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Sample records for high activity glasses

  1. Borosilicate glasses for the high activity waste vetrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantale, C.; Donato, A.; Guidi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Some results concerning the researches carried out on the high-level wastes vitrification at ENEA, Comb-Mepis-Rifiu laboratory are reported. A fission product solution referred to power plant nuclear fuel reprocessing has been selected and simulated with no radioactive chemicals. Some glass composition have been tested for the vitrification of this solution, the best of them being taken into consideration for real active tests at the hot bench scale plant ESTER in Ispra. The final glasses have been characterized from the chemical and physical point of view; moreover some microstructural investigations have been performed in order to identify few microsegregations and to test the degree of amorphousness of the products

  2. Demonstration of sulfur solubility determinations in high waste loading, low-activity waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-25

    A method recommended by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for sulfate solubility determinations in simulated low-activity waste glasses was demonstrated using three compositions from a recent Hanford high waste loading glass study. Sodium and sulfate concentrations in the glasses increased after each re-melting step. Visual observations of the glasses during the re-melting process reflected the changes in composition. The measured compositions showed that the glasses met the targeted values. The amount of SO3 retained in the glasses after washing was relatively high, ranging from 1.6 to 2.6 weight percent (wt %). Measured SnO2 concentrations were notably low in all of the study glasses. The composition of the wash solutions should be measured in future work to determine whether SnO2 is present with the excess sulfate washed from the glass. Increases in batch size and the amount of sodium sulfate added did not have a measureable impact on the amount of sulfate retained in the glass, although this was tested for only a single glass composition. A batch size of 250 g and a sodium sulfate addition targeting 7 wt %, as recommended by PNNL, will be used in future experiments.

  3. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO3, has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer

  4. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO 3 , has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO 3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO 3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer-layer glasses. The experimental

  5. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  6. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997

  7. Fabrication of high activity glasses in the cells VULCAIN and PIVER. Leaching at three temperatures of some of these glasses in the VULCAIN cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.; Laude, F.; Magnier, A.; Vernaz, E.

    1982-01-01

    The methods for manufacturing and leaching four blocks of glass and one of vitreous ceramic made as from actual solutions of fission products in the Vulcain cell are described. The four blocks of glass and the vitreous ceramic are in lumps weighing from 1.6 to 1.9 kg. The volatilities measured during the making of these blocks of glass by a pot (intermittent) method and expressed as a percentage of the total activity trapped in the condenser vary from 30.7 to 9.4 for ruthenium. In the case of cesium, strontium and cerium, the volatilization rates are between 0.01 and 0.5%. The behaviour under leaching of the vitreous ceramic is less good than its mother glass. The increase in leaching rates with temperature differs from one glass to the next and according to the components

  8. Melter feed viscosity during conversion to glass: Comparison between low-activity waste and high-level waste feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Tongan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Dixon, Derek R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Kim, Dongsang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Bonham, Charles C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; VanderVeer, Bradley J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Weese, Brigitte L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington; Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington

    2017-12-07

    During nuclear waste vitrification, a melter feed (generally a slurry-like mixture of a nuclear waste and various glass forming and modifying additives) is charged into the melter where undissolved refractory constituents are suspended together with evolved gas bubbles from complex reactions. Knowledge of flow properties of various reacting melter feeds is necessary to understand their unique feed-to-glass conversion processes occurring within a floating layer of melter feed called a cold cap. The viscosity of two low-activity waste (LAW) melter feeds were studied during heating and correlated with volume fractions of undissolved solid phase and gas phase. In contrast to the high-level waste (HLW) melter feed, the effects of undissolved solid and gas phases play comparable roles and are required to represent the viscosity of LAW melter feeds. This study can help bring physical insights to feed viscosity of reacting melter feeds with different compositions and foaming behavior in nuclear waste vitrification.

  9. Millimeter-Wave Measurements of High Level and Low Level Activity Glass Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woskov, Paul

    2005-01-01

    EMSP supported research of millimeter-wave technology for nuclear waste glass melter monitoring has been very productive in establishing this field and showing great progress. This work has garnered significant recognition, winning an R and D 100 Award for viscosity monitoring, a Best Paper Award by the American Ceramic Society for nuclear waste glass monitoring, investment by the Glass Plus industry consortium to test this technology for glass fiber manufacture, investment by Savannah River Technology Center in purchasing key hardware components for additional tests, and Japanese initiated exchange visits between MIT and the vitrification facilities at Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai to review this technology. There are also potentially important spin offs to other areas including nuclear and fossil fuel power production, and National Institute of Health sponsored research as indicated below. Consequently, this work has the potential of becoming a major inter nationally recognized EMSP success story. A summary of the main accomplishments follows. The readers are referred to the cited reference publications for more details, many of which were EMSP supported by this work

  10. Preparation of high-purity Pr{sup 3+} doped Ge–As–Se–In–I glasses for active mid-infrared optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaksina, E.V.; Shiryaev, V.S., E-mail: shiryaev@ihps.nnov.ru; Kotereva, T.V.; Velmuzhov, A.P.; Ketkova, L.A.; Snopatin, G.E.

    2016-09-15

    The multi-stage method for the synthesis of high-purity Ge–As–Se–In–I glasses doped with Pr{sup 3+} ions is developed. It is based on the chemical distillation purification of glass-forming melt and the chemical transport reactions for purification and vacuum loading of indium. The level of purity of glasses, synthesized by this method, is higher in comparison with the traditional direct melting method for glass synthesis. The high-purity Pr{sup 3+}-doped Ge–As–Se–In and Pr{sup 3+}-doped Ge–As–Se–In–I glass samples are prepared; the optical, thermal and luminescent properties are investigated. The purest host glass samples, obtained by the multi-stage purification techniques, contain a low concentration of limiting impurities: hydrogen − ≤0.05 ppm (wt) and oxygen − ≤0.1 ppm (wt), that is, at present, the best result for multi-component chalcogenide glasses for mid-IR active fibers. The samples of Pr{sup 3+}-doped Ge–As–Se–In glass fibers have the minimum optical losses of 0.58 dB/m at the wavelength of 2.72 μm and exhibit an intense broadband luminescence in the spectral range of 3.5–5.5 μm, with a maximum shifted to longer wavelengths as compared with the bulk samples.

  11. Manganese activated phosphate glass for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulla, D.

    1975-01-01

    A measuring element comprises a metaphosphate glass doped with manganese as an activator. The manganese activated metaphosphate glass can detect and determine radiation doses in the range between milliroentgens and more than 10 megaroentgens. (auth)

  12. A new bio-active glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, A.; Arif, I.; Suleman, M.; Hussain, K.; Shah, W.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1960 fine ceramics such as alumina have been used side by side with metallic materials for bone and joint replacement. They have high mechanical strength and are free from corrosion problem faced by metals. However they don't bond to the natural living bone and hence are called bio-inactive. This was followed by the development of bio-active glasses and glass-ceramics which bond to the natural bone but have low mechanical strength. In the present work a new bio-active glass-ceramic, based on CaO-SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 3/-MgO composition, has been developed which has mechanical strength compared to that of a bio-inactive glass ceramic and also bonds strongly to the natural bone. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals wollastanite and apatite phases in the glass ceramic. A new bio-active cement has also been developed which can be used to join broken pieces of bone or by itself at a filler. (author)

  13. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  14. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...

  15. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Joseph, I.; Bowman, B.W.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L

    2009-01-01

    The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al 2 O 3 concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the

  16. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  17. Immobilization of high activity nuclear wastes in sintered glass. Fabrication of blocks at semi-industrial scale by hot pressing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O.; Messi, N.B.; Riquelme, R.; Sterba, M.E.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sintering process under glass pressure has been studied as an alternative of melting with the aim of obtaining a monolytic material apt to preserve the high activity nuclear wastes. Different properties of the products obtained have been evaluated where the material is selected on the basis of the results attained. The purpose of this work is the equipment development and the process adjusting for the blocks obtainment. (Author) [es

  18. High Tech Art: Chameleon Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic Glass is a technology wherein extremely thin films of metal are vacuum deposited on a glass surface. The coated glass shields spacecraft instruments from cosmic radiation and protects human vision from unfiltered sunlight in space. Because the coating process allows some wavelengths of light and color to reflect and others to pass through, a chameleon effect is produced. Murray Schwartz, a former aerospace engineer, has based his business KROMA on this NASA optical technology. He produces dichroic stained glass windows, mobiles and jewelry. The technique involves deposition of super thin layers of metal oxides applied one layer at a time in a specific order and thickness for the desired effect. His product line is unique and has been very successful.

  19. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  20. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  1. Silver-activated radiophotoluminescence dosemeter glass with high sensitivity and good corrosion resistance, method of production and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaes, H.H.; Staaden, H.

    1976-01-01

    Hitherto known radiophotoluminescent dosimeter glasses have an interfering maximum of energy dependence in the γ-energy region of 40-60 KeV. The glas according to the invention does not have this disadvantage as the metaphophate group has been replaced by fluorine. The glass is melted from a mixture which besides a silver compound (AgPO 3 , AgNO 3 , Ag 2 CO 3 or LiAg[PO 3 ] 2 ) consists of at least one fluoride. Detailed examples clarify the method and give the limits of possible deviations in the composition. (UWI) [de

  2. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korečko, J.; Jirka, V.; Sourek, B.; Červený, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 10 (2010), s. 1794-1808 ISSN 0038-092X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : rasters made of glass * greenhouse * solar architecture * fresnel lens * mathematical simulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.135, year: 2010

  3. High-efficiency organic glass scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Patrick L.; Carlson, Joseph S.

    2017-12-19

    A new family of neutron/gamma discriminating scintillators is disclosed that comprises stable organic glasses that may be melt-cast into transparent monoliths. These materials have been shown to provide light yields greater than solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals and efficient PSD capabilities when combined with 0.01 to 0.05% by weight of the total composition of a wavelength-shifting fluorophore. Photoluminescence measurements reveal fluorescence quantum yields that are 2 to 5 times greater than conventional plastic or liquid scintillator matrices, which accounts for the superior light yield of these glasses. The unique combination of high scintillation light-yields, efficient neutron/gamma PSD, and straightforward scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes the developed organic glasses from existing scintillators.

  4. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  5. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  6. High-Temperature Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of Silicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertermann, M.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Whittington, A. G.; Spera, F. J.; Zayac, J.

    2005-12-01

    Transport of heat in geologically relevant materials is of great interest because of its key role in heat transport, magmatism and volcanic activity on Earth. To better understand the thermal properties of magmatic materials at high temperatures, we measured the thermal diffusivity of four synthetic end-member silicate glasses with the following compositions: albite (NaAlSi3O8), orthoclase (KAlSi3O8), anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8), and diopside (CaMgSi2O6). Thermal diffusivity measurements were conducted with the laser-flash technique and data were acquired from room temperature to a maximum temperature near 1100°C, depending on the glass transition temperature. The presence of sub-mm sized bubbles in one of the orthoclase samples had no discernable effect on measured diffusivities. At room temperature, the three feldspar-type glasses have thermal diffusivity (D) values of 0.58-0.61 mm2/s, whereas the diopside glass has 0.52 mm2/s. With increasing temperature, D decreases by 5-10% (relative) for all samples and becomes virtually constant at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures, the anorthite and diopside glasses exhibit significant drops in thermal diffusivity over a 50-100°C interval, correlating with previously published heat capacity changes near the glass transition for these compositions. For anorthite, D (in mm2/s) decreases from 0.48 at 750-860°C to 0.36 at 975-1075°C; for diopside, D changes from 0.42 at 630-750°C to 0.30 at 850-910°C, corresponding to relative drops of 24 and 29%, respectively. Albite and orthoclase glasses do not exhibit this change and also lack significant changes in heat capacity near the glass transition. Instead, D is constant at 400-800°C for albite, and for orthoclase values go through a minimum at 500-600°C before increasing slightly towards 1100°C but it never exceeds the room temperature D. Our data on thermal diffusivity correlate closely with other thermophysical properties. Thus, at least in case of simple

  7. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  8. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  9. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition...... of the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was observed...

  10. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  11. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15-40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles.

  12. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature.

  13. Foam glass obtained through high-pressure sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    Foam glasses are usually prepared through a chemical approach, that is, by mixing glass powder with foaming agents, and heating the mixture to a temperature above the softening point (106.6 Pa s) of the glass. The foaming agents release gas, enabling expansion of the sintered glass. Here, we use...... a physical foaming approach to prepare foam glass. First, closed pores filled with inert gases (He, Ar, or N2) are physically introduced into a glass body by sintering cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass powder at high gas pressure (5‐25 MPa) at 640°C and, then cooled to room temperature. The sintered bodies...... are subjected to a second heat treatment above the glass transition temperature at atmospheric pressure. This heat treatment causes expansion of the pores due to high internal gas pressure. We found that the foaming ability strongly depends on the gas pressure applied during sintering, and on the kinetic...

  14. Characterization and Conduction Mechanism of Highly Conductive Vanadate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuaki Nishida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent studies of highly conductive barium iron vanadate glass with a composition of 20 BaO ∙ 10 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 (in mol %. Isothermal annealing of the vanadate glass for several ten minutes at a given temperature, higher than glass transition temperature or crystallization temperature, caused an increase in σ. Substitution of CuI (3d10, ZnII (3d10 and CuII (3d9 for FeIII (3d5 was investigated to elucidate the effect of electron configuration on the conductivity (σ. A marked decrease in the activation energy of conduction (Ea was also observed after the annealing. Values of Ea were correlated to the energy gap between the donor level and the conduction band (CB in the n-type semiconductor model. Isothermal annealing of ZnII-substituted vanadate glass (20 BaO ∙ 5 ZnO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 at 450 °C for 30 min showed an increase in σ from 2.5 × 10–6 to 2.1 × 10–1 S cm–1, which was one order of magnitude larger than that of non-substituted vanadate glass (3.4 × 10–2 S cm–1. Under the same annealing condition, σ’s of 2.0 × 10–1 and 3.2 × 10–1 S cm–1 were observed for 20 BaO ∙ 5 Cu2O ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 and 20 BaO ∙ 5 CuO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 glasses, respectively. These results demonstrate an increase in the carrier (electron density in the CB, primarily composed of anti-bonding 4s-orbitals.

  15. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  16. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.

  17. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.

  18. High-energy γ-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Kozdras, A.; Kozyukhin, S.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of Co 60 γ-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge x Se 100-x glasses (5 ≤ x ≤ 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This γ-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 ≤ x ≤ 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with γ-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  19. High-energy {gamma}-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Department of Economy of Academy of Management and Administration in Opole, 18 Niedzialkowski Str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Kozyukhin, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, Leninsky Pr. 31, Moscow 199991 (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2009-09-01

    Effect of Co{sup 60} {gamma}-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} glasses (5 {<=} x {<=} 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This {gamma}-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 {<=} x {<=} 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with {gamma}-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  20. High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Chemical interaction of chalcogenides and some impurities (CS 2, TeO2 ) with the quartz glass at high temperature leads to the thin layers formation...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO1 1523 TITLE: High-Purity Glasses Based on Arsenic Chalcogenides...Materials Vol. 3, No. 2, June 2001, p. 341 - 349 HIGH-PURITY GLASSES BASED ON ARSENIC CHALCOGENIDES M. F. Churbanov, I. V. Scripachev, G. E. Snopatin, V. S

  1. The highly fragile glass former Decalin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Systems exhibiting the glass transition can be classified by fragility. In this work we studied structural and dynamical aspects of highly fragile C 10 H 18 Decalin. Trans Decalin is locked into a pseudo-flat centrosymmetric conformation, while cis Decalin interchanges dynamically between chiral, pseudo-spherical ground states. On investigation of the phase behaviour trans Decalin was found to crystallise rapidly and cleanly; its crystal structure could be determined. From the crystal structure the dynamics of crystalline trans Decalin could be calculated using ab-initio lattice energy calculations and compared to measurements. Using neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations the amorphous structure of Decalin was investigated. The difference in structure to the common molecular liquid Cumene is significant. The features of the amorphous structure of sphere-like cis Decalin show strong resemblance to the ones of Argon and metallic glasses. The dynamics of Decalin were investigated in the slightly supercooled liquid range. Using neutron scattering and optical spectroscopy, data was collected for a wide spectral range and several temperatures. The data suggests high fragility for the generic Decalin mixture, which is in agreement with the reported results. By contrast to previous estimations, an extrapolation of our data indicates cis Decalin to be only slightly less fragile than the generic mixture. Finally a lower limit to the four point susceptibility function χ 4 could be calculated and the number of correlated molecules determined. The evolution of this value as a function of T g /T and relaxation time are in agreement with literature. (author) [fr

  2. Low expansion and high gain Nd laser glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumitani, Tetsuro; Peng, B.

    1995-01-01

    Due to the relationship between Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter and covalency, new laser glasses have been developed which have low expansion coefficients (85--91 x 10 -7 /cm C, 0--70 C) and high emission cross sections. They have good chemical properties, high Young's modulus and high thermal conductivities. These glasses are suitable for the National Ignition Facility

  3. Determination of boron in borosilicate glasses by neutron capture prompt gamma-ray activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Jr, J E; Lindstrom, R M

    1987-01-01

    Major levels of boron in borosilicate glasses were determined nondestructively by neutron activation analysis. The effects of neutron self-shielding by boron (1 to 8% by weight) are examined. Results of the analysis of a series of glasses with increasing boron composition are 1.150 +- .005% and 7.766 +- .035% for the low and high members of the series. Once analyzed, the glasses are useful as secondary standards for alpha track counting, and also ion and electron microprobe analyses of glasses. 12 refs.; 3 tables.

  4. Ce+3-and Tb+3-luminescence in glasses. Ce+3-activated bulk silica and silica thin films. An α-particle detector based on a Ce+3-activated silica thin film. A Ce+3-Tb+3-energy transfer in a high melting point phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindl, R.; Loriers, J.; Sella, J.C.; Robert, A.

    1984-07-01

    While many Ce +3 -activated glasses of different type emit strongly under UV (253,7 nm) and β-ray excitation, only the commercial silicate glass NE 905 shows an useful emission when exposed to α-particles. Only phosphate glasses have give the green Tb +3 -emission, when doped by it, under UV and α and β radiation. Sputtered films of Ce +3 -activated silica have appropriate luminescence properties, adherence to the substrate and a perfect chemical resistance to hot nitric acid. An α-particle detector has been built which has permitted the quantitative detection of plutonium in the presence of other radiative ions

  5. Structural role of Cu in the soil active glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Wacławska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glasses from the SiO2-P2O5-K2O-CaO-MgO-CuO system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. Influence of copper addition on structure of the glasses was evaluated by XRD, SEM, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Chemical activity of the glasses in 2 wt.% citric acid solutions was measured by ICP-AES method. It has been found that increasing content of phosphorous increased solubility of copper in the structure of the studied glasses which was the result of formation of P-O-Cu bonds.

  6. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm 3 have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development

  7. Glass formulation for phase 1 high-level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide potential glass formulations for prospective Phase 1 High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification at Hanford. The results reported here will be used to aid in developing a Phase 1 HLW vitrification request for proposal (RFP) and facilitate the evaluation of ensuing proposals. The following factors were considered in the glass formulation effort: impact on total glass volume of requiring the vendor to process each of the tank compositions independently versus as a blend; effects of imposing typical values of B 2 O 3 content and waste loading in HLW borosilicate glasses as restrictions on the vendors (according to WAPS 1995, the typical values are 5--10 wt% B 2 O 3 and 20--40 wt% waste oxide loading); impacts of restricting the processing temperature to 1,150 C on eventual glass volume; and effects of caustic washing on any of the selected tank wastes relative to glass volume

  8. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  9. Leach behavior of high-level borosilicate glasses under deep geological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in high-level radioactive waste glass which is considered as the most practicable form of waste, and also is intended to be used in the disposal of national high-level radioactive waste in future. Leach theory of waste glass and the leach effects of ground water, metal barrier, buffer materials and rocks on the waste glass were reviewed. The leach of waste glass was affected by various factors such as composition, pH and Eh of ground water, temperature, pressure, radiation and humic acid. The crystallization, crack, weathering and the formation of altered phases of waste glass which is expected to occur in real disposal site were reviewed. The results of leaching in laboratory and in-situ were compared. The behaviors of radioactive elements leached from waste glass and the use of basalt glass for the long-term natural analogue of waste glass were also written in this report. The appraisal of durability of borosilicate waste glass as a waste media was performed from the known results of leach test and international in-situ tests were introduced. (author). 134 refs., 15 tabs., 24 figs

  10. Oxide glass to high temperature ceramic superconductors - a novel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, B.K.; Som, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    Recently it has been discovered that many of transition metal oxide (TMO) glasses like Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, Y-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O etc. can be directly converted to the corresponding high temperature superconducting phases by properly annealing the respective glasses. In this review recent developements in this field are summarised. The structural, electrical, dielectrical, magnetic, optical, and other properties of these new type of (TMO) glass systems have been elucidated comparing them with the corresponding results of already known (TMO) glasses which do not become superconductors on annealing above their glass transition temperatures (T g ). The electrical properties of this novel glass system have been analysed with reference to the various existing theoretical models based on polaron hopping conduction mechanism. The electrical, magnetic, and other properties of the respective superconductors obtained from their corresponding glass phases by annealing above (T g ) and the possibility of drawing wires, ribbons etc. from these glass matrices and then converting them to their high T c superconducting phases have also been discussed. (author). 107 refs., 32 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Glasses used for the high level radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1983-06-01

    High level radioactive wastes generated by the reprocessing of spent fuels is an important concern in the conditioning of radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the status of the knowledge about glasses used for the treatment of these liquids [fr

  12. Glass precursor approach to high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The available studies on the synthesis of high T sub c superconductors (HTS) via the glass precursor approach were reviewed. Melts of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system as well as those doped with oxides of some other elements (Pb, Al, V, Te, Nb, etc.) could be quenched into glasses which, on further heat treatments under appropriate conditions, crystallized into the superconducting phase(s). The nature of the HTS phase(s) formed depends on the annealing temperature, time, atmosphere, and the cooling rate and also on the glass composition. Long term annealing was needed to obtain a large fraction of the 110 K phase. The high T sub c phase did not crystallize out directly from the glass matrix, but was preceded by the precipitation of other phases. The 110 K HTS was produced at high temperatures by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures resulting in multiphase material. The presence of a glass former such as B2O3 was necessary for the Y-Ba-Cu-O melt to form a glass on fast cooling. A discontinuous YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) HTS phase crystallized out on heat treatment of this glass. Attempts to prepare Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O system in the glassy state were not successful.

  13. Properties and characteristics of high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper has briefly reviewed many of the characteristics and properties of high-level waste glasses. From this review, it can be noted that glass has many desirable properties for solidification of high-level wastes. The most important of these include: (1) its low leach rate; (2) the ability to tolerate large changes in waste composition; (3) the tolerance of anticipated storage temperatures; (4) its low surface area even after thermal shock or impact

  14. The glass transition in high-density amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerting, Thomas; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Handle, Philip H; Seidl, Markus; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Gainaru, Catalin; Böhmer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    There has been a long controversy regarding the glass transition in low-density amorphous ice (LDA). The central question is whether or not it transforms to an ultraviscous liquid state above 136 K at ambient pressure prior to crystallization. Currently, the most widespread interpretation of the experimental findings is in terms of a transformation to a superstrong liquid above 136 K. In the last decade some work has also been devoted to the study of the glass transition in high-density amorphous ice (HDA) which is in the focus of the present review. At ambient pressure HDA is metastable against both ice I and LDA, whereas at > 0.2 GPa HDA is no longer metastable against LDA, but merely against high-pressure forms of crystalline ice. The first experimental observation interpreted as the glass transition of HDA was made using in situ methods by Mishima, who reported a glass transition temperature T g of 160 K at 0.40 GPa. Soon thereafter Andersson and Inaba reported a much lower glass transition temperature of 122 K at 1.0 GPa. Based on the pressure dependence of HDA's T g measured in Innsbruck, we suggest that they were in fact probing the distinct glass transition of very high-density amorphous ice (VHDA). Very recently the glass transition in HDA was also observed at ambient pressure at 116 K. That is, LDA and HDA show two distinct glass transitions, clearly separated by about 20 K at ambient pressure. In summary, this suggests that three glass transition lines can be defined in the p-T plane for LDA, HDA, and VHDA.

  15. Study of the glass formation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William F.; Rolin, Terry

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were elevated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical, and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass; then, with subsequent devitrification, it was formed into a bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  16. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong In Han

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  17. Glass-solidification method for high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Kometani, Masayuki; Sasage, Ken-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    High level liquid wastes are removed with precipitates mainly comprising Mo and Zr, thereafter, the high level liquid wastes are mixed with a glass raw material comprising a composition having a B 2 O 3 /SiO 2 ratio of not less than 0.41, a ZnO/Li 2 O ratio of not less than 1.00, and an Al 2 O 3 /Li 2 O ratio of not less than 2.58, and they are melted and solidified into glass-solidification products. The liquid waste content in the glass-solidification products can be increased up to about 45% by using the glass raw material having such a predetermined composition. In addition, deposition of a yellow phase does not occur, and a leaching rate identical with that in a conventional case can be maintained. (T.M.)

  18. High-average-power laser medium based on silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro

    2000-01-01

    Silica glass is one of the most attractive materials for a high-average-power laser. We have developed a new laser material base don silica glass with zeolite method which is effective for uniform dispersion of rare earth ions in silica glass. High quality medium, which is bubbleless and quite low refractive index distortion, must be required for realization of laser action. As the main reason of bubbling is due to hydroxy species remained in the gelation same, we carefully choose colloidal silica particles, pH value of hydrochloric acid for hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate on sol-gel process, and temperature and atmosphere control during sintering process, and then we get a bubble less transparent rare earth doped silica glass. The refractive index distortion of the sample also discussed.

  19. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  20. Solidification of highly active wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.B.

    1986-07-01

    This document contains the annual reports for the contracts: (A) Glass Technology; (B) Calcination of Highly Active Waste Liquors; (C) Formation and Trapping of Volatile Ruthenium; (D) Deposition of Ruthenium; (E) Enhancement of Off-Gas Aerosol Collection; (F) Volatilisation of Cs, Tc and Te in High Level Waste Vitrification. (author)

  1. Linear variable differential transformer sensor using glass-covered amorphous wires as active core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, H.; Hristoforou, E.; Neagu, Maria; Pieptanariu, M.

    2000-01-01

    Results concerning linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) displacement sensor using as movable core glass-covered amorphous wires are presented. The LVDT response is linear for a displacement of the movable core up to about 14 mm, with an accuracy of 1 μm. LVDT using glass-covered amorphous wire as an active core presents a high sensitivity and good mechanical and corrosion resistance

  2. High level waste forms: glass marbles and thermal spray coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Oma, K.H.; Slate, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process that converts high-level waste to glass marbles and then coats the marbles has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The process consists of a joule-heated glass melter, a marble-making device based on a patent issued to Corning Glass Works, and a coating system that includes a plasma spray coater and a marble tumbler. The process was developed under the Alternative Waste Forms Program which strived to improve upon monolithic glass for immobilizing high-level wastes. Coated glass marbles were found to be more leach-resistant, and the marbles, before coating were found to be very homogeneous, highly impact resistant, and conductive to encapsulation in a metal matric for improved heat transfer and containment. Marbles are also ideally suited for quality assurance and recycling. However, the marble process is more complex, and marbles require a larger number of canisters for waste containment and have a higher surface area than do glass monoliths

  3. The immobilization of High Level Waste Into Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisyah; Martono, H.

    1998-01-01

    High level liquid waste is generated from the first step extraction in the nuclear fuel reprocessing. The waste is immobilized with boro-silicate glass. A certain composition of glass is needed for a certain type of waste, so that the properties of waste glass would meet the requirement either for further process or for disposal. The effect of waste loading on either density, thermal expansion, softening point and leaching rate has been studied. The composition of the high level liquid waste has been determined by ORIGEN 2 and the result has been used to prepare simulated high level waste. The waste loading in the waste glass has been set to be 19.48; 22.32; 25.27; and 26.59 weight percent. The result shows that increasing the waste loading has resulted in the higher density with no thermal expansion and softening point significant change. The increase in the waste loading increase that leaching rate. The properties of the waste glass in this research have not shown any deviation from the standard waste glass properties

  4. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  5. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramic materials produced with two different processes is studied. Hot pressing process and conventional casting and controlled crystallization process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied material was calculated by fracture ...

  6. Thermal conductivity of Glycerol's liquid, glass, and crystal states, glass-liquid-glass transition, and crystallization at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2016-02-14

    To investigate the effects of local density fluctuations on phonon propagation in a hydrogen bonded structure, we studied the thermal conductivity κ of the crystal, liquid, and glassy states of pure glycerol as a function of the temperature, T, and the pressure, p. We find that the following: (i) κcrystal is 3.6-times the κliquid value at 140 K at 0.1 MPa and 2.2-times at 290 K, and it varies with T according to 138 × T(-0.95); (ii) the ratio κliquid (p)/κliquid (0.1 MPa) is 1.45 GPa(-1) at 280 K, which, unexpectedly, is about the same as κcrystal (p)/κcrystal (0.1 MPa) of 1.42 GPa(-1) at 298 K; (iii) κglass is relatively insensitive to T but sensitive to the applied p (1.38 GPa(-1) at 150 K); (iv) κglass-T plots show an enhanced, pressure-dependent peak-like feature, which is due to the glass to liquid transition on heating; (v) continuous heating cold-crystallizes ultraviscous glycerol under pressure, at a higher T when p is high; and (vi) glycerol formed by cooling at a high p and then measured at a low p has a significantly higher κ than the glass formed by cooling at a low p. On heating at a fixed low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range at that p is reached. We attribute this effect to thermally assisted loss of the configurational and vibrational instabilities of a glass formed at high p and recovered at low p, which is different from the usual glass-aging effect. While the heat capacity, entropy, and volume of glycerol crystal are less than those for its glass and liquid, κcrystal of glycerol, like its elastic modulus and refractive index, is higher. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of fluctuations in local density and structure, and the relations between κ and the thermodynamic quantities.

  7. Dosimetric properties of commercial glasses and sand for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Ines

    2004-01-01

    Commercial glasses (transparent and colored) produced by Cebrace, Brazil, Sao Paulo, and sand samples of different Brazilian beaches were studied, due to their low cost and easy handling, to verify the possibility of their use in high dose dosimetry. The main dosimetric characteristics were determined using a densitometer, a spectrophotometer, a thermoluminescent (TL) reader and an electronic paramagnetic resonance system. The gamma irradiations were carried out using a Gamma-Cell 220 and a panoramic source ( 60 Co) of IPEN. An optical absorption band was observed at 420 nm in the glass samples. The TL glow curves presented peaks at 205 deg C, 135 deg C, 150 deg C and 145 deg C for the transparent, bronze, brown and green glass samples, respectively. All EPR spectra of the glasses showed Fe 3+ characteristic signals at g = 4.27 and 2.01. The gamma irradiated sand samples presented two peaks at 110 deg C and 170 deg C and an EPR signal at g= 1.999. However, these materials present a pronounced thermal fading at room temperature after irradiation. With the objective to minimize this thermal fading, both glass and sand samples were submitted to different pre- and post-irradiation thermal treatments. The glass and sand samples showed the possibility of utilization for high dose dosimetry and as Yes/No irradiation detectors. (author)

  8. Glass formulation for phase 1 high-level waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide potential glass formulations for prospective Phase 1 High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification at Hanford. The results reported here will be used to aid in developing a Phase 1 HLW vitrification request for proposal (RFP) and facilitate the evaluation of ensuing proposals. The following factors were considered in the glass formulation effort: impact on total glass volume of requiring the vendor to process each of the tank compositions independently versus as a blend; effects of imposing typical values of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and waste loading in HLW borosilicate glasses as restrictions on the vendors (according to WAPS 1995, the typical values are 5--10 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 20--40 wt% waste oxide loading); impacts of restricting the processing temperature to 1,150 C on eventual glass volume; and effects of caustic washing on any of the selected tank wastes relative to glass volume.

  9. Highly Doped Phosphate Glass Fibers for Compact Lasers and Amplifiers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Giovanna Boetti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the exploitation of compact laser sources and amplifiers in fiber form has found extensive applications in industrial and scientific fields. The fiber format offers compactness, high beam quality through single-mode regime and excellent heat dissipation, thus leading to high laser reliability and long-term stability. The realization of devices based on this technology requires an active medium with high optical gain over a short length to increase efficiency while mitigating nonlinear optical effects. Multicomponent phosphate glasses meet these requirements thanks to the high solubility of rare-earth ions in their glass matrix, alongside with high emission cross-sections, chemical stability and high optical damage threshold. In this paper, we review recent advances in the field thanks to the combination of highly-doped phosphate glasses and innovative fiber drawing techniques. We also present the main performance achievements and outlook both in continuous wave (CW and pulsed mode regimes.

  10. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  11. High electric field conduction in low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyanka; Yuan, Mengxue; Gao, Jun; Furman, Eugene; Lanagan, Michael T.

    2018-02-01

    Electrical conduction in silica-based glasses under a low electric field is dominated by high mobility ions such as sodium, and there is a transition from ionic transport to electronic transport as the electric field exceeds 108 V/m at low temperatures. Electrical conduction under a high electric field was investigated in thin low-alkali boroaluminosilicate glass samples, showing nonlinear conduction with the current density scaling approximately with E1/2, where E is the electric field. In addition, thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) characterization was carried out on room-temperature electrically poled glass samples, and an anomalous discharging current flowing in the same direction as the charging current was observed. High electric field conduction and TSDC results led to the conclusion that Poole-Frenkel based electronic transport occurs in the mobile-cation-depleted region adjacent to the anode, and accounts for the observed anomalous current.

  12. Strengthened glass for high average power laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqua, K.A.; Lindquist, A.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lambropoulos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advancements in high repetition rate and high average power laser systems have put increasing demands on the development of improved solid state laser materials with high thermal loading capabilities. The authors have developed a process for strengthening a commercially available Nd doped phosphate glass utilizing an ion-exchange process. Results of thermal loading fracture tests on moderate size (160 x 15 x 8 mm) glass slabs have shown a 6-fold improvement in power loading capabilities for strengthened samples over unstrengthened slabs. Fractographic analysis of post-fracture samples has given insight into the mechanism of fracture in both unstrengthened and strengthened samples. Additional stress analysis calculations have supported these findings. In addition to processing the glass' surface during strengthening in a manner which preserves its post-treatment optical quality, the authors have developed an in-house optical fabrication technique utilizing acid polishing to minimize subsurface damage in samples prior to exchange treatment. Finally, extension of the strengthening process to alternate geometries of laser glass has produced encouraging results, which may expand the potential or strengthened glass in laser systems, making it an exciting prospect for many applications

  13. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  14. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  15. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  16. Spectroscopic properties of highly Nd-doped lead phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novais, A.L.F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Guedes, I. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do PICI, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Vermelho, M.V.D., E-mail: vermelho@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-05

    The spectroscopic characteristics of highly Nd{sup 3+}-doped lead phosphate glasses (xNd:Pb{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) have been investigated. The X-ray spectra show that the matrices are glassy up to 25 wt% of Nd{sup 3+} doping. From the Judd–Ofelt analysis we observe that while the Ω{sub (2)} parameter remains constant indicating that the 4f{sup N} and 4f{sup N−1}5 d{sup 1} configurations are not affected by the Nd{sup 3+} doping, the behavior of both Ω{sub (4)} and Ω{sub (6)} changes for 15 wt% of Nd{sup 3+} doping. The reduction of the Ω{sub (6)} parameter is related to the increase of the covalence bonding between the ligands and the Nd{sup 3+} ions. At this particular concentration, the radiative lifetime has a four-fold enhancement. Such behaviors are likely to be related to a modification in the glass structure for high Nd{sup 3+} concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Highly doped lead-phosphate glass matrix, with nominal concentration of up to 25 wt%, maintain the spectroscopic properties without deterioration. The analysis concerning the point of view of Nd{sup 3+} ions showed that high concentrations only affects the rare earth electronic charge density distribution. - Highlights: • Spectroscopic characterization of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} highly doped lead phosphate glasses. • Phosphate glass doped with Nd{sup 3+} for applications in photonic devices. • Judd–Ofelt analysis in phosphate glasses doped with Neodymium.

  17. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  18. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION. FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Matlack, K.S.; Kot, W.; Pegg, I.L.; Joseph, I.; Bardakci, T.; Gan, H.; Gong, W.; Chaudhuri, M.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  19. High-level radioactive waste glass and storage canister design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slate, S.C.; Ross, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Management of high-level radioactive wastes is a primary concern in nuclear operations today. The main objective in managing these wastes is to convert them into a solid, durable form which is then isolated from man. A description is given of the design and evaluation of this waste form. The waste form has two main components: the solidified waste and the storage canister. The solid waste form discussed in this study is glass. Waste glasses have been designed to be inert to water attack, physically rugged, low in volatility, and stable over time. Two glass-making processes are under development at PNL. The storage canister is being designed to provide high-integrity containment for solidified wastes from processing to terminal storage. An outline is given of the steps in canister design: material selection, stress and thermal analyses, quality verification, and postfill processing. Examples are given of results obtained from actual nonradioactive demonstration tests. 14 refs

  20. Hydrogen-induced high damping of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are two important topics concerned with the recent researches on the damping materials of hydrogenated metallic glasses (HMGs). One is the mechanism of the high hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs. The other is the materials processing of 'bulk' HMGs for engineering. This article describes the summary of our recent studies on these topics. The first one is closely related to the local structure of the metallic glasses. Therefore, our recent results on the intermediate-range local structure of the simple two Zr-based metallic glasses are described, which has been clarified by the Voronoi analysis using the experimental data of the neutron diffraction measurements. The hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs is also discussed on the basis of these recent results of the local structure of the metallic glasses. In terms of the second topic, the first successful preparation of heavily hydrogenated Zr-based bulk HMG rods without hydrogen-induced surface embrittlement is described. They are prepared by a powder-compact-melting and liquid-casting process using Zr-Al-Ni-Cu metallic glass and ZrH 2 powders as the starting materials. It has been found that they have high damping properties.

  1. Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1994-01-01

    The disposition of actinide elements released from high-level waste glasses into a tuff groundwater in laboratory tests at 90 degrees C at various glass surface area/leachant volume ratios (S/V) between dissolved, suspended, and sorbed fractions has been measured. While the maximum release of actinides is controlled by the corrosion rate of the glass matrix, their solubility and sorption behavior affects the amounts present in potentially mobile phases. Actinide solubilities are affected by the solution pH and the presence of complexants released from the glass, such as sulfate, phosphate, and chloride, radiolytic products, such as nitrate and nitrite, and carbonate. Sorption onto inorganic colloids formed during lass corrosion may increase the amounts of actinides in solution, although subsequent sedimentation of these colloids under static conditions leads to a significant reduction in the amount of actinides in solution. The solution chemistry and observed actinide behavior depend on the S/V of the test. Tests at high S/V lead to higher pH values, greater complexant concentrations, and generate colloids more quickly than tests at low S/V. The S/V also affects the rate of glass corrosion

  2. High-Level Waste Glass Formulation Model Sensitivity Study 2009 Glass Formulation Model Versus 1996 Glass Formulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsher, J.D.; Meinert, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  3. Vibration-accelerated activation of flow units in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ning, E-mail: hslining@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Ze [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, Xinyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Meng [Institute of Advanced Wear & Corrosion Resistant and Functional Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2017-04-24

    Controlled activation of flow units and in-situ characterization of mechanical properties in metallic glasses are facing challenges thus far. Here, vibrational loading is introduced through nanoscale dynamic mechanical analysis technique to probe vibration-accelerated atomic level flow that plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. The intriguing finding is that high vibrational frequency induces deep indentation depth, prominent pop-in events on load–depth curves and low storage modulus, exhibiting a vibration-facilitated activation of flow units in Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} metallic glass. Theoretical analysis revealed that vibration-moderated activation time-scale accelerate the activation of flow units and responsible for the above scenario.

  4. Chemistry of glass corrosion in high saline brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Mueller, R.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion data obtained in laboratory tests can be used for the performance assessment of nuclear waste glasses in a repository if the data are quantitatively described in the frame of a geochemical model. Experimental data were obtained for conventional pH values corrected for liquid junction, amorphous silica solubility and glass corrosion in concentrated salt brines. The data were interpreted with a geochemical model. The brine chemistry was described with the Pitzer formalism using a data base which allows calculation of brine compositions in equilibrium with salt minerals at temperatures up to 200C. In MgCl 2 dominated brines Mg silicates form and due to the consumption of Mg the pH decreases with proceeding reaction. A constant pH (about 4) and composition of alteration products is achieved, when the alkali release from the glass balances the Mg consumption. The low pH results in high release of rare earth elements REE (rare earth elements) and U from the glass. In the NaCl dominated brine MgCl 2 becomes exhausted by Mg silicate formation. As long as there is still Mg left in solution the pH decreases. After exhaustion of Mg the pH rises with the alkali release from the glass and analcime is formed

  5. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  6. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASSES FOR HANFORD'S WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Bowan, B.W.; Joseph, I.; Gan, H.; Kot, W.K.; Matlack, K.S.; Pegg, I.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m 2 and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m 2 . The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al 2 O 3 concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m 2 .day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m 2 .day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m 2 .day).

  7. Neutron shielding properties of a borated high-density glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Aly Abdallah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron shielding properties of a borated high density glass system was characterized experimentally. The total removal macroscopic cross-section of fast neutrons, slow neutrons as well as the linear attenuation coefficient of total gamma rays, primary in addition to secondary, were measured experimentally under good geometric condition to characterize the attenuation properties of (75-x B2O3-1Li2O-5MgO-5ZnO-14Na2O-xBaO glassy system. Slabs of different thicknesses from the investigated glass system were exposed to a collimated beam of neutrons emitted from 252Cf and 241Am-Be neutron sources in order to measure the attenuation properties of fast and slow neutrons as well as total gamma rays. Results confirmed that barium borate glass was suitable for practical use in the field of radiation shielding.

  8. Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as

  9. High-level waste glass compendium; what it tells us concerning the durability of borosilicate waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Allison, J.

    1993-01-01

    Facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste in the United States are scheduled for startup in the next few years. It is, therefore, appropriate to examine the current scientific basis for understanding the corrosion of high-level waste borosilicate glass for the range of service conditions to which the glass products from these facilities may be exposed. To this end, a document has been prepared which compiles worldwide information on borosilicate waste glass corrosion. Based on the content of this document, the acceptability of canistered waste glass for geological disposal is addressed. Waste glass corrosion in a geologic repository may be due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. The important processes that determine the glass corrosion kinetics under these conditions are discussed based on experimental evidence from laboratory testing. Testing data together with understanding of the long-term corrosion kinetics are used to estimate radionuclide release rates. These rates are discussed in terms of regulatory performance standards

  10. Use of glasses as radiation detectors for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.

    1989-08-01

    Glass samples were tested in relation to the possibility of use in high dose dosimetry in medical and industrial areas. The main characteristics were determined: detection threshold, reproducibility, response to gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 6 Co and thermal decay at ambient temperature, with the use of optical absorption and thermoluminesce techniques. (author) [pt

  11. High-sensitivity gamma spectroscopy for extended sources. Application to activity measurements on the human body, on glass, and on soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, B.

