, and valley-to-valley width of the depth profile, surface area, and volume increased linearly with acid exposure time, and reached the maximum at 30s, respectively. The adhesion forces of different strains increased accordingly with etching time. Adhesion forces of S. oralis, S. mitis, S. mutans, and S. sobrinus reached the maximum values of 0.81 nN, 0.84 nN, 0.73 nN, and 0.64 nN with enamel treated for 20s, respectively, whereas that of S. sanguinis at 10s (1.28nN), and dropped on coarser enamel surfaces. In conclusion, enamel micro-scale morphology may significantly alter the direct adhesion forces of bacteria. And there may be a threshold roughness for bacterial adhesion on enamel surface.

  19. Integrin-Matrix Clusters Form Podosome-like Adhesions in the Absence of Traction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-han Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-activated integrins can form different adhesion structures. We report that nontransformed fibroblasts develop podosome-like adhesions when spread on fluid Arg-Gly-Asp peptide (RGD-lipid surfaces, whereas they habitually form focal adhesions on rigid RGD glass surfaces. Similar to classic macrophage podosomes, the podosome-like adhesions are protrusive and characterized by doughnut-shaped RGD rings that surround characteristic core components including F-actin, N-WASP, and Arp2/Arp3. Furthermore, there are 18 podosome markers in these adhesions, though they lack matrix metalloproteinases that characterize invadopodia and podosomes of Src-transformed cells. When nontransformed cells develop force on integrin-RGD clusters by pulling RGD lipids to prefabricated rigid barriers (metal lines spaced by 1–2 μm, these podosomes fail to form and instead form focal adhesions. The formation of podosomes on fluid surfaces is mediated by local activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the production of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3 in a FAK/PYK2-dependent manner. Enrichment of PIP3 precedes N-WASP activation and the recruitment of RhoA-GAP ARAP3. We propose that adhesion structures can be modulated by traction force development and that production of PIP3 stimulates podosome formation and subsequent RhoA downregulation in the absence of traction force.

  20. Biomechanics of ant adhesive pads: frictional forces are rate- and temperature-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federle, Walter; Baumgartner, Werner; Hölldobler, Bert

    2004-01-01

    Tarsal adhesive pads enable insects to hold on to smooth plant surfaces. Using a centrifuge technique, we tested whether a "wet adhesion" model of a thin film of liquid secreted between the pad and the surface can explain adhesive and frictional forces in Asian Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina). When forces are acting parallel to the surface, pads in contact with the surface can slide smoothly. Force per unit pad contact area was strongly dependent on sliding velocity and temperature. Seemingly consistent with the effect of a thin liquid film in the contact zone, (1) frictional force linearly increased with sliding velocity, (2) the increment was greater at lower temperatures and (3) no temperature dependence was detected for low-rate perpendicular detachment forces. However, we observed a strong, temperature-independent static friction that was inconsistent with a fully lubricated contact. Static friction was too large to be explained by the contribution of other (sclerotized) body parts. Moreover, the rate-specific increase of shear stress strongly exceeded predictions derived from estimates of the adhesive liquid film's thickness and viscosity. Both lines of evidence indicate that the adhesive secretion alone is insufficient to explain the observed forces and that direct interaction of the soft pad cuticle with the surface ("rubber friction") is involved.

  1. Chemical Force Microscopy: Probing Chemical Origin of Interfacial Forces and Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezenov, D V; Noy, A; Ashby, P

    2005-03-21

    Experimental methods of measuring intermolecular interactions have had several recent developments which have improved our understanding of chemical forces. First, they allowed direct exploration of the role that different functionalities, solvents and environmental variables play in shaping the strength of intermolecular interactions. Chemical force microscopy approach, in particular, became an extremely effective tool for exploring the contributions of each of these factors. Second, CFM studies clearly debunked the naive notion that intermolecular interaction strength is determined only by the nature of the interacting groups. These studies showed that the interaction strength between two chemical species must always considered in context of the environment surrounding these species. Third, CFM studies highlighted the critical role solvent plays in shaping intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Emerging kinetic view of the intermolecular interactions introduced a completely new paradigm for understanding these interactions. Kinetic modeling showed that the measured interactions strength depends not only on the energy landscape of the system, but also on the loading history prior to the bond break-up. This new paradigm refocused our attention to the energy landscape as a fundamental characteristic of the interaction. Moreover, dynamic force spectroscopy, derived from kinetic models, allowed direct characterization of the geometry of the potential energy barrier, while some other methods attempt to probe the equilibrium energy landscape directly. Further investigations of the interactions in different systems, especially interactions between biomolecules, will uncover many interesting characteristics of intermolecular potentials. These studies have the potential to reveal, for the first time, a true picture of the energy landscapes of adhesion processes in complex chemical and biological systems.

  2. New impact specimen for adhesives: optimization of high-speed-loaded adhesive joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, A.A.; Guyt, C.B.; Vlot, A.

    1998-01-01

    A new kind of joint specimen has been developed to load the adhesive in pure shear on impact. The specimen is tested with three adhesives at five layer thicknesses, and at three test speeds. From these tests it can be concluded that the rod-ring specimen is suitable for use in impact tests at high s

  3. Moisture absorption analysis of high performance polyimide adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Bhowmik, S.; Ernst, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    The high temperature resistant polymers and metal composites are used widely in aviation, space, automotive and electronics industry. The high temperature resistant polymers and metals are joined together using high temperature adhesives. Polyimide and epoxy adhesives that can withstand high tempera

  4. High-resolution traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Sergey V; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Waterman, Clare M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lateral shear forces applied to cells with single elastic micropillars to influence focal adhesion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heil, Patrick; Spatz, Joachim P, E-mail: spatz@mf.mpg.d [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are important adhesion sites between eukaryotic cells and the extracellular matrix, their size depending on the locally applied force. To quantitatively study the mechanosensitivity of FAs, we induce their growth and disassembly by varying the distribution of intracellular stress. We present a novel method for micromanipulation of living cells to explore the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) assembly under force. Fibroblasts are sheared laterally to their adhesion surface with single PDMS micropillars in order to apply laterally stretch or compression to focal adhesions. This allows for measuring the shear force exerted by the micropillar and correlates it with FA length and growth velocity. Furthermore, we analyze the resulting dynamics of FA molecules (paxillin) and compare intensity profiles along FAs before and after the application of external force. The responses of stretched and relaxed FAs differ fundamentally: relaxed and compressed FAs disassemble isotropically and show no length variation while stretched FAs grow unisotropically in the direction of the applied force and show protein influx only at their front.

  6. The regulation of traction force in relation to cell shape and focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rape, Andrew D; Guo, Wei-Hui; Wang, Yu-Li

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical forces provide critical inputs for proper cellular functions. The interplay between the generation of, and response to, mechanical forces regulate such cellular processes as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. We postulate that adherent cells respond to a number of physical and topographical factors, including cell size and shape, by detecting the magnitude and/or distribution of traction forces under different conditions. To address this possibility we introduce a new simple method for precise micropatterning of hydrogels, and then apply the technique to systematically investigate the relationship between cell geometry, focal adhesions, and traction forces in cells with a series of spread areas and aspect ratios. Contrary to previous findings, we find that traction force is not determined primarily by the cell spreading area but by the distance from cell center to the perimeter. This distance in turn controls traction forces by regulating the size of focal adhesions, such that constraining the size of focal adhesions by micropatterning can override the effect of geometry. We propose that the responses of traction forces to center-periphery distance, possibly through a positive feedback mechanism that regulates focal adhesions, provide the cell with the information on its own shape and size. A similar positive feedback control may allow cells to respond to a variety of physical or topographical signals via a unified mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling of adhesion in tablet compression - I. atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. J.; Li, T.; Bateman, S. D.; Erck, R.; Morris, K. R.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.; Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

    2003-04-01

    Adhesion problems during tablet manufacturing have been observed to be dependent on many formulation and process factors including the run time on the tablet press. Consequently, problems due to sticking may only become apparent towards the end of the development process when a prolonged run on the tablet press is attempted for the first time. It would be beneficial to predict in a relative sense if a formulation or new chemical entity has the potential for adhesion problems early in the development process. It was hypothesized that favorable intermolecular interaction between the drug molecules and the punch face is the first step or criterion in the adhesion process. Therefore, the rank order of adhesion during tablet compression should follow the rank order of these energies of interaction. The adhesion phenomenon was investigated using molecular simulations and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three model compounds were chosen from a family of profen compounds. Silicon nitride AFM tips were modified by coating a 20-nm iron layer on the surfaces by sputter coating. Profen flat surfaces were made by melting and recrystallization. The modified AFM probe and each profen surface were immersed in the corresponding profen saturated water during force measurements using AFM. The work of adhesion between iron and ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen in vacuum were determined to be -184.1, -2469.3, -17.3 mJ {center_dot} m-2, respectively. The rank order of the work of adhesion between iron and profen compounds decreased in the order: ketoprofen > ibuprofen > flurbiprofen. The rank order of interaction between the drug molecules and the iron superlattice as predicted by molecular simulation using Cerius2 is in agreement with the AFM measurements. It has been demonstrated that Atomic Force Microscopy is a powerful tool in studying the adhesion phenomena between organic drug compounds and metal surface. The study has provided insight into the adhesion problems

  8. Measurement of cell adhesion force by vertical forcible detachment using an arrowhead nanoneedle and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Hashizume, Yui; Mishima, Mari [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Kawamura, Ryuzo [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi [Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-nohdai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakamura, Chikashi, E-mail: chikashi-nakamura@aist.go.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a method to measure cell adhesion force by detaching cell using an arrowhead nanoneedle and AFM. • A nanofilm consisting of fibronectin and gelatin was formed on cell surface to reinforce the cell cortex. • By the nanofilm lamination, detachment efficiencies of strongly adherent cell lines were improved markedly. - Abstract: The properties of substrates and extracellular matrices (ECM) are important factors governing the functions and fates of mammalian adherent cells. For example, substrate stiffness often affects cell differentiation. At focal adhesions, clustered–integrin bindings link cells mechanically to the ECM. In order to quantitate the affinity between cell and substrate, the cell adhesion force must be measured for single cells. In this study, forcible detachment of a single cell in the vertical direction using AFM was carried out, allowing breakage of the integrin–substrate bindings. An AFM tip was fabricated into an arrowhead shape to detach the cell from the substrate. Peak force observed in the recorded force curve during probe retraction was defined as the adhesion force, and was analyzed for various types of cells. Some of the cell types adhered so strongly that they could not be picked up because of plasma membrane breakage by the arrowhead probe. To address this problem, a technique to reinforce the cellular membrane with layer-by-layer nanofilms composed of fibronectin and gelatin helped to improve insertion efficiency and to prevent cell membrane rupture during the detachment process, allowing successful detachment of the cells. This method for detaching cells, involving cellular membrane reinforcement, may be beneficial for evaluating true cell adhesion forces in various cell types.

  9. TANGENTIAL DISPLACEMENT INFLUENCE ON THE CRITICAL NORMAL FORCE OF ADHESIVE CONTACT BREAKAGE IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iakov A. Lyashenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dependencies of the critical components of normal and tangential forces corresponding to the contact breakage between a parabolic indenter and an elastic half-space have been determined taking into account adhesive interaction. In order to describe the adhesive contact, the method of dimensionality reduction (MDR and the modified rule of Heß taking into account tangential displacements have been used. The influence of the surface energy depending on the indenter separation angle has been studied.

  10. Dependency of micro particle adhesion of dispersive and nondispersive interactions analyzed by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawal, A; Andoh, E

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion behaviour of a micro semi-sphere tip (radius of curvature of 18 nm) after making contact with various inorganic solid surfaces is analyzed. Measurement force by the AFM tip corresponds to the interactive force estimated $9 using surface energy components, dispersion and nondispersion, based on van der Waal's interaction. These components can be obtained by measuring the contact angle of standard liquids on a material surface. By using two kinds of tip $9 with different component values, analysis of the interactive mechanism and prediction of macro tip (particle) adhesion can be made. (6 refs).

  11. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt.

  12. Statistical Analysis of Long- and Short-Range Forces Involved in Bacterial Adhesion to Substratum Surfaces as Measured Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yun; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    Surface thermodynamic analyses of microbial adhesion using measured contact angles on solid substrata and microbial cell surfaces are widely employed to determine the nature of the adhesion forces, i.e., the interplay between Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base forces. While surface thermodynamic

  13. Matching Forces Applied in Underwater Hull Cleaning with Adhesion Strength of Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinis Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is detrimental to the hydrodynamic performance of ships. In spite of advances in hull coating technology, a ship must usually undergo underwater hull cleaning to remove biofouling during her in-service time. However, some cleaning practices may also lead to decreased lifetime of the fouling-control coating. Therefore, cleaning forces should be minimized, according to the adhesion strength of marine organisms present on the hull. In this article, values of adhesion strength found in available literature are discussed in the light of current knowledge on hull cleaning technology. Finally, the following knowledge gaps are identified: (1 data on adhesion strength of naturally-occurring biofouling communities are practically absent; (2 shear forces imparted by current cleaning devices on low-form fouling (microfouling and corresponding effects on hull coatings are largely unknown. This knowledge would be valuable for both developers and users of cleaning technology.

  14. A correlation between the virulence and the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to silicon nitride: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong-Jae; Haines, Travis; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2009-10-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that is widely distributed in the environment. Despite being pathogenic at the species level, L. monocytogenes in fact comprises a diversity of strains from pathogenic ones that can result in disease and/or mortality to others that are relatively avirulent. The main goal of the current study was to answer the question on whether enhanced binding or attachment of L. monocytogenes to inert surfaces bears any relationship to pathogenicity in food-borne isolates. To answer this question, the nanoscale adhesion forces of eight L. monocytogenes strains that vary in their pathogenicity levels to a model surface of silicon nitride were quantified using atomic force microscopy. The strains used were the highly pathogenic (EGDe, 874, 1002, ATCC 19115), the intermediate pathogenic (ATCC 19112, ATCC 19118), and the non pathogenic (ATCC 15313 and HCC25). Our results indicate that the average nanoscale adhesion (in nN) and the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of strain virulence quantified in mice are logarithmically correlated according to: (nN)=-0.032ln(LD50)+1.040, r(2)=0.96. Such correlation indicates that nanoscale adhesion could potentially be used as a design criterion to distinguish between virulent and avirulent L. monocytogenes strains. Finally, stronger adhesion of virulent strains to inert surfaces modeled by silicon nitride might be a way for pathogenic strains to survive better in the environment and thus increase their likelihood of infecting animals or humans.

  15. Anti-adhesion effects of liquid-infused textured surfaces on high-temperature stainless steel for soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Liwen; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on the electrosurgical instruments can induce many serious complications, such as failure of hemostasis and damage to the surrounding soft tissue. The soft tissue adhesion is mainly caused by the high temperature on the instrument surface generally made of stainless steel. Nepenthes inspired liquid-infused surfaces (LIS), highly promising for anti-adhesion, have attracted considerable interests. In this paper, we investigated the anti-adhesion effects of LIS on high-temperature stainless steel for soft tissue for the first time, aiming to develop a new approach to solve the soft tissue adhesion problem. The textured surface, acting as the holding structures, was fabricated by photolithography-assisted chemical etching. Silicone oil, with good biocompatibility and high-temperature resistance, was chosen as the infused liquid. The adhesion force measurements for soft tissue on the LIS at high temperatures indicated that the soft tissue adhesion force was decreased by approximately 80% at 250 °C. Besides, the cycle tests of soft tissue adhesion force demonstrated the excellent stability of prepared LIS. We anticipate that LIS will be of great promise for practical applications on the electrosurgical instruments.

  16. Height anomalies in tappingmode atomic force microscopy in air caused by adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van S. John T.; Werf, van der Kees O.; Grooth, de Bart G.; Hulst, van Niek F.; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Height anomalies in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in air are shown to be caused by adhesion. Depending o­n the damping of the oscillation the height of a sticking surface is reduced compared to less sticking surfaces. It is shown that the height artefacts result from a modulation of osc

  17. Bacterial adhesion forces with substratum surfaces and the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, L.H.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Chen, Y.; Heuvel, van den E.R.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms causing biomaterial-associated infection resist antibiotic treatment and usually necessitate the replacement of infected implants. Here we relate bacterial adhesion forces and the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms on uncoated and polymer brush-coated silicone rubber. Nine strains of Sta

  18. Bacterial Adhesion Forces with Substratum Surfaces and the Susceptibility of Biofilms to Antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K.; Nejadnik, M. Reza; Chen, Yun; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms causing biomaterial-associated infection resist antibiotic treatment and usually necessitate the replacement of infected implants. Here we relate bacterial adhesion forces and the antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms on uncoated and polymer brush-coated silicone rubber. Nine strains of Sta

  19. Influence of Surface Properties on Adhesion Forces and Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhou, Jinglin; Jiang, Li; Xue, Jing; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia is becoming a prevalent material in dentistry. However, any foreign bodies inserted may provide new niches for the bacteria in oral cavity. The object of this study was to explore the effect of surface properties including surface roughness and hydrophobicity on the adhesion and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to zirconia. Atomic force microscopy was employed to determine the zirconia surface morphology and the adhesion forces between the S. mutans and zirconia. The results showed that the surface roughness was nanoscale and significantly different among tested groups (P Medium (17.00 ± 3.81 nm) > Fine (11.89 ± 1.68 nm). The contact angles of the Coarse group were the highest, followed by the Medium and the Fine groups. Increasing the surface roughness and hydrophobicity resulted in an increase of adhesion forces and early attachment (2 h and 4 h) of S. mutans on the zirconia but no influence on the further development of biofilm (6 h~24 h). Our findings suggest that the surface roughness in nanoscale and hydrophobicity of zirconia had influence on the S. mutans initial adhesion force and early attachment instead of whole stages of biofilm formation.

  20. Influence of Surface Properties on Adhesion Forces and Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhou, Jinglin; Jiang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia is becoming a prevalent material in dentistry. However, any foreign bodies inserted may provide new niches for the bacteria in oral cavity. The object of this study was to explore the effect of surface properties including surface roughness and hydrophobicity on the adhesion and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to zirconia. Atomic force microscopy was employed to determine the zirconia surface morphology and the adhesion forces between the S. mutans and zirconia. The results showed that the surface roughness was nanoscale and significantly different among tested groups (P Medium (17.00 ± 3.81 nm) > Fine (11.89 ± 1.68 nm). The contact angles of the Coarse group were the highest, followed by the Medium and the Fine groups. Increasing the surface roughness and hydrophobicity resulted in an increase of adhesion forces and early attachment (2 h and 4 h) of S. mutans on the zirconia but no influence on the further development of biofilm (6 h~24 h). Our findings suggest that the surface roughness in nanoscale and hydrophobicity of zirconia had influence on the S. mutans initial adhesion force and early attachment instead of whole stages of biofilm formation. PMID:27975061

  1. Finite element analysis of traction force microscopy: influence of cell mechanics, adhesion, and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Rachel; Mihai, Cosmin; Kniss, Douglas; Ghadiali, Samir N

    2013-07-01

    The interactions between adherent cells and their extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to play an important role in many biological processes, such as wound healing, morphogenesis, differentiation, and cell migration. Cells attach to the ECM at focal adhesion sites and transmit contractile forces to the substrate via cytoskeletal actin stress fibers. This contraction results in traction stresses within the substrate/ECM. Traction force microscopy (TFM) is an experimental technique used to quantify the contractile forces generated by adherent cells. In TFM, cells are seeded on a flexible substrate and displacements of the substrate caused by cell contraction are tracked and converted to a traction stress field. The magnitude of these traction stresses are normally used as a surrogate measure of internal cell contractile force or contractility. We hypothesize that in addition to contractile force, other biomechanical properties including cell stiffness, adhesion energy density, and cell morphology may affect the traction stresses measured by TFM. In this study, we developed finite element models of the 2D and 3D TFM techniques to investigate how changes in several biomechanical properties alter the traction stresses measured by TFM. We independently varied cell stiffness, cell-ECM adhesion energy density, cell aspect ratio, and contractility and performed a sensitivity analysis to determine which parameters significantly contribute to the measured maximum traction stress and net contractile moment. Results suggest that changes in cell stiffness and adhesion energy density can significantly alter measured tractions, independent of contractility. Based on a sensitivity analysis, we developed a correction factor to account for changes in cell stiffness and adhesion and successfully applied this correction factor algorithm to experimental TFM measurements in invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Therefore, application of these types of corrections to TFM

  2. A fast and quantitative evaluation of the Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm adhesion properties by means of digital pulsed force mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorana, Alessandro [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Papi, Massimiliano, E-mail: m.papi@rm.unicatt.it [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Bugli, Francesca; Torelli, Riccardo [Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Maulucci, Giuseppe [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); Cacaci, Margherita; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio [Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy); De Spirito, Marco [Istituto di Fisica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, L. go F. Vito 1, 00168 Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    The opportunistic pathogenic mould Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and in part immunocompetent patients. A. fumigatus can grow in multicellular communities by the formation of a hyphal network embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) meanly composed by polysaccharides, melanin, proteins. Because adhesion properties is one primary factor affecting the balance between growth, detachment and biofilm formation, its quantification is essential in understanding, predicting, and modelling biofilm development. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy have recently opened a range of novel applications in microbiology including the imaging and manipulation of membrane proteins at the subnanometer level, the observation of the surface of living cells at high resolution, the mapping of local properties such as surface charges, the measurement of elastic properties of cell-surface constituents and the probing of cellular interactions using functionalized probes. Nevertheless, the principal disadvantage of this approach is the relatively slow acquisition rate that makes AFM is not able to detect fast dynamics. In this study we demonstrated that digital pulsed force mode (DPFM) atomic force microscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images and to quantify the adhesion properties of the A. fumigatus biofilm with an high acquisition rate. Here we show by means of DPFM-AFM that Alginate Lyase (AlgL), an enzyme known to reduce negatively charged alginate levels in microbial biofilm, is able to reduce the biofilm adhesion forces forming several nano-fractures in the ECM. These results suggest that the AlgL could used to enhance the antifungal drugs transit through the ECM.

  3. A fast and quantitative evaluation of the Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm adhesion properties by means of digital pulsed force mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorana, Alessandro; Papi, Massimiliano; Bugli, Francesca; Torelli, Riccardo; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cacaci, Margherita; Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic mould Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and in part immunocompetent patients. A. fumigatus can grow in multicellular communities by the formation of a hyphal network embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) meanly composed by polysaccharides, melanin, proteins. Because adhesion properties is one primary factor affecting the balance between growth, detachment and biofilm formation, its quantification is essential in understanding, predicting, and modelling biofilm development. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy have recently opened a range of novel applications in microbiology including the imaging and manipulation of membrane proteins at the subnanometer level, the observation of the surface of living cells at high resolution, the mapping of local properties such as surface charges, the measurement of elastic properties of cell-surface constituents and the probing of cellular interactions using functionalized probes. Nevertheless, the principal disadvantage of this approach is the relatively slow acquisition rate that makes AFM is not able to detect fast dynamics. In this study we demonstrated that digital pulsed force mode (DPFM) atomic force microscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images and to quantify the adhesion properties of the A. fumigatus biofilm with an high acquisition rate. Here we show by means of DPFM-AFM that Alginate Lyase (AlgL), an enzyme known to reduce negatively charged alginate levels in microbial biofilm, is able to reduce the biofilm adhesion forces forming several nano-fractures in the ECM. These results suggest that the AlgL could used to enhance the antifungal drugs transit through the ECM.

  4. Topographical control of multiple cell adhesion molecules for traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polio, Samuel R; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Canović, Elizabeth P; Gaut, Carolynn M; Aksyonova, Diana; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Smith, Michael L

    2014-03-01

    Cellular traction forces are important quantitative measures in cell biology as they have provided much insight into cell behavior in contexts such as cellular migration, differentiation, and disease progression. However, the complex environment in vivo permits application of cell traction forces through multiple types of cell adhesion molecules. Currently available approaches to differentiate traction forces among multiple cell adhesion molecules are limited to specialized approaches to decouple cell-cell from cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) tractions. Here, we present a technique which uses indirect micropatterning onto a polyacrylamide gel to pattern multiple, spatially distinct fluorescently labeled ECM proteins, specifically gelatin and fibronectin (Fn), and confine the area to which cells can adhere. We found that cells interacting with both gelatin and Fn altered their traction forces significantly in comparison to cells on Fn-only substrates. This crosstalk interaction resulted in a decrease in overall traction forces on dual-patterned substrates as compared to cells on Fn-only substrates. This illustrates the unique need to study such interactions and demonstrates great potential in future studies in multi-ligand environments. Current micropatterning techniques on glass can easily be adapted to present other protein classes, such as cadherins, while maintaining control of adhesion spacing, cell spread area, and stiffness, each of which are important regulators of cell mechanobiology.

  5. High aspect ratio silicon nanowires control fibroblast adhesion and cytoskeleton organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Laura; Murello, Anna; Cassese, Damiano; Ban, Jelena; Dal Zilio, Simone; Lazzarino, Marco

    2017-04-18

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions are essential to the survival and proliferation of most cells, and are responsible for triggering a wide range of biochemical pathways. More recently, the biomechanical role of those interactions was highlighted, showing, for instance, that adhesion forces are essential for cytoskeleton organization. Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) with their small size, high aspect ratio and anisotropic mechanical response represent a useful model to investigate the forces involved in the adhesion processes and their role in cellular development. In this work we explored and quantified, by single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), the interaction of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with a flexible forest of Si NWs. We observed that the cell adhesion forces are comparable to those found on collagen and bare glass coverslip, analogously the membrane tether extraction forces are similar to that on collagen but stronger than that on bare flat glass. Cell survival did not depend significantly on the substrate, although a reduced proliferation after 36 h was observed. On the contrary both cell morphology and cytoskeleton organization revealed striking differences. The cell morphology on Si-NW was characterized by a large number of filopodia and a significant decrease of the cell mobility. The cytoskeleton organization was characterized by the absence of actin fibers, which were instead dominant on collagen and flat glass support. Such findings suggest that the mechanical properties of disordered Si NWs, and in particular their strong asymmetry, play a major role in the adhesion, morphology and cytoskeleton organization processes. Indeed, while adhesion measurements by SCFS provide out-of-plane forces values consistent with those measured on conventional substrates, weaker in-plane forces hinder proper cytoskeleton organization and migration processes.

  6. Force Fluctuations within Focal Adhesions Mediate ECM-Rigidity Sensing to Guide Directed Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Pasapera, Ana M.; Sabass, Benedikt; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell migration toward areas of higher extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity via a process called “durotaxis” is thought to contribute to development, immune response, and cancer metastasis. To understand how cells sample ECM rigidity to guide durotaxis, we characterized cell-generated forces on the nanoscale within single mature integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs). We found that individual FAs act autonomously, exhibiting either stable or dynamically fluctuating (“tugging”) traction. We show that a FAK/phosphopaxillin/vinculin pathway is essential for high FA traction and to enable tugging FA traction over a broad range of ECM rigidities. We show that tugging FA traction is dispensable for FA maturation, chemotaxis, and haptotaxis but is critical to direct cell migration toward rigid ECM. We conclude that individual FAs dynamically sample rigidity by applying fluctuating pulling forces to the ECM to act as sensors to guide durotaxis, and that FAK/phosphopaxillin/vinculin signaling defines the rigidity range over which this dynamic sensing process operates. PMID:23260139

  7. Control system for maximum use of adhesive forces of a railway vehicle in a tractive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Lee, Kwan Soo; Yoo, Hong Hee

    2008-04-01

    The realization of maximum adhesive forces for a railway vehicle is a very difficult process, because it involves using tractive efforts and depends on friction characteristics in the contact zone between wheels and rails. Tractive efforts are realized by means of tractive torques of motors, and their maximum values can provide negative effects such as slip and skid. These situations usually happen when information about friction conditions is lacking. The negative processes have a major influence on wearing of contact bodies and tractive units. Therefore, many existing control systems for vehicles use an effect of a prediction of a friction coefficient between wheels and rails because measuring a friction coefficient at the moment of running vehicle movement is very difficult. One of the ways to solve this task is to use noise spectrum analysis for friction coefficient detection. This noise phenomenon has not been clearly studied and analyzed. In this paper, we propose an adhesion control system of railway vehicles based on an observer, which allows one to determine the maximum tractive torque based on the optimal adhesive force between the wheels (wheel pair) of a railway vehicle and rails (rail track) depending on weight load from a wheel to a rail, friction conditions in the contact zone, a lateral displacement of wheel set and wheel sleep. As a result, it allows a railway vehicle to be driven in a tractive mode by the maximum adhesion force for real friction conditions.

  8. Modification of Cellular Cholesterol Content Affects Traction Force, Adhesion and Cell Spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Leann L; Oetama, Ratna J; Dembo, Micah; Byfield, F; Hammer, Daniel A; Levitan, Irena; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2010-06-01

    Cellular cholesterol is a critical component of the plasma membrane, and plays a key role in determining the physical properties of the lipid bilayer, such as elasticity, viscosity, and permeability. Surprisingly, it has been shown that cholesterol depletion increases cell stiffness, not due to plasma membrane stiffening, but rather, due to the interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. This indicates that traction stresses of the acto-myosin complex likely increase during cholesterol depletion. Here we use force traction microscopy to quantify the forces individual cells are exerting on the substrate, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as well as interference reflection microscopy to observe cell-substrate adhesion and spreading. We show that single cells depleted of cholesterol produce larger traction forces and have large focal adhesions compared to untreated or cholesterol-enriched cells. Cholesterol depletion also causes a decrease in adhesion area for both single cells and monolayers. Spreading experiments illustrate a decrease in spreading area for cholesterol-depleted cells, and no effect on cholesterol-enriched cells. These results demonstrate that cholesterol plays an important role in controlling and regulating the cell-substrate interactions through the actin-plasma membrane complex, cell-cell adhesion, and spreading.

  9. Sensitive force technique to probe molecular adhesion and structural linkages at biological interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K; Merkel, R

    1995-06-01

    Adhesion and cytoskeletal structure are intimately related in biological cell function. Even with the vast amount of biological and biochemical data that exist, little is known at the molecular level about physical mechanisms involved in attachments between cells or about consequences of adhesion on the material structure. To expose physical actions at soft biological interfaces, we have combined an ultrasensitive transducer and reflection interference microscopy to image submicroscopic displacements of probe contact with a test surface under minuscule forces. The transducer is a cell-size membrane capsule pressurized by micropipette suction where displacement normal to the membrane under tension is proportional to the applied force. Pressure control of the tension tunes the sensitivity in operation over four orders of magnitude through a range of force from 0.01 pN up to the strength of covalent bonds (approximately 1000 pN)! As the surface probe, a microscopic bead is biochemically glued to the transducer with a densely-bound ligand that is indifferent to the test surface. Movements of the probe under applied force are resolved down to an accuracy of approximately 5 nm from the interference fringe pattern created by light reflected from the bead. With this arrangement, we show that local mechanical compliance of a cell surface can be measured at a displacement resolution set by structural fluctuations. When desired, a second ligand is bound sparsely to the probe for focal adhesion to specific receptors in the test surface. We demonstrate that monitoring fluctuations in probe position at low transducer stiffness enhances detection of molecular adhesion and activation of cytoskeletal structure. Subsequent loading of an attachment tests mechanical response of the receptor-substrate linkage throughout the force-driven process of detachment.

  10. Endothelial Adhesion of Targeted Microbubbles in Both Small and Great Vessels Using Ultrasound Radiation Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of microbubble-mediated ultrasound molecular imaging and drug delivery has been significantly affected by the axial laminar flow of vessels which prevents ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs from targeting vascular endothelium. Studies show that acoustic manipulation could increase targeted UCA adhesion in microcirculation and some small vessels. In this study we demonstrate that ultrasound radiation force (USRF can also significantly enhance the targeted adhesion of microbubbles in both small and great vessels. Our results indicate that the UCA adhesion targeted to ICAM-1 expressed on mouse cremaster microvascular endothelial cells increase about 9-fold when USRF is applied at 1 MHz and 73.9 kPa. The adhesion of anti-CD34 microbubbles to the endothelia of rat abdominal aorta was visually analyzed using scanning electron microscopy for the first time and thousands of microbubbles were found attached to the aortic endothelia after USRF application at the same acoustic parameters. Our data illustrate that targeted adhesion of anti-CD34 microbubbles is possible in normal abdominal aorta and we demonstrate the potential of using USRF in molecular imaging of a vascular target.

  11. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  12. Effect of shear forces and ageing on the compliance of adhesive pads in adult cockroaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanmin; Robinson, Adam; Viney, Christine; Federle, Walter

    2015-09-01

    The flexibility of insect adhesive pads is crucial for their ability to attach on rough surfaces. Here, we used transparent substrates with micropillars to test in adult cockroaches (Nauphoeta cinerea) whether and how the stiffness of smooth adhesive pads changes when shear forces are applied, and whether the insect's age has any influence. We found that during pulls towards the body, the pad's ability to conform to the surface microstructures was improved in comparison to a contact without shear, suggesting that shear forces make the pad more compliant. The mechanism underlying this shear-dependent increase in compliance is still unclear. The effect was not explained by viscoelastic creep, changes in normal pressure, or shear-induced pad rolling, which brings new areas of cuticle into surface contact. Adhesive pads were significantly stiffer in older cockroaches. Stiffness increased most rapidly in cockroaches aged between 2.5 and 4 months. This increase is probably based on wear and repair of the delicate adhesive cuticle. Recent wear (visualised by Methylene Blue staining) was not age dependent, whereas permanent damage (visible as brown scars) accumulated with age, reducing the pads' flexibility. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Parameters affecting the adhesion strength between a living cell and a colloid probe when measured by the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E; Pyo, Nayoung; Tanaka, Saaya; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kanda, Yoichi; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-03-15

    In this study, we used the colloid probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to investigate the adhesion force between a living cell and a silica colloid particle in a Leibovitz's L-15 medium (L-15). The L-15 liquid maintained the pharmaceutical conditions necessary to keep the cells alive in the outside environment during the AFM experiment. The force curves in such a system showed a steric repulsion in the compression force curve, due to the compression of the cells by the colloid probe, and an adhesion force in the decompression force curve, due to binding events between the cell and the probe. We also investigated for the first time how the position on the cell surface, the strength of the pushing force, and the residence time of the probe at the cell surface individually affected the adhesion force between a living cell and a 6.84 microm diameter silica colloid particle in L-15. The position of measuring the force on the cell surface was seen not to affect the value of the maximum adhesion force. The loading force was also seen not to notably affect the value of the maximum adhesion force, if it was small enough not to pierce and damage the cell. The residence time of the probe at the cell surface, however, clearly affected the adhesion force, where a longer residence time gave a larger maximum force. From these results, we could conclude that the AFM force measurements should be made using a loading force small enough not to damage the cell and a fixed residence time, when comparing results of different systems.

  14. Multiscale treatment of theoretical mechanisms for the protection of hydrogel surfaces from adhesive forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    One role of a lubricant is to prevent wear of two surfaces in contact, which is likely to be the result of adhesive forces that cause a pair of asperities belonging to two surfaces in contact to stick together. Such adhesive sticking of asperities can occur both for sliding surfaces and for surfaces which are pressed together and then pulled apart. The latter situation, for example, is important for contact lenses, as prevention of sticking reduces possible damage to the cornea as the lenses are inserted and removed from the eye. Contact lenses are made from both neutral and polyelectrolyte hydrogels. It is demonstrated here that sticking of neutral hydrogels can be prevented by repulsive forces between asperities in contact, resulting from polymers attached to the gel surface but not linked with each other. For polyelectrolyte hydrogels, it is shown that osmotic pressure due to counterions, held at the interface between asperities in contact by the electrostatic attraction between the ions and the fixed charges in the gel, can provide a sufficiently strong repulsive force to prevent adhesive sticking of small-length-scale asperities.

  15. Force of adhesion upon loss of contact angle hysteresis: when a liquid behaves like a solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Juan V; Castillo, Rolando

    2013-11-27

    The theoretically predicted vanishment of the macroscopic contact angle hysteresis is found experimentally along with a small but finite force of adhesion (F(Ad)≈-0.5 μN) that, unexpectedly, is independent of the history of the preload. Our results agree with the prediction of a model in which the surface tension of the liquid provides the counterpart of the restoring force of an elastic solid, evidencing that the dewetting of a liquid in the absence of strong pinning points is equivalent to the detachment of an elastic solid.

  16. Measuring adhesion on rough surfaces using atomic force microscopy with a liquid probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan V. Escobar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a procedure to perform and interpret pull-off force measurements during the jump-off-contact process between a liquid drop and rough surfaces using a conventional atomic force microscope. In this method, a micrometric liquid mercury drop is attached to an AFM tipless cantilever to measure the force required to pull this drop off a rough surface. We test the method with two surfaces: a square array of nanometer-sized peaks commonly used for the determination of AFM tip sharpness and a multi-scaled rough diamond surface containing sub-micrometer protrusions. Measurements are carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid water capillary interactions. We obtain information about the average force of adhesion between a single peak or protrusion and the liquid drop. This procedure could provide useful microscopic information to improve our understanding of wetting phenomena on rough surfaces.

  17. Lateral and perpendicular interaction forces involved in mobile and immobile adhesion of microorganism on model solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Poortinga, AT; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Gliding and near-surface swimming of microorganisms are described as a mobile form of microbial adhesion that need not necessarily be reversible. It is argued that the reversibility of microbial adhesion depends on the depth of the secondary interaction minimum, calculated from the forces between an

  18. Influence of tip indentation depth on the adhesive behavior of viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane networks studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, J.P.; Vancso, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) outfitted with a custom control and data acquisition system was used to investigate the adhesive nature of a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Due to the complex dependence of the adhesion of this sample on factors such as indentation, surfa

  19. Normally Oriented Adhesion versus Friction Forces in Bacterial Adhesion to Polymer-Brush Functionalized Surfaces Under Fluid Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Veeregowda, Deepak H.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is problematic in many diverse applications. Coatings of hydrophilic polymer chains in a brush configuration reduce bacterial adhesion by orders of magnitude, but not to zero. Here, the mechanism by which polymer-brush functionalized surfaces reduce bacterial adhesion from a

  20. On the Transition from Bulk to Ordered Form of Water: A Theoretical Model to Calculate Adhesion Force Due to Capillary and van der Waals Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaqoob, M.A.; Rooij, de M.B.; Schipper, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The adhesion force due to capillary interaction between two hydrophilic surfaces is strongly dependent on the partial pressure of water and is often calculated using the Kelvin equation. The validity of the Kelvin equation is questionable at low relative humidity (RH) of water, like in high vacuum a

  1. Theoretical model for cellular shapes driven by protrusive and adhesive forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The forces that arise from the actin cytoskeleton play a crucial role in determining the cell shape. These include protrusive forces due to actin polymerization and adhesion to the external matrix. We present here a theoretical model for the cellular shapes resulting from the feedback between the membrane shape and the forces acting on the membrane, mediated by curvature-sensitive membrane complexes of a convex shape. In previous theoretical studies we have investigated the regimes of linear instability where spontaneous formation of cellular protrusions is initiated. Here we calculate the evolution of a two dimensional cell contour beyond the linear regime and determine the final steady-state shapes arising within the model. We find that shapes driven by adhesion or by actin polymerization (lamellipodia have very different morphologies, as observed in cells. Furthermore, we find that as the strength of the protrusive forces diminish, the system approaches a stabilization of a periodic pattern of protrusions. This result can provide an explanation for a number of puzzling experimental observations regarding cellular shape dependence on the properties of the extra-cellular matrix.

  2. Effect of chain length on the adhesion behaviour of n-alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(1 1 1): An atomic force microscopy study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Subramanian; S Sampath

    2005-10-01

    The effect of chain length on the adhesion behaviour of n-alkanethiols CH3(CH2) SH, where = 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 14 and 15 has been followed by carrying out pull-off force measurement using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembled monolayers on Au(111) surface has been characterized by reflection absorption infra-red spectroscopy (RAIRS) and contact mode AFM. It is observed that the work of adhesion is independent of thiol chain length though the standard deviation is high for short chain length thiol-based monolayers. This may be attributed to the relatively more deformable nature of the short chain thiol films due to their heterogeneity in the monolayer structure than the long chain ones. This, in turn, increases the contact area/volume between the AFM tip and the monolayer, and hence the force of adhesion. However, in the presence of water, the force of adhesion is lower than that observed in air reflecting the effects of capillary forces/polar components associated with the surface energy.

  3. Stabilization of membrane necks by adhesive particles, substrate surfaces, and constriction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-10-21

    Membrane remodelling processes involving the formation and fission of small buds require the formation and closure of narrow membrane necks, both for biological membranes and for model membranes such as lipid bilayers. The conditions required for the stability of such necks are well understood in the context of budding of vesicles with bilayer asymmetry and/or intramembrane domains. In many cases, however, the necks form in the presence of an adhesive surface, such as a solid particle or substrate, or the cellular cortex itself. Examples of such processes in biological cells include endocytosis, exocytosis and phagocytosis of solid particles, the formation of extracellular and outer membrane vesicles by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, as well as the closure of the cleavage furrow in cytokinesis. Here, we study the interplay of curvature elasticity, membrane-substrate adhesion, and constriction forces to obtain generalized stability conditions for closed necks which we validate by numerical energy minimization. We then explore the consequences of these stability conditions in several experimentally accessible systems such as particle-filled membrane tubes, supported lipid bilayers, giant plasma membrane vesicles, bacterial outer membrane vesicles, and contractile rings around necks. At the end, we introduce an intrinsic engulfment force that directly describes the interplay between curvature elasticity and membrane-substrate adhesion.