    1962-01-01

    The measurement and location by gamma spectroscopy of human body internal contaminations at maximum permissible levels, and, in certain cases, at lower activities such as that due to 40 K was investigated. The characteristics of the high-sensitivity apparatus used are given, and several assemblies using large-volume NaI(Tl) scintillators are described. The relatively light shielding required for natural radioactivity permitted construction of mobile assembly. Conditions of use are described, and the results are given. All gamma emitting elements were measured in 15 min at levels lower than the tolerance dose. Gamma spectroscopy was also used to determine fission products in the earth and to study radioactive elements in the presence of other emitters. (author) [fr

  12. High-silica glass matrix process for high-level waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, J.H.; Macedo, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    In the search for an optimum glass matrix composition, we have determined that chemical durability and thermal stability are maximized, and that stress development is minimized for glass compositions containing large concentrations of glass-forming oxides, of which silica is the major component (80 mol%). These properties and characteristics were recently demonstrated to belong to very old geological glasses known as tektites (ages of 750,000 to 34 million years.) The barrier to simulating tektite compositions for the waste glasses was the high melting temperature (1600 to 1800 0 C) needed for these glasses. Such temperatures greatly complicate furnace design and maintenance and lead to an intolerable vaporization of many of the radioisotopes into the off-gas system. Research conducted at our laboratory led to the development of a porous high-silica waste glass material with approximately 80% SiO 2 by mole and 30% waste loading by weight. The process can handle a wide variety of compositions, and yields long, elliptical, monolithic samples, which consist of a loaded high-silica core completely enveloped in a high-silica glass tube, which has collapsed upon the core and sealed it from the outside. The outer glass layer is totally free of waste isotopes and provides an integral multibarrier protection system

  13. Minor component study for simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses (Draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Langowskim, M.H.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.; Vienna, J.D.; Smith, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Hanford Site single-shell tank (SSI) and double-shell tank (DSI) wastes are planned to be separated into low activity (or low-level waste, LLW) and high activity (or high-level waste, HLW) fractions, and to be vitrified for disposal. Formulation of HLW glass must comply with glass processibility and durability requirements, including constraints on melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, tendency for phase segregation on the molten glass surface, and chemical durability of the final waste form. A wide variety of HLW compositions are expected to be vitrified. In addition these wastes will likely vary in composition from current estimates. High concentrations of certain troublesome components, such as sulfate, phosphate, and chrome, raise concerns about their potential hinderance to the waste vitrification process. For example, phosphate segregation in the cold cap (the layer of feed on top of the glass melt) in a Joule-heated melter may inhibit the melting process (Bunnell, 1988). This has been reported during a pilot-scale ceramic melter run, PSCM-19, (Perez, 1985). Molten salt segregation of either sulfate or chromate is also hazardous to the waste vitrification process. Excessive (Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni) spinel crystal formation in molten glass can also be detrimental to melter operation

  14. Local elastic expansion model for viscous-flow activation energies of glass-forming molecular liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Olsen, Niels Boye; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1996-01-01

    A model for the viscosity of glass-forming molecular liquids is proposed in which a "flow event" requires a local volume increase. The activation energy for a flow event is identified with the work done in shoving aside the surrounding liquid; this work is proportional to the high-frequency shear...

  15. Conceptual process for conversion of high level waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    During a ten-year period highly radioactive wastes amounting to 22 million gallons of salt cake and 5 million gallons of wet sludge are to be converted to 1.2 million gallons of glass and 24 million gallons of decontaminated salt cake and placed in the new storage facilities which will provide high assurance of containment with minimal reliance on maintenance and surveillance. The glass will contain nearly all of the radioactivity in a form that is highly resistant to leaching and dispersion. The salt cake will contain a small amount of residual radioactivity. The process is shown in Figure 1 and the facilities may be arranged in seven modules to accomplish seven tasks, (1) remove wastes from tanks, (2) separate sludge and salt, (3) decontaminate salt, (4) solidify and package sludge and 137 Cs, (5) solidify and package decontaminated salt, (6) store high level waste, and (7) store decontaminated salt cake

  16. Glass ceramics for sealing to high-thermal-expansion metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, J.A. Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Glass ceramics were studied, formulated in the Na 2 O CaO.P 2 O 5 , Na 2 O.BaOP 2 O 5 , Na 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 , and Li 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 systems to establish their suitability for sealing to high thermal expansion metals, e.g. aluminum, copper, and 300 series stainless steels. Glass ceramics in Na 2 O.CaO.P 2 O 5 and Na 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 systems have coefficients of thermal expansion in the range 140 x 10 -1 per 0 C less than or equal to α less than or equal to 225 x 10 -7 per 0 C and fracture toughness values generally greater than those of phosphate glasses; they are suitable for fabricating seals to high thermal expansion metals. Crystal phases include NaPo 3 , (NaPO 3 ) 3 , NaBa(PO 3 ) 3 , and NaCa(PO 3 ) 3 . Glass ceramics formed in the Na 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .P 2 O 5 systems have coefficients of thermal expansion greater than 240 x 10 -7 per 0 C, but they have extensive microcracking. Due to their low thermal expansion values (α less than or equal to 120 x 10 -7 per 0 C), glass ceramics in the Li 2 O.BaO.P 2 O 5 system are unsuitable for sealing to high thermal expansion metals

  17. Leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hiroshi

    1987-03-01

    The author's work in the study on the leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass were summarized. The subjects described are (1) leach rates at high temperatures, (2) effects of cracks on leach rates, (3) effects of flow rate on leach rates, and (4) an in-situ burial test in natural groundwater. In the following section, the leach rates obtained by various experiments were summarized and discussed. (author)

  18. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A. A.; Peeler, D. K.; Kim, D. S.; Vienna, J. D.; Piepel, G. F.; Schweiger, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  19. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, D. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, G. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, M. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  20. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Lead recovery and high silica glass powder synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Mingfei [Henan Key Laboratory Cultivation Base of Mine Environmental Protection and Ecological Remediation, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Fu, Zegang [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Wang, Yaping, E-mail: wangyp326@163.com [School of Surveying and Land Information Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000, Henan China (China); Wang, Jingyu [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Zhang, Zhiyuan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. • A part of PbO was reduced into Pb and detached from the glass phase. • The rest of PbO and other metal oxides were mainly concentrated in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. • PbO enriched in the interconnected B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase can be completely leached out by HNO{sub 3}. • High silica glass powder(SiO{sub 2} purity >95%) was obtained after the leaching process. - Abstract: In this study, a novel process for the removal of toxic lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of high silica glass powder was developed by a carbon-thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process. CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. In the thermal process, a part of PbO contained in the funnel glass was reduced into metallic Pb and detached from the glass phase. The rest of PbO and other metal oxides (including Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3,} BaO and CaO) were mainly concentrated in the boric oxide phase. The metallic Pb phase and boric oxide phase were completely leached out by 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. The lead removal rate was 99.80% and high silica glass powder (SiO{sub 2} purity >95 wt%) was obtained by setting the temperature, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} added amount and holding time at 1000 °C, 20% and 30 mins, respectively. The prepared high silicate glass powders can be used as catalyst carrier, semipermeable membranes, adsorbents or be remelted into high silicate glass as an ideal substitute for quartz glass. Thus this study proposed an eco-friendly and economical process for recycling Pb-rich electronic glass waste.

  2. Damage characterization of E-glass and C-glass fibre polymer composites after high velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.; Jawaid, M.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to identify impact damage on glass fibre reinforced polymer composite structures after high velocity impact. In this research, Type C-glass (600 g/m2) and Type E-glass (600 g/m2) were used to fabricate Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer composites (GFRP) plates. The panels were fabricated using a vacuum bagging and hot bounder method. Single stage gas gun (SSGG) was used to do the testing and data acquisition system was used to collect the damage data. Different types of bullets and different pressure levels were used for the experiment. The obtained results showed that the C-glass type of GFRP experienced more damage in comparison to E-glass type of materials based on the amount of energy absorbed on impact and the size of the damage area. All specimens underwent a partial fibre breakage but the laminates were not fully penetrated by the bullets. This indicated that both types of materials have high impact resistance even though the applied pressures of the gas gun were on the high range. We concluded that within the material specifications of the laminates including the type of glass fibre reinforcement and the thickness of the panels, those composite materials are safe to be applied in structural and body armour applications as an alternative to more expensive materials such as Kevlar and type S-glass fibre based panels.

  3. High-Power ZBLAN Glass Fiber Lasers: Review and Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiushan Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF, considered as the most stable heavy metal fluoride glass and the excellent host for rare-earth ions, has been extensively used for efficient and compact ultraviolet, visible, and infrared fiber lasers due to its low intrinsic loss, wide transparency window, and small phonon energy. In this paper, the historical progress and the properties of fluoride glasses and the fabrication of ZBLAN fibers are briefly described. Advances of infrared, upconversion, and supercontinuum ZBLAN fiber lasers are addressed in detail. Finally, constraints on the power scaling of ZBLAN fiber lasers are analyzed and discussed. ZBLAN fiber lasers are showing promise of generating high-power emissions covering from ultraviolet to mid-infrared considering the recent advances in newly designed optical fibers, beam-shaped high-power pump diodes, beam combining techniques, and heat-dissipating technology.

  4. Processing of high-temperature simulated waste glass in a continuous ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.; Brouns, R.A.; Hanson, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent operations have demonstrated that high-melting-point glasses and glass-ceramics can be successfully processed in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters with minor modifications to the existing technology. Over 500 kg of simulated waste glasses have been processed at temperatures up to 1410 0 C. The processability of the two high-temperature waste forms tested is similar to existing borosilicate waste glasses. High-temperature waste glass formulations produced in the bench-scale melter exhibit quality comparing favorably to standard waste glass formulations

  5. Fabrication of Radiation Shielding Glasses Based on Lead-free High Refractive Index Glasses Prepared from Local Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dararutana, Pisutti; Dutchaneepet, Jirapan; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Lead glasses that show high refractive index are the best know and most popular for radiation shielding. Due to harmful effects of lead and considering the health as well as the environmental issues, lead-free glasses were developed. In this work, content of Chumphon sand was fixed at 40 % (by weight) as a main composition but concentrations of BaCO3 were varied from 6 to 30 % (by weight). It was found that the absorption coefficient of the glass samples containing 30 % BaCO3 was 0.233 cm-1 for Ba-133. The density was also measured. It can be concluded that the prepared lead free glasses offered adequate shielding to gamma radiation in comparison with the lead ones. These glasses were one of the environmental friendly materials

  6. High-Damage-Threshold Pinhole for Glass Fusion Laser Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumit, N.A.; Letzring, S.A.; Johnson, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    We are investigating methods to fabricate high-damage-threshold spatial-filter pinholes that might not be susceptible to plasma closure for relatively high energies and long pulses. These are based on the observation that grazing-incidence reflection from glass can withstand in excess of 5 kJ/cm 2 (normal to the beam) without plasma formation. The high damage threshold results from both the cos q spreading of the energy across the surface and the reflection of a large fraction of the energy from the surface, thereby greatly reducing the field strength within the medium

  7. High aspect ratio channels in glass and porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H.D. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Dang, Z.Y. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Wu, J.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Kan, J.A. van; Qureshi, S. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Ynsa, M.D.; Torres-Costa, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco Edif. 22, Faraday 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Maira, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Venkatesan, T.V. [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Breese, M.B.H., E-mail: phymbhb@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a micromachining process to produce high-aspect-ratio channels and holes in glass and porous silicon. Our process utilizes MeV proton beam irradiation of silicon using direct writing with a focused beam, followed by electrochemical etching. To increase throughput we have also developed another process for large area ion irradiation based on a radiation-resistant gold surface mask, allowing many square inches to be patterned. We present a study of the achievable channel width, depth and period and sidewall verticality for a range of channels which can be over 100 μm deep or 100 nm wide with aspect ratios up to 80. This process overcomes the difficulty of machining glass on a micro- and nanometer scale which has limited many areas of applications in different fields such as microelectronics and microfluidics.

  8. High-entropy bulk metallic glasses as promising magnetic refrigerants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Juntao; Huo, Lishan; Li, Jiawei; Men, He; Wang, Xinmin; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Li, Run-Wei; Inoue, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the Ho 20 Er 20 Co 20 Al 20 RE 20 (RE = Gd, Dy, and Tm) high-entropy bulk metallic glasses (HE-BMGs) with good magnetocaloric properties are fabricated successfully. The HE-BMGs exhibit a second-order magnetic phase transition. The peak of magnetic entropy change (ΔS M pk ) and refrigerant capacity (RC) reaches 15.0 J kg −1 K −1 and 627 J kg −1 at 5 T, respectively, which is larger than most rare earth based BMGs. The heterogeneous nature of glasses also contributes to the large ΔS M pk and RC. In addition, the magnetic ordering temperature, ΔS M pk and RC can be widely tuned by alloying different rare earth elements. These results suggest that the HE-BMGs are promising magnetic refrigerant at low temperatures

  9. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Slurry Fed Melters (SFM) are being developed in the United States, Europe and Japan for the conversion of high-level radioactive waste to borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The high transition metal, noble metal, nitrate, organic, and sulfate contents of these wastes lead to unique melter redox control requirements. Pilot waste-glass melter operations have indicated the possibility of nickel sulfide or noble-metal fission-product accumulation on melter floors, which can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, and decrease melter life. Sulfide formation is prevented by control of the redox chemistry of the melter feed. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Computerized thermodynamic computations are being developed to predict the sequence and products of redox reactions and is assessing process variations. Continuous melter test results have been compared to improved computer staged-thermodynamic-models of redox behavior. Feed chemistry control to prevent sulfide and moderate noble metal accumulations are discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs

  10. A monolithic glass chip for active single-cell sorting based on mechanical phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigle, Christoph; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Whyte, Graeme; Homewood, Philip; Martín-Badosa, Estela; Guck, Jochen

    2015-03-07

    The mechanical properties of biological cells have long been considered as inherent markers of biological function and disease. However, the screening and active sorting of heterogeneous populations based on serial single-cell mechanical measurements has not been demonstrated. Here we present a novel monolithic glass chip for combined fluorescence detection and mechanical phenotyping using an optical stretcher. A new design and manufacturing process, involving the bonding of two asymmetrically etched glass plates, combines exact optical fiber alignment, low laser damage threshold and high imaging quality with the possibility of several microfluidic inlet and outlet channels. We show the utility of such a custom-built optical stretcher glass chip by measuring and sorting single cells in a heterogeneous population based on their different mechanical properties and verify sorting accuracy by simultaneous fluorescence detection. This offers new possibilities of exact characterization and sorting of small populations based on rheological properties for biological and biomedical applications.

  11. Mechanical Properties of a High Lead Glass Used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Smith, Nathan A.; Ersahin, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The elastic constants, strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth parameters, and mirror constant of a high lead glass supplied as tubes and funnels were measured using ASTM International (formerly ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials) methods and modifications thereof. The material exhibits lower Young's modulus and slow crack growth exponent as compared to soda-lime silica glass. Highly modified glasses exhibit lower fracture toughness and slow crack growth exponent than high purity glasses such as fused silica.

  12. Glass: a candidate engineered material for management of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.K.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    While the commercial importance of glass is generally recognized, a few people are aware of extremely wide range of glass formulations that can be made and of the versatility of this engineered material. Some of the recent developments in the field of glass leading to various technological applications include glass fiber reinforcement of cement to give new building materials, substrates for microelectronics circuitry in form of semiconducting glasses, nuclear waste immobilization and specific medical applications. The present paper covers fundamental understanding of glass structure and its application for immobilization of high level radioactive liquid waste. High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) arising during reprocessing of spent fuel are immobilized in sodium borosilicate glass matrix developed indigenously. Glass compositions are modified according to the composition of HLW to meet the criteria of desirable properties in terms. These glass matrices have been characterized for different properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, thermal stability and radiation stability. (author)

  13. Development of Faraday rotators for high power glass laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kunio; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe.

    1980-01-01

    As a new approach to nuclear fusion, laser-induced fusion has been recently highlighted. It is no exaggeration to say that the future success of this technique depends on the development of high power laser as the energy driver. Faraday rotators are used as photo-diodes to prevent amplifiers and oscillator assemblies from the possibility to be broken by reversely transmitting light. The authors were able to increase the isolation ratio by about 10 times as compared with conventional one by employing the large performance index, disc type Faraday glass, FR-5. In this paper, first, Faraday glasses which are the composing element of Faraday rotators and the optical characteristics of dielectric thin-film polarizers are described, and next, the design of a magnetic coil and its resulting coil characteristics are reported. Then the dominant causes limiting the isolation ratio of Faraday rotators are investigated, and it is clarified that the residual strain in Faraday glasses and the non-uniformity of magnetic field affect predominantly. The measured results are as follows: The magnetic flux densities required to rotate by 45 deg the polarizing plane of the light transmitted through the Faraday rotators A and B are both 27 kG; and the isolation ratios over the whole effective plane are 36 and 32 dB, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 0 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms

  15. Ground Glass Pozzolan in Conventional, High, and Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Tagnit-Hamou Arezki; Zidol Ablam; Soliman Nancy; Deschamps Joris; Omran Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Ground-glass pozzolan (G) obtained by grinding the mixed-waste glass to same fineness of cement can act as a supplementary-cementitious material (SCM), given that it is an amorphous and a pozzolanic material. The G showed promising performances in different concrete types such as conventional concrete (CC), high-performance concrete (HPC), and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC). The current paper reports on the characteristics and performance of G in these concrete types. The use of G pro...

  16. Physical and chemical characterization of borosilicate glasses containing Hanford high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Palmer, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    Scouting studies are being performed to develop and evaluate silicate glass forms for immobilization of Hanford high-level wastes. Detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of these glasses is required to assess their suitability for long-term storage or disposal. Some key properties to be considered in selecting a glass waste form include leach resistance, resistance to radiation, microstructure (includes devitrification behavior or crystallinity), homogeneity, viscosity, electrical resistivity, mechanical ruggedness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, density, softening point, annealing point, strain point, glass transformation temperature, and refractive index. Other properties that are important during processing of the glass include volatilization of glass and waste components, and corrosivity of the glass on melter components. Experimental procedures used to characterize silicate waste glass forms and typical properties of selected glass compositions containing simulated Hanford sludge and residual liquid wastes are presented. A discussion of the significance and use of each measured property is also presented

  17. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...... such as type and concentration of foaming agent, glass composition and particle size to obtain foam glass with high porosity and closed pores. Using this approach we show that the foaming of bottle glass is preferentially conducted at a SiC concentration of 1‒4 wt%....

  18. Alkali activated slag cements using waste glass as alternative activators. Rheological behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Torres-Carrasco

    2015-03-01

    The findings show that AAS paste behaviour of rheology when the activator was a commercial waterglass solution or NaOH/Na2CO3 with waste glass was similar, fit the Herschel-Bulkley model. The formation of primary C-S-H gel in both cases were confirmed. However, the rheological behaviour in standard cements fit the Bingham model. The use of the waste glass may be feasible from a rheological point of view in pastes can be used.

  19. Studies on the thermal decomposition of nitrates found in highly active waste and of chemicals used to convert the waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, K.S.

    1977-05-01

    The decomposition of all the individual chemicals used in the Harwell inactive vitrification pilot plant has been studied by means of a thermal balance. Weight loss curves to 1100 0 C have been obtained. The four materials sodium nitrate, cesium nitrate, lithium nitrate and ruthenium nitroso-nitrate (solution) showed a greater weight loss than that based on an oxide yield, and hence these compounds or their products of decomposition are volatile below 1100 0 C. The remaining materials suffered a weight loss no more than that corresponding to a full yield of the oxide, and hence they were not volatile below 1100 0 C. Most of the chemicals begin to decompose at less than 75 0 C but the nitrates of cesium, strontium, barium and sodium not until 295 0 to 590 0 C. The results obtained can be used in the analysis of process conditions in the vitrification and calcination of highly radioactive wastes and also of the thermal decomposition behaviour of mixtures containing those materials. The materials tested were: Al(NO 3 ) 3 .9H 2 O, Ba(NO 3 ) 2 , CaNo 3 , Cr(NO 3 ) 3 .9H 2 O, Fe(NO 3 ) 3 .9H 2 O. Mg(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O, Ni(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O, R.E. Nitrates, Ruthenium Solution, Sr(NO 3 ) 2 , UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O, Zn(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O. Zirconium Solution, 'Gasil WP' Silica, 'Neosyl' Silica, LiOH.H 2 O. LiNO 3 .3H 2 O, Na 2 CO 3 , NaNO 3 , Na 2 B 4 O 7 .10H 2 O. (author)

  20. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    OpenAIRE

    Mangutova Bianka V.; Fidancevska Emilija M.; Milosevski Milosav I.; Bossert Joerg H.

    2004-01-01

    Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa). The polyurethane f...

  1. Study on Modified Water Glass Used in High Temperature Protective Glass Coating for Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate water glass was modified with sodium polyacrylate as the binder, the composite slurry used for high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating was prepared by mixing glass powder with good lubrication properties in the binder. The properties of the modified binder and high-temperature oxidation resistance of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy coated with composite glass coating were studied by XRD, SEM, EDS, TG-DSC and so on. Results showed that sodium polyacrylate modified water glass could obviously improve the suspension stability of the binder, the pyrolytic carbon in the binder at high temperature could increase the surface tension in the molten glass system, and the composite glass coating could be smooth and dense after heating. Pyrolytic carbon diffused and combined with oxygen in the coating under the heating process to protect the titanium alloy from oxidation. The thickness of the oxide layer was reduced 51% after applying the high-temperature oxidation-resistant coating. The coating also showed a nearly 30% reduction in friction coefficient due to the boundary lubricant regime. During cooling, the coating could be peeled off easily because of the mismatched CTE between the coating and substrate.

  2. Establishment of a dosimetric system for high doses using glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Quezada, Valeria de la Asuncion

    1997-01-01

    A routine dosimetric system was developed using commercial glass samples. The dosimetric characteristics of national and imported samples were studied: batch uniformity, response repeatability, reutilization, absorbed dose response, detection range, response stability as a function of absorbed dose, storage temperature and thermal treatments pre- and post-irradiation, using the optical absorption technique. As an application, the dosimetric system was tested in a flower irradiation process at IPEN. All the obtained results show the usefulness of the proposed system for high dose dosimetry. (author)

  3. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  4. Plutonium Solubility In High-Level Waste Alkali Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to ∼18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m 3 of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m 3 3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt

  5. Thermal Stability and Optical Activity of Erbium Doped Chalcogenide Glasses for Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, D.; Koughia, K.; Kasap, S. O.; Maeda, K.; Sakai, T.; Ikuta, J.; Ivanova, Z. G.

    The glass transition and crystallization temperatures (T g , T c ), heat capacity, thermal stability and glass uniformity of GeSGa, GeSeGa, Ge(SeTe)Ga chalcogenide glasses doped with Er3+ by the addition of Er2S3 have been investigated by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Temperature-Modulated DSC (TMDSC). While some of the glasses have two crystallization peaks, these glasses were nonetheless optically actively and uniform. Essential optical properties have been evaluated, such as the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and lifetime as a function of the glass composition. We present typical results to emphasize some of the important characteristics of these systems and discuss trends within a glass system; and also highlight differences between glass systems.

  6. Synthesis and In Vitro Activity Assessment of Novel Silicon Oxycarbide-Based Bioactive Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gonzalo-Juan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel bioactive glasses based on a Ca- and Mg-modified silicon oxycarbide (SiCaMgOC were prepared from a polymeric single-source precursor, and their in vitro activity towards hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated upon incubating the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF at 37 °C. The as-prepared materials exhibit an outstanding resistance against devitrification processes and maintain their amorphous nature even after exposure to 1300 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the SiCaMgOC samples after the SBF test showed characteristic reflections of apatite after only three days, indicating a promising bioactivity. The release kinetics of the Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the adsorption of H+ after immersion of SiCaMgOC in simulated body fluid for different soaking times were analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The results show that the mechanism of formation of apatite on the surface of the SiCaMgOC powders is similar to that observed for standard (silicate bioactive glasses. A preliminary cytotoxicity investigation of the SiOC-based bioactive glasses was performed in the presence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF as well as human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293. Due to their excellent high-temperature crystallization resistance in addition to bioactivity, the Ca- and Mg-modified SiOC glasses presented here might have high potential in applications related to bone repair and regeneration.

  7. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant.

  8. A nonconjugated radical polymer glass with high electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yongho; Agarkar, Varad; Sung, Seung Hyun; Savoie, Brett M.; Boudouris, Bryan W.

    2018-03-01

    Solid-state conducting polymers usually have highly conjugated macromolecular backbones and require intentional doping in order to achieve high electrical conductivities. Conversely, single-component, charge-neutral macromolecules could be synthetically simpler and have improved processibility and ambient stability. We show that poly(4-glycidyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a nonconjugated radical polymer with a subambient glass transition temperature, underwent rapid solid-state charge transfer reactions and had an electrical conductivity of up to 28 siemens per meter over channel lengths up to 0.6 micrometers. The charge transport through the radical polymer film was enabled with thermal annealing at 80°C, which allowed for the formation of a percolating network of open-shell sites in electronic communication with one another. The electrical conductivity was not enhanced by intentional doping, and thin films of this material showed high optical transparency.

  9. Performance of a buried radioactive high level waste (HLW) glass after 24 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Bibler, Ned E.; Peeler, David K.; John Plodinec, M.

    2008-01-01

    A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in a lysimeter in the SRS burial ground for 24 years. Lysimeter leachate data was available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed this. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with results of other laboratory and field tests. Radionuclide profiling for alpha, beta, and 137 Cs indicated that Pu was not enriched in the soil while 137 Cs and 9 deg. C Sr were enriched in the first few centimeters surrounding the glass. Lysimeter leachate data indicated that 9 deg. C Sr and 137 Cs leaching from the glass was diffusion controlled

  10. Fabrication of highly insulating foam glass made from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    We prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. We investigated the influence of the carbon and MnO2 concentrations, the glass-powder preparation and the foaming conditions on the density and homogeneity of the pore structure...... and the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the foam density. The results show that the moderate foaming effect of the carbon is greatly improved by the addition of MnO2. A density as low as 131 kg m-3 can be achieved with fine glass powder. The foam density has a slight dependence on the carbon and MnO2...... concentrations, but it is mainly affected by the foaming temperature and the time. The thermal conductivity of the foam-glass samples is lower than that of commercial foam glasses with the same density. The lowest value was determined to be 42 mW m-1 K-1 for a foam glass with a density of 131 kg m-3. A further...

  11. Network structure and thermal stability study of high temperature seal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.; Mahapatra, M. K.

    2008-10-01

    High temperature seal glass has stringent requirement on glass thermal stability, which is dictated by glass network structures. In this study, a SrO-La2O3-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 based glass system was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction for solid oxide cell application purpose. Glass structural unit neighboring environment and local ordering were evaluated. Glass network connectivity as well as silicon and boron glass former coordination were calculated for different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. Thermal stability of the borosilicate glasses was studied after thermal treatment at 850 °C. The study shows that high B2O3 content induces BO4 and SiO4 structural unit ordering, increases glass localized inhomogeneity, decreases glass network connectivity, and causes devitrification. Glass modifiers interact with either silicon- or boron-containing structural units and form different devitrified phases at different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. B2O3-free glass shows the best thermal stability among the studied compositions, remaining stable after thermal treatment for 200 h at 850 °C.

  12. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Yanbo; Wen Lei; Wu Botao; Ren Jinjun; Chen Danping; Qiu Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses have been prepared by sintering nanoporous glasses. The absorption, fluorescent spectra and fluorescent lifetimes have been measured and the emission cross-section and minimum pump intensities were calculated. Codoping aluminum ions enhanced the fluorescence intensity of Yb-doped high silica glass obviously. The emission cross-sections of Yb-doped and Yb-Al-codoped high silica glasses were 0.65 and 0.82 pm 2 , respectively. The results show that Yb-Al-codoped high silica glass has better spectroscopic properties for a laser material. The study of high silica glass doped with ytterbium is helpful for its application in Yb laser systems, especially for high-power and high-repetition lasers

  13. Study of absorption and IR-emission of Er3+, Dy3+, Tm3+ doped high-purity tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motorin, S. E.; Dorofeev, V. V.; Galagan, B. I.; Sverchkov, S. E.; Koltashev, V. V.; Denker, B. I.

    2018-04-01

    A study of high-purity TeO2-ZnO based tellurite glasses doped with Er3+, Dy3+ or Tm3+ that could be used as laser media in the 2-3 μm spectral range is presented. The glasses are prepared by melting the oxides mixture inside a silica glass reactor in an atmosphere of purified oxygen. The low level of hydroxyl groups absorption allowed to measure correctly the luminescence decay characteristics of the dopants. The rare-earth ions absorption bands, the luminescence spectra and kinetic characteristics of emission from the levels 4I11/2, 4I13/2 of Er3+, 6H13/2 of Dy3+ and 3H4, 3H5, 3F4 of Tm3+ ions are investigated. The results confirm the high potential of tellurite glasses as an active media for bulk, planar waveguide and fiber lasers.

  14. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangutova Bianka V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa. The polyurethane foam was used as a pore creator which gave the material porosity of 70(5% (fly ash-glass composite and a porosity of 65( 5% (slag-glass composite. E-modulus values of the designed porous systems were 3.5(1.2 GPa and 8.1(3 GPa, while the bending strength values were 6.0(2 MPa and 13.2(3.5 MPa, respectively. These materials could be used for the production of tiles, wall bricks, as well as for the construction of air diffusers for waste water aeration.

  15. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II

  16. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  17. Isothermal crystallization kinetics in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.; Smith, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of a simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass were measured and modelled. Kinetics of acmite growth in the standard HW39-4 glass were measured using the isothermal method. A time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram was generated from these data. Classical glass-crystal transformation kinetic models were empirically applied to the crystallization data. These models adequately describe the kinetics of crystallization in complex HLW glasses (i.e., RSquared = 0.908). An approach to measurement, fitting, and use of TTT diagrams for prediction of crystallinity in a HLW glass canister is proposed

  18. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...... and products of catalytic reactions can freely diffuse through open mesopores (2–40 nm). The formation mechanism of hierarchically structured porous bioactive glasses, the immobilization mechanism of enzyme and the catalysis mechanism of immobilized enzyme are then discussed. The novel nanostructure...

  19. Development of an ASTM standard glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCT), for high level radioactive waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The nation's first, and the world's largest, facility to immobilize high-level nuclear waste in durable borosilicate glass has started operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The product specifications on the glass wasteform produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) required extensive characterization of the glass product before actual production began and for continued characterization during production. To aid in this characterization, a glass durability (leach) test was needed that was easily reproducible, could be performed remotely on highly radioactive samples, and could yield results rapidly. Several standard leach tests were examined with a variety of test configurations. Using existing tests as a starting point, the DWPF Product Consistency Test (PCT was developed in which crushed glass samples are exposed to 90 ± 2 degree C deionized water for seven days. Based on extensive testing, including a seven-laboratory round robin and confirmatory testing with radioactive samples, the PCT is very reproducible, yields reliable results rapidly, and can be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples

  20. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  1. Lanthanide-activated Na5Gd9F32 nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Daqin; Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Yan; Yu, Hua; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Zhenguo; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Na 5 Gd 9 F 32 nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na 5 Gd 9 F 32 lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na 5 Gd 9 F 32 nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na 5 Gd 9 F 32 lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb 3+ /Er 3+ ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties

  2. Immobilization of high-level wastes into sintered glass: 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, D.O.; Messi de Bernasconi, N.; Audero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to immobilize the high-level radioactive wastes from fuel elements reprocessing, borosilicate glass was adopted. Sintering experiments are described with the variety VG 98/12 (SiO 2 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , MgO, CaO and Na 2 O) (which does not present devitrification problems) mixed with simulated calcinated wastes. The hot pressing line (sintering under pressure) was explored in two variants 1: In can; 2: In graphite matrix with sintered pellet extraction. With scanning electron microscopy it is observed that the simulated wastes do not disolve in the vitreous matrix, but they remain dispersed in the same. The results obtained point out that the leaching velocities are independent from the density and from the matrix type employed, as well as from the fact that the wastes do no dissolve in the matrix. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  4. Effects of ionizing radiations on the optical properties of ionic copper-activated sol-gel silica glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Helou, Nissrine; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Capoen, Bruno; Ouerdane, Youcef; Boukenter, Aziz; Girard, Sylvain; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Studying the impact of radiations on doped silica glasses is essential for several technological applications. Herein, bulk silica glasses, activated with various concentrations of luminescent monovalent copper (Cu+), have been prepared using the sol-gel technique. Thereafter, these glasses were subjected to X- or γ-rays irradiation at 1 MGy(SiO2) accumulated dose. The effect of these ionizing radiations on the optical properties of these glasses, as a function of the Cu-doping content, were investigated using optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Before any irradiation, the glass with the lowest copper concentration exhibits blue and green luminescence bands under UV excitation, suggesting that Cu+ ions occupy both cubic and tetragonal symmetry sites. However, at higher Cu-doping level, only the green emission band exists. Moreover, we showed that the hydroxyl content decreases with increasing copper doping concentration. Both X and γ radiation exposures induced visible absorption due to HC1 color centers in the highly Cu-doped glasses. In the case of the lower Cu-doped glass, the Cu+ sites with a cubic symmetry are transformed into sites with tetragonal symmetry.

  5. Sodium Is Not Essential for High Bioactivity of Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojing; Chen, Xiaohui; Brauer, Delia S.; Wilson, Rory M.; Law, Robert V.; Hill, Robert G.; Karpukhina, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate that excellent bioactivity of glass can be achieved without the presence of an alkali metal component in glass composition. In vitro bioactivity of two sodium-free glasses based on the quaternary system SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2 with 0 and 4.5 mol% CaF2 content was investigated and compared with the sodium containing glasses with equivalent amount of CaF2. The formation of apatite after immersion in Tris buffer was followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), 31P and 19F solid state MAS-NMR. The dissolution study was completed by ion release measurements in Tris buffer. The results show that sodium free bioactive glasses formed apatite at 3 hours of immersion in Tris buffer, which is as fast as the corresponding sodium containing composition. This signifies that sodium is not an essential component in bioactive glasses and it is possible to make equally degradable bioactive glasses with or without sodium. The results presented here also emphasize the central role of the glass compositions design which is based on understanding of structural role of components and/or predicting the network connectivity of glasses. PMID:29271977

  6. Properties and structure of high erbium doped phosphate glass for short optical fibers amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seneschal, Karine; Smektala, Frederic; Bureau, Bruno; Floch, Marie Le; Jiang Shibin; Luo, Tao; Lucas, Jacques; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2005-01-01

    New phosphate glasses have been developed in order to incorporate high rare-earth ions concentrations. These glasses present a great chemical stability and a high optical quality. The phosphate glass network is open, very flexible, with a linkage of the tetrahedrons very disordered and contains a larger number of non-bridging oxygens (66%). The great stability and resistance against crystallization associated with the possibility to incorporate high doping concentration of rare-earth ions in these phosphate glasses make them very good candidates for the realization of ultra short single mode amplifiers with a high gain at 1.55 μm

  7. Geochemical characterization of impact glasses from the Zhamanshin crater by various modes of activation analysis. Remarks on genesis of irghizites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizera, J.; Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague; Randa, Z.; Tomandl, I.

    2012-01-01

    A large set of impact glasses from the Zhamanshin crater in Kazakhstan was analyzed by various modes of instrumental neutron activation analysis, supplemented by instrumental photon activation analysis and prompt gamma-ray activation analysis. Results of the determination of more than forty major and trace elements have shown that the analyzed set of homogeneous, tektite-like impact glasses with size of several centimeters and of various forms could be divided into two geochemically different groups. The lustrous, silica rich (acidic) glasses with high Ni content have been classified conventionally as irghizites. The dull, silica poor (basic) glasses with very low Ni content should not be confused with the large, heterogeneous impactite forms-zhamanshinites, but considered as a separate type of impact glass. Within both primary groups, further division has been suggested based on lower contents of Ni in an irghizite subgroup, and evidence of mixing of source materials for both primary groups in a part of the basic glasses. Based on the contents of Ni, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co, an ordinary chondrite impactor has been suggested with its contribution to the irghizite matter ranging between 4 and 21%. Possible source materials and impact processes leading to irghizite formation have been outlined. (author)

  8. Bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys for reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Jayaraj, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in materials engineering have generated complex alloys that retain a glassy state in bulk form (bulk metallic glasses or BMGs) via ingot casting. High corrosion resistance is expected for BMGs (amorphous) as they are free from defects associated with the crystalline state such as grain boundaries, dislocations and stacking faults. Compared with conventional alloys containing one or two principal elements, the recently developed HEAs are usually composed of five or more elements with equimolar or near equimolar elemental fractions, which forms single solid solution phase. These HEAs exhibit excellent microstructural stability with better mechanical, wear and corrosion resistance properties as they are essentially single phase. Reprocessing of spent fuel from the fast breeder reactor involves the use of high concentration of (11.5 M) nitric acid under boiling conditions for the dissolution of the fuel. Conventional AISI type 304LSS and nitric acid grade 304L stainless steel would undergo inter-granular corrosion under these conditions and cannot be used for the fabrication of dissolver vessel. Currently titanium is used and zirconium alloys are proposed for future dissolver applications. Thus searching for newer materials with higher corrosion resistance suggests metallic glasses and HEAs for critical components of the dissolver application. Several Zr-based glassy alloys with different microstructural states and Ni-Nb based glassy alloys and TiZrHfNbTa HEA were cast and characterized for microstructure and corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. From these studies, factors such as the corrosive environment (nitric acid, chloride and fluoride), and the presence of passivating elements in the alloy were emphasized for better corrosion resistance of BMGs and HEA. Attempts were also made to prepare coatings of Zr-and Ni-based glassy alloys on 304LSS by laser based deposition technique and their corrosion properties were evaluated. (author)

  9. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  10. Simulation of Self-Irradiation of High-Sodium Content Nuclear Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, Alexey S.; Ojovan, Michael I.; Batyukhnova, Olga G.; Lee, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Alkali-borosilicate glasses are widely used in nuclear industry as a matrix for immobilisation of hazardous radioactive wastes. Durability or corrosion resistance of these glasses is one of key parameters in waste storage and disposal safety. It is influenced by many factors such as composition of glass and surrounding media, temperature, time and so on. As these glasses contain radioactive elements most of their properties including corrosion resistance are also impacted by self-irradiation. The effect of external gamma-irradiation on the short-term (up to 27 days) dissolution of waste borosilicate glasses at moderate temperatures (30 deg. to 60 deg. C) was studied. The glasses studied were Magnox Waste glass used for immobilisation of HLW in UK, and K-26 glass used in Russia for ILW immobilisation. Glass samples were irradiated under γ-source (Co-60) up to doses 1 and 11 MGy. Normalised rates of elemental release and activation energy of release were measured for Na, Li, Ca, Mg, B, Si and Mo before and after irradiation. Irradiation up to 1 MGy results in increase of leaching rate of almost all elements from both MW and K-26 with the exception of Na release from MW glass. Further irradiation up to a dose of 11 MGy leads to the decrease of elemental release rates to nearly initial value. Another effect of irradiation is increase of activation energies of elemental release. (authors)

  11. SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 decrees C to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling

  12. Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90 degrees C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials

  13. Hydration of high-silica glasses in the deep sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federman, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Natural analogs of nuclear waste glasses are important because they provide information of the one variable that is not controllable in the laboratory - long intervals of time in the actual environment of storage. Some natural glasses have persisted for millions of years in deep-sea sediments in the form of disseminated particles and distinct tephra layers, while other apparently similar specimens have been completely altered to clay assemblages relatively quickly. Geologists have reached no firm conclusions as to why these differences exist, and more research is certainly warranted. These glasses vary in age, composition, and in the in-situ conditions they have experienced. They may provide important information for two different aspects of nuclear waste glass research: First, the chemical composition and especially the water content of these glasses as a function of time may give an understanding of the mechanisms and rates of diffusion in glasses in the natural environment. Second, the apparent differing durability of these glasses in different environmental conditions may suggest the optimal characteristics of a nuclear waste glass depository

  14. Synthesis and devitrification of high glass-forming ability bulk metallic glasses.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hong.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, literature on the production, microstructures and properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) has been reviewed with particular reference to glass forming ability (GFA) and alloys of the Fe-Zr-B and Zr-based BMG systems. The experimental procedures used in the research are presented and the results for the amorphous Fe80Zr12B8 ribbon and the Zr57Ti5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr57Nb5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr53Nb2Al8Cu30Ni7 BMGs are given and discussed. Wedge-shaped ingots of the Zr-based BMGs were produ...

  15. Eu-activated fluorochlorozirconate glass-ceramic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.; Henke, B.; Chen, G.; Woodford, J.; Newman, P. J.; MacFarlane, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    Rare-earth-doped fluorochlorozirconate (FCZ) glass-ceramic materials have been developed as scintillators and their properties investigated as a function of dopant level. The paper presents the relative scintillation efficiency in comparison to single-crystal cadmium tungstate, the scintillation intensity as a function of x-ray intensity and x-ray energy, and the spatial resolution (modulation transfer function). Images obtained with the FCZ glass-ceramic scintillator and with cadmium tungstate are also presented. Comparison shows that the image quality obtained using the glass ceramic is close to that from cadmium tungstate. Therefore, the glass-ceramic scintillator could be used as an alternative material for image formation resulting from scintillation. Other inorganic scintillators such as single crystals or polycrystalline films have limitations in resolution or size, but the transparent glass-ceramic can be scaled to any shape or size with excellent resolution

  16. Crystallization of high-strength nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, A; Chen, X; Wilson, R M; Hill, R; Cattell, M J

    2013-11-01

    Fine-grained, high strength, translucent leucite dental glass-ceramics are synthesized via controlled crystallization of finely milled glass powders. The objectives of this study were to utilize high speed planetary milling of an aluminosilicate glass for controlled surface crystallization of nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics and to test the biaxial flexural strength. An aluminosilicate glass was synthesized, attritor or planetary milled and heat-treated. Glasses and glass-ceramics were characterized using particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental (fine and nanoscale) and commercial (Ceramco-3, IPS Empress Esthetic) leucite glass-ceramics were tested using the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) test. Gaussian and Weibull statistics were applied. Experimental planetary milled glass-ceramics showed an increased leucite crystal number and nano-scale median crystal sizes (0.048-0.055 μm(2)) as a result of glass particle size reduction and heat treatments. Experimental materials had significantly (p0.05) strength difference. All other groups' mean BFS and characteristic strengths were found to be significantly different (pglass-ceramics with high flexural strength. These materials may help to reduce problems associated with brittle fracture of all-ceramic restorations and give reduced enamel wear. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-performance geometric phase elements in silica glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Drevinskas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High-precision three-dimensional ultrafast laser direct nanostructuring of silica glass resulting in multi-layered space-variant dielectric metasurfaces embedded in volume is demonstrated. Continuous phase profiles of nearly any optical component are achieved solely by the means of geometric phase. Complex designs of half-wave retarders with 90% transmission at 532 nm and >95% transmission at >1 μm, including polarization gratings with efficiency nearing 90% and computer generated holograms with a phase gradient of ∼0.8π rad/μm, were fabricated. A vortex half-wave retarder generating a single beam optical vortex with a tunable orbital angular momentum of up to ±100ℏ is shown. The high damage threshold of silica elements enables the simultaneous optical manipulation of a large number of micro-objects using high-power laser beams. Thus, the continuous control of torque without altering the intensity distribution was implemented in optical trapping demonstration with a total of 5 W average power, which is otherwise impossible with alternate beam shaping devices. In principle, the direct-write technique can be extended to any transparent material that supports laser assisted nanostructuring and can be effectively exploited for the integration of printed optics into multi-functional optoelectronic systems.

  18. Elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass induced by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Yu; Zhou, Jiajia; Khisro, Said Nasir; Zhou, Shifeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Abnormal elements redistribution behavior was observed in tellurite glass. • The refractive index and Raman intensity distribution changed significantly. • The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed. • First time report on the abnormal element redistribution behavior in glass. • The glass network structure determines the elemental redistribution behavior. - Abstract: The success in the fabrication of micro-structures in glassy materials using femtosecond laser irradiation has proved its potential applications in the construction of three-dimensional micro-optical components or devices. In this paper, we report the elemental redistribution behavior in tellurite glass after the irradiation of high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses. The relative glass composition remained unchanged while the glass density changed significantly, which is quite different from previously reported results about the high repetition rate femtosecond laser induced elemental redistribution in silicate glasses. The involved mechanism is discussed with the conclusion that the glass network structure plays the key role to determine the elemental redistribution. This observation not only helps to understand the interaction process of femtosecond laser with glassy materials, but also has potential applications in the fabrication of micro-optical devices

  19. High pressure dielectric studies on the structural and orientational glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, E; Tarnacka, M; Jurkiewicz, K; Kaminski, K; Paluch, M

    2016-02-07

    High pressure dielectric studies on the H-bonded liquid D-glucose and Orientationally Disordered Crystal (ODIC) 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose (levoglucosan) were carried out. It was shown that in both compounds, the structural relaxation is weakly sensitive to compression. It is well reflected in the low pressure coefficient of the glass transition and orientational glass transition temperatures which is equal to 60 K/GPa for both D-glucose and 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. Although it should be noted that ∂Tg(0)/∂p evaluated for the latter compound seems to be enormously high with respect to other systems forming ODIC phase. We also found that the shape of the α-loss peak stays constant for the given relaxation time independently on the thermodynamic condition. Consequently, the Time Temperature Pressure (TTP) rule is satisfied. This experimental finding seems to be quite intriguing since the TTP rule was shown to work well in the van der Waals liquids, while in the strongly associating compounds, it is very often violated. We have also demonstrated that the sensitivity of the structural relaxation process to the temperature change measured by the steepness index (mp) drops with pressure. Interestingly, this change is much more significant in the case of D-glucose with respect to levoglucosan, where the fragility changes only slightly with compression. Finally, kinetics of ODIC-crystal phase transition was studied at high compression. It is worth mentioning that in the recent paper, Tombari and Johari [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 104501 (2015)] have shown that ODIC phase in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose is stable in the wide range of temperatures and there is no tendency to form more ordered phase at ambient pressure. On the other hand, our isochronal measurements performed at varying thermodynamic conditions indicated unquestionably that the application of pressure favors solid (ODIC)-solid (crystal) transition in 1,6-anhydro-D-glucose. This result mimics the impact of pressure on the

  20. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-01-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications. PMID:27725780

  1. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-11

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  2. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  3. Ground Glass Pozzolan in Conventional, High, and Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagnit-Hamou Arezki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-glass pozzolan (G obtained by grinding the mixed-waste glass to same fineness of cement can act as a supplementary-cementitious material (SCM, given that it is an amorphous and a pozzolanic material. The G showed promising performances in different concrete types such as conventional concrete (CC, high-performance concrete (HPC, and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC. The current paper reports on the characteristics and performance of G in these concrete types. The use of G provides several advantages (technological, economical, and environmental. It reduces the production cost of concrete and decrease the carbon footprint of a traditional concrete structures. The rheology of fresh concrete can be improved due to the replacement of cement by non-absorptive glass particles. Strength and rigidity improvements in the concrete containing G are due to the fact that glass particles act as inclusions having a very high strength and elastic modulus that have a strengthening effect on the overall hardened matrix.

  4. Waste glass as partial mineral precursor in alkali-activated slag/fly ash system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.; Keulen, A.; Arbi, K.; Ye, G.

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of a waste glass powder residue (GP) from glass recycling as partial mineral precursor to produce alkali-activated materials is investigated. GP served as powder coal fly ash (PCFA) replacement within a reference system composed of 50% PCFA and 50% ground granulated blast furnace

  5. Systematic approach to preparing ceramic-glass composites with high translucency for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Humberto N; Chimanski, Afonso; Cesar, Paulo F

    2015-10-01

    Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glasses Prepared using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    The increasing focus on better building insulation is important to lower energy consumption. Development of new and improved insulation materials can contribute to solving this problem. Foam glass has a good insulating effect due to its large gas volume (porosity >90 %). It can be produced with o...... the thermal conductivity varies with gas composition. This allows us to determine the contribution of the gas and solid phase to the total thermal conductivity of a foam glass....

  7. Fracturing of simulated high-level waste glass in canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.D.; Slate, S.C.

    1981-09-01

    Waste-glass castings generated from engineering-scale developmental processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory are generally found to have significant levels of cracks. The causes and extent of fracturing in full-scale canisters of waste glass as a result of cooling and accidental impact are discussed. Although the effects of cracking on waste-form performance in a repository are not well understood, cracks in waste forms can potentially increase leaching surface area. If cracks are minimized or absent in the waste-glass canisters, the potential for radionuclide release from the canister package can be reduced. Additional work on the effects of cracks on leaching of glass is needed. In addition to investigating the extent of fracturing of glass in waste-glass canisters, methods to reduce cracking by controlling cooling conditions were explored. Overall, the study shows that the extent of glass cracking in full-scale, passively-cooled, continuous melting-produced canisters is strongly dependent on the cooling rate. This observation agrees with results of previously reported Pacific Northwest Laboratory experiments on bench-scale annealed canisters. Thus, the cause of cracking is principally bulk thermal stresses. Fracture damage resulting from shearing at the glass/metal interface also contributes to cracking, more so in stainless steel canisters than in carbon steel canisters. This effect can be reduced or eliminated with a graphite coating applied to the inside of the canister. Thermal fracturing can be controlled by using a fixed amount of insulation for filling and cooling of canisters. In order to maintain production rates, a small amount of additional facility space is needed to accomodate slow-cooling canisters. Alternatively, faster cooling can be achieved using the multi-staged approach. Additional development is needed before this approach can be used on full-scale (60-cm) canisters

  8. Yield stress in metallic glasses: The jamming-unjamming transition studied through Monte Carlo simulations based on the activation-relaxation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach allowing for stress control is employed to study the yield stress of a two-dimensional metallic glass in the limit of low temperatures and long (infinite) time scales. The elementary thermally activated events are determined using the activation-relaxation technique (ART). By tracking the minimum-energy state of the glass for various applied stresses, we find a well-defined jamming-unjamming transition at a yield stress about 30% lower than the steady-state flow stress obtained in conventional strain-controlled quasistatic simulations. ART is then used to determine the evolution of the distribution of thermally activated events in the glass microstructure both below and above the yield stress. We show that aging below the yield stress increases the stability of the glass, both thermodynamically (the internal potential energy decreases) and dynamically (the aged glass is surrounded by higher-energy barriers than the initial quenched configuration). In contrast, deformation above the yield stress brings the glass into a high internal potential energy state that is only marginally stable, being surrounded by a high density of low-energy barriers. The strong influence of deformation on the glass state is also evidenced by the microstructure polarization, revealed here through an asymmetry of the distribution of thermally activated inelastic strains in glasses after simple shear deformation.

  9. Operating Range for High Temperature Borosilicate Waste Glasses: (Simulated Hanford Enveloped)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, J.; Ramsey, W. G.; Toghiani, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    The following results are a part of an independent thesis study conducted at Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory-Mississippi State University. A series of small-scale borosilicate glass melts from high-level waste simulant were produced with waste loadings ranging from 20% to 55% (by mass). Crushed glass was allowed to react in an aqueous environment under static conditions for 7 days. The data obtained from the chemical analysis of the leachate solutions were used to test the durability of the resulting glasses. Studies were performed to determine the qualitative effects of increasing the B2O3 content on the overall waste glass leaching behavior. Structural changes in a glass arising due to B2O3 were detected indirectly by its chemical durability, which is a strong function of composition and structure. Modeling was performed to predict glass durability quantitatively in an aqueous environment as a direct function of oxide composition

  10. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of HLW vitrification is limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layer, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~53.8 ± 3.7 µm/h determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  11. Immobilization of high-level wastes into sintered glass: 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, A.M.; Russo, D.O.; Messi de Bernasconi, N.; Audero, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    High level radioactive wastes are immobilized into borosilicate glasses. Experiences with the variety VG 98/12 (SiO 2 , TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , MgO, CaO, Na 2 O) are described. The pressing was performed in a matrix of 12.7 mm diameter, the walls of which were lubricated with sterotex dissolved in Cl 4 C. The sintering was made in an horizontal electric furnace in air atmosphere at temperatures between 500 and 600 deg C. It was observed that the maximum density occurs at 605 deg C. Comparing both the hot and the cold pressing process, it is concluded that: 1) In spite of requiring more complex equipment the hot pressing process has the advantage that lower pressures are applied, with the consequent obtainment of waste blocks with larger diameters, and 2) it is advisable that pressing process should be performed in the definitive can. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  13. Segregation of the elements of the platinum group in a simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitamura, H.; Banba, T.; Kamizono, H.; Kiriyama, Y.; Kumata, M.; Murakami, T.; Tashiro, S.

    1983-01-01

    Segregation of the elements of the platinum group occurred during vitrification of the borosilicate glass containing 20 wt% simulated high-level waste oxides. The segregated materials were composed of two crystalline phases: one was the solid solution of ruthenium and rhodium dioxides and the other was that of palladium and rhodium metals also with tellurium. The segregated materials were not distributed homogeneously throughout the glass: (i) on the surface of the glass, there occurred palladium, rhodium and tellurium alloy alone; and (ii) at the inner part of the glass, the agglomerates of the two phases were concentrated in one part and dispersed in the other

  14. Immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glasses. Devitrification evaluation produced with different thermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messi de Bernasconi, N.B.; Russo, D.O.; Bevilacqua, M.E.; Sterba, M.E.; Heredia, A.D.; Audero, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes immobilization of high level nuclear wastes in sintered glass, as alternative way to melting glass. Different chemical compositions of borosilicate glass with simulate waste were utilized and satisfactory results were obtained at laboratory scale. As another contribution to the materials studies by X ray powder diffraction analysis, the devitrification produced with different thermal treatments, was evaluated. The effect of the thermal history on the behaviour of fission products containing glasses has been studied by several working groups in the field of high level waste fixation. When the glass is cooled through the temperature range from 800 deg C down to less than 400 deg C (these temperatures are approximates) nucleation and crystal growth can take place. The rate of crystallization will be maximum near the transformation point but through this rate may be low at lower temperatures, devitrification can still occur over long periods of time, depending on the glass composition. It was verified that there can be an appreciable increase in leaching in some waste glass compositions owing to the presence of crystalline phases. On the other hand, other compositions show very little change in leachability and the devitrified product is often preferable as there is less tendency to cracking, particularly in massive blocks of glass. A borosilicate glass, named SG7, which was developed specially in the KfK for the hot pressing of HLW with glass frit was studied. It presents a much enhanced chemical durability than borosolicate glass developed for the melting process. The crystallization behaviour of SG7 glass products was investigated in our own experiments by annealing sintered samples up to 3000 h at temperatures between 675 and 825 deg C. The samples had contained simulated waste with noble metals, since these might act as foreign nuclei for crystallization. Results on the extent of devitrification and time- temperature- transformation curves are

  15. High-temperature oxidation of tungsten covered by layer of glass-enamel melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsova, V.B.; Shardakov, N.T.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Deryabin, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion losses of tungsten covered by the layer of glass-enamel melt were determined at 800, 850, 900, 950 deg C. It is shown that the rate of high-temperature oxidation of tungsten decreases after application of glass-enamel melt on its surface. This is probably conditioned by reduction of area of metal interaction with oxidizing atmosphere

  16. Development of aluminosilicate and borosilicate glasses as matrices for CANDU high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strathdee, G.G.; McIntyre, N.S.; Taylor, P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper covers the results of analyses of two radioactive nepheline syenite glass blocks recovered from in-ground leaching experiments at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Current research on borosilicate glasses for immobilization of high-level waste is also described

  17. Effect of insertion method on knoop hardness of high viscous glass ionomer cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Bonifácio, C.C.; Bönecker, M.; Imparato, J.C.P.; de Gee, A.J.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Knoop hardness of three high viscous glass ionomer cements: G1 - Ketac Molar; G2 - Ketac Molar Easymix (3M ESPE) and G3 - Magic Glass ART (Vigodent). As a parallel goal, three different methods for insertion of Ketac Molar Easymix were tested: G4 -

  18. A Simple Demonstration of the High-Temperature Electrical Conductivity of Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverina, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We usually think of glass as a good electrical insulator; this, however, is not always the case. There are several ways to show that glass becomes conducting at high temperatures, but the following approach, devised by Brown University demonstration manager Gerald Zani, may be one of the simplest to perform.

  19. Remediation and production of low-sludge high-level waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.; Brown, K.G.; Beam, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    High-level radioactive sludge will constitute 24-28 oxide weight percent of the high-level waste glass produced at the Savannah River Site. A recent melter campaign using non-radioactive, simulated feed was performed with a sludge content considerably lower than 24 percent. The resulting glass was processed and shown to have acceptable durability. However, the durability was lower than predicted by the durability algorithm. Additional melter runs were performed to demonstrate that low sludge feed could be remediated by simply adding sludge oxides. The Product Composition Control System, a computer code developed to predict the proper feed composition for production of high-level waste glass, was utilized to determine the necessary chemical additions. The methodology used to calculate the needed feed additives, the effects of sludge oxides on glass production, and the resulting glass durability are discussed

  20. The incorporation of technetium into a representative low-activity waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bakel, A.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Buck, E.C.; Emery, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    A glass that has been tested to understand the corrosion behavior of waste glasses with high soda contents for immobilizing Hanford incidental wastes has been made by melting crushed glass with either TcO 2 or NaTcO 4 at 1,100--1,300 C. Incorporation of technetium in the glass was affected by solubility or kinetic effects. Metallic technetium inclusions formed in all the TcO 2 -doped glasses. Inclusions also formed in glasses with added NaTcO 4 that were melted at 1,100 C, but a glass melted at 1,200 C did not contain detectable inclusions. The presence of Tc-bearing inclusions complicates the interpretation of results from dissolution tests because of the simultaneous release of technetium from more than one phase, the unknown surface areas of each phase, and the possible incorporation of technetium that is released from one phase into another phase. A glass containing about 0.15 mass % Tc dissolved in the glass is being used in dissolution tests to study the release behavior of technetium

  1. West Valley high-level nuclear waste glass development: a statistically designed mixture study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, L.A.; Bowen, W.M.; Lokken, R.O.; Wald, J.W.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    The first full-scale conversion of high-level commercial nuclear wastes to glass in the United States will be conducted at West Valley, New York, by West Valley Nuclear Services Company, Inc. (WVNS), for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting WVNS in the design of the glass-making process and the chemical formulation of the glass. This report describes the statistically designed study performed by PNL to develop the glass composition recommended for use at West Valley. The recommended glass contains 28 wt% waste, as limited by process requirements. The waste loading and the silica content (45 wt%) are similar to those in previously developed waste glasses; however, the new formulation contains more calcium and less boron. A series of tests verified that the increased calcium results in improved chemical durability and does not adversely affect the other modeled properties. The optimization study assessed the effects of seven oxide components on glass properties. Over 100 melts combining the seven components into a wide variety of statistically chosen compositions were tested. Viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and chemical durability were measured and empirically modeled as a function of the glass composition. The mathematical models were then used to predict the optimum formulation. This glass was tested and adjusted to arrive at the final composition recommended for use at West Valley. 56 references, 49 figures, 18 tables.

  2. High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, David

    2012-08-16

    The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ≤ 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

  3. Optimization of waste loading in high-level glass in the presence of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoza, M.; Fann, G.I.; Hopkins, D.F.

    1995-02-01

    Hanford high-level liquid waste will be converted into a glass form for long-term storage. The glass must meet certain constraints on its composition and properties in order to have desired properties for processing (e.g., electrical conductivity, viscosity, and liquidus temperature) and acceptable durability for long-term storage. The Optimal Waste Loading (OWL) models, based on rigorous mathematical optimization techniques, have been developed to minimize the number of glass logs required and determine glass-former compositions that will produce a glass meeting all relevant constraints. There is considerable uncertainty in many of the models and data relevant to the formulation of high-level glass. In this paper, we discuss how we handle uncertainty in the glass property models and in the high-level waste composition to the vitrification process. Glass property constraints used in optimization are inequalities that relate glass property models obtained by regression analysis of experimental data to numerical limits on property values. Therefore, these constraints are subject to uncertainty. The sampling distributions of the regression models are used to describe the uncertainties associated with the constraints. The optimization then accounts for these uncertainties by requiring the constraints to be satisfied within specified confidence limits. The uncertainty in waste composition is handled using stochastic optimization. Given means and standard deviations of component masses in the high-level waste stream, distributions of possible values for each component are generated. A series of optimization runs is performed; the distribution of each waste component is sampled for each run. The resultant distribution of solutions is then statistically summarized. The ability of OWL models to handle these forms of uncertainty make them very useful tools in designing and evaluating high-level waste glasses formulations

  4. Chemical composition measurements of the low activity waste (LAW) EPA-Series glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste glasses provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 100.2 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %.

  5. Mechanisms of postradiation transformations in alkaline-phosphate glasses activated by copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vil'chinskaya, N.N.; Dmitryuk, A.V.; Ignat'ev, E.G.; Karapetyan, G.O.; Petrovskij, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Lithium aluminophosphate glasses activated by copper served as the object under investigation. Copper content varied from 0 up to 0.13 mass.%. It is shown that pole redistribution among PO 4 2- and Cu(2) centers takes place in alkaline -phosphate glasses activated by Cu(1). This process prevails for copper content of above 0.1%. Therefore the possibility appears to evaluate the quantum yield of colour center formation

  6. Mechanisms of postradiation transformations in alkaline-phosphate glasses activated by copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vil' chinskaya, N.N.; Dmitryuk, A.V.; Ignat' ev, E.G.; Karapetyan, G.O.; Petrovskij, G.T. (Gosudarstvennyj Opticheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1984-01-01

    Lithium aluminophosphate glasses activated by copper served as the object under investigation. Copper content varied from 0 up to 0.13 mass.%. It is shown that pole redistribution among PO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and Cu(2) centers takes place in alkaline -phosphate glasses activated by Cu(1). This process prevails for copper content of above 0.1%. Therefore the possibility appears to evaluate the quantum yield of colour center formation.

  7. Transparent form-active system with structural glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, M.S.N.; Veer, F.A.; Eigenraam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Free-form transparent wide-span spatial structures which have being constructed so far, are based on the concept of three sets of components, the structural components, usually steel elements to ensure both compressive and tensional capacity; the glass cladding elements for expressing transparency;

  8. Development and radiation stability of glasses for highly radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.R.; Dalton, J.T.; Hudson, B.; Marples, J.A.C.

    1976-01-01

    The variation of formation temperature, crystallizing behaviour and leach resistance with composition changes for sodium-lithium borosilicate glasses suitable for vitrifying Magnox waste are discussed. Viscosities have been measured between 400 and 1050 0 C. The principal crystal phases which occur have been identified as magnesium silicate, magnesium borate and ceria. The leach rate of polished discs in pure water at 100 0 C does not decrease with time if account is taken of the fragile siliceous layer that is observed to occur. The effect of 100 years' equivalent α- and β-irradiation on glass properties is discussed. Stored energy release experiments demonstrated that energy is released over a wide temperature range so that it cannot be triggered catastrophically. Temperatures required to release energy are dependent upon the original storage temperature. Helium release is by Fick's diffusion law up to at least 30% of the total inventory, with diffusion coefficients similar to those for comparable borosilicate glasses. Leach rates were not measurably affected by α-radiation. β-radiation in a Van de Graaff accelerator did not change physical properties, but irradiation in an electron microscope caused minute bubbles in lithium-containing glasses above 200 0 C. (author)

  9. In-Situ Phase Transition Control in the Supercooled State for Robust Active Glass Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shichao; Cao, Maoqing; Li, Chaoyu; Li, Jiang; Qiu, Jianrong; Zhou, Shifeng

    2017-06-21

    The construction of a dopant-activated photonic composite is of great technological importance for various applications, including smart lighting, optical amplification, laser, and optical detection. The bonding arrangement around the introduced dopants largely determines the properties, yet it remains a daunting challenge to manipulate the local state of the matrix (i.e., phase) inside the transparent composite in a controllable manner. Here we demonstrate that the relaxation of the supercooled state enables in-situ phase transition control in glass. Benefiting from the unique local atom arrangement manner, the strategy offers the possibility for simultaneously tuning the chemical environment of the incorporated dopant and engineering the dopant-host interaction. This allows us to effectively activate the dopant with high efficiency (calculated as ∼100%) and profoundly enhance the dopant-host energy-exchange interaction. Our results highlight that the in-situ phase transition control in glass may provide new opportunities for fabrication of unusual photonic materials with intense broadband emission at ∼1100 nm and development of the robust optical detection unit with high compactness and broadband photon-harvesting capability (from X-ray to ultraviolet light).

  10. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  11. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  12. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [Process Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia); East, Daniel; Simon, George P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  13. Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.L.; Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)

  14. Glass as a medium for the ultimate disposal of highly radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1983-09-01

    The conversion of high level radioactive liquid wastes into glass is now considered in every nuclear country. The glass composition must take into account the components of the solutions and be formulated in order to meet certain requirements, mainly those necessary for safe further disposal. The compositions of these glasses, all borosilicates, are consequently unusual. Heat due to β γ decay generates some devitrification but it has not yet been demonstrated that this is detrimental. β irradiation has minor effects on the glass structure but the effect of α emitters is not presently totally investigated. If stored energy consequenses are negligible, further experiments must be carried out to ascertain the effect of helium build up or the behaviour of the mechanical properties. Processes of industrial interest have been developped and a plant has already produced radioactive glass blocks for 5 years

  15. Transition to Glass: Pilot Training for High-Technology Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Chute, Rebecca D.; Moses, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This report examines the activities of a major commercial air carrier between 1993 and late 1996 as it acquired an advanced fleet of high-technology aircraft (Boeing 757). Previously, the airline's fleet consisted of traditional (non-glass) aircraft, and this report examines the transition from a traditional fleet to a glass one. A total of 150 pilots who were entering the B-757 transition training volunteered for the study, which consisted of three query phases: (1) first day of transition training, (2) 3 to 4 months after transition training, and (3) 12 to 14 months after initial operating experience. Of these initial 150 pilots, 99 completed all three phases of the study, with each phase consisting of probes on attitudes and experiences associated with their training and eventual transition to flying the line. In addition to the three questionnaires, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Although the primary focus of this study was on the flight training program, additional factors such as technical support, documentation, and training aids were investigated as well. The findings generally indicate that the pilot volunteers were highly motivated and very enthusiastic about their training program. In addition, the group had low levels of apprehension toward automation and expressed a high degree of satisfaction toward their training. However, there were some concerns expressed regarding the deficiencies in some of the training aids and lack of a free-play flight management system training device.

  16. Leaching and mechanical properties of cabal glasses developed as matrices for immobilization high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezz-Eldin, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the leaching behavior of simulated high-level-waste cabal glass (CaO-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) as a bulk specimen. During leach tests, the glass is immersed in either deionized water or in groundwater for up to 57 days at 70 deg. C. Based on the results, mechanisms observed with the leaching of the glass in deionized water or groundwater are discussed. Three factors, i.e., time of immersion, type of leaching solution and irradiation effect, are extensively studied. The corrosion was found to be linear with time in the limit of investigation (1-57 days) but with different rates depending on the type of solution and glass composition. Effects of γ-irradiation on the glass together with groundwater were found to decrease the glass durability. The evolution of the damage on mechanical and physical properties of the glass before and after leaching or irradiation was also discussed. The addition of waste oxide changes the properties of the glass matrix, so the influence of the guest oxides on the properties of host materials is also discussed

  17. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenu Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF was finally evaluated.

  18. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased

  19. The role of natural glasses as analogues in projecting the long-term alteration of high-level nuclear waste glasses: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The common observation of glasses persisting in natural environments for long periods of time (up to tens of millions of years) provides compelling evidence that these materials can be kinetically stable in a variety of subsurface environments. This paper reviews how natural and historical synthesized glasses can be employed as natural analogues for understanding and projecting the long-term alteration of high-level nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion of basaltic glass results in many of the same alteration features found in laboratory testing of the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses. Evidence has also been found indicating similarities in the rate controlling processes, such as the effects of silica concentration on corrosion in groundwater and in laboratory leachates. Naturally altered rhyolitic glasses and tektites provide additional evidence that can be used to constrain estimates of long-term waste glass alteration. When reacted under conditions where water is plentiful, the corrosion for these glasses is dominated by network hydrolysis, while the corrosion is dominated by molecular water diffusion and secondary mineral formation under conditions where water contact is intermittent or where water is relatively scarce. Synthesized glasses that have been naturally altered result in alkali-depleted alteration features that are similar to those found for natural glasses and for nuclear waste glasses. The characteristics of these alteration features appear to be dependent on the alteration conditions which affect the dominant reaction processes during weathering. In all cases, care must be taken to ensure that the information being provided by natural analogues is related to nuclear waste glass corrosion in a clear and meaningful way

  20. Glass-crystalline materials for active waste incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulichenko, V.V.; Krylova, N.V.; Vlasov, V.I.; Polyakov, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the possibility and conditions for using glass-crystalline materials for the incorporation of radionuclides. Materials of a cast pyroxene type that are obtained by smelting calcined wastes with acid blast furnace slags are described. A study was also made of materials of a basalt type prepared from wastes with and without alkali metal salt. Changes in the structure and properties of materials in the process of storage at different temperatures have been studied

  1. Glass-ceramics frits for high mechanical resistance glazes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajek, M.; Lis, J.; Partyka, J.; Wojczyk, M.

    2004-01-01

    The obtaining and application of glass-ceramics frits for glazes were discussed by many authors. This glazes are characterized by raised mechanical parameters and chemical resistance. Factors, that determines crystallization process are initial composition, heat treatment and nucleation agents. The kind of crystalline phases, crystal habit and the content of residual glass phase play the decisive role in the strengthening of the glaze. In this paper are shown results of investigation over controlled crystallization in the ternary systems; Li 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , CaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , ZnO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , MgO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , with or without nucleation agents. (author)

  2. The effects of uranium oxide high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyal, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Because of their unusually good chemical durability, iron phosphate glasses are a natural candidate for a nuclear waste disposal glass. We have studied the effects of UO 2 high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses with both neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction using the GLAD instrument of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source and the 1-BM bending magnet beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, respectively. The results of neutron scattering, which is mostly sensitive to correlations involving light atoms i.e. O-O, Fe-O and P-O, suggest the main structural features of the base glass are largely unaffected by the addition of UO 2 . The nearest-neighbor P-O, Fe-O and O-O peaks remain at the same position in real space and their intensities scale approximately with concentration. These findings are consistent with the earlier results of Raman scattering and EXAFS on the Fe-K edge wherein both cases the spectra remain similar to the base glass. High-energy x-ray scattering which is sensitive to correlations involving the heavier atoms and thus complements the neutron measurements, is also consistent with uranium occupying interstitial sites in the relatively undisturbed base glass structure. However, important questions remain as to the precise local structure and oxidation state of uranium in these glasses

  3. Microstructured fibers with high lanthanum oxide glass core for nonlinear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelke, J.; Schuster, K.; Litzkendorf, D.; Schwuchow, A.; Kirchhof, J.; Bartelt, H.; Tombelaine, V.; Leproux, P.; Couderc, V.; Labruyere, A.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a low loss microstructured fiber (MOF) with a high nonlinear glass core and silica holey cladding. The substitution of mostly used silica as core material of microstructured fibers by lanthanum oxide glass promises a high nonlinear conversion efficiency for supercontinuum (SC) generation. The glass composition is optimized in terms of thermochemical and optical requirements. The glass for the MOF core has a high lanthanum oxide concentration (10 mol% La2O3) and a good compatibility with the silica cladding. This is performed by adding a suitable alumina concentration up to 20 mol%. The lanthanum oxide glass preform rods were manufactured by melting technique. Besides purity issues the material homogeneity plays an important role to achieve low optical loss. The addition of fluorides allows the better homogenization of the glass composition in the preform volume by refining. The minimum attenuation of an unstructured fiber drawn from this glass is about 0.6 dB/m. It is mostly caused by decreasing of scattering effects. The microstructured silica cladding allows the considerable shifting of dispersive behavior of the MOF for an optimal pump light conversion. The MOF shows zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDW) of 1140 nm (LP01 mode) and 970 nm (LP11 mode). The supercontinuum generation was investigated with a 1064 nm pump laser (650 ps). It shows a broad band emission between 500 nm and 2200 nm.

  4. High-level waste glass field burial tests at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.; Walton, F.B.; Johnson, H.L.

    1983-06-01

    In 1960 June, 25 nepheline syenite-based glass hemispheres containing the fission products 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 144 Ce and 106 Ru were buried below the water table in fluvial sand at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Soil and groundwater concentrations of 90 Sr and 137 Cs have been determined since then and the data have been interpreted using kinetically limited migration models to deduce the leaching history of the glass for these burial conditions. The leaching history derived from the field data is compared to laboratory leaching of samples from a glass hemisphere retrieved in 1978, and also to pre-burial laboratory leaching of identical hemispheres. The time dependence of the leach rates observed for the buried specimens suggests that leaching is being inhibited by the formation of a protective surface layer, although no direct observation of this layer has been made. Using an average leach rate of 5.6 x 10 -14 kg/(m 2 .s) derived from the field data for the period 1966 to 1977, it is estimated that it would require approximately 20 million years to dissolve the glass hemispheres. The effect of the kinetic limitations of the fission-product/fluvial-sand interactions is discussed with respect to the migration of 90 Sr and 137 Cs over a 20-a time scale. It is concluded that kinetically limited sorption by oxyhydroxides rather than equilibrium ion exchange controls the long-term migration of 90 Cr; the action of the oxyhydroxides immobilizes the 90 Sr on the longer time scale. Cesium is initially rapidly bound to the micaceous fraction of the sand. On a longer time scale, slow remobilization of 137 Cs in particulate form is observed and is believed to be related to bacterial action

  5. High-level waste solidification: why we chose glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper considers the desirable properties and factors to be assessed in the selection of a solidified waste product, surveys the possible product options and then analyzes in detail their suitability in meeting the criteria. It concludes that glasses are currently the preferred choice for the following reasons: their ability to fix the full spectrum of elements contained in the waste; their tolerance of the composition variations that will occur on a day to day basis in practice; their relatively low formation temperatures that lead to simpler and hence safer processing; their radiation stability; and their adequate leach rates. Suitable compositions are available for the wastes that will arise in the UK and techniques are available for manufacture on a production scale. Lower leach rates might be obtained by choosing glasses with higher formation temperatures or ceramics. However, these latter generally also have higher formation temperatures, have less tolerance for composition variations and their radiation stability is unproven. Supercalcines and synthetic rocks (SYNROC) may eventually be demonstrated to have some advantageous properties, but present indications are that these could be major disadvantages which more than offset any gains. Other advanced concepts (for example, the dispersion of glass beads in a metal matrix) have lower leach rates, but lead to additional complexity in manufacture

  6. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  7. Ultra-high carrier mobility InSb film by rapid thermal annealing on glass substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charith Jayanada Koswaththage

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available InSb films were deposited on both mica and glass substrates using thermal evaporation and subjected to FA or RTA. Crystallinity, composition and electrical properties were investigated. High Hall electron mobility as high as 25,000 cm2/(Vs was obtained with the capped InSb film by keeping the In:Sb ratio after RTA at 520°C for 30 sec or more without adopting epitaxial growth on glass.

  8. The effect of temperature on guiding of slow highly charged ions through a mesoscopic glass capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereczky, R J; Tökési, K; Kowarik, G; Ladinig, F; Schrempf, D; Aumayr, F

    2012-01-01

    We present first temperature dependent transmission measurements of slow highly charged ions through a single, straight Duran glass capillary with a high aspect ratio. By changing the temperature of the glass capillary the electrical conductivity of the Duran can be varied by several orders of magnitude. This held the promise to investigate the effect of conductivity on particle transport (build-up and removal of charge patches) through capillaries in more details.

  9. The chemical durability of glasses suitable for the storage of high level radioactive wastes, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo; Kawamoto, Takamichi; Nanbu, Tadahiko; Nakamura, Takao.

    1975-01-01

    To develop the glassy materials suitable for the long-term storage of high level radioactive wastes, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-alumina-silica system has been investigated. The test was carried out by the following three ways, (1) glass-disk immersion method, (2) continuous leach method and (3) method prescribed in JIS-R3502. In the continuous leach method, glass grains were exposed to circulating water at a constant temperature for a week to obtain the leach factor or leach rate. It was found from the experimental results that, as the silica content increased, the melting temperature of the glasses progressively increased and the chemical durability was considerably improved, and that B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O constituents were preferentially dissolved in water leaving relatively insoluble components such as SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 . The rate at which B 2 O 3 and Na 2 O in glass are leached out is governed by three processes, that is, (1) the boundary reaction on the glass surface, (2) the diffusion process through the hydrated layer, and (3) the disintegration of hydrated layer. The first process probably corresponds to the hydration of boric oxides on the glass surface or to the ion exchange between protons in solution and Na + ions in glass, and the second process seems to correspond to the diffusion of protons through the hydrated layer on the glass surface. Although the ratio of [Na-BO 4 ]/[BO 3 ] in the borax-silica glasses was determined to be 0.5 by means of NMR measurement, Na 2 O/B 2 O 3 ratio in leached solution was less than 0.5, indicating that [BO 3 ] groups in glass were more soluble than [Na-BO 4 ] groups. From the viewpoint of appreciation of safety, the chemical durability of the glasses of borax-aluminasilica system was rather unsatisfactory, but that of the glasses containing silica in quantities was comparable to the soda-lime silicate sheet glasses. (auth.)

  10. Explorations on High Dimensional Landscapes: Spin Glasses and Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagun, Levent

    This thesis deals with understanding the structure of high-dimensional and non-convex energy landscapes. In particular, its focus is on the optimization of two classes of functions: homogeneous polynomials and loss functions that arise in machine learning. In the first part, the notion of complexity of a smooth, real-valued function is studied through its critical points. Existing theoretical results predict that certain random functions that are defined on high dimensional domains have a narrow band of values whose pre-image contains the bulk of its critical points. This section provides empirical evidence for convergence of gradient descent to local minima whose energies are near the predicted threshold justifying the existing asymptotic theory. Moreover, it is empirically shown that a similar phenomenon may hold for deep learning loss functions. Furthermore, there is a comparative analysis of gradient descent and its stochastic version showing that in high dimensional regimes the latter is a mere speedup. The next study focuses on the halting time of an algorithm at a given stopping condition. Given an algorithm, the normalized fluctuations of the halting time follow a distribution that remains unchanged even when the input data is sampled from a new distribution. Two qualitative classes are observed: a Gumbel-like distribution that appears in Google searches, human decision times, and spin glasses and a Gaussian-like distribution that appears in conjugate gradient method, deep learning with MNIST and random input data. Following the universality phenomenon, the Hessian of the loss functions of deep learning is studied. The spectrum is seen to be composed of two parts, the bulk which is concentrated around zero, and the edges which are scattered away from zero. Empirical evidence is presented for the bulk indicating how over-parametrized the system is, and for the edges that depend on the input data. Furthermore, an algorithm is proposed such that it would

  11. Activation behavior of boron implanted poly-Si on glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, M.; Shimamura, K.; Tsubokawa, H.; Tokushige, K.; Furuta, H.; Hirao, T.

    2010-01-01

    The activation behavior of boron (B) implanted poly-Si films on glass substrates has been investigated. The effect of B dose and annealing temperature on crystal defects and electrical properties of the films were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and Hall measurement. It was found that the maximum activation ratio of the film with B dose of 1 x 10 15 cm -2 was obtained when Raman peak associated with disordered amorphous silicon disappeared. However, reverse anneal was observed in the film when the annealing temperature further increased. The results from secondary ion mass spectrometry and Hall measurement revealed that B segregation at the top and bottom interface and deactivation of B substitutional occurred simultaneously in the high-dose specimens when the annealing temperature increased from 600 to 750 o C.

  12. Experimental results from a large volume active target made of glass capillaries and liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, P.; Buontempo, S.; Brunner, J.; De Jong, M.; Fabre, J.P.; Frenkel, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Golovkin, S.; Gregoire, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Kushnirenko, A.; Martellotti, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Medvedkov, A.; Michel, L.; Mondardini, M.R.; Panman, J.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Y.; Riccardi, F.; Siegmund, W.P.; Strack, R.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Winter, K.; Wong, H.; Zymin, K.

    1995-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of high-resolution tracking with an active target made of glass capillaries filled with organic liquid scintillator. This technique allows real time detection of short-lived particle decays. In this paper, we report on experimental results obtained from an active target having 2 x 2 cm 2 cross section and 180 cm length, installed in front of the CHORUS detector and exposed to the CERN Wide Band Neutrino Beam. The detector consists of 5.1 x 10 5 capillaries with 20 μm inner diameter, read out by a single optoelectronic chain and a Megapixel CCD. Details on tests in the neutrino beam will be reported. First neutrino interactions have been detected. (orig.)

  13. Parametrization in models of subcritical glass fracture: Activation offset and concerted activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno Poletto; Hühn, Carolin; Erlebach, Andreas; Mey, Dorothea; Sierka, Marek; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    There are two established but fundamentally different empirical approaches to parametrize the rate of subcritical fracture in brittle materials. While both are relying on a thermally activated reaction of bond rupture, the difference lies in the way as to how the externally applied stresses affect the local energy landscape. In the consideration of inorganic glasses, the strain energy is typically taken as an off-set on the activation barrier. As an alternative interpretation, the system’s volumetric strain-energy is added to its thermal energy. Such an interpretation is consistent with the democratic fiber bundle model. Here, we test this approach of concerted activation against macroscopic data of bond cleavage activation energy, and also against ab initio quantum chemical simulation of the energy barrier for cracking in silica. The fact that both models are able to reproduce experimental observation to a remarkable degree highlights the importance of a holistic consideration towards non-empirical understanding.

  14. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  15. Conversion of highly active waste to solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffler, K.

    Borosilicate glasses were selected as matrix material for solidification of highly radioactive wastes. Current laboratory work on the VERA process is described. Goals were met by a five-component glass VG-38 and a glass-ceramic VC-15. The VERA process is described: flowsheet, denitration, calcinator, fusion facility

  16. Development of a glass matrix for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Thorat, Vidya; Ramchandran, M.; Amar Kumar; Ozarde, P.D.; Raj, Kanwar; Das, D.

    2004-07-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the earlier reprocessing flow sheet ferrous sulphamate has been used for valancy adjustment of Pu from IV to III for effective separation. This has resulted in generation of HLW containing significance amount of sulphate. Internationally borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted for vitrification of HLW. The first Indian vitrification facility at Waste Immobilislition Plant (WIP), Tarapur a five component borosilicate matrix (SiO 2 :B 2 O 3 :Na 2 O : MnO : TiO 2 ) has been used for vitrification of waste. However at Trombay HLW contain significant amount of sulphate which is not compatible with standard borosilicate formulation. Extensive R and D efforts were made to develop a glass formulation which can accommodate sulphate and other constituents of HLW e.g., U, Al, Ca, etc. This report deals with development work of a glass formulations for immobilization of sulphate bearing waste. Different glass formulations were studied to evaluate the compatibility with respect to sulphate and other constituents as mentioned above. This includes sodium, lead and barium borosilicate glass matrices. Problems encountered in different glass matrices for containment of sulphate have also been addressed. A glass formulation based on barium borosilicate was found to be effective and compatible for sulphate bearing high level waste. (author)

  17. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste

  18. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  19. Static and Dynamic Behavior of High Modulus Hybrid Boron/Glass/Aluminum Fiber Metal Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Po-Ching

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation presents the investigation of a newly developed hybrid fiber metal laminates (FMLs) which contains commingled boron fibers, glass fibers, and 2024-T3 aluminum sheets. Two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs are developed. The first, type I hybrid FMLs, contained a layer of boron fiber prepreg in between two layers of S2-glass fiber prepreg, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The second, type II hybrid FMLs, contained three layer of commingled hybrid boron/glass fiber prepreg layers, sandwiched by two aluminum alloy 2024-T3 sheets. The mechanical behavior and deformation characteristics including blunt notch strength, bearing strength and fatigue behavior of these two types of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs were investigated. Compared to traditional S2-glass fiber reinforced aluminum laminates (GLARE), the newly developed hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates possess high modulus, high yielding stress, and good blunt notch properties. From the bearing test result, the hybrid boron/glass/aluminum fiber metal laminates showed outstanding bearing strength. The high fiber volume fraction of boron fibers in type II laminates lead to a higher bearing strength compared to both type I laminates and traditional GLARE. Both types of hybrid FMLs have improved fatigue crack initiation lives and excellent fatigue crack propagation resistance compared to traditional GLARE. The incorporation of the boron fibers improved the Young's modulus of the composite layer in FMLs, which in turn, improved the fatigue crack initiation life and crack propagation rates of the aluminum sheets. Moreover, a finite element model was established to predict and verify the properties of hybrid boron/glass/aluminum FMLs. The simulated results showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Glass formability of high T(sub c) Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were evaluated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass, then with subsequent devitrification it was formed into bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  1. Effect of high pressure on the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paluch, M; Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, ulica Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-05-23

    A glass is usually formed by cooling a liquid at a rate sufficient to avoid crystallization. In the vicinity of the glass transition the structural relaxation time increases with lowering temperature in a non-Arrhenius fashion and the structural relaxation function reveals a non-Debye behaviour. However, liquid can be also vitrified by keeping it at a constant temperature and increasing the pressure. This pressure-induced transition to the glassy state is also accompanied by dramatic changes in the relaxation dynamics. Herein we discuss the behaviour of the structural relaxation times of glass-forming liquids and polymer melts under high pressure.