  4. Optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Axner, Ove; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Fällman, Erik

    2006-08-01

    Instrumentation and methodologies for single molecule force spectroscopy on bacterial adhesion organelles by the use of force measuring optical tweezers have been developed. A thorough study of the biomechanical properties of fimbrial adhesion organelles expressed by uropathogenic E. coli, so-called pili, is presented. Steady-state as well as dynamic force measurements on P pili, expressed by E. coli causing pyelonephritis, have revealed, among other things, various unfolding and refolding properties of the helical structure of P pili, the PapA rod. Based on these properties an energy landscape model has been constructed by which specific biophysical properties of the PapA rod have been extracted, e.g. the number of subunits, the length of a single pilus, bond lengths and activation energies for bond opening and closure. Moreover, long time repetitive measurements have shown that the rod can be unfolded and refolded repetitive times without losing its intrinsic properties. These properties are believed to be of importance for the bacteria's ability to maintain close contact with host cells during initial infections. The results presented are considered to be of importance for the field of biopolymers in general and the development of new pharmaceuticals towards urinary tract infections in particular. The results show furthermore that the methodology can be used to gain knowledge of the intrinsic biomechanical function of adhesion organelles. The instrumentation is currently used for characterization of type 1 pili, expressed by E. coli causing cystitis, i.e. infections in the bladder. The first force spectrometry investigations of these pili will be presented.

  5. Surface Polarity Of Beta-hmx Crystal And The Related Adhesive Forces With Estane Binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hanson, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the results on the study of surface properties of {beta}-HMX crystal utilizing molecular simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces are investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles agree excellently with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain with and without nitroplasticizer from the three principal crystal surfaces were calculated using umbrella sampling technique. We find that the detaching free energy/force increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, our results also show that nitroplasticizer plays an important role in the adhesion forces between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  6. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  7. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2012-08-21

    Interactions between rotavirus and Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) were studied by time-resolved dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. In NOM-containing NaCl solutions of up to 600 mM, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation in NaCl solutions. Aggregation rates of rotavirus in solutions containing 20 mg C/L increased with divalent cation concentration until reaching a critical coagulation concentration of 30 mM CaCl2 or 70 mM MgCl2. Deposition kinetics of rotavirus on NOM-coated silica surface was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. Experimental attachment efficiencies for rotavirus adsorption to NOM-coated surface in MgCl2 solution were lower than in CaCl2 solution at a given divalent cation concentration. Stronger adhesion force was measured for virus-virus and virus-NOM interactions in CaCl2 solution compared to those in MgCl2 or NaCl solutions at the same ionic strength. This study suggested that divalent cation complexation with carboxylate groups in NOM and on virus surface was an important mechanism in the deposition and aggregation kinetics of rotavirus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Role of Lewis basicity and van der Waals forces in adhesion of silica MFI zeolites (010) with polyimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald; Bae, Tae-Hyun; Meredith, J Carson

    2009-08-18

    Adhesion between zeolites and polymers is a central factor in achieving defect-free mixed-matrix membranes for energy-efficient gas separations. In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to measure adhesion forces between a pure silica MFI (ZSM-5: Zeolite Socony Mobil-Five) (010) zeolite probe and a series of polyimide (Matrimid 5218, 6FDA-DAM, 6FDA-6FpDA, and 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2)) and polyetherimide (Ultem 1000) polymers in air. Combined with measurements of surface energy of the polymer surfaces, the dependence of adhesion on polymer structure was determined. Adhesion force was strongly dependent on the Lewis basicity component of polymer surface energy and was less dependent on van der Waals (VDW) components, by a factor of about 6. Hydrogen bonding likely occurs between the acidic (electron acceptor) component of the zeolite surface (silanols or adsorbed water) and the basic (electron donor) component of the polymer surface. Adhesion force was strongly correlated with the mole fraction of carbonyls per monomer. We conclude that differences in adhesion as a function of polymer structure were primarily controlled by the polymer's Lewis basicity, contributed primarily by carbonyl groups.

  9. Tamarindus indica pectin blend film composition for coating tablets with enhanced adhesive force strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Rajneet; Singh, Kuldeep; Sapra, Bharti; Tiwary, A K; Rana, Vikas

    2014-02-15

    Tablet coating is the most useful method to improve tablet texture, odour and mask taste. Thus, the present investigation was aimed at developing an industrially acceptable aqueous tablet coating material. The physico-chemical, electrical and SEM investigations ensures that blending of Tamarindus indica (Linn.) pectin (TP) with chitosan gives water resistant film texture. Therefore, CH-TP (60:40) spray coated tablets were prepared. The evaluation of CH-TP coated tablets showed enhanced adhesive force strength (between tablet surface to coat) and negligible cohesive force strength (between two tablets) both evaluated using texture analyzer. The comparison of CH-TP coated tablets with Eudragit coated tablets further supported superiority of the former material. Thus, the findings pointed towards the potential of CH-TP for use as a tablet coating material in food as well as pharmaceutical industry.

  10. GRAPHENE PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Price DW, Roberts JA, Scott JB, Wadhawan A, Ye Z, Tour JM. Nanotubes in microwave fields : light emission , intense heat, outgassing, and reconstruction...Arepalli S, Yowell LL, Tour JM. Carbon nanotube composite curing through absorption of microwave radiation. Composites Science and Technology. 2008 Dec...polymer that is suitable for high-temperature applications. Graphene is a two-dimensional form of carbon nanomaterial that has been studied

  11. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Reischl, Bernhard; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Nordlund, Kai; Lassila, Antti

    2017-03-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20-60 %rh. Force-distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation.

  12. Mechanically functional amyloid fibrils in the adhesive of a marine invertebrate as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Mostaert, Anika; Crockett, Rowena; Kearn, Graham; Cherny, Izhack; Gazit, Ehud; C Serpell, Louise; P Jarvis, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are primarily known in a pathogenic context for their association with a wide range of debilitating human diseases. Here we show a marine invertebrate (Entobdella soleae) utilizes functional amyloid fibrils comparable to those of a unicellular prokaryote (Escherichia coli). Thioflavin-T binding and Raman spectroscopy provided evidence for the presence of amyloid in the adhesive of Entobdella soleae. We elucidated that for these two very different organisms, amyloid fibrils provide adhesive and cohesive strength to their natural adhesives. Comparing the nanoscale mechanical responses of these fibrils with those of pathogenic amyloid by atomic force microscopy revealed that the molecular level origin of the cohesive strength was associated with the generic intermolecular β-sheet structure of amyloid fibrils. Functional adhesive residues were found only in the case of the functional amyloid. Atomic force microscopy provided a useful means to characterize the internal structural forces within individual amyloid fibrils and how these relate to the mechanical performance of both functional and pathogenic amyloid. The mechanistic link of amyloid-based cohesive and adhesive strength could be widespread amongst natural adhesives, irrespective of environment, providing a new strategy for biomimicry and a new source of materials for understanding the formation and stability of amyloid fibrils more generally.

  13. Optimizing Adhesive Design by Understanding Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Daniel R; Crosby, Alfred J

    2015-12-23

    Adhesives have long been designed around a trade-off between adhesive strength and releasability. Geckos are of interest because they are the largest organisms which are able to climb utilizing adhesive toepads, yet can controllably release from surfaces and perform this action over and over again. Attempting to replicate the hierarchical, nanoscopic features which cover their toepads has been the primary focus of the adhesives field until recently. A new approach based on a scaling relation which states that reversible adhesive force capacity scales with (A/C)(1/2), where A is the area of contact and C is the compliance of the adhesive, has enabled the creation of high strength, reversible adhesives without requiring high aspect ratio, fibrillar features. Here we introduce an equation to calculate the compliance of adhesives, and utilize this equation to predict the shear adhesive force capacity of the adhesive based on the material components and geometric properties. Using this equation, we have investigated important geometric parameters which control force capacity and have shown that by controlling adhesive shape, adhesive force capacity can be increased by over 50% without varying pad size. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that compliance of the adhesive far from the interface still influences shear adhesive force capacity. Utilizing this equation will allow for the production of adhesives which are optimized for specific applications in commercial and industrial settings.

  14. Quantifying the adhesion and interaction forces between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Lail, Laila I; Liu, Yatao; Atabek, Arzu; Camesano, Terri A

    2007-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize interactions between natural organic matter (NOM), and glass or bacteria. Poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA), soil humic Acid (SHA), and Suwannee River humic Acid (SRHA), were adsorbed to silica AFM probes. Adhesion forces (Fadh) for the interaction of organic-probes and glass slides correlated with organic molecular weight (MW), but not with radius of the organic aggregate (R), charge density (Q), or zeta potential (zeta). Two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with different lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were chosen: PAO1 (A+B+), whose LPS have common antigen (A-band) + O-antigen (B-band); and mutant AK1401 (A+B-). Fadh between bacteria and organics correlated with organic MW, R, and Q, but not zeta. PAO1 had lower Fadh with silica than NOM, which was attributed to negative charges from the B-band polymers causing electrostatic repulsion. AK1401 adhered stronger to silica than to the organics, perhaps because the absence of the B-band exposed underlying positively charged proteins. DLVO calculations could not explain the differences in the two bacteria or predict qualitative or quantitative trends in interaction forces in these systems. Molecular-level information from AFM studies can bring us closer to understanding the complex nature of bacterial-NOM interactions.

  15. Screening of high temperature adhesives for large area bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenersen, A. A.; Wykes, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    High temperature-resistant adhesive systems were screened for processability, mechanical and physical properties, operational capability at 589 K (600 F), and the ability to produce large area bonds of high quality in fabricating Space Shuttle components. The adhesives consisted primarily of polyimide systems, including FM34B-18, NR-150B2 (DuPont), PMR-15, LARC-13, LARC-160, Thermid 600, and AI-1130L (AMOCA). The processing studies included preparation of polyimide resins, fabrication of film adhesives, development of lay-up and cure procedures, fabrication of honeycomb sandwich panels, and fabrication of mid-plane bonded panels in joints up to 30.5 cm (12 in.) wide. The screening program included tests for tack and drape properties, reticulation and filleting characteristics, ability to produce void-free or low porosity bonds in mid-plane bonded panels, out-time stability, lap shear strength, climbing drum peel strength, and glass transition temperature (Tg). This paper describes the processing methods developed and the test results.

  16. Coupled effects of substrate adhesion and intermolecular forces on polymer thin film glass-transition behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenjie; Keten, Sinan

    2013-10-15

    Intermolecular noncovalent forces between polymer chains influence the mobility and glass-transition temperature (Tg), where weaker interchain interactions, all else being the same, typically results in lower bulk polymer Tg. Using molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that this relation can become invalid for supported ultrathin films when the substrate-polymer interaction is extremely strong and the polymer-polymer interactions are much weaker. This contrasting trend is found to be due to a more pronounced substrate-induced appreciation of the film Tg for polymers with weaker intermolecular interactions and low bulk Tg. We show that optimizing this coupling between substrate adhesion and bulk Tg maximizes thin film Tg, paving the way for tuning film properties through interface nanoengineering.

  17. Highly reflective and adhesive surface of aluminized polyvinyl chloride film by vacuum evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Denian; Tai, Qile; Feng, Qiang; Li, Qi; Xu, Xizhe; Li, Hairong; Huang, Jing; Dong, Lijie; Xie, Haian; Xiong, Chuanxi

    2014-08-01

    Aluminized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film with high reflectivity and strong adhesion was facilely fabricated by vacuum evaporation. The technical study revealed that both alkali-pretreatment of the PVC matrix and thermal annealing after aluminization could greatly promote the peeling adhesion force of this metal/polymer composite by producing interfacial active chemical groups and removing the inner stress, respectively. Reflectivity test and AFM study indicated that the reflecting capacitance of the aluminum coating was closely related to the surface roughness, which can be easily controlled by modulating deposition of aluminum. Moreover, the formation of aluminum layer follows an island model process, and a continuous and smooth coating with highest reflectivity and lowest surface resistance was achieved at deposition time of 60 s. We anticipate that the cost-effective metallized PVC film by this strategy may find extensive applications in light harvesting, solar energy, and flexible mirrors, among others.

  18. The development of a cascade impactor simulator based on adhesion force measurements to aid the development of dry powder inhalations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podczeck, F

    1997-05-01

    Adhesion and friction forces are the main physical factors determining the re-suspension of a micronized drug from carrier particles during inhalation. Hence, it appears useful to link adhesion and friction force measurements to the in vitro testing of dry powder inhalations, namely the assessment of the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) using an eight-stage Andersen cascade impactor. Interactive mixtures of micronized Salmeterol Xinafoate adhered to irrespirable lactose monohydrate carrier particles were used as model dosage forms. The adhesion force between the drug and carrier particles was assessed using a centrifuge technique, and the MMAD was determined under standardized working conditions using the Andersen-Cascade impactor (Mark II). A cascade impactor simulator (CIS), which is a computer program containing a re-suspension model to assess the amount of drug detached from the carrier particles during inhalation, was developed and validated using the experimental data. It could be shown, that the CIS provided a good estimate of the loss of drug due to adhesion to the carrier particles and the loss of drug on the cascade impactor walls. Small deviations between the theoretical and experimental mass median aerodynamic particle diameters however were found. These deviations were shown to be mainly due to the experimental error introduced by the cascade impactor, and that the error due to the experimental adhesion measurements is negligibly small. Hence, the CIS developed could be a useful tool in early development stages of dry powder inhalations to predict the in vitro aerodynamic performance of drug particles.

  19. A novel graded bioactive high adhesion implant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brohede, Ulrika [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Zhao, Shuxi [Division for Solid State Physics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Lindberg, Fredrik [Division for Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Mihranyan, Albert; Forsgren, Johan [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Stromme, Maria, E-mail: maria.stromme@angstrom.uu.se [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden); Engqvist, Hakan, E-mail: hakan.engqvist@angstrom.uu.se [Division for Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    One method to increase the clinical success rate of metal implants is to increase their bone bonding properties, i.e. to develop a bone bioactive surface leading to reduced risks of interfacial problems. Much research has been devoted to modifying the surface of metals to make them become bioactive. Many of the proposed methods include depositing a coating on the implant. However, there is a risk of coating failure due to low substrate adhesion. This paper describes a method to obtain bioactivity combined with a high coating adhesion via a gradient structure of the coating. Gradient coatings were deposited on Ti (grade 5) using reactive magnetron sputtering with increasing oxygen content. To increase the grain size in the coating, all coatings were post annealed at 385 deg. C. The obtained coating exhibited a gradual transition over 70 nm from crystalline titanium oxide (anatase) at the surface to metallic Ti in the substrate, as shown using cross-section transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling. Using scratch testing, it could be shown that the adhesion to the substrate was well above 1 GPa. The bioactivity of the coating was verified in vitro by the spontaneous formation of hydroxylapatite upon storage in phosphate buffer solution at 37 deg. C for one week. The described process can be applied to implants irrespective of bulk metal in the base and should introduce the possibility to create safer permanent implants like reconstructive devices, dental, or spinal implants.

  20. A novel graded bioactive high adhesion implant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohede, Ulrika; Zhao, Shuxi; Lindberg, Fredrik; Mihranyan, Albert; Forsgren, Johan; Strømme, Maria; Engqvist, Håkan

    2009-06-01

    One method to increase the clinical success rate of metal implants is to increase their bone bonding properties, i.e. to develop a bone bioactive surface leading to reduced risks of interfacial problems. Much research has been devoted to modifying the surface of metals to make them become bioactive. Many of the proposed methods include depositing a coating on the implant. However, there is a risk of coating failure due to low substrate adhesion. This paper describes a method to obtain bioactivity combined with a high coating adhesion via a gradient structure of the coating. Gradient coatings were deposited on Ti (grade 5) using reactive magnetron sputtering with increasing oxygen content. To increase the grain size in the coating, all coatings were post annealed at 385 °C. The obtained coating exhibited a gradual transition over 70 nm from crystalline titanium oxide (anatase) at the surface to metallic Ti in the substrate, as shown using cross-section transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling. Using scratch testing, it could be shown that the adhesion to the substrate was well above 1 GPa. The bioactivity of the coating was verified in vitro by the spontaneous formation of hydroxylapatite upon storage in phosphate buffer solution at 37 °C for one week. The described process can be applied to implants irrespective of bulk metal in the base and should introduce the possibility to create safer permanent implants like reconstructive devices, dental, or spinal implants.

  1. Influence of the Molecular Adhesion Force on the Indentation Depth of a Particle into the Wafer Surface in the CMP Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By theoretical calculation, the external force on the particle conveyed by pad asperities and the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer are compared and analyzed quantitatively. It is confirmed that the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer has a great influence on the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP material removal process. Considering the molecular adhesion force between particle and wafer, a more precise model for the indentation of a particle into the wafer surface is developed in this paper, and the new model is compared with the former model which neglected the molecular adhesion force. Through theoretical analyses, an approach and corresponding critical values are applied to estimate whether the molecular adhesion force in CMP can be neglected. These methods can improve the precision of the material removal model of CMP.

  2. Switchable Adhesion in Vacuum Using Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Julia; Frensemeier, Mareike; Kroner, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Suction based attachment systems for pick and place handling of fragile objects like glass plates or optical lenses are energy-consuming and noisy and fail at reduced air pressure, which is essential, e.g., in chemical and physical vapor deposition processes. Recently, an alternative approach toward reversible adhesion of sensitive objects based on bioinspired dry adhesive structures has emerged. There, the switching in adhesion is achieved by a reversible buckling of adhesive pillar structures. In this study, we demonstrate that these adhesives are capable of switching adhesion not only in ambient air conditions but also in vacuum. Our bioinspired patterned adhesive with an area of 1 cm(2) provided an adhesion force of 2.6 N ± 0.2 N in air, which was reduced to 1.9 N ± 0.2 N if measured in vacuum. Detachment was induced by buckling of the structures due to a high compressive preload and occurred, independent of air pressure, at approximately 0.9 N ± 0.1 N. The switch in adhesion was observed at a compressive preload between 5.6 and 6.0 N and was independent of air pressure. The difference between maximum adhesion force and adhesion force after buckling gives a reasonable window of operation for pick and place processes. High reversibility of the switching behavior is shown over 50 cycles in air and in vacuum, making the bioinspired switchable adhesive applicable for handling operations of fragile objects.

  3. E-cadherin-dependent stimulation of traction force at focal adhesions via the Src and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Estevez, Maruxa; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-07-18

    The interplay between cadherin- and integrin-dependent signals controls cell behavior, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the strength of adhesion to the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. We deposited cells expressing a defined repertoire of cadherins and integrins on fibronectin (FN)-coated polyacrylamide gels (FN-PAG) and on FN-coated pillars used as a micro-force sensor array (μFSA), and analyzed the functional relationship between these adhesion receptors to determine how it regulates cell traction force. We found that cadherin-mediated adhesion stimulated cell spreading on FN-PAG, and this was modulated by the substrate stiffness. We compared S180 cells with cells stably expressing different cadherins on μFSA and found that traction forces were stronger in cells expressing cadherins than in parental cells. E-cadherin-mediated contact and mechanical coupling between cells are required for this increase in cell-FN traction force, which was not observed in isolated cells, and required Src and PI3K activities. Traction forces were stronger in cells expressing type I cadherins than in cells expressing type II cadherins, which correlates with our previous observation of a higher intercellular adhesion strength developed by type I compared with type II cadherins. Our results reveal one of the mechanisms whereby molecular cross talk between cadherins and integrins upregulates traction forces at cell-FN adhesion sites, and thus provide additional insight into the molecular control of cell behavior. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantifying adhesion of acidophilic bioleaching bacteria to silica and pyrite by atomic force microscopy with a bacterial probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengxue; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen; Nguyen, Tuan A H; Nguyen, Anh V

    2014-03-01

    The adhesion of acidophilic bacteria to mineral surfaces is an important phenomenon in bioleaching processes. In this study, functionalized colloidal probes covered by bioleaching bacterial cells (Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans) were developed and used to sense specific adhesion forces to a silica surface and a pyrite surface in various solutions. Experimentally, recorded retraction curves of A. thiooxidans revealed sawtooth features that were in good agreement with the wormlike chain model, while that of L. ferrooxidans exhibited stair-step separation. The magnitudes of adhesion forces and snap-off distances were strongly influenced by the ionic strength and pH. Macroscopic surface properties including hydrophobicity and surface potential for bacterial cells and substrata were measured by a sessile drop method and microelectrophoresis. The ATR-FTIR spectra indicated the presence of different types of biopolymers on two strains of bacteria.

  5. The effect of temperature on adhesion forces between surfaces and model foods containing whey protein and sugar

    OpenAIRE

    Goode, K. R.; Bowen, James; Akhtar, N.; Robbins, P. T.; Fryer, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fouling deposit from foods and food components is a severe problem in food processing and leads to frequent cleaning. The design of surfaces that resist fouling may decrease the need for cleaning and thus increase efficiency. Atomic force microscopy has been used to measure adhesion forces between stainless steel (SS) and fluoro-coated glass (FCG) microparticles and the model food deposits (i) whey protein (WPC), (ii) sweetened condensed milk, and (iii) caramel. Measurements ...

  6. Adhesive performance of washed cottonseed meal at high solid contents and low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water-washed cottonseed meal (WCSM) has been shown as a promising biobased wood adhesive. Recently, we prepared WSCM in a pilot scale for promoting its industrial application. In this work, we tested the adhesive strength and viscosity of the adhesive preparation with high solid contents (up to 30%...

  7. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  8. Variation of Surface Adhesion Force During the Formation of OTS Self-assembled Monolayer Investigated by AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国华; HigashitaniKo

    1999-01-01

    Variation of the surface adhesion force during the formation of octadecyl trichlororilane (OTS) .self-assembled monolayer on a glass substrate surface was investigated hy atomic force microscope (AFM). The research shows that the hydrophobicity and the adbeslon force of the sample surface increases gradualy while the substrate surface is covered by OTS molecules as the reaction proceeds. After 15 min reaction, a cloee-pac.ked and smooth OTS self-assembled monolayer could from on the glass subetrate surface with an advancing contact angle of 105° and an interfaeial energy of 55.79 mJ.m-2.

  9. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  10. Monitoring of TGF-β 1-Induced Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation Process by Measuring Cell Adhesion Force with a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Gao, AnXiu; Yu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process in which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion, and gain migratory and invasive properties. It is believed that EMT is associated with initiation and completion of the invasion-metastasis cascade. In this study, an economic approach was developed to fabricate a microfluidic device with less instrumentation requirement for the investigation of EMT by quantifying cell adhesion force. Fluid shear force was precisely controlled by a homemade microfluidic perfusion apparatus and interface. The adhesion capability of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 on different types of extracellular matrix protein was studied. In addition, effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on EMT in A549 cells were investigated by characterizing the adhesion force changes and on-chip fluorescent staining. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic device is a potential tool to characterize the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process by measuring cell adhesion force.

  11. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-02-12

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions.

  12. Manipulation of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silicon wafer in the peak force tapping mode in water: pH-dependent friction and adhesion force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiwek, Simon; Stark, Robert W., E-mail: stark@csi.tu-darmstadt.de, E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Dietz, Christian, E-mail: stark@csi.tu-darmstadt.de, E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Physics of Surfaces, Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 16, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Heim, Lars-Oliver [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Str. 10, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-03-14

    The friction force between nanoparticles and a silicon wafer is a crucial parameter for cleaning processes in the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about the pH-dependency of the friction forces and the shear strength at the interface. Here, we push polystyrene nanoparticles, 100 nm in diameter, with the tip of an atomic force microscope and measure the pH-dependency of the friction, adhesion, and normal forces on a silicon substrate covered with a native silicon dioxide layer. The peak force tapping mode was applied to control the vertical force on these particles. We successively increased the applied load until the particles started to move. The main advantage of this technique over single manipulation processes is the achievement of a large number of manipulation events in short time and in a straightforward manner. Geometrical considerations of the interaction forces at the tip-particle interface allowed us to calculate the friction force and shear strength from the applied normal force depending on the pH of an aqueous solution. The results clearly demonstrated that particle removal should be performed with a basic solution at pH 9 because of the low interaction forces between particle and substrate.

  13. Local Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly modulates applied traction force during apCAM adhesion site maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Kenneth B; Schaefer, Andrew W; Schoonderwoert, Vincent T; Creamer, Matthew S; Dufresne, Eric R; Forscher, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Homophilic binding of immunoglobulin superfamily molecules such as the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM) leads to actin filament assembly near nascent adhesion sites. Such actin assembly can generate significant localized forces that have not been characterized in the larger context of axon growth and guidance. We used apCAM-coated bead substrates applied to the surface of neuronal growth cones to characterize the development of forces evoked by varying stiffness of mechanical restraint. Unrestrained bead propulsion matched or exceeded rates of retrograde network flow and was dependent on Arp2/3 complex activity. Analysis of growth cone forces applied to beads at low stiffness of restraint revealed switching between two states: frictional coupling to retrograde flow and Arp2/3-dependent propulsion. Stiff mechanical restraint led to formation of an extensive actin cup matching the geometric profile of the bead target and forward growth cone translocation; pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex or Rac attenuated F-actin assembly near bead binding sites, decreased the efficacy of growth responses, and blocked accumulation of signaling molecules associated with nascent adhesions. These studies introduce a new model for regulation of traction force in which local actin assembly forces buffer nascent adhesion sites from the mechanical effects of retrograde flow. © 2017 Buck et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. High-performance mussel-inspired adhesives of reduced complexity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahn, B Kollbe; Das, Saurabh; Linstadt, Roscoe; Kaufman, Yair; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nadine R; Mirshafian, Razieh; Kesselman, Ellina; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Lipshutz, Bruce H; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    .... Translation of mussel-inspired wet adhesion typically entails catechol functionalization of polymers and/or polyelectrolytes, and solution processing of many complex components and steps that require...

  15. Nanoscale Cell Wall Deformation Impacts Long-Range Bacterial Adhesion Forces on Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yun; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of

  16. Nanoscale cell wall deformation impacts long-range bacterial adhesion forces on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Harapanahalli, A.K.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria occurs on virtually all natural and synthetic surfaces and is crucial for their survival. Once they are adhering, bacteria start growing and form a biofilm, in which they are protected against environmental attacks. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is mediated by a combination of

  17. Evaluation of Adhesive Properties in Polymeric Thin Film by Ultrasonic Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Park, Tae Sung; Park, Ik Keun; Mryasaka, Chiaki [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    This study presents the assessment results of adhesive properties on the interface between a silicon wafer and nano-scale polymer thin film pattern through UAFM images by using the contact resonance frequency of the cantilever. For the experiment, we varied surface treatment processes for the silicon wafer and fabricated a 300nm polymer thin film pattern through lithography. Images from the optical microscope were used to compare the produced test specimens for adhesive condition and the critical load value from the nano scratch test was used to verify the adhesive condition of the nano pattern. Each test specimen resulted in a 1{mu}mx1{mu}m surface image and subsurface adhesive image. Adhesive condition was evaluated by image contrast differences on the interface according to the changing amplitudes and phases of contact resonance frequency.

  18. Multiscale mechanics and physics of nature’s dry adhesion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Dry adhesion systems adhere via physical bonds without any significant contribution from a liquid medium. In nature, these systems are found among the footpads of spiders, lizards and many other small animals, with high adhesion force, low detachment force and elfcleaning properties. These features are highly interesting for biomimetic man-made adhesives. Heavy animals have an adhesion force much higher than its muscle force, and to enable detachment, they have evolved a functional surface wi...

  19. Elucidating How Wood Adhesives Bond to Wood Cell Walls using High-Resolution Solution-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle

    2013-01-01

    Some extensively used wood adhesives, such as pMDI (polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) and PF (phenol formaldehyde) have shown excellent adhesion properties with wood. However, distinguishing whether the strength is due to physical bonds (i.e., van der Waals, London, or hydrogen bond forces) or covalent bonds between the adherend and the adhesive is not fully...

  20. Three-dimensional cell body shape dictates the onset of traction force generation and growth of focal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchard, Jonathan; Bimbard, Célian; Bufi, Nathalie; Durand-Smet, Pauline; Proag, Amsha; Richert, Alain; Cardoso, Olivier; Asnacios, Atef

    2014-09-09

    Cell shape affects proliferation and differentiation, which are processes known to depend on integrin-based focal adhesion (FA) signaling. Because shape results from force balance and FAs are mechanosensitive complexes transmitting tension from the cell structure to its mechanical environment, we investigated the interplay between 3D cell shape, traction forces generated through the cell body, and FA growth during early spreading. Combining measurements of cell-scale normal traction forces with FA monitoring, we show that the cell body contact angle controls the onset of force generation and, subsequently, the initiation of FA growth at the leading edge of the lamella. This suggests that, when the cell body switches from convex to concave, tension in the apical cortex is transmitted to the lamella where force-sensitive FAs start to grow. Along this line, increasing the stiffness resisting cell body contraction led to a decrease of the lag time between force generation and FA growth, indicating mechanical continuity of the cell structure and force transmission from the cell body to the leading edge. Remarkably, the overall normal force per unit area of FA increased with stiffness, and its values were similar to those reported for local tangential forces acting on individual FAs. These results reveal how the 3D cell shape feeds back on its internal organization and how it may control cell fate through FA-based signaling.

  1. Polymer surface functionalities that control human embryoid body cell adhesion revealed by high throughput surface characterization of combinatorial material microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L; Taylor, Michael; Urquhart, Andrew J; Bogatyrev, Said R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-12-01

    High throughput materials discovery using combinatorial polymer microarrays to screen for new biomaterials with new and improved function is established as a powerful strategy. Here we combine this screening approach with high throughput surface characterization (HT-SC) to identify surface structure-function relationships. We explore how this combination can help to identify surface chemical moieties that control protein adsorption and subsequent cellular response. The adhesion of human embryoid body (hEB) cells to a large number (496) of different acrylate polymers synthesized in a microarray format is screened using a high throughput procedure. To determine the role of the polymer surface properties on hEB cell adhesion, detailed HT-SC of these acrylate polymers is carried out using time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pico litre drop sessile water contact angle (WCA) measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A structure-function relationship is identified between the ToF SIMS analysis of the surface chemistry after a fibronectin (Fn) pre-conditioning step and the cell adhesion to each spot using the multivariate analysis technique partial least squares (PLS) regression. Secondary ions indicative of the adsorbed Fn correlate with increased cell adhesion whereas glycol and other functionalities from the polymers are identified that reduce cell adhesion. Furthermore, a strong relationship between the ToF SIMS spectra of bare polymers and the cell adhesion to each spot is identified using PLS regression. This identifies a role for both the surface chemistry of the bare polymer and the pre-adsorbed Fn, as-represented in the ToF SIMS spectra, in controlling cellular adhesion. In contrast, no relationship is found between cell adhesion and wettability, surface roughness, elemental or functional surface composition. The correlation between ToF SIMS data of the surfaces and the cell adhesion demonstrates

  2. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S.; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  3. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesika, Noshir S [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Zeng Hongbo [Chemical and Materials Engineering Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Kristiansen, Kai; Israelachvili, Jacob [Chemical Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Zhao, Boxin [Chemical Engineering Department and Waterloo Institute of Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tian Yu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Autumn, Kellar, E-mail: npesika@tulane.ed [Department of Biology, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, OR 97219 (United States)

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  4. Gecko adhesion pad: a smart surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesika, Noshir S; Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai; Zhao, Boxin; Tian, Yu; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2009-11-18

    Recently, it has been shown that humidity can increase the adhesion of the spatula pads that form the outermost (adhesive) surface of the tokay gecko feet by 50% relative to the main adhesion mechanism (i.e. van der Waals adhesive forces), although the mechanism by which the enhancement is realized is still not well understood. A change in the surface hydrophobicity of a gecko setal array is observed when the array, which supports the spatulae, is exposed to a water drop for more than 20 min, suggesting a change in the hydrophilic-lyophilic balance (HLB), and therefore of the conformation of the surface proteins. A surface force apparatus (SFA) was used to quantify these changes, i.e. in the adhesion and friction forces, while shearing the setal array against a silica surface under (i) dry conditions, (ii) 100% humidity and (iii) when fully immersed in water. The adhesion increased in the humid environment but greatly diminished in water. Although the adhesion forces changed significantly, the friction forces remained unaffected, indicating that the friction between these highly textured surfaces is 'load-controlled' rather than 'adhesion-controlled'. These results demonstrate that the gecko adhesive pads have the ability to exploit environmental conditions to maximize their adhesion and stabilize their friction forces. Future designs of synthetic dry adhesives inspired by the gecko can potentially include similar 'smart' surfaces that adapt to their environment.

  5. Combined Poisson and soft-particle DLVO analysis of the specific and nonspecific adhesion forces measured between L. monocytogenes grown at various temperatures and silicon nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordesli, F Pinar; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2012-09-18

    Adhesion forces between pathogenic L. monocytogenes EGDe and silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) under water and at room temperature for cells grown at five different temperatures (10, 20, 30, 37, and 40 °C). Adhesion forces were then decoupled into specific (hydrogen bonding) and nonspecific (electrostatic and Lifshitz-van der Waals) force components using Poisson statistical analysis. The strongest specific and nonspecific attraction forces were observed for cells grown at 30 °C, compared to those observed for cells grown at higher or lower temperatures, respectively. By combining the results of Poisson analysis with the results obtained through soft-particle Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) analysis, the contributions of the Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrostatic forces to the overall nonspecific interaction forces were determined. Our results showed that the Lifshitz-van der Waals attraction forces dominated the total nonspecific adhesion forces for all investigated thermal conditions. However, irrespective of the temperature of growth investigated, hydrogen bonding forces were always stronger than the nonspecific forces. Finally, by combining Poisson analysis with soft-particle analysis of DLVO forces, the closest separation distances where the irreversible bacterial adhesion takes place can be determined relatively easily. For all investigated thermal conditions, the closest separation distances were <1 nm.

  6. Evaluation on High-temperature Adhesion Performance of Hot-applied Sealant for Asphalt Pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng; LI Tinggang; SHI Xiaopei

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the high-temperature performances of the asphalt pavement hot-applied sealant, as well as to reduce failures of the sealant pullout, the softening point test and the flow test (two existing methods for evaluating high-temperature performances) were conducted. It was found that both tests could not accurately reflect the adhesion performances of the sealant at high temperatures. For this purpose, the adhesion test for PSAT (pressure sensitive adhesive tape) has been taken as a reference to develop a device that is suitable for evaluating the adhesion performances, by modifying relevant test parameters according to the road conditions at high temperatures. Thirteen common sealants were tested in the modified adhesion test, softening point test and flow test. The experimental results show that no significant correlation (p>0.05) exists between the adhesion value, softening point, adhesion value and flow value;while a significant correlation (p<0.05) exists between the softening point and flow value. The modified adhesion test is efficient in distinguishing the high-temperature adhesion performances of different sealants, and can be used as a standard method for evaluating such performances.

  7. Sensitive force technique to probe molecular adhesion and structural linkages at biological interfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K; Merkel, R.

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion and cytoskeletal structure are intimately related in biological cell function. Even with the vast amount of biological and biochemical data that exist, little is known at the molecular level about physical mechanisms involved in attachments between cells or about consequences of adhesion on the material structure. To expose physical actions at soft biological interfaces, we have combined an ultrasensitive transducer and reflection interference microscopy to image submicroscopic displ...

  8. Highly adhesive metal plating on Zylon fiber via iodine pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatema, Ummul Khair [Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1 Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Gotoh, Yasuo, E-mail: ygotohy@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1 Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan)

    2011-11-01

    Highly adhesive metal plating was performed on poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) fiber named Zylon via iodine pretreatment followed by electroless plating. First, iodine components were selectively doped into the inner part of the fiber near the surface through iodine vapor exposure. The doped iodine was converted to palladium iodide particles by treating with palladium chloride solution. After the reduction of the iodide to metal palladium particles, electroless copper plating was conducted on the fiber. A uniform copper layer was deposited on the fiber surface and exhibited high durability in durability tests such as ultrasonic exposure, tape peeling-off, and corrosion in NaCl solution. This durability was attributed to the palladium particles formed at the fiber surface that served as an anchor for the plated layer as well as an electroless plating catalyst. The plated fibers also possessed electrical conductivity. Although the tensile strength of the Zylon fiber decreased from 5.8 to 4.9 GPa after undergoing the pretreatment and plating processes, the light shielding effect improved the light resistance of the plated fibers in terms of tensile properties. After 18 days of xenon lamp exposure, the plated fibers retained 74% of its initial strength, whereas that of untreated fibers decreased to 43%.

  9. High-adhesion Cu patterns fabricated by nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Ming; Liu, Jianguo, E-mail: liujg@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Du, Qifeng; Ai, Jun

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • High-adhesion copper patterns on alumina ceramic were obtained conveniently. • Effects of processing parameters on adhesion were investigated. • The adhesion of copper–ceramic was higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder. • Failure mechanism was studied by the analysis of fracture surfaces. - Abstract: Adhesion strength is a crucial factor for the performance and reliability of metallic patterns on insulator substrates. In this study, we present an efficient technique for selective metallization of alumina ceramic with high adhesion strength by using nanosecond laser modification and electroless copper plating. Specifically, a 355 nm Nd:YVO{sub 4} ultraviolet (UV) laser was employed not only to decompose palladium chloride film locally for catalyzing the electroless reaction, but also to modify the ceramic surface directly using its high fluence. An orthogonal experiment was undertaken to study the effects of processing parameters including laser fluence, scanning speed and scanning line interval on adhesion strength. The adhesion strength was measured by pulling a metallic wire soldered into the copper coating perpendicular to the substrate using a pull tester. The results have shown that a strong adhesion between the copper coating and the alumina ceramic, higher than the tensile strength of tin-lead solder was obtained. Surface and interface characteristics were investigated to understand that, whose results have shown that the high-aspect-ratio microstructures formed by the laser modification is the major reason for the improvement of adhesion.

  10. Logarithmic contact time dependence of adhesion force and its dominant role among the effects of AFM experimental parameters under low humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tianmao; Meng, Yonggang

    2017-10-01

    The influences of contact time, normal load, piezo velocity, and measurement number of times on the adhesion force between two silicon surfaces were studied with an atomic force microscope (AFM) at low humidity (17-15%). Results show that the adhesion force is time-dependent and increases logarithmically with contact time until saturation is reached, which is related with the growing size of a water bridge between them. The contact time plays a dominant role among these parameters. The adhesion forces with different normal loads and piezo velocities can be quantitatively obtained just by figuring out the length of contact time, provided that the contact time dependence is known. The time-dependent adhesion force with repeated contacts at one location usually increases first sharply and then slowly with measurement number of times until saturation is reached, which is in accordance with the contact time dependence. The behavior of the adhesion force with repeated contacts can be adjusted by the lengths of contact time and non-contact time. These results may help facilitate the anti-adhesion design of silicon-based microscale systems working under low humidity.

  11. α-Catenin and vinculin cooperate to promote high E-cadherin-based adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William A; Boscher, Cécile; Chu, Yeh-Shiu; Cuvelier, Damien; Martinez-Rico, Clara; Seddiki, Rima; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mege, René-Marc; Dufour, Sylvie

    2013-02-15

    Maintaining cell cohesiveness within tissues requires that intercellular adhesions develop sufficient strength to support traction forces applied by myosin motors and by neighboring cells. Cadherins are transmembrane receptors that mediate intercellular adhesion. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain recruits several partners, including catenins and vinculin, at sites of cell-cell adhesion. Our study used force measurements to address the role of αE-catenin and vinculin in the regulation of the strength of E-cadherin-based adhesion. αE-catenin-deficient cells display only weak aggregation and fail to strengthen intercellular adhesion over time, a process rescued by the expression of αE-catenin or chimeric E-cadherin·αE-catenins, including a chimera lacking the αE-catenin dimerization domain. Interestingly, an αE-catenin mutant lacking the modulation and actin-binding domains restores cadherin-dependent cell-cell contacts but cannot strengthen intercellular adhesion. The expression of αE-catenin mutated in its vinculin-binding site is defective in its ability to rescue cadherin-based adhesion strength in cells lacking αE-catenin. Vinculin depletion or the overexpression of the αE-catenin modulation domain strongly decreases E-cadherin-mediated adhesion strength. This supports the notion that both molecules are required for intercellular contact maturation. Furthermore, stretching of cell doublets increases vinculin recruitment and α18 anti-αE-catenin conformational epitope immunostaining at cell-cell contacts. Taken together, our results indicate that αE-catenin and vinculin cooperatively support intercellular adhesion strengthening, probably via a mechanoresponsive link between the E-cadherin·β-catenin complexes and the underlying actin cytoskeleton.

  12. High-affinity DNA base analogs as supramolecular, nanoscale promoters of macroscopic adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cyrus A; Jones, Amanda R; Briggs, Ellen M; Novitsky, Eric J; Kuykendall, Darrell W; Sottos, Nancy R; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2013-05-15

    Adhesion phenomena are essential to many biological processes and to synthetic adhesives and manufactured coatings and composites. Supramolecular interactions are often implicated in various adhesion mechanisms. Recently, supramolecular building blocks, such as synthetic DNA base-pair mimics, have drawn attention in the context of molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular polymers. These reversible, hydrogen-bonding interactions have been studied extensively for their adhesive capabilities at the nano- and microscale, however, much less is known about their utility for practical adhesion in macroscopic systems. Herein, we report the preparation and evaluation of supramolecular coupling agents based on high-affinity, high-fidelity quadruple hydrogen-bonding units (e.g., DAN·DeUG, Kassoc = 10(8) M(-1) in chloroform). Macroscopic adhesion between polystyrene films and glass surfaces modified with 2,7-diamidonaphthyridine (DAN) and ureido-7-deazaguanine (DeUG) units was evaluated by mechanical testing. Structure-property relationships indicate that the designed supramolecular interaction at the nanoscale plays a key role in the observed macroscopic adhesive response. Experiments probing reversible adhesion or self-healing properties of bulk samples indicate that significant recovery of initial strength can be realized after failure but that the designed noncovalent interaction does not lead to healing during the process of adhesion loss.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of thermoplastic elastomer dry adhesives with high strength and low contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Khaled, Walid; Sameoto, Dan

    2014-05-14

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyurethane elastomers have commonly been used to manufacture mushroom shaped gecko-inspired dry adhesives with high normal adhesion strength. However, the thermosetting nature of these two materials severely limits the commercial viability of their manufacturing due to long curing times and high material costs. In this work, we introduce poly(styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene) (SEBS) thermoplastic elastomers as an alternative for the manufacture of mushroom shaped dry adhesives with both directional and nondirectional performance. These materials are attractive for their potential to be less contaminating via oligomer transfer than thermoset elastomers, as well as being more suited to mass manufacturing. Low material transfer properties are attractive for adhesives that could potentially be used in cleanroom environments for microscale assembly and handling in which device contamination is a serious concern. We characterized a thermoplastic elastomer in terms of oligomer transfer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and found that the SEBS transfers negligible amounts of its own oligomers, during contact with a gold-coated silicon surface, which may be representative of the metallic bond pads found in micro-electro-mechanical systems devices. We also demonstrate the fabrication of mushroom shaped isotropic and anisotropic adhesive fibers with two different SEBS elastomer grades using thermocompression molding and characterize the adhesives in terms of their shear-enhanced normal adhesion strength. The overall adhesion of one of the thermoplastic elastomer adhesives was found to be stronger or comparable to their polyurethane counterparts with identical dimensions.

  14. Method for Measuring the Distribution of Adhesion Forces on Continuous Nanoscale Protrusions Using Carbon Nanofiber Tip on a Scanning Probe Microscope Cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoi, Norihiro; Abe, Daisuke

    2015-07-01

    The adhesion force on surfaces has received attention in numerous scientific and technological fields, including catalysis, thin-film growth, and tribology. Many applications require knowledge of the strength of these forces as a function of position in three dimensions, but until now such information has only been theoretically proposed. Here, we demonstrate an approach based on scanning probe microscopy that can obtain such data and be used to image the three-dimensional surface force field of continuous nanoscale protrusions. We present adhesion force maps with nanometer and nanonewton resolution that allow detailed characterization of the interaction between a surface and a thin carbon nanofiber (CNF) rod synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at the end of a tip on a scanning probe microscope cantilever in three dimensions. In these maps, the positions of all continuous nanoscale protrusions are identified and the differences in the adhesive forces among limited areas at inequivalent sites are quantified.

  15. High-throughput DNA extraction of forensic adhesive tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Christina; Jansson, Linda; Ansell, Ricky; Hedman, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Tape-lifting has since its introduction in the early 2000's become a well-established sampling method in forensic DNA analysis. Sampling is quick and straightforward while the following DNA extraction is more challenging due to the "stickiness", rigidity and size of the tape. We have developed, validated and implemented a simple and efficient direct lysis DNA extraction protocol for adhesive tapes that requires limited manual labour. The method uses Chelex beads and is applied with SceneSafe FAST tape. This direct lysis protocol provided higher mean DNA yields than PrepFiler Express BTA on Automate Express, although the differences were not significant when using clothes worn in a controlled fashion as reference material (p=0.13 and p=0.34 for T-shirts and button-down shirts, respectively). Through in-house validation we show that the method is fit-for-purpose for application in casework, as it provides high DNA yields and amplifiability, as well as good reproducibility and DNA extract stability. After implementation in casework, the proportion of extracts with DNA concentrations above 0.01ng/μL increased from 71% to 76%. Apart from providing higher DNA yields compared with the previous method, the introduction of the developed direct lysis protocol also reduced the amount of manual labour by half and doubled the potential throughput for tapes at the laboratory. Generally, simplified manual protocols can serve as a cost-effective alternative to sophisticated automation solutions when the aim is to enable high-throughput DNA extraction of complex crime scene samples. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  17. Adhesion and cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  18. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  19. Silicone Adhesives for High Temperature Inflatable Fabrics and Polymer Films Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thin films, elastomeric materials, high temperature fabrics and adhesives that are capable of withstanding thermal extremes (-130oC to 500oC) are highly desirable...

  20. Preparation of Ultra-High-Speed Casein Trade Mark Adhesive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Zhi Wu; Yu-Jiao Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction In present trade mark adhesives for beer bottle labeling are mostly prepared based on starch[1] ,polyvinyl formal[2] and their derivants[3-5] ,but they can only be applied to the labeling speed of 20 000 bottle/h and their water proofness are not satisfactory, especially when the water temperature is 0℃ below. The application of metal foil requires that sealing and labeling must be finished at the same time, but different penetrating speed of water in metal foil and paper label causes different drying speed, and also, the labeling speed and need of iced beer are increasing now, so these changes result in more strict requirements for adhesive.In this paper the chelating casein adhesive was obtained with casein as main moldings, urea as dispersing agent, starch as auxiliary, and ZnSO4 as cross-linked agent. The effects of dispersing agent, cross-linked agent and starch on the performances of adhesive were investigated.

  1. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  2. The Regulation of Traction Force in Relation to Cell Shape and Focal Adhesions

    OpenAIRE

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-Li

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical forces provide critical inputs for proper cellular functions. The interplay between the generation of, and response to, mechanical forces regulate such cellular processes as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. We postulate that adherent cells respond to a number of physical and topographical factors, including cell size and shape, by detecting the magnitude and/or distribution of traction forces under different conditions. To address this possibility we introduce a new s...

  3. High Bonding Temperatures Greatly Improve Soy Adhesive Wet Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Frihart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soy wood adhesive bond strengths reported in different literature studies are difficult to compare because a variety of temperatures and other conditions have been used for the bonding and testing step. Some reports have indicated bond strengths are sensitive to bonding temperature, but the reason(s for this has not been intensively investigated. Although these prior studies differ in other ways (such as type of soy, wood species, and test method, the effect of bonding temperature has not been clearly examined, which is important for focusing commercial applications. A tensile shear test using two-parallel-ply veneer specimens with smooth maple was used to measure both the dry and wet cohesive strength of soy adhesives. Although the soy adhesives gave very good strengths and dry wood failure, they often have low wood failure and shear strengths under wet conditions when bonded at 120 °C. However, wet strength greatly increased as the bonding temperature increased (120, 150 and 180 °C for these two-ply tests with. This study examined the use of different types of soys (flours, concentrates and isolates and different bonding temperatures and bonding conditions to evacuate several possible mechanisms for this temperature sensitivity, with coalescence being the most likely.

  4. Continuous Plasma Treatment of Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) Fibres for Adhesion Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodoru, Steluta; Kusano, Yukihiro; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2009-01-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge in Ar, He, He/O2, N2 or O2 at atmospheric pressure was used for the continuous plasma treatment of UHMWPE fibres. The influence of the input power of the discharge and the gas flow rate on surface modification is studied with the aim of adhesion improvement. Surface...... characterization using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy shows a significant increase in polar functional groups and roughness at the surfaces after plasma treatment, indicating that adhesive properties can be improved....

  5. Applications of Traction Force Microscopy in Measuring Adhesion Molecule Dependent Cell Contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Cynthia Marie

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as controlled elastic modulus substrates for single cell traction force microscopy studies. The first section describes the use of EDC/NHS chemistry to convalently link microbeads to the hydrogel matrix for the purpose of performing long-term traction force studies (7 days). The final study…

  6. Determination of the surface free energy of crystalline and amorphous lactose by atomic force microscopy adhesion measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Ebbens, Stephen; Chen, Xinyong; Jin, Zheng; Luk, Shen; Madden, Claire; Patel, Nikin; Roberts, Clive J

    2006-02-01

    This study was conducted to accurately measure the dispersive surface free energy of lactose solids in ordered and disordered states. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the contact adhesion force between an AFM tip and lactose under low humidity (ca. 1% RH). The geometry of the tip contacting apex was characterized by scanning a porous aluminum film with ultrasharp spikes (radius 2-3 nm). A sphere vs. flat surface model was employed to relate the adhesion force determined to the surface energy based upon the Johnson-Kendal-Roberts theory. Spray-dried amorphous lactose in a compressed-disk form and single crystals of alpha-lactose monohydrate were prepared as model samples. The condition of the smooth sample surface and sphere-shaped tip used was shown to be appropriate to the application of the JKR model. The surface energy of crystalline [(0,-1,-1) face] and amorphous lactose was determined to be 23.3 +/- 2.3 and 57.4 +/- 7.9 mJ m(-2), respectively. We have demonstrated the capability of AFM to measure the dispersive surface free energy of pharmaceutical materials directly through a blank probe at the nanometer scale. These data, although consistent with results from more traditional methods, illustrate some unique attributes of this approach, namely, surface energies are directly derived from solid-solid interactions, measurements may be made on specific crystalline faces, and the potential exists to identify the submicron heterogeneity of organic solids in terms of their molecular energy states (such as ordered and disordered lactose).

  7. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service, phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Hale, J. N.; Dumars, W. G.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of 3 experimental polymers from NASA-Langley and a commercially produced polymer from Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals as high temperature structural adhesives is presented. A polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ), polyimide (STPI/LaRC-2), and a polyarylene ether (PAE-SO2) were evaluated as metal-to-metal adhesives. Lap shear, crack extension, and climbing drum peel specimens were fabricated from all three polymers and tested after thermal, combined thermal/humidity, and stressed hydraulic fluid (Skydrol) exposure. The fourth polymer, LARC-TPI was evaluated as an adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. All three experimental polymers performed well as metal-to-metal adhesives from 219 K (-65 F) to 505 K (450 F), including humidity exposure. Structural adhesive strength was also maintained at 505 K for a minimum of 3000 hours. LaRC-TPI was evaluated as a high temperature (505 K) adhesive for titanium honeycomb sandwich structure. The LaRC-TPI bonding process development concentrated on improving the honeycomb core-to-skin bond. The most promising approach of those evaluated combined a LaRC-TPI polymer solution with a semi-crystalline LaRC-TPI powder for adhesive film fabrication and fillet formation.

  8. High orientation Al films growth on LiNbO3 single crystal and its adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-mei; CHEN Jing-jing; PAN Feng

    2004-01-01

    High orientation Al films were deposited on 64°Y-XLiNbO3 substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the influence of deposition temperature on microstructure and adhesion properties of Al films were investigated. The results show that crystallographic orientation of films varies with substrate temperature and the adhesion strength between LiNbO3 and Al films strongly depends on crystallographic orientation of Al films. The (111) orientated Al films shows stronger adhesion strength to LiNbO3 substrate than (100) orientated films. There is an optimum substrate temperature of 60 ℃ and hardening temperature of 200 ℃ for obtaining high (111) orientated Al films with good surface structure and adhesion property. Using this Al film, we have successfully fabricated the SAW filters with high frequency of about 1.89 GHz.

  9. Underwater adhesion of abalone: The role of van der Waals and capillary forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, A.Y.M., E-mail: albertlin22@yahoo.com [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Brunner, R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Chen, P.Y. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Talke, F.E. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Meyers, M.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The observation of the pedal foot of the red abalone Haliotis rufescens reveals the presence of micrometer-scaled setae terminating in nanometer-sized cylindrical fibrils, with some resemblance to those found on the gecko foot. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) pull-off force measurements on a single seta are compared with theoretical estimates for van der Waals attraction obtained through the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) equation, approximately 600 nN, and show agreement. The use of the JKR equation is justified through an analysis of the shape of the fibril extremities (parabolic) as well as their diameter ({approx}200 nm). Measurements under varying humidity conditions indicate that additional capillary interactions play a role, since the pull-off force increases with humidity. It is proposed that both van der Waals and capillary forces play a role in the attachment mechanism of H. rufescens, effectively enabling suction to reach its theoretical limit. Bulk pull-off force measurements on entire live animals yield an average detachment stress of 115 kPa, consistent with theoretical estimates. The setae and nanoscale fibril terminations enable compliance to surfaces with a variety of roughnesses, effectively sealing the interface, in addition to providing capillary and van der Waals forces.

  10. Superhydrophobic, Biomimetic Surfaces with High and Low Adhesion, Optical Transmittance, and Nanoscale Mechanical Wear Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Daniel R.

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (defined as surfaces having water contact angle greater than 150°) show great promise for use in a rapidly growing number of engineering applications, ranging from biomedical devices to fluid drag reduction in pipelines. In nature, the surfaces of many organisms, such as certain plant leaves, are known to exhibit superhydrophobicity. In some cases, droplet adhesion is very low (droplet rolls away easily), while in other cases adhesion is high (droplet remains adhered when surface is inverted). The recent advent and development of microscopes with resolution down to a few nanometers (such as atomic force microscopes and scanning electron microscopes) has allowed for in-depth understanding of the micro- and nanoscale mechanisms employed by these plant leaves and other natural surfaces to achieve their particular wetting properties. Biomimetics (or "mimicking nature") is therefore a very promising approach for the development of engineering surfaces with desired wetting characteristics. However, research in creating biomimetic surfaces is still in its early stages, and many of the surfaces created thus far are not mechanically robust, which is required for many potential real-world applications. In addition, for applications such as self-cleaning windows and solar panels, optical transparency is required. In this thesis, a set of original studies are presented in which superhydrophobic surfaces were designed based on biomimetics and fabricated using a wide of variety of techniques. The surfaces were characterized with regard to wetting characteristics such as water contact angle and contact angle hysteresis, micro- and nanoscale mechanical durability, and in some cases optical transmittance. Theoretical wetting models served as guides both in the design and in the understanding of experimental results, especially in regard to different wetting regime and regime transition. This work provides important conclusions and valuable insight for

  11. Remote Robot Control With High Force-Feedback Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved scheme for force-reflecting hand control of remote robotic manipulator provides unprecedently high force-reflection gain, even when dissimilar master and slave arms used. Three feedback loops contained in remote robot control system exerting position-error-based force feedback and compliance control. Outputs of force and torque sensors on robot not used directly for force reflection, but for compliance control, while errors in position used to generate reflected forces.

  12. Multivariate Analysis of High Through-Put Adhesively Bonded Single Lap Joints: Experimental and Workflow Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    bondline thickness, surface preparation, presence of an overflow fillet, and adhesive type. Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science high... questionnaire results for adhesive fill and fillet quality ..........15 Table 3 Maximum strength and displacement at maximum load as a function of observed...Acknowledgments This research was supported in part by the US Army Education Outreach - Gains in the Education of Math and Science (GEMS) Program at

  13. Single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Jonne; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Gaub, Hermann E; Muller, Daniel J

    2008-06-01

    The controlled adhesion of cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix is crucial for tissue development and maintenance. Numerous assays have been developed to quantify cell adhesion. Among these, the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) has recently been established. This assay permits the adhesion of living cells to be studied in near-physiological conditions. This implementation of AFM allows unrivaled spatial and temporal control of cells, as well as highly quantitative force actuation and force measurement that is sufficiently sensitive to characterize the interaction of single molecules. Therefore, not only overall cell adhesion but also the properties of single adhesion-receptor-ligand interactions can be studied. Here we describe current implementations and applications of SCFS, as well as potential pitfalls, and outline how developments will provide insight into the forces, energetics and kinetics of cell-adhesion processes.

  14. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  15. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  16. Fabrication and characterization of hierarchical nanostructured smart adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungoo; Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-04-15

    The mechanics of fibrillar adhesive surfaces of biological systems such as a Lotus leaf and a gecko are widely studied due to their unique surface properties. The Lotus leaf is a model for superhydrophobic surfaces, self-cleaning properties, and low adhesion. Gecko feet have high adhesion due to the high micro/nanofibrillar hierarchical structures. A nanostructured surface may exhibit low adhesion or high adhesion depending upon fibrillar density, and it presents the possibility of realizing eco-friendly surface structures with desirable adhesion. The current research, for the first time uses a patterning technique to fabricate smart adhesion surfaces: single- and two-level hierarchical synthetic adhesive structure surfaces with various fibrillar densities and diameters that allows the observation of either the Lotus or gecko adhesion effects. Contact angles of the fabricated structured samples were measured to characterize their wettability, and contamination experiments were performed to study for self-cleaning ability. A conventional and a glass ball attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip were used to obtain the adhesive forces via force-distance curves to study scale effect. A further increase of the adhesive forces on the samples was achieved by applying an adhesive to the surfaces.

  17. Nano-materials for adhesive-free adsorbers for bakable extreme high vacuum cryopump surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutzman, Marcy; Jordan, Kevin; Whitney, Roy R.

    2016-10-11

    A cryosorber panel having nanomaterials used for the cryosorption material, with nanomaterial either grown directly on the cryopanel or freestanding nanomaterials attached to the cryopanel mechanically without the use of adhesives. Such nanomaterial cryosorber materials can be used in place of conventional charcoals that are attached to cryosorber panels with special low outgassing, low temperature capable adhesives. Carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials could serve the same purpose as conventional charcoal cryosorbers, providing a large surface area for cryosorption without the need for adhesive since the nanomaterials can be grown directly on a metallic substrate or mechanically attached. The nanomaterials would be capable of being fully baked by heating above 100.degree. C., thereby eliminating water vapor from the system, eliminating adhesives from the system, and allowing a full bake of the system to reduce hydrogen outgassing, with the goal of obtaining extreme high vacuum where the pump can produce pressures below 1.times.10.sup.-12 Torr.

  18. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Nievergelt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples.

  19. System integration and demonstration of adhesive bonded high temperature aluminum alloys for aerospace structure, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Anthony; Laakso, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive bonding materials and processes were evaluated for assembly of future high-temperature aluminum alloy structural components such as may be used in high-speed civil transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. A number of candidate high-temperature adhesives were selected and screening tests were conducted using single lap shear specimens. The selected adhesives were then used to bond sandwich (titanium core) test specimens, adhesive toughness test specimens, and isothermally aged lap shear specimens. Moderate-to-high lap shear strengths were obtained from bonded high-temperature aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced (SiC(sub p)) aluminum specimens. Shear strengths typically exceeded 3500 to 4000 lb/in(sup 2) and flatwise tensile strengths exceeded 750 lb/in(sup 2) even at elevated temperatures (300 F) using a bismaleimide adhesive. All faceskin-to-core bonds displayed excellent tear strength. The existing production phosphoric acid anodize surface preparation process developed at Boeing was used, and gave good performance with all of the aluminum and silicon carbide particulate-reinforced aluminum alloys investigated. The results of this program support using bonded assemblies of high-temperature aluminum components in applications where bonding is often used (e.g., secondary structures and tear stoppers).

  20. Study on adhesively-bonded surface of tapered double cantilever specimen made of aluminum foam affected with shear force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洪鹏; CHO Jae-ung

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum foam is widely used in diverse areas to minimize the weight and maximize the absorption of shock energy in lightweight structures and various bio-materials. It presents a number of advantages, such as low density, incombustibility, non-rigidity, excellent energy absorptivity, sound absorptivity and low heat conductivity. The aluminum foam with an air cell structure was placed under the TDCB Mode II tensile load by using Landmark equipment manufactured by MTS to examine the shear failure behavior. The angle of the tapered adhesively-bonded surfaces of specimens was designated as a variable, and three models were developed with the inclined angles differing from one another at 6°, 8° and 10°. The specimens with the inclined angles of 6°, 8° and 10° have the maximum reaction forces of 168 N, 194 N when the forced displacements are 6, 5 and 4.2 mm respectively. There are three specimens with the inclined angles of 10°, 8° and 6° in the order of maximum reaction force. As the analysis result, the maximum equivalent stresses of 0.813 MPa and 0.895 MPa happened when the forced displacements of 6 mm and 5 mm proceeded at the models of 6° and 8°, respectively. A simulation was carried out on the basis of finite element method and the experimental design. The results of the experiment and the simulation analysis are shown not different from each other significantly. Thus, only a simulation could be confirmed to be performed in substitution of an experiment, which is costly and time-consuming in order to determine the shearing properties of materials made of aluminum foam with artificial data.

  1. Protein high-force pulling simulations yield low-force results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Lichter

    Full Text Available All-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are used to pull with extremely large constant force (750-3000 pN on three small proteins. The introduction of a nondimensional timescale permits direct comparison of unfolding across all forces. A crossover force of approximately 1100 pN divides unfolding dynamics into two regimes. At higher forces, residues sequentially unfold from the pulling end while maintaining the remainder of the protein force-free. Measurements of hydrodynamic viscous stresses are made easy by the high speeds of unfolding. Using an exact low-Reynolds-number scaling, these measurements can be extrapolated to provide, for the first time, an estimate of the hydrodynamic force on low-force unfolding. Below 1100 pN, but surprisingly still at extremely large applied force, intermediate states and cooperative unfoldings as seen at much lower forces are observed. The force-insensitive persistence of these structures indicates that decomposition into unfolded fragments requires a large fluctuation. This finding suggests how proteins are constructed to resist transient high force. The progression of [Formula: see text] helix and [Formula: see text] sheet unfolding is also found to be insensitive to force. The force-insensitivity of key aspects of unfolding opens the possibility that numerical simulations can be accelerated by high applied force while still maintaining critical features of unfolding.

  2. High adhesion of tumor cells to mesothelial monolayers derived from peritoneal wash of disseminated gastrointestinal cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Ranieri

    Full Text Available The role of the mesothelial layer in the peritoneal spreading of cancer cells is only partially clarified. Here we attempted to better define the mesothelial contribution to the tumor cell adhesion using a direct adhesion test applied to human primary cultures of mesothelial cells (HPMCs derived from the peritoneal washes of patients with gastric and colorectal cancers. Gastric and colon carcinoma cells were seeded on different mesothelial monolayers and quantitative fluorescence analysis was performed to analyze their growth and adhesive properties. The adhesion of the cancer cells was not affected by the origin of the HPMCs when derived from patients with different cancers or with benign disease. In contrast, the high levels of ICAM1 expression and ROS production, which characterize these senescent mesothelial cells, enhanced the tumor cell adhesion. These results suggest that the mesothelial adhesive properties are dependent on the cell senescence, while are not affected by the tumor environment. The use of peritoneal washes as a source to isolate HPMCs provides a practical and reliable tool for the in vitro analysis of the mesothelial conditions affecting the peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  3. A Cold Adhesion for Self-fused Alloy Coat by High Frequency Induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zeng-zhi; AI Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a method to prepare self-fused alloy coat, which started with a cold adhesion precoating and then induction fusing plus, is presented. It also intended to analyze the mechanism, microstructure and anitwear ability of the coat. The workpiece was precoated with Ni60 powder through an adhesion agent. The oven-dried precoat was then heated by a high frequency induction generated by 100kw power with a frequency of 250kHz. The technological parameters of the method were determined through analysis of the thermal magnetism, thermal resistivity and anti-induction mechanism. By comparing the microstrucrures and properties of the coat produced by cold adhesion, thermal spraying and laser refusing, it is concluded that: (1) One side of the workpiece should be preheated to 200℃ before induction fusion, and the range of induction frequency should be 200~250kHz. (2) The microstrucrure of the coat by cold adhesion is superior to that by thermal spraying, but the particle size range should be 0.047~0.044mm (200~320 meshes) (3) The corrosion resistance of Ni60 coat by cold adhesion is better than that by thermal spraying, and the cold adhesion is the best method to prepare the antiwear coat.

  4. A Cold Adhesion for Self-fused Alloy Coat by High Frequency Induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZeng-zhi; AIBo

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a method to prepare self-fused alloy coat, which started with a cold adhesion precoating and then induction fusing plus, is presented. It also intended to analyze the mechanism, microstnlcture and anitwear ability of the coat. The workpiece was precoated with Ni60 powder through an adhesion agent. The oven-dried precoat was then heated by a high frequency induction generated by 100kw power with a frequency of 250kHz. The technological parameters of the method were determined through analysis of tbe thermal magnetism, thermal resislivity, and anti-induction mechanism. By comparing the microsLrUclures and properties of the coat produced by cold adhesion, thermal spraying and laser refusing, it is concluded that: (1) One side of the workpiece should be preheated to 200℃ before induction fusion, and the range of induction frequency should be 200-250kHz. (2) The microstructure of the coat by cold adhesion is superior to that by themal spraying, but the particle size range should be 0.047-0.044mm (200-320 meshes) (3) The corrosion resistance of Ni60 coat by cold adhesion is better than that by thermal spraying, and the cold adhesion is the best method to prepare the antiwear coat.

  5. Cleaning properties of dry adhesives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; P.; DíAZ; TéLLEZ; D.; SAMEOTO; C.; MENON

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study into the cleaning properties of synthetic dry adhesives. We have manufactured the adhesive micro-fibres through a low-cost, high yield fabrication method using Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the structural material. We deliberately contaminated the adhesive samples with different sized particles in the micro and macro scales and tested different cleaning methods for their efficacy with respect to each particle size. We investigated different cleaning methods, which included the use of wax moulding, vibration and pressure sensitive adhesives. For adhesion testing we used a custom system with a linear stage and a force sensor indenting a hemispherical probe into the adhesive surface and measuring the pull-off force. To characterize the cleaning efficacy we visually inspected each sample in a microscope and weighed the samples with a microgram-accuracy analytical balance. Results showed that the moulding method induced adhesion recovery in a greater percentage than the other cleaning methods and even helped with the recovery of collapsed posts in some cases. On the other hand pressure sensitive adhesives seem to have the upper hand with regards to certain particle sizes that can potentially pose problems with the moulding method.

  6. Control of adhesion force between ceria particles and polishing pad in shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical planarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jihoon; Moon, Jinok; Bae, Jae-Young; Yoon, Kwang Seob; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-06-01

    The adhesion force between ceria and polyurethane (PU) pad was controlled to remove the step height from cell region to peripheral region during Shallow Trench Isolation Chemical Mechanical Planarization (STI-CMP) for NAND flash. Picolinic acid was found to be adsorbed on ceria particles at pH 4.5 following a Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorbed amount of 0.36 mg/m2. The ceria suspension with full surface coverage of picolinic acid showed a threefold increase in the number of adhered ceria particles on the PU pad over non-coated ceria particles. It was shown that the coverage percent of picolinic acid on ceria corresponds well with the amount percent of adsorbed ceria on PU pad. The change in adsorbed particles was directly reflected in the CMP polishing process where significant improvements were achieved. Particularly, convex areas on the chip experienced higher friction force from the attached abrasives on the PU pad than concave areas. As a result, the convex areas have increased removal rate of step height compared to the ceria suspension without picolinic acid. The changing profiles of convex areas are reported during the step height reduction as a function of polishing time.

  7. 纳米接触过程中黏着规律的变化%Variation of adhesive force in the nanoscale contact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段芳莉; 王光建; 仇和兵

    2012-01-01

    Intermolecular attractive forces lead to the adhesion problem in M/NEMS. The Van der Waals formula for the interaction between macroscopic objects can be used only in the situation with no deformation. As to the adhesive contact between elastic bodies it is still unknown how the attractive force contributes to the normal force on the interface. In this paper large-scale molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the adhesive contact between a rigid spherical tip and an elastic fiat substrate. We study the effect of atomic-scale surface roughness on the adhesive properties, including pull-off force between tips and substrate, the variation of adhesive force with applied load, and the distribution of contact stress. The results show that the adhesive force varies linearly with the applied load for the atomic-scale smooth contact. But for the atomic-scale rough contact the variation of adhesive force with applied load can be divided into two phases, which are distinguished by different increasing slops. Compared with the smooth contact, the rough contact has a small pull-off force, but exhibits a large adhesive force during the contacting process. Our simulations indicate that the pull-off force cannot characterize the contribution of attractive interaction to the normal force on the interface in the case of an elastic adhesion contacting.%本文应用大规模分子动力学方法,模拟了两种具有不同粗糙形貌的、刚性球形探头与弹性平面基体之间的纳米尺度接触,计算了探头与基体之间的拉离力和黏着功,研究了接触过程中界面黏着力随载荷的变化规律,分析了接触界面原子的法向应力分布.研究发现,原子级光滑接触的黏着力随着载荷的增大而线性增大,而原子级粗糙接触的黏着力-载荷曲线分为以不同斜率增长的两个阶段.相比于原子级光滑探头,原子级粗糙探头与基体之间具有较小的拉离力和黏着功,却在接触过程中形成

  8. Supercritical CO2 assisted electroless plating on polypropylene substrate-effect of injection speed on adhesive force of metal to polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Masahiro; Tsubouchi, Kensuke; Ishihara, Shota; Hikima, Yuta; Tengsuwan, Siwach

    2016-03-01

    The aqueous plating solution cannot be diffused into a plain polypropylene (PP) substrate and consequently Ni-P metal layer cannot be formed by electroless plating on the PP substrate with a satisfied degree of adhesive force unless the hydrophilicity of the substrate surface was increased. A block copolymer PP-b-polyethylene oxide (PP-b-PEO) was used to increase the hydrophilicity of the surface and the adhesive force of the metal layer to the satisfactory level. Our previous study showed the morphology of PP-b-PEO domain near the surface of substrate strongly affected the adhesiveness of the metal layer to the substrate. The degrees of elongation and orientation of the PP-b-PEO domains in PP matrix were the key factors of determining the thickness of the metal-PP composite layer and the resulting adhesive strength. In this study, the effect of injection molding condition on the degrees of elongation and orientation was investigated: PP/PP-b-PEO blend substrates were prepared by injection molding at different injection speed. The higher injection speed increased the degrees of elongation and orientation of copolymer and formed multilayered structure of the copolymer domains. It could produce the electroless plating PP substrate with the higher adhesive strength of the Ni-P metal layer to the PP substrate.

  9. Sodium Hypochlorite as Fluorotic Dentin Pretreatment of Two-Step Self-Etch Adhesive with Silver Nanoparticle: Atomic Force Microscope and Adhesive Microtensile Bond Strength Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Josefina Monjarás-Ávila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with commercial sodium hypochlorite, 5.25%, with a self-etch adhesive (Optibond Versa in its original formula and with the incorporation of silver nanoparticles (NaAg on fluorotic dentin. 240 human molars were classified according to fluorosis severity with Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI and subdivided into three study subgroups according to the adhesive technique: (1 self-etch (SE control subgroup; (2 NaOCl/SE subgroup; (3 NaOCl/SE + NaAg subgroup. The nanostructural characteristics were observed by AFM, μTBS was tested, and hybrid layer formation was observed by SEM. One-way analyses of variance (ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests were used. No statistically significant differences were found in roughness values in any of the subgroups and subgroups studied. Remnants of smear layer were detected in areas devoid of resin tags in SEM images of samples bonded with subgroup 2, in contrast to subgroup 3. No statistically significant difference between any of the results was found in μTBS and a greater number of adhesive failures were observed. The results show that the pretreatment technique of 5.25% NaOCl and the incorporation of NaAg to the self-adhesive system do not produce a surface more adequate for a better adhesion.

  10. Room Temperature Characteristics of Polymer-Based Low Ice Adhesion Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Vågenes, Elisabeth T.; Delabahan, Chrisrosemarie; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2017-02-01

    Ice adhesion is mainly dictated by surface properties, and water wettability is frequently correlated with ice adhesion strength. However, these established correlations are limited to high ice adhesion and become invalid when the ice adhesion strength is low. Here we carried out an experimental study to explore the relationships between low ice adhesion strength and room temperature surface properties. A variety of room temperature properties of 22 polymer-based hydrophilic and hydrophobic samples consisting of both low and high ice adhesion surfaces were analysed. The properties investigated include water adhesion force, water wettability, roughness, elastic modulus and hardness. Our results show that low ice adhesion strength does not correlate well with water contact angle and its variants, surface roughness and hardness. Low elastic modulus does not guarantee low ice adhesion, however, surfaces with low ice adhesion always show low elastic modulus. Low ice adhesion (below 60 kPa) of tested surfaces may be determinative of small water adhesion force (from 180 to 270 μN). Therefore, measurement of water adhesion force may provide an effective strategy for screening anti-icing or icephobic surfaces, and surfaces within specific values of water adhesion force will possibly lead to a low ice adhesion.

  11. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  12. High-Multipolar Effects on Dispersive Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Noguez, C; Esquivel-Sirvent, R; Villarreal, C; Noguez, Cecilia; Roman-Velazquez, Carlos E.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the dispersive force between a spherical nanoparticle (with a radius $\\le$ 100 nm) and a substrate is enhanced by several orders of magnitude when the sphere is near to the substrate. We calculate exactly the dispersive force in the non-retarded limit by incorporating the contributions to the interaction from of all the multipolar electromagnetic modes. We show that as the sphere approaches the substrate, the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, induced by the vacuum and the presence of the substrate, the dispersive force is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We discuss this effect as a function of the size of the sphere.

  13. Comparison of bacterial adhesion to dental materials of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jie; Wang, Chuanyong; Li, Yifei; Zhao, Zhihe; Mei, Li

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bacterial adhesion to denture materials of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The adhesion forces of living Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans to PET and PMMA were directly measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid. Streptococcal biofilms formed on the two material surfaces were investigated and compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and colony-forming units (CFU) counting. Surface roughness and hydrophobicity of PET and PMMA were also measured. The results showed that PET surfaces were significantly smoother and more hydrophilic than PMMA surfaces both with and without a salivary film (p SCANNING 38:665-670, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bioinspired, Highly Stretchable, and Conductive Dry Adhesives Based on 1D-2D Hybrid Carbon Nanocomposites for All-in-One ECG Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Junyong; Sohn, Jongmoo; Cho, Donghwi; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-04-26

    Here we propose a concept of conductive dry adhesives (CDA) combining a gecko-inspired hierarchical structure and an elastomeric carbon nanocomposite. To complement the poor electrical percolation of 1D carbon nanotube (CNT) networks in an elastomeric matrix at a low filler content (∼1 wt %), a higher dimensional carbon material (i.e., carbon black, nanographite, and graphene nanopowder) is added into the mixture as an aid filler. The co-doped graphene and CNT in the composite show the lowest volume resistance (∼100 ohm·cm) at an optimized filler ratio (1:9, total filler content: 1 wt %) through a synergetic effect in electrical percolation. With an optimized conductive elastomer, gecko-inspired high-aspect-ratio (>3) microstructures over a large area (∼4 in.(2)) are successfully replicated from intaglio-patterned molds without collapse. The resultant CDA pad shows a high normal adhesion force (∼1.3 N/cm(2)) even on rough human skin and an excellent cycling property for repeatable use over 30 times without degradation of adhesion force, which cannot be achieved by commercial wet adhesives. The body-attachable CDA can be used as a metal-free, all-in-one component for measuring biosignals under daily activity conditions (i.e., underwater, movements) because of its superior conformality and water-repellent characteristic.

  15. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C; Scheie, Anne A; van der Mei, Henny C

    2007-04-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant IB03987 was nearly unable to adhere to laminin films under flow conditions due to a lack of specific interactions (0.8 x 10(6) and 1.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) compared with parent strain LT11 (21.8 x 10(6) and 26.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2)). The adhesion of both the parent and mutant strains was slightly greater at pH 6.8 than at pH 5.8. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the parent strain experienced less repulsion when it approached a laminin film than the mutant experienced. Upon retraction, combined specific and nonspecific adhesion forces were stronger for the parent strain (up to -5.0 and -4.9 nN at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) than for the mutant (up to -1.5 and -2.1 nN), which was able to interact only through nonspecific interactions. Enthalpy was released upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of the parent strain but not upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of IB03987. A comparison of the adhesion forces in AFM with the adhesion forces reported for specific ligand-receptor complexes resulted in the conclusion that the number of antigen I/II binding sites for laminin on S. mutans LT11 is on the order of 6 x 10(4) sites per organism and that the sites are probably arranged along exterior surface structures, as visualized here by immunoelectron microscopy.

  16. Detection of HEMA in self-etching adhesive systems with high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Hameršak, Z.; Stipetić, I.; Matosevic, D.; Negovetić-Mandić, V.; Prskalo, K.

    2009-04-01

    One of the factors that can decrease hydrolytic stability of self-etching adhesive systems (SEAS) is 2-hydroxymethylmethacrylate (HEMA). Due to hydrolytic instability of acidic methacrylate monomers in SEAS, HEMA can be present even if the manufacturer did not include it in original composition. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of HEMA because of decomposition by hydrolysis of methacrylates during storage, resulting with loss of adhesion strength to hard dental tissues of the tooth crown. Three most commonly used SEAS were tested: AdheSE ONE, G-Bond and iBond under different storage conditions. High performance liquid chromatography analysis was performed on a Nucleosil C 18-100 5 μm (250 × 4.6 mm) column, Knauer K-501 pumps and Wellchrom DAD K-2700 detector at 215 nm. Data were collected and processed by EuroCrom 2000 HPLC software. Calibration curves were made related eluted peak area to known concentrations of HEMA (purchased from Fluka). The elution time for HEMA is 12.25 min at flow rate 1.0 ml/min. Obtained results indicate that no HEMA was present in AdheSE ONE because methacrylates are substituted with methacrylamides that seem to be more stable under acidic aqueous conditions. In all other adhesive systems HEMA was detected.

  17. Design and fabrication of polymer based dry adhesives inspired by the gecko adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kejia

    There has been significant interest in developing dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which offers several advantages compared to conventional pressure sensitive adhesives. Specifically, gecko adhesive pads have anisotropic adhesion properties: the adhesive pads (spatulae) stick strongly when sheared in one direction but are non-adherent when sheared in the opposite direction. This anisotropy property is attributed to the complex topography of the array of fine tilted and curved columnar structures (setae) that bear the spatulae. In this thesis, easy, scalable methods, relying on conventional and unconventional techniques are presented to incorporate tilt in the fabrication of synthetic polymer-based dry adhesives mimicking the gecko adhesive system, which provide anisotropic adhesion properties. In the first part of the study, the anisotropic adhesion and friction properties of samples with various tilt angles to test the validity of a nanoscale tape-peeling model of spatular function are measured. Consistent with the Peel Zone model, samples with lower tilt angles yielded larger adhesion forces. Contact mechanics of the synthetic array were highly anisotropic, consistent with the frictional adhesion model and gecko-like. Based on the original design, a new design of gecko-like dry adhesives was developed which showed superior tribological properties and furthermore showed anisotropic adhesive properties without the need for tilt in the structures. These adhesives can be used to reversibly suspend weights from vertical surfaces (e.g., walls) and, for the first time to our knowledge, horizontal surfaces (e.g., ceilings) by simultaneously and judiciously activating anisotropic friction and adhesion forces. Furthermore, adhesion properties between artificial gecko-inspired dry adhesives and rough substrates with varying roughness are studied. The results suggest that both adhesion and friction forces on a rough substrate depends significantly on the

  18. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (μ‧) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30 000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10 000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10 000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of μ‧, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  19. Progress in Micro-particle Adhesion Force Measurement Techniques%微颗粒黏附力测试技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟剑; 吴超

    2012-01-01

    为了解微颗粒黏附力测试技术的研究进展,以Particle、Adhesion、Measurement为主题词,在Ei Compendex,Ei Inspec 和Elsevier Science数据库中检索了2001-2010年收录的文献,共检索出150余篇有关微颗粒黏附力测试技术的文献.根据这些文献的发表时间、作者所属的国家和所研究的测试技术进行了统计分析.对各种微颗粒黏附力测试技术(AFM分离技术、微机械分离技术、离心分离技术、静电场分离技术、振动分离技术和激光分离技术)进行了分析和优缺点比较,并展望了该领域发展的前沿方向.%The adhesion and removal of micro-particles are very important for the quality control of many industrial processes. They are also directly related to the environmental pollution and occupational health. The study on micro-particle adhesion force measurement techniques is helpful to control micro-particles adhesion pollution and remove micro-particles on the surface. In order to understand the progress in the micro-particle adhesion force measurement techniques, the studies on this area are reviewed. Based on the databases (Ei Compendex, Ei Inspec, and Elsevier Science), three subject words (Particle, Adhesion, and Measurement) are used and about 150 papers in the area published in the years from 2001 to 2010 are found from the search results. The statistics analysis on the publication time, authors' countries, and topics of measurement techniques is conducted. Various micro-particle adhesion force measurement techniques including the AFM detachment technique, the micromechanical detachment technique, the centrifugal detachment technique, the electrostatic detachment technique, the vibration detachment technique, and the laser detachment technique are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of those micro-particle adhesion force measurement techniques are compared with each other. In the end, the development directions on this field are pointed out.