  2. Technical Note: Updated durability/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Hartley, S.A.; Redgate, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    This technical note presents empirical models developed in FYI 995 to predict durability as functions of glass composition. Models are presented for normalized releases of B, Li, Na, and Si from the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) applied to quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses as well as from the 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) test applied to quenched glasses. Models are presented for Composition Variation Study (CVS) data from low temperature melter (LTM) studies (Hrma, Piepel, et al. 1994) and high temperature melter (HTM) studies (Vienna et al. 1995). The data used for modeling in this technical note are listed in Appendix A

  3. Test plan: Effects of phase separation on waste loading for high level waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the Tanks Focus Area's (TFA) effort to increase waste loading for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at various facilities in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, the occurrence of phase separation in waste glasses spanning the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) composition ranges were studied during FY99. The type, extent, and impact of phase separation on glass durability for a series of HLW glasses, e.g., SRS-type and INEEL-type, were examined

  4. Effect of high pressure on the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paluch, M; Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A

    2007-01-01

    A glass is usually formed by cooling a liquid at a rate sufficient to avoid crystallization. In the vicinity of the glass transition the structural relaxation time increases with lowering temperature in a non-Arrhenius fashion and the structural relaxation function reveals a non-Debye behaviour. However, liquid can be also vitrified by keeping it at a constant temperature and increasing the pressure. This pressure-induced transition to the glassy state is also accompanied by dramatic changes in the relaxation dynamics. Herein we discuss the behaviour of the structural relaxation times of glass-forming liquids and polymer melts under high pressure

  5. Porous glass with high silica content for nuclear waste storage : preparation, characterization and leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aegerter, M.A.; Santos, D.I. dos; Ventura, P.C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aqueous solutions simulating radioactive nuclear wastes (like Savanah River Laboratory) were incorporated in porous glass matrix with high silica content prepared by decomposition of borosilicate glass like Na 2 O - B 2 O 3 - SiO 2 . After sintering, the samples were submitted, during 28 days, to standard leaching tests MCC1, MCC5 (Soxhlet) and stagnating. The total weight loss, ph, as well as the integral and differential leaching rates and the accumulated concentrations in the leach of Si, Na, B, Ca, Mn, Al, Fe and Ni. The results are compared with the results from reference borosilicate glass, made by fusion, ceramic, synroc, concrets, etc... (E.G.) [pt

  6. Glass consistency and glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Glass produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will have to consistently be more durable than a benchmark glass (evaluated using a short-term leach test), with high confidence. The DWPF has developed a Glass Product Control Program to comply with this specification. However, it is not clear what relevance product consistency has on long-term glass performance. In this report, the authors show that DWPF glass, produced in compliance with this specification, can be expected to effectively limit the release of soluble radionuclides to natural environments. However, the release of insoluble radionuclides to the environment will be limited by their solubility, and not glass durability

  7. Solidification of highly active wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.B.

    1984-11-01

    Final reports are presented on work on the following topics: glass technology; enhancement of off-gas aerosol collection; formation and trapping of volatile ruthenium; volatilisation of caesium, technetium and tellurium in high-level waste vitrification; deposition of ruthenium; and calcination of high-level waste liquors. (author)

  8. INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted

  9. INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

    2008-09-23

    The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted

  10. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Alexander J.; Campbell, John H.

    1998-01-01

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  11. Lattice thermal conductivity of silicate glasses at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamic and transport properties of magma holds the key to understanding the thermal evolution and chemical differentiation of Earth. The discovery of the remnant of a deep magma ocean above the core mantle boundary (CMB) from seismic observations suggest that the CMB heat flux would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, including lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) components, of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals around the region. Recent measurements on the krad of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals show that krad of dense silicate glasses could be significantly smaller than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases, and therefore the dense silicate melts would act as a thermal insulator in deep lower mantle. This conclusion, however, remains uncertain due to the lack of direct measurements on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicate melts under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Besides the CMB, magmas exist in different circumstances beneath the surface of the Earth. Chemical compositions of silicate melts vary with geological and geodynamic settings of the melts and have strong influences on their thermal properties. In order to have a better view of heat transport within the Earth, it is important to study compositional and pressure dependences of thermal properties of silicate melts. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses with basaltic and rhyolitic compositions up to Earth's lower mantle pressures using time-domain thermoreflectance coupled with diamond-anvil cell techniques. This study not only provides new data for the thermal conductivity of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior, but is crucial for further understanding of the evolution of Earth's complex internal structure.

  12. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  13. Lead-iron phosphate glass: a stable storage medium for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, B.C.; Boatner, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which show that lead-iron phosphate glasses are a promising new waste form for the safe immobilization of both high-level defense and high-level commercial radioactive waste. Relative to the borosilicate nuclear waste glasses that are currently the ''reference'' waste form for the long-term disposal of nuclear waste, lead-iron phosphate glasses have several distinct advantages: (1) an aqueous corrosion rate that is about 1000 times lower, (2) a processing temperature that is 100 0 to 250 0 C lower and, (3) a much lower melt viscosity in the temperature range from 800 0 to 1000 0 C. Most significantly, the lead-iron phosphate waste form can be processed using a technology similar to that developed for borosilicate nuclear waste glasses

  14. Comparative consideration and design of a security depot for high radioactive glass-enclosed materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroni, U.

    1985-01-01

    From the beginning of 1990 the COGEMA shall supply glass-enclosed high radioactive waste of the reprocessing of German fuel elements back to the Federal Republic of Germany. As to this time the final waste storage in the salt stock of Gorleben will not be available the glass cannisters have to be deposited above ground. First a comparison is made out of a number of proposed storage concepts for the deposition of HAW-glass blocks. The safety technical behaviour of the facility is considered. On the basis of the gained results a new facility design is presented, which can take 450 glass cannisters in a discoid built up cast-steel vessel and makes possible the utilization of the resulting radioactive heat of dissociation. During the development of this concept besides a compact, reasonable method of building and the thermodynamic behaviour of the storage the aspect of high security against release of radioactive materials was emphasized. (orig.) [de

  15. High-power microcavity lasers based on highly erbium-doped sol-gel aluminosilicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Chung; Chu Thi Thu Ha; Nguyen Thu Trang; Pham Thu Nga; Pham Van Hoi; Bui Van Thien

    2006-01-01

    High-power whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) lasing from highly erbium-doped sol-gel aluminosilicate microsphere cavity coupled to a half-tapered optical fiber is presented. The lasing output power as high as 0.45 mW (-3.5 dBm) was obtained from sol-gel glass microsphere cavity with diameters in the range of 40-150 μm. The sol-gel method for making highly concentration Er-doped aluminosilicate glasses with Er-ion concentrations from 0.125 to 0.65 mol% of Er 3+ is described. Controlling collected lasing wavelength at each WGM is possible by adjusting the distance between the half-taper fiber and the microcavity and by diameter of the waist of half-taper fiber. Using the analytic formulas we calculated the TE and TM lasing modes and it is shown that the experimental results are in good agreement with the calculation prediction

  16. Analysis of Nd3+:glass, solar-pumped, high-powr laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, L. E.; Williams, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The operating characteristics of Nd(3+):glass lasers energized by a solar concentrator were analyzed for the hosts YAG, silicate glass, and phosphate glass. The modeling is based on the slab zigzag laser geometry and assumes that chemical hardening methods for glass are successful in increasing glass hardness by a factor of 4. On this basis, it was found that a realistic 1-MW solar-pumped laser might be constructed from phosphate glass 4 sq m in area and 2 mm thick. If YAG were the host medium, a 1-MW solar-pumped laser need only be 0.5 sq m in area and 0.5 cm thick, which is already possible. In addition, Nd(3+) doped glass fibers were found to be excellent solar-pumped laser candidates. The small diameter of fibers eliminates thermal stress problems, and if their diameter is kept small (10 microns), they propagate a Gaussian single mode which can be expanded and transmitted long distances in space. Fiber lasers could then be used for communications in space or could be bundled and the individual beams summed or phase-matched for high-power operation.

  17. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  18. High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-03-01

    Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively

  19. Effect of Technetium-99 sources on its retention in low activity waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Lukens, Wayne; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-05-01

    Small-scale crucible melting tests on simulated waste glass were performed with technetium-99 (Tc-99) introduced as different species in a representative low activity waste simulant. The glass saw an increase in Tc-99 retention when TcO2•2H2O and various Tc-minerals containing reduced tetravalent Tc were used compared to tests in which pertechnetate with heptavalent Tc was used. We postulate that the increase of Tc retention is likely caused by different reaction paths for Tc incorporation into glass during early stages of melting, rather than the low volatility of reduced tetravalent Tc compounds, which has been a generally accepted idea. Additional studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms relevant to the effect of reduced Tc compounds on Tc incorporation into or volatilization from the glass melt.

  20. Effect of Technetium-99 Sources on Its Retention in Low Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-05-01

    Small-scale crucible melting tests on simulated waste glass were performed with technetium-99 (Tc-99) introduced as different species in a representative low activity waste simulant. The glass saw an increase in Tc-99 retention when TcO2∙2H2O and various Tc-minerals containing reduced tetravalent Tc were used compared to tests in which pertechnetate with hexavalent Tc was used. We postulate that the increase of Tc retention is likely caused by different reaction paths for Tc incorporation into glass during early stages of melting, rather than the low volatility of reduced tetravalent Tc compounds, which has been a generally accepted idea. Additional studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms relevant to the effect of reduced Tc compounds on Tc incorporation into or volatilization from glass melt.

  1. Effect of the glass transition temperature on alpha-amylase activity in a starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Vinita; Panyoyai, Naksit; Small, Darryl M; Shanks, Robert A; Kasapis, Stefan

    2017-02-10

    This study optimises a protocol for the estimation of α-amylase activity in a condensed starch matrix in the vicinity of the glass transition region. Enzymatic activity on the vitrified starch system was compared with that of a reference substrate, maltodextrin. The activity was assayed as the rate of release of reducing sugar using a dinitrosalicylic acid procedure. The condensed carbohydrate matrices served the dual purpose of acting as a substrate as well as producing a pronounced effect on the ability to enzymatic hydrolysis. Activation energies were estimated throughout the glass transition region of condensed carbohydrate preparations based on the concept of the spectroscopic shift factor. Results were used to demonstrate a considerable moderation by the mechanical glass transition temperature, beyond the expected linear effect of the temperature dependence, on the reaction rate of starch hydrolysis by α-amylase in comparison with the low-molecular weight chain of maltodextrin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad, E-mail: terpil@umcs.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Rymuszka, Diana [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun’ko, Vladimir M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • New modified silica materials synthesis. • Support surface plasma activation. • Apparent surface free energy determination. • Equilibrium contact angle calculation. - Abstract: Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γ{sub S}) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γ{sub S} decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m{sup 2} (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2} for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  3. High temperature oxidation and crystallization behavior of phosphate glass compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Grumbaum, N.; Gonzalez Oliver, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the thermal transformation of three iron phosphate glasses having the following nominal compositions: M4 [70% P 2 O 5 , 30% Fe 2 O 3 ], M5 [85% M4, 15% UO 2 ] y M7 [69.7% P 2 O 5 , 28.6% Fe 2 O 3 , 1,7% Al 2 O 3 ]. Thermogravimetric analysis, DTA (differential thermal analysis) and SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering) were performed.It was observed that it is easily possible to produce glasses in these systems having very low crystallinity.We could determine the final stable crystalline phases [Fe 4 (P 2 O 7 ) 3 , Fe(PO 3 ) 3 and Fe 3 (P 2 O 7 ) 2 ].The presence of uranium ions affects not only the redox effects but also the crystallization of the system.SAXS data obtained during the heating in vacuum up to ∼600degC, gave some variation of scattering intensities vs. scattering vector suggesting the development of an extra phase or some kind inhomogeneities that seems to disappear on heating

  4. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  5. Superconducting phase of YBa2Cu3O7-δ films in high magnetic fields: Vortex glass or Bose glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woeltgens, P.J.M.; Dekker, C.; Swueste, J.; de Wijn, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) curves are measured in laser-ablated YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ films deposited onto SrTiO 3 . The measurements are performed near the glass phase transition in a magnetic field of 5 T at various angles from the c axis. From a critical scaling analysis, the angular dependencies of the glass transition temperature and the critical glass exponents are extracted. At small angles, these results distinguish between a vortex glass, caused by random pointlike disorder, and a Bose glass, caused by linelike disorder. The results can be understood in terms of the vortex-glass model only. No evidence is found for the existence of a Bose-glass phase

  6. Alpha spectrum profiling of plutonium in leached simulated high-level radioactive waste-glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, H.; Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Low-geometry X-ray spectra from /sup 239/Pu and /sup 237/Np, incorporated into simulated high-level radioactive waste-glass, were transformed into depth distributions for these elements. Changes in the depth profiles were observed for a series of static leachings in 75/degree/C water. Radiochemical assay of the leach solutions revealed that little neptunium or plutonium was leached, and that the amount leached was independent of leaching time. The depth profiles of the leached specimens showed that there was selective leaching of nonradioactive components of the glass, concentrating the remaining neptunium and plutonium in a broad zone near (but not at) the glass surface. Eventual redeposition of nonradioactive material onto the glass surface inhibited further leaching

  7. Evaluation the microwave heating of spinel crystals in high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-18

    In this report, the microwave heating of a crystal-free and a partially (24 wt%) trevorite-crystallized waste glass simulant were evaluated. The results show that a 500 mg piece of partially crystallized waste glass can be heated from room-temperature to above 1600 °C (as measured by infrared radiometry) within 2 minutes using a single mode, highly focused, 2.45 GHz microwave, operating at 300 W. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the partially crystallized glass experiences an 87 % reduction in trevorite following irradiation and thermal quenching. When a crystal-free analogue of the same waste glass simulant composition is exposed to the same microwave radiation it could not be heated above 450 °C regardless of the heating time.

  8. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with supporting glass formulation development and process control strategies in key technical areas, relevant to the Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and related to high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Of specific interest is the development of predictive models for crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) in HLW glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations. This report summarizes recent progress by researchers at SRNL towards developing a predicative tool for quantifying nepheline crystallization in HLW glass canisters using laboratory experiments. In this work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to obtain the temperature regions over which nucleation and growth of nepheline occur in three simulated HLW glasses - two glasses representative of WTP projections and one glass representative of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) product. The DWPF glass, which has been studied previously, was chosen as a reference composition and for comparison purposes. Complementary quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy confirmed the validity of the methodology to determine nucleation and growth behavior as a function of temperature. The nepheline crystallization growth region was determined to generally extend from ~ 500 to >850 °C, with the maximum growth rates occurring between 600 and 700 °C. For select WTP glass compositions (high Al2O3 and B2O3), the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 600 °C, with the maximum nucleation rates occurring at ~ 530 °C. For the DWPF glass composition, the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 750 °C with the maximum nucleation rate occurring at ~ 640 °C. The nepheline growth at the peak temperature, as determined by XRD, was between 35 - 75 wt.% /hour. A maximum nepheline growth rate of ~ 0.1 mm/hour at 700 °C was measured for the DWPF

  9. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, K.; Amoroso, J.; Mcclane, D.

    2017-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with supporting glass formulation development and process control strategies in key technical areas, relevant to the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and related to high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Of specific interest is the development of predictive models for crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) in HLW glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations. This report summarizes recent progress by researchers at SRNL towards developing a predicative tool for quantifying nepheline crystallization in HLW glass canisters using laboratory experiments. In this work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to obtain the temperature regions over which nucleation and growth of nepheline occur in three simulated HLW glasses - two glasses representative of WTP projections and one glass representative of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) product. The DWPF glass, which has been studied previously, was chosen as a reference composition and for comparison purposes. Complementary quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy confirmed the validity of the methodology to determine nucleation and growth behavior as a function of temperature. The nepheline crystallization growth region was determined to generally extend from ~ 500 to >850 °C, with the maximum growth rates occurring between 600 and 700 °C. For select WTP glass compositions (high Al2O3 and B2O3), the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 600 °C, with the maximum nucleation rates occurring at ~ 530 °C. For the DWPF glass composition, the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 750 °C with the maximum nucleation rate occurring at ~ 640 °C. The nepheline growth at the peak temperature, as determined by XRD, was between 35 - 75 wt.% /hour. A maximum nepheline growth rate of ~ 0.1 mm/hour at 700 °C was measured for the DWPF

  10. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  11. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high $\\eta$ CMS muon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00185093; Lagarde, François; Laktineh, Imad; Buridon, Victor; Chen, Xiushan; Combaret, Christophe; Eynard, Alexis; Germani, Lionel; Grenier, Gerald; Mathez, Hervé; Mirabito, Laurent; Petrukhin, Alexei; Steen, Arnaud; Tromeur, William; Wang, Yi; Gong, A.; Moreau, Nathalie; de la Taille, Christophe; Dulucq, Fréderic

    2017-02-11

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to $6 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The region of the forward muon spectrometer ($|\\eta| > 1.6$) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles rate up to 2 kHz/cm$^2$ ( including a safety factor 3 ) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The actual RPC technology of CMS cannot sustain the expected background level. A new generation Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low resistivity glass (LR) is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high eta muon stations of CMS. The design of small size prototypes and the studies of their performances under high rate particles flux is presented.

  12. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high ${\\eta}$ CMS muon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A.A.O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.F.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharmag, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M.I.; Awan, I.M.; Hoorani, R.; Muhammad, S.; Shahzad, H.; Shah, M.A.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lim, J.H.; Park, S.K.; Kim, M.S.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Pedraza, I.; Uribe Estradam, C.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L.M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S.J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J.C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-09-09

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to $6.10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ . The region of the forward muon spectrometer ($|{\\eta}| > 1.6$) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles rate up to $2 kHz/cm^{2}$ (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The actual RPC technology of CMS cannot sustain the expected background level. The new technology that will be chosen should have a high rate capability and provides a good spatial and timing resolution. A new generation of Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low-resistivity (LR) glass is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high ${\\eta}$ muon stations of CMS. First the design of small size prototypes and studies of their perfor...

  13. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of high-level waste vitrification at Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant may be limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layers, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an underprediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsened over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. The accumulation rate of ∼53.8 ± 3.7 μm/h determined for this glass will result in a ∼26 mm-thick layer after 20 days of melter idling.

  14. Establishing Relationship between Process Parameters and Temperature during High Speed End Milling of Soda Lime Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasima Bagum, Mst.; Konneh, Mohamed; Yeakub Ali, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    In glass machining crack free surface is required in biomedical and optical industry. Ductile mode machining allows materials removal from brittle materials in a ductile manner rather than by brittle fracture. Although end milling is a versatile process, it has not been applied frequently for machining soda lime glass. Soda lime glass is a strain rate and temperature sensitive material; especially around glass transition temperature Tg, ductility increased and strength decreased. Hence, it is envisaged that the generated temperature by high-speed end milling (HSEM) could be brought close to the glass transition temperature, which promote ductile machining. In this research, the objective is to investigate the effect of high speed machining parameters on generated temperature. The cutting parameters were optimized to generate temperature around glass transition temperature of soda lime using response surface methodology (RSM). Result showed that the most influencing process parameter is feed rate followed by spindle speed and depth of cut to generate temperature. Confirmation test showed that combination of spindle speed 30,173 rpm, feed rate 13.2 mm/min and depth of cut 37.68 µm generate 635°C, hence ductile chip removal with machined surface Ra 0.358 µm was possible to achieve.

  15. Porous glass matrix method for encapsulating high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, P.B.; Tran, D.C.; Simmons, J.H.; Saleh, M.; Barkatt, A.; Simmons, C.J.; Lagakos, N.; DeWitt, E.

    1979-01-01

    A novel process which uses solidified porous high-silica glass powder to fixate radioactive high-level wastes is described. The process yields cylinders consisting of a core of high-silica glass containing the waste elements in its structure and a protective layer also of high-silica glass completely free of waste elements. The process can be applied to waste streams containing 0 to 100% solids. The core region exhibits a higher coefficient of thermal expansion and a lower glass transition temperature than the outer protective layer. This leads to mechanical strengthening of the glass and good resistance to stress corrosion by the development of a high residual compressive stress on the surface of the sample. Both the core and the protective layer exhibit extremely high chemical durability and offer an effective fixation of the radioactive waste elements, including 239 Pu and 99 Tc which have long half-lives, for calculated periods of more than 1 million years, when temperatures are not allowed to rise above 100 0 C

  16. Recent Evidence on Bioactive Glass Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Drago

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone defects caused by trauma or pathological events are major clinical and socioeconomic burdens. Thus, the efforts of regenerative medicine have been focused on the development of non-biodegradable materials resembling bone features. Consequently, the use of bioactive glass as a promising alternative to inert graft materials has been proposed. Bioactive glass is a synthetic silica-based material with excellent mechanical properties able to bond to the host bone tissue. Indeed, when immersed in physiological fluids, bioactive glass reacts, developing an apatite layer on the granule’s surface, playing a key role in the osteogenesis process. Moreover, the contact of bioactive glass with biological fluids results in the increase of osmotic pressure and pH due to the leaching of ions from granules’ surface, thus making the surrounding environment hostile to microbial growth. The bioactive glass antimicrobial activity is effective against a wide selection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, either in planktonic or sessile forms. Furthermore, bioglass is able to reduce pathogens’ biofilm production. For the aforementioned reasons, the use of bioactive glass might be a promising solution for the reconstruction of bone defects, as well as for the treatment and eradication of bone infections, characterized by bone necrosis and destruction of the bone structure.

  17. THE CURIOUS CASE OF GLASS I: HIGH IONIZATION AND VARIABILITY OF DIFFERENT TYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Andrew J. [Department of Physical Science, Wilbur Wright College, 4300 N. Narragansett Ave., Chicago, IL 60634 (United States); Richter, Matthew J. [Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Carr, John S. [Remote Sensing Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7210, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Moerchen, Margaret M. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Santiago (Chile); Doppmann, Greg W. [W. M. Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Seifahrt, Andreas [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine-structure emission with high ionization ([Ne III]/[Ne II] = 2.1 and [S IV]/[S III] = 0.6) that indicates that the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest that extreme-ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars, this is the first detection of [S IV] and such a high [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and we consider other possible classifications for the system. We find that Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared wavelengths. The optical light curve indicates that a central stellar component in Glass Ib became entirely visible for 2.5 years beginning in mid-2002 and possibly displayed periodic variability with repeated, short-period dimming during that time. As the fine-structure emission was not detected in observations before or after our Spitzer IRS observation, we explore whether the variable nature of Glass Ib is related to the gas being highly ionized, possibly due to variable accretion or an X-ray flare.

  18. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  19. Thin film metal sensors in fusion bonded glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Ek, Johan; Hedman, Ludvig; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehlstedt, Viktor; Stocklassa, Jesper; Snögren, Pär; Pettersson, Victor; Larsson, Jonas; Vizuete, Olivier; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure microfluidics offers fast analyses of thermodynamic parameters for compressed process solvents. However, microfluidic platforms handling highly compressible supercritical CO 2 are difficult to control, and on-chip sensing would offer added control of the devices. Therefore, there is a need to integrate sensors into highly pressure tolerant glass chips. In this paper, thin film Pt sensors were embedded in shallow etched trenches in a glass wafer that was bonded with another glass wafer having microfluidic channels. The devices having sensors integrated into the flow channels sustained pressures up to 220 bar, typical for the operation of supercritical CO 2 . No leakage from the devices could be found. Integrated temperature sensors were capable of measuring local decompression cooling effects and integrated calorimetric sensors measured flow velocities over the range 0.5–13.8 mm s −1 . By this, a better control of high-pressure microfluidic platforms has been achieved. (paper)

  20. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter

  1. Radiation effects in glass waste forms for high-level waste and plutonium disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    A key challenge in the permanent disposal of high-level waste (HLW), plutonium residues/scraps, and excess weapons plutonium in glass waste forms is the development of predictive models of long-term performance that are based on a sound scientific understanding of relevant phenomena. Radiation effects from β-decay and α-decay can impact the performance of glasses for HLW and Pu disposition through the interactions of the α-particles, β-particles, recoil nuclei, and γ-rays with the atoms in the glass. Recently, a scientific panel convened under the auspices of the DOE Council on Materials Science to assess the current state of understanding, identify important scientific issues, and recommend directions for research in the area of radiation effects in glasses for HLW and Pu disposition. The overall finding of the panel was that there is a critical lack of systematic understanding on radiation effects in glasses at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The current state of understanding on radiation effects in glass waste forms and critical scientific issues are presented

  2. Immobilization of simulated high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass: Pilot scale demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.A.; Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS), operated by the Savannah River Laboratory, is a pilot scale facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility. The IDMS has successfully demonstrated, on an engineering scale (one-fifth), that simulated high level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge can be chemically treated with formic acid to adjust both its chemical and physical properties, and then blended with simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) product and borosilicate glass frit to produce a melter feed which can be processed into a durable glass product. The simulated sludge, PHA and frit were blended, based on a product composition program, to optimize the loading of the waste glass as well as to minimize those components which can cause melter processing and/or glass durability problems. During all the IDMS demonstrations completed thus far, the melter feed and the resulting glass that has been produced met all the required specifications, which is very encouraging to future DWPF operations. The IDMS operations also demonstrated that the volatile components of the melter feed (e.g., mercury, nitrogen and carbon, and, to a lesser extent, chlorine, fluorine and sulfur) did not adversely affect the melter performance or the glass product

  3. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  4. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  5. Development of high-average-power-laser medium based on silica glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a high-average-power laser material based on silica glass. A new method using Zeolite X is effective for homogeneously dispersing rare earth ions in silica glass to get a high quantum yield. High quality medium, which is bubbleless and quite low refractive index distortion, must be required for realization of laser action, and therefore, we have carefully to treat the gelation and sintering processes, such as, selection of colloidal silica, pH value of for hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate, and sintering history. The quality of the sintered sample and the applications are discussed. (author)

  6. Permanent disposal by burial of highly radioactive wastes incorporated into glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, W.F.

    1967-01-01

    A method has been developed at Chalk River for incorporating high-level fission product wastes from nuclear fuel processing into glass blocks for ultimate disposal. Nitric acid solutions of fission products were mixed with nepheline-syenite and lime in crucibles and fired in a kiln to a temperature of 1350 o C to form a glass with high resistance to leaching. Two test disposals of glass blocks were made into the ground below the water table. The first, in August 1958, contained about 300 Ci in 25 blocks of a highly resistant glass. The second, in May 1960, contained about 1100 Ci in 25 blocks of a less resistant formulation. Monitoring of the two tests has continued for eight and six years respectively. A soil sampling programme has indicated that the leaching rate tended to decrease with time and is now less than 10 -10 g/cm 2 per day, or two orders of magnitude lower than that predicted from laboratory leaching tests. These results indicate that the method is suitable for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear wastes and that the blocks could be buried unprotected in a controlled area, even in saturated sand of low exchange capacity. Burial above the saturated zone in an and region would result in even less release of radioactivity from the glass. (author)

  7. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams-13000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  8. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurobori, Toshio, E-mail: kurobori@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yanagida, Yuka [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kodaira, Satoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shirao, Taichi [Nikon Instech Co., Ltd., Tanakanishi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8221 (Japan)

    2017-05-21

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  9. Fluorescent nuclear track images of Ag-activated phosphate glass irradiated with photons and heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Kodaira, Satoshi; Shirao, Taichi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report about the demonstration of the nuclear track imaging capabilities of Ag-activated phosphate glass. A 375 nm laser and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were respectively used for track excitation and detection. Specifically, the blue and orange radiophotoluminescent (RPL) tracks and dose distributions observed after irradiation with soft X-rays, gamma rays and heavy charged particles (HCPs) are examined. In addition, the origins of the reductions in RPL efficiency for high-dose X-ray irradiation and for irradiation with HCPs with high linear energy transfer (LET) values are investigated via a CLSM and a conventional fluorescent reader and discussed. - Highlights: • 3D track images are demonstrated using a confocal laser microscopy. • Fluorescent track detectors are based on RPL Ag-doped phosphate glass. • The dose distributions are examined for X-ray, gamma ray and HCP irradiations. • The origins of the reduction in RPL efficiency are investigated and discussed.

  10. High-Precision Dispensing of Nanoliter Biofluids on Glass Pedestal Arrays for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yang; Xu, QianFeng; Zhu, Jing; Poget, Sébastien F; Lyons, Alan M

    2016-05-04

    Precise dispensing of nanoliter droplets is necessary for the development of sensitive and accurate assays, especially when the availability of the source solution is limited. Conventional approaches are limited by imprecise positioning, large shear forces, surface tension effects, and high costs. To address the need for precise and economical dispensing of nanoliter volumes, we developed a new approach where the dispensed volume is dependent on the size and shape of defined surface features, thus freeing the dispensing process from pumps and fine-gauge needles requiring accurate positioning. The surface we fabricated, called a nanoliter droplet virtual well microplate (nVWP), achieves high-precision dispensing (better than ±0.5 nL or ±1.6% at 32 nL) of 20-40 nL droplets using a small source drop (3-10 μL) on isolated hydrophilic glass pedestals (500 μm on a side) bonded to arrays of polydimethylsiloxane conical posts. The sharp 90° edge of the glass pedestal pins the solid-liquid-vapor triple contact line (TCL), averting the wetting of the glass sidewalls while the fluid is prevented from receding from the edge. This edge creates a sufficiently large energy barrier such that microliter water droplets can be poised on the glass pedestals, exhibiting contact angles greater >150°. This approach relieves the stringent mechanical alignment tolerances required for conventional dispensing techniques, shifting the control of dispensed volume to the area circumscribed by the glass edge. The effects of glass surface chemistry and dispense velocity on droplet volume were studied using optical microscopy and high-speed video. Functionalization of the glass pedestal surface enabled the selective adsorption of specific peptides and proteins from synthetic and natural biomolecule mixtures, such as venom. We further demonstrate how the nVWP dispensing platform can be used for a variety of assays, including sensitive detection of proteins and peptides by fluorescence

  11. Femtosecond laser direct writing of gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnubhatla, K C; Kumar, R Sai Santosh; Rao, D Narayana; Rao, S Venugopal; Osellame, R; Ramponi, R; Bhaktha, S N B; Mattarelli, M; Montagna, M; Turrell, S; Chiappini, A; Chiasera, A; Ferrari, M; Righini, G C

    2009-01-01

    The femtosecond laser direct writing technique was employed to inscribe gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass. Using the butt coupling technique, a systematic study of waveguide loss with respect to input pulse energy and writing speed was performed to achieve the best waveguide with low propagation loss (PL). By pumping at 980 nm, we observed signal enhancement in these active waveguides in the telecom spectral region. The refractive index change was smooth and we estimated it to be ∼10 -3 . The high quantum efficiency (∼80%) and a best PL of ∼0.9 dB cm -1 combined with signal enhancement makes Baccarat glass a potential candidate for application in photonics.

  12. Low field scaling properties of high Tc superconductor glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannella, C.; Fruchter, L.; Chappert, C.

    We show that the zero field cooling (ZFC) M/H curves of both the YBaCuO and the LaSrCuO granular superconductor glasses (SuG) are subjected to scaling when plotted against the reduced variable t/H1/ψ . The breaking of the scaling for too weak or too strong magnetic fields is discussed and justified by the introduction of a phenomenological fractal picture, describing the behaviour of the disordered intergranular junction network. Nous montrons que les courbes M/H caractéristiques des verres de supraconducteurs granulaires sont sujettes à une loi d'échelle lorsqu'elles sont tracées en fonction de la variable réduite t/H1/ψ. La brisure de la loi d'échelle pour des champs trop forts ou trop faibles est justifiée par l'introduction d'un modèle phénoménologique fractal capable de décrire le comportement d'un réseau désordonné des jonctions.

  13. Why high-capacity manipulators and lead glass windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Monitor remote-handling system was developed to maintain the main experimental beam line at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The technology and operating experience developed at LAMPF can be applied to other areas where handling of radioactive, hazardous, or toxic materials is required. These could include radiological incidents similar to Three Mile Island and toxic material spills, such as chlorine tank car derailments, where no provision for remote-handling exists. The technology can also be applied to routine radioactive remote-handling operations now conducted in conventional hot cells. These operations are normally done using mechanical master-slave manipulators with viewing through lead glass windows. The conventional facility can be replaced by a plain shielded box with an equivalent of the front end of Monitor inside. Master-slave manipulators of the future should be of 10-kg capacity with a force-reflection threshold of 0.2, minimum size, and provision for total sealing

  14. Thermo-physical and structural studies of sodium zinc borovanadate glasses in the region of high concentration of modifier oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chethana, B.K. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Reddy, C. Narayana [Maharani' s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560 001 (India); Rao, K.J., E-mail: kalyajrao@yahoo.co.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► Highly modified sodium zinc borovanadate glasses. ► Structural model for borovanadate glasses. ► Network forming tendency of ZnO in borovanadate glasses. ► Fragility can be limited to NBO concentration in borovanadate glasses. -- Abstract: This paper reports investigation of Na{sub 2}O and ZnO modified borovanadate glasses in the highly modified regime of compositions. These glasses have been prepared by microwave route. Ultraviolet (UV) and visible, infrared (IR), Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies have been used to characterize the speciation in the glasses. Together with the variation of properties such as molar volume and glass transition temperatures, spectroscopic data indicate that at high levels of modification, ZnO tends to behave like network former. It is proposed that the observed variation of all the properties can be reasonably well understood with a structural model. The model considers that the modification and speciation in glasses are strongly determined by the hierarchy of group electronegativities. Further, it is proposed that the width of the transitions of glasses obtained under same condition reflects the fragility of the glasses. An empirical expression has been suggested to quantify fragility on the basis of width of the transition regions.

  15. Construction of lead glass tubing matrices for applications in medical physics and high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, G.; Conti, M.; Del Guerra, A.; Cinti, M.; Di Fino, M.; Habel, R.

    1985-01-01

    Honeycomb matrices which act both as gamma ray converter/radiator and electron drift structures have been manufactured from lead glass tubing of high density (5-6 g/cm 3 ). Baking the tubing in a reducing atmosphere produces a resistive metallic layer which can be used as a continuous voltage divider for drift field shaping. The application of a multiwire proportional chamber/converter detector to positron emission tomography is described; arrays of lead glass capillaries ( < 1.0 mm inner diameter) are used as converter for the 511 keV annihilation photons. Another application is under study in high energy physics, a high density projection chamber in electromagnetic calorimetry. The various phases of the construction of these lead glass matrices for both applications are described in detail

  16. A slow atomic diffusion process in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changjiu; Wong, Kaikin; Krishnan, Rithin P.; Embs, Jan P.; Chathoth, Suresh M.

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been used to study atomic relaxation processes in high-entropy glass-forming metallic melts with different glass-forming ability (GFA). The momentum transfer dependence of mean relaxation time shows a highly collective atomic transport process in the alloy melts with the highest and lowest GFA. However, a jump diffusion process is the long-range atomic transport process in the intermediate GFA alloy melt. Nevertheless, atomic mobility close to the melting temperature of these alloy melts is quite similar, and the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient exhibits a non-Arrhenius behavior. The atomic mobility in these high-entropy melts is much slower than that of the best glass-forming melts at their respective melting temperatures.

  17. Characterization of leached surface layers on simulated high-level waste glasses by sputter-induced optical emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houser, C.; Tsong, I.S.T.; White, W.B.

    1979-01-01

    The leaching process in simulated waste encapsulant glasses was studied by measuring the compositional depth-profiles of H (from water), the glass framework formers Si and B, the alkalis Na and Cs, the alkaline earths Ca and Sr, the transition metals Mo and Fe, the rare-earths La, Ce, and Nd, using the technique of sputter-induced optical emission. The leaching process of these glasses is highly complex. In addition to alkali/hydrogen exchange, there is breakdown of the glass framework, build-up of barrier layers on the surface, and formation of layered reaction zones of distinctly different chemistry all within the outer micrometer of the glass

  18. Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 1, Discussion and glass durability data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. Data collected throughout the world are included in the data base; current emphasis is on waste glasses and their properties. The goal is to provide a data base of properties and compositions and an analysis of dominant property trends as a function of composition. This data base is a resource that nuclear waste producers, disposers, and regulators can use to compare properties of a particular high-level nuclear waste glass product with the properties of other glasses of similar compositions. Researchers may use the data base to guide experimental tests to fill gaps in the available knowledge or to refine empirical models. The data are incorporated into a computerized data base that will allow the data to be extracted based on, for example, glass composition or test duration. 3 figs

  19. The TVT Glass Pavilion: Theoretical Study on a Highly Transparent Building Made with Long-Spanned TVT Portals Braced with Hybrid Glass-Steel Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Froli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary buildings, the architectural demand for a complete dematerialisation of load bearing structures can be satisfied only in limited cases with the exclusive structural use of glass. Otherwise, for challenging applications such as long spanned or high-rise structures, the use of hybrid glass-steel systems is mandatory. Glass, fragile but highly compressive resistant, is associated with steel, ductile and tensile resistant. The present research shows the feasibility study for a fully glazed pavilion made of six TVT (Travi Vitree Tensegrity portal frames longitudinally braced by pre-stressed hybrid glass panels. The frames are about 20 m in span and 8 m in height. Appropriate multiscalar FEM numerical analyses, calibrated on the collapse tests performed on previous TVT large-scale prototypes, stated that the structural performance would be able to withstand heavy static and dynamic loads and stated the observance of the Fail-Safe Design principles.

  20. High-temperature mechanical relaxation in glass-like B2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomovskoj, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The study of high-temperature mechanical relaxation in glass-like B 2 O 3 was carried out at the temperatures from 470 to 620 K using the method of internal friction at freely damped tortional vibrations (frequency range is 0.05 - 10 Hz) and forced torsional vibrations (frequency range is 0.1 -0.00001 Hz). Possible mechanisms of high-temperature mechanical relaxation are considered. It is shown that several possible mechanisms of high-temperature mechanical relaxation in glass-like B 2 O 3 can be singled out. Switching of B-O bridge bond between two boroxol cycles of boroxol grouping for oxygen vacancy in spatial structure of glass-like B 2 O 3 , formed as a result of thermal breaking of one out of three B-O bonds, according to diffusion theory of glass viscosity. The slip of one layer boroxol groupings as to another one in the presence of only tricoordinated boron atoms in the structure of glass-like B 2 O 3

  1. Highly sensitive pseudo-differential ac-nanocalorimeter for the study of the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laarraj, Mohcine; Adhiri, Rahma; Moussetad, Mohamed; Ouaskit, Said; Guttin, Christophe; Richard, Jacques; Garden, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We present a nanocalorimeter designed for the measurement of the dynamic heat capacity of thin films. The microfabricated sensor, the thermal conditioning of the sensor, as well as the highly stable and low noise electronic chain allow measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the complex specific heat with a resolution Δ C/C of about 10 −5 . The performances of this quasi-differential nanocalorimeter were tested on a model of polymeric glass-former, the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). The high stability and low noise of the device are essential for accurate studies on non-equilibrium slow relaxing systems such as glasses

  2. Highly sensitive pseudo-differential ac-nanocalorimeter for the study of the glass transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laarraj, Mohcine [Institut NÉEL, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire d’Ingénierie et des Matériaux (LIMAT), Université Hassan II de Casablanca, Faculté des Sciences Ben M’Sik, Casablanca Maroc (Morocco); Adhiri, Rahma; Moussetad, Mohamed [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie et des Matériaux (LIMAT), Université Hassan II de Casablanca, Faculté des Sciences Ben M’Sik, Casablanca Maroc (Morocco); Ouaskit, Said [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée (LPMC), Université Hassan II de Casablanca, Faculté des Sciences Ben M’Sik, Casablanca Maroc (Morocco); Guttin, Christophe; Richard, Jacques; Garden, Jean-Luc [Institut NÉEL, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-11-15

    We present a nanocalorimeter designed for the measurement of the dynamic heat capacity of thin films. The microfabricated sensor, the thermal conditioning of the sensor, as well as the highly stable and low noise electronic chain allow measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the complex specific heat with a resolution Δ C/C of about 10{sup −5}. The performances of this quasi-differential nanocalorimeter were tested on a model of polymeric glass-former, the polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). The high stability and low noise of the device are essential for accurate studies on non-equilibrium slow relaxing systems such as glasses.

  3. Evaluation of glasses containing cadmium for high dose dosimetry by the thermoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Gabriel Soares Marchiori de; Ferreira, Pamela Zati; Cunha, Diego Merigue da; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Carrera, Betzabel Noemi Silva; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2016-01-01

    New glass matrices were evaluated for high dose dosimetry by the thermoluminescence technique. Their nominal composition are 20Li_2CO_3.10Al_2O_3.15CdO.55B_2O_3 and 20Li_2CO_3.10Al_2O_3.20CdO.50B_2O_3 (mol%). The glass matrices were irradiated with different doses: 50, 100, 200, 500, 700 and 900 Gy, and the thermoluminescence emission curves were obtained for each of these values. The results show a great potential of using these matrices in high dose dosimetry. (author)

  4. Use of a high density lead glass tubing projection chamber in positron emission tomography and in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, M.; Guerra, A.D.; Habel, R.; Mulera, T.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Schwartz, G.