  20. Durability of polyimide adhesives and their bonded joints for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatareddy, Hari

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and develop an understanding of durability of an adhesive bonded system, for application in a future high speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft structure. The system under study was comprised of Ti-6Al-4V metal adherends and a thermosetting polyimide adhesive, designated as FM-5, supplied by Cytec Engineered Materials, Inc. An approach based on fracture mechanics was employed to assess Ti-6Al-4V/FM-5 bond durability. Initially, wedge tests were utilized to find a durable surface pretreatment for the titanium adherends. Based on an extensive screening study, chromic acid anodization (CAA) was chosen as the standard pretreatment for this research project. Double cantilever beam specimens (DCB) were then made and aged at 150sp°C, 177sp°C, and 204sp°C in three different environments; ambient atmospheric air (14.7 psia), and reduced air pressures of 2 psia (13.8 KPa) and 0.2 psia (1.38 KPa). Joints were aged for up to 18 months (including several intermediate aging times) in the above environments. The strain energy release rate (G) of the adhesive joints was monitored as a function of exposure time in the different environments. A 40% drop in fracture toughness was noted over the 18 month period, with the greatest degradation observed in samples aged at 204sp°C in ambient atmospheric air pressure. The loss in adhesive bond performance with time was attributable to a combination of physical and chemical aging phenomena in the FM-5 resin, and possible degradation of the metal-adhesive interface(s). Several mechanical and material tests, performed on the bonded joints and neat FM-5 resin specimens, confirmed the above statement. It was also noted that physical aging could be "erased" by thermal rejuvenation, partially restoring the toughness of the FM-5 adhesive material. The FM-5 adhesive material displayed good chemical resistance towards organic solvents and other aircraft fluids such as jet fuel and hydraulic fluid. The

  1. Highly compliant shape memory polymer gels for tunable damping and reversible adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Randy A.; Berg, Michael C.; Gold, Christopher S.; Leighliter, Brad; Morton, Jeffrey T.; Lenhart, Joseph L.

    2016-02-01

    Materials that can dynamically change their properties to better adapt to the local environment have potential utility in robotics, aerospace, and coatings. For some of these applications, most notably robotics, it is advantageous for these responsive materials to be highly compliant in an effort to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and mechanical damping within a broad temperature operational environment. In this report, non-aqueous, highly compliant shape-memory polymer gels are developed by incorporating a low density of chemical cross-links into a physically cross-linked thermoplastic elastomer gel. Chemical cross-linkers were evaluated by varying there size and degree of functionality to determine the impact on the mechanical and adhesive properties. As a result of the chemical cross-linking, the gels exhibit modulus plateaus around room temperature and at elevated temperatures above 100 °C, where the thermoplastic elastomer gel typically melts. The materials were designed so that moduli in the plateaued regions were above and below the Dahlquist criteria of 4 × 104 Pa, respectively, where materials with a modulus below this value typically exhibit an increase in adhesion. The shape memory polymer gels were also integrated into fiber-reinforced composites to determine the temperature-dependent changes in mechanical damping. It is anticipated that this work will provide insight into materials design to provide dynamic changes in adhesion and damping to improve robotic appendage manipulation and platform mobility.

  2. INFLUENCE OF HIGH-STRENGTH REINFORCEMENT WITHOUT ADHESION TO CONCRETE ON STRENGTH OF CAST-IN-SITU BEAMLESS FLOORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipenko Yuri Grigoryevich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence and location of prestressed high-strength reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a beamless floor panel is considered. The work is aimed at clarifying the methodology for calculating the strength of cast-in-situ beamless floor with mixed reinforcement, where reinforcement is used in a plastic shell of monostrend type without adhesion to concrete for the most complete use of the strength characteristics of the panel material. The aim of the study is to determine the level of influence and location of prestressed reinforcement without adhesion to concrete on the strength of a panel of cast-in-situ beamless floor, as well as comparison of the results obtained for the stresses of ropes in panels with contour and diagonal arrangement of prestressed reinforcement. The shape of the rope position is represented by a part of the parabola passing through the points of the rope support. On the support, the vertical and horizontal components of the reaction are determined by the longitudinal force in the rope and the exit angle of the guy rope. 9х9m cast-in-situ beamless floor panels in two variants were investigated: with diagonal and contour stressing steel. The values of increment in stresses in the ropes and the resulting values at various prestress and deflection levels, presented in the form of tables and graphs, have been calculated. According to the results of the study, the use of high-strength prestressed ropes without adhesion to concrete, as an additional working reinforcement, reduces deflections of the panels and lowers consumption of common reinforcement. The results indicate a relative decrease in efficiency of using rope strength along with an increase in the initial prestress level. From the point of ensuring load-bearing capacity, the contour positioning of ropes is preferable, due to more complete use of strength of high-tensile reinforcement. To meet the requirements of ultimate limit states, the

  3. Heterogeneous response of traction force at focal adhesions of vascular smooth muscle cells subjected to macroscopic stretch on a micropillar substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Adachi, Akifumi; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2011-10-13

    Traction force generated at focal adhesions (FAs) of cells plays an essential role in regulating cellular functions. However, little is known about how the traction force at each FA changes during cell stretching. Here we investigated dynamic changes in traction force at FAs during macroscopic stretching of porcine aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on elastic micropillar substrates. SMCs were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based substrates with a micropillar array, and stretched approximately in the direction of their major axis and then released by stretching and relaxing the substrates. This stretch-release cycle was repeated twice with cell strain rates of 0.3%/15s up to a 3% strain, and the deflection of the PDMS micropillars was measured simultaneously to obtain the traction force at each FA F, total force in the cell's major axis direction F(all), and whole-cell strain ε(cell). Traction forces of SMCs during stretching varied widely with location: their changes at some pillars synchronized well with the applied strain ε(cell), but others did not synchronized. Whole-cell stiffness estimated as the slope of the loading limb of the F(all)-ε(cell) curves was ∼10nN/%, which was the same order of magnitude of the reported stiffness of cultured SMCs obtained in a tensile test. Interestingly, F(all) at a zero-strain state (pretension at the whole-cell level) actively increased in some cells following the loading/unloading process, as did whole-cell stiffness. Such a change did not occur in cultured SMCs in the tensile test in which cells were held with a pair of micropipettes coated with nonspecific adhesive. These results indicate that SMCs showed a myogenic response when stretched through their multiple FAs, but not through nonspecific adhesions on their membrane. SMCs may behave differently depending on the sites through which they are stretched. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Temperature Structures, Adhesives, and Advanced Thermal Protection Materials for Next-Generation Aeroshell Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy J.; Congdon, William M.; Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Whitley, Karen S.

    2005-01-01

    The next generation of planetary exploration vehicles will rely heavily on robust aero-assist technologies, especially those that include aerocapture. This paper provides an overview of an ongoing development program, led by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and aimed at introducing high-temperature structures, adhesives, and advanced thermal protection system (TPS) materials into the aeroshell design process. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate TPS materials that can withstand the higher heating rates of NASA's next generation planetary missions, and to validate high-temperature structures and adhesives that can reduce required TPS thickness and total aeroshell mass, thus allowing for larger science payloads. The effort described consists of parallel work in several advanced aeroshell technology areas. The areas of work include high-temperature adhesives, high-temperature composite materials, advanced ablator (TPS) materials, sub-scale demonstration test articles, and aeroshell modeling and analysis. The status of screening test results for a broad selection of available higher-temperature adhesives is presented. It appears that at least one (and perhaps a few) adhesives have working temperatures ranging from 315-400 C (600-750 F), and are suitable for TPS-to-structure bondline temperatures that are significantly above the traditional allowable of 250 C (482 F). The status of mechanical testing of advanced high-temperature composite materials is also summarized. To date, these tests indicate the potential for good material performance at temperatures of at least 600 F. Application of these materials and adhesives to aeroshell systems that incorporate advanced TPS materials may reduce aeroshell TPS mass by 15% - 30%. A brief outline is given of work scheduled for completion in 2006 that will include fabrication and testing of large panels and subscale aeroshell test articles at the Solar-Tower Test Facility located at Kirtland AFB and operated by Sandia

  5. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  6. Propofol protects against high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Minmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia could induce oxidative stress, activate transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, up-regulate expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, and lead to endothelial injury. Studies have indicated that propofol could attenuate oxidative stress and suppress NF-κB activation in some situations. In the present study, we examined whether and how propofol improved high glucose-induced up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods Protein expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, NF-κB, inhibitory subunit of NF-κBα (IκBα, protein kinase Cβ2 (PKCβ2, and phosphorylation of PKCβ2 (Ser660 were measured by Western blot. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. PKC activity was measured with SignaTECT PKC assay system. Superoxide anion (O2.- accumulation was measured with the reduction of ferricytochrome c assay. Human peripheral mononuclear cells were prepared with Histopaque-1077 solution. Results High glucose induced the expression of endothelial selectin (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, and increased mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. High glucose induced O2.- accumulation, PKCβ2 phosphorylation and PKC activation. Further, high glucose decreased IκBα expression in cytoplasm, increased the translocation of NF-κB from cytoplasm to nuclear, and induced NF-κB activation. Importantly, we found these high glucose-mediated effects were attenuated by propofol pretreatment. Moreover, CGP53353, a selective PKCβ2 inhibitor, decreased high glucose-induced NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules expression, and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Conclusion Propofol, via decreasing O2.- accumulation, down-regulating PKCβ2 Ser660 phosphorylation and PKC as well as NF-κB activity, attenuated high glucose-induced endothelial adhesion molecules expression

  7. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Bacterial Adhesion on Tooth Enamel Irradiated With High Intensity Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Ruchele D; Silva, Camilla B; Lepri, Cesar P; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius R

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on enamel irradiated with high intensity lasers, associated or not to a fluoride varnish. Eighty fragments of bovine enamel were equally divided in 8 groups (n=10). Group 1 was not treated and Group 2 received only a 5% fluoride varnish application. The other groups were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG (8.92 J/cm2), an Nd:YAG (84.9 J/cm2) and a diode laser (199.04 J/cm2), associated or not to a 5% fluoride varnish. The surface roughness was measured before and after treatments. Afterward, all samples were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans at 37 °C for 24 h. The colony-forming units (CFU) were counted by a stereoscope and the results were expressed in CFU/mm2. One-way ANOVA and the Tukey´s test compared the roughness data and the Student´s test compared the results obtained in the bacterial adhesion test (a=5%). The results showed that the irradiated samples without varnish presented the same roughness and the same bacterial adhesion that the non-irradiated samples. However, samples irradiated in the presence of fluoride varnish showed higher surface roughness and higher bacterial adhesion than the non-irradiated samples and those irradiated without varnish. Presence of pigments in the varnish increased the lasers' action on the enamel surface, which produced ablation in this hard tissue and significantly increased its surface roughness. For this reason, the enamel's susceptibility to bacterial adhesion was higher when the irradiation of the samples was made in presence of fluoride varnish.

  8. High refractive index silicone gels for simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence and traction force microscopy of adherent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Substrate rigidity profoundly impacts cellular behaviors such as migration, gene expression, and cell fate. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF microscopy enables selective visualization of the dynamics of substrate adhesions, vesicle trafficking, and biochemical signaling at the cell-substrate interface. Here we apply high-refractive-index silicone gels to perform TIRF microscopy on substrates with a wide range of physiological elastic moduli and simultaneously measure traction forces exerted by cells on the substrate.

  9. A room temperature cured low dielectric hyperbranched epoxy adhesive with high mechanical strength

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bibekananda De; Niranjan Karak

    2014-05-01

    A low dielectric constant hyperbranched epoxy thermoset with excellent adhesive and mechanical strength is the demand for advanced electronics and engineering applications. The present investigation provided a room temperature, curable hyperbranched epoxy, obtained by an A2 + B3 polycondensation reaction. The synthesized hyperbranched epoxy was cured by a combined hardener system consisting of a commercial poly(amido-amine) and a first generation aliphatic poly(amido-amine) dendrimer (PAD) prepared by Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and aliphatic amines. The thermoset exhibited high mechanical strength, excellent adhesive strength, low dielectric constant, good thermal stability and excellent weather resistance along with very good moisture resistance. The results showed the influence of the amount of PAD on the performance of the thermoset. Thus, the study revealed that the combined poly(amido-amine) cured hyperbranched epoxy has high potential in advanced electrical packaging and microelectronic devices.

  10. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  11. 蛋白质对 PVDF 超滤膜污染行为的界面微观作用力解析%Adhesion Force Analysis of Protein Fouling of PVDF Ultrafiltration Membrane Using Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭东; 周淼; 孟晓荣; 王磊; 黄丹曦; 夏四清

    2015-01-01

    To determine the fouling behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on different hydrophilic PVDF ultrafiltration membrane over a range of pH, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and self-made colloidal probes were used to detect the microscopic adhesion forces of membrane-BSA and BSA-BSA, respectively. The results showed a positive correlation between the flux decline extent and the membrane-foulant adhesion force in the initial filtration stage, whereas the foulant-foulant interaction force was closely related to the membrane fouling in the later filtration stage. Moreover, the membrane-BSA adhesion interaction was stronger than the BSA-BSA adhesion interaction, which indicated that the fouling was mainly caused by the adhesion interaction between membrane and foulant. At the same pH, the adhesion force between PA membrane-BSA was smaller than that of PP membrane-BSA, illustrating the more hydrophilic the membrane was, the better the antifouling ability it had. The adhesion force between BSA-BSA fouled PA membrane was similar to that between BSA-BSA fouled PP membrane. These results confirmed that elimination of the membrane-BSA adhesion force is important to control the protein fouling of membranes.%采用原子力显微镜,结合自制微颗粒探针,对膜-污染物及污染物-污染物间微观作用力进行了检测分析,考察了不同 pH条件下牛血清蛋白(BSA)在不同界面特性 PVDF 超滤膜上的膜污染行为。结果表明,在膜过滤初期,通量剧烈衰减主要由 BSA和膜之间黏附力作用导致,在膜过滤后期,BSA 与 BSA 之间的黏聚作用则是影响后期膜污染行为的主要因素; PA 膜-BSA 和PP 膜-BSA 之间的黏附作用力均大于 BSA-BSA 之间的黏聚作用力,说明在整个膜过滤过程中,BSA 与 PVDF 超滤膜之间的黏附作用对膜污染起主导作用;相同 pH 条件下,PA 膜-BSA 之间的微观作用小于 PP 膜-BSA 之间的相互作用力,说明亲水性较强的 PA 膜具

  12. Hydrophobic and high adhesive polyaniline layer of rectangular microtubes fabricated by a modified interfacial polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuanqiang; Gong, Xiangxiang; Qu, Yun; Han, Jie

    2016-08-01

    A modified interfacial polymerization of aniline is developed to fabricate hydrophobic and adhesive polyaniline (PANI) layer of rectangular microtubes on the glass substrate. The modified method uses pentanol as an organic medium to dissolve aniline monomer, with the water film of oxidant and surfactant on the glass substrate as water phase. The effects of some synthetic parameters (such as monomer concentration, alcohol molecular structure and surfactant type) on the morphology of PANI layer are studied for better understanding the fabrication of PANI nanostructures on the film. The alcohol molecular structure plays key role for the supermolecular assembly of PANI chains into nanostructures, while the surfactant may direct the array and deposition of these nanostructures on the glass substrate. The formation reason of PANI rectangular sub-microtubes is roughly interpreted according to our previous works. Wettability experiment indicates that the as-prepared PANI layer exhibits excellent hydrophobicity and high adhesive properties to water drop.

  13. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perton, M.; Blouin, A.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  14. Use of high L.E.T. radiation to improve adhesion of metals to polytetrafluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    MgK alpha X-rays (1254 eV) and 2 keV electrons irradiate the surface of polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE). The damage is confined to a few tenths of a micron below the surface, and the doses exceed 10 to the eight power rad. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of the irradiated surfaces and mass spectroscopy of the gaseous products of irradiation indicate that the damaged layer is crosslinked or branched PTFE. After either type of irradiation, the surface has enhanced affinity for metals and a lower contact angle with hexadecane. Tape pull tests show that evaporated Ni and Au films adhere better to the irradiated surface. XPS shows the Ni interacts chemically with PTFE forming NiF2 and possibly NiC. However, the gold adhesion and contact angle results indicate that the interaction is, at least in part, chemically nonspecific. Decreased contact angles on FEP Teflon crystallized against gold were attributed to either the presence of a polar oxygen layer or increased physical forces due to greater density. In the case of irradiated PTFE, no oxygen on the surface was observed. The crosslinked structure might, however, have a greater density, thus accounting for the observed increase in adhesion and wettability.

  15. Integrin-mediated traction force enhances paxillin molecular associations and adhesion dynamics that increase the invasiveness of tumor cells into a three-dimensional extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhdjian, Armen H; Kai, FuiBoon; Rubashkin, Matthew G; Prahl, Louis S; Przybyla, Laralynne M; McGregor, Alexandra L; Bell, Emily S; Barnes, J Matthew; DuFort, Christopher C; Ou, Guanqing; Chang, Alice C; Cassereau, Luke; Tan, Steven J; Pickup, Michael W; Lakins, Jonathan N; Ye, Xin; Davidson, Michael W; Lammerding, Jan; Odde, David J; Dunn, Alexander R; Weaver, Valerie M

    2017-06-01

    Metastasis requires tumor cells to navigate through a stiff stroma and squeeze through confined microenvironments. Whether tumors exploit unique biophysical properties to metastasize remains unclear. Data show that invading mammary tumor cells, when cultured in a stiffened three-dimensional extracellular matrix that recapitulates the primary tumor stroma, adopt a basal-like phenotype. Metastatic tumor cells and basal-like tumor cells exert higher integrin-mediated traction forces at the bulk and molecular levels, consistent with a motor-clutch model in which motors and clutches are both increased. Basal-like nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells also display an altered integrin adhesion molecular organization at the nanoscale and recruit a suite of paxillin-associated proteins implicated in invasion and metastasis. Phosphorylation of paxillin by Src family kinases, which regulates adhesion turnover, is similarly enhanced in the metastatic and basal-like tumor cells, fostered by a stiff matrix, and critical for tumor cell invasion in our assays. Bioinformatics reveals an unappreciated relationship between Src kinases, paxillin, and survival of breast cancer patients. Thus adoption of the basal-like adhesion phenotype may favor the recruitment of molecules that facilitate tumor metastasis to integrin-based adhesions. Analysis of the physical properties of tumor cells and integrin adhesion composition in biopsies may be predictive of patient outcome. © 2017 Mekhdjian, Kai, Rubashkin, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Task force for integral test of High Energy nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    According to completion of the JENDL-High Energy file for neutron nuclear cross sections up to 50 MeV, a task force for integral test of high energy nuclear data was organized to discuss a guide line for integral test activities. A status of existing differential and integral experiments and how to perform such a test were discussed in the task force. Here the purpose and outline of the task force is explained with some future problems raised in discussion among the task member. (author)

  17. High-resolution patterning of silver conductive lines by adhesion contrast planography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Koutake, Masayoshi; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2015-09-01

    We developed printed electronics compatible planographic printing methods that enable single-micrometer-order patterning with high rectangularity and thickness uniformity. Instead of conventional planographic printing methods where selective wetting is used for pattern generation, an adhesive latent image produced on a silicone surface is exploited for patterning in the proposed printing methodologies. We further investigated the fundamental mechanisms of the proposed methods by focusing on adhesion contrasts between the blanket, printing area, and non-printing area of a printing plate (PP) and determined that printing is feasible when a simple magnitude relation of adhesions is satisfied for thin layers of size ranging from approximately 50 nm to 100 nm. Latent image formation can be carried out via a simple ultraviolet exposure of the silicone surface, thereby enabling the rapid prototyping of printed device fabrications. The easily preparable, single material-based flat PPs developed in this study have the advantages of flexibility in pattern designs, washing process, fabrication cost, and pattern-rewriting capability compared with the conventional printing methods in which raised surfaces such as stamps or clichés are required for patterning.

  18. Nitriding of high speed steel by bipolar PBII for improvement in adhesion strength of DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Junho, E-mail: choi@mech.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Soejima, Koji; Kato, Takahisa [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Masahiro [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute (TIRI), Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Wonsik [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, bipolar plasma based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII) was used for plasma nitriding of high speed steel (SKH2), and the effects of the treatment parameters (positive pulse voltage, negative pulse voltage, treatment pressure, treatment time, and precursor gases) on the nitriding process were investigated. The hardness, roughness, and depth of nitride layer were also measured. The adhesion strength of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on the nitride substrate was evaluated by carrying out Rockwell indentation and microscratch tests. Nitriding by bipolar PBII was achieved in the combining of two effects: nitrogen ion implantation by applying a high negative pulse voltage and thermal diffusion of nitrogen atoms under the application of a high positive pulse voltage. However, a very high voltage negative pulse caused surface roughening of the nitride layer. Application of a high positive pulse voltage during nitriding was found to be effective in promoting the thermal diffusion of the implanted nitrogen atoms. Effective nitriding could be achieved under the following conditions: high positive pulse voltage, low negative pulse voltage, high nitrogen gas pressure, and addition of hydrogen to the precursor gas. The adhesion strength of the DLC films on the SKH2 substrate was well improved after nitriding.

  19. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-01

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  20. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component of the high-strength adhesive secreted by English ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Tan, Li; Sun, Leming; Petrosino, Jennifer; Cui, Mei-Zhen; Hao, Feng; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-06-07

    Over 130 y have passed since Charles Darwin first discovered that the adventitious roots of English ivy (Hedera helix) exude a yellowish mucilage that promotes the capacity of this plant to climb vertical surfaces. Unfortunately, little progress has been made in elucidating the adhesion mechanisms underlying this high-strength adhesive. In the previous studies, spherical nanoparticles were observed in the viscous exudate. Here we show that these nanoparticles are predominantly composed of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), a superfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins present in the extracellular spaces of plant cells. The spheroidal shape of the AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles results in a low viscosity of the ivy adhesive, and thus a favorable wetting behavior on the surface of substrates. Meanwhile, calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and the pectic acids give rise to the cross-linking of the exuded adhesive substances, favor subsequent curing (hardening) via formation of an adhesive film, and eventually promote the generation of mechanical interlocking between the adventitious roots of English ivy and the surface of substrates. Inspired by these molecular events, a reconstructed ivy-mimetic adhesive composite was developed by integrating purified AGP-rich ivy nanoparticles with pectic polysaccharides and calcium ions. Information gained from the subsequent tensile tests, in turn, substantiated the proposed adhesion mechanisms underlying the ivy-derived adhesive. Given that AGPs and pectic polysaccharides are also observed in bioadhesives exuded by other climbing plants, the adhesion mechanisms revealed by English ivy may forward the progress toward understanding the general principles underlying diverse botanic adhesives.

  1. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  2. Adhesion improvement of carbon-based coatings through a high ionization deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hultman, L.

    2012-06-01

    The deposition of highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films using a pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration is reviewed. SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pretreated in the environment of a high ionized Cr+Ar plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and implant Cr metal ions. CNx films were subsequently deposited at room temperature by DC magnetron sputtering from a high purity C target in a N2/Ar plasma discharge. All processing was done in an industrial-scale CemeCon CC800 coating system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples pretreated at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed). The adhesion of CNx films, evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C test, reaches strength quality HF1. Adhesion results are correlated to high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirming the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel. The throwing power increase for HIPIMS coatings is associated to the higher ionization in the plasma discharge.

  3. Reversible manipulation of the adhesive forces of TiO{sub 2}/polybenzoxazine nanoassembled coatings through UV irradiation and thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Sheng-Feng; Kao, Tzu-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Cheng, Chih-Chia [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Chi-Jung [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100, Wenhwa Road, Seatwen, Taichung 40724, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jem-Kun, E-mail: jkchen@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: We developed a simple approach, mixing TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and 3-phenyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,3-benzoxazine (BA), to obtain a UV-responsive surfaces after thermal treatment. Because the wettability between TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and BA, a nanoassembled structure was generated on the surface during the coating process. Results indicate that the mixing 30 wt% TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into PBA matrix generated the superhydrophobic surface (static water contact angle > 150°) with ca. 1° of sliding angle. The superhydrophobic TiO{sub 2}/PBA nanoassembled surface can be converted by photocatalytic oxidation into a highly hydrophilic one (static water contact angle ∼ 0°) within five minimums. Interestingly, the hydrophilic surface can be converted back into a superhydrophobic surface by heat treatment. A water droplet can be transported among the surfaces that UV-irradiated for various times. Velocity of the droplet on the 15°-titled surface could be also manipulated with UV irradiation for various times. The correlations between PBA and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles would provide insight into the designing and developing of light-responsive surfaces. - Highlights: • Nanoassembly of PBA and TiO{sub 2} NPs are generated with superhydrophobicity. • The superhydrophobicity can be converted to hydrophilic surface within 5 min. • The hydrophilic surface can be converted back into a superhydrophobic surface. • Adhesive force of the nanoassemblies can be manipulated by UV illumination time. - Abstract: In this study we mixed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) with 3-phenyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,3-benzoxazine (BA), as a precursor to a polybenzoxazine (PBA), to generate nanocomposite surfaces possessing low surface free energies. Because of extreme phase separation between the TiO{sub 2} NPs and BA, their mixtures featured nanoassembled structures on their surfaces. After thermal curing, we obtained PBA/TiO{sub 2} nanoassembled (PTN) surfaces possessing

  4. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and antigen I/II deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H.J.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  5. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  6. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzami, Saied Mostafa; Moosavi, Horieh; Moddaber, Maryam; Parvizi, Reza; Moayed, Mohamad Hadi; Mokhber, Nima; Meharry, Michael; B Kazemi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs). Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR)/ liner/ None (No), on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No). In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB), Clearfil S3 (S3), Single Bond (SB) and Varnish (V). Each main group (n=6) was divided into two subgroups (n=3) according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA) or spherical Tytin (Tyt). The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP), and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate) and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates). Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. PMID:27942548

  7. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  8. The FORCE: A highly portable parallel programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Alaghband, Gita; Jakob, Ruediger

    1989-01-01

    Here, it is explained why the FORCE parallel programming language is easily portable among six different shared-memory microprocessors, and how a two-level macro preprocessor makes it possible to hide low level machine dependencies and to build machine-independent high level constructs on top of them. These FORCE constructs make it possible to write portable parallel programs largely independent of the number of processes and the specific shared memory multiprocessor executing them.

  9. The FORCE - A highly portable parallel programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Alaghband, Gita; Jakob, Ruediger

    1989-01-01

    This paper explains why the FORCE parallel programming language is easily portable among six different shared-memory multiprocessors, and how a two-level macro preprocessor makes it possible to hide low-level machine dependencies and to build machine-independent high-level constructs on top of them. These FORCE constructs make it possible to write portable parallel programs largely independent of the number of processes and the specific shared-memory multiprocessor executing them.

  10. An open source based high content screening method for cell biology laboratories investigating cell spreading and adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Schmandke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adhesion dependent mechanisms are increasingly recognized to be important for a wide range of biological processes, diseases and therapeutics. This has led to a rising demand of pharmaceutical modulators. However, most currently available adhesion assays are time consuming and/or lack sensitivity and reproducibility or depend on specialized and expensive equipment often only available at screening facilities. Thus, rapid and economical high-content screening approaches are urgently needed. RESULTS: We established a fully open source high-content screening method for identifying modulators of adhesion. We successfully used this method to detect small molecules that are able to influence cell adhesion and cell spreading of Swiss-3T3 fibroblasts in general and/or specifically counteract Nogo-A-Δ20-induced inhibition of adhesion and cell spreading. The tricyclic anti-depressant clomipramine hydrochloride was shown to not only inhibit Nogo-A-Δ20-induced cell spreading inhibition in 3T3 fibroblasts but also to promote growth and counteract neurite outgrowth inhibition in highly purified primary neurons isolated from rat cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed and validated a high content screening approach that can be used in any ordinarily equipped cell biology laboratory employing exclusively freely available open-source software in order to find novel modulators of adhesion and cell spreading. The versatility and adjustability of the whole screening method will enable not only centers specialized in high-throughput screens but most importantly also labs not routinely employing screens in their daily work routine to investigate the effects of a wide range of different compounds or siRNAs on adhesion and adhesion-modulating molecules.

  11. High iron sequestrating bifidobacteria inhibit enteropathogen growth and adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Vazquez-Gutierrez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota plays an important role in host health, in particular by its barrier effect and competition with exogenous pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, the competition of Bifidobacterium pseudolongum PV8-2 (Bp PV8-2 and Bifidobacterium kashiwanohense PV20-2 (Bk PV20-2, isolated from anemic infant gut microbiota and selected for their high iron sequestration properties was investigated against Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhi and Escherichia coli O157:H45 (EHEC by using co-culture tests and assays with intestinal cell lines. Single and co-cultures were carried out anaerobically in chemically semi-defined low iron (1.5 µM Fe medium (CSDLIM without and with added ferrous iron (30 µM Fe. Surface properties of the tested strains were measured by bacterial adhesion to solvent xylene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and to extracellular matrix molecules, mucus II, collagen I, fibrinogen, fibronectin. HT29-MTX mucus-secreting intestinal cell cultures were used to study bifidobacteria competition, inhibition and displacement of the enteropatogens. During co-cultures in CSDLIM we observed strain-dependent inhibition of bifidobacterial strains on enteropathogens, independent of pH, organic acid production and supplemented iron. Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 inhibited S. Typhi N15 and EHEC after 24 h compared to single culture growth. In contrast Bk PV20-2 showed less inhibition on S. Typhi N15 than Bp PV8-2, and no inhibition on EHEC. Affinity for intestinal cell surface glycoproteins was strain-specific, with high affinity of Bp PV8-2 for mucin and Bk PV20-2 for fibronectin. Bk PV20-2 showed high adhesion potential (15.6 +/- 6.0 % to HT29-MTX cell layer compared to Bp PV8-2 (1.4 +/- 0.4 %. In competition, inhibition and displacement tests, Bp PV8-2 significantly (P<0.05 reduced S. Typhi N15 and EHEC adhesion, while Bk PV20-2 was only active on S. Typhi N15 adhesion. To conclude, bifidobacterial strains selected for their high iron binding

  12. Effect of Self-etch Adhesives on Self-sealing Ability of High-Copper Amalgams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied Mostafa Moazzami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Similar to conventional amalgam, high-copper amalgam alloy may also undergo corrosion, but it takes longer time for the resulting products to reduce microleakage by sealing the micro-gap at the tooth/amalgam interface. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of self-etch adhesives with different pH levels on the interfacial corrosion behavior of high-copper amalgam restoration and its induction potential for self-sealing ability of the micro-gap in the early hours after setting by means of Electro-Chemical Tests (ECTs. Materials and Method: Thirty cylindrical cavities of 4.5mm x 4.7mm were prepared on intact bicuspids. The samples were divided into five main groups of application of Adhesive Resin (AR/ liner/ None (No, on the cavity floor. The first main group was left without an AR/ liner (No. In the other main groups, the types of AR/ liner used were I-Bond (IB, Clearfil S3 (S3, Single Bond (SB and Varnish (V. Each main group (n=6 was divided into two subgroups (n=3 according to the types of the amalgams used, either admixed ANA 2000 (ANA or spherical Tytin (Tyt. The ECTs, Open Circuit Potential (OCP, and the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR for each sample were performed and measured 48 hours after the completion of the samples. Results: The Tyt-No and Tyt-IB samples showed the highest and lowest OCP values respectively. In LPR tests, the Rp values of ANA-V and Tyt-V were the highest (lowest corrosion rate and contrarily, the ANA-IB and Tyt-IB samples, with the lowest pH levels, represented the lowest Rp values (highest corrosion rates. Conclusion: Some self-etch adhesives may increase interfacial corrosion potential and self-sealing ability of high-copper amalgams. Keywords ● Electrochemical Test ● Dental Amalgam ● Corrosion ● Self-etch adhesive;

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of nanoparticle releasing in AFM nanomanipulation using high voltage electrostatic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattan Kashani, H.; Shokrolahi, S.; Akbari Moayyer, H.; Shariat Panahi, M.; Shahmoradi Zavareh, A.

    2017-07-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) have been widely used as nanomanipulators due to their versatility to work with a broad range of materials and their controllable interaction force, among other features. While AFMs can effectively grasp, move, and position nanoscale objects in 2D environments through basic pull/push operations, they often lack the high precision required in many 3D pick and place applications, especially in non-vacuum environments. In this study, a novel method to resolve the adhesion problem between nanoscale objects and the AFM tip has been developed and tested. The method is based on the application of a high electrostatic voltage to the tip to produce the repulsive force required for the release of the nanoobject. The method is proposed for conductive nanoparticles and tips used in many nanomanipulation applications, and can be easily implemented on typical AFMs with minimal alterations. The applicability of the proposed method is investigated through a series of combined Molecular Dynamics/Finite Element simulations.

  14. The study of adhesive forces between the type-3 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and collagen-coated surfaces by using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chiahan; Fan, Chia-chieh; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Long, Hsu

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to host cells by a bacterial pathogen is a critical step for establishment of infection. It will contribute greatly to the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis by studying the biological force between a single pair of pathogen and host cell. In our experiment, we use a calibrated optical tweezers system to detach a single Klebsiella pneumoniae, the pathogen, from collagen, the host. By gradually increasing the laser power of the optical tweezers until the Klebsiella pneumoniae is detached from the collagen, we obtain the magnitude of the adhesive force between them. This happens when the adhesive force is barely equal to the trapping force provided by the optical tweezers at that specific laser power. This study is important because Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen which causes suppurative lesions, urinary and respiratory tract infections. It has been proved that type 3 fimbrial adhesin (mrkD) is strongly associated with the adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Besides, four polymorphic mrkD alleles: namely, mrkDv1, v2, v3, and v4, are typed by using RFLP. In order to investigate the relationship between the structure and the function for each of these variants, DNA fragments encoding the major fimbrial proteins mrkA, mrkB, mrkC are expressed together with any of the four mrkD adhesins in E. coli JM109. Our study shows that the E. coli strain carrying the mrkDv3 fimbriae has the strongest binding activity. This suggests that mrkDv3 is a key factor that enhances the adherence of Klebsiella Pneumoniae to human body.

  15. Interactions between the L1 cell adhesion molecule and ezrin support traction-force generation and can be regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Gil, Orlando D; Whittard, John D; Gazdoiu, Mihaela; Joseph, Todd; Wu, James; Waksman, Adam; Benson, Deanna L; Salton, Stephen R; Felsenfeld, Dan P

    2008-09-01

    An Ig superfamily cell-adhesion molecule, L1, forms an adhesion complex at the cell membrane containing both signaling molecules and cytoskeletal proteins. This complex mediates the transduction of extracellular signals and generates actin-mediated traction forces, both of which support axon outgrowth. The L1 cytoplasmic region binds ezrin, an adapter protein that interacts with the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we analyzed L1-ezrin interactions in detail, assessed their role in generating traction forces by L1, and identified potential regulatory mechanisms controlling ezrin-L1 interactions. The FERM domain of ezrin binds to the juxtamembrane region of L1, demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid interaction traps and protein binding analyses in vitro. A lysine-to-leucine substitution in this domain of L1 (K1147L) shows reduced binding to the ezrin FERM domain. Additionally, in ND7 cells, the K1147L mutation inhibits retrograde movement of L1 on the cell surface that has been linked to the generation of the traction forces necessary for axon growth. A membrane-permeable peptide consisting of the juxtamembrane region of L1 that can disrupt endogenous L1-ezrin interactions inhibits neurite extension of cerebellar cells on L1 substrates. Moreover, the L1-ezrin interactions can be modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of the L1 cytoplasmic region, namely, Y1151, possibly through Src-family kinases. Replacement of this tyrosine together with Y1176 with either aspartate or phenylalanine changes ezrin binding and alters colocalization with ezrin in ND7 cells. Collectively, these data suggest that L1-ezrin interactions mediated by the L1 juxtamembrane region are involved in traction-force generation and can be regulated by the phosphorylation of L1. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. INTERPARTICLE FORCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE FLUIDIZATION OF GELDART A PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Cui; Jamal Chaouki

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports and current studies show that fluidization of some Geldart A particles is enhanced by increasing bed temperature. Both the averaged local particle concentration and the particle concentration in the dense phase decrease with increasing bed temperature, at constant superficial gas velocities. However, conventional models fail to predict these changes, because the role of interparticle forces is usually neglected at different bed temperatures.Here, the interparticle forces are analyzed to explore the mechanism of gas-solid fluidization at high temperatures. Indeed, as the temperature increases, the interparticle attractive forces decrease while the interparticle repulsive forces increase. Consequently, fluidization behaviors of some Geldart A particles seem to increasingly shift from typical Geldart A towards B with increasing temperature.

  17. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  18. Magnetic field switchable dry adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Bovero, Enrico; Menon, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic field controllable dry adhesive device is manufactured. The normal adhesion force can be increased or decreased depending on the presence of an applied magnetic field. If the magnetic field is present during the entire normal adhesion test cycle which includes both applying a preloading force and measuring the pulloff pressure, a decrease in adhesion is observed when compared to when there is no applied magnetic field. Similarly, if the magnetic field is present only during the preload portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, a decrease in adhesion is observed because of an increased stiffness of the magnetically controlled dry adhesive device. When the applied magnetic field is present during only the pulloff portion of the normal adhesion test cycle, either an increase or a decrease in normal adhesion is observed depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  19. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) for ductile adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, P.; Carbas, RJC; Campilho, RDSG; Abenojar, J.; Martínez, MA; Silva LFM, da

    2017-05-01

    Works carried out in this publication belong to a project that seeks the replacement of welded joints by adhesive joints at stress concentration nodes in bus structures. Fracture toughness in Mode I (GIC) has been measured for two different ductile adhesives, SikaTack Drive and SikaForce 7720. SikaTack Drive is a single-component polyurethane adhesive with high viscoelasticity (more than 100%), whose main use is the car-glass joining and SikaForce 7720 is double-component structural polyurethane adhesive. Experimental works have been carried out from the test called Double Cantilever Beam (DCB), using two steel beams as adherents and an adhesive thickness according to the problem posed in the Project, of 2 and 3 mm for SikaForce 7720 and SikaTack Drive, respectively. Three different methods have been used for measuring the fracture toughness in mode I (GIC) from the values obtained in the experimental DCB procedure for each adhesive: Corrected Beam Theory (CBT), Compliance Calibration Method (CCM) and Compliance Based Beam Method (CBBM). Four DCB specimens have been tested for each adhesive. Dispersion of each GIC calculation method for each adhesive has been studied. Likewise variations between the three different methods have been also studied for each adhesive.

  20. Elastocapilllarity in insect adhesion: the case of beetle adhesive hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernay, Sophie; Gilet, Tristan; Lambert, Pierre; Federle, Walter

    2014-11-01

    The feet of many insects are covered with dense arrays of hair-like structures called setae. Liquid capillary bridges at the tip of these micrometric structures are responsible for the controlled adhesion of the insect on a large variety of substrates. The resulting adhesion force can exceed several times the body weight of the insect. The high aspect-ratio of setae suggests that flexibility is a key ingredient in this capillary-based adhesion mechanism. There is indeed a strong coupling between their elastic deformation and the shape of the liquid meniscus. In this experimental work, we observe and quantify the local deflection of dock beetle seta tips under perpendicular loading using interference microscopy. Our results are then interpreted in the light of an analytic model of elastocapillarity. This research has been funded by the FRIA/FNRS and the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme (IAP 7/38 MicroMAST) initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office.

  1. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  2. High Fat Diet Induces Adhesion of Platelets to Endothelium in Two Models of Dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD represent about 30% of all global deaths. It is currently accepted that, in the atherogenic process, platelets play an important role, contributing to endothelial activation and modulation of the inflammatory phenomenon, promoting the beginning and formation of lesions and their subsequent thrombotic complications. The objective of the present work was to study using immunohistochemistry, the presence of platelets, monocytes/macrophages, and cell adhesion molecules (CD61, CD163, and CD54, in two stages of the atheromatous process. CF-1 mice fed a fat diet were used to obtain early stages of atheromatous process, denominated early stage of atherosclerosis, and ApoE−/− mice fed a fat diet were used to observe advanced stages of atherosclerosis. The CF-1 mice model presented immunostaining on endothelial surface for all three markers studied; the advanced atherosclerosis model in ApoE−/− mice also presented granular immunostaining on lesion thickness, for the same markers. These results suggest that platelets participate in atheromatous process from early stages to advance d stages. High fat diet induces adhesion of platelets to endothelial cells in vivo. These findings support studying the participation of platelets in the formation of atheromatous plate.

  3. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-01

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm-1) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  4. High Fat Diet Induces Adhesion of Platelets to Endothelium in Two Models of Dyslipidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Díaz, Natalia; Albornoz, María Eliana; Huilcaman, Ricardo; Morales, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all global deaths. It is currently accepted that, in the atherogenic process, platelets play an important role, contributing to endothelial activation and modulation of the inflammatory phenomenon, promoting the beginning and formation of lesions and their subsequent thrombotic complications. The objective of the present work was to study using immunohistochemistry, the presence of platelets, monocytes/macrophages, and cell adhesion molecules (CD61, CD163, and CD54), in two stages of the atheromatous process. CF-1 mice fed a fat diet were used to obtain early stages of atheromatous process, denominated early stage of atherosclerosis, and ApoE−/− mice fed a fat diet were used to observe advanced stages of atherosclerosis. The CF-1 mice model presented immunostaining on endothelial surface for all three markers studied; the advanced atherosclerosis model in ApoE−/− mice also presented granular immunostaining on lesion thickness, for the same markers. These results suggest that platelets participate in atheromatous process from early stages to advance d stages. High fat diet induces adhesion of platelets to endothelial cells in vivo. These findings support studying the participation of platelets in the formation of atheromatous plate. PMID:25328689

  5. Acceleration of objects to high velocity by electromagnetic forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Richard F

    2017-02-28

    Two exemplary approaches to the acceleration of projectiles are provided. Both approaches can utilize concepts associated with the Inductrack maglev system. Either of them provides an effective means of accelerating multi-kilogram projectiles to velocities of several kilometers per second, using launchers of order 10 meters in length, thus enabling the acceleration of projectiles to high velocities by electromagnetic forces.

  6. Period Prevalence of Acute Neck Injury in US Air Force Pilots Exposed to High G Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    unquantified clinical and epidemiological problem in exposed pilots. There has been a paucity of research in this area. This proposal is a beginning, with a...larg-e majority of pilots. Thus neck injury and its sequelae are unquantified clinical and epidemiological problems in pilots exposed to high G forces...Basal Impression 19. Cervical Ribs 20. Scoliosis , 21. Intraspongy Nuclear Hernitation 22. Significant Compression or Loss of Height of Any Vertebral

  7. High-Resolution Force Balance Analyses of Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlin, E. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in glacier velocity, thickness, and terminus position have been used to infer the dynamic response of tidewater glaciers to environmental perturbations, yet few analyses have attempted to quantify the associated variations in the glacier force balance. Where repeat high-resolution ice thickness and velocity estimates are available, force balance time series can be constructed to investigate the redistribution of driving and resistive forces associated with changes in terminus position. Comparative force balance analyses may, therefore, help us understand the variable dynamic response observed for glaciers in close proximity to each other. Here we construct force balance time series for Helheim Glacier, SE Greenland, and Columbia Glacier, SE Alaska, to investigate differences in dynamic sensitivity to terminus position change. The analysis relies on in situ and remotely sensed observations of ice thickness, velocity, and terminus position. Ice thickness time series are obtained from stereo satellite image-derived surface elevation and continuity-derived bed elevations that are constrained by airborne radar observations. Surface velocity time series are obtained from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations. Approximately daily terminus positions are from a combination of satellite images and terrestrial time-lapse photographs. Helheim and Columbia glaciers are two of the best-studied Arctic tidewater glaciers with comprehensive high-resolution observational time series, yet we find that bed elevation uncertainties and poorly-constrained stress-coupling length estimates still hinder the analysis of spatial and temporal force balance variations. Here we use a new observationally-based method to estimate the stress-coupling length which successfully reduces noise in the derived force balance but preserves spatial variations that can be over-smoothed when estimating the stress-coupling length as a scalar function of the ice thickness

  8. Gradient Control of the Adhesive Force between Ti/TiO2 Nanotubular Arrays Fabricated by Anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Li, Jidong; Li, Yubao; Wang, Jian; Zuo, Yi; Jiang, Jiaxing; Wang, Huanan

    2014-11-01

    The poor control of the adhesion of TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) layers to a non-anodized titanium (Ti) substrate has limited their widespread application, because the stripping mechanism has not yet been revealed. Here, we report a novel method to control the detachment of TNTs by post-treatment of the as-fabricated samples in protic and aprotic solvents with different polarities. Post-treatment using an organic solvent of lower polarity increases the adhesion of the tube layer, in contrast to the spontaneous detachment of the TNT layer after treatment using a solvent of higher polarity. The structure and the composition at the rupture interface were studied to explore the mechanism of the stripping behavior. Based on our experimental results and previous studies, a hypothesis of a hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) mechanism was proposed to explain the mechanism of TNTs' natural detachment and the control over of TNTs' stripping behaviors by post-treatment, in which the presence of protons at the interface between the TNT layer and the Ti substrate play an important role in controlling the two layers' cohesion. In summary, this method and mechanism hold promise to be used as a tool for the design and fabrication of TNT-related materials in future.

  9. Adhesion between Silica Particle and Mica Surfaces in Water and Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski; Ishimura; Higashitani

    2000-07-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to study the adhesion between a silica sphere and a mica plate in pure water and solutions of monovalent cations (LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl). It is found that the adhesive force depends not only on the electrolyte concentration but also on the hydration enthalpy of cations and the contact time of the particle on the surface. Possible mechanisms by which the observed phenomena can be explained consistently are discussed extensively. It is suggested that the adhesive force is closely related to the structure of the layer of cations and water molecules adsorbed on the surfaces: the strong adhesive force is obtained when highly hydrated cations (Li(+), Na(+)) are adsorbed to form a thick but weakly adsorbed layer, while the weak adhesive force is observed when poorly hydrated cations (Cs(+), K(+)) are adsorbed to form a thin but strongly adsorbed layer. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... is the first committing step in biofilm formation, and has therefore been intensely scrutinized. Much however, still remains elusive. Bacterial adhesion is a highly complex process, which is influenced by a variety of factors. In this thesis, a range of physico-chemical, molecular and environmental parameters......, which influence the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to a sessile lifestyle, have been studied. Protein conditioning film formation was found to influence bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation considerable, and an aqueous extract of fish muscle tissue was shown to significantly...

  11. High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Paul, William; Pietrobon, Brendan; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grütter, Peter H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2010-08-01

    We report the design and development of a friction force microscope for high-resolution studies in electrochemical environments. The design choices are motivated by the experimental requirements of atomic-scale friction measurements in liquids. The noise of the system is analyzed based on a methodology for the quantification of all the noise sources. The quantitative contribution of each noise source is analyzed in a series of lateral force measurements. Normal force detection is demonstrated in a study of the solvation potential in a confined liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane. The limitations of the timing resolution of the instrument are discussed in the context of an atomic stick-slip measurement. The instrument is capable of studying the atomic friction contrast between a bare Au(111) surface and a copper monolayer deposited at underpotential conditions in perchloric acid.

  12. High-Force Dielectric Electroactive Polymer (DEAP) membrane actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Steffen; York, Alexander; Seelecke, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Energy efficiency, lightweight and scalability are key features for actuators in applications such as valves, pumps or any portable system. Dielectric electroactive Polymer (DEAP) technology is able to fulfill these requirements1 better than commonly used technology e.g. solenoids, but has limitations concerning force and stroke. However, the circular DEAP membrane actuator shows a potential increase in stroke in the mm range, when combined with an appropriate biasing mechanism2. Although, thus far, their force range is limited to the single-digit Newton range, or less3,4. This work describes how this force limit of DEAP membrane actuators can be pushed to the high double-digit Newton range and beyond. The concept for such an actuator consists of a stack of double-layered DEAPs membrane actuator combined with a biasing mechanism. These two components are combined in a novel way, which allows a compact design by integrating the biasing mechanism into the DEAP membrane actuator stack. Subsequently, the single components are manufactured, tested, and their force-displacement characteristic is documented. Utilizing this data allows assembling them into actuator systems for different applications. Two different actuators are assembled and tested (dimensions: 85x85x30mm3 (LxWxH)). The first one is able to lift 7.5kg. The second one can generate a force of 66N while acting against a spring load.

  13. A low-cost, high-yield fabrication method for producing optimized biomimetic dry adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameoto, D.; Menon, C.

    2009-11-01

    We present a low-cost, large-scale method of fabricating biomimetic dry adhesives. This process is useful because it uses all photosensitive polymers with minimum fabrication costs or complexity to produce molds for silicone-based dry adhesives. A thick-film lift-off process is used to define molds using AZ 9260 photoresist, with a slow acting, deep UV sensitive material, PMGI, used as both an adhesion promoter for the AZ 9260 photoresist and as an undercutting material to produce mushroom-shaped fibers. The benefits to this process are ease of fabrication, wide range of potential layer thicknesses, no special surface treatment requirements to demold silicone adhesives and easy stripping of the full mold if process failure does occur. Sylgard® 184 silicone is used to cast full sheets of biomimetic dry adhesives off 4" diameter wafers, and different fiber geometries are tested for normal adhesion properties. Additionally, failure modes of the adhesive during fabrication are noted and strategies for avoiding these failures are discussed. We use this fabrication method to produce different fiber geometries with varying cap diameters and test them for normal adhesion strengths. The results indicate that the cap diameters relative to post diameters for mushroom-shaped fibers dominate the adhesion properties.

  14. Temporal and spacial changes of highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule immunoreactivity in amygdala kindling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Iwai, M; Nagano, I; Shoji, M; Abe, K

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the migration of neural stem cells as well as neural plastic changes in epileptic brain, spaciotemporal expression of immunoreactive highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) was examined in amygdala kindling development of rat. The neural migration and synaptic remodeling detected with PSA-NCAM staining occurred in dentate gyrus of hippocampus, subventricular zone and pyriform cortex with amygdaloid kindling in generalized seizure but not in partial seizure. Although PSA-NCAM positive dendrite in dentate gyrus was minimally found in the control brain, it extended slightly in animals with partial seizure, and greatly toward the molecular layer with generalized seizure. Thus, the migration of neural stem cells as well as neural plastic changes were specially and temporally different between brain regions depending on different kindling stages. These changes may mainly contribute to the reorganization of neural network in epileptic brain.

  15. High-speed adaptive contact-mode atomic force microscopy imaging with near-minimum-force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Juan; Zou, Qingze

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an adaptive contact-mode imaging approach is proposed to replace the traditional contact-mode imaging by addressing the major concerns in both the speed and the force exerted to the sample. The speed of the traditional contact-mode imaging is largely limited by the need to maintain precision tracking of the sample topography over the entire imaged sample surface, while large image distortion and excessive probe-sample interaction force occur during high-speed imaging. In this work, first, the image distortion caused by the topography tracking error is accounted for in the topography quantification. Second, the quantified sample topography is utilized in a gradient-based optimization method to adjust the cantilever deflection set-point for each scanline closely around the minimal level needed for maintaining stable probe-sample contact, and a data-driven iterative feedforward control that utilizes a prediction of the next-line topography is integrated to the topography feeedback loop to enhance the sample topography tracking. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated through imaging a calibration sample of square pitches at both high speeds (e.g., scan rate of 75 Hz and 130 Hz) and large sizes (e.g., scan size of 30 μm and 80 μm). The experimental results show that compared to the traditional constant-force contact-mode imaging, the imaging speed can be increased by over 30 folds (with the scanning speed at 13 mm/s), and the probe-sample interaction force can be reduced by more than 15% while maintaining the same image quality.

  16. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  17. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion, adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:28149471

  18. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  19. Nuclear Forces and High-Performance Computing: The Perfect Match

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, T; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-12

    High-performance computing is now enabling the calculation of certain nuclear interaction parameters directly from Quantum Chromodynamics, the quantum field theory that governs the behavior of quarks and gluons and is ultimately responsible for the nuclear strong force. We briefly describe the state of the field and describe how progress in this field will impact the greater nuclear physics community. We give estimates of computational requirements needed to obtain certain milestones and describe the scientific and computational challenges of this field.

  20. Promotion of initial cell adhesion on trisuccinimidyl citrate-modified nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Inoue, Motoki; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2013-04-01

    The surface of nickel-free high-nitrogen stainless steel (HNS) was modified with a citric acid-based cross-linker, trisuccinimidyl citrate (TSC), to promote initial cell adhesion in external skeletal fixation pins. The remaining active ester groups on TSC-immobilized HNS reacted with the amino groups of serum proteins. The immobilized serum proteins formed cell recognition sites to promote the initial cell adhesion immediately after cell seeding. The amount of fibronectin, which is a typical cell adhesion protein, immobilized on the TSC-immobilized HNS surface was threefold greater than on the original HNS after only 15 min. The fibroblastic cell culture experiments showed that the initial cell adhesion was significantly enhanced on the TSC-immobilized HNS compared with the original HNS at 3 h. Furthermore, the cell adhesion activity of the TSC-immobilized HNS continued to promote cell proliferation even at 7 days. Therefore, TSC-immobilized HNS may enable the rapid integration of soft tissues through its reaction with the patient's serum proteins and extracellular proteins around the surgical site.

  1. A transparent conductive adhesive laminate electrode for high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Daniel; Greenwood, Peter; Troughton, Joel; Wijdekop, Maarten; Carnie, Mathew; Davies, Matthew; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J; Watson, Trystan; Worsley, David

    2014-11-26

    A self-adhesive laminate solar-cell electrode is presented based on a metal grid embedded in a polymer film (x-y conduction) and set in contact with the active layer using a pressure-sensitive adhesive containing a very low quantity (1.8%) of organic conductor, which self-organizes to provide z conduction to the grid. This ITO-free material performs in an identical fashion to evaporated gold in high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. High-Content Microscopy Analysis of Subcellular Structures: Assay Development and Application to Focal Adhesion Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Torsten; Schmidt, David; Schwanitz, Georg; Ahmad, Mubashir; Hamann, Jana; Schlosser, Corinne; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Böhm, Konrad J; Tuckermann, Jan; Ploubidou, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    High-content analysis (HCA) converts raw light microscopy images to quantitative data through the automated extraction, multiparametric analysis, and classification of the relevant information content. Combined with automated high-throughput image acquisition, HCA applied to the screening of chemicals or RNAi-reagents is termed high-content screening (HCS). Its power in quantifying cell phenotypes makes HCA applicable also to routine microscopy. However, developing effective HCA and bioinformatic analysis pipelines for acquisition of biologically meaningful data in HCS is challenging. Here, the step-by-step development of an HCA assay protocol and an HCS bioinformatics analysis pipeline are described. The protocol's power is demonstrated by application to focal adhesion (FA) detection, quantitative analysis of multiple FA features, and functional annotation of signaling pathways regulating FA size, using primary data of a published RNAi screen. The assay and the underlying strategy are aimed at researchers performing microscopy-based quantitative analysis of subcellular features, on a small scale or in large HCS experiments. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. High-resolution nanotransfer printing applicable to diverse surfaces via interface-targeted adhesion switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Won; Yang, Se Ryeun; Hur, Yoon Hyung; Kim, Seong Wan; Baek, Kwang Min; Yim, Soonmin; Jang, Hyun-Ik; Park, Jae Hong; Lee, Seung Yong; Park, Chong-Ook; Jung, Yeon Sik

    2014-11-01

    Nanotransfer printing technology offers outstanding simplicity and throughput in the fabrication of transistors, metamaterials, epidermal sensors and other emerging devices. Nevertheless, the development of a large-area sub-50 nm nanotransfer printing process has been hindered by fundamental reliability issues in the replication of high-resolution templates and in the release of generated nanostructures. Here we present a solvent-assisted nanotransfer printing technique based on high-fidelity replication of sub-20 nm patterns using a dual-functional bilayer polymer thin film. For uniform and fast release of nanostructures on diverse receiver surfaces, interface-specific adhesion control is realized by employing a polydimethylsiloxane gel pad as a solvent-emitting transfer medium, providing unusual printing capability even on biological surfaces such as human skin and fruit peels. Based on this principle, we also demonstrate reliable printing of high-density metallic nanostructures for non-destructive and rapid surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analyses and for hydrogen detection sensors with excellent responsiveness.

  4. The influence of surface DBD plasma treatment on the adhesion of coatings to high-tech textiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Šimor, M.; Creyghton, Y.; Wypkema, A.W.; Zemek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The surface of high-performance poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers is difficult to wet and impossible to chemically bond to different matrices. Sizing applied on the fiber surface usually improves fiber wetting, but prevents good adhesion between a matrix and the fiber surface. The present st

  5. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  6. Highly adhesive metal plating on Zylon ® fiber via iodine pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, Ummul Khair; Gotoh, Yasuo

    2011-11-01

    Highly adhesive metal plating was performed on poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole) fiber named Zylon® via iodine pretreatment followed by electroless plating. First, iodine components were selectively doped into the inner part of the fiber near the surface through iodine vapor exposure. The doped iodine was converted to palladium iodide particles by treating with palladium chloride solution. After the reduction of the iodide to metal palladium particles, electroless copper plating was conducted on the fiber. A uniform copper layer was deposited on the fiber surface and exhibited high durability in durability tests such as ultrasonic exposure, tape peeling-off, and corrosion in NaCl solution. This durability was attributed to the palladium particles formed at the fiber surface that served as an anchor for the plated layer as well as an electroless plating catalyst. The plated fibers also possessed electrical conductivity. Although the tensile strength of the Zylon® fiber decreased from 5.8 to 4.9 GPa after undergoing the pretreatment and plating processes, the light shielding effect improved the light resistance of the plated fibers in terms of tensile properties. After 18 days of xenon lamp exposure, the plated fibers retained 74% of its initial strength, whereas that of untreated fibers decreased to 43%.

  7. Shock adhesion test for composite bonded assembly using a high pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, E.; Berthe, L.; Buzaud, E.; Boustie, M.; Arrigoni, M.

    2013-07-01

    In a context of the rising use of composite assemblies in aeronautic or defense fields, the assessment of their strength is a key issue. The method developed in this study attempts to provide solutions. A shock adhesion test based on short compressive loads, obtained by a high pulsed power generator, is proposed as a proof test to ensure the quality of composite bonded assemblies. A calibrated load induces a local tensile stress able to damage the bond interface. The high pulsed power source is the GEnerateur de Pression Isentropique device (Isentropic Pressure Generator), used to generate the required stresses, with a 450 ns pulse duration to test assemblies above the mm thickness range. The understanding of the mechanisms of wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these multilayer assemblies are scientific challenges. The ability of the technique to induce a tensile stress able to disbond the laminates and the assemblies is demonstrated. This paper details the response of carbon epoxy laminates and their bonded assemblies to a shock loading near the damage threshold.

  8. Polyphenols from Artemisia annua L Inhibit Adhesion and EMT of Highly Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells MDA-MB-231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young Shin; Lee, Won Sup; Panchanathan, Radha; Joo, Young Nak; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, Jin-Myung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Kim, Hye Jung

    2016-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that polyphenolic compounds from plants have anti-invasion and anti-metastasis capabilities. The Korean annual weed, Artemisia annua L., has been used as a folk medicine for treatment of various diseases. Here, we isolated and characterized polyphenols from Korean A. annua L (pKAL). We investigated anti-metastatic effects of pKAL on the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells especially focusing on cancer cell adhesion to the endothelial cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Firstly, pKAL inhibited cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but not that of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs). Polyphenols from Korean A. annua L inhibited the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to ECs through reducing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression of MDA-MB-231 and ECs, but not intracellular adhesion molecule-1 at the concentrations where pKAL did not influence the cell viability of either MDA-MB-231 cells nor EC. Further, pKAL inhibited tumor necrosis factor-activated MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and EMT. Moreover, pKAL inhibited phosphorylation of Akt, but not that of protein kinase C. These results suggest that pKAL may serve as a therapeutic agent against cancer metastasis at least in part by inhibiting the cancer cell adhesion to ECs through suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and invasion through suppression of EMT. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. High resolution, large deformation 3D traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients.

  10. High resolution, large deformation 3D traction force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennet Toyjanova

    Full Text Available Traction Force Microscopy (TFM is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients.

  11. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasieli de Oliveira Ramos

    Full Text Available Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC. We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad, plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization.

  12. Fibrinogen matrix deposited on the surface of biomaterials acts as a natural anti-adhesive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullin, Roman; Christenson, Wayne; Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on the luminal surface of biomaterials is a critical early event during the interaction of blood with implanted vascular graft prostheses which determines their thrombogenicity. We have recently identified a nanoscale process by which fibrinogen modifies the adhesive properties of various surfaces for platelets and leukocytes. In particular, adsorption of fibrinogen at low density promotes cell adhesion while its adsorption at high density results in the formation of an extensible multilayer matrix, which dramatically reduces cell adhesion. It remains unknown whether deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of vascular graft materials produces this anti-adhesive effect. Using atomic force spectroscopy, single cell force spectroscopy, and standard adhesion assays with platelets and leukocytes, we have characterized the adhesive and physical properties of the contemporary biomaterials, before and after coating with fibrinogen. We found that uncoated PET, PTFE and ePTFE exhibited high adhesion forces developed between the AFM tip or cells and the surfaces. Adsorption of fibrinogen at the increasing concentrations progressively reduced adhesion forces, and at ≥2 μg/ml all surfaces were virtually nonadhesive. Standard adhesion assays performed with platelets and leukocytes confirmed this dependence. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying thrombogenicity of vascular grafts.

  13. Printed high-frequency RF identification antenna on ultrathin polymer film by simple production process for soft-surface adhesive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayata, Hiroki; Okamoto, Marin; Takeoka, Shinji; Iwase, Eiji; Fujie, Toshinori; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for manufacturing electronic devices using ultrathin polymer films, and develop a high-frequency RF identification. To expand the market for flexible devices, it is important to enhance their adhesiveness and conformability to surfaces, to simplify their fabrication, and to reduce their cost. We developed a method to design an antenna for use on an operable RF identification whose wiring was subjected to commercially available inkjet or simple screen printing, and successfully fabricated the RF identification. By using ultrathin films made of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) as substrates — less than 750 nm — the films could be attached to various surfaces, including soft surfaces, by van der Waals force and without using glue. We succeeded in the simple fabrication of an ultrathin RF identification including a commercial or simple printing process.

  14. Soft Pneumatic Actuator Fascicles for High Force and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Matthew A.; Sadeghi, Hamed; Florez, Juan Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Soft pneumatic actuators (SPAs) are found in mobile robots, assistive wearable devices, and rehabilitative technologies. While soft actuators have been one of the most crucial elements of technology leading the development of the soft robotics field, they fall short of force output and bandwidth requirements for many tasks. In addition, other general problems remain open, including robustness, controllability, and repeatability. The SPA-pack architecture presented here aims to satisfy these standards of reliability crucial to the field of soft robotics, while also improving the basic performance capabilities of SPAs by borrowing advantages leveraged ubiquitously in biology; namely, the structured parallel arrangement of lower power actuators to form the basis of a larger and more powerful actuator module. An SPA-pack module consisting of a number of smaller SPAs will be studied using an analytical model and physical prototype. Experimental measurements show an SPA pack to generate over 112 N linear force, while the model indicates the benefit of parallel actuator grouping over a geometrically equivalent single SPA scale as an increasing function of the number of individual actuators in the group. For a module of four actuators, a 23% increase in force production over a volumetrically equivalent single SPA is predicted and validated, while further gains appear possible up to 50%. These findings affirm the advantage of utilizing a fascicle structure for high-performance soft robotic applications over existing monolithic SPA designs. An example of high-performance soft robotic platform will be presented to demonstrate the capability of SPA-pack modules in a complete and functional system. PMID:28289573

  15. High resolution magnetic imaging: MicroSQUID Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, K; Ladam, C; Dolocan, V O; Hykel, D; Crozes, T [Institut Neel, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Schuster, K [Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimetrique 300 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire F-38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Mailly, D [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Site Alcatel de Marcoussis Route de Nozay F-91460 Marcoussis (France)], E-mail: klaus.hasselbach@grenoble.cnrs.fr

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic imaging at the micrometer scale with high sensitivity is a challenge difficult to be met. Magnetic force microscopy has a very high spatial resolution but is limited in magnetic resolution. Hall probe microscopy is very powerful but sensor fabrication at the one micron scale is difficult and effects due to discreteness of charge appear in the form of significant 1/f noise. SQUID microscopy is very powerful, having high magnetic resolution, but spatial resolution is usually of the order of 10 {mu}m. The difficulties lay mostly in an efficient way to couple flux to the sensor. The only way to improve spatial resolution is to place the probe close to the very edge of the support, thus maximising coupling and spatial resolution. If there has been found a way to bring close the tip, there must be also found a reliable a way to maintain distance during scanning. We want to present recent improvements on scanning microsquid microscopy: Namely the improved fabrication of microSQUID tips using silicon micro machining and the precise positioning of the micrometer diameter microSQUID loop by electron beam lithography. The microSQUID is a microbridge DC SQUID, with two opposite microbridges. The constrictions are patterned by high-resolution e-beam lithography and have a width of 20 nm and a length of about 100 nm. The distance control during scanning is obtained by integrating the microSQUID sensor with a piezoelectric tuning fork acting as a force sensor allowing to control height and even topographic imaging. The detector is placed in a custom built near field microscope and the sample temperature can be varied between 0.1 Kelvin and 10 K. The microscope is used to study magnetic flux structures in unconventional superconductors and will be used to observe thermal domains in superconducting detectors in the voltage state.

  16. The optimal shape of elastomer mushroom-like fibers for high and robust adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Aksak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, significant effort has been put into mimicking the ability of the gecko lizard to strongly and reversibly cling to surfaces, by using synthetic structures. Among these structures, mushroom-like elastomer fiber arrays have demonstrated promising performance on smooth surfaces matching the adhesive strengths obtained with the natural gecko foot-pads. It is possible to improve the already impressive adhesive performance of mushroom-like fibers provided that the underlying adhesion mechanism is understood. Here, the adhesion mechanism of bio-inspired mushroom-like fibers is investigated by implementing the Dugdale–Barenblatt cohesive zone model into finite elements simulations. It is found that the magnitude of pull-off stress depends on the edge angle θ and the ratio of the tip radius to the stalk radius β of the mushroom-like fiber. Pull-off stress is also found to depend on a dimensionless parameter χ, the ratio of the fiber radius to a length-scale related to the dominance of adhesive stress. As an estimate, the optimal parameters are found to be β = 1.1 and θ = 45°. Further, the location of crack initiation is found to depend on χ for given β and θ. An analytical model for pull-off stress, which depends on the location of crack initiation as well as on θ and β, is proposed and found to agree with the simulation results. Results obtained in this work provide a geometrical guideline for designing robust bio-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives.

  17. Intercellular Adhesion-Dependent Cell Survival and ROCK-Regulated Actomyosin-Driven Forces Mediate Self-Formation of a Retinal Organoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lowe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we dissected retinal organoid morphogenesis in human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived cultures and established a convenient method for isolating large quantities of retinal organoids for modeling human retinal development and disease. Epithelialized cysts were generated via floating culture of clumps of Matrigel/hESCs. Upon spontaneous attachment and spreading of the cysts, patterned retinal monolayers with tight junctions formed. Dispase-mediated detachment of the monolayers and subsequent floating culture led to self-formation of retinal organoids comprising patterned neuroretina, ciliary margin, and retinal pigment epithelium. Intercellular adhesion-dependent cell survival and ROCK-regulated actomyosin-driven forces are required for the self-organization. Our data supports a hypothesis that newly specified neuroretina progenitors form characteristic structures in equilibrium through minimization of cell surface tension. In long-term culture, the retinal organoids autonomously generated stratified retinal tissues, including photoreceptors with ultrastructure of outer segments. Our system requires minimal manual manipulation, has been validated in two lines of human pluripotent stem cells, and provides insight into optic cup invagination in vivo.

  18. Measurement of Metal Cutting Forces at High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princehouse, David W.

    1996-03-01

    Proposed numerically-controlled milling machines will cut aluminum alloys with cutter tip speeds of up to 130 m/s (300 MPH). There are a variety of challenging technical problems to be solved--high power density motors, inverters, cutter/machine dynamics, servo control systems--and compelling reasons to do so. We measured time-varying cutting forces at these tip speeds with a 25.4-cm (10-in) diameter cutter turning at rates up to 167 Hz (10,000 RPM.) We took special care to measure and compensate for the dynamic response of the force transducer (a three-axis quartz-crystal milling dynamometer), extending the useful bandwidth of the measurements well into the mechanical resonances of the dynamometer. We instrumented a production milling machine on the factory floor and processed megabytes of data, obtaining results minutes after a cut was made. This case study shows how a physicist's background in mechanics, instrumentation, signal processing, and computing hardware and software can help advance the state of the art in aerospace manufacturing.

  19. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    tract to the microbial flocs in waste water treatment facilities. Microbial biofilms may however also cause a wide range of industrial and medical problems, and have been implicated in a wide range of persistent infectious diseases, including implantassociated microbial infections. Bacterial adhesion...... in the formation of highly complex sessile communities, referred to as biofilms. Such microbial communities are often highly dynamic and heterogeneous in nature. Microbial biofilms are of great importance in a wide range of natural processes and industrial settings, from the commensal flora of the gastrointestinal...

  20. Quadrature phase interferometer for high resolution force spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Paolino, Pierdomenico; Bellon, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a deflection measurement setup for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is based on a quadrature phase differential interferometer: we measure the optical path difference between a laser beam reflecting above the cantilever tip and a reference beam reflecting on the static base of the sensor. A design with very low environmental susceptibility and another allowing calibrated measurements on a wide spectral range are described. Both enable a very high resolution (down to $2.5E-15 m/sqrt{Hz}$), illustrated by a thermal noise measurement on an AFM cantilever. A quick review shows that our precision is equaling or outperforming the best results reported in the literature, but for a much larger deflection range, up to a few microns.

  1. Shear adhesion strength of thermoplastic gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive exceeds material limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Andrew G; Fearing, Ronald S

    2011-09-20

    Natural gecko array wearless dynamic friction has recently been reported for 30,000 cycles on a smooth substrate. Following these findings, stiff polymer gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives have been proposed for high-cycle applications such as robot feet. Here we examine the behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and polypropylene (PP) microfiber arrays during repeated cycles of engagement on a glass surface, with a normal preload of less than 40 kPa. We find that fiber arrays maintained 54% of the original shear stress of 300 kPa after 10,000 cycles, despite showing a marked plastic deformation of fiber tips. This deformation could be due to shear-induced plastic creep of the fiber tips from high adhesion forces, adhesive wear, or thermal effects. We hypothesize that a fundamental material limit has been reached for these fiber arrays and that future gecko synthetic adhesive designs must take into account the high adhesive forces generated to avoid damage. Although the synthetic material and natural gecko arrays have a similar elastic modulus, the synthetic material does not show the same wear-free dynamic friction as the gecko.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion but not plasticity is affected by high substrate stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Kal Van Tam, Koichiro Uto, Mitsuhiro Ebara, Stefania Pagliari, Giancarlo Forte and Takao Aoyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledged ability of synthetic materials to induce cell-specific responses regardless of biological supplies provides tissue engineers with the opportunity to find the appropriate materials and conditions to prepare tissue-targeted scaffolds. Stem and mature cells have been shown to acquire distinct morphologies in vitro and to modify their phenotype when grown on synthetic materials with tunable mechanical properties. The stiffness of the substrate used for cell culture is likely to provide cells with mechanical cues mimicking given physiological or pathological conditions, thus affecting the biological properties of cells. The sensitivity of cells to substrate composition and mechanical properties resides in multiprotein complexes called focal adhesions, whose dynamic modification leads to cytoskeleton remodeling and changes in gene expression. In this study, the remodeling of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells in response to substrate stiffness was followed in the first phases of cell–matrix interaction, using poly-ε-caprolactone planar films with similar chemical composition and different elasticity. As compared to mature dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells showed a specific response to substrate stiffness, in terms of adhesion, as a result of differential focal adhesion assembly, while their multipotency as a bulk was not significantly affected by matrix compliance. Given the sensitivity of stem cells to matrix mechanics, the mechanobiology of such cells requires further investigations before preparing tissue-specific scaffolds.

  3. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the contac

  4. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  5. Highly sensitivity adhesion molecules detection in hereditary haemochromatosis patients reveals altered expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Norris, S

    2012-02-01

    Several abnormalities in the immune status of patients with hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) have been reported, suggesting an imbalance in their immune function. This may include persistent production of, or exposure to, altered immune signalling contributing to the pathogenesis of this disorder. Adhesion molecules L-, E- and P-Selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are some of the major regulators of the immune processes and altered levels of these proteins have been found in pathological states including cardiovascular diseases, arthritis and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to assess L-, E- and P-Selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in patients with HH and correlate these results with HFE mutation status and iron indexes. A total of 139 subjects were diagnosed with HH (C282Y homozygotes = 87, C282Y\\/H63D = 26 heterozygotes, H63D homozygotes = 26), 27 healthy control subjects with no HFE mutation (N\\/N), 18 normal subjects heterozygous for the H63D mutation served as age-sex-matched controls. We observed a significant decrease in L-selectin (P = 0.0002) and increased E-selectin and ICAM-1 (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0059) expression in HH patients compared with healthy controls. This study observes for the first time that an altered adhesion molecules profile occurs in patients with HH that is associated with specific HFE genetic component for iron overload, suggesting that differential expression of adhesion molecules may play a role in the pathogenesis of HH.

  6. Miniature High-Force, Long-Stroke SMA Linear Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummin, Mark A.; Donakowski, William; Cohen, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Improved long-stroke shape-memory-alloy (SMA) linear actuators are being developed to exert significantly higher forces and operate at higher activation temperatures than do prior SMA actuators. In these actuators, long linear strokes are achieved through the principle of displacement multiplication, according to which there are multiple stages, each intermediate stage being connected by straight SMA wire segments to the next stage so that relative motions of stages are additive toward the final stage, which is the output stage. Prior SMA actuators typically include polymer housings or shells, steel or aluminum stages, and polymer pads between successive stages of displacement-multiplication assemblies. Typical output forces of prior SMA actuators range from 10 to 20 N, and typical strokes range from 0.5 to 1.5 cm. An important disadvantage of prior SMA wire actuators is relatively low cycle speed, which is related to actuation temperature as follows: The SMA wires in prior SMA actuators are typically made of a durable nickel/titanium alloy that has a shape-memory activation temperature of 80 C. An SMA wire can be heated quickly from below to above its activation temperature to obtain a stroke in one direction, but must then be allowed to cool to somewhat below its activation temperature (typically, less than or equal to 60 C in the case of an activation temperature of 80 C) to obtain a stroke in the opposite direction (return stroke). At typical ambient temperatures, cooling times are of the order of several seconds. Cooling times thus limit cycle speeds. Wires made of SMA alloys having significantly higher activation temperatures [denoted ultra-high-temperature (UHT) SMA alloys] cool to the required lower return-stroke temperatures more rapidly, making it possible to increase cycle speeds. The present development is motivated by a need, in some applications (especially aeronautical and space-flight applications) for SMA actuators that exert higher forces, operate

  7. The Adhesion Improvement of Cubic Boron Nitride Film on High Speed Steel Substrate Implanted by Boron Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Zhi-hai; ZHANG Ping; TAN Jun

    2005-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride(c-BN) films were deposited on W6Mo5Cr4V2 high speed steel(HSS) substrate implanted with boron ion by RF-magnetron sputtering. The films were analyzed by the bending beam method, scratch test, XPS and AFM. The experimental results show that the implantation of boron atom can reduce the in ternal stress and improve the adhesion strength of the films. The critical load of scratch test rises to 27.45 N, compared to 1.75 N of c-BN film on the unimplanted HSS. The AFM shows that the surface of the c-BN film on the implanted HSS is low in roughness and small in grain size. Then the composition of the boron implanted layer was analyzed by the XPS. And the influence of the boron implanted layer on the internal stress and adhesion strength of c-BN films were investigated.

  8. Adhesive modification of indium-tin-oxide surface for template attachment for deposition of highly ordered nanostructure arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W. [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Liao, L.S., E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Cai, S.D.; Zhou, D.Y.; Jin, Z.M.; Shi, X.B.; Lei, Y.L. [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), a very cheap polymer with one hydroxyl group in each repeating unit, was spun coated on the surface of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) substrate to improve the adhesion between the substrate and a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template layer for a template-directed fabrication of nanostructures. Compared with dihydroxy-terminated polystyrene (PS-dOH) and a silane coupling agent (KH550), PVA was a superior binder because of its abundant hydroxyl groups for adhesion enhancement and its low cost for applications. As an example, a highly ordered CdSe nanorod array free standing on the ITO substrate was electrochemically deposited by using an ultrathin AAO layer as the template on the PVA modified surface. It was demonstrated that the PVA modified ITO can be reliably used for the template-directed fabrication of nanostructures.

  9. Microbowl-arrayed surface generated by EBL of negative-tone SU-8 for highly adhesive hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiangmeng, E-mail: xiangmengli2010@stu.xjtu.edu.cn; Shao, Jinyou, E-mail: jyshao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ding, Yucheng, E-mail: ycding@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Tian, Hongmiao, E-mail: tian.hongmiao@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    A unique microbowl-arrayed surface demonstrates highly adhesive hydrophobicity similar to a rose-petal. Such a textured surface is generated by electron beam lithography on negative-tone SU-8 resist with X–Y cross-lines scanning. The microbowl array patterned surface possesses an advancing contact angle of 160° and a contact angle hysteresis of 90°, and it is capable of holding a 50 μl aqueous droplet as positioned perpendicularly. The wetting properties of adhesive hydrophobicity can be tuned by varying the exposure dosage in EBL as well as the thickness of the fluorocarbon deposition, both of which can change the curvature of microbowl array with submicron-ridges. Therefore, the contact state on such microbowl-arrayed surfaces can be varied from Cassie–Baxter's to Wenzel's model.

  10. Highly loaded interactive mixtures for dry powder inhalers: prediction of the adhesion capacity using surface energy and solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K G; Dowe, U; Zadnik, J

    2005-05-01

    In order to correlate drug adhesion properties of a highly loaded interactive mixture for the use in dry powder inhalers with the surface energy and to establish a link to the solubility parameter, surface free energy was detected for micronized substances (salbutamol sulfate, salbutamol base, theophylline and alpha-lactose monohydrate) using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Interactive mixtures with coarse crystalline alpha-lactose monohydrate as a carrier were prepared at loading levels from 7.5 to 20% (w/w) and analyzed with respect to their adhesion capacity (CA) using the air jet sieving method. Solubility parameters were taken from literature or calculated. As a result the CA was independent of the drug load and correlated linearly with volume specific surface energy interaction (SEIv) values of the adherents (R2 = 0.98498). A link between SEIv and the size normalized solubility parameter (delta(tot)/d50) was found. Consequently, plotting delta(tot)/d50 versus CA resulted also in a strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.99140). Overall a powerful tool was established to judge and quantify adhesion properties of highly loaded interactive mixtures even for estimates in early preformulation at a time where just the molecular structure of the active ingredient is known.

  11. The Properties of Light Pressure Force with High Order in Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈险峰; 方建兴; 朱士群

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the light pressure force in low and high intensity laser fields is derived. The exact numerical results of forces Fn∥(n=0,1,2,3,4,5,6…) through the matrix continued fraction method are presented. At low intensity field (G=1), the spatially averaged force F0∥ gives a cooling effect at the negative detuning. At high intensity (G=64), the effects of the forces with higher order (n≥2) appear and the contributes of the forces with odd or even order are opposite. It is great different from no high order force at low intensity.

  12. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well...... to rewriting on arbitrary adhesive categories....

  13. Adhesion properties of gecko setae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ginel; Peattie, Anne; Daniels, Roxanne; Full, Robert; Kenny, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Millions of keratin hairs on gecko feet, called setae, act as a spectacular dry adhesive. Each seta branches into hundreds of smaller fibers that terminate in spatula-shaped ends. Morphological differences between the setae from different gecko species are suspected to affect both single-seta and whole-animal adhesion properties. Single-seta adhesive force measurements made using a MEMS piezoresistive cantilever capable of two-axis measurements are presented.

  14. Underwater adhesion: The barnacle way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.

    of substrates in aqueous environment. The adhesive properties of the barnacle adhesive proteins have been utilized for various dental and medical purposes. These polyphenolic proteins are currently in demand as they are non-toxic biomaterial, highly effective...

  15. Advanced adhesion and friction measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    An advanced micro-force tester for investigating the micromechanical behavior of various patterned surfaces in dry and wet conditions is presented in this paper. The parallel slice-beam configuration of the tester not only eliminates the large load-dependent slope and tangential displacement at the free end that is found in a single beam system, but also performs a trans-scale deflection with high sensitivity and linearity for force sensing. Meanwhile, the simple structure is characterized by low cost, high efficiency, and ease of fabrication. An integrated nano- and micro-stage comprise the mobile table to produce a large stroke with high resolution, which is specifically required in wet adhesion testing because of the formation of a long liquid bridge. Preliminary experiments of adhesion and friction conducted using PDMS pillars with a plano-convex lens validated the feasibility of this setup.

  16. Analysis of the behaviours mediating barnacle cyprid reversible adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic 'walking' behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as 'footprints' on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic 'suction cup'. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous 'temporary adhesive', 'dry' adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface - presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond - seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion, inherently sticky and

  17. Analysis of the behaviours mediating barnacle cyprid reversible adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Aldred

    Full Text Available When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic 'walking' behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as 'footprints' on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic 'suction cup'. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous 'temporary adhesive', 'dry' adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface - presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond - seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion

  18. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  19. Response of thermosphere density to high-latitude forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y.; Kosch, M. J.; Vickers, H.; Sutton, E. K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Solar wind-magnetospheric disturbances cause enhancements in the energy input to the high-latitude upper atmosphere through particle precipitation and Joule heating. As the upper atmosphere is heated and expanded during geomagnetically disturbed periods, the neutral density in the thermosphere increases at a fixed altitude. Conversely, the thermosphere contracts during the recovery phase of the disturbance, resulting in a decrease of the density. The main objectives of this study are (1) to determine the morphology of the global thermospheric density response to high-latitude forcing, and (2) to determine the recovery speed of the thermosphere density after geomagnetic disturbances. For (1), we use thermospheric density data measured by the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite during 2000-2010. It is demonstrated that the density enhancement during disturbed periods occurs first in the dayside cusp region, and the density at other regions slowly follows it. The reverse process is observed when geomagnetic activity ceases; the density enhancement in the cusp region fades away first, then the global density slowly goes back to the quiet level. For (2), we analyze EISCAT Svalbard radar and Tromso UHF radar data to estimate thermospheric densities during the recovery phase of geomagnetic disturbances. We attempt to determine the time constant for the density recovery both inside and outside the cusp region.