    1985-10-01

    We describe the principle of operation of a high density Projection Chamber, in which the converter/radiator and drift field shaping structures are combined in the form of high density (5 to 6 g/cm 3 ) lead glass tubing. The main applications of this type of detector to Medical Physics (Positron Emission Tomography) and High Energy Physics (Electromagnetic Calorimetry) are discussed

  5. Fiscal 1999 technical achievement report. Development project on international standards for supporting new industry (Standardization of method for evaluating physical properties of new glass at high temperatures); 1999 nendo shinki sangyo shiengata kokusai hyojun kaihatsu jigyo seika hokokusho. New glass koon bussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In the manufacture and processing of high quality glass to be used with electronic devices and displays, values representing its physical properties at high temperatures, such as viscosity, density, cubical expansion coefficient, and surface tension are necessary. Studies were conducted about techniques for evaluating physical values of such high temperature molten materials, and efforts were under way to develop the research results into international standards. Techniques for measuring physical values of high temperature molten soda ash based glass were improved for higher precision, and techniques for evaluating physical values of high temperature molten borosilicate glass were studied. Delegates were sent to International Commission on Glass (ICG) and technical committee TC18 for joining discussion, decision was made that researchers participate in robin tests on molten glass thermal conductivity, density, and cubical expansion coefficient, and pertinent activities were launched. (NEDO)

  6. Structure and spectral properties of the silver-containing high-silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girsova, M A; Golovina, G F; Anfimova, I N; Antropova, T V; Arsent'ev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Silver-containing high-silica glasses were synthesized by an impregnation of the silica porous glasses (PGs) first with AgNO 3 aqueous solution (with or without the presence of the sensitizers, such as Cu(NO 3 ) 2 or Ce(NO 3 ) 3 ), next in the mixed halide salt (NH 4 Cl, KBr, KI) solution. Then some part of the samples was sintered at the temperatures from 850 to 900°C up to closing of the pores. The structure of glasses was studied by UV-VIS-NIR and IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. According to XRD data the silver-containing high-silica glasses contain the AgBr, AgI, Ag 3 PO 4 , (CuBr) 0.75 (CuI) 0.25 phases. IR spectra confirmed B-O-B, Si- O-Si, P-O-P, O-P-O, O-B-O bonds, (PO 4 ) 3- and P-O - groups in glasses. (paper)

  7. Settling of Spinel in A High-Level Waste Glass Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors call melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 degree C (or even higher in advanced melters) to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling. This process is slow and expensive. Moreover, the melters that are currently in use or are going to be used in the U.S. are sensitive to clogging and thus cannot process melt in which solid particles are suspended. These particles settle and gradually accumulate on the melter bottom. Such particles, most often small crystals of spinel ( a mineral containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other minor oxides), inevitably occurred in the melt when the content of the waste in the glass (called waste loading) increases above a certain limit. To avoid the presence of solid particles in the melter, the waste loading is kept rather low, in average 15% lower than in glass formulated for more robust melters

  8. Novel High Temperature and Radiation Resistant Infrared Glasses and Optical Fibers for Sensing in Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballato, John [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2018-01-22

    One binary and three series of ternary non-oxide pure sulfide glasses compositions were investigated with the goal of synthesizing new glasses that exhibit high glass transition (Tg) and crystallization (Tc) temperatures, infrared transparency, and reliable glass formability. The binary glass series consisted of Ges2 and La2S3 and the three glass series in the x(nBaS + mLa2S3) + (1-2x)GeS2 ternary system have BaS:La2S3 modifier ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 with . With these glasses, new insights were realized as to how ionic glasses form and how glass modifiers affect both structure and glass formability. All synthesized compositions were characterized by Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to better understand the fundamental structure, optical, and thermal characteristics of the glasses. After a range of these glasses were synthesized, optimal compositions were formed into glass disks and subjected to gamma irradiation. Glass disks were characterized both before and after irradiation by microscope imaging, measuring the refractive index, density, and UV-VIS-IR transmission spectra. The final total dose the samples were subjected to was ~2.5 MGy. Ternary samples showed a less than 0.4% change in density and refractive index and minimal change in transmission window. The glasses also resisted cracking as seen in microscope images. Overall, many glass compositions were developed that possess operating temperatures above 500 °C, where conventional chalcogenide glasses such as As2S3 and have Tgs from ~200-300 °C, and these glasses have a greater than Tc – Tg values larger than 100 °C and this shows that these glasses have good thermal stability of Tg such that they can be fabricated into optical fibers and as such can be considered candidates for high temperature infrared fiber optics. Initial fiber fabrication efforts showed that selected glasses could be drawn but larger

  9. Interpretation of certain spectroscopic peculiarities of rare earth activators in liquifying glass based on adsorption study of their leaching products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkat, T.M.; Galant, E.I.; Dobychin, D.P.; Zinyakova, V.M.; Rejshakhrit, A.L.; Tolstoj, M.N.

    1977-01-01

    A sorption method was employed to investigate the porous products from the leaching of DV-1 glasses containing various activators and to study spectral properties of segregating glasses. The volume of pores formed in leaching and the distribution of their radii were studied in glasses subjected to various thermal treatments. The relationship was investigated of the kinetics of growth of the size of the inhomogeneity areas and the presence of activators. It is found that those segregating transformations in the glass, which influence the interaction of ions of different earth elements, are related to the formation of inhomogeneity areas of radii of more than 8 and less than 50 A

  10. ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES: SRNL GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-01-23

    The Department of Energy has authorized a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America to develop a systematic approach to increase high level waste melter throughput (by increasing waste loading with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). This task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. Four specific tasks have been proposed to meet these objectives (for details, see WSRC-STI-2007-00483): (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. Task 2, Crystal Accumulation Modeling/Higher Waste Loading Glasses is the focus of this report. The objective of this study is to provide supplemental data to support the possible use of alternative melter technologies and/or implementation of alternative process control models or strategies to target higher waste loadings (WLs) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--ultimately leading to higher waste throughputs and a reduced mission life. The glass selection strategy discussed in this report was developed to gain insight into specific technical issues that could limit or compromise the ability of glass formulation efforts to target higher WLs for future sludge batches at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These technical issues include Al-dissolution, higher TiO{sub 2} limits and homogeneity issues for coupled-operations, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility, and nepheline formation. To address these technical issues, a test matrix of 28 glass compositions has been developed based on 5 different sludge projections for future processing. The glasses will be fabricated and characterized based on

  11. Free volume model: High-temperature deformation of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition region. Compression tests at different temperatures and strain rates have been conducted. The mechanical behavior is analyzed in the framework of the free volume model, taking into account the dependence of the flow defect concentration on deformation. The activation volume is evaluated and allows one to gather the viscosity data (for the different strain rates and temperatures) on a unique master curve. It is also shown that, due to the relation between flow defect concentration and free volume, it is not possible to deduce the equilibrium flow defect concentration directly from mechanical measurements. However, if this parameter is arbitrarily chosen, mechanical measurements give access to the other parameters of the model, these parameters for the alloy under investigation being of the same order of magnitude as those for other metallic glasses

  12. FeSiBP bulk metallic glasses with high magnetization and excellent magnetic softness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Akihiro [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: amakino@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Kubota, Takeshi; Chang, Chuntao [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Makabe, Masahiro [Makabe R and D Co., Ltd., 3-1-25 Nagatake, Sendai 983-0036 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Fe-based amorphous alloy ribbons are one of the major soft magnetic materials, because of their superior magnetic properties such as the relatively high saturation magnetization (J{sub s}) of 1.5-1.6 T and good magnetic softness. However, the preparation of the ordinary amorphous magnetic alloys requires cooling rates higher than 10{sup 4} K/s due to the low glass-forming ability (GFA) and thus restricts the material outer shape. Recently, Fe-metalloid-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) containing glass-forming elements such as Al, Ga, Nb, Mo, Y and so forth have been developed. These alloys have high GFA, leading to the formation of BMG rod with diameters of mm-order. However, the glass-forming metal elements in BMGs result in a remarkable decrease in magnetization. Basically, J{sub s} depends on Fe content; hence, high J{sub s} requires high Fe content in the Fe-based amorphous alloys or BMGs. On the other hand, high GFA requires a large amount of glass-forming elements in the alloys, which results in lower Fe content. Therefore, in substances, the coexistence of high J{sub s} and high GFA is difficult. Since this matter should be immensely important from academia to industry in the material field, a great deal of effort has been devoted; however, it has remained unsolved for many years. In this paper, we present a novel Fe-rich FeSiBP BMG with high J{sub s} of 1.51 T comparable to the ordinary Fe-Si-B amorphous alloy now in practical use as well as with high GFA leading to a rod-shaped specimen of 2.5 mm in diameter, obtained by Cu-mold casting in air.

  13. Lead-iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1984-04-11

    Disclosed are lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste

  14. Effects of crystallization on thermal properties and chemical durability of the glasses containing simulated high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Terai, Ryohei; Hara, Shigeo

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the thermodynamic stability of the glasses containing high level radioactive wastes, the conversion to glass-ceramics by the heat-treatment was carried out with two kinds of glasses, and the change of thermal properties and chemical durability by crystallization was investigated. One of the glasses has a composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 system, and another one has a composition which could grow the nephelite crystals from Na 2 O in wastes and Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 added as glass-forming materials. Transition and yield points shifted to higher temperatures by the conversion and the glass-ceramics were found to be more stable than the original glasses. The glass-ceramics of the composition of SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -ZnO-TiO 2 showed poor durability, whereas the chemical durability of the glass-ceramics containing nephelite crystals was considerably improved. In the latter case, improvement of the durability is attributable to that some parts of glass are converted to nephelite crystals and the crystals are more durable than glass under most conditions. (auth.)

  15. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33480 Tarsus, Turkey. MS received 18 October 2005; revised 22 March 2006. Abstract. In this study, abrasive ... process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied ...

  16. Effects of carbonate and sulphate ions in synthetic groundwater on high-level waste glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, H.

    1990-01-01

    This laboratory experiment aims to examine the effects of rare earth carbonate and sulphate ions, that are naturally present in underground water, have on glass used to store high-level radioactive waste for disposal underground. Borosilicate glass (or HLW glass) is stored under observation on the land surface for several decades before being buried deep below ground in geological disposal sites. Two types of precipitation occur during leaching from the glass, immediate formation of a hydrated surface layer and slow precipitation from concentration in the leachates. This slow process of some elements precipitating onto the glass surface or into the leachates is examined in this experiment using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Carbonates from rare-earth elements are found in the synthetic groundwater used. It is shown that carbonate and sulphate ions will affect leaching and will occur in geological disposal sites. Other particles were also observed to precipitate using SEM-EDX. (author)

  17. Chemical durability of borosilicate glasses containing simulated high-level nuclear wastes, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Shigeo; Terai, Ryohei; Yamanaka, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    The Soxhlet-type leaching test apparatus has been developed to evaluate the chemical durability of some borosilicate glasses containing simulated High-Level nuclear Wastes, HLW. After the leaching over the temperature range of 50 0 -95 0 C, the weight loss of specimens with time was determined on both the samples of blocks and grains, and various components dissolved into water were analyzed by atomic absorption and colorimetry technique. It was found that Soxhlet-type test method was more useful than JIS test method, because the specimens in Soxhlet type apparatus were forced always to react with pure water and the mechanism of leaching could be evaluate accurately. The chemical durability of commercial glasses decreases generally with increasing of alkali contents in glasses. In the case of these borosilicate glasses containing HLW, however, the leachability was apparently independent on the alkali contents because of the complexity of these glass compositions. The variation of leaching rate with temperature suggests that dissolution mechanism changes with temperature. (author)

  18. Structure of high alumina content Al2O3-SiO2 composition glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Richard; Sen, Sabyasachi; Youngman, Randall E; Hart, Robert T; Benmore, Chris J

    2008-12-25

    The structure of binary aluminosilicate glasses containing 60-67 mol % Al2O3 were investigated using high-resolution 27Al NMR and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The glasses were made by aerodynamic levitation of molten oxides. The 67% alumina composition required a cooling rate of approximately 1600 degrees C s(1-) to form glass from submillimeter sized samples. NMR results show that the glasses contain aluminum in 4-, 5-, and 6-fold coordination in the approximate ratio 4:5:1. The average Al coordination increases from 4.57 to 4.73 as the fraction of octahedral Al increases with alumina content. The diffraction results on the 67% composition are consistent with a disordered Al framework with Al ions in a range of coordination environments that are substantially different from those found in the equilibrium crystalline phases. Analysis of the neutron and X-ray structure factors yields an average bond angle of 125 +/- 4 degrees between an Al ion and the adjoining cation via a bridging oxygen. We propose that the structure of the glass is a "transition state" between the alumina-rich liquid and the equilibrium mullite phase that are dominated by 4- and 6-coordinated aluminum ions, respectively.

  19. High-frequency dynamics of the glass former dibutylphthalate under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet, A.; Krisch, M.; Duval, E.; Polian, A.

    2002-01-01

    The high-frequency dynamics of a fragile molecular glass former (dibutylphthalate) was studied through inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), as a function of pressure and temperature. The mesoscopic structural arrest associated with the glass transition process was tracked by following upon cooling the inelastic excitations at fixed Q points in the dispersion curves, at ambient pressure and 2 kbar. The application of pressure to this system induces an offset between the macroscopic glass transition temperature T g and the mesoscopic glass transition temperature, as determined from IXS. The concomitant fragility decrease of dibutylphthalate under pressure unveils that the stronger the glass former is, the more its mesoscopic dynamics differ from the macroscopic regime. This trend is interpreted as the signature of a nanoscopic inhomogeneous elastic network. Further aspects of this system are obtained when studying the temperature dependence of its nonergodicity factor f Q (T). The chemical specificity of the molecule is suggested to be responsible for the nonobservation of a critical temperature T c in dibutylphthalate up to ∼300 K

  20. Novel injectable gellan gum hydrogel composites incorporating Zn- and Sr-enriched bioactive glass microparticles: High-resolution X-ray microcomputed tomography, antibacterial and in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Dziadek, Michal; Gorodzha, Svetlana; Lišková, Jana; Brackman, Gilles; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Vervaet, Chris; Balcaen, Lieve; Del Rosario Florez Garcia, Maria; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Weinhardt, Venera; Baumbach, Tilo; Vanhaecke, Frank; Coenye, Tom; Bačáková, Lucie; Surmeneva, Maria A; Surmenev, Roman A; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Skirtach, Andre G

    2018-06-01

    Mineralization of hydrogel biomaterials is desirable to improve their suitability as materials for bone regeneration. In this study, gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were formed by simple mixing of GG solution with bioactive glass microparticles of 45S5 composition, leading to hydrogel formation by ion release from the amorphous bioactive glass microparticles. This resulted in novel injectable, self-gelling composites of GG hydrogels containing 20% bioactive glass. Gelation occurred within 20 min. Composites containing the standard 45S5 bioactive glass preparation were markedly less stiff. X-ray microcomputed tomography proved to be a highly sensitive technique capable of detecting microparticles of diameter approximately 8 μm, that is, individual microparticles, and accurately visualizing the size distribution of bioactive glass microparticles and their aggregates, and their distribution in GG hydrogels. The widely used melt-derived 45S5 preparation served as a standard and was compared with a calcium-rich, sol-gel derived preparation (A2), as well as A2 enriched with zinc (A2Zn5) and strontium (A2Sr5). A2, A2Zn, and A2Sr bioactive glass particles were more homogeneously dispersed in GG hydrogels than 45S5. Composites containing all four bioactive glass preparations exhibited antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Composites containing A2Zn5 and A2Sr5 bioactive glasses supported the adhesion and growth of osteoblast-like cells and were considerably more cytocompatible than 45S5. All composites underwent mineralization with calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite upon incubation in simulated body fluid. The extent of mineralization appeared to be greatest for composites containing A2Zn5 and 45S5. The results underline the importance of the choice of bioactive glass when preparing injectable, self-gelling composites. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The feasibility of sampling the glass pour in a high level waste vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.V.; Shilton, P.; Morris, J.B.

    1986-06-01

    Vitrified high level waste can be sampled for quality assurance purposes in three general ways: (I) from the glass pour, (II) from the canister, and (III) from the melter. A discussion of the potential advantages and disadvantages of each route is presented. The second philosophy seems to show the best promise; it is recommended that the Contained Pot method and the Token method are best suited for further development. An international survey of policy at vitrification plants shows that with one possible exception no glass sampling is intended and that quality is normally to be assured by control of the vitrification process. (author)

  2. Analysis for silicon in solution in high level waste glass durability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.A.; Smart, R.St.C.; Dale, L.S.; Levins, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    In comparative studies of the durability of HLW glasses, the measurement of the dissolution of the silicate network, in terms of both rate and extent, is of prime importance. To achieve this, analytical techniques such as colorimetry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometry are used. The reliability of these analytical techniques for determination of silicon concentration in dissolution of HLW glasses, is examined. At high concentrations both FAA and ICP are accurate but colorimetry, even with HF pretreatment or NaOH digestion, does not give agreement with ICP. At concentrations below 40 mg l -1 all three methods are reliable. (Auth.)

  3. Superhydrophobic Zr-based metallic glass surface with high adhesive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Xia, Ting; Heng, Liping; Liu, Lin

    2013-06-01

    Micro/nano hierarchical structures were constructed on Zr35Ti30Be26.75Cu8.25 metallic glass surface by silicon moulding and subsequently chemical etching. The as-formed surface exhibited both superhydrophobicity and high adhesive force towards water. The superhydrophobicity is rationalized based on the modified Cassie-Baxter model [A. B. D. Cassie and S. Baxter, Trans. Faraday Soc. 40, 546 (1944)]. The origin of the robust adhesion is described in terms of intermolecular capillary forces. The present results not only provide a method to fabricate superhydrophobic metallic glasses surface but also explore an important industrial application as dry adhesives and transport of liquid microdroplets.

  4. Hydration of Rhyolitic Glasses: Comparison Between High- and Low-Temperature Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, L.; Fayek, M.; Cole, D. R.; Carter, T.

    2012-12-01

    While a great deal is known about the interaction between water and rhyolitic glasses and melts at temperatures above the glass transition, the nature of this interaction at lower temperatures is more obscure. Comparisons between high- and low-temperature diffusive studies suggest that several factors play an important role under lower-temperatures conditions that are not significant at higher temperatures. Surface concentrations, which equilibrate quickly at high temperature, change far more slowly as temperatures decrease, and may not equilibrate at room temperature for hundreds or thousands of years. Coupled with temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients this complicates calculation of diffusion profiles as a function of time. A key factor in this process appears to be the inability of "self-stress", caused by the in-diffusing species, to relax at lower temperatures, a result expected below the glass transition. Regions of the glass hydrated at low temperatures are strongly optically anisotropic, and preliminary calculations suggest that the magnitude of stress involved may be very high. On the microstuctural scale, extrapolations of high-temperature FTIR data to lower temperatures suggests there should be little or no hydroxyl present in glasses "hydrated" at low temperatures. Analyses of both block and powder samples suggest that this is generally true in the bulk of the hydrated glass, excluding hydroxyl groups that formed during the initial cooling of the melt. However, hydroxyl do groups appear to be present at the glass surface, where both SIMS and neutron reflectometry data suggest hydration levels may be higher than projected from the bulk of the glass. Isotopic exchange experiments also suggest that bonding is relatively weak, as hydration water exchanges readily with the enviroment. All of these observations lead to the conclusion that the observed stress is due to the presence of interstructural, rather than bonded, water. This likely explains the

  5. Comparative measurements between a Li-6 glass and a He-3 high-pressure gas scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priesmeyer, H.G.; Fischer, P.; Harz, U.; Soldner, B.

    1983-01-01

    The He-3 high-pressure gas scintillation neutron detector commercially available as LND 800, has been compated to a Li-6 glass scintillator type NE 912. (n,γ) pulse height discrimination capabilities and neutron detection efficiencies have been determined. The objective of these measurements was to try to improve the Kiel Fast-Chopper TOF detector system by using a gasscintillator, which could cover the neutron beam geometry and by which gamma ray background contributions could be reduced. The time response always meets the requirements of a chopper experiment, but the neutron detection efficiency of the Li-6 glasses now used had to be maintained. (orig./HP) [de

  6. High-level nuclear waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Sproull, J.; Bourcier, W.L.; McGrail, B.P.

    1992-01-01

    With the imminent startup, in the United States, of facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, a document has been prepared that compiles the scientific basis for understanding the alteration of the waste glass products under the range of service conditions to which they may be exposed during storage, transportation, and eventual geologic disposal. A summary of selected parts of the content of this document is provided. Waste glass alterations in a geologic repository may include corrosion of the glass network due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. Experimental testing results are described and interpreted in terms of the underlying chemical reactions and physical processes involved. The status of mechanistic modeling, which can be used for long-term predictions, is described and the remaining uncertainties associated with long-term simulations are summarized

  7. High rate operation of micro-strip gas chambers on diamond-coated glass

    CERN Document Server

    Bouclier, Roger; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Temmel, T; Cooke, R A; Donnel, S; Sastri, S A; Sonderer, N

    1996-01-01

    Very high rate operation of micro­strip gas chambers can be achieved using slightly conducting substrates. We describe preliminary measurements realized with detectors manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated, before the photo-lithographic processing, with a diamond layer having a surface resistivity of around 1014 ‡/o. Stable medium-term operation, and a rate capability largely exceeding the one obtained with identical plates manufactured on uncoated glass are demonstrated. If these results are confirmed by long-term measurements the diamond coating technology appears very attractive since it allows, with a moderate cost overhead, to use thin, commercially available glass with the required surface quality for the large-scale production of gas micro-strip detectors.

  8. Preliminary flowsheet for the conversion of Hanford high-level waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beary, M.M.; Chick, L.A.; Ely, P.C.; Gott, S.A.

    1977-06-01

    The flowsheets describe a process for converting waste removed from the Hanford underground waste tanks to more immobile form. The process involves a chemical separation of the radionuclides from industrial chemicals, and then making glass from the resulting small volume of highly radioactive waste. Removal of Sr, actinides, cesium, and technetium is discussed

  9. Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties of highly Er3+-doped novel oxyfluoride glasses for photonic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavulu, C.R. [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Sreedhar, V.B.; Jayasankar, C.K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Jang, Kiwan [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Soo [Department of Chemistry, Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Soung Soo, E-mail: ssyi@silla.ac.kr [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}-doped novel oxyfluoride glasses have been prepared by melt quenching technique. • Structural, thermal and spectroscopic properties have been carried out. • SALSFEr glasses exhibit intense green and weak red emissions at 365 nm excitation. • Major laser transition for Er{sup 3+} ion in SALSFEr glasses is {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (1.53 μm). • These results suggest the possibility of using SALSFEr glasses as photonic devices. - Abstract: The Er{sup 3+}-doped novel oxyfluoride glasses of composition (43 − x)SiO{sub 2}–10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–24LiF–23SrF{sub 2}–xEr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, where x = 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 mol%, have been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique and are characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Raman, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, optical absorption spectra, visible (vis) and near-infrared (NIR) emission spectra measurements. Judd–Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ω{sub λ}, λ = 2, 4 and 6) have been derived from the absorption spectrum of 1.0 mol% Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped glass and are in turn used to calculate radiative properties for the important luminescent levels of Er{sup 3+} ions. The studied glasses show intense green and weak red visible emissions under 365 nm excitation. The decrease in visible emission intensities with concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions has been explained due to energy transfer processes between Er{sup 3+} ions. Upon excitation at 980 nm laser diode, an intense 1.53 μm NIR emission has been observed with the maximum full width at half maximum (FWHM) for Er{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluoride glasses. The higher Er{sup 3+} ion doping capability and relatively high gain and broad emission at 1.5 μm are the most notable features of these glasses to realize efficient short-length optical amplifiers.

  10. Effects of container material on PCT leach test results for high-level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, S.B.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    A glass-based waste form used for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes should exhibit good resistance to aqueous corrosion since typically this is the primary process by which radionucleides could be released into the environment upon failure of other barriers. In the USA, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) provides a set of requirements to ensure the consistency of the waste forms produced and specifies the Product Consistency Test (PCT) as a measure of relative chemical durability. While the PCT procedure permits usage of both Teflon and stainless steel vessels for testing of simulated development glasses, Teflon is not permitted for testing of production glasses due to radiative degradation. The results presented in this paper indicate that there are very significant differences between tests conducted in the two types of vessels due to the well-known permeability of Teflon to atmospheric carbon dioxide which results in lowering of the solution pH and a consequent reduction in the leach rate of silicate glasses. A wide range of nuclear waste glass compositions was subjected to the PCT procedure using both Teflon and stainless steel vessels. The magnitude of the effect (up to a factor of four for B, Na, Li concentrations) depends strongly on glass composition, therefore the isolated checks performed previously were inconclusive. The permeability to CO, of two types of Teflon vessels specified in the PCT procedure was directly measured using buffer solutions: ingress of CO, is linear in time, strongly pH-dependent, and was as high as 100 ppm after 7 days. In actual PCT tests in Teflon vessels, the total CO, content was 560 ppm after 87 days and 1930 ppm after one year

  11. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high-level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  12. High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano Velez

    2008-03-31

    Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500°C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

  13. Low-density to high-density transition in Ce75Al23Si2 metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Q S; Lou, H B; Gong, Y; Wang, X D; Jiang, J Z; Fang, Y Z; Wu, F M; Yang, K; Li, A G; Yan, S; Yu, X H; Lathe, C

    2010-01-01

    Using in situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD), we observed a pressure-induced polyamorphic transition from the low-density amorphous (LDA) state to the high-density amorphous (HDA) state in Ce 75 Al 23 Si 2 metallic glass at about 2 GPa and 300 K. The thermal stabilities of both LDA and HDA metallic glasses were further investigated using in situ high-temperature and high-pressure XRD, which revealed different pressure dependences of the onset crystallization temperature (T x ) between them with a turning point at about 2 GPa. Compared with Ce 75 Al 25 metallic glass, minor Si doping shifts the onset polyamorphic transition pressure from 1.5 to 2 GPa and obviously stabilizes both LDA and HDA metallic glasses with higher T x and changes their slopes dT x /dP. The results obtained in this work reveal another polyamorphous metallic glass system by minor alloying (e.g. Si), which could modify the transition pressure and also properties of LDA and HDA metallic glasses. The minor alloying effect reported here is valuable for the development of more polyamorphous metallic glasses, even multicomponent bulk metallic glasses with modified properties, which will trigger more investigations in this field and improve our understanding of polyamorphism and metallic glasses.

  14. General requirements applicable to the production, inspection, processing, packaging and storage of high activity wastes packed in glass form and resulting from the reprocessing of fuels irradiated in pressurized light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The Fundamental Safety Rules applicable to certain types of nuclear installation are intended to clarify the conditions of which observance, for the type of installation concerned and for the subject that they deal with, is considered as equivalent to compliance with regulatory French technical practice. These Rules should facilitate safety analysises and the clear understanding between persons interested in matters related to nuclear safety. They in no way reduce the operator's liability and pose no obstacle to statutory provisions in force. For any installation to which a Fundamental Safety Rule applies according to the foregoing paragraph, the operator may be relieved from application of the Rule if he shows proof that the safety objectives set by the Rule are attained by other means that he proposes within the framework of statutory procedures. Furthermore, the Central Service for the Safety of Nuclear Installations reserves the right at all times to alter any Fundamental Safety Rule, as required, should it deem this necessary, while specifying the applicability conditions. This rule is intended to define the general provisions applicable to the production, inspection, processing, packaging and storage of wastes, resulting from the reprocessing of fuels irradiated in a PWR, packaged in the form of glass

  15. Borosilicate glass as a matrix for immobilization of SRP high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 22 million gallons of high-level radioactive defense waste are currently being stored in large underground tanks located on the Savannah River Plant (SRP) site in Aiken, South Carolina. One option now being considered for long-term management of this waste involves removing the waste from the tanks, chemically processing the waste, and immobilizing the potentially harmful radionuclides in the waste into a borosilicate glass matrix. The technology for producing waste glass forms is well developed and has been demonstrated on various scales using simulated as well as radioactive SRP waste. Recently, full-scale prototypical equipment has been made operational at SRP. This includes both a joule-heated ceramic melter and an in-can melter. These melters are a part of an integrated vitrification system which is under evaluation and includes a spray calciner, direct liquid feed apparatus, and various elements of an off-gas system. Two of the most important properties of the waste glass are mechanical integrity and leachability. Programs are in progress at SRL aimed at minimizing thermally induced cracking by carefully controlling cooling cycles and using ceramic liners or coatings. The leachability of SRP waste glass has been studied under many different conditions and consistently found to be low. For example, the leachability of actual SRP waste glass was found to be 10 -6 to 10 -5 g/(cm 2 )(day) initially and decreasing to 10 -9 to 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 100 days. Waste glass is also being studied under anticipated storage conditions. In brine at 90 0 C, the leachability is about 5 x 10 -8 g/(cm 2 )(day) after 60 days. The effects of other geological media including granite, basalt, shale, and tuff are also being studied as part of the multibarrier isolation system

  16. Low temperature high density plasma nitriding of stainless steel molds for stamping of oxide glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a die for mold- and direct-stamping processes of optical oxide glasses. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical oxide-glass elements. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness over 1400 HV within its thickness of 50 μm without any formation of nitrides after plasma nitriding at 693 K for 14.4 ks. This plasma-nitrided mold was utilized for mold-stamping of two colored oxide glass plates at 833 K; these plates were successfully deformed and joined into a single glass plate by this stamping without adhesion or galling of oxide glasses onto the nitrided mold surface.

  17. On high temperature internal friction in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotukhin, I.V.; Kalinin, Yu.E.; Roshchupkin, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature background of internal friction in amorphous lanthanum-aluminium alloys was investigated. More rapid growth of internal friction was observed at temperature ∼ 453 K reaching maximal value at 495 K. Crystallization process was accompanied by decrease of internal friction. Increase of mechanical vibration frequency to 1000 Hz leads to rise of internal friction background in the range of room temperatures and to decrease at temperatures above 370 K. Bend was observed on temperature dependence of internal friction at 440 K

  18. Surface morphology study in high speed milling of soda lime glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Bagum, Mst. Nasima; Ali, Mohammad Yeakub; Amin, A. K. M. Nurul

    2018-05-01

    Soda lime glass has a wide range of applications in optical, bio-medical and semi-conductor industries. It is undeniably a challenging task to produce micro finish surface on an amorphous brittle solid like soda lime glass due to its low fracture toughness. In order to obtain such a finish surface, ductile machining has been exploited, as this usually cause's plastic flow which control crack propagation. At sub-micro scale cutting parameters, researchers achieved nano finish surface in micro milling operation using coated tool. However it is possible to enhance the rate of material removal (RMR) of soda lime glass at flexible cutting condition. High speed cutting at micro meter level, extend of thermal softening might be prominent than the strain gradient strengthening. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of high cutting speed end milling parameters on the surface texture of soda lime glass using uncoated carbide tool. The spindle speed, depth of cut and feed rate were varied from 20,000 to 40,000 rpm, 10 to 30 mm/min and 30 to 50 µm respectively. Mathematical model of roughness has been developed using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Experimental verification confirmed that surface roughness (Ra) 0.38 µm is possible to achieve at increased RMR, 4.71 mm3/min.

  19. High activity waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaul, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Chem-Nuclear Environmental Services (CNES) has developed a container that is capable of containing high activity waste and can be shipped as a regular DOT Type A shipment. By making the container special form the amount of activity that can be transported in a Type A shipment is greatly enhanced. Special form material presents an extra degree of protection to the environment by requiring the package to be destroyed to get access to the radioactive material and must undergo specific testing requirements, whereas normal form material can allow access to the radioactive material. With the special form container up to 10 caries of radium can be transported in a single package. This paper will describe the considerations that were taken to develop these products

  20. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  1. Effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics prepared from high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-hong; Feng, Ke-qin; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2017-08-01

    Foamed glass-ceramics were prepared via a single-step sintering method using high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass as the main raw materials The influence of sintering temperature (900-1060°C) on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics was studied. The results show that the crystal shape changed from grainy to rod-shaped and finally turned to multiple shapes as the sintering temperature was increased from 900 to 1060°C. With increasing sintering temperature, the average pore size of the foamed glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased. By contrast, the compressive strength and the bulk density decreased and subsequently increased. An excessively high temperature, however, induced the coalescence of pores and decreased the compressive strength. The optimal properties, including the highest compressive strength (16.64 MPa) among the investigated samples and a relatively low bulk density (0.83 g/cm3), were attained in the case of the foamed glass-ceramics sintered at 1000°C.

  2. High level waste containing granules coated and embedded in metal as an alternative to HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.

    1980-01-01

    Simulated high level waste containing granules were overcoated with pyrocarbon or nickel respectively. The coatings were performed by the use of chemical vapour deposition in a fluidized bed. The coated granules were embedded in an aluminium-silicon-alloy to improve the dissipation of radiation induced heat. The metal-granules-composites obtained were of improved product stability related to the high level waste containing glasses. (orig.) [de

  3. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Aluminum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [WTP Engineering Division, United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 450, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP's overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or

  4. [Three-dimensional display simulation of lung surgery using "active shutter glasses"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Takamasa; Kanzaki, Masato; Sakamoto, Kei; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Shimizu, Toshihide; Oyama, Kunihiro; Murasugi, Masahide

    2011-08-01

    We have reported preoperative 3-dimensional (3D) simulation of thoracoscopic lung surgery using self-made software and internet shareware of 3D-modeler. Using "active shutter glasses", we have tried the "3D display simulation" of lung surgery. 3D display was more effective to grasp clear 3D interrelation between the bronchii and pulmonary vascular system than those in images of currently in use with the same information volume.

  5. Localized chemistry of 99Tc in simulated low activity waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jamie L.

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) is to dispose of the nuclear waste accumulated in the underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Richland, WA. Incorporation and stabilization of technetium (99Tc) from these tanks into vitrified waste forms is a concern to the waste glass community and DOE due to 99Tc's long half-life ( 2.13˙105 y), and its high mobility in the subsurface environment under oxidizing conditions. Working in collaboration with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and other national laboratories, plans were formulated to obtain first-of-a-kind chemical structure determination of poorly understood and environmentally relevant technetium compounds that relate to the chemistry of the Tc in nuclear waste glasses. Knowledge of the structure and spectral signature of these compounds aid in refining the understanding of 99Tc incorporation into and release from oxide based waste glass. In this research a first-of-its kind mechanism for the behavior of 99Tc during vitrification is presented, and the structural role of Tc(VII) and (IV) in borosilicate waste glasses is readdressed.

  6. Study of lanthanum aluminum silicate glasses for passive and active optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, K.; Litzkendorf, D.; Grimm, S.; Kobelke, J.; Schwuchow, A.; Ludwig, A.; Leich, M.; Jetschke, S.; Dellith, J.; Auguste, J.-L.; Leparmentier, S.; Humbert, G.; Werner, G.

    2013-03-01

    We report on SiO2-Al2O3-La2O3 glasses - with and without Yb2O3 - suitable for nonlinear and fiber laser applications. We also present successful supercontinuum generation and fiber laser operation around 1060 nm in step-index fibers. We have optimized the glass compositions in terms of thermal and optical requirements for both a high La2O3 (24 mol%) and Yb2O3(6 mol%) concentration. The aluminum concentration was adjusted to about 21 mol% Al2O3 to increase the solubility of lanthanum and ytterbium in the glass beyond possible MCVD based techniques. The glasses have been characterized by dilatometrical methods to find transition temperatures from 860 to 880°C and thermal expansion coefficients between 4.1 and 7.0 × 10-6 K-1. Structured step index fibers with a SiO2-Al2O3-La2O3 core and silica cladding have been realized showing a fiber loss minimum of about 500 dB/km at 1200 nm wavelength. The chromatic dispersion could be adjusted to shift the zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) close to the pump wavelength of 1550 nm in a supercontinuum generation setup. First fiber laser experiments show an efficiency of about 41 % with a remarkably reduced photodarkening compared to MCVD based fibers.

  7. Glasses used in the solidification of high level radioactive waste: their behaviour in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1983-02-01

    Because of their amorphous structure, glasses are particularly suitable matrixes for the solidification of the mixture of radionuclides included in the high level wastes from reactor fuel reprocessing. They are not sensitive to variations in the fractions present of different waste oxides and are resistent to the effects of irradiation. In particular, borosilicate glasses have been investigated for around 25 years and the vitrification techniques have been tested on the technological scale. The environmental conditions within a final waste repository are expected to be such that the chemical resistance of glasses to attack by groundwaters is of special interest. In the present report the corrosion behaviour is described, with emphasis being placed upon the most significant controlling parameters. Since experimental determination of corrosion rates must be done in relatively short-time experiments, the results of which can depend strongly upon the measurement methods employed, it is necessary to carry out a critical assessment of the techniques commonly used in laboratory work. Experimental results are illustrated by means of selected examples. Particular emphasis is placed upon the effects of increased temperatures and of irradiation. The models which have been proposed for the estimation of the long-term corrosion behaviour of glasses are not yet fully sufficient and improvements are required. Furthermore, the actual corrosion rates which are fed into such models must be replaced by values more appropriate for the actual environmental conditions to which the glasses are most likely to be exposed within high level waste repositories. It should be noted, however, that even with current conservative input data on corrosion rates, typical estimated lifetimes for vitrified waste blocks are of the order of 10 5 years. The report concludes with recommendations concerning the most useful areas for further investigations. (author)

  8. High performance, transparent a-IGZO TFTs on a flexible thin glass substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwang Jun; Jang, Jae Eun; Kim, Joonwoo; Kim, Jung-Hye; Jeong, Soon Moon; Jeong, Jaewook

    2014-01-01

    We investigated electrical properties of transparent amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) transparent electrodes on a flexble thin glass substrate. The TFTs show a high field-effect mobility, a good subthreshold slope and a high on/off ratio owing to the high temperature thermal annealing process which cannot be applied to typical transparent polymer-based flexible substrates. Bias stress instability tests applying tensile stress concurrently with the bending radius of up to 40 mm indicated that mechanically and electrically stable a-IGZO TFTs can be fabricated on the transparent thin glass substrate. (paper)

  9. Eu{sup 3+} emission in phosphate glasses with high UV transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G.H. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Anjos, V., E-mail: virgilio@fisica.ufjf.br [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Bell, M.J.V. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Carmo, A.P. [Instituto Federal Fluminense-Campus Cabo Frio, CP 112015, CEP 28909-971 Cabo Frio, RJ (Brazil); Pinheiro, A.S.; Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, CP 593, CEP 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We report a study of the phosphate glass PZABP (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–BaO–PbO) doped with europium (Eu{sup 3+}) in different concentrations. Absorption, photoluminescence and time resolved photoluminescence were used to investigate the influence of increasing Eu{sup 3+} concentrations. The present glass exhibits Eu{sup 3+} absorption bands in the ultraviolet region (about 300 nm) due to the high transparency of the system compared to other phosphate glasses. In this way, it was possible to obtain the Judd–Ofelt parameters from the emission and absorption spectra. Moreover, a strong red emission attributed to the transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} of Eu{sup 3+} (611 nm) was observed. It was found that the radiative lifetime and the quantum efficiency of the Eu{sup 3+} level, {sup 5}D{sub 0}, do not suffer a significant change as the concentration of Eu{sup 3+} ions increases. - Highlights: • UV transparent glass matrix is used for Eu{sup 3+} doping. • Judd–Ofelt parameters from the emission and absorption spectra were obtained. • Red emission attributed to the transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} of Eu{sup 3+} (611 nm) was observed.

  10. Performance of surrogate high-level waste glass in the presence of iron corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.; Pan, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide release from a waste package (WP) is a series of processes that depend upon the composition and flux of groundwater contacting the waste-forms (WF); the corrosion rate of WP containers and internal components made of Alloy 22, 316L SS, 304L SS and carbon steel; the dissolution rate of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass and spent nuclear fuel (SNF); the solubility of radionuclides; and the retention of radionuclides in secondary mineral phases. In this study, forward reaction rate measurements were made on a surrogate HLW glass in the presence of FeCl 3 species. Results indicate that the forward reaction rate increases with an increase in the FeCl 3 concentration. The addition of FeCl 3 causes the drop in the pH due to hydrolysis of Fe 3+ ions in the solution. Results based on the radionuclide concentrations and dissolution rates for HLW glass and SNF indicate that the contribution from glass is similar to SNF at 75 deg C. (authors)

  11. Development of a High Precision Edge Alignment System for Touch-Panel Glass Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hau-Wei Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are two kinds of alignment systems, marked and unmarked. The glass substrate for touch panels is categorized as an unmarked work piece. Vision based glass substrate alignment (GSA relies on the edge of the glass. Traditional GSA systems compensate first for angular and then for linear error. This reduces alignment accuracy and increases alignment time and edge detection usually takes longer than 10 ms. This study proposes an effortless edge detection method. This method is very simple and can significantly reduce the time taken to detect the edge to about 6 ms using a 1.3 megapixel image. In this study, a floating center idea is used to control the glass substrate on a high precision coplanar XXY alignment stage. According to the method, users can set the rotation center anywhere as long as it is on the working (xy plane. Tolerance prognosis is also considered in this study to help the operator decide if the substrate is usable or should be rejected. The experimental results show alignment repeatability of the x, y, and θ axes to be 1 μm, 1 μm, and 5 arcsec, respectively.

  12. Properties and solubility of chrome in iron alumina phosphate glasses containing high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Kim, C.W.; Reis, S.T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical durability, glass formation tendency, and other properties of iron alumina phosphate glasses containing 70 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW), doped with different amounts of Cr 2 O 3 , have been investigated. All of the iron alumina phosphate glasses had an outstanding chemical durability as measured by their small dissolution rate (1 . 10 -9 g/(cm 2 . min)) in deionized water at 90 C for 128 d, their low normalized mass release as determined by the product consistency test (PCT) and a barely measurable corrosion rate of 2 . d) after 7 d at 200 C by the vapor hydration test (VHT). The solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in the iron phosphate melts was estimated at 4.1 wt%, but all of the as-annealed melts contained a few percent of crystalline Cr 2 O 3 that had no apparent effect on the chemical durability. The chemical durability was unchanged after deliberate crystallization, 48 h at 650 C. These iron phosphate waste forms, with a waste loading of at least 70 wt%, can be readily melted in commercial refractory crucibles at 1250 C for 2 to 4 h, are resistant to crystallization, meet all current US Department of Energy requirements for chemical durability, and have a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 which is at least three times larger than that for borosilicate glasses. (orig.)

  13. ''Cold crucible'' vitrification projects for low and high active waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.; Jouan, A.

    1998-01-01

    In continuity of the CEA HLW vitrification process experienced for more than 20 years in industrial operations in Cogema reprocessing plants (Marcoule and La Hague), CEA has developed an advanced extended performance cold crucible glass melter to address a wider range of waste like LLW, ILW and in particular waste with very corrosive species or requiring glass with higher elaboration temperature. In the cold crucible melter the bath of molten glass is directly heated by induction while the walls are cooled in order to freeze a protective glass layer. This technology subsequently allows high glass throughput while keeping the flexibility, the maintainability and low secondary waste generation related to a small metallic melter. Its recent use in the glass industry and the thousands of hours of pilot tests performed on inactive surrogates have demonstrated the maturity of this technology and its flexibility of use for processing most of the waste generated at nuclear facilities. SGN has therefore proposed this technology in Italy and Korea and in USA in the frame of the Hanford Privatization phase 1 A feasibility study. Main features of this study but also tests results with Hanford surrogates and active samples are discussed. (author)

  14. The leaching of radioactivity from highly radioactive glass blocks buried below the water table: fifteen years of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, W.F.