  20. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario Roa, S. Alex Schumaker...disclose the work. PA Clearance Number: 16308 Clearance Date: 6/17/2016 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For presentation at AIAA Propulsion and Energy; Salt...the coupling between the impact waves created by impinging jets and high frequency acoustic pressure perturbations. High speed, backlit imaging was

  1. Design and microfabrication of a high-aspect-ratio PDMS microbeam array for parallel nanonewton force measurement and protein printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasoglu, F. M.; Bohl, A. J.; Layton, B. E.

    2007-03-01

    Cell and protein mechanics has applications ranging from cellular development to tissue engineering. Techniques such as magnetic tweezers, optic tweezers and atomic force microscopy have been used to measure cell deformation forces of the order of piconewtons to nanonewtons. In this study, an array of polymeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microbeams with diameters of 10-40 µm and lengths of 118 µm was fabricated from Sylgard® with curing agent concentrations ranging from 5% to 20%. The resulting spring constants were 100-300 nN µm-1. The elastic modulus of PDMS was determined experimentally at different curing agent concentrations and found to be 346 kPa to 704 kPa in a millimeter-scale array and ~1 MPa in a microbeam array. Additionally, the microbeam array was used to print laminin for the purpose of cell adhesion. Linear and nonlinear finite element analyses are presented and compared to the closed-from solution. The highly compliant, transparent, biocompatible PDMS may offer a method for more rapid throughput in cell and protein mechanics force measurement experiments with sensitivities necessary for highly compliant structures such as axons.

  2. Curing Behavior and Viscoelasticity of Dual-Curable Adhesives Based on High-Reactivity Azo Initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Shim, Gyu-Seong; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Moon, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Kwan; No, Dong-Hun; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the curing behavior of dual-curable acrylic resin to solve problems associated with curing of adhesives in shaded areas during display manufacture. A low-temperature curing-type thermal initiator, 2,2'-azobis (4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile), with a 30°C half-life decomposition temperature was used in the investigation. Dual-curable adhesives were prepared according to the thermal initiator content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation dose. The effects of thermal initiator and UV irradiation on the curing behavior and viscoelasticity were investigated. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gel-fraction analysis, an evaluation was carried out to determine the degree of curing after dual UV/thermal curing. In addition, the real-time curing behavior was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a UV/advanced rheometric expansion system. A lift-off test was carried out to verify the effects of dual curing on adhesion performance. Application of UV irradiation before thermal curing suppressed the thermal curing efficiency. Also, the network structure formed after dual curing with low UV dose showed higher crosslinking density. Therefore, the thermal initiator radical effectively influenced uncured areas with low curing temperature and initiator content without causing problems in UV-curable zones.

  3. High adhesion transparent conducting films using graphene oxide hybrid carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Shi-Xun; Wang, Jie; Geng, Hong-Zhang; Jia, Song-Lin; Xu, Chun-Xia; Li, Lin-Ge; Shi, Pei-Pei; Li, Guangfen

    2017-01-01

    Flexible transparent conducting films (TCFs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted more and more attention for their wide range of potential applications. While, there are still some problems to be solved on several aspects. In this study, a graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (GO/CNT) hybrid TCF was fabricated through the simple spray coating method. GO sheets were introduced to form new electron transporting channels. It was found that the best optoelectronic property films were fabricated when the ratio of GO/CNT is 1.5:1.0, which the sheet resistance of the film was found to be 146 Ω/sq at the transmittance of 86.0%. Due to the two-dimensional structure and the oxidation groups of GO sheets, flatness and wettability of the electrode surface was improved obviously. Adhesion factor of the TCFs was calculated by the change of transparent and sheet resistance after trial test, the addition of GO sheets enhanced the adhesion dramatically and the mechanism was analyzed. Improvements of conductivity, flatness, wettability and adhesion above are all advantageous for the solution-based processing of organic electronics for spraying and printing.

  4. Possibilities of Increase of Adhesion of the Cubic Boron Nitride Coatings by Applying an Interfacial Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaciejKupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the work the chosen investigations of the adhesion force of thin, superhard coatings to the cutting edges made of cemented carbides are presented. For identification of the adhesion force of coatings to substrate an automatic scratch tester constructed at Poznan University of Technology was applied. The estimation of the adhesion force (value of critical load measured during scratch test) was carried out on the base of the vibration signal. Results of investigations are pointed at the influence of a surface preparation (degreasing, etching, low and high-temperature sputtering) on a critical load values. It was round that the most effective method for surface preparation is low temperature sputtering. The influence of the TiC+Al2O3+TiN interracial layer on increase of the adhesion force of BN coating to cemented carbides substrate was observed.

  5. Possibilities of Increase of Adhesion of the Cubic Boron Nitride Coatings by Applying an Interfacial Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Kupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the work the chosen investigations of the adhesion force of thin, superhard coatings to the cutting edges made of cemented carbides are presented. For identification of the adhesion force of coatings to substrate an automatic scratch tester constructed at Poznan University of Technology was applied. The estimation of the adhesion force (value of critical load measured during scratch test) was carried out on the base of the vibration signal. Results of investigations are pointed at the influence of a surface preparation (degreasing, etching, low and high-temperature sputtering) on a critical load values.It was found that the most effective method for surface preparation is low temperature sputtering. The influence of the TiC+Al2O3+TiN interfacial layer on increase of the adhesion force of BN coating to cemented carbides substrate was observed.

  6. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  7. Bending energy penalty enhances the adhesive strength of functional amyloid curli to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Wang, Ao; DeBenedictis, Elizabeth P; Keten, Sinan

    2017-09-27

    The functional amyloid curli fiber, a major proteinaceous component of biofilm extracellular matrices, plays an important role in biofilm formation and enterobacteriaceae adhesion. Curli nanofibers exhibit exceptional underwater adhesion to various surfaces, have high rigidity and strong tensile mechanical properties, and thus hold great promise in biomaterials. The mechanisms of how curli fibers strongly attach to surfaces and detach under force remain elusive. To investigate curli fiber adhesion to surfaces, we developed a coarse-grained curli fiber model, in which the protein subunit CsgA (curli specific gene A) self-assembles into the fiber. The coarse-grained model yields physiologically relevant and tunable bending rigidity and persistence length. The force-induced desorption of a single curli fiber is examined using coarse-grained modeling and theoretical analysis. We find that the bending energy penalty arising from high persistence length enhances the resistance of the curli fiber against desorption and thus strengthens the adhesion of the curli fiber to surfaces. The CsgA-surface adhesion energy and the curli fiber bending rigidity both play crucial roles in the resistance of curli fiber against desorption from surfaces. To enable the desorption process, the applied peeling force must overcome both the interfacial adhesion energy and the energy barrier for bending the curli fiber at the peeling front. We show that the energy barrier to desorption increases with the interfacial adhesion energy, however, the bending induced failure of a single curli fiber limits the work of adhesion if the proportion of the CsgA-surface adhesion energy to the CsgA-CsgA cohesive energy becomes large. These results illustrate that the optimal adhesion performance of nanofibers is dictated by the interplay between bending, surface energy and cohesive energy. Our model provides timely insight into enterobacteriaceae adhesion mechanisms as well as future designs of engineered

  8. The differential effect of metabolic alkalosis on maximum force and rate of force development during repeated, high-intensity cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Jason C; Marshall, Paul W M; Raftry, Sean; Brooks, Cristy; Dowswell, Ben; Romero, Rick; Green, Simon

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the influence of sodium bicarbonate supplementation on maximal force production, rate of force development (RFD), and muscle recruitment during repeated bouts of high-intensity cycling. Ten male and female (n = 10) subjects completed two fixed-cadence, high-intensity cycling trials. Each trial consisted of a series of 30-s efforts at 120% peak power output (maximum graded test) that were interspersed with 30-s recovery periods until task failure. Prior to each trial, subjects consumed 0.3 g/kg sodium bicarbonate (ALK) or placebo (PLA). Maximal voluntary contractions were performed immediately after each 30-s effort. Maximal force (F max) was calculated as the greatest force recorded over a 25-ms period throughout the entire contraction duration while maximal RFD (RFD max) was calculated as the greatest 10-ms average slope throughout that same contraction. F max declined similarly in both the ALK and PLA conditions, with baseline values (ALK: 1,226 ± 393 N; PLA: 1,222 ± 369 N) declining nearly 295 ± 54 N [95% confidence interval (CI) = 84-508 N; P force vs. maximum rate of force development during a whole body fatiguing task.

  9. Ion drag force in plasmas at high electronegativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I; Yu, M Y; Stenflo, L; Xu, S

    2005-07-01

    The electric as well as the positive- and negative-ion drag forces on an isolated dust grain in an electronegative plasma are studied for large negative-ion densities, when the negative ions are not Boltzmann distributed. The investigation is carried out for submicrometer dust particles, so that the theory of Coulomb scattering is applicable for describing ion-dust interaction. Among the forces acting on the dust grain, the negative-ion drag force is found to be important. The effects of the negative-ion density, neutral-gas pressure, and dust-grain size on the forces are also considered. It is shown that by increasing the density of the negative ions one can effectively manipulate the dust grains. Our results imply that both dust voids and balls can be formed.

  10. Mapping in vitro local material properties of intact and disrupted virions at high resolution using multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Alexander; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Carrascosa, José L.; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Raman, Arvind

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the relationships between viral material properties (stiffness, strength, charge density, adhesion, hydration, viscosity, etc.), structure (protein sub-units, genome, surface receptors, appendages), and functions (self-assembly, stability, disassembly, infection) is of significant importance in physical virology and nanomedicine. Conventional Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) methods have measured a single physical property such as the stiffness of the entire virus from nano-indentation at a few points which severely limits the study of structure-property-function relationships. We present an in vitro dynamic AFM technique operating in the intermittent contact regime which synthesizes anharmonic Lorentz-force excited AFM cantilevers to map quantitatively at nanometer resolution the local electro-mechanical force gradient, adhesion, and hydration layer viscosity within individual φ29 virions. Furthermore, the changes in material properties over the entire φ29 virion provoked by the local disruption of its shell are studied, providing evidence of bacteriophage depressurization. The technique significantly generalizes recent multi-harmonic theory (A. Raman, et al., Nat. Nanotechnol., 2011, 6, 809-814) and enables high-resolution in vitro quantitative mapping of multiple material properties within weakly bonded viruses and nanoparticles with complex structure that otherwise cannot be observed using standard AFM techniques.Understanding the relationships between viral material properties (stiffness, strength, charge density, adhesion, hydration, viscosity, etc.), structure (protein sub-units, genome, surface receptors, appendages), and functions (self-assembly, stability, disassembly, infection) is of significant importance in physical virology and nanomedicine. Conventional Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) methods have measured a single physical property such as the stiffness of the entire virus from nano-indentation at a few points which severely limits the

  11. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  12. Stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by surface wrinkling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Kwak, Moon Kyu; Suh, Kahp Y

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (approximately 10.8 N/cm(2)) and shear adhesion (approximately 14.7 N/cm(2)) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of approximately 3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of approximately 0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment.

  13. Stretchable, Adhesion-Tunable Dry Adhesive by Surface Wrinkling

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2010-02-16

    We introduce a simple yet robust method of fabricating a stretchable, adhesion-tunable dry adhesive by combining replica molding and surface wrinkling. By utilizing a thin, wrinkled polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) sheet with a thickness of 1 mm with built-in micropillars, active, dynamic control of normal and shear adhesion was achieved. Relatively strong normal (∼10.8 N/cm2) and shear adhesion (∼14.7 N/cm2) forces could be obtained for a fully extended (strained) PDMS sheet (prestrain of∼3%), whereas the forces could be rapidly reduced to nearly zero once the prestrain was released (prestrain of ∼0.5%). Moreover, durability tests demonstrated that the adhesion strength in both the normal and shear directions was maintained over more than 100 cycles of attachment and detachment. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. Adhesion enhancement of biomimetic dry adhesives by nanoparticle in situ synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Téllez, J. P.; Harirchian-Saei, S.; Li, Y.; Menon, C.

    2013-10-01

    A novel method to increase the adhesion strength of a gecko-inspired dry adhesive is presented. Gold nanoparticles are synthesized on the tips of the microfibrils of a polymeric dry adhesive to increase its Hamaker constant. Formation of the gold nanoparticles is qualitatively studied through a colour change in the originally transparent substance and quantitatively analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. A pull-off force test is employed to quantify the adhesion enhancement. Specifically, adhesion forces of samples with and without embedded gold nanoparticles are measured and compared. The experimental results indicate that an adhesion improvement of 135% can be achieved.

  15. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  16. Precipitation-Strengthened, High-Temperature, High-Force Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Nathal, Michael V.; Crombie, Edwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are an enabling component in the development of compact, lightweight, durable, high-force actuation systems particularly for use where hydraulics or electrical motors are not practical. However, commercial shape memory alloys based on NiTi are only suitable for applications near room temperature, due to their relatively low transformation temperatures, while many potential applications require higher temperature capability. Consequently, a family of (Ni,Pt)(sub 1-x)Ti(sub x) shape memory alloys with Ti concentrations ranging from about 15 to 25 at.% have been developed for applications in which there are requirements for SMA actuators to exert high forces at operating temperatures higher than those of conventional binary NiTi SMAs. These alloys can be heat treated in the range of 500 C to produce a series of fine precipitate phases that increase the strength of alloy while maintaining a high transformation temperature, even in Ti-lean compositions.

  17. Fundamental High-Speed Limits in Single-Molecule, Single-Cell, and Nanoscale Force Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Force spectroscopy is enhancing our understanding of single-biomolecule, single-cell, and nanoscale mechanics. Force spectroscopy postulates the proportionality between the interaction force and the instantaneous probe deflection. By studying the probe dynamics, we demonstrate that the total force acting on the probe has three different components: the interaction, the hydrodynamic, and the inertial. The amplitudes of those components depend on the ratio between the resonant frequency and the frequency at which the data are measured. A force–distance curve provides a faithful measurement of the interaction force between two molecules when the inertial and hydrodynamic components are negligible. Otherwise, force spectroscopy measurements will underestimate the value of unbinding forces. Neglecting the above force components requires the use of frequency ratios in the 50–500 range. These ratios will limit the use of high-speed methods in force spectroscopy. The theory is supported by numerical simulations. PMID:27359243

  18. AtaA, a new member of the trimeric autotransporter adhesins from Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 mediating high adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter sp. Tol 5 exhibits an autoagglutinating nature and noteworthy adhesiveness to various abiotic surfaces from hydrophobic plastics to hydrophilic glass and stainless steel. Although previous studies have suggested that bacterionanofibers on Tol 5 cells are involved in the adhesive phenotype of Tol 5, the fiber that directly mediates Tol 5 adhesion has remained unknown. Here, we present a new member of trimeric autotransporter adhesins designated AtaA, which we discovered by analyzing a less adhesive mutant of Tol 5, T1, obtained by transposon mutagenesis. AtaA forms thinner and shorter nanofibers than fimbriae on Tol 5 cells. We performed target disruption of ataA by allelic marker exchange, and the resulting ΔataA strain was complemented with ataA on the Escherichia coli-Acinetobacter shuttle vector, which was newly constructed. These results proved that AtaA is essential for Tol 5's autoagglutinating nature and high adhesiveness to surfaces of various materials. In addition, the adhesiveness to solid surfaces mediated by AtaA is notably higher than that mediated by YadA of Yersinia enterocolitica WA-314. Moreover, and importantly, these characteristics can be conferred to the non-adhesive, non-agglutinating bacterium Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 in trans by transformation with ataA, with expected applications to microbial immobilization.

  19. A design methodology for biologically inspired dry fibrillar adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksak, Burak

    Realization of the unique aspects of gecko adhesion and incorporating these aspects into a comprehensive design methodology is essential to enable fabrication of application oriented gecko-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives. To address the need for such a design methodology, we propose a fibrillar adhesion model that evaluates the effect of fiber dimensions and material on adhesive performance of fiber arrays. A fibrillar adhesion model is developed to predict the adhesive characteristics of an array of fibrillar structures, and quantify the effect of fiber length, radius, spacing, and material. Photolithography techniques were utilized to fabricate elastomer microfiber arrays. Fibers that are fabricated from stiff SU-8 photoresist are used to fabricate a flexible negative mold that facilitates fabrication of fiber arrays from various elastomers with high yield. The tips of the cylindrical fibers are modified to mushroom-like tip shapes. Adhesive strengths in excess of 100 kPa is obtained with mushroom tipped elastomer microfibers. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are utilized as enhanced friction materials by partially embedding inside soft polyurethanes. Friction coefficients up to 1 were repeatedly obtained from the resulting VACNF composite structures. A novel fabrication method is used to attach Poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) molecular brush-like structures on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These brushes are grown on unstructured PDMS and PDMS fibers with mushroom tips. Pull-off force is enhanced by up to 7 times with PBA brush grafted micro-fiber arrays over unstructured PDMS substrate. Adhesion model, initially developed for curved smooth surfaces, is extended to self-affine fractal surfaces to better reflect the adhesion performance of fiber arrays on natural surfaces. Developed adhesion model for fiber arrays is used in an optimization scheme which estimates optimal design parameters to obtain maximum adhesive strength on a given

  20. Calcium phosphate coating containing silver shows high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity and inhibits bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Yoshiki, E-mail: andoy@jmmc.jp [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Noda, Iwao; Sakurai, Nobuko [Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomonori [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Yonekura, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the serious complications of orthopedic implants. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, we developed a novel coating technology of calcium phosphate (CP) containing silver (Ag), designated Ag-CP coating, using a thermal spraying technique. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy and biological safety of this coating. In vitro antibacterial activity tests showed that the growths of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are completely suppressed on Ag-CP coating. In vitro bacterial adherence tests revealed that the number of adherent bacteria on the surface of this coating is significantly less (p < 0.02) than that on the surface of the CP coating. Moreover, the Ag-CP coating completely inhibits MRSA adhesion [<10 colony-forming units (CFU)] when 10{sup 2} CFU MRSA is inoculated. On the other hand, V79 Chinese hamster lung cells were found to grow on the Ag-CP coating as well as on the CP coating in a cytotoxicity test. These results indicate that the Ag-CP coating on the surface of orthopedic implants exhibits antibacterial activity and inhibits bacterial adhesion without cytotoxicity.

  1. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  2. Controlling E. coli adhesion on high-k dielectric bioceramics films using poly(amino acid) multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Neil J; Wells-Kingsbury, Jamie M; Ihrig, Marcella M; Fangman, Teresa E; Namavar, Fereydoon; Cheung, Chin Li

    2012-03-06

    The influence of high-k dielectric bioceramics with poly(amino acid) multilayer coatings on the adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was studied by evaluating the density of bacteria coverage on the surfaces of these materials. A biofilm forming K-12 strain (PHL628), a wild-type strain (JM109), and an engineered strain (XL1-Blue) of E. coli were examined for their adherence to zirconium oxide (ZrO(2)) and tantalum oxide (Ta(2)O(5)) surfaces functionalized with single and multiple layers of poly(amino acid) polyelectrolytes made by the layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition. Two poly(amino acids), poly(l-arginine) (PARG) and poly(l-aspartic acid) (PASP), were chosen for the functionalization schemes. All three strains were found to grow and preferentially adhere to bare bioceramic film surfaces over bare glass slides. The bioceramic and glass surfaces functionalized with positively charged poly(amino acid) top layers were observed to enhance the adhesion of these bacteria by up to 4-fold in terms of bacteria surface coverage. Minimal bacteria coverage was detected on surfaces functionalized with negatively charged poly(amino acid) top layers. The effect of different poly(amino acid) coatings to promote or minimize bacterial adhesion was observed to be drastically enhanced with the bioceramic substrates than with glass. Such observed enhancements were postulated to be attributed to the formation of higher density of poly(amino acids) coatings enabled by the high dielectric strength (k) of these bioceramics. The multilayer poly(amino acid) functionalization scheme was successfully applied to utilize this finding for micropatterning E. coli on bioceramic thin films.

  3. Elaboration of highly hydrophobic polymeric surface — a potential strategy to reduce the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncin-Epaillard, F., E-mail: fabienne.poncin-epaillard@univ-lemans.fr [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), département Polymères, Colloïdes et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 6283 Université LUNAM, av. O. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Herry, J.M. [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1319 MICALIS, équipe B2HM, 25 avenue de la République, 91300 Massy (France); Marmey, P.; Legeay, G. [CTTM, 20 rue Thalès de Milet 72000 Le Mans (France); Debarnot, D. [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), département Polymères, Colloïdes et Interfaces, UMR CNRS 6283 Université LUNAM, av. O. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Bellon-Fontaine, M.N. [INRA-AgroParisTech, UMR 1319 MICALIS, équipe B2HM, 25 avenue de la République, 91300 Massy (France)

    2013-04-01

    Different polymeric surfaces have been modified in order to reach a high hydrophobic character, indeed the superhydrophobicity property. For this purpose, polypropylene and polystyrene have been treated by RF or μwaves CF{sub 4} plasma with different volumes, the results were compared according to the density of injected power. The effect of pretreatment such as mechanical abrasion or plasma activation was also studied. The modified surfaces were shown as hydrophobic, or even superhydrophobic depending of defects density. They were characterized by measurement of wettability and roughness at different scales, i.e. macroscopic, mesoscopic and atomic. It has been shown that a homogeneous surface at the macroscopic scale could be heterogeneous at lower mesoscopic scale. This was associated with the crystallinity of the material. The bioadhesion tests were performed with Gram positive and negative pathogenic strains: Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Hafnia alvei. They have demonstrated an antibacterial efficiency of very hydrophobic and amorphous PS treated for all strains tested and a strain-dependent efficiency with modified PP surface being very heterogeneous at the mesoscopic scale. Thus, these biological results pointed out not only the respective role of the surface chemistry and topography in bacterial adhesion, but also the dependence on the peaks and valley distribution at bacteria dimension scale. Highlights: ► Simple, eco-friendly modification of polymers leading to highly hydrophobic property ► Plasma treatment inducing surface fluorination and roughness ► Study of non-adhesion of different types of bacteria onto such polymeric surfaces ► Dependence of their non-adhesion on surface topography whatever their characteristics.

  4. New linear piezomotors for high-force precise positioning applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Letty, Ronan; Claeyssen, Frank; Barillot, Francois; Six, Marc F.; Bouchilloux, Philippe

    1998-07-01

    Piezomotors are an increasingly competitive alternative to electromagnetic stepper motors, especially in applications where large bandwidths and/or precise positioning control are desired. Piezomotors use a combination of electromechanical and frictional forces and, compared to conventional electromagnetic motors, have the advantages that no power supply is required to maintain the motor in position and no lubrication is necessary in the device. The operating principle of these motors relies on the use of an ultrasonic vibration, which is created via the piezoelectric effect (at resonance in most cases), in order to generate vibration forces at the `stator/rotor' contact interface. A mechanical preload is also applied at this contact interface and is responsible for the motor's holding force at rest. To meet the specifications of an aerospace application, we developed a new design of Linear PiezoMotors (LPMs). The first prototype we built shows very promising results, and makes the LPM a serious candidate to replace conventional stepper motors. The LPM features the following characteristics: a standing force of 100 N, a blocked force of 37 N, a maximum actuation speed of 23 mm/s, a maximum run of 10 mm, a mass of 500 g, an electrical power of 2.2 W, and a position accuracy superior to 1 micrometers . To our knowledge, the driving force delivered by the LPM has never before been achieved in resonant devices. This paper describes the physical operating principles of the LPM, as well as the modeling tools and experimental techniques we used for its development. Several implementation schemes are also presented and show the wide range of possible applications offered by the linear piezomotor.

  5. Identifying traction-separation behavior of self-adhesive polymeric films from in situ digital images under T-peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nase, Michael; Rennert, Mirko; Naumenko, Konstantin; Eremeyev, Victor A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper procedures are developed to identify traction-separation curves from digital images of the deformed flexible films during peeling. T-peel tests were performed for self-adhesive polymeric films. High quality photographs of the deformed shape within and outside the zone of adhesive interaction were made in situ by the digital light microscope. The deformed line is approximated by a power series with coefficients computed by minimizing a least squares functional. Two approaches to identify the traction-separation curve for the given deformation line are proposed. The first one is based on the energy integral of the non-linear theory of rods and allows the direct evaluation of the adhesion force potential. The second one utilizes the complementary energy type variational equation and the Ritz method to compute the adhesion force. The accuracy of both approaches is analyzed with respect to different approximations for the deformed line and the force of interaction. The obtained traction vs. axial coordinate and the traction-separation curves provide several properties of the adhesive system including the maximum adhesion force, the length of the adhesive zone and the equilibrium position, where the adhesive force is zero while the separation is positive.

  6. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  7. Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels with high mechanical strengths and cell adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Mi, Wenying; Wang, Huiliang; Su, Yunlan; He, Changcheng

    2014-11-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite/polyacrylamide composite hydrogels were successfully fabricated by physically mixing nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp) particles into a peroxidized micelles initiated and cross-linked (pMIC) polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel. The nanocomposite hydrogels exhibited excellent mechanical properties. The fracture tensile stresses of the gels were in the range of 0.21-0.86 MPa and the fracture tensile strains were up to 30 mm/mm, and the compressive strengths were up to 35.8 MPa. Meanwhile the introduction of nHAp endowed the composite hydrogels with good cell adhesion properties. This nHAp/PAAm nanocomposite hydrogel is expected to find potential applications in tissue engineering.

  8. Adhesive Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lack, Stephen; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2004-01-01

    We introduce adhesive categories, which are categories with structure ensuring that pushouts along monomorphisms are well-behaved. Many types of graphical structures used in computer science are shown to be examples of adhesive categories. Double-pushout graph rewriting generalises well to rewrit...

  9. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, Masayasu; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78–88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94–97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  10. Mechanisms of adhesion in geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autumn, Kellar; Peattie, Anne M

    2002-12-01

    The extraordinary adhesive capabilities of geckos have challenged explanation for millennia, since Aristotle first recorded his observations. We have discovered many of the secrets of gecko adhesion, yet the millions of dry, adhesive setae on the toes of geckos continue to generate puzzling new questions and valuable answers. Each epidermally-derived, keratinous seta ends in hundreds of 200 nm spatular tips, permitting intimate contact with rough and smooth surfaces alike. Prior studies suggested that adhesive force in gecko setae was directly proportional to the water droplet contact angle (θ) , an indicator of the free surface energy of a substrate. In contrast, new theory suggests that adhesion energy between a gecko seta and a surface (W(GS)) is in fact proportional to (1 + cosθ), and only for θ > 60°. A reanalysis of prior data, in combination with our recent study, support the van der Waals hypothesis of gecko adhesion, and contradict surface hydrophobicity as a predictor of adhesion force. Previously, we and our collaborators measured the force production of a single seta. Initial efforts to attach a seta failed because of improper 3D orientation. However, by simulating the dynamics of gecko limbs during climbing (based on force plate data) we discovered that, in single setae, a small normal preload, combined with a 5 μm displacement yielded a very large adhesive force of 200 microNewton (μN), 10 times that predicted by whole-animal measurements. 6.5 million setae of a single tokay gecko attached maximally could generate 130 kg force. This raises the question of how geckos manage to detach their feet in just 15 ms. We discovered that simply increasing the angle that the setal shaft makes with the substrate to 30° causes detachment. Understanding how simultaneous attachment and release of millions of setae are controlled will require an approach that integrates levels ranging from molecules to lizards.

  11. 4种玻璃离子水门汀对ITI基台与金属内冠之间粘接力的比较研究%A comparative study on adhesive force of cast crown copings cemented to ITI abutments using four glass ionomer cements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程耀; 傅柏平

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究4种玻璃离子类水门汀对ITI种植系统标准颈粘接固位基台和金属内冠之间的粘接力。方法将10只金属内冠与10只I T I标准颈粘接固位基台分别使用以下4种水门汀进行交叉粘固:A组为玻璃离子水门汀(日本);B组为树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(美国);C组为暂时粘固用玻璃离子水门汀(日本);D组为玻璃离子水门汀(德国);粘固后测试并记录样本粘接力(N),同时观察并记录粘固界面的断裂模式,最后,对粘接力进行统计学处理。所有内冠和基台经清洗后重复使用。结果4种水门汀的粘接力及由大至小的排列顺序为C组(183.6±29.4) N>D组(153.4±36.2) N>B组(144.4±41.1) N>A组(109.9±25.7)N,其中C组的粘接力最高,A组的粘接力最低,A组显著低于其它3种水门汀(PD(153.4±36.2N)>B(144.4±41.1N)>A (109.9±25.7N). Group C produced the highest adhesive force, while group A exhibited the lowest adhesive force, significantly lower than other three luting cements(P<0.05). The fracture surface observation shows that group A and D fractured at the interface of cement and abutments, while group B and C exhibited as“mixed fracture”mode. Conclusion Both conventional glass ionomer cement and resin-modified glass ionomer cements possessed the clinically acceptable adhesive forces, while the provisional glass ionomer luting cements was not suitable for the provisional cementation of implant crowns due to the too high adhesive force.

  12. Nike Court Force High Lux 奢华外衣

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nike这次将使用在Air Force1中惯用的Lux的处理手法重新包装经典的Court Force High,这两双球鞋分别采用了黑色和灰色的单色顶级绒面革物料制作鞋面。而Lux系列的标志则印制在球鞋的后跟处。这是一款设计简洁的球鞋,与时下流行的色彩潮流截然不同.也许反潮流而行之也是体现纯粹经典的好办法。

  13. Effects of nano-surface properties on initial osteoblast adhesion and Ca/P adsorption ability for titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Hsu, Y C; Hsieh, M C; Yang, S P; Su, F C; Lee, T M

    2008-08-20

    Titanium alloys (Ti6Al4V), while subjected to high temperature surface treatment, experience altered nano-surface characteristics. The effects of such surface treatments are examined, including the initial adhesion force experienced by osteoblasts, the Ca/P adsorption capability, and the nano-surface properties, including the amounts of amphoteric Ti-OH groups, surface topography, and surface roughness. The initial adhesion force is considered a quantitative indicator of cyto-compatibility in vitro. Previously, a cyto-detacher was applied in a pioneer attempt measuring the initial adhesion force of fibroblasts on a metal surface. Presently, the cyto-detacher is further applied to evaluate the initial adhesion force of osteoblasts. Results reveal that (1) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could promote the adsorption capability of Ca and P; (2) titanium alloys subjected to heat treatment could have higher initial osteoblast adhesion forces; (3) the adhesion strength of osteoblasts, ranging from 38.5 to 58.9 nN (nanonewtons), appears stronger for rougher surfaces. It is concluded that the heat treatment could have impacted the biocompatibility in terms of the initial osteoblast adhesion force and Ca/P adsorption capability.

  14. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-07-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals.

  15. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Scheie, Anne A.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant I

  16. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  17. Humidity Dependence of Adhesion for Silane Coated Microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; MAYER,THOMAS M.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    1999-11-09

    This study examines adhesion between silane-coated micromachined surfaces that are exposed to humid conditions. Our quantitative values for interfacial adhesion energies are determined from an in-situ optical measurement of deformations in partly-adhered cantilever beams. We coated micromachined cantilevers with either ODTS (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}SiCl{sub 3}) or FDTS (C{sub 8}F{sub 17}C{sub 2}H{sub 4}SiCl{sub 3}) with the objective of creating hydrophobic surfaces whose adhesion would be independent of humidity. In both cases, the adhesion energy is significantly lower than for uncoated, hydrophilic surfaces. For relative humidities (RH) less than 95% (ODTS) and 80% (FDTS) the adhesion energy was extremely low and constant. In fact, ODTS-coated beams exposed to saturated humidity conditions and long (48 hour) exposures showed only a factor of two increase in adhesion energy. Surprisingly, FDTS coated beams, which initially have a higher contact angle (115{degree}) with water than do ODTS coated beams (112{degree}), proved to be much more sensitive to humidity. The FDTS coated surfaces showed a factor of one hundred increase in adhesion energy after a seven hour exposure to 90% RH. Atomic force microscopy revealed agglomerated coating material after exposed to high RH, suggesting a redistribution of the monolayer film. This agglomeration was more prominent for FDTS than ODTS. These findings suggest a new mechanism for uptake of moisture under high humidity conditions. At high humidities, the silane coatings can reconfigure from a surface to a bulk phase leaving behind locally hydrophilic sites which increase the average measured adhesion energy. In order for the adhesion increase to be observed, a significant fraction of the monolayer must be converted from the surface to the bulk phase.

  18. Mechanical Activation of a Multimeric Adhesive Protein through Domain Conformational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Sithara S.; Botello, Eric; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Frey, Eric W.; Patel, Jay M.; Moake, Joel; Dong, Jing-fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical force-induced activation of the adhesive protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF), which experiences high hydrodynamic forces, is essential in initiating platelet adhesion. The importance of the mechanical force-induced functional change is manifested in the multimeric VWF’s crucial role in blood coagulation, when high fluid shear stress activates plasma VWF (pVWF) multimers to bind platelets. Here we showed that a pathological level of high shear stress exposure of pVWF multimers results in domain conformational changes, and the subsequent shifts in the unfolding force allow us to use force as a marker to track the dynamic states of multimeric VWF. We found that shear-activated pVWF multimers (spVWF) are more resistant to mechanical unfolding than non-sheared pVWF multimers, as indicated in the higher peak unfolding force. These results provide insight into the mechanism of shear-induced activation of pVWF multimers. PMID:23521301

  19. Attonewton force detection using microspheres in a dual-beam optical trap in high vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Stutz, Jordan H; Cunningham, Mark; Geraci, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the implementation of laser-cooled silica microspheres as force sensors in a dual-beam optical dipole trap in high vacuum. Using this system we have demonstrated trap lifetimes exceeding several days, attonewton force detection capability, and wide tunability in trapping and cooling parameters. Measurements have been performed with charged and neutral beads to calibrate the sensitivity of the detector. This work establishes the suitability of dual beam optical dipole traps for precision force measurement in high vacuum with long averaging times, and enables future applications including the study of gravitational inverse square law violations at short range, Casimir forces, acceleration sensing, and quantum opto-mechanics.

  20. Central fatigue of the first dorsal interosseous muscle during low-force and high-force sustained submaximal contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Tamara D; Bilodeau, Martin

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the extent of central fatigue in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of healthy adults in low, moderate and high-force submaximal contractions. Nine healthy adults completed four experimental sessions where index finger abduction force was recorded during voluntary contractions and in response to brief trains (five pulses at 100 Hz) of electrical stimulation. The ability to maximally activate FDI under volition, or voluntary activation, and its change with sustained activity (central fatigue) was assessed using the twitch interpolation technique. The fatigue tasks consisted of continuous isometric index finger abduction contractions held until exhaustion at four target force levels: 30%, 45%, 60% and 75% of the maximal voluntary contraction. The main finding was the presence of central fatigue for the 30% task, but not for the three other fatigue tasks. The extent of central fatigue was also associated with changes in a measure reflecting the status of peripheral structures/mechanisms. It appears that central fatigue contributed to task failure for the lowest force fatigue task (30%), but not for the other (higher) contraction intensities.

  1. Fragmented carbon nanotube macrofilms as adhesive conductors for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-03-25

    Polymer binders such as poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and conductive additives such as carbon black (CB) are indispensable components for manufacturing battery electrodes in addition to active materials. The concept of adhesive conductors employing fragmented carbon nanotube macrofilms (FCNTs) is demonstrated by constructing composite electrodes with a typical active material, LiMn2O4. The adhesive FCNT conductors provide not only a high electrical conductivity but also a strong adhesive force, functioning simultaneously as both the conductive additives and the binder materials for lithium-ion batteries. Such composite electrodes exhibit superior high-rate and retention capabilities compared to the electrodes using a conventional binder (PVDF) and a conductive additive (CB). An in situ tribology method combining wear track imaging and force measurement is employed to evaluate the adhesion strength of the adhesive FCNT conductors. The adhesive FCNT conductors exhibit higher adhesion strength than PVDF. It has further been confirmed that the adhesive FCNT conductor can be used in both cathodes and anodes and is proved to be a competent substitute for polymer binders to maintain mechanical integrity and at the same time to provide electrical connectivity of active materials in the composite electrodes. The organic-solvent-free electrode manufacturing offers a promising strategy for the battery industry.

  2. Platelet adhesion, contact phase coagulation activation, and C5a generation of polyethylene glycol acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membrane with varieties of grafting amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, F; Nakayama, M; Nishimura, K; Hiyoshi, T

    1998-10-01

    Grafting of polyethylene glycol chains onto cellulosic membrane can be expected to reduce the interaction between blood (plasma protein and cells) and the membrane surface. Alkylether carboxylic acid (PEG acid) grafted high flux cellulosic membranes for hemodialysis, in which the polyethylene glycol chain bears an alkyl group at one side and a carboxyl group at the other side, have been developed and evaluated. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes with various grafting amounts have been compared with respect to platelet adhesion, the contact phase of blood coagulation, and complement activation in vitro. A new method of quantitating platelet adhesion on hollow-fiber membrane surfaces has been developed, which is based on the determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity after lysis of the adhered platelets. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes showed reduced platelet adhesion and complement activation effects in grafting amounts of 200 ppm or higher without detecting adverse effects up to grafting amounts of 850 ppm. The platelet adhesion of a PEG acid-grafted cellulosic membrane depends on both the flux and grafting amounts of the membrane. It is concluded that the grafting of PEG acid onto a cellulosic membrane improves its biocompatibility as evaluated in terms of platelet adhesion, complement activation, and thrombogenicity.

  3. High-Throughput Atomic Force Microscopes Operating in Parallel

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghian, H; Dekker, B; Winters, J; Bijnagte, T; Rijnbeek, R

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This nanoinstrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrument can meas...

  4. A novel transdermal drug delivery system based on self-adhesive Janus nanofibrous film with high breathability and monodirectional water-penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongli; Li, Yue; Wu, Jianming; Wang, Weiguo; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) had achieved significant success in medical practice, but still suffered from adhesion failure and skin reaction due to the occlusive properties of hydrophobic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). In order to solve these problems, a novel TDDS patch based on self-adhesive Janus nanofibrous film was prepared by a multilayered electrospinning. This multifunctional patch was a bilayer structure. The subjacent layer was a hydrophobic and adhesive fibrous layer electrospun from polyacrylate PSA (HPSA), and the upper backing layer was a hydrophilic cross-linked poly (vinyl alcohol) (c-PVA) nanofibrous film. The structures of the HPSA/c-PVA composite fibrous films were characterized and their application properties, including adherence performance, water vapor permeability, water-penetration, release characteristics, and skin irritation were evaluated. The results indicated that the HPSA/c-PVA composite fibrous films could provide suitable adhesive properties for TDDS application, excellent capacity for drug loading and release, aesthetical appearance and high safety for use on the skin. Especially, due to the nanofibrous network structures and the hydrophobic-hydrophilic wettability gradient from hydrophobic HPSA layer to the hydrophilic c-PVA layer, the Janus films possessed high breathability and monodirectional water-penetration. Water could penetrate from the hydrophobic to the hydrophilic side, but could not permeate through in the opposite direction. This may provide a feasible solution to the problems caused by the water, sweat, or wound exudate on the skin, when the hydrophobic PSAs were used as matrix for TDDS and wound dressing patches.

  5. AFM studied the effect of celastrol on β1 integrin-mediated HUVEC adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Changhong; Jin, Hua; Cai, Jiye

    2013-01-01

    Integrin-mediated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhesion to the extracellular matrix plays a fundamental role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Celastrol, a traditional Chinese medicine plant, has possessed anticancer and suppressed angiogenesis activities. Here, the mechanism underling the antiangiogenesis capacity of celastrol was investigated by exploring the effect of celastrol on β1(CD29) integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Flow cytometry results showed that the HUVECs highly expressed CD29 and cell adhesion assay indicated that celastrol specifically inhibited the adhesion of HUVECs to fibronectin (FN) without affecting nonspecific adhesion to poly-L-lysine (PLL). After cell FN adhesion being inhibited, the cell surface nanoscale structure and adhesion force were detected by atomic force microscope (AFM). High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with celastrol. The membrane average roughness (Ra) and the major forces were decreased from 31.34 ± 4.56 nm, 519.60 ± 82.86 pN of 0 μg/ml celastrol to 18.47 ± 6.53 nm, 417.79 ± 53.35 pN of 4.0 μg/ml celastrol, 10.54 ± 2.85 nm, 258.95 ± 38.98 pN of 8.0 μg/ml celastrol, respectively. Accompanying with the decrease of adhesion force, the actin cytoskeleton in the cells was obviously disturbed by the celastrol. All of these changes influenced the migration of HUVECs from the wound-healing migration assay. Taken together, our results suggest that celastrol can be as an inhibitor of HUVEC adhesion to FN. This work provides a novel approach to inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  6. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer;

    2011-01-01

    for the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an important...

  7. Reverse adhesion of a gecko-inspired synthetic adhesive switched by an ion-exchange polymer-metal composite actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-Jie; Liu, Rui; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Li-Ming; Fang, Shao-Ming; Elliott, Winston Howard; Tan, Wei

    2015-03-11

    Inspired by how geckos abduct, rotate, and adduct their setal foot toes to adhere to different surfaces, we have developed an artificial muscle material called ion-exchange polymer-metal composite (IPMC), which, as a synthetic adhesive, is capable of changing its adhesion properties. The synthetic adhesive was cast from a Si template through a sticky colloid precursor of poly(methylvinylsiloxane) (PMVS). The PMVS array of setal micropillars had a high density of pillars (3.8 × 10(3) pillars/mm(2)) with a mean diameter of 3 μm and a pore thickness of 10 μm. A graphene oxide monolayer containing Ag globular nanoparticles (GO/Ag NPs) with diameters of 5-30 nm was fabricated and doped in an ion-exchanging Nafion membrane to improve its carrier transfer, water-saving, and ion-exchange capabilities, which thus enhanced the electromechanical response of IPMC. After being attached to PMVS micropillars, IPMC was actuated by square wave inputs at 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V to bend back and forth, driving the micropillars to actively grip or release the surface. To determine the adhesion of the micropillars, the normal adsorption and desorption forces were measured as the IPMC drives the setal micropillars to grip and release, respectively. Adhesion results demonstrated that the normal adsorption forces were 5.54-, 14.20-, and 23.13-fold higher than the normal desorption forces under 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 V, respectively. In addition, shear adhesion or friction increased by 98, 219, and 245%, respectively. Our new technique provides advanced design strategies for reversible gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives, which might be used for spiderman-like wall-climbing devices with unprecedented performance.

  8. High resolution magnetic force microscopy using focused ion beam modified tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Siekman, M.H.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscope tips coated by the thermal evaporation of a magnetic 30 nm thick Co film have been modified by focused ion beam milling with Ga+ ions to produce tips suitable for magnetic force microscopy. Such tips possess a planar magnetic element with high magnetic shape anisotropy, an ex

  9. Calculating levitation forces in the magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermolaev, YS; Rudnev, IA

    2005-01-01

    A new method of calculation of the magnetic levitation force in the permanent magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems is proposed based on the Maxwell equations and the Bean model. The dependences of the levitation force on the gap width calculated for various regimes of superconductor coolin

  10. Calculating levitation forces in the magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ermolaev, YS; Rudnev, IA

    2005-01-01

    A new method of calculation of the magnetic levitation force in the permanent magnet-high-temperature superconductor systems is proposed based on the Maxwell equations and the Bean model. The dependences of the levitation force on the gap width calculated for various regimes of superconductor coolin

  11. High-throughput atomic force microscopes operating in parallel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Hamed; Herfst, Rodolf; Dekker, Bert; Winters, Jasper; Bijnagte, Tom; Rijnbeek, Ramon

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an essential nanoinstrument technique for several applications such as cell biology and nanoelectronics metrology and inspection. The need for statistically significant sample sizes means that data collection can be an extremely lengthy process in AFM. The use of a single AFM instrument is known for its very low speed and not being suitable for scanning large areas, resulting in a very-low-throughput measurement. We address this challenge by parallelizing AFM instruments. The parallelization is achieved by miniaturizing the AFM instrument and operating many of them simultaneously. This instrument has the advantages that each miniaturized AFM can be operated independently and that the advances in the field of AFM, both in terms of speed and imaging modalities, can be implemented more easily. Moreover, a parallel AFM instrument also allows one to measure several physical parameters simultaneously; while one instrument measures nano-scale topography, another instrument can measure mechanical, electrical, or thermal properties, making it a lab-on-an-instrument. In this paper, a proof of principle of such a parallel AFM instrument has been demonstrated by analyzing the topography of large samples such as semiconductor wafers. This nanoinstrument provides new research opportunities in the nanometrology of wafers and nanolithography masks by enabling real die-to-die and wafer-level measurements and in cell biology by measuring the nano-scale properties of a large number of cells.

  12. From the Cover: Shape insensitive optimal adhesion of nanoscale fibrillar structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian; Yao, Haimin

    2004-05-01

    Gecko and many insects have adopted nanoscale fibrillar structures on their feet as adhesion devices. Here, we consider adhesion between a single fiber and a substrate by van der Waals or electrostatic interactions. For a given contact area A, the theoretical pull-off force of the fiber is thA where th is the theoretical strength of adhesion. We show that it is possible to design an optimal shape of the tip of the fiber to achieve the theoretical pull-off force. However, such design tends to be unreliable at the macroscopic scale because the pull-off force is sensitive to small variations in the tip shape. We find that a robust design of shape-insensitive optimal adhesion becomes possible only when the diameter of the fiber is reduced to length scales on the order of 100 nm. In general, optimal adhesion could be achieved by a combination of size reduction and shape optimization. The smaller the size, the less important the shape. At large contact sizes, optimal adhesion could still be achieved if the shape can be manufactured to a sufficiently high precision. The robust design of optimal adhesion at nanoscale provides a plausible explanation for the convergent evolution of hairy attachment systems in biology.

  13. Finite Element Analysis based Optimization of Magnetic Adhesion Module for Concrete Wall Climbing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD Omar faruq Howlader

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wall climbing robot can provide easier accessibility to tall structures for Non Destructive Testing (NDT and improve working environments of human operators. However, existing adhesion mechanism for climbing robots such as vortex, electromagnet etc. are still at development stage and offer no feasible adhesion mechanism. As a result, few practical products have been developed for reinforced concrete surfaces, though wall-climbing robots have been researched for many years. This paper proposes a novel magnetic adhesion mechanism for wall-climbing robot for reinforced concrete surface. Mechanical design parameters such as distance between magnets, the yoke thickness, and magnet arrangements have been investigated by Finite Element Analysis (FEA. The adhesion module can be attached under the chassis of a prototype robot. The magnetic flux can penetrate maximum concrete cover of 30 mm and attain adhesion force of 121.26 N. The prototype provides high Force-to-Weight ratio compared to other reported permanent magnet based robotic systems. Both experiment and simulation results prove that the magnetic adhesion mechanism can generate efficient adhesion force for the climbing robot to operate on vertical reinforced concrete structures.

  14. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  15. Discovery of low mucus adhesion surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Minghao; Yildiz, Hasan; Carrier, Rebecca; Belfort, Georges

    2013-02-01

    Mucus secretion from the body is ubiquitous, and finding materials that resist mucus adhesion is a major technological challenge. Here, using a high throughput platform with photo-induced graft polymerization, we first rapidly synthesized, screened and tested a library of 55 different surfaces from six functional monomer classes to discover porcine intestinal low mucus adhesion surfaces using a 1h static mucus adsorption protocol. From this preliminary screen, two chemistries, a zwitterionic ([2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride) and a multiple hydroxyl (N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide) surface, exhibited significantly low mucus adhesion from a Langmuir-type isotherm when exposed to increasing concentrations of mucus for 24 h. Apolar or hydrophobic interactions were likely the dominant attractive forces during mucus binding since many polar or hydrophilic monomers reduced mucus adhesion. Hansen solubility parameters were used to illustrate the importance of monomer polarity and hydrogen bonding in reducing mucus adsorption. For a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG) monomers with changing molecular weight from 144 g mol⁻¹ to 1100 g mol⁻¹, we observed an excellent linear correlation (R²=0.998) between relative amount adsorbed and the distance from a water point in a specialized Hansen solubility parameter plot, emphasizing the role of surface-water interactions for PEG modified surfaces.

  16. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  17. Adhesion of PBO Fiber in Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The high mechanical and thermal performance of poly p-phenylene- 2, 6-benzobisoxazole ( PBO ) fiber provides great potential applications as reinforcement fibers for composites. A composite of PBO fiber and epoxy resin has excellent electrical insulation properties, therefore, it is considered to be the best choice for the reinforcement in high magnetic field coils for pulsed magnetic fields up to 100 T.However, poor adhesion between PBO fiber and matrix is found because of the chemically inactive and/or relatively smooth surface of the reinforcement fiber preventing efficient chemical bonding in the interface, which is a challenging issue to improve mechanical properties. Here, we report the surface modification of PBO fibers by ultraviolet (UV)irradiation, O2 and NH3 plasma, as well as acidic treatments. The interfacial adhesion strength values of all the treatments show the similar level as determined for aramid fibers by pull-out tests, a significant impact on fibermatrix-adhesion was not achieved. The surface free energy and roughness are increased for both sized and extracted fibers after plasma treatments together with maleic anhydride grafting. The sized fiber shows marginal improvement in adhesion strength and no change in fiber tensile strength because of the barrier effect of the finish.For the extracted fiber, different surface treatments either show no apparent effect or cause reduction in adhesion strength. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topography analysis of the fracture surfaces proved adhesive failure at the fiber surface. The fiber surface roughness is increased and more surface flaws are induced, which could result in coarse interface structures when the treated fiber surface has no adequate wetting and functional groups. The adhesion failure is further confirmed by similar adhesion strength and compression shear strength values when the fiber was embedded in various epoxy resins with different temperature behavior. The tensile strength of fiber

  18. Single phase forced convection cooling of high power leds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozdemir, M.Z.; Chestakov, D.; Frijns, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    LEDs are strong candidates for future illumination applications dueto their much lower consumption of energy compared to conventional lighting options. One of key problems in development of LEDs is successful thermal management during illumination. Therefore, current research ongoing related to high

  19. Gecko-Inspired, Controlled Adhesion and Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menguc, Yigit

    This thesis work is primarily concerned with taking inspiration from the principles of gecko-adhesion in order to control the attachment of synthetic structured adhesives. We present gecko-inspired angled elastomer micropillars with flat or round tip endings as compliant pick-and-place micromanipulators. The pillars are 35 mum in diameter, 90 mum tall, and angled at an inclination of 20°. By gently pressing the tip of a pillar to a part, the pillar adheres to it through intermolecular forces. Next, by retracting quickly, the part is picked from a given donor substrate. During transferring, the adhesion between the pillar and the part is high enough to withstand disturbances due to external forces or the weight of the part. During release of the part onto a receiver substrate, the contact area of the pillar to the part is drastically reduced by controlled vertical or shear displacement, which results in reduced adhesive forces. The maximum repeatable ratio of pick-to-release adhesive forces was measured as 39 to 1. We find that a flat tip shape and shear displacement control provide a higher pick-to-release adhesion ratio than a round tip and vertical displacement control, respectively. We present a model of forces to serve as a framework for the operation of this micromanipulator. Finally, demonstrations of pick-and-place manipulation of mum-scale silicon microplatelets and a cm-scale glass cover slip serve as proofs of concept. The compliant polymer micropillars are safe for use with fragile parts, and, due to exploiting intermolecular forces, could be effective on most materials and in air, vacuum, and liquid environments. We present a study of the self-cleaning and contamination resistance phenomena of synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives made from elastomeric polyurethane. The phenomenon of self-cleaning makes the adhesive foot of the gecko robust against dirt, and makes it effectively sticky throughout the lifetime of the material (within the molting cycles

  20. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  1. Adhesion in a Vacuum Environment and its Implications for Dust Mitigation Techniques on Airless Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkebile, Stephen; Gaier, James R.

    2012-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, the adhesion of dust to critical spacecraft systems was a greater problem than anticipated and resulted in functional degradation of thermal control surfaces, spacesuit seals, and other spacecraft components. Notably, Earth-based simulation efforts did not predict the magnitude and effects of dust adhesion in the lunar environment. Forty years later, we understand that the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment, coupled with micrometeorite impacts and constant ion and photon bombardment from the sun result in atomically clean and high surface energy dust particles and spacecraft surfaces. However, both the dominant mechanism of adhesion in airless environments and the conditions for high fidelity simulation tests have still to be determined. The experiments presented in here aim to aid in the development of dust mitigation techniques for airless bodies (e.g., lunar surface, asteroids, moons of outer planets). The approach taken consists of (a) quantifying the adhesion between common polymer and metallic spacecraft materials and a synthetic noritic volcanic glass, as a function of surface cleanliness and of triboelectric charge transfer in a UHV environment, and (b) determining parameters for high fidelity tests through investigation of adhesion dependence on vacuum environment and sample treatment. Adhesion force has been measured between pins of spacecraft materials and a plate of synthetic volcanic glass by determining the pull-off force with a torsion balance. Although no significant adhesion is generally observed directly as a result of high surface energies, the adhesion due to induced electrostatic charge is observed to increase with spacecraft material cleanliness, in some cases by over a factor of 10. Furthermore, electrostatically-induced adhesion is found to decrease rapidly above pressures of 10-6 torr. It is concluded that high-fidelity tests should be conducted in high to ultrahigh vacuum and include an ionized surface cleaning

  2. Development of a novel precision instrument for high-resolution simultaneous normal and shear force measurements between small planar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Troy; Clark, William; Jalili, Nader

    2017-05-01

    In the design and development of end effector pads for silicon wafer handling robots, it is imperative that the static friction/adhesion force properties of the pads with respect to a variety of planar surfaces be characterized. In this work, the overall design, calibration, and data acquisition procedure of an instrument developed for performing these measurements on small (nano/micro- and macroscales; however, this device allows for the consistent measurement of these same types of forces on components with surface dimensions ranging from 0.1 mm to 10 mm.

  3. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, L.; Bryan, T.; Williams, S.; McCoy, B.; MacLeod, T.

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and development

  4. Innovative Electrostatic Adhesion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Tom; Macleod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Williams, Scott; McCoy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Developing specialized Electro-Static grippers (commercially used in Semiconductor Manufacturing and in package handling) will allow gentle and secure Capture, Soft Docking, and Handling of a wide variety of materials and shapes (such as upper-stages, satellites, arrays, and possibly asteroids) without requiring physical features or cavities for a pincher or probe or using harpoons or nets. Combined with new rigid boom mechanisms or small agile chaser vehicles, flexible, high speed Electro-Static Grippers can enable compliant capture of spinning objects starting from a safe stand-off distance. Electroadhesion (EA) can enable lightweight, ultra-low-power, compliant attachment in space by using an electrostatic force to adhere similar and dissimilar surfaces. A typical EA enabled device is composed of compliant space-rated materials, such as copper-clad polyimide encapsulated by polymers. Attachment is induced by strong electrostatic forces between any substrate material, such as an exterior satellite panel and a compliant EA gripper pad surface. When alternate positive and negative charges are induced in adjacent planar electrodes in an EA surface, the electric fields set up opposite charges on the substrate and cause an electrostatic adhesion between the electrodes and the induced charges on the substrate. Since the electrodes and the polymer are compliant and can conform to uneven or rough surfaces, the electrodes can remain intimately close to the entire surface, enabling high clamping pressures. Clamping pressures of more than 3 N/cm2 in shear can be achieved on a variety of substrates with ultra-low holding power consumption (measured values are less than 20 microW/Newton weight held). A single EA surface geometry can be used to clamp both dielectric and conductive substrates, with slightly different physical mechanisms. Furthermore EA clamping requires no normal force be placed on the substrate, as conventional docking requires. Internally funded research and

  5. Detection of nerve gases using surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high droplet adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakonen, Aron; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    we demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for sensitive detection of femtomol quantities of two nerve gases, VX and Tabun, using a handheld Raman device and SERS substrates consisting of flexible gold-covered Si nanopillars. The substrate surface exhibits high droplet...

  6. High-performance composite membrane with enriched CO2-philic groups and improved adhesion at the interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Wang, Shaofei; Wu, Hong; Guo, Ruili; Liu, Ye; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tian, Zhizhang; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi

    2014-05-14

    A novel strategy to design a high-performance composite membrane for CO2 capture via coating a thin layer of water-swellable polymers (WSPs) onto a porous support with enriched CO2-philic groups is demonstrated in this study. First, by employing a versatile platform technique combining non-solvent-induced phase separation and surface segregation, porous support membranes with abundant CO2-philic ethylene oxide (EO) groups at the surface are successfully prepared. Second, a thin selective layer composed of Pebax MH 1657 is deposited onto the support membranes via dip coating. Because of the water-swellable characteristic of Pebax and the enriched EO groups at the interface, the composite membranes exhibit high CO2 permeance above 1000 GPU with CO2/N2 selectivity above 40 at a humidified state (25 °C and 3 bar). By tuning the content of the PEO segment at the interface, the composite membranes can show either high CO2 permeance up to 2420 GPU with moderate selectivity of 46.0 or high selectivity up to 109.6 with fairly good CO2 permeance of 1275 GPU. Moreover, enrichment of the PEO segment at the interface significantly improves interfacial adhesion, as revealed by the T-peel test and positron annihilation spectroscopy measurement. In this way, the feasibility of designing WSP-based composite membranes by enriching CO2-philic groups at the interface is validated. We hope our findings may pave a generic way to fabricate high-performance composite membranes for CO2 capture using cost-effective materials and facile methods.

  7. Dispersion and optical gradient force from high-order mode coupling between two hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guanghui, E-mail: gsnuwgh@163.com; Zhang, Weifeng; Lu, Jiahui; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-12

    We analytically study dispersion properties and optical gradient forces of different-order transverse magnetic (TM) modes in two coupled hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides (HMMWs). According to Maxwell's equations, we obtain the dispersion relation of symmetric and antisymmetric modes, and calculate optical gradient forces of different-order modes by using Maxwell stress tensor. Numerical results show that the dispersion properties are dependent on the filling ratio, and the optical gradient forces of high-order TM modes are larger than the fundamental mode when the gap between two HMMWs is very narrow, but they weaken much faster than the case of low-order TM modes with the gap width increasing. In addition, the effects of the dielectric surrounding of waveguides on the coupling effect and optical gradient force are clarified. These properties offer an avenue for various optomechanical applications in optical sensors and actuators. - Highlights: • The dependence of dispersion properties in hyperbolic metamaterials on the filling ratio is analyzed. • It is possible that the optical gradient forces of high-order modes are larger than the fundamental mode. • Optical gradient forces of high-order modes weaken much faster than the case of low-order modes. • The influence of the dielectric surrounding on the coupling effect and optical gradient force are clarified.

  8. Force-Mediated Kinetics of Single P-Selectin/Ligand Complexes Observed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jurgen; Katopodis, Andreas G.; Kolbinger, Frank; Anselmetti, Dario

    1998-10-01

    Leukocytes roll along the endothelium of postcapillary venules in response to inflammatory signals. Rolling under the hydrodynamic drag forces of blood flow is mediated by the interaction between selectins and their ligands across the leukocyte and endothelial cell surfaces. Here we present force-spectroscopy experiments on single complexes of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by atomic force microscopy to determine the intrinsic molecular properties of this dynamic adhesion process. By modeling intermolecular and intramolecular forces as well as the adhesion probability in atomic force microscopy experiments we gain information on rupture forces, elasticity, and kinetics of the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 interaction. The complexes are able to withstand forces up to 165 pN and show a chain-like elasticity with a molecular spring constant of 5.3 pN nm-1 and a persistence length of 0.35 nm. The dissociation constant (off-rate) varies over three orders of magnitude from 0.02 s-1 under zero force up to 15 s-1 under external applied forces. Rupture force and lifetime of the complexes are not constant, but directly depend on the applied force per unit time, which is a product of the intrinsic molecular elasticity and the external pulling velocity. The high strength of binding combined with force-dependent rate constants and high molecular elasticity are tailored to support physiological leukocyte rolling.

  9. Comparison of the cohesion-adhesion balance approach to colloidal probe atomic force microscopy and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography for the prediction of dry powder inhalation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew D; Buckton, Graham

    2016-07-25

    The abilities of the cohesive-adhesive balance approach to atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to predict the performance of carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations were compared. Five model drugs (beclometasone dipropionate, budesonide, salbutamol sulphate, terbutaline sulphate and triamcinolone acetonide) and three model carriers (erythritol, α-lactose monohydrate and d-mannitol) were chosen, giving fifteen drug-carrier combinations. Comparison of the AFM and IGC interparticulate adhesion data suggested that they did not produce equivalent results. Comparison of the AFM data with the in vitro fine particle delivery of appropriate DPI formulations normalised to account for particle size differences revealed a previously observed pattern for the AFM measurements, with a slightly cohesive AFM CAB ratio being associated with the highest fine particle fraction. However, no consistent relationship between formulation performance and the IGC data was observed. The results as a whole highlight the complexity of the many interacting variables that can affect the behaviour of DPIs and suggest that the prediction of their performance from a single measurement is unlikely to be successful in every case.

  10. Printed highly conductive Cu films with strong adhesion enabled by low-energy photonic sintering on low-Tg flexible plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinzhou; Shao, Shuangshuang; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Copper (Cu) films and circuits were fabricated by screen-printing Cu nanoink on low-Tg (glass transition temperature) flexible plastic substrates (PEN and PET) instead of widely used high-Tg polyimide (PI) substrate. Photonic sintering of printed Cu films was carried out using intensive pulsed light (IPL). Low resistivities of 28 μΩ · cm on PEN and 44 μΩ · cm on PET were obtained without damaging the substrates. The sintered Cu films exhibited strong adhesion to PEN and PET substrates, with measured adhesion strength of 5B by the ASTM D3359 international standard, whereas the top part of the copper film on the PI substrate was stripped off during the adhesion test. The sintered Cu films also showed excellent stability in harsh conditions and mechanical flexibility in rolling tests. The underlying mechanisms of the high conductivity and strong adhesion on PEN and PET substrates with low-energy IPL sintering were investigated. Simple circuits and radio frequency identification antennas were made by screen-printing Cu nanoink and IPL sintering, demonstrating the technique’s feasibility for practical applications.

  11. Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: high-alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cícero Bottino

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to qualitatively demonstrate surface micro-morphological changes after the employment of different surface conditioning methods on high-alumina and glassy-matrix dental ceramics. Three disc-shaped high-alumina specimens (In-Ceram Alumina, INC and 4 glassy-matrix ceramic specimens (Vitadur Alpha, V (diameter: 5 mm and height: 5 mm were manufactured. INC specimens were submitted to 3 different surface conditioning methods: INC1 - Polishing with silicon carbide papers (SiC; INC2 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; INC3 - Chairside silica coating (CoJet; 30 µm SiOx. Vitadur Alpha (V specimens were subjected to 4 different surface conditioning methods: V1 - Polishing with SiC papers; V2 - HF acid etching; V3 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 µm Al2O3; V4 - Chairside silica coating (30 µm SiOx. Following completion of the surface conditioning methods, the specimens were analyzed using SEM. After polishing with SiC, the surfaces of V specimens remained relatively smooth while those of INC exhibited topographic irregularities. Chairside air-abrasion with either aluminum oxide or silica particles produced retentive patterns on both INC and V specimens, with smoother patterns observed after silica coating. V specimens etched with HF presented a highly porous surface. Chairside tribochemical silica coating resulted in smoother surfaces with particles embedded on the surface even after air-blasting. Surface conditioning using air-borne particle abrasion with either 50 µm alumina or 30 µm silica particles exhibited qualitatively comparable rough surfaces for both INC and V. HF acid gel created the most micro-retentive surface for the glassy-matrix ceramic tested.

  12. Drug release and adhesive properties of crospovidone-containing matrix patches based on polyisobutene and acrylic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Martin; Fussnegger, Bernhard; Bodmeier, Roland

    2010-12-23

    Ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were insoluble in blends of high:medium:low molecular weight polyisobutene adhesives (ratio: 1:5:0, 1:5:2 and 1:5:4) but soluble in acrylic adhesives (Durotak 87-202A, Durotak 87-2074 and Durotak 87-2677). The incorporation of drug adsorbates onto crospovidone into the polyisobutene blends yielded crystal-free patches. The drug release from these patches was independent of polyisobutene's molecular weight distribution, probably because the drug release occurred mainly through fluid filled channels. By contrast, the drug release from acrylic adhesives was independent of whether the patches contained pure drugs or drug adsorbates onto crospovidone. A higher degree of saturation (or supersaturation) in these systems resulted in a higher thermodynamic activity of the drugs and hence a higher drug release. The crystal-free acrylic and polyisobutene patches did not show drug recrystallization after 3 months at 25°C/60 RH and 40°C/75 RH. The adhesive properties of polyisobutene patches were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The area under the curve of force-distance curves recorded with the texture analyzer correlated well with the in vivo skin adhesion. The elongation at detachment showed the same trend as the in vivo matrix creep. Crospovidone contents ≤ 30% had no detrimental effect on the adhesive properties of the patches.

  13. Silk-fibronectin protein alloy fibres support cell adhesion and viability as a high strength, matrix fibre analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Li, David; Gyune Rim, Nae; Backman, Daniel; Smith, Michael L.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2017-04-01

    Silk is a natural polymer with broad utility in biomedical applications because it exhibits general biocompatibility and high tensile material properties. While mechanical integrity is important for most biomaterial applications, proper function and integration also requires biomaterial incorporation into complex surrounding tissues for many physiologically relevant processes such as wound healing. In this study, we spin silk fibroin into a protein alloy fibre with whole fibronectin using wet spinning approaches in order to synergize their respective strength and cell interaction capabilities. Results demonstrate that silk fibroin alone is a poor adhesive surface for fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in the absence of serum. However, significantly improved cell attachment is observed to silk-fibronectin alloy fibres without serum present while not compromising the fibres’ mechanical integrity. Additionally, cell viability is improved up to six fold on alloy fibres when serum is present while migration and spreading generally increase as well. These findings demonstrate the utility of composite protein alloys as inexpensive and effective means to create durable, biologically active biomaterials.

  14. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  15. Stimulation of primary osteoblasts with ATP induces transient vinculin clustering at sites of high intracellular traction force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Toh Weng; Pfau, Bastian; Jones, David; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), released in response to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, induces the dynamic and asynchronous protrusion and subsequent retraction of local membrane structures in osteoblasts. The molecular mechanisms involved in the ligand-stimulated herniation of the plasma membrane are largely unknown, which prompted us to investigate whether the focal-adhesion protein vinculin is engaged in the cytoskeletal alterations that underlie the ATP-induced membrane blebbing. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of primary bovine osteoblast-like cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged vinculin, we found that stimulation of cells with 100 μM ATP resulted in the transient and rapid clustering of recombinant vinculin in the cell periphery, starting approximately 100 s after addition of the nucleotide. The ephemeral nature of the vinculin clusters was made evident by the brevity of their mean assembly and disassembly times (66.7 ± 13.3 s and 99.0 ± 6.6 s, respectively). Traction force vector maps demonstrated that the vinculin-rich clusters were localized predominantly at sites of high traction force. Intracellular calcium measurements showed that the ligand-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i clearly preceded the clustering of vinculin, since [Ca(2+)]i levels returned to normal within 30 s of exposure to ATP, indicating that intracellular calcium transients trigger a cascade of signalling events that ultimately result in the incorporation of vinculin into membrane-associated focal aggregates.

  16. Prying Force Calculation and Design Method for T-shaped Tensile Connector with High Strength Bolt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoxin Hou; Guohong Huang; Chao Gong

    2015-01-01

    In order to establish the design method for T⁃shaped tensile connector with high strength bolt, the theoretical analysis is carried out. Firstly, it analyzes the performance of the connector and establishes prying force calculation model. Based on the model, prying force equation and function between bolt prying force and flange thickness is derived, and the min and max thickness requirement of flange plate under a certain tension load is then obtained. Finally, two simplified design methods of the connector are proposed, which are bolt pulling capacity method and flange plate bending capacity method.

  17. Flange joint system for SRF cavities utilizing high force spring clamps for low particle generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-09-05

    A flange joint system for SRF cavities. The flange joint system includes a set of high force spring clamps that produce high force on the simple flanges of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities to squeeze conventional metallic seals. The system establishes the required vacuum and RF-tight seal with minimum particle contamination to the inside of the cavity assembly. The spring clamps are designed to stay within their elastic range while being forced open enough to mount over the flange pair. Upon release, the clamps have enough force to plastically deform metallic seal surfaces and continue to a new equilibrium sprung dimension where the flanges remain held against one another with enough preload such that normal handling will not break the seal.

  18. Adhesion Transition of Flexible Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Arthur; Lauga, Eric

    2009-03-01

    As forays into fabrication and self-assembly venture to increasingly small length scales, the role of adhesion events between material elements of the system must be closely scrutinized. This area of study is typically dominated by investigations into capillary adhesion, but relatively recent interest in carbon nanotubes and biomimetic devices have spurred interest in intermolecular forces as another source of micro- and nano-scale adhesion. We present here a far-field model for ``dry'' adhesion. We consider a small number N of flexible beams interacting with each other via a typical Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, and describe the behavior of the system as the ratio of bending rigidity to beam-beam attraction is reduced. Applications ranging from fibrillar systems to the comparatively stiff carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  19. Adhesion Between Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    Different adhesion methods of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layers were studied with respect to adhesional force and the resulting rheology of the two-layered PDMS films were investigated. The role of adhesion between PDMS layers on the performances of two-layer structures was studied with peel...

  20. Continuous high throughput molecular adhesion based cell sorting using ridged microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasadduq, Bushra; Wang, Gonghao; Alexeev, Alexander; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Sulchek, Todd

    2016-11-01

    Cell molecular interactions govern important physiological processes such as stem cell homing, inflammation and cancer metastasis. But due to a lack of effective separation technologies selective to these interactions it is challenging to specifically sort cells. Other label free separation techniques based on size, stiffness and shape do not provide enough specificity to cell type, and correlation to clinical condition. We propose a novel microfluidic device capable of high throughput molecule dependent separation of cells by flowing them through a microchannel decorated with molecule specific coated ridges. The unique aspect of this sorting design is the use of optimized gap size which is small enough to lightly squeeze the cells while flowing under the ridged part of the channel to increase the surface area for interaction between the ligand on cell surface and coated receptor molecule but large enough so that biomechanical markers, stiffness and viscoelasticity, do not dominate the cell separation mechanism. We are able to separate Jurkat cells based on its expression of PSGL-1ligand using ridged channel coated with P selectin at a flow rate of 0.045ml/min and achieve 2-fold and 5-fold enrichment of PSGL-1 positive and negative Jurkat cells respectively.

  1. A high performance sensor for triaxial cutting force measurement in turning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, You; Zhao, Yulong; Liang, Songbo; Zhou, Guanwu

    2015-04-03

    This paper presents a high performance triaxial cutting force sensor with excellent accuracy, favorable natural frequency and acceptable cross-interference for high speed turning process. Octagonal ring is selected as sensitive element of the designed sensor, which is drawn inspiration from ring theory. A novel structure of two mutual-perpendicular octagonal rings is proposed and three Wheatstone full bridge circuits are specially organized in order to obtain triaxial cutting force components and restrain cross-interference. Firstly, the newly developed sensor is tested in static calibration; test results indicate that the sensor possesses outstanding accuracy in the range of 0.38%-0.83%. Secondly, impacting modal tests are conducted to identify the natural frequencies of the sensor in triaxial directions (i.e., 1147 Hz, 1122 Hz and 2035 Hz), which implies that the devised sensor can be used for cutting force measurement in a high speed lathe when the spindle speed does not exceed 17,205 rev/min in continuous cutting condition. Finally, an application of the sensor in turning process is operated to show its performance for real-time cutting force measurement; the measured cutting forces demonstrate a good accordance with the variation of cutting parameters. Thus, the developed sensor possesses perfect properties and it gains great potential for real-time cutting force measurement in turning.

  2. A High Performance Sensor for Triaxial Cutting Force Measurement in Turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high performance triaxial cutting force sensor with excellent accuracy, favorable natural frequency and acceptable cross-interference for high speed turning process. Octagonal ring is selected as sensitive element of the designed sensor, which is drawn inspiration from ring theory. A novel structure of two mutual-perpendicular octagonal rings is proposed and three Wheatstone full bridge circuits are specially organized in order to obtain triaxial cutting force components and restrain cross-interference. Firstly, the newly developed sensor is tested in static calibration; test results indicate that the sensor possesses outstanding accuracy in the range of 0.38%–0.83%. Secondly, impacting modal tests are conducted to identify the natural frequencies of the sensor in triaxial directions (i.e., 1147 Hz, 1122 Hz and 2035 Hz, which implies that the devised sensor can be used for cutting force measurement in a high speed lathe when the spindle speed does not exceed 17,205 rev/min in continuous cutting condition. Finally, an application of the sensor in turning process is operated to show its performance for real-time cutting force measurement; the measured cutting forces demonstrate a good accordance with the variation of cutting parameters. Thus, the developed sensor possesses perfect properties and it gains great potential for real-time cutting force measurement in turning.

  3. Structural and tribometric characterization of biomimetically inspired synthetic "insect adhesives"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Matthias W; Kleemeier, Malte; Hartwig, Andreas; Rischka, Klaus; Ellermann, Angelika; Daniels, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    Background: Based on previous chemical analyses of insect tarsal adhesives, we prepared 12 heterogeneous synthetic emulsions mimicking the polar/non-polar principle, analysed their microscopical structure and tested their adhesive, frictional, and rheological properties. Results: The prepared emulsions varied in their consistency from solid rubber-like, over soft elastic, to fluid (watery or oily). With droplet sizes >100 nm, all the emulsions belonged to the common type of macroemulsions. The emulsions of the first generation generally showed broader droplet-size ranges compared with the second generation, especially when less defined components such as petrolatum or waxes were present in the lipophilic fraction of the first generation of emulsions. Some of the prepared emulsions showed a yield point and were Bingham fluids. Tribometric adhesion was tested via probe tack tests. Compared with the "second generation" (containing less viscous components), the "first generation" emulsions were much more adhesive (31–93 mN), a finding attributable to their highly viscous components, i.e., wax, petrolatum, gelatin and poly(vinyl alcohol). In the second generation emulsions, we attained much lower adhesivenesses, ranging between 1–18 mN. The adhesive performance was drastically reduced in the emulsions that contained albumin as the protein component or that lacked protein. Tribometric shear tests were performed at moderate normal loads. Our measured friction forces (4–93 mN in the first and 0.1–5.8 mN in the second generation emulsions) were comparatively low. Differences in shear performance were related to the chemical composition and emulsion structure. Conclusion: By varying their chemical composition, synthetic heterogeneous adhesive emulsions can be adjusted to have diverse consistencies and are able to mimic certain rheological and tribological properties of natural tarsal insect adhesives. PMID:28144564

  4. Structural and tribometric characterization of biomimetically inspired synthetic "insect adhesives"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias W. Speidel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on previous chemical analyses of insect tarsal adhesives, we prepared 12 heterogeneous synthetic emulsions mimicking the polar/non-polar principle, analysed their microscopical structure and tested their adhesive, frictional, and rheological properties.Results: The prepared emulsions varied in their consistency from solid rubber-like, over soft elastic, to fluid (watery or oily. With droplet sizes >100 nm, all the emulsions belonged to the common type of macroemulsions. The emulsions of the first generation generally showed broader droplet-size ranges compared with the second generation, especially when less defined components such as petrolatum or waxes were present in the lipophilic fraction of the first generation of emulsions. Some of the prepared emulsions showed a yield point and were Bingham fluids. Tribometric adhesion was tested via probe tack tests. Compared with the "second generation" (containing less viscous components, the "first generation" emulsions were much more adhesive (31–93 mN, a finding attributable to their highly viscous components, i.e., wax, petrolatum, gelatin and poly(vinyl alcohol. In the second generation emulsions, we attained much lower adhesivenesses, ranging between 1–18 mN. The adhesive performance was drastically reduced in the emulsions that contained albumin as the protein component or that lacked protein. Tribometric shear tests were performed at moderate normal loads. Our measured friction forces (4–93 mN in the first and 0.1–5.8 mN in the second generation emulsions were comparatively low. Differences in shear performance were related to the chemical composition and emulsion structure.Conclusion: By varying their chemical composition, synthetic heterogeneous adhesive emulsions can be adjusted to have diverse consistencies and are able to mimic certain rheological and tribological properties of natural tarsal insect adhesives.

  5. Structural and tribometric characterization of biomimetically inspired synthetic "insect adhesives".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Matthias W; Kleemeier, Malte; Hartwig, Andreas; Rischka, Klaus; Ellermann, Angelika; Daniels, Rolf; Betz, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Background: Based on previous chemical analyses of insect tarsal adhesives, we prepared 12 heterogeneous synthetic emulsions mimicking the polar/non-polar principle, analysed their microscopical structure and tested their adhesive, frictional, and rheological properties. Results: The prepared emulsions varied in their consistency from solid rubber-like, over soft elastic, to fluid (watery or oily). With droplet sizes >100 nm, all the emulsions belonged to the common type of macroemulsions. The emulsions of the first generation generally showed broader droplet-size ranges compared with the second generation, especially when less defined components such as petrolatum or waxes were present in the lipophilic fraction of the first generation of emulsions. Some of the prepared emulsions showed a yield point and were Bingham fluids. Tribometric adhesion was tested via probe tack tests. Compared with the "second generation" (containing less viscous components), the "first generation" emulsions were much more adhesive (31-93 mN), a finding attributable to their highly viscous components, i.e., wax, petrolatum, gelatin and poly(vinyl alcohol). In the second generation emulsions, we attained much lower adhesivenesses, ranging between 1-18 mN. The adhesive performance was drastically reduced in the emulsions that contained albumin as the protein component or that lacked protein. Tribometric shear tests were performed at moderate normal loads. Our measured friction forces (4-93 mN in the first and 0.1-5.8 mN in the second generation emulsions) were comparatively low. Differences in shear performance were related to the chemical composition and emulsion structure. Conclusion: By varying their chemical composition, synthetic heterogeneous adhesive emulsions can be adjusted to have diverse consistencies and are able to mimic certain rheological and tribological properties of natural tarsal insect adhesives.

  6. Adhesive plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Swain, Ronald L.; Banker, John G.; Edwards, Charlene C.

    1978-01-01

    Adhesive plaster compositions are provided by treating particles of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 or Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with dilute acid solutions. The resulting compositions have been found to spontaneously harden into rigid reticulated masses resembling plaster of Paris. Upon heating, the hardened material is decomposed into the oxide, yet retains the reticulated rigid structure.

  7. A novel impermeable adhesive membrane to reinforce dural closure: a preliminary retrospective study on 119 consecutive high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroli, Paolo; Acerbi, Francesco; Broggi, Morgan; Schiariti, Marco; Albanese, Erminia; Tringali, Giovanni; Franzini, Angelo; Broggi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in neurosurgery remains a significant source of morbidity. TissuePatchDural (TPD), a novel impermeable adhesive membrane, can be used to reinforce dural closure in cases considered at high risk to develop postoperative CSF leak. A retrospective, single-center, clinical investigation was conducted on 119 patients who underwent elective neurosurgical procedures between January and June 2010. Inclusion criteria included adult patients undergoing clean elective surgeries where a primary watertight closure was not possible. Three groups of patients were considered: 1) infratentorial, 67 cases; 2) supratentorial, 34 cases; and 3) spinal, 18 cases. All these patients received TPD to reinforce dural closure. Preoperative (long-term corticosteroid therapy, previous surgery and radiotherapy), intraoperative (site of procedures and size of dural gap), and postoperative (early and late hydrocephalus) conditions were analyzed as possible risk factors associated with CSF leakage. The mean follow-up was 7.14 months (range 6-12 months). CSF leak was detected in 11 of 119 cases (9.2%). The presence of pre- and postoperative risk factors was associated with a higher percentage of CSF leakage: 8 of 22 cases (36.3%) vs. 3 of 97 cases (3.1%) (P < 0.0001). All leaks could be conservatively treated and no patient required readmission or second surgery. No TPD-related adverse or allergic effects were observed. TPD seems to be a safe tool to be used to reinforce dural closure in patients with a high risk of developing CSF leaks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adhesion switch on a gecko-foot inspired smart nanocupule surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenlong

    2014-11-21

    A gecko-foot inspired nanocupule surface prepared by an AAO template covering method was composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polystyrene blend. Both superhydrophobicity and high adhesion force were exhibited on the PNIPAm/PS film at room temperature. Moreover, by controlling the temperature, the wettability of the film could be switched between 138.1 ± 5.5° and 150.6 ± 1.5°, and the adhesion force could also be correspondingly tuned accurately by temperature. This reversibility in both wettability and adhesion force could be used to construct smart devices for fine selection of water droplets. The proof-of-concept was demonstrated by the selective catching of precise weight controlled water droplets at different temperatures. This work could help us to design new type of devices for blood bioanalysis or lossless drug transportation.