    1976-03-01

    The results from two test burials of high-level fission products incorporated into nepheline syenite glass indicate that the nuclear wastes from fuel processing for a 30,000 MWe nuclear power industry could be incorporated into such glass and stored beneath the water table in the waste management area of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) without harm to the environment. (author)

  15. Addition of Pullulan to Trehalose Glasses Improves the Stability of β-Galactosidase at High Moisture Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; Tian, Yu; Visser, J. Carolina; Olinga, Peter; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of therapeutic proteins in a matrix of sugar glass is known to enhance protein stability, yet protection is often lost when exposed to high relative humidity (RH). We hypothesized that especially in these conditions the use of binary glasses of a polysaccharide and disaccharide might

  16. The influence of removing sizing on strength and stiffness of conventional and high modulus E-glass fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    Two types of E-glass fibres, a conventional and a high modulus where the last one in the following will be denoted as ECR-glass fibre, were investigated regarding density, diameter, stiffness and strength. The fibres were analysed as pristine and after sizing removal treatments. The sizing was re...

  17. Investigations into the stabilization of drugs by sugar glasses : III. The influence of various high-pH buffers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H C; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W; Frijlink, Henderik W

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of the high-pH buffers ammediol, borax, CHES, TRIS, and Tricine on the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrated fraction (Tg') of trehalose/buffer and inulin/buffer solutions at pH 6.0 and pH 9.8. Also, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of sugar

  18. Barium borosilicate glass - a potential matrix for immobilization of sulfate bearing high-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Sengupta, P.; Kumar, Amar; Das, D.; Kale, G.B.; Raj, Kanwar

    2006-01-01

    Borosilicate glass formulations adopted worldwide for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is not suitable for sulphate bearing HLW, because of its low solubility in such glass. A suitable glass matrix based on barium borosilicate has been developed for immobilization of sulphate bearing HLW. Various compositions based on different glass formulations were made to examine compatibility with waste oxide with around 10 wt% sulfate content. The vitrified waste product obtained from barium borosilicate glass matrix was extensively evaluated for its characteristic properties like homogeneity, chemical durability, glass transition temperature, thermal conductivity, impact strength, etc. using appropriate techniques. Process parameters like melt viscosity and pour temperature were also determined. It is found that SB-44 glass composition (SiO 2 : 30.5 wt%, B 2 O 3 : 20.0 wt%, Na 2 O: 9.5 wt% and BaO: 19.0 wt%) can be safely loaded with 21 wt% waste oxide without any phase separation. The other product qualities of SB-44 waste glass are also found to be on a par with internationally adopted waste glass matrices. This formulation has been successfully implemented in plant scale

  19. High index glass thin film processing for photonics and photovoltaic (PV) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu Anthony

    To favorably compete with fossil-fuel technology, the greatest challenge for thin film solar-cells is to improve efficiency and reduce material cost. Thickness scaling to thin film reduces material cost but affects the light absorption in the cells; therefore a concept that traps incident photons and increases its optical path length is needed to boost absorption in thin film solar cells. One approach is the integration of low symmetric gratings (LSG), using high index material, on either the front-side or backside of 30 um thin c-Si cells. In this study, Multicomponent TeO2--Bi2O 3--ZnO (TBZ) glass thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering under different oxygen flow rates. The influences of oxygen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of the resulting thin films were investigated. The structural origin of the optical property variation was studied using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that TBZ glass thin film is a suitable material for front side LSG material photovoltaic and photonics applications due to their amorphous nature, high refractive index (n > 2), broad band optical transparency window, low processing temperature. We developed a simple maskless method to pattern sputtered tellurite based glass thin films using unconventional agarose hydrogel mediated wet etching. Conventional wet etching process, while claiming low cost and high throughput, suffers from reproducibility and pattern fidelity issues due to the isotropic nature of wet chemical etching when applied to glasses and polymers. This method overcomes these challenges by using an agarose hydrogel stamp to mediate a conformal etching process. In our maskless method, agarose hydrogel stamps are patterned following a standard soft lithography and replica molding process from micropatterned masters and soaked in a chemical etchant. The micro-scale features on the stamp are

  20. GLASS BOX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curtis, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The goals of this effort were to develop Glass Box capabilities to allow for the capturing of analyst activities and the associated data resources, track and log the results of automated processing...

  1. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  2. Evaluation of glasses containing cadmium for high dose dosimetry by the thermoluminescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Gabriel Soares Marchiori de; Ferreira, Pamela Zati; Cunha, Diego Merigue da; Dantas, Noelio Oliveira; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira, E-mail: lucio.neves@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel Noemi Silva; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    New glass matrices were evaluated for high dose dosimetry by the thermoluminescence technique. Their nominal composition are 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.15CdO.55B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.20CdO.50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%). The glass matrices were irradiated with different doses: 50, 100, 200, 500, 700 and 900 Gy, and the thermoluminescence emission curves were obtained for each of these values. The results show a great potential of using these matrices in high dose dosimetry. (author)

  3. Study of a new glass matrix by thermoluminescent technique for high-dose dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pamela Z.; Carvalho, Gabriel S. Marchiori de; Cunha, Diego M. da; Dantas, Noelio O.; Silva, Anielle C.A.; Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P., E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Linda, V.E. Caldas [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carrera, Betzabel N.S.; Watanabe, Shigueo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    The thermoluminescence technique is widely used for both personal and for high-dose dosimetry. In this work, the thermoluminescence technique was utilized to study a new glass matrix, with nominal composition of 20Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.30BaO.40B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol%), irradiated with different doses in a {sup 60}Co source. The glow curves and the dose-response curve were obtained for radiation doses of 10, 50, 100, 200 e 700 Gy. The results showed that this new glass matrix has potential use in high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  4. Photocatalytic Active Bismuth Fluoride/Oxyfluoride Surface Crystallized 2Bi2O3-B2O3 Glass-Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumeet Kumar; Singh, V. P.; Chauhan, Vishal S.; Kushwaha, H. S.; Vaish, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    The present article deals with 2Bi2O3-B2O3 (BBO) glass whose photocatalytic activity has been enhanced by the method of wet etching using an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid (HF). X-ray diffraction of the samples reveals that etching with an aqueous solution of HF leads to the formation of BiF3 and BiO0.1F2.8 phases. Surface morphology obtained from scanning electron microscopy show granular and plate-like morphology on the etched glass samples. Rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G) has been used to investigate the photocatalytic activity of the as-quenched and etched glasses. Enhanced visible light-driven photocatalytic activity was observed in HF etched glass-ceramics compared to the as-quenched BBO glass. Contact angle of the as-quenched glass was 90.2°, which decreases up to 20.02° with an increase in concentration of HF in the etching solution. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and increase in the hydrophilic nature suggests the efficient treatment of water pollutants by using the prepared surface crystallized glass-ceramics.

  5. Durability, mechanical, and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1990-01-01

    The high-level liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is routinely solidified into granular calcined high-level waste (HLW) and stored onsite. Research is being conducted at the ICPP on methods of immobilizing the HLW, including developing a durable glass-ceramic form which has the potential to significantly reduce the final waste volume by up to 60% compared to a glass form. Simulated, pilot plant, non-radioactive, calcines similar to the composition of the calcined HLW and glass forming additives are used to produce experimental glass-ceramic forms. The objective of the research reported in this paper is to study the impact of ground calcine particle size on durability and mechanical and thermal properties of experimental glass-ceramic forms

  6. Transient regimes during high-temperature deformation of a bulk metallic glass: A free volume approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Brechet, Y.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition range. Compression and stress-relaxation tests have been conducted. The stress-strain curves are modeled in the framework of the free volume theory, including transient phenomena (overshoot and undershoot). This approach allows several physical parameters (activation volume, flow defect creation and relaxation coefficient) to be determined from a mechanical experiment. This model is able to rationalize the dependency of stress overshoot on relaxation time. It is shown that, due to the relationship between flow defect concentration and free volume model, it is impossible to determine the equilibrium flow defect concentration. However, the relative variation of flow defect is always the same, and all the model parameters depend on the equilibrium flow defect concentration. The methodology presented in this paper should, in the future, allow the consistency of the free volume model to be assessed

  7. Understanding the glass-forming ability of active pharmaceutical ingredients for designing supersaturating dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Usui, Toshinori; Hattori, Mitsunari

    2012-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions have great potential for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs. Crystallization behavior during storage and after exposure to aqueous media must be examined in detail for designing stable and effective amorphous formulations, and it is significantly affected by the intrinsic properties of an amorphous drug. Many attempts have been made to correlate various thermodynamic parameters of pharmaceutical glasses with their crystallization behavior; however, variations in model drugs that could be used for such investigation has been limited because the amorphous characteristics of drugs possessing a high crystallization tendency are difficult to evaluate. In this study, high-speed differential scanning calorimetry, which could inhibit their crystallization using high cooling rates up to 2000°C/s, was employed for assessing such drugs. The thermodynamic parameters of the glasses, including glass transition temperature (T(g)) and fragility, were obtained to show that their crystallization tendency cannot be explained simply by the parameters, although there have been general thought that fragility may be correlated with crystallization tendency. Also investigated was correlation between the thermodynamic parameters and crystallization tendency upon contact with water, which influences in vivo efficacy of amorphous formulations. T(g) was correlated well with the crystallization tendency upon contact with water. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Microscopic Theory of Coupled Slow Activated Dynamics in Glass-Forming Binary Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2018-04-05

    The Elastically Collective Nonlinear Langevin Equation theory for one-component viscous liquids and suspensions is generalized to treat coupled slow activated relaxation and diffusion in glass-forming binary sphere mixtures of any composition, size ratio, and interparticle interactions. A trajectory-level dynamical coupling parameter concept is introduced to construct two coupled dynamic free energy functions for the smaller penetrant and larger matrix particle. A two-step dynamical picture is proposed where the first-step process involves matrix-facilitated penetrant hopping quantified in a self-consistent manner based on a temporal coincidence condition. After penetrants dynamically equilibrate, the effectively one-component matrix particle dynamics is controlled by a new dynamic free energy (second-step process). Depending on the time scales associated with the first- and second-step processes, as well as the extent of matrix-correlated facilitation, distinct physical scenarios are predicted. The theory is implemented for purely hard-core interactions, and addresses the glass transition based on variable kinetic criteria, penetrant-matrix coupled activated relaxation, self-diffusion of both species, dynamic fragility, and shear elasticity. Testable predictions are made. Motivated by the analytic ultralocal limit idea derived for pure hard sphere fluids, we identify structure-thermodynamics-dynamics relationships. As a case study for molecule-polymer thermal mixtures, the chemically matched fully miscible polystyrene-toluene system is quantitatively studied based on a predictive mapping scheme. The resulting no-adjustable-parameter results for toluene diffusivity and the mixture glass transition temperature are in good agreement with experiment. The theory provides a foundation to treat diverse dynamical problems in glass-forming mixtures, including suspensions of colloids and nanoparticles, polymer-molecule liquids, and polymer nanocomposites.

  9. NMR characterization of simulated Hanford low-activity waste glasses and its use in understanding waste form chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darab, J.G.; Linehan, J.C.; McGrail, B.P.

    1999-01-01

    Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize the structural and chemical environments of B, Al, and Si in model Hanford low-activity waste glasses. The average 29 Si NMR peak position was found to systematically change with changing glass composition and structure. From an understanding of the structural roles of Al and B obtained from MAS-NMR experiments, the authors first developed a model that reliably predicts the distribution of structural units and the average 29 Si chemical shift value, δ, based purely on glass composition. A product consistency test (PCT) was used to determine the normalized elemental release (NL) from the prepared glasses. Comparison of the NMR and PCT data obtained from sodium boro-aluminosilicate glasses indicates that a rudimentary exponential relationship exists between the 29 Si chemical shift value, and the boron NL value

  10. Thermal and optical bleaching of radiation effects in silver activated metaphosphate glass - its use in U.V. dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagpal, J.S.; Ramanathan, G.; Gangadharan, P.

    1976-01-01

    While investigating the use of silver activated metaphosphate glass in radiation dosimetry, using its properties of radiophotoluminescence (RPL) in the range 20 mR to 10 3 R and of optical absorbance changes at higher exposures, a difference in the behaviour of the centers responsible for the two phenomenon was observed when the glass was exposed to 253.7 nm u.v. Ultraviolet exposure was observed to bleach the radiophotoluminescence in an irradiated glass whereas it was observed to induce photoluminescence in an unirradiated glass. Thermal behaviour of the two centers was also different. After heating the glass for 5 min at a number of temperatures, a gradual increase in RPL was observed up to 200 0 C. Above 200 0 C, the thermal treatment bleached the RPL. The optical absorbance was bleached from room temperature upwards. (U.K.)

  11. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  12. Design and Evaluation of Smart Glasses for Food Intake and Physical Activity Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jungman; Oh, Wonjoon; Baek, Dongyoub; Ryu, Sunwoong; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2018-02-14

    This study presents a series of protocols of designing and manufacturing a glasses-type wearable device that detects the patterns of temporalis muscle activities during food intake and other physical activities. We fabricated a 3D-printed frame of the glasses and a load cell-integrated printed circuit board (PCB) module inserted in both hinges of the frame. The module was used to acquire the force signals, and transmit them wirelessly. These procedures provide the system with higher mobility, which can be evaluated in practical wearing conditions such as walking and waggling. A performance of the classification is also evaluated by distinguishing the patterns of food intake from those physical activities. A series of algorithms were used to preprocess the signals, generate feature vectors, and recognize the patterns of several featured activities (chewing and winking), and other physical activities (sedentary rest, talking, and walking). The results showed that the average F1 score of the classification among the featured activities was 91.4%. We believe this approach can be potentially useful for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors with higher accuracy as practical means to treat ingestive problems.

  13. Structural studies of WO3-TeO2 glasses by high-Q-neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.; Kaur, A.; Krishna, P.S.R.; Shinde, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Glasses from the system: xWO 3 -(100-x)TeO 2 (x=15, 20 and 25 mol %) were prepared by melt quenching technique and characterized by density, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy and high-Q neutron diffraction measurements. Glass density and glass transition temperature increased with increase in WO 3 concentration, Raman spectroscopy indicated the conversion of TeO 4 units into TeO 3 units with increase in WO 3 content. The increase in glass transition temperature with the incorporation of WO 3 was attributed to the increase in average bond strength of the glass network since the bond dissociation energy of W-O bonds (672 kJ/mol) is significantly higher than that of Te-O bonds (376 kJ/mol). UV-visible studies found a very strong optical absorption band due to W 6+ ions, just below the absorption edge. High-Q neutron diffraction measurements were performed on glasses and radial distribution function analyses revealed changes in W-O and Te-O correlations in the glass network. The findings about changes in glass structure from neutron diffraction studies were consistent with structural information obtained from Raman spectroscopy and structure-property correlations were made. (author)

  14. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  15. Structural analysis and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kobzi, Balázs; Sinkó, Katalin; Homonnay, Zoltán [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Kuzmann, Ernő [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1512 (Hungary); Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, RuđerBošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan); Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hematite was precipitated by heat treatment of iron aluminosilicate glass. • The hematite phase shows visible light photocatalytic activity. • We could prepare an effective photocatalyst from ‘ubiquitous elements’. - Abstract: A relationship between structure and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate (15Na{sub 2}O⋅15CaO⋅40Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅(30−x)SiO{sub 2}) glass (xNCFAS) was investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and UV–visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV–VIS). The {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectrum of 11NCFAS glass measured after heat-treatment at 1000 °C for 100 min was composed of a paramagnetic doublet due to Fe{sup III}(T{sub d}) and two magnetic sextets due to regular hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and hematite with larger internal magnetic field. X-ray diffraction patterns of heat-treated xNCFAS samples resulted in decrease of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increase of Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 22}O{sub 33} or CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with alumina content. A quick decrease in methylene blue (MB) concentration from 15.6 to 4.7 μmol L{sup −1} was observed in the photocatalytic reaction test with 40 mg of heat-treated 11NCFAS glass under visible light-exposure. The largest first-order rate constant of MB decomposition (k) was estimated to be 9.26 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1}. Tauc’s plot yielded a band gap energy (E{sub g}) of 1.88 eV for heat-treated 11NCFAS glass, which is smaller than previously reported E{sub g} of 2.2 eV for α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These results prove that addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into iron-containing soda lime silicate glass is favorable for the preparation of improved visible light-photocatalyst with ‘ubiquitous’ elements.

  16. Effect of In-situ Cure on Measurement of Glass Transition Temperatures in High-temperature Thermosetting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    TEMPERATURES IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMOSETTING POLYMERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...illustrated the difficulties inherent in measurement of the glass transition temperature of this high-temperature thermosetting polymer via dynamic...copyright protection in the United States. EFFECT OF IN-SITU CURE ON MEASUREMENT OF GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMOSETTING

  17. Evolution of the optical properties of chromium doped calcium tetraborate glass under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesniewski, Tadeusz; Barzowska, Justyna; Mahlik, Sebastian; Behrendt, Mirosław; Padlyak, Bohdan V.; Grinberg, Marek

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we present luminescence properties of calcium tetraborate glass (CaB 4 O 7 ) activated with Cr 3+ ions. Excitation spectra, steady state and time resolved luminescence spectra at temperatures between 10 K and 300 K and at high hydrostatic pressure up to 120 kbar were measured. The excitation spectrum consists of two broad bands peaking at 420 nm and 580 nm related to transitions from the 4 A 2g ground state to 4 T 1g and 4 T 2g excited states, respectively. Ambient pressure luminescence spectrum consists of two bands peaking at 690 nm and 850 nm. First band is related to the spin forbidden 2 E g → 4 A 2g transition, whereas the second broad band is related to the spin allowed 4 T 2g → 4 A 2g transition. Widths of both bands are significantly greater than natural due to inhomogeneous broadening. The ratio between intensities of these bands is strongly temperature and pressure dependent. At pressure below 50 kbar relative contribution of the 2 E g → 4 A 2g luminescence decreases with increasing temperature and increases when pressure is applied. For pressure higher than 50 kbar only the emission related to the 2 E g → 4 A 2g transition is observed. Analysis of luminescence lineshape and kinetics allowed to estimate the width of the crystal field distribution and show that even at ambient pressure most of the Cr 3+ ions occupy high field sites with energy of the 4 T 2g higher than the energy of the 2 E g state.

  18. Evolution of the optical properties of chromium doped calcium tetraborate glass under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewski, Tadeusz, E-mail: tadeusz.lesniewski@phdstud.ug.edu.pl [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Gdansk, Wita Stwosza 57, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Barzowska, Justyna; Mahlik, Sebastian; Behrendt, Mirosław [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Gdansk, Wita Stwosza 57, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Padlyak, Bohdan V. [Sector of Spectroscopy, Vlokh Institute of Physical Optics, Dragomanov St. 23, 79-005 Lviv (Ukraine); Division of Spectroscopy of Functional Materials, Institute of Physics, University of Zielona Gora, Szafrana St. 4a, 65-516 Zielona Gora (Poland); Grinberg, Marek, E-mail: fizmgr@ug.edu.pl [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Gdansk, Wita Stwosza 57, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    In this contribution, we present luminescence properties of calcium tetraborate glass (CaB{sub 4}O{sub 7}) activated with Cr{sup 3+} ions. Excitation spectra, steady state and time resolved luminescence spectra at temperatures between 10 K and 300 K and at high hydrostatic pressure up to 120 kbar were measured. The excitation spectrum consists of two broad bands peaking at 420 nm and 580 nm related to transitions from the {sup 4}A{sub 2g} ground state to {sup 4}T{sub 1g} and {sup 4}T{sub 2g} excited states, respectively. Ambient pressure luminescence spectrum consists of two bands peaking at 690 nm and 850 nm. First band is related to the spin forbidden {sup 2}E{sub g}→{sup 4}A{sub 2g} transition, whereas the second broad band is related to the spin allowed {sup 4}T{sub 2g}→{sup 4}A{sub 2g} transition. Widths of both bands are significantly greater than natural due to inhomogeneous broadening. The ratio between intensities of these bands is strongly temperature and pressure dependent. At pressure below 50 kbar relative contribution of the {sup 2}E{sub g}→{sup 4}A{sub 2g} luminescence decreases with increasing temperature and increases when pressure is applied. For pressure higher than 50 kbar only the emission related to the {sup 2}E{sub g}→{sup 4}A{sub 2g} transition is observed. Analysis of luminescence lineshape and kinetics allowed to estimate the width of the crystal field distribution and show that even at ambient pressure most of the Cr{sup 3+} ions occupy high field sites with energy of the {sup 4}T{sub 2g} higher than the energy of the {sup 2}E{sub g} state.

  19. Fine-pitch glass GEM for high-resolution X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Mitsuya, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The fine-pitch G-GEM is made of a 400 μm thick photo-etchable glass substrate with 150 μm pitch holes. It is fabricated using the same wet etching technique as that for the standard G-GEM. In this work, we present the experimental results obtained with a single fine-pitch G-GEM with a 50 × 50 mm 2 effective area. We recorded an energy resolution of 16.2% and gas gain up to 5,500 when the detector was irradiated with 5.9 keV X-rays. We present a 50 × 50 mm 2 X-ray radiograph image acquired with a scintillation gas and optical readout system.

  20. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  1. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by 29 Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of 29 Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300 0 C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T 1 and T 2 ) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for 23 Na and 29 Si

  2. High Dielectric Low Loss Transparent Glass Material Based Dielectric Resonator Antenna with Wide Bandwidth Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Arshad; Zheng, Yuliang; Braun, Hubertus; Hovhannisyan, Martun; Letz, Martin; Jakoby, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of new high permittivity and low loss glass material for antennas. This glass material is transparent. A very simple rectangular dielectric resonator antenna is designed first with a simple microstrip feeding line. In order to widen the bandwidth, the feed of the design is modified by forming a T-shaped feeding. This new design enhanced the bandwidth range to cover the WLAN 5 GHz band completely. The dielectric resonator antenna cut into precise dimensions is placed on the modified microstrip feed line. The design is simple and easy to manufacture and also very compact in size of only 36 × 28 mm. A -10 dB impedance bandwidth of 18% has been achieved, which covers the frequency range from 5.15 GHz to 5.95 GHz. Simulations of the measured return loss and radiation patterns are presented and discussed.

  3. Ground-glass opacity at high resolution CT: an approach for differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spina, Juan C.; Rogondino, Jose; Vidales, Valeria; Rolnik, Maria C.; Montanari, Mariano; Salazar, Santiago N.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Ground-Glass Opacity in high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with its underlying abnormality and anatomic distribution and its correlation with different etiologies. Methods: A 38 patients series, (32 men, 16 women, mean age 54,6 years, range 20-28) was retrospectively analyzed. They were evaluated with high resolution computed tomography, 2 mm thick sections and 10 mm of interval. Contrast intravenous iodinated contrast (no-ionic) was injected in 11 patients. The final diagnosis was made with sputum analysis, bronchioalveolar lavage, trans bronchial biopsy and open lung biopsy. Results: The differential diagnosis of ground glass opacity is based on analyzing their anatomic resolution and the underlying pathology in the lung parenchyma. Centrilobular distribution indicated early air-spaces pathology produced in our series by 21 infections, 4 pulmonary hemorrhages, 1 hypersensitivity pneumonitis and 1 descamative interstitial pneumonitis. Panlobular distribution, alveolar proteinosis (1 case) sarcoidosis (1 case) drug toxicity 1 case and one case of pneumocystis carinii. Peripherical distribution typical of early idiopathic fibrosis (1). Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (1). Structural alterations of the lung parenchyma with bronchiectasias was seen in 16 cases, cystic lesions in 3 cases, sub pleural linear opacities 4 cases, peribronchovascular interstitial thickening or nodularity and emphysema in 10 cases. Conclusion: HRCT is useful to evaluate ground glass opacities pattern with the anatomic distribution and the underlying structural pathology. These findings under some clinical circumstances can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases, indicating a potentially treatable disease. (author)

  4. In situ structural analysis of calcium aluminosilicate glasses under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, R F; de Ligny, D; Martinet, C; Sandrini, M; Medina, A N; Rohling, J H; Baesso, M L; Lima, S M; Andrade, L H C; Guyot, Y

    2016-08-10

    In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the structural evolution of OH(-)-free calcium aluminosilicate glasses, under high pressure and at room temperature. Evaluation was made of the role of the SiO2 concentration in percalcic join systems, for Al/(Al  +  Si) in the approximate range from 0.9 to 0.2. Under high pressure, the intensity of the main band related to the bending mode of bridging oxygen ([Formula: see text][T-O-T], where T  =  Si or Al) decreased gradually, suggesting that the bonds were severely altered or even destroyed. In Si-rich glasses, compression induced a transformation of Q (n) species to Q (n-1). In the case of Al-rich glass, the Al in the smallest Q (n) units evolved from tetrahedral to higher-coordinated Al (([5])Al and ([6])Al). Permanent structural changes were observed in samples recovered from the highest pressure of around 15 GPa and, particularly for Si-rich samples, the recovered structure showed an increase of three-membered rings in the Si/Al tetrahedral network.

  5. Archaeometric investigation of medieval Bulgarian glasses and sgraffito ceramics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhingova, R.; Kulev, I.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine the content of Au, Ba, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cr, Co, Cs, Cu, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Rb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, Sb, V and Yb in glass samples excavated from medieval glassworkshops in Pliska and Preslav and in 20 glass finds from Preslav. Sgraffito ceramic samples excavated in Veliko Tarnovo were also analysed and the elements Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Si, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, V and Yb were determined. In order to localize the production site of the archaeological finds, the results from the analysis were subjected to cluster analysis, and stepwise discriminant analysis using the program package BMDP. A variety of the production of the medieval glass workshop in Preslav was identified and evaluated. It was proved that a part of the sgraffito ceramics samples have been produced in one and the same place and that the chemical composition might be successfully used to differentiate between the production of two workshops

  6. The neutron activation analysis of archaeological glasses from Scandinavia and Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Hunter, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis is used as a method of investigation into the technological development and raw materials used in the production of glass in the Ist millennium A.D. Samples were selected with two aims in mind: Firstly, there is the determination of whether or not vessel glass from thw two regions can be assigned to a common area of manufacture as has been suggested on the basis of major element analysis. Secondly, the results complement a project of major element analysis by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique and can be used to provide a further characterisation of some raw materials by correlation with XRF data. The material analysed includes fragments from Helgoe, Sweden, and from Saxon Southamton (Hamwih). Samples and flux monitors were irradiated in the Herald reactor at Alkermaston for 48 hours and the gamma-ray spectra recorded in two counting periods, one week after irradiation and again after a further period of four weeks. A general discussion of the archaeological significance of the data is made together with a rview of problems that this technique presents with regard to the analysis of early glass. (author)

  7. Evidence for microbial activity at the glass-alteration interface in oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Terje; Furnes, Harald; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Tumyr, Ole

    1998-10-01

    A detailed microbiological and geochemical study related to the alteration of basaltic glass of pillow lavas from the oceanic crust recovered from Hole 896A on the Costa Rica Rift (penetrating 290 m into the volcanic basement) has been carried out. A number of independent observations, pointing to the influence of microbes, may be summarized as follows: (1) Alteration textures are reminiscent of microbes in terms of form and shape. (2) Altered material contains appreciable amounts of C, N and K, and the N/C ratios are comparable to those of nitrogen-starved bacteria. (3) Samples stained with a dye (DAPI) that binds specifically to nucleic acids show the presence of DNA in the altered glass. Further, staining with fluorescent labeled oligonucleotide probes that hybridize specifically to 16S-ribosomal RNA of bacteria and archaea demonstrate their presence in the altered part of the glass. (4) Disseminated carbonate in the glassy margin of the majority of pillows shows δ 13C values, significantly lower than that of fresh basalt, also suggests biological activity. The majority of the samples have δ 18O values indicating temperatures of 20-100°C, which is in the range of mesophilic and thermophilic micro-organisms.

  8. Effects of waste content of glass waste forms on Savannah River high-level waste disposal costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of the waste content of glass waste forms of Savannah River high-level waste disposal costs are evaluated by their impact on the number of waste canisters produced. Changes in waste content affect onsite Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) costs as well as offsite shipping and repository emplacement charges. A nominal 1% increase over the 28 wt % waste loading of DWPF glass would reduce disposal costs by about $50 million for Savannah River wastes generated to the year 2000. Waste form modifications under current study include adjustments of glass frit content to compensate for added salt decontamination residues and increased sludge loadings in the DWPF glass. Projected cost reductions demonstrate significant incentives for continued optimization of the glass waste loadings. 13 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Determination of the origin of the medieval glass bracelets discovered in Dubna (Moscow Region, Russia), using the neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrieva, S.O.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the determination of the origin of archaeological finds from medieval glass using the method of neutron activation analysis (NAA). Among such objects we can discover things not only produced in ancient Russian glassmaking workshops but also brought from Byzantium. The authors substantiate the ancient Russian origin of the medieval glass bracelets of pre-Mongol period, found on the ancient Dubna settlement. The conclusions are based on the data about the glass chemical composition obtained as a result of NAA of ten fragments of bracelets at the IBR-2 reactor, FLNP, JINR. [ru

  10. Determination of the origin of the medieval glass bracelets discovered in Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia, using the neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrieva, S.O.; Frontasyeva, M.V.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    The work is dedicated to the determination of the origin of archaeological finds from medieval glass using the method of neutron activation analysis (NAA). Among such objects we can discover things not only produced in ancient Russian glassmaking workshops but also imported from Byzantium. The authors substantiate the ancient Russian origin of the medieval glass bracelets of pre-Mongol period, found on the ancient Dubna settlement. The conclusions are based on data on the glass chemical composition obtained as a result of NAA of 10 fragments of bracelets at the IBR-2 reactor, FLNP, JINR.

  11. Near-field performance assessment for a low-activity waste glass disposal system: laboratory testing to modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.; Bacon, D.H.; Icenhower, J.P.; Mann, F.M.; Puigh, R.J.; Schaef, H.T.; Mattigod, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    Reactive chemical transport simulations of glass corrosion and radionuclide release from a low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system were conducted out to times in excess of 20 000 yr with the subsurface transport over reactive multiphases (STORM) code. Time and spatial dependence of glass corrosion rate, secondary phase formation, pH, and radionuclide concentration were evaluated. The results show low release rates overall for the LAW glasses such that performance objectives for the site will be met by a factor of 20 or more. Parameterization of the computer model was accomplished by combining direct laboratory measurements, literature data (principally thermodynamic data), and parameter estimation methods

  12. Structural fluctuations and orientational glass of levoglucosan--High stability against ordering and absence of structural glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombari, Elpidio; Johari, G P

    2015-03-14

    To investigate whether a non-exponential relaxation always indicates 2-4 nm-size regions of dynamic heterogeneity, we studied the kinetic freezing and unfreezing of structural fluctuations involving the rotational modes in orientationally disordered crystal (ODIC) of levoglucosan by calorimetry. The heat capacity, Cp, of levoglucosan measured over the 203 K-463 K range shows that its low-temperature, orientationally ordered crystal (ORC) transforms to ODIC phase on heating, which then melts to a low viscosity liquid. On cooling, the melt transforms to the ODIC which then does not transform to the ORC. Instead, the ODIC supercools. Fluctuations resulting from hindered (random) rotations of levoglucosan molecules confined to the lattice sites and from their conformational changes become progressively slower on cooling and an orientational glass (O-G) forms showing the sigmoid shape decrease in Cp characteristic of structural arrest like that of a glass. On heating the O-G state, rotational fluctuations begin to contribute to Cp at To-g of 247.8 K and there is an overshoot in Cp and thermal hysteresis (characteristic of physical ageing) in the temperature range of 230-260 K. The non-exponential relaxation parameter, β(cal), determined by fitting the Cp data to a non-exponential, nonlinear model for relaxation of a glass is 0.60, which is similar to β(cal) found for polymers, molecular liquids, and metal-alloy melts in which Brownian diffusion occurs. Such β(cal) glass formation, but its value of 0.60 for ODIC levoglucosan, in which Brownian diffusion does not occur, would not indicate such domains. Despite the lack of Brownian diffusion, we discuss these findings in the potential energy landscape paradigm. Levoglucosan melt, which is believed to vitrify and to stabilize a protein's disordered structure, did not supercool even at 200 K/min cooling rate. The findings have consequences for reports on the dielectric relaxation studies that indicated that levoglucosan

  13. Ground-glass opacity in diffuse lung diseases: high-resolution computed tomography-pathology correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Maria Lucia de Oliveira; Vianna, Alberto Domingues; Marchiori, Edson; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Moraes, Heleno Pinto de

    2003-01-01

    Ground-glass opacity is a finding frequently seen in high-resolution computed tomography examinations of the chest and is characterized by hazy increased attenuation of lung, however without blurring of bronchial and vascular margins. Due to its un specificity, association with other radiological, clinical and pathological findings must be considered for an accurate diagnostic interpretation. In this paper were reviewed 62 computed tomography examinations of patients with diffuse pulmonary diseases of 14 different etiologies in which ground-glass opacity was the only or the most remarkable finding, and correlated this findings with pathology abnormalities seen on specimens obtained from biopsies or necropsies. In pneumocystosis, ground-glass opacities correlated histologically with alveolar occupation by a foaming material containing parasites, in bronchiole alveolar cell carcinoma with thickening of the alveolar septa and occupation of the lumen by mucus and tumoral cells, in paracoccidioidomycosis with thickening of the alveolar septa, areas of fibrosis and alveolar bronchopneumonia exudate, in sarcoidosis with fibrosis or clustering of granulomas and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with alveolar septa thickening due to fibrosis. Alveolar occupation by blood was found in cases of leptospirosis, idiopathic hemo siderosis, metastatic kidney tumor and invasive aspergillosis whereas oily vacuole were seen in lipoid pneumonia, proteinaceous and lipo proteinaceous material in silico proteinosis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and edematous fluid in cardiac failure. (author)

  14. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-02-01

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO2 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P2O5 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  15. Development of high strength hydroxyapatite for bone tissue regeneration using nanobioactive glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Pragya; Dalai, Sridhar; Vijayalakshmi, S.; Sudera, Prerna; Sivam, Santosh Param; Sharma, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    With an increasing demand of biocompatible bone substitutes for the treatment of bone diseases and bone tissue regeneration, bioactive glass composites are being tested to improvise the osteoconductive as well as osteoinductive properties. Nanobioactive glass (nBG) composites, having composition of SiO 2 70 mol%, CaO 26 mol % and P 2 O 5 4 mol% were prepared by Freeze drying method using PEG-PPG-PEG co-polymer. Polymer addition improves the mechanical strength and porosity of the scaffold of nBG. Nano Bioactive glass composites upon implantation undergo specific reactions leading to the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA). This is tested in vitro using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). This high strength hydroxyapatite (HA) layer acts as osteoconductive in cellular environment, by acting as mineral base of bones, onto which new bone cells proliferate leading to new bone formation. Strength of the nBG composites as well as HA is in the range of cortical and cancellous bone, thus proving significant for bone tissue regeneration substitutes.

  16. Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress toward acceptance of high-alumina formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Vienna, John D.

    2011-01-01

    We have critically compiled and analyzed historical data for investigating the quantity of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) precipitation as a function of composition in simulated nuclear waste glasses. To understand composition we used two primary methods: (1) investigating the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O ternary with filtering for different B2O3 levels and (2) creating a quadrant system consisting of compositions reduced to two metric numbers. These metrics are (1) the nepheline discriminator (ND) which depends only on the SiO2 content by weight normalized to the total weight of the Al2O3-SiO2-Na2O sub-mixture and (2) the optical basicity (OB) which contains contributions from all constituents in the glass. Nepheline precipitation is expected to be suppressed at high SiO2 levels (ND >0.62) or at low basicities (OB 5 wt% B2O3. The OB concept can help further refine regions of nepheline-free glass formation.

  17. Retrofit of a high power Nd:glass laser system with liquid crystal polarizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, S.D.; Cerqua, K.A.; Kessler, T.J.; Seka, W.; Bahr, R.

    1985-03-01

    The glass development laser (GDL), has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics since 1978. This Nd:phosphate glass system produces high peak power optical radiation at lambda = 1054 nm or lambda = 351 nm for use in studying the interaction physics of intense laser beams with matter. The amplifier staging incorporates the propagation of linearly and circularly polarized light in rod amplifiers which vary in diameter from 16 mm to 90 mm. Numerous quartz or mica quarter waveplates and Brewster angle dielectric thin film polarizers are required to limit accumulated phase retardation between amplification stages and to accommodate interstage Pockels' cell isolation switches. We have recently replaced most of the waveplate-dielectric polarizer combinations in GDL with liquid crystal polarizers. Comprised of 11 μm thick cholesteric fluids sandwiched between optical quality glass plates, liquid crystal polarizers provide excellent polarization properties, low insertion loss, angular insensitivity, and laser damage resistance at lambda = 1054 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of left-handed and right-handed circular polarizers will be discussed

  18. Paper-based microfluidics with high resolution, cut on a glass fiber membrane for bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xueen; Wei, Shasha; Kong, Jilie

    2014-03-07

    In this report, we describe a simple, low-cost, straight forward and highly reproducible fabrication method of microfluidic systems. This system was cut on a glass fiber membrane by a common cutter without using any other sophisticated equipment or organic solvents. This format represents a novel type of paper-based microfluidics with high resolution of the microchannel down to ~137 μm, comparable to those made by conventional photolithography. We successfully applied this method to microfluidics to create a star micro-array format of multiplexed urine tests in this study.

  19. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  20. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study

  1. Effects of thermal history and irradiation on the dc conductivity of high purity GeO2 glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magruder, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The dc electrical properties of a series of high purity GeO 2 glasses fused and equilibrated at various temperatures (T phi) in air were measured. T phi ranged from 1350 0 C to 1690 0 C. The charge carriers are shown to be the Na ions. The mobility is found to obey an Arrhenius function with enthalpy of activation of approximately 1.01 eV in the as-quenched state for all T phi's. The changes observed in the mobilities of the Na ions for the various T phi's are suggested to be caused by changes in the configurational coordinates of the average interstitial sites through which the Na ion moves with changes in T phi. These changes are manifested in the entropy of activation. Subsequent annealing treatments at 420 0 C (15 0 below the Littleton softening point) for the times observed in these experiments do not change the general behavior of the mobility with T phi even though they do change the observed values of mobilities. These changes are suggested to result from thermal compaction changing the average well structure through which the Na ion moves. The γ irradiation of these glasses causes a decrease in the mobility of the Na ion for all T phi samples. The mobilities decreases with increasing dose. These decreases in mobilities are suggested to be caused by radiation induced compaction and by change of defect concentrations. These two processes result through relaxation processes and coulombic forces in changes in the average well structure

  2. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  3. Two-state model of light induced activation and thermal bleaching of photochromic glasses: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Jose A.; Perciante, Cesar D.

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of photochromic glasses during activation and bleaching is investigated. A two-state phenomenological model describing light-induced activation (darkening) and thermal bleaching is presented. The proposed model is based on first-order kinetics. We demonstrate that the time behavior in the activation process (acting simultaneously with the thermal fading) can be characterized by two relaxation times that depend on the intensity of the activating light. These characteristic times are lower than the decay times of the pure thermal bleaching process. We study the temporal evolution of the glass optical density and its dependence on the activating intensity. We also present a series of activation and bleaching experiments that validate the proposed model. Our approach may be used to gain more insight into the transmittance behavior of photosensitive glasses, which could be potentially relevant in a broad range of applications, e.g., real-time holography and reconfigurable optical memories

  4. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  5. Glass composition development for plasma processing of Hanford high sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.

    1995-02-01

    To assess the acceptability of prospective compositions, response criteria based on durability, homogeneity, viscosity and volatility were defined. Response variables were weighted: durability 35%, homogeneity 25%, viscosity 25%, volatility 15%. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to define the first twelve glass formulations. Glass former additives included Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Li2O, ZrO2 and SiO2. Lithia was added to facilitate fritting of the additives. The additives were normalized to silica content to ease experimental matrix definition and glass formulation. Preset high and low values of these ratios were determined for the initial twelve melts. Based on rankings of initial compositions, new formulations for testing were developed based on a simplex algorithm. Rating and ranking of subsequent compositions continued until no apparent improvement in glass quality was achieved in newly developed formulations. An optimized composition was determined by averaging the additive component values of the final best performing compositions. The glass former contents to form the optimized glass were: 16.1 wt % Al2O3, 12.3 wt % B2O3, 5.5 wt % CaO, 1.7 wt % Li2O, 3.3 wt % ZrO2, 61.1 wt % SiO2. An optimized composition resulted after only 25 trials despite studying six glass additives. A vitrification campaign was completed using a small-scale Joule heated melter. 80 lbs of glass was produced over 96 hours of continuous operation. Several salt compounds formed and deposited on melter components during the run and likely caused the failure of several pour chamber heaters. In an attempt to minimize sodium volatility, several low or no boron glasses were formulated. One composition containing no boron produced a homogeneous glass worthy of additional testing

  6. Preparation of high-purity Pr(3+) doped Ge–Ga–Sb–Se glasses with intensive middle infrared luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaksina, E.V.; Shiryaev, V.S., E-mail: shiryaev@ihps.nnov.ru; Kotereva, T.V.; Churbanov, M.F.

    2016-02-15

    Glass materials with high emission characteristics and low content of limiting impurities are required for creation of devices for middle infrared (mid-IR) fiber optics. The paper presents the results of preparation of high-purity Pr{sup 3+}-doped Ga{sub x}Ge{sub y}Sb{sub z}Se{sub 1−(x+y+z)} (x=3÷4, y=20÷26, z=5÷11) glasses. The multi-stage technique for synthesis of these glasses is developed. It is based on chemical distillation purification of glass components and the transport reaction for purification of gallium. Transmitting, as well as thermal and luminescent properties of glasses are investigated. The content of limiting impurities of oxygen, carbon and hydrogen in the glass samples was ≤0.2 ppm wt. The 1300–3000 ppm wt Pr{sup 3+}-doped Ga–Ge–Sb–Se bulk glasses exhibit an intensive photoluminescence in the spectral range of 3.5–5.5 μm.

  7. Applicability test of glass lining material for high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid in thermochemical water-splitting IS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A key issue for realizing the thermochemical IS process for hydrogen production is the selection of materials for working with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid. Glass lining material is a promising candidate, which is composed of steel having good strength and glass having good corrosion resistance. Since the applicability of glass lining material depends strongly on the service condition, corrosion tests using glass used in glass lining material and heat cycle tests using glass lining piping were carried out to examine the possibility of using the glass lining material with high-temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid. It was confirmed that the glass lining materials exhibited sufficient corrosion resistance and heat resistance in high-temperature sulfuric acid of the IS process. (author)

  8. High content silicate porous glasses used for radioactive wastes storage: preparation and characterization of the spinodal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, P.C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The phase separation behavior via spinodal decomposition of two sodium borosilicate glasses has been studied having the following compositions in weight %: Glass A: 8% Na 2 O - 32% B 2O3 - 60% Si O 2 Glass 8% B: Na 2 O -27% B 2 O 3 - 65% Si O 2 . The growth of the mean size r of the minor phase microstructure has been determined as a function of both the time length (0-100 hours) and the heat treatment by analyzing temperature 580, 600 0 C of the glass sample images obtained with a Scanning Electron Microscope. The results are in good agreement with the theory of Lifshitz-Slyozov which predict a growth of the minor phase microstructure via a diffusion controlled process through the insoluble phase such that r-bar = A o t e - ΔE/R T. The activation energy ΔE and the pre-exponential factor A o of the diffusion process were found ΔE = 58,8 kCal/mol; A o = 8,42 x 10 21 Angstrom 3 /h for the glass A and ΔE = 92,6 kCal/mol; A o = 4,84 x 10 29 Angstrom 3 /h for the glass B. The distribution curves of the microstructure size allowed to suggest for the glasses under study the most adequate heat treatments to absorbs after the leaching of the soluble phase. (author)

  9. Glass-embedded two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal devices with a broad bandwidth waveguide and a high quality nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung-Woo; Han, Jin-Kyu; Song, Bong-Shik; Noda, Susumu

    2010-08-30

    To enhance the mechanical stability of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab structure and maintain its excellent performance, we designed a glass-embedded silicon photonic crystal device consisting of a broad bandwidth waveguide and a nanocavity with a high quality (Q) factor, and then fabricated the structure using spin-on glass (SOG). Furthermore, we showed that the refractive index of the SOG could be tuned from 1.37 to 1.57 by varying the curing temperature of the SOG. Finally, we demonstrated a glass-embedded heterostructured cavity with an ultrahigh Q factor of 160,000 by adjusting the refractive index of the SOG.

  10. Lanthanide-activated Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Yan, E-mail: chenyan@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Hua; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Zhenguo [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: phuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties.

  11. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  12. Fracture toughness measurements on a glass bonded sodalite high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O'Holleran, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel produces two high-level waste streams; cladding hulls and chloride salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream. The waste form consists of 75 Vol.% crystalline sodalite (containing the salt) with 25 Vol.% of an ''intergranular'' glassy phase. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on representative samples of this material using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confirmed by post-indentation polishing of a test sample. Young's modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and Young's modulus values are reported, along with results from scanning electron microscopy studies

  13. Ti-based bulk metallic glass with high cold workability at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.M.; Park, J.S.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, M.H.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    The cold workability of Ti-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been investigated. Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG with a large compressive plastic strain of 4.7% shows a high cold workability, i.e. total reduction ratio of 50% by cold rolling at room temperature. The multiple shear bands formed during rolling are effective in enhancing the plasticity. The cold rolled Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG (reduction ratio: 30%) exhibits a large plastic strain of ∝14%. (orig.)

  14. Highly -oriented growth of polycrystalline silicon films on glass by pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinig, P.; Selle, B.; Fenske, F.; Fuhs, W.; Alex, V.; Birkholz, M.

    2002-01-01

    Nominally undoped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films were deposited on glass at 450 deg. C at high deposition rate (>100 nm/min) by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The pulse frequency was found to have a significant influence on the preferred grain orientation. The x-ray diffraction pattern exhibits a strong enhancement of the (400) reflex with increasing pulse frequency. The quantitative evaluation reveals that over 90% of the grains are oriented. The observed change in preferred grain orientation in poly-Si films at low temperatures is associated with concurrent ion bombardment of the growing film

  15. Smart glass as the method of improving the energy efficiency of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayunova, Olga; Gumerova, Eliza; Miloradova, Nadezda

    2018-03-01

    The question that has to be answered in high-rise building is glazing and its service life conditions. Contemporary market offers several types of window units, for instance, wooden, aluminum, PVC and combined models. Wooden and PVC windows become the most widespread and competitive between each other. In recent times design engineers choose smart glass. In this article, the advantages and drawbacks of all types of windows are reviewed, and the recommendations are given according to choice of window type in order to improve energy efficiency of buildings.

  16. The solidification of high-level liquid wastes in glass and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    1989-01-01

    In spent nuclear fuel reprocessing a highly radioactive waste solution is produced. It must be converted into a solid product, which binds the radionuclides, be hydrolytic as well as radiation and temperature resistant. Borosilicate glasses fulfil these requirements and, jointly with the barriers of a repository, they prevent inadmissible amounts of radionuclides from escaping into the biocycle. Two techniques were developed for industrial-scale vitrification: a rotary kiln calciner combined with an induction heated metallic melter and the electrode heated ceramic melters. Both techniques were already demonstrated on an industrial scale and under radioactive conditions. (AVM, Marcoule and PAMELA, Mol). (orig./MM) [de

  17. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  18. Glass as a matrix for SRP high-level defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.; Bibler, N.E.; Dukes, M.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Work done at Savannah River Laboratory and elsewhere that has led to development of glass as a candidate for solidifying Savannah River Plant waste is summarized. Areas of development described are glass formulation and fabrication, and leaching and radiation effects

  19. Absorption Spectroscopy Analysis of Calcium-Phosphate Glasses Highly Doped with Monovalent Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José A

    2016-06-03

    CaO-P2 O5 glasses with high concentrations of monovalent copper ions were prepared by a simple melt-quench method through CuO and SnO co-doping. Spectroscopic characterization was carried out by optical absorption with the aim of analyzing the effects of Cu(+) ions on the optical band-gap energies, which were estimated on the basis of indirect-allowed transitions. The copper(I) content is estimated in the CuO/SnO-containing glasses after the assessment of the concentration dependence of Cu(2+) absorption in the visible region for CuO singly doped glasses. An exponential dependence of the change in optical band gaps (relative to the host) with Cu(+) concentration is inferred up to about 10 mol %. However, the entire range is divided into two distinct linear regions that are characterized by different rates of change with respect to concentration: 1) below 5 mol %, where the linear dependence presents a relatively high magnitude of the slope; and 2) from 5-10 mol %, where a lower magnitude of the slope is manifested. With increasing concentration, the mean Cu(+) -Cu(+) interionic distance decreases, thereby decreasing the sensitivity of monovalent copper for light absorption. The decrease in optical band-gap energies is ultimately shown to follow a linear dependence with the interionic distance, suggesting the potential of the approach to gauge the concentration of monovalent copper straightforwardly in amorphous hosts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Design, development and characterization studies of a large aperture high power Nd : glass rod amplifier stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopi, N.; Bapna, R.C.; Murali, C.G.; Narayan, B.S.; Dhareshwar, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-plasma interaction studies and experiments related to laser driven shocks as well as laser induced inertially confined thermonuclear fusion have resulted in an ever increasing demand for high brightness lasers capable of producing nanosecond pulse with energy of hundreds of kilo joules. High power Nd-glass laser chains with a master oscillator followed by a number of amplifier stages made up of rods, disks, slabs etc. are in operation in many leading laboratories in the world. This report describes the design, development and characterisation studies of a large aperture Nd:glass laser amplifier which is to be incorporated on line with the existing 40 J, 5 ns high power laser chain built for laser-plasma interaction and laser driven shock wave studies in the Laser and Plasma Technology Division. The development work described in this report discusses the design based on optimum material selection, optimisation of various sub components, ease of maintenance and smooth operation. The necessary operational electronics has also been described. The characterization studies mainly include measurement of spatial gain uniformity, thermally induced depolarization effects, and thermal relaxation studies. (author). 37 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Characterization of borosilicate glasses containing simulated high-level radioactive wastes from PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, R.; Eguchi, K.; Yamanaka, H.

    1979-01-01

    The characterization of borosilicate glasses containing simulated HLW from PNC has been carried out. Phase separation of molybdates, volatilization, viscosity, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, chemical durability, and devitrification of these glasses have been measured, and the suitability of the glasses for the vitrified solidification processes is discussed from the viewpoint of safety

  2. The antimicrobial activity of as-prepared silver-loaded phosphate glasses and zirconium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Wang; Jiang, Ji Zhi; Yang, Yang; Yan, Zhao Chun; Yan, Wang Xiao; He, Shui Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of silver-loaded zirconium phosphate (JDG) and silver-loaded phosphate glasses (ZZB) against Escherichia coli were studied. Although the silver content in JDG was higher than that in ZZB, ZZB suspensions showed better antimicrobial property than JDG suspensions, especially at low concentrations. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using minimum inhibitory concentrations, bacterial inhibition ring tests, and detection of silver ions in the suspensions. Furthermore, the amounts of silver ions in suspensions with/without bacterial cells were analyzed. Results revealed that only a portion of released silver ions could be adsorbed by E. coli cells, which are critical to cell death. The damaged microstructures of E. coli cells observed by transmission electron microscopy may further prove that the adsorbed silver ions play an important role in the antimicrobial process.

  3. High-temperature laser annealing for thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cell on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, A.; Schneider, J.; Dore, J.; Mermet, F.; Slaoui, A.

    2012-06-01

    Thin film polycrystalline silicon films grown on glass substrate were irradiated with an infrared continuous wave laser for defects annealing and/or dopants activation. The samples were uniformly scanned using an attachment with the laser system. Substrate temperature, scan speed and laser power were varied to find suitable laser annealing conditions. The Raman spectroscopy and Suns- V oc analysis were carried out to qualify the films quality after laser annealing. A maximum enhancement of the open circuit voltage V oc of about 100 mV is obtained after laser annealing of as-grown polysilicon structures. A strong correlation was found between the full width half maximum of the Si crystalline peak and V oc. It is interpreted as due to defects annealing as well as to dopants activation in the absorbing silicon layer. The maximum V oc reached is 485 mV after laser treatment and plasma hydrogenation, thanks to defects passivation.

  4. Study on the fabrication and photoluminescence characteristics of LiPO3 glass scintillators with the lanthanides activators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S. Z.; Lee, J. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Choi, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    In this syudy, LiPO 3 glass scintillators were fabricated, and lanthanides (except Pm) oxides or chlorides were used as an activator. For the fabrication of LiPO 3 glasses, optimum heating conditions were obtained, and the photoluminescence of the glasses was measured by the monochromator. For the best transparency of the glass samples, optimum heating temperature and time is 950 .deg. C and 90 min, respectively. As the result of photoluminescence analysis, it was impossible to apply Pr, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu to activator. Because emission spectrum of samples with them was equal to that of sample without activator. In case of samples with Europium, the peak of emission spectrum of Eu(II) and Eu(III) is 420 nm and 620 nm, separately. And Samples with Ce(III) are about 380 nm, and Tb(III) are about 550 nm. On the fabrication of LiPO 3 glass samples, PL intensity was increased by adding sugar as reductant, and using Ar reduction atmosphere. And the optimum reduction conditions were differed as to the kinds of activators. Samples with Eu(II) and Tb(III) have the best PL intensity in the Ar reduction atmosphere, and sample with Ce(III) have the best intensity by added sugar

  5. High magnetic field measurement utilizing Faraday rotation in SF11 glass in simplified diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Premananda; Shukla, Rohit; Venkateswarlu, D

    2017-04-01

    With the commercialization of powerful solid-state lasers as pointer lasers, it is becoming simpler nowadays for the launch and free-space reception of polarized light for polarimetric applications. Additionally, because of the high power of such laser diodes, the alignment of the received light on the small sensor area of a photo-diode with a high bandwidth response is also greatly simplified. A plastic sheet polarizer taken from spectacles of 3D television (commercially available) is simply implemented as an analyzer before the photo-receiver. SF11 glass is used as a magneto-optic modulating medium for the measurement of the magnetic field. A magnetic field of magnitude more than 8 Tesla, generated by a solenoid has been measured using this simple assembly. The measured Verdet constant of 12.46 rad/T-m is obtained at the wavelength of 672 nm for the SF11 glass. The complete measurement system is a cost-effective solution.

  6. Highly-Bioreactive Silica-Based Mesoporous Bioactive Glasses Enriched with Gallium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sanchez-Salcedo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects in bone cell growth and antibacterial action are currently attributed to Ga3+ ions. Thus, they can be used to upgrade mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs, investigated for tissue engineering, whenever they released therapeutic amounts of gallium ions to the surrounding medium. Three gallium-enriched MBGs with composition (in mol % xSiO2–yCaO–zP2O5–5Ga2O3, being x = 70, y = 15, z = 10 for Ga_1; x = 80, y = 12, z = 3 for Ga_2; and x = 80, y = 15, z = 0 for Ga_3, were investigated and compared with the gallium-free 80SiO2–15CaO–5P2O5 MBG (B. 29Si and 31P MAS NMR analyses indicated that Ga3+ acts as network modifier in the glass regions with higher polymerization degree and as network former in the zones with high concentration of classical modifiers (Ca2+ ions. Ga_1 and Ga_2 exhibited a quick in vitro bioactive response because they were coated by an apatite-like layer after 1 and 3 days in simulated body fluid. Although we have not conducted biological tests in this paper (cells or bacteria, Ga_1 released high but non-cytotoxic amounts of Ga3+ ions in Todd Hewitt Broth culture medium that were 140 times higher than the IC90 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, demonstrating its potential for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Operation of microstrip gas chambers manufactured on glass coated with high resistivity diamond-like layers

    CERN Document Server

    Boimska, B; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe recent observations and measurements realized with micro-strip gas chambers (MSGCs) manufactured on boro-silicate glass coated with a thin layer of diamond-like carbon (DLC) having a surface resistivity around 4.10$^{16}\\Omega/\\Box$. The role of the back-pla electrode configuration and potential in the detector performance has been studied. Even for this very high resistivity of the coatings, MSGCs operate differently from those manufactured on bare boro-silicate glass; the charge gain increases with the radiation flux for counting rates above 103 Hz/mm2, reaching a value 60% higher for 105 Hz/mm2. This behavior does not depend on the presence and potential of the back plane electrode; however, both maximum gain and rate capability are influenced by the drift field. From this study, compared with measurements realized previously with other detectors, we deduce that for stable high rate operation of MSGCs the resistivity of the coating should not exceed ~10$^{15}\\Omega/\\Box$.

  8. Structure of Se-rich As-Se glasses by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchak, R.; Kovalskiy, A.; Miller, A. C.; Jain, H.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-01-01

    To establish the validity of various proposed structural models, we have investigated the structure of the binary As x Se 100-x chalcogenide glass family (x≤40) by high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. From the composition dependence of the valence band, the contributions to the density of states from the 4p lone pair electrons of Se and the 4p bonding states and 4s electrons of Se and As are identified in the top part of the band. The analysis of Se 3d and As 3d core-level spectra supports the so-called chain crossing model for the atomic structure of Se-rich As x Se 100-x bulk glasses. The results also indicate small deviations (∼3-8%) from this model, especially for glass compositions with short Se chains (25 40 Se 60 and of Se-Se-Se fragments in a glass with composition x=30 is established

  9. A novel disk-type X-ray area imaging detector using radiophotoluminescence in silver-activated phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Nakamura, Shoichi

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel two- and three-dimensional (2-D, 3-D) imaging detector based on the radiophotoluminescence (RPL) phenomenon in silver-activated phosphate glass (PG:Ag) and evaluate its dosimetric characteristics. A compact disk-type PG:Ag detector with a diameter of 80 mm was rotated at a rate of 400 rpm to read out the accumulated dose information and then remove the images for reuse. After X-ray exposure, three RPL dosimeter processes, i.e., preheating, reading, and erasing, were carried out with only a UV laser at 375 nm by adjusting the stepwise output levels. The 3-D images and dose distributions were rapidly reconstructed with a high spatial resolution of 1 μm and a sensitivity of 1 mGy.

  10. Fabrication of Metallic Glass Powder for Brazing Paste for High-Temperature Thermoelectric Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung-Ho; Kim, Suk Jun; Lee, Soonil; Seo, Won-Seon; Kim, Il-Ho; Choi, Soon-Mok

    2018-06-01

    Metallic glass (MG) offers the advantage of outstanding oxidation resistance, since it has disordered atomic-scale structure without grain boundaries. We fabricated Al-based MG ribbons (Al84.5Y10Ni5.5) by a melt spinning process. We evaluated the adhesion strength of interfaces between the Al-based MG and a Ni-coated Cu electrode formed under various conditions at high temperature. In addition, we attempted to optimize the process conditions for pulverizing MG ribbons to high-energy ball milling and planetary milling. We confirmed that the electrical resistivity of the Al-based MG ribbon was substantially reduced after annealing at high temperature (over 300°C) due to crystallization.

  11. Shock-induced decomposition of a high density glass (ZF6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianming; Liu, Xun; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Cao, Xiuxia

    2011-07-01

    The dynamic high-pressure behavior of a high density glass (ZF6) was investigated in this study. The Hugoniot data, shock temperature (TH) and release sound velocity (C) of ZF6 were measured by a time-resolved multi-channel pyrometer in the shock pressure (PH) range of 50-170 GPa. The Hugoniot data is in accord with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) shock Hugoniot data and shows a good linearity over 21 GPa. Polymorphic phase transitions were identified by the kinks in the measured TH-PH and C-PH relationships. The onset pressures of the transformations are ˜75 and ˜128 GPa, respectively. A thermodynamic calculation suggests that the phase transition at 75 GPa is its disproportionation to massicot (high pressure phase of PbO) and melted silica while the transition at 128 GPa is from the melting of massicot.

  12. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  13. High-frequency characteristics of glass/ceramic composite and alumina multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, K.; Suzuki, H.; Yokoyama, H.; Kamechara, N.; Tsubone, K.; Tanisawa, H.; Sugiki, H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the transmission characteristics of glass/ceramic composite (borosilicate glass/alumina) and alumina multilayer structures examined. The triplate stripline formed in the glass/ceramic multilayer shows low conductor and dielectric loss. Alumina multilayer, however, has twice the transmission loss at 10 GHz, because the resistivity of W in the alumina multilayer is higher than the Cu in the glass/ceramic multilayer. Crosstalk between striplines in the glass/ceramics is less than -80 dB up to 11 GHz and 9 GHz for alumina

  14. Effect of high pressure on the mechanical properties of lithium disilicate glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, Silvio; Lepienski, Carlos M.; Jr, Paulo C. Soares; Balzaretti, Naira M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → High pressure densification of LS2 decreases the mechanical properties. → Densification of LS2 at high temperature improves the mechanical properties. → Hardness and elastic modulus of LS2 densified at high temperature are notably high. - Abstract: Lithium disilicate glass has been submitted to a high pressure treatment associated to a heat treatment, and the effects of densification and crystallization at high pressure on the mechanical properties were evaluated. The hardness and elastic modulus were examined by instrumented indentation using a Berkovich tip. The crack pattern morphology after indentation with a cube corner indenter was also investigated. The hardness and elastic modulus of the samples submitted to high pressure at room temperature decreased with increasing pressure. The hardness and elastic modulus of the samples submitted simultaneously to high pressure (up to 7.7 GPa) and high temperature increased noticeably. The amount, length and type of cracks induced by the cube corner tip changed with increasing pressure. These results indicate that the high temperature treatment under high pressure improved the mechanical properties of LS 2 .

  15. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. Vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters, as is presently done with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is cooled rapidly, thus retaining its vitreous structure

  16. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-01-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate nuclear waste glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference waste form, borosilicate glass. Vitreous lead-iron-phosphate glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than borosilicate glass. However, severe crystallization leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is presently done with borosilicate glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from borosilicate glass. Therefore, in order to realize the performance advantages of the lead-iron-phosphate material in a nuclear waste form, it would be necessary to process it so that it is rapidly cooled, thus retaining its vitreous structure. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Corrosion of inconel in high-temperature borosilicate glass melts containing simulant nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Yuan, Xiaoning; Brigden, Clive T.; Tao, Jun; Hyatt, Neil C.; Miekina, Michal

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Inconel 601 in the borosilicate glass (MW glass) containing 25 wt.% of simulant Magnox waste, and in ZnO, Mn2O3 and Fe2O3 modified Mg/Ca borosilicate glasses (MZMF and CZMF glasses) containing 15 wt.% of simulant POCO waste, were evaluated by dimensional changes, the formation of internal defects and changes in alloy composition near corrosion surfaces. In all three kinds of glass melts, Cr at the inconel surface forms a protective Cr2O3 scale between the metal surface and the glass, and alumina precipitates penetrate from the metal surface or formed in-situ. The corrosion depths of inconel 601 in MW waste glass melt are greater than those in the other two glass melts. In MW glass, the Cr2O3 layer between inconel and glass is fragmented because of the reaction between MgO and Cr2O3, which forms the crystal phase MgCr2O4. In MZMF and CZMF waste glasses the layers are continuous and a thin (Zn, Fe, Ni, B)-containing layer forms on the surface of the chromium oxide layer and prevents Cr2O3 from reacting with MgO or other constituents. MgCr2O4 was observed in the XRD analysis of the bulk MW waste glass after the corrosion test, and ZrSiO4 in the MZMF waste glass, and ZrSiO4 and CaMoO4 in the CZMF waste glass.

  18. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  19. FeNbB bulk metallic glass with high boron content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, M.; Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270016, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Hajlaoui, Khalil; Yavari, Alain Reza [LTPCM-CNRS, I.N.P. Grenoble, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP 75, F-38402 University Campus (France)

    2007-07-01

    Fe-based alloys able to form magnetic bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are of the type transition metal - metalloid and often contain 5 or more elements. Usually, the metalloid content is around 20 atomic %. Very recently, the Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30} alloy was found to be able to form BMG by copper mold casting technique, despite its high metalloid content. Several composition with boron contents around 30 at. % or even higher were calculated since 1993 as possible compositions of the remaining amorphous matrix after the first stage of nanocrystallization of Finemet-type Fe{sub 77}Si{sub 14}B{sub 9} glassy ribbons with 0.5 to 1 atomic % Cu and a few percent Nb addition. Melt-spun ribbons of all calculated compositions were found to be glassy. The composition of the ternary Fe-based BMG investigated in the present study resulted as an optimization of all possibilities. The alloy is ferromagnetic with glass transition temperature T{sub g}=845 K, crystallisation temperature T{sub x}=876 K, liquidus temperature T{sub liq}=1451 K and mechanical strength of 4 GPa. The coercivity of as-cast samples is very low, around 1.5 A/m. The present contribution aims at discussing the thermal stability, mechanical and magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30} BMG.

  20. Transfer-free synthesis of highly ordered Ge nanowire arrays on glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, M.; Toko, K., E-mail: toko@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Jevasuwan, W.; Fukata, N. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N. [Electron Microscope Facility, TIA, AIST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Vertically aligned Ge nanowires (NWs) are directly synthesized on glass via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth using chemical-vapor deposition. The use of the (111)-oriented Ge seed layer, formed by metal-induced crystallization at 325 °C, dramatically improved the density, uniformity, and crystal quality of Ge NWs. In particular, the VLS growth at 400 °C allowed us to simultaneously achieve the ordered morphology and high crystal quality of the Ge NW array. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the resulting Ge NWs had no dislocations or stacking faults. Production of high-quality NW arrays on amorphous insulators will promote the widespread application of nanoscale devices.

  1. Modeling of large aperture third harmonic frequency conversion of high power Nd:glass laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henesian, M.A.; Wegner, P.J.; Speck, D.R.; Bibeau, C.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Laumann, C.W.; Lawson, J.K.; Weiland, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    To provide high-energy, high-power beams at short wavelengths for inertial-confinement-fusion experiments, we routinely convert the 1.053-μm output of the Nova, Nd:phosphate-glass, laser system to its third-harmonic wavelength. We describe performance and conversion efficiency modeling of the 3 x 3 arrays potassium-dihydrogen-phosphate crystal plates used for type II/type II phase-matched harmonic conversion of Nova 0.74-m diameter beams, and an alternate type I/type II phase-matching configuration that improves the third-harmonic conversion efficiency. These arrays provide energy conversion of up to 65% and intensity conversion to 70%. 19 refs., 11 figs

  2. Ductile Bulk Aluminum-Based Alloy with Good Glass-Forming Ability and High Strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-Chao, Zhuo; Shu-Jie, Pang; Hui, Wang; Tao, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Based on a new approach for designing glassy alloy compositions, bulk Al-based alloys with good glass-forming ability (GFA) are synthesized. The cast Al 86 Si 0.5 Ni 4.06 Co 2.94 Y 6 Sc 0.5 rod with a diameter of 1 mm shows almost fully amorphous structure besides about 5% fcc-Al nucleated in the center of the rod. The bulk alloy with high Al concentration exhibits an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.18 GPa and maximum strength of 1.27 GPa as well as an obvious plastic strain of about 2.4% during compressive deformation. This light Al-based alloy with good GFA and mechanical properties is promising as a new high specific strength material with good deformability. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  3. Approaches to the accurate characterization of high purity metal fluorides and fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beary, E. S.; Paulsen, P. J.; Rains, T. C.; Ewing, K. J.; Jaganathan, J.; Aggarwal, I.

    1990-11-01

    The analytical challenges posed by the measurement of trace contaminants in high purity metal fluorides require that innovative chemical preparation procedures be used to enhance existing instrumental techniques. The instrumental techniques used to analyze these difficult matrices must be sensitive enough to detect extremely low levels of trace impurities, and the background interferences derived from the matrix (metal fluoride or glass) must be minimized. A survey of analytical techniques that have the necessary characteristics to analyze these materials will be given. In addition, means of controlling the chemical blank will be presented. Mass and atomic spectrometric techniques will be discussed, specifically graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Analytical procedures using GFAAS and ICP-MS have been developed to determine sub ppb (part per billion) levels of contaminants in high purity fluoride materials.

  4. Passive active neutron radioassay measurement uncertainty for combustible and glass waste matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1997-01-01

    Using a modified statistical sampling and verification approach, total uncertainty of INEL's Passive Active Neutron (PAN) radioassay system was evaluated for combustible and glass content codes. Waste structure and content of 100 randomly selected drums in each the waste categories were computer modeled based on review of real-time radiography video tapes. Specific quantities of Pu were added to the drum models according to an experimental design. These drum models were then submitted to the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon code processing and subsequent calculations to produce simulated PAN system measurements. The reported Pu masses from the simulation runs were compared with the corresponding input masses. Analysis of the measurement errors produced uncertainty estimates. This paper presents results of the uncertainty calculations and compares them to previous reported results obtained for graphite waste

  5. Formulation of special glass frit and its use for decontamination of Joule melter employed for vitrification of high level and radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsala, T.P.; Mishra, P.K.; Thakur, D.A.; Ghongane, D.E.; Jayan, R.V.; Dani, U.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced vitrification system at TWMP Tarapur was used for successful vitrification of large volume of HLW stored in waste tank farm. After completion of the operational life of the joule melter, dismantling was planned. Prior to the dismantling, the hold up inventory of active glass product from the melter was flushed out using specially formulated inactive glass frit to reduce the air activity buildup in the cell during dismantling operations. The properties of the special glass frit prepared are comparable with that of the regular product glass. More than 94% of holdup activity was flushed out from the joule melter prior to the dismantling of the melter. (author)

  6. White-Beam X-ray Diffraction and Radiography Studies on High-Boron Containing Borosilicate Glass at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kathryn; Vohra, Yogesh; Kono, Yoshio; Wereszczak, Andrew; Patel, Parimal

    Multi-angle energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction studies and white-beam x-ray radiography were conducted with a cylindrically shaped (1 mm diameter and 0.7 mm high) high-boron content borosilicate glass sample (17.6% B2O3) to a pressure of 13.7 GPa using a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) press at Beamline 16-BM-B, HPCAT of the Advanced Photon Source. The measured structure factor S(q) to large q = 19 Å-1, is used to determine information about the internuclear bond distances between various species of atoms within the glass sample. Sample pressure was determined with gold as a pressure standard. The sample height as measured by radiography showed an overall uniaxial compression of 22.5 % at 13.7 GPa with 10.6% permanent compaction after decompression to ambient conditions. The reduced pair distribution function G(r) was extracted and Si-O, O-O, and Si-Si bond distances were measured as a function of pressure. Raman spectroscopy of pressure recovered sample as compared to starting material showed blue-shift and changes in intensity and widths of Raman bands associated with silicate and B3O6 boroxol rings. US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0614.

  7. Peculiarities of the diffusion of silver and sodium ions in phosphate glasses with a high content of sodium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syutkin, V.M.; Tolkatchev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The phosphate glasses with a high content of alkali metal ions are good ionic conductors. Despite active studies, the mechanism of ion diffusion is not so far clear. The present work discusses the characteristics of ion diffusion in phosphate glasses with a high content of sodium oxide. An effective method to study ion transport is the investigation of relaxation processes the kinetics of which depends on ion diffusion. We use the data for two types of relaxation processes the kinetics of which is determined by ion diffusion. This is the conductivity relaxation due to sodium (host) ions and the decay of radiation-induced centers controlled by silver (guest) ion diffusion. Both of the processes being actually the first-order processes display a nonexponential kinetic behavior. The relaxation law can be interpreted either as the inherently nonexponential function or as the weighted sum of exponential decay functions with a distribution of relaxation times. It has been demonstrated that on the molecular level the relaxation function should be interpreted in the frame of the scheme of parallel first-order processes. This fact allows one to formulate a number of features of ion diffusion: (i) the mean square displacement of ions does not exceed several angstrom when transport becomes non-dispersive; (ii) the diffusion coefficient of ions is the function of coordinates. In this case, a characteristic distance at which D(r) noticeably varies is no less than a hundred of angstrom; (iii) the instantaneous concentration of mobile ions is well below the overall concentration ions

  8. Comparison of SRP high-level waste disposal costs for borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation of costs for the immobilization and repository disposal of SRP high-level wastes indicates that the borosilicate glass waste form is less costly than the crystalline ceramic waste form. The wastes were assumed immobilized as glass with 28% waste loading in 10,300 reference 24-in.-diameter canisters or as crystalline ceramic with 65% waste loading in either 3400 24-in.-diameter canisters or 5900 18-in.-diameter canisters. After an interim period of onsite storage, the canisters would be transported to the federal repository for burial. Total costs in undiscounted 1981 dollars of the waste disposal operations, excluding salt processing for which costs are not yet well defined, were about $2500 million for the borosilicate glass form in reference 24-in.-diameter canisters, compared to about $2900 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 24-in.-diameter canisters and about $3100 million for the crystalline ceramic form in 18-in.-diameter canisters. No large differences in salt processing costs for the borosilicate glass and crystalline ceramic forms are expected. Discounting to present values, because of a projected 2-year delay in startup of the DWPF for the crystalline ceramic form, preserved the overall cost advantage of the borosilicate glass form. The waste immobilization operations for the glass form were much less costly than for the crystalline ceramic form. The waste disposal operations, in contrast, were less costly for the crystalline ceramic form, due to fewer canisters requiring disposal; however, this advantage was not sufficient to offset the higher development and processing costs of the crystalline ceramic form. Changes in proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations to permit lower cost repository packages for defense high-level wastes would decrease the waste disposal costs of the more numerous borosilicate glass forms relative to the crystalline ceramic forms

  9. Microcolumn high pressure liquid chromatography with a glass-frit nebulizer interface for plasma emission detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.; Nisamaneepong, W.; Caruso, J.

    1985-01-01

    Microcolumn high pressure liquid chromatography (micro-HPLC) is rapidly gaining recognition as a practical separation tool for organometallic compounds. The use of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as a detector for micro-HPLC is studied. Several miniaturized glass-frit nebulizers are investigated as interfaces between the output of the microbore column and the ICP torch. Their performance with aqueous and methanolic solutions is evaluated by direct nebulization and flow injection analysis. The most efficient of these nebulizers is used in the micro-HPLC/ICP study of some Cd, Pb, and Zn organometallic compounds. Detection limits of 1.92 ng of Pb for tetramethyllead and 5.01 ng of Pb for tetraethyllead are obtained and compared with regular HPLC/ICP of these same compounds. Approximately equivalent detection limits were obtained when using a microwave induced plasma as an alternate plasma source

  10. Feasibility study of radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter postal dose intercomparison for high energy photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Siyong; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Chung, Jin-Beom; Shin, Dong-Oh; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2009-01-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. In this study we evaluated whether the GRD would be suitable for external dosimetric audit program in radiotherapy. For this purpose, we introduced a methodology of the absorbed dose determination with the GRD by establishing calibration coefficient and various correction factors (non-linearity dose response, fading, energy dependence and angular dependence). A feasibility test of the GRD postal dose intercomparison was also performed for eight high photon beams by considering four radiotherapy centers in Korea. In the accuracy evaluation of the GRD dosimetry established in this study, we obtained within 1.5% agreements with the ionization chamber dosimetry for the 60 Co beam. It was also observed that, in the feasibility study, all the relative deviations were smaller than 3%. Based on these results, we believe that the new GRD system has considerable potential to be used for a postal dose audit program

  11. Heat accumulation during high repetition rate ultrafast laser interaction: Waveguide writing in borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Eaton, Shane M; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R

    2007-01-01

    During high repetition rate (>200 kHz) ultrafast laser waveguide writing, visible heat modified zones surrounding the formed waveguide occur as a result of heat accumulation. The radii of the heat-modified zones increase with the laser net fluence, and were found to correlate with the formation of low-loss and cylindrically symmetric optical waveguides. A numerical thermal model based on the finite difference method is applied here to account for cumulative heating and diffusion effects. The model successfully shows that heat propagation and accumulation accurately predict the radius of the 'heat modified' zones observed in borosilicate glass waveguides formed across a wide range of laser exposure conditions. Such modelling promises better control of thermal effects for optimizing the fabrication and performance of three-dimensional optical devices in transparent materials

  12. DNA in glasses at 77 K: high energy ionizing radiation versus UV electron injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, M.E.; Parker, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Most in the field of ionizing radiation damage to DNA in frozen aqueous solutions agree that two major types of radical ions are formed, i.e. . G + / . A + and . T - / . C - . The main evidence stems from EPR and strand break studies. Fluid solutions exposed to laser light are known to give G .+ and e solv - with low yields of single strand breaks. We have explored this contrast by photoionizing DNA solutions at 77 K, in the expectation that this would prevent the formation of e solv - and hence that the results might be similar to those for high energy radiation. They are not: the results show only the formation of G .+ (or) A .+ , the fate of the ejected electrons is unclear except for sodium perchlorate glasses when they react to give O .- . (Author)

  13. Positron annihilation studies on bulk metallic glass and high intensity positron beam developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Stoeffl, W.

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is an ideal probe to examine atomic scale open-volume regions in materials. Below, we summarize the recent results on studies of open-volume regions of a multicomponent Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass. Our studies establish two types of open-volume regions, one group that is too shallow to trap positrons at room temperature and becomes effective only at low temperatures and the other group that localizes positrons at room temperature and is large enough to accommodate hydrogen. The second half of the paper will concentrate on the high intensity positron program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A new positron production target is under development and we are constructing two experimental end stations to accommodate a pulsed positron microprobe and an experiment on positron diffraction and holography. Important design considerations of these experiments will be described. (author)

  14. Radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming systems. VII. Polymerization in supercooled state under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetsu, I.; Yoshii, F.; Watanabe, Y.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate under high pressure was studied. The glass transition temperature of these monomers was heightened by increased pressure. The temperature dependence of polymerizability showed a characteristic relation, similar to those in supercooled-phase polymerization under normal pressure, that had a maximum at T/sub ν/ which shifted to higher levels of temperature as well as to T/sub g/ under high pressure. Polymerizability in the supercooled state also increased under increased pressure

  15. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hua; Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na 2 O/Li 2 O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn 0.60 Ni 0.20 Mg 0.20 )(Cr 1.37 Fe 0.63 )O 4 . The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q 3 species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na 2 O/Li 2 O base glass up to 28 days, due to a combination of the enhanced network

  16. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at glass buttes, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Perkin, Doug [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Martini, Brigette [Corescan Inc., Ascot (Australia); Boshmann, Darrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The engineering and studies phase of the Glass Buttes project was aimed at reducing risk during the early stages of geothermal project development. The project’s inclusion of high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys allowed Ormat to evaluate the value of these surveys both independently and in combination to quantify the most valuable course of action for exploration in an area where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The sizes of the thermal anomalies at Glass Buttes are unusually large. Over the course of Phase I Ormat acquired high resolution LIDAR data to accurately map fault manifestations at the surface and collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys to map subsurface structural features. In addition, Ormat collected airborne hyperspectral data to assist with mapping the rock petrology and mineral alteration assemblages along Glass Buttes faults and magnetotelluric (MT) survey to try to better constrain the structures at depth. Direct and indirect identification of alteration assemblages reveal not only the geochemical character and temperature of the causative hydrothermal fluids but can also constrain areas of upflow along specific fault segments. All five datasets were merged along with subsurface lithologies and temperatures to predict the most likely locations for high permeability and hot fluids. The Glass Buttes temperature anomalies include 2 areas, totaling 60 km2 (23 mi2) of measured temperature gradients over 165° C/km (10° F/100ft). The Midnight Point temperature anomaly includes the Strat-1 well with 90°C (194 °F) at 603 m (1981 ft) with a 164 °C/km (10°F/100ft) temperature gradient at bottom hole and the GB-18 well with 71°C (160 °F) at 396 m (1300 ft) with a 182°C/km (11°F/100ft) gradient. The primary area of alteration and elevated temperature occurs near major fault intersections associated with Brothers Fault Zone and Basin and Range systems. Evidence for faulting is

  17. Comparative molecular simulation study of low and high density polymer glasses: A competition between attractive and repulsive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jalim; Jose, Prasanth

    Results of molecular dynamics simulations of a system of Kremer and Grest linear polymer melts are presented at moderate and high number density. A detailed study of molecular pair distribution function shows that potential of mean force between the molecules has form of Gaussian with an attractive tail at number density ρ = 0.85 (in Lennard-Jones units), which is due to the dominating attractive interactions from temperature T = 0.7. This system shows gelation assisted glass transition, which is interpreted from peaks of molecular structure factor at small wave-numbers. At low temperature, this system phase separate to form dense domains whose local density is high; these domains show many dynamical features of glass transition in monomer and molecular level of relaxation indicating glass transition is assisted by gelation in this system. In the same system, at ρ = 1.0, repulsive interactions dominate, structure does not change even at low temperatures; the system exhibits dynamic heterogeneity and known to undergo glass transition. In this work, we compare and contrast the structure and dynamics of the system near its glass transition. Also, we computed correlation length of systems from the peak value of four-point structural dynamic susceptibility. HPC facility at IIT Mandi.

  18. Direct observation of radial distribution change during tensile deformation of metallic glass by high energy X-ray diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasu, Toshio, E-mail: nasu@kekexafs.kj.yamagata-u.ac.j [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Sasaki, Motokatsu [Faculty of Education, Arts and Science, Yamagata University, 1-4-12 Kojirakawa, Yamagata, Yamagata, 990-8560 (Japan); Usuki, Takeshi; Sekine, Mai [Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Harima Science Garden City, Sayo town, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Sakurai, Masaki; Wei Zhang; Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-08-26

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the micro-mechanism of deformation behavior of metallic glasses. We report the results of direct observations of short-range and medium-range structural change during tensile deformation of metallic glasses by high energy X-ray diffraction method. Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass samples in the ribbon shape (1.5 mm width and 25 mum) were made by using rapid quenching method. Tensile deformation added to the sample was made by using special equipment adopted for measuring the high energy X-ray diffraction. The peaks in pair distribution function g(r) for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and N{sub 30}iZr{sub 70} metallic glasses move zigzag into front and into rear during tensile deformation. These results of direct observation on atomic distribution change for Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} and Ni{sub 30}Zr{sub 70} metallic glass ribbons during tensile deformation suggest that the micro-relaxations occur.

  19. Titanium addition influences antibacterial activity of bioactive glass coatings on metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Omar; Stone, Wendy; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zalzal, Paul; Waldman, Stephen; Papini, Marcello; Towler, Mark R

    2017-10-01

    In an attempt to combat the possibility of bacterial infection and insufficient bone growth around metallic, surgical implants, bioactive glasses may be employed as coatings. In this work, silica-based and borate-based glass series were synthesized for this purpose and subsequently characterized in terms of antibacterial behavior, solubility and cytotoxicity. Borate-based glasses were found to exhibit significantly superior antibacterial properties and increased solubility compared to their silica-based counterparts, with BRT0 and BRT3 (borate-based glasses with 0 and 15 mol% of titanium dioxide incorporated, respectively) outperforming the remainder of the glasses, both borate and silicate based, in these respects. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy confirmed the release of zinc ions (Zn 2+ ), which has been linked to the antibacterial abilities of glasses SRT0, BRT0 and BRT3, with inhibition effectively achieved at concentrations lower than 0.7 ppm. In vitro cytotoxicity studies using MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts confirmed that cell proliferation was affected by all glasses in this study, with decreased proliferation attributed to a faster release of sodium ions over calcium ions in both glass series, factor known to slow cell proliferation in vitro .

  20. Anelastic deformation processes in metallic glasses and activation energy spectrum model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, [No Value; Csach, K; Kasardova, A; Bengus, VZ; Ocelik, Vaclav

    1997-01-01

    The isothermal kinetics of anelastic deformation below the glass transition temperature (so-called 'stress induced ordering' or 'creep recovery' deformation) was investigated in Ni-Si-B metallic glass. The relaxation time spectrum model and two recently developed methods for its calculation from the

  1. Balance of oxygen throughout the conversion of a high-level waste melter feed to glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, S.M.; Hrma, P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, R.; Hujová, Miroslava; Dixon, D.R.; Schweiger, M. J.; Kruger, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 16 (2017), s. 13113-13118 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : oxygen mass balance * feed-to-glass conversion * evolved gas * oxygen partial pressure * Fe redox ratio Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016

  2. Evaluation of lead-iron-phosphate glass as a high-level waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Kissinger, H.E.; Hodges, F.N.

    1986-09-01

    The lead-iron-phosphate (Pb-Fe-P) glass developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was evaluated for its potential as an improvement over the current reference nuclear waste form, borosilicate (B-Si) glass. The evaluation was conducted as part of the Second Generation HLW Technology Subtask of the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of this work was to investigate possible alternatives to B-Si glass as second-generation waste forms. While vitreous Pb-Fe-P glass appears to have substantially better chemical durability than B-Si glass, severe crystallization or devitrification leading to deteriorated chemical durability would result if this glass were poured into large canisters as is the procedure with B-Si glass. Cesium leach rates from this crystallized material are orders of magnitude greater than those from B-Si glass. Therefore, to realize the potential performance advantages of the Pb-Fe-P material in a nuclear waste form, the processing method would have to cool the material rapidly to retain its vitreous structure

  3. ARRHENIUS MODEL FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE GLASS VISCOSITY WITH A CONSTANT PRE-EXPONENTIAL FACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified form of the Arrhenius equation, ln η = A + B(x)/T, where η is the viscosity, T the temperature, x the composition vector, and A and B the Arrhenius coefficients, was fitted to glass-viscosity data for the processing temperature range (the range at which the viscosity is within 1 to 103 Pa.s) while setting A = constant and treating B(x) as a linear function of mass fractions of major components. Fitting the Arrhenius equation to over 550 viscosity data of commercial glasses and approximately 1000 viscosity data of glasses for nuclear-waste glasses resulted in the A values of -11.35 and -11.48, respectively. The R2 value ranged from 0.92 to 0.99 for commercial glasses and was 0.98 for waste glasses. The Arrhenius models estimate viscosities for melts of commercial glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 1100 to 1550 C and viscosity range of 5 to 400 Pa.s and for waste glasses containing 32 to 60 mass% SiO2 within the temperature range of 850 to 1450 C and viscosity range of 0.4 to 250 Pa.s

  4. Immobilization of high-level defense waste in a slurry-fed electric glass melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R.A.; Mellinger, G.B.; Nelson, T.A.; Oma, K.H.