  9. Adhesion Control between Resist and Photomask Blank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaaki; Hatakeyama, Sho; Yoshida, Kouji; Abe, Makoto; Totsukawa, Daisuke; Morikawa, Yasutaka; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya; Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2009-06-01

    Most problems in photomask fabrication such as pattern collapse, haze, and cleaning damage are related to the behavior of surfaces and interfaces of resists, opaque layers, and quartz substrates. Therefore, it is important to control the corresponding surface and interface energies in photomask fabrication processes. In particular, adhesion analysis in microscopic regions is strongly desirable to optimize material and process designs in photomask fabrication. We applied the direct peeling (DP) method with a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and measured the adhesion of resist patterns on Cr and quartz surfaces for photomask process optimization. We also studied the effect of tip shape on the reproducibility of adhesion measurements and the dependence of collapse behavior on the resist profile. We measured lateral forces between the resulting collapsed resist pillar and the Cr or the quartz surface before and after the sliding and related these observed lateral forces to the static and kinetic frictional forces, respectively. We also studied the effect of surface modification of the Cr and quartz surfaces with silanization reagents on adhesion measured with the DP method. Resist adhesion could be controlled by surface modification using silanes. We also discuss the relationship between the adhesion observed with the DP method and the properties of the modified surfaces including water contact angles and local adhesive forces measured from force-distance curves with an SPM.

  10. Interfacial Friction and Adhesion of Polymer Brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.

    2011-08-02

    A bead-probe lateral force microscopy (LFM) technique is used to characterize the interfacial friction and adhesion properties of polymer brushes. Our measurements attempt to relate the physical structure and chemical characteristics of the brush to their properties as thin-film, tethered lubricants. Brushes are synthesized at several chain lengths and surface coverages from polymer chains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and a poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PPG/PEG). At high surface coverage, PDMS brushes manifest friction coefficients (COFs) that are among the lowest recorded for a dry lubricant film (μ ≈ 0.0024) and close to 1 order of magnitude lower than the COF of a bare silicon surface. Brushes synthesized from higher molar mass chains exhibit higher friction forces than those created using lower molar mass polymers. Increased grafting density of chains in the brush significantly reduces the COF by creating a uniform surface of stretched chains with a decreased surface viscosity. Brushes with lower surface tension and interfacial shear stresses manifest the lowest COF. In particular, PDMS chains exhibit COFs lower than PS by a factor of 3.7 and lower than PPG/PEG by a factor of 4.7. A scaling analysis conducted on the surface coverage (δ) in relation to the fraction (ε) of the friction force developing from adhesion predicts a universal relation ε ∼ δ4/3, which is supported by our experimental data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    . Staphylococci adhere stronger on fresh glass than on hydrophilic glass, while the weaker adhesion by P. fluorescens was similar on both types of glass. These results confirmed the importance of surface hydrophobicity in bacterial adhesion. This study has demonstrated that single-cell force spectroscopy allows...... be considered. We have developed a simple and versatile method to make single-cell bacterial probes for measuring single cell adhesion by force spectroscopy using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A single-cell probe was readily made by picking up a bacterial cell from a glass surface by approaching a tipless AFM...... on the adhesion force, we explored the bond formation and adhesive strength of four different bacterial strains towards three abiotic substrates with variable hydrophobicity and surface roughness. The adhesion force and final rupture length were dependent on bacterial strains, surfaces properties, and time...

  12. Dispersion and optical gradient force from high-order mode coupling between two hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanghui; Zhang, Weifeng; Lu, Jiahui; Zhao, Huijun

    2016-08-01

    We analytically study dispersion properties and optical gradient forces of different-order transverse magnetic (TM) modes in two coupled hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides (HMMWs). According to Maxwell's equations, we obtain the dispersion relation of symmetric and antisymmetric modes, and calculate optical gradient forces of different-order modes by using Maxwell stress tensor. Numerical results show that the dispersion properties are dependent on the filling ratio, and the optical gradient forces of high-order TM modes are larger than the fundamental mode when the gap between two HMMWs is very narrow, but they weaken much faster than the case of low-order TM modes with the gap width increasing. In addition, the effects of the dielectric surrounding of waveguides on the coupling effect and optical gradient force are clarified. These properties offer an avenue for various optomechanical applications in optical sensors and actuators.

  13. Controllable and switchable capillary adhesion mechanism for bio-adhesive pads: Effect of micro patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XiangJun; LIU Yuan; LIU YongHe; AHMED S.I.-U.

    2009-01-01

    Some insects and animals, such as bugs, grasshoppers and tree frogs, realize their efficient adhesion mechanism to glass surface, wall and ceiling by injecting a wetting liquid thin film into the pad-substrate contact area. Their ability to control adhesion (attaching or detaching from a surface) is in many cases connected to the contact geometry and surface patterns of their attachment pads. This paper focuses on the dependence of the capillary adhesion (wet adhesion) on the micro patterns of the bio-adhesive pads. The objective is to reveal the possible mechanism for a bio-adhesive pad to control capillary force through adjusting its micro-scale surface pattern and topography. A capillary adhesion force model is built up taking account of the combined role of micro-dimple geometry as well as the wetting behavior of the confined liquid thin film. Calculated results of the apparent contact angle on the regularly micro-dimpled surfaces are compared with and in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Simulation of the capillary adhesion force reveals that it is controllable in a large mag-nitude by adjusting a dimensionless surface pattern parameter k defined as a/(a+b), where a is the dia-meter of micro dimple, and (a+b) is the side length of one pattern cell. When adjusting the parameter k more than 0.75, the capillary adhesion force could be switchable from attractive to repulsive. This effect of micro patterns on the interfacial capillary force is proved to be dominant when the pad-substrate clearance decreases to the nano/micrometer scale. These results indicate that a controllable and switchable capillary adhesive mechanism might be utilized by a living insect or animal to realize its stable adhesion and quick releasing movement through adjusting the micro-pattern topography of its bio-adhesive pad.

  14. Adhesion of Antireflective Coatings in Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, Ryan; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    The development of a new composite dual cantilever beam (cDCB) thin-film adhesion testing method is reported, which allows the measurement of adhesion on the fragile thin substrates used in multijunction photovoltaics. We address the adhesion of several antireflective coating systems on multijunction cells. By varying interface chemistry and morphology, we demonstrate the ensuing effects on adhesion and help to develop an understanding of how high adhesion can be achieved, as adhesion values ranging from 0.5 J/m2 to 10 J/m2 were measured. Damp Heat (85 degrees C/85% RH) was used to invoke degradation of interfacial adhesion. We show that even with germanium substrates that fracture easily, quantitative measurements of adhesion can still be made at high test yield. The cDCB test is discussed as an important new methodology, which can be broadly applied to any system that makes use of thin, brittle, or otherwise fragile substrates.

  15. Impact-force sparse reconstruction from highly incomplete and inaccurate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Baijie; Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Jiawei; Chen, Xuefeng

    2016-08-01

    The classical l2-norm-based regularization methods applied for force reconstruction inverse problem require that the number of measurements should not be less than the number of unknown sources. Taking into account the sparse nature of impact-force in time domain, we develop a general sparse methodology based on minimizing l1-norm for solving the highly underdetermined model of impact-force reconstruction. A monotonic two-step iterative shrinkage/thresholding (MTWIST) algorithm is proposed to find the sparse solution to such an underdetermined model from highly incomplete and inaccurate measurements, which can be problematic with Tikhonov regularization. MTWIST is highly efficient for large-scale ill-posed problems since it mainly involves matrix-vector multiplies without matrix factorization. In sparsity frame, the proposed sparse regularization method can not only determine the actual impact location from many candidate sources but also simultaneously reconstruct the time history of impact-force. Simulation and experiment including single-source and two-source impact-force reconstruction are conducted on a simply supported rectangular plate and a shell structure to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of MTWIST, respectively. Both the locations and force time histories of the single-source and two-source cases are accurately reconstructed from a single accelerometer, where the high noise level is considered in simulation and the primary noise in experiment is supposed to be colored noise. Meanwhile, the consecutive impact-forces reconstruction in a large-scale (greater than 104) sparse frame illustrates that MTWIST has advantages of computational efficiency and identification accuracy over Tikhonov regularization.

  16. Effect of adhesive thickness on adhesively bonded T-joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, A. R.; Afendi, Mohd; Majid, M. S. Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the effect of adhesive thickness on tensile strength of adhesively bonded stainless steel T-joint. Specimens were made from SUS 304 Stainless Steel plate and SUS 304 Stainless Steel perforated plate. Four T-joint specimens with different adhesive thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were made. Experiment result shows T-joint specimen with adhesive thickness of 1.0 mm yield highest maximum load. Identical T-joint specimen jointed by spot welding was also tested. Tensile test shows welded T-Joint had eight times higher tensile load than adhesively bonded T-joint. However, in low pressure application such as urea granulator chamber, high tensile strength is not mandatory. This work is useful for designer in fertilizer industry and others who are searching for alternative to spot welding.

  17. Experimental study of forced convection heat transfer during upward and downward flow of helium at high pressure and high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Valentin; Narbeh Artoun; Masahiro Kawaji; Donald M. McEligot

    2015-08-01

    Fundamental high pressure/high temperature forced convection experiments have been conducted in support of the development of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. The experiments utilize a high temperature/high pressure gas flow test facility constructed for forced convection and natural circulation experiments. The test section has a single 16.8 mm ID flow channel in a 2.7 m long, 108 mm OD graphite column with four 2.3kW electric heater rods placed symmetrically around the flow channel. This experimental study presents the role of buoyancy forces in enhancing or reducing convection heat transfer for helium at high pressures up to 70 bar and high temperatures up to 873 degrees K. Wall temperatures have been compared among 10 cases covering the inlet Re numbers ranging from 500 to 3,000. Downward flows display higher and lower wall temperatures in the upstream and downstream regions, respectively, than the upward flow cases due to the influence of buoyancy forces. In the entrance region, convection heat transfer is reduced due to buoyancy leading to higher wall temperatures, while in the downstream region, buoyancyinduced mixing causes higher convection heat transfer and lower wall temperatures. However, their influences are reduced as the Reynolds number increases. This experimental study is of specific interest to VHTR design and validation of safety analysis codes.

  18. Analysis of adhesion of radiation curable compositions to polyester substrate. [. gamma. rays or electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, W.K.; Barbery, J.; Gupta, B.S.

    1977-07-01

    Properties of bonds produced by radiation curing of adhesives on polyester film were studied. Investigation of bonding in polyester non-wovens had revealed that adhesion of binders to fibers was weak, which resulted in interfacial failures, judged from electron micrographs. If a binder droplet surrounds a cluster of fibers, tearing of binder took place but fibers still peeled out of droplets with interfacial separation. In order to understand the failure mechanism, a study was carried out on Mylar film bonded with adhesives cured by electron beam or gamma-rays from /sup 60/Co. Mixtures of isodecyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate were copolymerized between Mylar films to produce adhesives with a wide range of glass transition temperatures. Hexanediol diacrylate was added in various amounts to produce different degrees of cross-linking. Small amounts of fumed silica (Cab-O-Sil) were added to thicken the monomers used in the /sup 60/Co experiments. By varying rheological properties in this fashion, a maximum peel force of 3.5 lb/in. was obtained. This value is in line with peel strengths from polyester using commercial, prepolymerized adhesives with solubility parameters similar to those used here delta = 8.3 to 9.3). These results show that the primary reason for the poor adhesion of radiation curable adhesives to polyester is their high degree of cross-linking and that radiation curable adhesives are not basically different from other types, except in cases where their unique properties could be utilized with advantage.

  19. High Precision Prediction of Rolling Force Based on Fuzzy and Nerve Method for Cold Tandem Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Chun-yu; SHAN Xiu-ying; NIU Zhao-ping

    2008-01-01

    The rolling force model for cold tandem mill was put forward by using the Elman dynamic recursive network method, based on the actual measured data. Furthermore, a good assumption is put forward, which brings a full universe of discourse self-adjusting factor fuzzy control, closed-loop adjusting, based on error feedback and expertise into a rolling force prediction model, to modify prediction outputs and improve prediction precision and robustness. The simulated results indicate that the method is highly effective and the prediction precision is better than that of the traditional method. Predicted relative error is less than ±4%, so the prediction is high precise for the cold tandem mill.

  20. A review of Air Force high efficiency cascaded multiple bandgap solar cell research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahilly, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    At the time of their conception, the cell stack systems to be discussed represent the best semiconductor materials combinations to achieve Air Force program goals. These systems are investigated thoroughly and the most promising systems, from the standpoint of high efficiency, are taken for further development with large area emphasized (at least 4 sq cm). The emphasis in the Air Force cascaded cell program is placed on eventual nonconcentrator application. This use of the final cell design considerably relieves the low resistance requirements for the tunnel junction. In a high concentration application the voltage drop across the tunnel junction can be a very serious problem.

  1. Acoustic radiation force of high-order Bessel beam standing wave tweezers on a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2009-12-01

    Particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of Bessel beams is an active field of research. In a previous investigation, [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 1604-1620] an expression for the radiation force of a zero-order Bessel beam standing wave experienced by a sphere was derived. The present work extends the analysis of the radiation force to the case of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of positive order m having an angular dependence on the phase phi. The derivation for the general expression of the force is based on the formulation for the total acoustic scattering field of a HOBB by a sphere [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic scattering of a high-order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2840-2850; F.G. Mitri, Equivalence of expressions for the acoustic scattering of a progressive high order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control 56 (2009) 1100-1103] to derive the general expression for the radiation force function YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave incident upon a rigid sphere immersed in non-viscous water are computed. The rigid sphere calculations for YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave (m=0). The proposed theory is of particular interest essentially due to its inherent value as a canonical problem in particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of a HOBB standing wave on a sphere. It may also serve as the benchmark for comparison to other solutions obtained by strictly numerical or asymptotic approaches.

  2. Design principles for high-pressure force fields: Aqueous TMAO solutions from ambient to kilobar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzl, Christoph; Kibies, Patrick; Imoto, Sho; Frach, Roland; Suladze, Saba; Winter, Roland; Marx, Dominik; Horinek, Dominik; Kast, Stefan M.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate force fields are one of the major pillars on which successful molecular dynamics simulations of complex biomolecular processes rest. They have been optimized for ambient conditions, whereas high-pressure simulations become increasingly important in pressure perturbation studies, using pressure as an independent thermodynamic variable. Here, we explore the design of non-polarizable force fields tailored to work well in the realm of kilobar pressures - while avoiding complete reparameterization. Our key is to first compute the pressure-induced electronic and structural response of a solute by combining an integral equation approach to include pressure effects on solvent structure with a quantum-chemical treatment of the solute within the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) framework. Next, the solute's response to compression is taken into account by introducing pressure-dependence into selected parameters of a well-established force field. In our proof-of-principle study, the full machinery is applied to N,N,N-trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) in water being a potent osmolyte that counteracts pressure denaturation. EC-RISM theory is shown to describe well the charge redistribution upon compression of TMAO(aq) to 10 kbar, which is then embodied in force field molecular dynamics by pressure-dependent partial charges. The performance of the high pressure force field is assessed by comparing to experimental and ab initio molecular dynamics data. Beyond its broad usefulness for designing non-polarizable force fields for extreme thermodynamic conditions, a good description of the pressure-response of solutions is highly recommended when constructing and validating polarizable force fields.

  3. The RSC chromatin remodelling ATPase translocates DNA with high force and small step size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirinakis, George; Clapier, Cedric R; Gao, Ying; Viswanathan, Ramya; Cairns, Bradley R; Zhang, Yongli

    2011-06-15

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition and reconfigure nucleosomes. Despite their diverse functions, all remodellers share highly conserved ATPase domains, many shown to translocate DNA. Understanding remodelling requires biophysical knowledge of the DNA translocation process: how the ATPase moves DNA and generates force, and how translocation and force generation are coupled on nucleosomes. Here, we characterize the real-time activity of a minimal RSC translocase 'motor' on bare DNA, using high-resolution optical tweezers and a 'tethered' translocase system. We observe on dsDNA a processivity of ∼35 bp, a speed of ∼25 bp/s, and a step size of 2.0 (±0.4, s.e.m.) bp. Surprisingly, the motor is capable of moving against high force, up to 30 pN, making it one of the most force-resistant motors known. We also provide evidence for DNA 'buckling' at initiation. These observations reveal the ATPase as a powerful DNA translocating motor capable of disrupting DNA-histone interactions by mechanical force.

  4. Multimode laser cooling and ultra-high sensitivity force sensing with nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Slatyer, Harri J; Buchler, Ben C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Photo-induced forces can be used to manipulate and cool the mechanical motion of oscillators. When the oscillator is used as a force sensor, such as in atomic force microscopy, active feedback is an enticing route to enhancing measurement performance. Here, we show broadband multimode cooling of $-23$ dB down to a temperature of $8 \\pm 1$~K in the stationary regime. Through the use of periodic quiescence feedback cooling, we show improved signal-to-noise ratios for the measurement of transient signals. We compare the performance of real feedback to numerical post-processing of data and show that both methods produce similar improvements to the signal-to-noise ratio of force measurements. We achieved a room temperature force measurement sensitivity of $< 2\\times10^{-16}$ N with integration time of less than $0.1$ ms. The high precision and fast force microscopy results presented will potentially benefit applications in biosensing, molecular metrology, subsurface imaging and accelerometry.

  5. Radiation forces on a three-level atom in the high-order Bessel beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zheng-Ling; Yin Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces acting on a A-configuration three-level atom in an arbitrary light field are derived by means of the optical Bloch equations based on the atomic density matrix elements, and the general properties of the average dissipative and dipole forces on a three-level atom in the linearly-polarized high-order Bessel beams (HBBs) are analysed. We find a resonant property (with two resonant peaks) of the dissipative force and a non-resonant property (with two pairs of non-resonant peaks) of the dipole force on the three-level atom, which are completely different from those on the two-level atom. Meanwhile we find a saturation effect of the average dissipative force in the HBB, which comes from the saturation of the upper-level population. Our study shows that the general expressions of the average dissipative and dipole forces on the three-level atom will be simplified to those of the two-level atom under the approximation of large detuning. Finally, we study the axial and azimuthal Doppler cooling of atoms in 1D optical molasses composed of two counter-propagating HBBs and discuss the azimuthal influence of the HBB on the Doppler cooling limit. We also find that the Doppler limit of atoms in the molasses HBB is slightly below the conventional Doppler limit of hг/(2кB) due to the orbital angular momentum lh of the HBB.

  6. Radiation force on absorbing targets and power measurements of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analytic expressions for the radiated field of a circular concave piston given by Hasegawa et al.,an integral for calculation of the radiation force on a plane absorbing target in a spherically focused field is derived.A general relation between acoustic power P and normal radiation force Fn is obtained under the condition of kr 1.Numerical computation is carried out by using the symbolic computation program for practically focused sources and absorbing circular targets.The results show that,for a given source,there is a range of target positions where the radiation force is independent of the target’s position under the assumption that the contribution of the acoustic field behind the target to the radiation force can be neglected.The experiments are carried out and confirm that there is a range of target positions where the measured radiation force is basically independent of the target’s position even at high acoustic power (up to 700 W).It is believed that when the radiation force method is used to measure the acoustic power radiated from a focused source,the size of the target must be selected in such a way that no observable sound can be found in the region behind the target.

  7. Ferroelectric Domain Imaging Mechanism in High-Vacuum Scanning Force Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hua-Rong; YU Han-Feng; CHU Rui-Qing; LI Guo-Rong; YIN Qing-Rui

    2005-01-01

    @@ High-vacuum scanning force microscopy of the domain structures in PMN-PT single crystals is investigated. It has been shown that under high vacuum conditions, the polarization charges are not effectively compensated for by intrinsic screening charges from the ferroelectrics. This result suggests that the electrostatic tip-sample interaction plays a great contribution to the domain imaging mechanism in PMN-PT ferroelectric single crystals under high vacuum conditions.

  8. Effect of various loads on the force-time characteristics of the hang high pull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Beckham, George K; Wright, Glenn A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various loads on the force-time characteristics associated with peak power during the hang high pull (HHP). Fourteen athletic men (age: 21.6 ± 1.3 years; height: 179.3 ± 5.6 cm; body mass: 81.5 ± 8.7 kg; 1 repetition maximum [1RM] hang power clean [HPC]: 104.9 ± 15.1 kg) performed sets of the HHP at 30, 45, 65, and 80% of their 1RM HPC. Peak force, peak velocity, peak power, force at peak power, and velocity at peak power were compared between loads. Statistical differences in peak force (p = 0.001), peak velocity (p < 0.001), peak power (p = 0.015), force at peak power (p < 0.001), and velocity at peak power (p < 0.001) existed, with the greatest values for each variable occurring at 80, 30, 45, 80, and 30% 1RM HPC, respectively. Effect sizes between loads indicated that larger differences in velocity at peak power existed as compared with those displayed by force at peak power. It seems that differences in velocity may contribute to a greater extent to differences in peak power production as compared with force during the HHP. Further investigation of both force and velocity at peak power during weightlifting variations is necessary to provide insight on the contributing factors of power production. Specific load ranges should be prescribed to optimally train the variables associated with power development during the HHP.

  9. Oral Mucous Membrane Irritation Test and Biting Force Measurement of a New Denture Adhesive%义齿稳固剂的口腔黏膜刺激性及对咬合力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖亚伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 初步探讨自行研制的纤维素类义齿稳固剂(denture adhesive,DA)对口腔黏膜的刺激性和临床应用效果.方法 健康金黄地鼠10只随机分为2组,麻醉后,其中1组动物口腔左侧黏膜放置DA浸提液,另1组置入阳性对照材料,2组动物口腔右侧黏膜均放置阴性对照材料.分别于1、4、6、8 h后肉眼观察局部黏膜改变,并做组织切片了解组织学改变.临床测定20例患者使用DA前后,新旧全口义齿最大咬合力的变化.结果 实验动物均未出现局部及全身的不良刺激反应.所研制的稳固剂可提高新旧全口义齿的最大咬合力,但仅旧义齿使用前后差异有统计学意义(t=3.584,P<0.01).结论 所研制的DA义齿稳固剂未见对口腔黏膜的不良刺激反应,DA可提高旧义齿的最大咬合力,有较好的临床应用前景.%Objective To evaluate local and systemic response to the developed synthetic denture adhesive( DA), by oral membrane irritation test. Clinical investigation was di~ussed in this article as well. Methods Ten hamsters were used in this research and divided into 2 groups evenly. The eluates of DA and positive control materials were fixed on the left of oral membrane of each 5 hamsters' pouch separately, while the negative materials were put on the right side of all the 10 tested animals. After 1 h, 4 h, 6 h and 8 h of local and systemic observation, the local oral membrane specimens were viewed under microscope. Twenty edentulous patients with complete dentures were selected for this research also.The maximum biting force was recorded before and after application of the adhesive to all the new and old dentures. Results The results showed that there were no local or systemic abnormal response to the test material. The clinical investigation data indicated that significantly greater biting forces were generated with old dentures than with the new dentures.Conclusion The developed DA exhibited no abnormal oral mucous membrane

  10. Opposing Shear-Induced Forces Dominate Inertial Focusing in Curved Channels and High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Keinan, Eliezer; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    Inertial focusing is the migration of particles in fluid toward equilibrium, where current theory predicts that shear-induced and wall-induced lift forces are balanced. First reported in 1961, this Segre-Silberberg effect is particularly useful for microfluidic isolation of cells and particles. Interestingly, recent work demonstrated particle focusing at high Reynolds numbers that cannot be explained by current theory. In this work, we show that non-monotonous velocity profiles, such as those developed in curved channels, create peripheral velocity maxima around which opposing shear-induced forces dominate over wall effects. Similarly, entry effects amplified in high Reynolds flow produce an equivalent trapping mechanism in short, straight channels. This new focusing mechanism in the developing flow regime enables a 10-fold miniaturization of inertial focusing devices, while our model corrects long-standing misconceptions about the nature of mechanical forces governing inertial focusing in curved channels.

  11. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  12. Relative Contributions of Heating and Momentum Forcing to High-Latitude Lower Thermospheric Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Y. S.; Richmond, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    At high latitudes the thermospheric dynamics are gov­erned by various heat and momentum sources. Recently several modeling studies have been attempt­ed to understand the physical process that control the high-latitude lower thermospheric dynamics. Kwak and Richmond [2007] and Kwak et al. [2007] studied the momentum forcing bal­ance that are mainly responsible for maintaining the high-latitude lower thermospheric wind system by using the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermo­sphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIE-GCM). Kwak and Richmond [2014] analyzed the divergence and vorticity of the high-latitude neutral wind field in the lower thermosphere during the south­ern summertime. In this study, we extend previous works by Kwak and Rich­mond [2007, 2014] and Kwak et al. [2007], which helped to better understand the physical processes maintaining thermospheric dynamics at high latitudes, and here perform a "term analysis of the potential vorticity equation" for the high-latitude neu­tral wind field in the lower thermosphere, on the basis of numerical simulations using the NCAR TIE-GCM. These analyses can provide insight into the relative strength of the heating and the momentum forcing responsible for driving rotational winds at the high-latitude lower thermosphere. The heating is the net heat including the heat transfer by downward molecular and eddy heat conduction, the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ra­diation, auroral heating by particles, Joule dissipation of ionospheric currents, release of chemical energy by the atomic oxygen recombination, and radiative CO2, NO and O infrared emissions. The momentum forcing is associated with the viscous force and the frictional drag force from convecting ions.

  13. A batch fabricated biomimetic dry adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northen, Michael T.; Turner, Kimberly L.

    2005-08-01

    The fine hair adhesive system found in nature is capable of reversibly adhering to just about any surface. This dry adhesive, best demonstrated in the pad of the gecko, makes use of a multilevel conformal structure to greatly increase inelastic surface contact, enhancing short range interactions and producing significant amounts of attractive forces. Recent work has attempted to reproduce and test the terminal submicrometre 'hairs' of the system. Here we report the first batch fabricated multi-scale conformal system to mimic nature's dry adhesive. The approach makes use of massively parallel MEMS processing technology to produce 20-150 µm platforms, supported by single slender pillars, and coated with ~2 µm long, ~200 nm diameter, organic looking polymer nanorods, or 'organorods'. To characterize the structures a new mesoscale nanoindenter adhesion test technique has been developed. Experiments indicate significantly improved adhesion with the multiscale system. Additional processing caused a hydrophilic to hydrophobic transformation of the surface and testing indicated further improvement in adhesion.

  14. Highly eccentric inspirals into a Schwarzschild black hole using self-force calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Eccentric-orbit inspirals into a massive black hole are calculated using the gravitational self-force. Both extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) and intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) are modeled. These calculations include all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects for inspirals into a Schwarzschild black hole. We compute systems with initial eccentricities as high as e = 0.8 and initial separations as large as 100 M. In the case of EMRIs, the calculations follow the decay through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge. Inspirals are computed using an osculating-orbits scheme that is driven by self-force data from a hybridized self-force code. A Lorenz gauge self-force code is combined with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code, allowing the hybrid self-force model to track orbital phase in the inspirals to within 0.1 radians or better. Extensions of the method to include other physical effects are considered.

  15. Bullet Retarding Forces in Ballistic Gelatin by Analysis of High Speed Video

    CERN Document Server

    Gaylord, Steven; Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Though three distinct wounding mechanisms (permanent cavity, temporary cavity, and ballistic pressure wave) are described in the wound ballistics literature, they all have their physical origin in the retarding force between bullet and tissue as the bullet penetrates. If the bullet path is the same, larger retarding forces produce larger wounding effects and a greater probability of rapid incapacitation. By Newton's third law, the force of the bullet on the tissue is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force of the tissue on the bullet. For bullets penetrating with constant mass, the retarding force on the bullet can be determined by frame by frame analysis of high speed video of the bullet penetrating a suitable tissue simulant such as calibrated 10% ballistic gelatin. Here the technique is demonstrated with 9mm NATO bullets, 32 cm long blocks of gelatin, and a high speed video camera operating at 20,000 frames per second. It is found that different 9mm NATO bullets have a wide variety of pot...

  16. Nanomagnets with high shape anisotropy and strong crystalline anisotropy: perspectives on magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, H; Jaafar, M; Llobet, J; Esteve, J; Vázquez, M; Asenjo, A; del Real, R P; Plaza, J A

    2011-12-16

    We report on a new approach for magnetic imaging, highly sensitive even in the presence of external, strong magnetic fields. Based on FIB-assisted fabricated high-aspect-ratio rare-earth nanomagnets, we produce groundbreaking magnetic force tips with hard magnetic character where we combine a high aspect ratio (shape anisotropy) together with strong crystalline anisotropy (rare-earth-based alloys). Rare-earth hard nanomagnets are then FIB-integrated to silicon microcantilevers as highly sharpened tips for high-field magnetic imaging applications. Force resolution and domain reversing and recovery capabilities are at least one order of magnitude better than for conventional magnetic tips. This work opens new, pioneering research fields on the surface magnetization process of nanostructures based either on relatively hard magnetic materials-used in magnetic storage media-or on materials like superparamagnetic particles, ferro/antiferromagnetic structures or paramagnetic materials.

  17. Bioinspired super-antiwetting interfaces with special liquid-solid adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjie; Zheng, Yongmei; Zhai, Jin; Jiang, Lei

    2010-03-16

    Super-antiwetting interfaces, such as superhydrophobic and superamphiphobic surfaces in air and superoleophobic interfaces in water, with special liquid-solid adhesion have recently attracted worldwide attention. Through tuning surface microstructures and compositions to achieve certain solid/liquid contact modes, we can effectively control the liquid-solid adhesion in a super-antiwetting state. In this Account, we review our recent progress in the design and fabrication of these bioinspired super-antiwetting interfaces with special liquid-solid adhesion. Low-adhesion superhydrophobic surfaces are biologically inspired, typically by the lotus leaf. Wettability investigated at micro- and nanoscale reveals that the low adhesion of the lotus surface originates from the composite contact mode, a microdroplet bridging several contacts, within the hierarchical structures. Recently high-adhesion superhydrophobic surfaces have also attracted research attention. These surfaces are inspired by the surfaces of gecko feet and rose petals. Accordingly, we propose two biomimetic approaches for the fabrication of high-adhesion superhydrophobic surfaces. First, to mimic a sticky gecko's foot, we designed structures with nanoscale pores that could trap air isolated from the atmosphere. In this case, the negative pressure induced by the volume change of sealed air as the droplet is pulled away from surface can produce a normal adhesive force. Second, we constructed microstructures with size and topography similar to that of a rose petal. The resulting materials hold air gaps in their nanoscale folds, controlling the superhydrophobicity in a Wenzel state on the microscale. Furthermore, we can tune the liquid-solid adhesion on the same superhydrophobic surface by dynamically controlling the orientations of microstructures without altering the surface composition. The superhydrophobic wings of the butterfly (Morpho aega) show directional adhesion: a droplet easily rolls off the surface

  18. Measurement of Levitation Forces of High-"T[subscript c] Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    We show the construction of a so-called levitation balance which is capable of measuring the levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a superconducting high-T[subscript c] thin film sample. The underlying theoretical basis is discussed in detail. The experiment is performed as an introductory physics experiment for school students as well…

  19. Measurement of Levitation Forces of High-"T[subscript c] Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    We show the construction of a so-called levitation balance which is capable of measuring the levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a superconducting high-T[subscript c] thin film sample. The underlying theoretical basis is discussed in detail. The experiment is performed as an introductory physics experiment for school students as well…

  20. Monsoonal response to mid-holocene orbital forcing in a high resolution GCM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.H.C.; Drijfhout, S.S.; Tuenter, E.; Lourens, L.J.; Hilgen, F.J.; Weber, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we use a sophisticated high-resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, EC-Earth, to investigate the effect of Mid-Holocene orbital forcing on summer monsoons on both hemispheres. During the Mid-Holocene (6 ka), there was more summer insolation on the Northern Hemisphere than

  1. Monsoonal response to mid-holocene orbital forcing in a high resolution GCM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.H.C.; Drijfhout, S.S.; Tuenter, E.; Lourens, L.J.; Hilgen, F.J.; Weber, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we use a sophisticated high-resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, EC-Earth, to investigate the effect of Mid-Holocene orbital forcing on summer monsoons on both hemispheres. During the Mid-Holocene (6 ka), there was more summer insolation on the Northern Hemisphere than t

  2. Forces in yeast flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-07

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion ("flocculation") is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  3. Handbook of Adhesion, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, D. E.

    2005-06-01

    This second edition of the successful Handbook of Adhesion provides concise and authoritative articles covering many aspects of the science and technology associated with adhesion and adhesives. It is intended to fill a gap between the necessarily simplified treatment of the student textbook and the full and thorough treatment of the research monograph and review article. The articles are structured in such a way, with internal cross-referencing and external literature references, that the reader can build up a broader and deeper understanding, as their needs require. This second edition includes many new articles covering developments which have risen in prominence in the intervening years, such as scanning probe techniques, the surface forces apparatus and the relation between adhesion and fractal surfaces. Advances in understanding polymer - polymer interdiffusion are reflected in articles drawing out the implications for adhesive bonding. In addition, articles derived from the earlier edition have been revised and updated where needed. Throughout the book there is a renewed emphasis on environmental implications of the use of adhesives and sealants. The scope of the Handbook, which features nearly 250 articles from over 60 authors, includes the background science - physics, chemistry and material science - and engineering, and also aspects of adhesion relevant to the use of adhesives, including topics such as: Sealants and mastics Paints and coatings Printing and composite materials Welding and autohesion Engineering design The Handbook of Adhesion is intended for scientists and engineers in both academia and industry, requiring an understanding of the various facets of adhesion.

  4. Levitation force and magnetization in bulk and thin film high T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riise, A.B

    1998-04-01

    The authors present high-resolution measurements of the repulsive vertical force and its associated stiffness between a Nd-B-Fe magnet and a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} superconductor in cylindrical geometry. The results are compared with theoretical predictions. The calculations are based on a model in which the superconductor is assumed to be either a sintered granular material or consisting of grains embedded in a nonactive matrix so that only intragranular currents are important. The critical state model is applied to each grain individually and closed form expressions for both vertical force F{sub z} and stiffness are obtained in a configuration with cylindrical symmetry. The model explains all features of the experimental results in a consistent way. A good quantitative agreement has been obtained using only three adjustable parameters. Several central aspects of the phenomenon of magnetic levitation with high-T{sub c} superconductors are presented. High-resolution measurements are made of the repulsive vertical force and its associated stiffness as well as the horizontal stabilizing force and the stiffness governing lateral vibrations. The results obtained at 77 K using a granular YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} sample and Nd-Fe-B magnet in a rectangular levitation configuration are compared with theoretical predictions. The calculations, which are based on the critical state model with the assumption that it applies to the grins individually, give closed-form expressions for all the measured quantities. It is concluded that the present model explains all features of the observations in a consistent way. Using only three adjustable parameters a good agreement exists also at a quantitative level. Experimental studies and theoretical modelling of the levitation force on a permanent magnet placed above a superconducting thin film are offered. It is shown that measurements of the levitation force is a simple and precise method to determine the

  5. Improvement of force factor of magnetostrictive vibration power generator for high efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Shota, E-mail: happiest3.7@gmail.com; Ueno, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Sotoshi [Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa-city, Ishikawa 920-1164 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We develop high power magnetostrictive vibration power generator for battery-free wireless electronics. The generator is based on a cantilever of parallel beam structure consisting of coil-wound Galfenol and stainless plates with permanent magnet for bias. Oscillating force exerted on the tip bends the cantilever in vibration yields stress variation of Galfenol plate, which causes flux variation and generates voltage on coil due to the law of induction. This generator has advantages over conventional, such as piezoelectric or moving magnet types, in the point of high efficiency, highly robust, and low electrical impedance. Our concern is the improvement of energy conversion efficiency dependent on the dimension. Especially, force factor, the conversion ratio of the electromotive force (voltage) on the tip velocity in vibration, has an important role in energy conversion process. First, the theoretical value of the force factor is formulated and then the validity was verified by experiments, where we compare four types of prototype with parameters of the dimension using 7.0 × 1.5 × 50 mm beams of Galfenol with 1606-turn wound coil. In addition, the energy conversion efficiency of the prototypes depending on load resistance was measured. The most efficient prototype exhibits the maximum instantaneous power of 0.73 W and energy of 4.7 mJ at a free vibration of frequency of 202 Hz in the case of applied force is 25 N. Further, it was found that energy conversion efficiency depends not only on the force factor but also on the damping (mechanical loss) of the vibration.

  6. Interplay between surface properties of standard, vitamin E blended and oxidised ultra high molecular weight polyethylene used in total joint replacement and adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banche, G; Allizond, V; Bracco, P; Bistolfi, A; Boffano, M; Cimino, A; Brach del Prever, E M; Cuffini, A M

    2014-04-01

    We have assessed the different adhesive properties of some of the most common bacteria associated with periprosthetic joint infection on various types of ultra high molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). Quantitative in vitro analysis of the adhesion of biofilm producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to physically and chemically characterised standard UHMWPE (PE), vitamin E blended UHMWPE (VE-PE) and oxidised UHMWPE (OX-PE) was performed using a sonication protocol. A significant decreased bacterial adhesion was registered for both strains on VE-PE, in comparison with that observed on PE, within 48 hours of observation (S. aureus p = 0.024 and E. coli p = 0.008). Since Vitamin E reduces bacterial adhesive ability, VE-stabilised UHMWPE could be valuable in joint replacement by presenting excellent mechanical properties, while reducing bacterial adhesiveness.

  7. Origin of the nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices probed by force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolenko, Ivan S; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Magonov, Sergei N; Lishko, Valeryi K; Oshkadyerov, Stanislav P; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2010-11-16

    The deposition of a multilayered fibrinogen matrix on various surfaces results in a dramatic reduction of integrin-mediated cell adhesion and outside-in signaling in platelets and leukocytes. The conversion of a highly adhesive, low-density fibrinogen substrate to the nonadhesive high-density fibrinogen matrix occurs within a very narrow range of fibrinogen coating concentrations. The molecular events responsible for this transition are not well understood. Herein, single-cell and molecular force spectroscopy were used to determine the early steps in the formation of nonadhesive fibrinogen substrates. We show that the adsorption of fibrinogen in the form of a molecular bilayer coincides with a several-fold reduction in the adhesion forces generated between the AFM tip and the substrate as well as between a cell and the substrate. The subsequent deposition of new layers at higher coating concentrations of fibrinogen results in a small additional decrease in adhesion forces. The poorly adhesive fibrinogen bilayer is more extensible under an applied tensile force than is the surface-bound fibrinogen monolayer. Following chemical cross-linking, the stabilized bilayer displays the mechanical and adhesive properties characteristic of a more adhesive fibrinogen monolayer. We propose that a greater compliance of the bi- and multilayer fibrinogen matrices has its origin in the interaction between the molecules forming the adjacent layers. Understanding the mechanical properties of nonadhesive fibrinogen matrices should be of importance in the therapeutic control of pathological thrombosis and in biomaterials science.

  8. Excitation Forces on Point Absorbers Exposed to High Order Non-linear Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, Thomas Hansen; Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Kramer, Morten

    2013-01-01

    of proper methods to calculate design pressure distributions has led to structural failures such as buckling in the shells in wave energy prototypes. As a step towards understanding the complex loading from high order non-linear waves, this paper presents a practical approach to estimate wave excitation...... forces accounting for both non-linearity and diffraction effects. The method is validated by laboratory experiments using a hemispherical point absorber with a 6-axis force transducer, but the technique is believed to be applicable for most types of submerged or semi-submerged floating devices...

  9. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  10. Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W. L.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

  11. Kink topology control by high-frequency external forces in nonlinear Klein-Gordon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nodarse, R.; Quintero, N. R.; Mertens, F. G.

    2014-10-01

    A method of averaging is applied to study the dynamics of a kink in the damped double sine-Gordon equation driven by both external (nonparametric) and parametric periodic forces at high frequencies. This theoretical approach leads to the study of a double sine-Gordon equation with an effective potential and an effective additive force. Direct numerical simulations show how the appearance of two connected π kinks and of an individual π kink can be controlled via the frequency. An anomalous negative mobility phenomenon is also predicted by theory and confirmed by simulations of the original equation.

  12. Kink topology control by high-frequency external forces in nonlinear Klein-Gordon models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Nodarse, R; Quintero, N R; Mertens, F G

    2014-10-01

    A method of averaging is applied to study the dynamics of a kink in the damped double sine-Gordon equation driven by both external (nonparametric) and parametric periodic forces at high frequencies. This theoretical approach leads to the study of a double sine-Gordon equation with an effective potential and an effective additive force. Direct numerical simulations show how the appearance of two connected π kinks and of an individual π kink can be controlled via the frequency. An anomalous negative mobility phenomenon is also predicted by theory and confirmed by simulations of the original equation.

  13. Suppression effects of dental glass-ceramics with polarization-induced highly dense surface charges against bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Koizumi, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Okura, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and antibacterial ability capacity of surface-improved dental glass-ceramics by an electrical polarization process. Commercially available dental glass-ceramic materials were electrically polarized to induce surface charges in a direct current field by heating. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystal structure, and surface free energy (SFE) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and water droplet methods, respectively. The antibacterial capacity was assessed by a bacterial adhesion test using Streptococcus mutans. Although the surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystal structure were not affected by electrical polarization, the polar component and total SFE were enhanced. After 24 h incubation at 37ºC, bacterial adhesion to the polarized samples was inhibited. The electrical polarization method may confer antibacterial properties on prosthetic devices, such as porcelain fused to metal crowns or all ceramic restorations, without any additional bactericidal agents.

  14. Experimental Contribution to High-Precision Characterization of Magnetic