    1980-11-01

    Scoping studies have been performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory related to the direct liquid-feeding of a generic high-level defense waste to a joule-heated ceramic melter. Tests beginning on the laboratory scale and progressing to full-scale operation are reported. Laboratory work identified the need for a reducing agent in the feed to help control the foaming tendencies of the waste glass. These tests also indicated that suspension agents were helpful in reducing the tendency of solids to settle out of the liquid feed. Testing was then moved to a larger pilot-scale melter (designed for approx. 2.5 kg/h) where verification of the flowsheet examined in the lab was accomplished. It was found that the reducing agent controlled foaming and did not result in the precipitation of metals. Pumping problems were encountered when slurries with higher than normal solids content were fed. A demonstration (designed for approx. 50 kg/h) in a full-scale melter was then made with the tested flowsheet; however, the amount of reducing agent had to be increased. In addition, it was found that feed control needed further development; however, steady-state operation was achieved giving encouraging results on process capacities. During steady-state operation, ruthenium losses to the offgas system averaged less than 0.16%, while cesium losses were somewhat higher, ranging from 0.91 to 24% and averaging 13%. Particulate decontamination factors from feed to offgas in the melter ranged from 5 x 10 2 to greater than 10 3 without any filtration or treatment. Approximately 1050 kg of glass was produced from 2900 L of waste at rates up to 40 kg/h

  5. Study on the fabrication and photoluminescence characteristics of LiBO2 glass scintillators with the lanthanides activators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sin, S. W.; Hwang, J. H.; Choi, S. H.; Sumarokov, S. Yu.

    2002-01-01

    LiBO 2 glass scintillators were fabricated, and lanthanides(except Pm) oxides or chlorides were used as an activator. For the fabrication of LiBO 2 glasses, optimum heating conditions were obtained, and the photoluminescence of the glasses was measured by the monochromator. For the best transparency of the glass samples, optimum heating temperature and time are 1000 .deg. C and 40 min, respectively. The result of photoluminescence analysis shows that Pr, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu are not good as activator. Because emission spectrum of samples with them was equal to that of sample without activator. In the case of samples with Europium, the peak of emission spectrum of Eu(III) is 810 nm. And Samples with Ce(III) are 760 nm, and Tb(III) are about 535 nm. Samples with Ce(III) and Tb(III) have the best PL intensity with added sugar in Ar reduction atmosphere, and sample with Eu(III) has the best intensity without a reducing process

  6. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of short- and intermediate-range structure in oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuya, Kentaro

    2002-01-01

    The feature of high-energy X-ray diffraction method is explained. The oxide glasses studies by using BL04B2, high-energy X-ray diffraction beam line of SPring-8, and the random system materials by high-energy monochromatic X-ray diffraction are introduced. An advantage of third generation synchrotron radiation is summarized. On SPring-8, the high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments of random system are carried out by BL04B2 and BL14B1 beam line. BL04B2 can select Si (111)(E=37.8 keV, λ=0.033 nm) and Si(220)(E=61.7 keV, λ=0.020 nm) as Si monochromator. The intermediate-range structure of (MgO) x (P 2 O 5 ) 1-x glass ,MgP 2 O 6 glass, B 2 O 3 glass, SiO 2 and GeO 2 are explained in detail. The future and application of high-energy X-ray diffraction are stated. (S.Y.)

  7. Ground-glass opacity: High-resolution computed tomography and 64-multi-slice computed tomography findings comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Ciccio, Carmelo; Boi, Luca; Velari, Luca; Crusco, Sonia; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Comparative evaluation of ground-glass opacity using conventional high-resolution computed tomography technique and volumetric computed tomography by 64-row multi-slice scanner, verifying advantage of volumetric acquisition and post-processing technique allowed by 64-row CT scanner. Methods: Thirty-four patients, in which was assessed ground-glass opacity pattern by previous high-resolution computed tomography during a clinical-radiological follow-up for their lung disease, were studied by means of 64-row multi-slice computed tomography. Comparative evaluation of image quality was done by both CT modalities. Results: It was reported good inter-observer agreement (k value 0.78-0.90) in detection of ground-glass opacity with high-resolution computed tomography technique and volumetric Computed Tomography acquisition with moderate increasing of intra-observer agreement (k value 0.46) using volumetric computed tomography than high-resolution computed tomography. Conclusions: In our experience, volumetric computed tomography with 64-row scanner shows good accuracy in detection of ground-glass opacity, providing a better spatial and temporal resolution and advanced post-processing technique than high-resolution computed tomography.

  8. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  9. Applications of High Energy Ion Beam Techniques in Environmental Science: Investigation Associated with Glass and Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V; Zhang, Yanwen

    2006-02-01

    High energy ion beam capabilities including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) have been very effectively used in environmental science to investigate the ion exchange mechanisms in glass waste forms and the effects of irradiation in glass and ceramic waste forms in the past. In this study, RBS and NRA along with SIMNRA simulations were used to monitor the Na depletion and D and 18O uptake in alumina silicate glasses, respectively, after the glass coupons were exposed to aqueous solution. These results show that the formation of a reaction layer and an establishment of a region where diffusion limited ion exchange occur in these glasses during exposure to silica-saturated solutions. Different regions including reaction and diffusion regions were identified on the basis of the depth distributions of these elements. In the case of ceramics, damage accumulation was studied as a function of ion dose at different irradiation temperatures. A sigmoidal dependence of relative disorder on the ion dose was observed. The defect dechanneling factors were calculated for two irradiated regions in SrTiO? using the critical angles determined from the angular yield curves. The dependence of defect dechanneling parameter on the incident energy was investigated and it was observed that the generated defects are mostly interstitial atoms and amorphous clusters. Thermal recovery experiments were performed to study the damage recovery processes up to a maximum temperature of 870 K.

  10. Preparation and characterization of an improved borosilicate glass matrix for the incorporation of high level radioactive waste (HAW). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guber, W.; Hussain, M.; Kahl, L.; Ondracek, G.; Saidl, J.; Dippel, T.

    1979-08-01

    On the basis of laboratory and technical experience with the preparation and the characterization of borosilicate glasses as solidification matrix for high level radioactive waste solution (HAW), a borosilicate glass composition with optimum properties has been developed. Keeping in view the technical and final storage requirements, a number of glass compositions with varying proportions of influential components as Al, Mg, Na were prepared and thoroughly investigated for certain parameters as specific gravity, thermal conductivity, impact resistance, thermal expansion, viscosity, characteristic temperature points, specific heat, evaporation losses from the melt, electrical conductivity, leach resistance, tendency toward recrystallization and second phase formation. All the compositions (some with different amounts of Gd 2 O 3 , an expected neutron poision) contained 15 wt. % simulated HAW oxides. Samples for investigation were fabricated very close to the actual process conditions of vitrification. Two glass products GP12 and GP26 (3.7% Gd 2 O 3 ) have been selected out of 25 glasses as the optimised products for further thorough investigations. Leach resistance, viscosity at 1420 K, tendency towards recrystallization and second phase formation were the most important deciding factors. (orig.) [de

  11. Western Canada: high prices, high activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savidant, S

    2000-01-01

    The forces responsible for the high drilling and exploration activity in Western Canada (recent high prices, excess pipeline capacity, and the promise of as yet undiscovered natural gas resources) are discussed. Supply and demand signposts, among them weather impacts, political response by governments, the high demand for rigs and services, the intense competition for land, the scarcity of qualified human resources, are reviewed/. The geological potential of Western Canada, the implications of falling average pool sizes, the industry's ability to catch up to increasing declines, are explored. The disappearance of easy large discoveries, rising development costs involved in smaller, more complex hence more expensive pools are assessed and the Canadian equity and capital markets are reviewed. The predicted likely outcome of all the above factors is fewer players, increasing expectation of higher returns, and more discipline among the remaining players

  12. Enhanced activity and stability of L-arabinose isomerase by immobilization on aminopropyl glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye-Wang; Jeya, Marimuthu; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2011-03-01

    Immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis L: -arabinose isomerase (BLAI) on aminopropyl glass modified with glutaraldehyde (4 mg protein g support⁻¹) was found to enhance the enzyme activity. The immobilization yield of BLAI was proportional to the quantity of amino groups on the surface of support. Reducing particle size increased the adsorption capacity (q(m)) and affinity (k(a)). The pH and temperature for immobilization were optimized to be pH 7.1 and 33 °C using response surface methodology (RSM). The immobilized enzyme was characterized and compared to the free enzyme. There is no change in optimal pH and temperature before and after immobilization. However, the immobilized BLAI enzyme achieved 145% of the activity of the free enzyme. Correspondingly, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) was improved 1.47-fold after immobilization compared to the free enzyme. The thermal stability was improved 138-fold (t₁/₂) increased from 2 to 275 h) at 50 °C following immobilization.

  13. Active glass-type human augmented cognition system considering attention and intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ojha, Amitash; Lee, Minho

    2015-10-01

    Human cognition is the result of an interaction of several complex cognitive processes with limited capabilities. Therefore, the primary objective of human cognitive augmentation is to assist and expand these limited human cognitive capabilities independently or together. In this study, we propose a glass-type human augmented cognition system, which attempts to actively assist human memory functions by providing relevant, necessary and intended information by constantly assessing intention of the user. To achieve this, we exploit selective attention and intention processes. Although the system can be used in various real-life scenarios, we test the performance of the system in a person identity scenario. To detect the intended face, the system analyses the gaze points and change in pupil size to determine the intention of the user. An assessment of the gaze points and change in pupil size together indicates that the user intends to know the identity and information about the person in question. Then, the system retrieves several clues through speech recognition system and retrieves relevant information about the face, which is finally displayed through head-mounted display. We present the performance of several components of the system. Our results show that the active and relevant assistance based on users' intention significantly helps the enhancement of memory functions.

  14. Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes

  15. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  16. Development of high dispersed TiO2 paste for transparent screen-printable self-cleaning coatings on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuanhao; Lu, Lin; Yang Hongxing; Che Quande

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a cheap and facile method to fabricate transparent self-cleaning coatings on glass by screen-printing high dispersed TiO 2 paste. Three kinds of ZrO 2 beads with diameter of 2, 1, and 0.1–0.2 mm were utilized to investigate their influence on the grinding and dispersion of the commercial TiO 2 powder in the ball mill. From the SEM images, surface profiler and transmittance spectrum it could be demonstrated that the smallest ZrO 2 bead with the diameter of 0.1–0.2 mm was the best candidate to disperse the TiO 2 powder into nanoscale size to make the high dispersed TiO 2 paste which was the key factor to achieve a smooth, high transparent TiO 2 coating. The surface wettability measurement showed that all the screen-printed coatings had super hydrophilic surfaces, which was independent to the surface morphology. However, the coating with the highest transparency showed the lowest photocatalytic activity which is mainly due to the light loss.

  17. High aspect ratio nanoholes in glass generated by femtosecond laser pulses with picosecond intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sanghoon; Choi, Jiyeon; Noh, Jiwhan; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2018-02-01

    Because of its potential uses, high aspect ratio nanostructures have been interested for last few decades. In order to generate nanostructures, various techniques have been attempted. Femtosecond laser ablation is one of techniques for generating nanostructures inside a transparent material. For generating nanostructures by femtosecond laser ablation, previous studies have been attempted beam shaping such as Bessel beam and temporal tailored beam. Both methods suppress electron excitation at near surface and initiate interference of photons at certain depth. Recent researches indicate that shape of nanostructures is related with temporal change of electron density and number of self-trapped excitons. In this study, we try to use the temporal change of electron density induced by femtosecond laser pulse for generating high aspect ratio nanoholes. In order to reveal the effect of temporal change of electron density, secondary pulses are irradiated from 100 to 1000 ps after the irradiation of first pulse. Our result shows that diameter of nanoholes is increasing and depth of nanoholes is decreasing as pulse to pulse interval is getting longer. With manipulating of pulse to pulse interval, we could generate high aspect ratio nanoholes with diameter of 250-350 nm and depth of 4∼6 μm inside a glass.

  18. Chalcogenide glasses for device application modified by high-energy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Chalcogenide glasses (ChG) or chemical compounds of chalcogen atoms (S, Se or Te, but not O) with some elements from IV-th and V-th groups of the Periodic Table (typically As, Ge, Sb, Bi, etc. ) obtained by melt quenching, are a perspective for application in modern optoelectronics, photonics, telecommunications, acoustic-optics, xerography, lithography, etc. This uniqueness is due to extremely high sensitivity of ChG to external influences, associated, presumably, with high steric flexibility proper to glassy-like network with low average atomic coordination (chalcogen atoms are typically two-fold coordinated in a glassy-like network), relatively large internal free volume and specific lp-character of electronic states localized at a valence-band top. However, at present, the further possibilities for conventional chemical/technological methods to prepare ChG are fully exhausted. One of the steps to resolve this problem is post-technological modification of ChG using possibilities of high-energy irradiation. This work is focused on new advanced radiation-modified ChG for device application in optoelectronics. The attractive practical use of these non-crystalline materials is tightly connected with radiation-induced defect formation processes. For the first time, we consider the possibilities of Raman scattering along with X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to characterize microstructural mechanisms of radiation-induced effects in ChG. (authors)

  19. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History, and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Izák, Pavel; Hrma, P.; Arey, B. W.; Plaisted, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 289, 1-3 (2001), s. 17-29 ISSN 0022-3093 Grant - others:DOE(US) DE/06/76RL01830 Keywords : feed melting * crystalization * high-level waste glass Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.363, year: 2001

  20. Reaction of water with a simulated high-level nuclear waste glass at 3000C, 300 bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Scheetz, B.E.; Komarneni, S.; Smith, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    The hydrothermal stability of high-level nuclear wastes is an important consideration in establishing waste form acceptance criteria for a geological repository in basalt. A detailed examination of the stability of a typical simulated high-level waste glass and pressurized water at 300 0 C in a closed system has shown that extensive reaction occurred within a few weeks. The water acted first as a catalyst-solvent in devitrification of the glass and in dissolution, transport, and recrystallization of some of its constituents, and, second, as a reactant in forming hydrated and hydroxylated phases. This reaction with water resulted in the conversion of a solid shard of glass into a fragmented and partially dispersed mass of crystalline and noncrystalline material plus dissolved species within two weeks. The major crystalline reaction products were found to be analogs of naturally occurring minerals: (Cs,Na,Rb) 2 (UO 2 ) 2 .(Si 2 O 5 ) 3 .4H 2 O (weeksite) and a series of pyroxene-structure phases, (Na,Ca) (Fe,Zn,Ti)Si 2 O 6 (acmite, acmite--augites). Weeksite, however, is not expected to have long-term stability in the basalt environment. Much of the Na and Mo, and almost all of the B, in the original glass was identified in the product solutions. Of the elements or analogs of long-lived, hazardous radionuclides studied in this work, only Cs was observed in these solutions in substantial amounts. Although the comparatively rapid and extensive reactions at 300 0 C would appear to require that an acceptable glass would have low waste and heat loading, it is suggested that there is good potential for favorable glass--basalt--water hydrothermal interactions. Favorable interactions would mean that, in the event of a hydrothermal incident, the interaction products would be more stable than the original waste form and would remain in the immediate repository

  1. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-insulated glass house, Egebjerggaard, Ballerup; Det hoejisolerede glashus. Egebjerggaard, Ballerup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.; Aggerholm, S.

    1999-11-01

    New, super-insulating transparent and translucent glazing offers new perspectives for use of glass in architecture to achieve new facade idioms, spatial and light effects and low energy consumption. The new types of glazing are being tested in practice through the construction of a super-insulated glass house for Ballerup Ejendomsselskab in the district of Egebjerggaard west of Copenhagen. The project is based on SBI Report 220, Super-insulated glass houses (1993), in which use of new, super-insulating transparent and translucent glazing is analysed in relation to architecture, light conditions, indoor climate and energy consumption - for a detached house and a terraced house. (EHS)

  3. Behavior of high resistance to He{sup 2+} induced irradiation damage in metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Mei, Xianxiu, E-mail: xxmei@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Hou, Wenjing; Wang, Younian [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Zhiguang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Highlights: •Metallic glasses and W were irradiated with 500 keV He{sup 2+} at different fluences. •Metallic glasses could maintain amorphous state at different irradiation fluences. •The resistance to He{sup 2+} irradiation of metallic glasses was superior to the one in W metal. •Cu- and Zr-based metallic glasses had better resistance to He{sup 2+} irradiation. -- Abstract: This study details the irradiation of various metallic glasses ((Cu{sub 47}Zr{sub 45}Al{sub 8}){sub 98.5}Y{sub 1.5}, Zr{sub 64}Cu{sub 17.8}Ni{sub 10.7}Al{sub 7.5}, Co{sub 61.2}B{sub 26.2}Si{sub 7.8}Ta{sub 4.8}) and metallic W using He{sup 2+} ions with an energy of 500 keV at irradiation fluences of 2 × 10{sup 17}, 1 × 10{sup 18} and 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} to investigate the radiation-resistant properties of these metallic glasses compared to the conventional irradiation-resistant material W. These three metallic glasses were able to maintain an amorphous state during these irradiation fluences. There was no significant irradiation damage at the low irradiation fluence. When the irradiation fluence was increased to 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, a damage layer appeared up to a distance corresponding to the range of the ions away from the surfaces of the Cu- and Zr-based metallic glasses without any visible damage on the surface. Significant surface stripping damage appeared in the Co-based metallic glass. Relatively speaking, surface layer peeling appeared in metallic W along the crystal boundary at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. When the fluence was increased to 2 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, multilayer peeling, stripping, etc. appeared. The roughness of the Cu- and Zr-based metallic glass showed further smoothing with increasing fluence, while the opposite occurred in the Co-based metallic glass. Within the wavelength range of 400–1700 nm, after irradiation of He{sup 2+} at a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, the reflectance of the Cu-based and Co

  4. Low-density to high-density transition in Ce{sub 75}Al{sub 23}Si{sub 2} metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Q S; Lou, H B; Gong, Y; Wang, X D; Jiang, J Z [International Center for New-Structured Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Fang, Y Z; Wu, F M [College of Mathematics, Physics and Information Engineering, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004, Zhejiang (China); Yang, K; Li, A G; Yan, S; Yu, X H [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203 (China); Lathe, C, E-mail: qiaoshizeng@gmail.co, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.c [HASYLAB am DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Hamburg D-22603 (Germany)

    2010-09-22

    Using in situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD), we observed a pressure-induced polyamorphic transition from the low-density amorphous (LDA) state to the high-density amorphous (HDA) state in Ce{sub 75}Al{sub 23}Si{sub 2} metallic glass at about 2 GPa and 300 K. The thermal stabilities of both LDA and HDA metallic glasses were further investigated using in situ high-temperature and high-pressure XRD, which revealed different pressure dependences of the onset crystallization temperature (T{sub x}) between them with a turning point at about 2 GPa. Compared with Ce{sub 75}Al{sub 25} metallic glass, minor Si doping shifts the onset polyamorphic transition pressure from 1.5 to 2 GPa and obviously stabilizes both LDA and HDA metallic glasses with higher T{sub x} and changes their slopes dT{sub x}/dP. The results obtained in this work reveal another polyamorphous metallic glass system by minor alloying (e.g. Si), which could modify the transition pressure and also properties of LDA and HDA metallic glasses. The minor alloying effect reported here is valuable for the development of more polyamorphous metallic glasses, even multicomponent bulk metallic glasses with modified properties, which will trigger more investigations in this field and improve our understanding of polyamorphism and metallic glasses.

  5. Improvements in processing characteristics and engineering properties of wood flour-filled high density polyethylene composite sheeting in the presence of hollow glass microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris Yalcin; Steve E Amos; Andrew S D Souza; Craig M Clemons; I Sedat Gunes; Troy K Ista

    2012-01-01

    Hollow glass microspheres were introduced into wood flour/high density polyethylene composites by melt compounding in a twin-screw extruder. The prepared composites were subsequently converted to extruded profiles in order to obtain composite sheeting. The presence of hollow glass microspheres highly reduced the density of the extruded sheets down to 0.9 g/cc, while...

  6. Do light cured ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants perform better than resin-composite sealants: a 4-year randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Chen, X.; Fan, M.W.; Mulder, J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The hypotheses tested were: the cumulative survival rates of dentin caries lesion-free pits and fissures of ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants with light-curing (high-intensity LED) and glass-carbomer sealants are higher than those of conventional ART sealants and

  7. Holographic wavefront characterization of a frequency-tripled high-peak-power neodymium:glass laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Near-field amplitude and phase distributions from a high-peak-power, frequency converted Nd:glass laser (lambda = 351 nm) have been holographically recorded on silver-halide emulsions. Conventionally, the absence of a suitable reference beam forces one to use some type of shearing interferometry to obtain phasefront information, while the near-field and far-field distributions are recorded as intensity profiles. In this study, a spatially filtered, locally generated reference beam was created to holographically store the complex amplitude distribution of the pulsed laser beam, while reconstruction of the original wavefront was achieved with a continuous-wave laser. Reconstructed near-field and quasi-far-field intensity distributions closely resembled those obtained from conventional techniques, and accurate phasefront reconstruction was achieved. Furthermore, several two-beam interferometric techniques, not practicable with a high-peak-power laser, have been successfully implemented on a continuous-wave reconstruction of the pulsed laser beam. 46 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab

  8. Fun with Singing Wine Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Christine; Galloway, Melodie; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    A fun activity is presented using singing wine glasses for introductory physics students. Students tune a white wine glass and a red wine glass to as many semitones as possible by filling the glasses with the appropriate amounts of water. A smart phone app is used to measure the frequencies of equal-temperament tones. Then plots of frequency…

  9. A Novel SOFC/SOEC Sealing Glass with a Low SiO2 Content and a High Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    the amount of Si emission, a low Si containing sealing glass (chemical composition: 50 mol% CaO, 20 mol% ZnO, 20 mol% B2O3 and 10 mol% SiO2) was developed at DTU. In this work, the results from thermal characterization, the crystallization behavior of the glass and the long-term stability and adhesion......Solid oxide cells require seals that can function in harsh, elevated temperature environments. In addition, a low Si content can be advantageous, since Si impurities from the glass sealant can be transported to the active fuel electrode and poison the Ni-YSZ triple phase boundaries. To reduce...... behavior of the glass were studied under SOFC and SOEC relevant conditions. The glass-ceramic sealant performed well over 400 h, and no cell degradation or leakage related to the seal was found, indicating that the developed glass system is applicable for the use in SOFC/SOEC stacks....

  10. High quality-factor quartz tuning fork glass probe used in tapping mode atomic force microscopy for surface profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Xu, Yanhao; Shimizu, Yuki; Matsukuma, Hiraku; Gao, Wei

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a high quality-factor (Q-factor) quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a glass probe attached, used in frequency modulation tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the surface profile metrology of micro and nanostructures. Unlike conventionally used QTFs, which have tungsten or platinum probes for tapping mode AFM, and suffer from a low Q-factor influenced by the relatively large mass of the probe, the glass probe, which has a lower density, increases the Q-factor of the QTF probe unit allowing it to obtain better measurement sensitivity. In addition, the process of attaching the probe to the QTF with epoxy resin, which is necessary for tapping mode AFM, is also optimized to further improve the Q-factor of the QTF glass probe. The Q-factor of the optimized QTF glass probe unit is demonstrated to be very close to that of a bare QTF without a probe attached. To verify the effectiveness and the advantages of the optimized QTF glass probe unit, the probe unit is integrated into a home-built tapping mode AFM for conducting surface profile measurements of micro and nanostructures. A blazed grating with fine tool marks of 100 nm, a microprism sheet with a vertical amplitude of 25 µm and a Fresnel lens with a steep slope of 90 degrees are used as measurement specimens. From the measurement results, it is demonstrated that the optimized QTF glass probe unit can achieve higher sensitivity as well as better stability than conventional probes in the measurement of micro and nanostructures.

  11. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite (Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2), and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history

  12. CoO-doped MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-colored transparent glass-ceramics with high crystallinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wufu; Zhang, Qian; Luo, Zhiwei; Yu, Jingbo; Gao, Xianglong; Li, Yunxing; Lu, Anxian

    2018-02-01

    To obtain CoO-doped MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (MAS)-colored transparent glass-ceramics with high crystallinity, the glass with the composition 21MgO-21Al2O3-54SiO2-4B2O3-0.2CoO (in mol %) was prepared by conventional melt quenching technique and subsequently thermal treated at several temperatures. The crystallization behavior of the glass, the precipitated crystalline phases and crystallinity were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of the glass-ceramics was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FSEM). The transmittance of glass-ceramic was measured by UV spectrophotometer. The results show that a large amount of α-cordierite (indianite) with nano-size was precipitated from the glass matrix after treatment at 1020 °C for 3 h. The crystallinity of the transparent glass-ceramic reached up to 97%. Meanwhile, the transmittance of the glass-ceramic was 74% at 400 nm with a complex absorption band from 450 nm to 700 nm. In addition, this colored transparent glass-ceramic possessed lower density (2.469 g/cm3), lower thermal expansion coefficient (1.822 × 10-6 /℃), higher Vickers hardness (9.1 GPa) and higher bending strength (198 MPa) than parent glass.

  13. Alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced high strength concrete in simulated aggressive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, W.H.; Cheah, C.B.; Ramli, M.; Chang, K.Y.

    2018-01-01

    The durability of the alkali-resistant (AR) glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) in three simulated aggresive environments, namely tropical climate, cyclic air and seawater and seawater immersion was investigated. Durability examinations include chloride diffusion, gas permeability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy examination (SEM). The fiber content is in the range of 0.6 % to 2.4 %. Results reveal that the specimen containing highest AR glass fiber content suffered severe strength loss in seawater environment and relatively milder strength loss under cyclic conditions. The permeability property was found to be more inferior with the increase in the fiber content of the concrete. This suggests that the AR glass fiber is not suitable for use as the fiber reinforcement in concrete is exposed to seawater. However, in both the tropical climate and cyclic wetting and drying, the incorporation of AR glass fiber prevents a drastic increase in permeability. [es

  14. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BP McGrail, WL Ebert, DH Bacon, DM Strachan

    1998-02-18

    Privatized services are being procured to vitrify low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. Over 500,000 metric tons of low-activity waste glass will be generated, which is among the largest volumes of waste within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and is one of the largest inventories of long-lived radionuclides planned for disposal in a low-level waste facility. Before immobilized waste can be disposed, DOE must approve a "performance assessment," which is a document that describes the impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Because the release rate of radionuclides from the glass waste form is a key factor determining these impacts, a sound scientific basis for determining their long-term release rates must be developed if this disposal action is to be accepted by regulatory agencies, stakeholders, and the public. In part, the scientific basis is determined from a sound testing strategy. The foundation of the proposed testing strategy is a well accepted mechanistic model that is being used to calculate the glass corrosion behavior over the geologic time scales required for performance assessment. This model requires that six parameters be determined, and the testing program is defined by an appropriate set of laboratory experiments to determine these parameters, and is combined with a set of field experiments to validate the model as a whole. Three general classes of laboratory tests are proposed in this strategy: 1) characterization, 2) accelerated, and 3) service condition. Characterization tests isolate and provide specific information about processes or parameters in theoretical models. Accelerated tests investigate corrosion behavior that will be important over the regulated service life of a disposal system within a laboratory time frame of a few years or less. Service condition tests verify that the techniques used in accelerated tests do not change

  15. Growth and Characterization of Nanostructured Glass Ceramic Scintillators for Miniature High-Energy Radiation Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    rise time was resolved using Kerr gating technique with 8 ps resolution. Spectro -temporal dynamics was resolved using streak camera and tunable pump...mol% CeF3 doped glass under UV light irradiation). Fig. 5. Radioluminescence (RL) spectra of all the CeF3 doped glasses...technique with 8 ps resolution. Spectro -temporal dynamics was resolved using streak camera and tunable pump at second/third harmonic (400/267nm) and XUV

  16. The composition effect on the long-term corrosion of high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Waste glass can be optimized for long-term corrosion behavior if the key parameters that control the rate of corrosion are identified, measured, and modeled as functions of glass composition. Second-order polynomial models have been used to optimize glass with respect to a set of requirements on glass properties, such as viscosity and outcomes of standard corrosion tests. Extensive databases exist for the 7-day Product Consistency Test and the 28-day Materials Characterization Center tests, which have been used for nuclear waste glasses in the United States. Models based on these tests are reviewed and discussed to demonstrate the compositional effects on the extent of corrosion under specified conditions. However, modeling the rate of corrosion is potentially more useful for predicting long-term behavior than modeling the extent of corrosion measured by standard tests. Based on an experimental study of two glasses, it is shown that the rate of corrosion can be characterized by simple functions with physically meaningful coefficients. (author)

  17. 1998 Annual Study Report. Standardization of methods for evaluating properties of new glass at high temperature; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. New glass koon bussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    High-temperature properties of glass melts, e.g., density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium and gas solubility, are basic factors that must be considered in high quality glass melting technology and computer simulation of the glass tank furnace. The structure of the glass melts is also important for understanding these properties. This R and D program is aimed at proposing the international standards for the methods of measuring these high-temperature properties of the melts. The 1988 efforts are directed to the measuring technologies for density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium, gas solubility and melt structures of soda-lime-silica glass melts. The R and D for measuring methods for high-temperature melts through international cooperation and establishment of the international standards for these methods are proposed in the joint CGR/HVG/TNO/GPF conference, which provides the arena for information exchange by glass manufacturers. (NEDO)

  18. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms......, which is determined by the shear modulus. First, we here present an in situ high-temperature Brillouin spectroscopy test of the shoving model near the glass transition of eight aluminosilicate glass-forming systems. We find that the measured viscosity data agree qualitatively with the measured...... temperature dependence of shear moduli, as predicted by the shoving model. However, the model systematically underpredicts the values of fragility. Second, we also present a thorough test of the shoving model for predicting the low temperature dynamics of an aluminosilicate glass system. This is done...

  19. Structure-to-glass transition temperature relationships in high temperature stable condensation polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.; Gratz, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) connecting group in aryl dianhydrides used to prepare aromatic condensation polyimides provides high glass transition temperature (T sub g) polyimides with excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if a trifluorophenyl-ethylidene (3F) connecting group would have a similar effect on the T sub g of aromatic condensation polyimides. A new dianhydride containing the 3F connecting group was synthesized. This dianhydride and an aromatic diamine also containing the 3F connecting group were used together and in various combinations with known diamines or known dianhydrides, respectively, to prepare new 3F containing condensation polyimides. Known polyimides, including some with the 6F connecting linkage, were also prepared for comparison purposes. The new 3F containing polymers and the comparison polymers were prepared by condensation polymerization via the traditional amic-acid polymerization method in N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent. The solutions were characterized by determining their inherent viscosities and then were thermally converted into polyimide films under nitrogen atmosphere at 300 to 500 C, usually 350 C. The T sub g's of the films and resin discs were then determined by thermomechanical analysis and were correlated as a function of the final processing temperatures of the films and resin discs. The results showed that similarities existed in the T sub g's depending on the nature of the connecting linkage in the monomers used to prepare the condensation polyimides.

  20. Low-Cost, High Glass-Transition Temperature, Thermosetting Polyimide Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy C.

    1999-01-01

    PMR-15 polyimide, developed in the mid-1970's at the NASA Lewis Research Center, is recognized as a state-of-the-art high-temperature resin for composite applications in the temperature range of 500 to 550 F (260 to 288 C). PMR-15 offers easy processing and good property retention at a reasonable cost. For these reasons, it is widely used in both military and commercial aircraft engine components. Traditionally, polyimide composites have been designed for long-term use at 500 to 600 F over thousands of hours. However, new applications in reusable launch vehicles (RLV's) require lightweight materials that can perform for short times (tens of hours) at temperatures between 800 and 1000 F (425 and 538 C). Current efforts at Lewis are focused on raising the use temperature of polyimide composites by increasing the glass-transition temperature of the matrix resins. Achieving this dramatic increase in the upper use temperature without sacrificing polymer and composite processability is a major technical challenge.

  1. High density liquid structure enhancement in glass forming aqueous solution of LiCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camisasca, G.; De Marzio, M.; Rovere, M.; Gallo, P.

    2018-06-01

    We investigate using molecular dynamics simulations the dynamical and structural properties of LiCl:6H2O aqueous solution upon supercooling. This ionic solution is a glass forming liquid of relevant interest in connection with the study of the anomalies of supercooled water. The LiCl:6H2O solution is easily supercooled and the liquid state can be maintained over a large decreasing temperature range. We performed simulations from ambient to 200 K in order to investigate how the presence of the salt modifies the behavior of supercooled water. The study of the relaxation time of the self-density correlation function shows that the system follows the prediction of the mode coupling theory and behaves like a fragile liquid in all the range explored. The analysis of the changes in the water structure induced by the salt shows that while the salt preserves the water hydrogen bonds in the system, it strongly affects the tetrahedral hydrogen bond network. Following the interpretation of the anomalies of water in terms of a two-state model, the modifications of the oxygen radial distribution function and the angular distribution function of the hydrogen bonds in water indicate that LiCl has the role of enhancing the high density liquid component of water with respect to the low density component. This is in agreement with recent experiments on aqueous ionic solutions.

  2. Effect of In-Situ Cure on Measurement of Glass Transition Temperatures in High-Temperature Thermosetting Polymers (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-20

    TEMPERATURES IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMOSETTING POLYMERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...temperature thermosetting polymer via dynamic mechanical analysis alone. These difficulties result from the residual cure of samples heated beyond their...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Effect of In-Situ Cure on Measurement of Glass Transition Temperatures in High-Temperature Thermosetting

  3. High-efficiency ytterbium-free erbium-doped all-glass double cladding silicate glass fiber for resonantly-pumped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zexuan; Geng, Jihong; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shibin

    2014-02-01

    A highly efficient ytterbium-free erbium-doped silicate glass fiber has been developed for high-power fiber laser applications at an eye-safe wavelength near 1.55 μm. Our preliminary experiments show that high laser efficiency can be obtained from a relatively short length of the gain fiber when resonantly pumped at 1535 nm in both core- and cladding-pumping configurations. With a core-pumping configuration as high as 75%, optical-to-optical efficiency and 4 W output power were obtained at 1560 nm from a 1 m long gain fiber. When using a cladding-pumping configuration, approximately 13 W output power with 67.7% slope efficiency was demonstrated from a piece of 2 m long fiber. The lengths of silicate-based gain fiber are much shorter than their silica-based counterparts used in other experiments, which is significantly important for high-power narrow-band and/or pulsed laser applications.

  4. Development of textured ZnO-coated low-cost glass substrate with very high haze ratio for silicon-based thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongsingthong, Aswin; Krajangsang, Taweewat; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak; Sritharathikhun, Jaran; Konagai, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) films with a very high haze ratio and low resistivity were developed on soda–lime glass substrate by using reactive ion etching (RIE) treatment with carbon tetrafluoride (CF 4 ) to modify the substrate surface morphology before the deposition of ZnO films. We found that the surface morphology of the ZnO films deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique could be modified by varying the glass treatment conditions and the gas pressure was a key parameter. With increasing glass-etching pressure, the surface morphology of the ZnO films changed from conventional pyramid-like single texture to greater cauliflower-like double texture, leading to significant increases in root mean square roughness and haze ratio of the films. By employing the developed high-haze ZnO films as a front transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer in microcrystalline silicon solar cells, an enhancement in the quantum efficiency in the long-wavelength region has been achieved. Experimental results have verified that our unique and original glass etching treatment is a simple and effective technique to improve the light-scattering properties of the ZnO films while preserving their good transparency and electrical properties. Thus, the ZnO films deposited on etched soda–lime glass have a high potential for the use as a front TCO layer in thin-film Si solar cells. - Highlights: • High-haze zinc oxide (ZnO) grown on low cost soda–lime glass has been developed. • Surface of the ZnO can be modified by varying glass-substrate etching conditions. • Glass-etching pressure is a key to increase haze ratio of the ZnO films. • Higher cell efficiency has been achieved from cell using etched glass. • High-haze ZnO coated glass is a promising transparent conductive oxide coated glass

  5. Development of textured ZnO-coated low-cost glass substrate with very high haze ratio for silicon-based thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongsingthong, Aswin, E-mail: aswin.hongsingthong@nectec.or.th [Solar Energy Technology Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Khlong 1, Khlong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Krajangsang, Taweewat; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak; Sritharathikhun, Jaran [Solar Energy Technology Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, 112 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Khlong 1, Khlong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Konagai, Makoto [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, NE-15, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2013-06-30

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) films with a very high haze ratio and low resistivity were developed on soda–lime glass substrate by using reactive ion etching (RIE) treatment with carbon tetrafluoride (CF{sub 4}) to modify the substrate surface morphology before the deposition of ZnO films. We found that the surface morphology of the ZnO films deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique could be modified by varying the glass treatment conditions and the gas pressure was a key parameter. With increasing glass-etching pressure, the surface morphology of the ZnO films changed from conventional pyramid-like single texture to greater cauliflower-like double texture, leading to significant increases in root mean square roughness and haze ratio of the films. By employing the developed high-haze ZnO films as a front transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer in microcrystalline silicon solar cells, an enhancement in the quantum efficiency in the long-wavelength region has been achieved. Experimental results have verified that our unique and original glass etching treatment is a simple and effective technique to improve the light-scattering properties of the ZnO films while preserving their good transparency and electrical properties. Thus, the ZnO films deposited on etched soda–lime glass have a high potential for the use as a front TCO layer in thin-film Si solar cells. - Highlights: • High-haze zinc oxide (ZnO) grown on low cost soda–lime glass has been developed. • Surface of the ZnO can be modified by varying glass-substrate etching conditions. • Glass-etching pressure is a key to increase haze ratio of the ZnO films. • Higher cell efficiency has been achieved from cell using etched glass. • High-haze ZnO coated glass is a promising transparent conductive oxide coated glass.

  6. Immobilization of Chloroperoxidase on Aminopropyl-Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadima, Tenshuk A.; Pickard, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) purified from Caldariomyces fumago CMI 89362 was covalently bound to aminopropyl-glass by using a modification of an established method. Acid-washed glass was derivatized by using aminopropyltriethoxysilane, and the enzyme was ionically bound at low ionic strength. Further treatment with glutaraldehyde covalently linked the enzyme to the glass beads in an active form. No elution of bound activity from glass beads could be detected with a variety of washings. The loading of enzyme protein to the glass beads was highest, 100 mg of CPO per g of glass, at high reaction ratios of CPO to glass, but the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme was highest, 36% of theoretical, at low enzyme-to-carrier ratios. No differences in the properties of the soluble and immobilized enzymes could be detected by a number of criteria: their pH-activity and pH-stability profiles were similar, as were their thermal stabilities. After five uses, the immobilized enzyme retained full activity between pH 6.0 and 6.7. PMID:16348352

  7. Neutron activation analysis of AD 1660-1930 European copper-coloured blue glass trade beads from Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Aufreiter, S.

    1995-01-01

    Blue glass trade beads from well-dated late seventeenth- to early twentieth-century sites and collections have been analysed non-destructively by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The beads display enough variations in their elemental contents to allow us to characterize the different chemistries. The implication of these results is that similar chemical analyses of blue beads from undated archaeological sites may be used to help date the sites, since each bead chemistry has a specific earliest period. (author)

  8. The Effect of Composition on Spinel Crystals Equilibrium in Low-Silica High-Level Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiricka, Milos; Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The liquidus temperature (TL) and the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel were measured in the regions of low-silica (less than 42 mass% SiO2) high-level waste borosilicate glasses within the spinel primary phase field as functions of glass composition. The components that varied, one at a time, were Al2O3, B2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, Li2O, MnO, Na2O, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2. The effects of Al2O3, B2O3, Fe2O3, NiO, SiO2, and ZrO2 on the TL in this region and in glasses with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2 were similar. However, in the low-silica region, Cr2O3 increased the TL substantially less, and Li2O and Na2O decreased the TL significantly less than in the region with 42 to 56 mass% SiO2. The effect of MnO on the TL of the higher SiO2 glasses is not yet understood with sufficient accuracy. The temperature at which the equilibrium mass fraction of spinel was 1 mass% was 25C to 64C below the TL

  9. (Alpha, gamma) irradiation effect on the alteration of high-level radioactive wastes matrices (UO2, hollandite, glass SON68)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the effect of irradiation on the alteration of high level nuclear waste forms matrices. The matrices investigated are UO 2 to simulate the spent fuel, the hollandite for the specific conditioning of Cs, and the inactive glass SON68 representing the nuclear glass R7T7) The alpha irradiation experiments on UO 2 colloids in aqueous carbonate media have enabled to distinguish between the oxidation of UO 2 matrix as initial and dissolution as subsequent step. The simultaneous presence of carbonate and H 2 O 2 (product resulting from water radiolysis) increased the dissolution rate of UO 2 to its maximum value governed by the oxidation rate. ii) The study of hollandite alteration under gamma irradiation confirmed the good retention capacity for Cs and Ba. Gamma irradiation had brought only a little influence on releasing of Cs and Ba in solution. Electronic irradiation had conducted to the amorphization of the hollandite only for a dose 1000 times higher than the auto-induced dose of Ba over millions of years. iii) The experiences of glass irradiation under alpha beam and of helium implantation in the glass SON68 were analyzed by positon annihilation spectroscopy. No effect has been observed on the solid surface for an irradiation dose equal to 1000 years of storage. (author)

  10. Qualification and characterization programmes for disposal of a glass product resulting from high level waste vitrification in the PAMELA installation of BELGOPROCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeyse, A. de; De, A.K.; Demonie, M.; Iseghem, P. van

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of a general quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) programme, the quality of a conditioned waste product is achieved in two phases. The first phase is the design of a process and facility which will ensure the required quality of the product. In the second phase the conformance of the product with the preset requirements is verified. NIRAS/ONDRAF, as the agency responsible for the management of all radioactive waste in Belgium (including treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal), controls compliance with the quality requirements during both phases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the different phases of this general procedure in the case of a vitrified HLW product resulting from a vitrification campaign in the PAMELA facility at the BELGOPROCESS site. The active glass product of type SM527 produced during the vitrification of highly enriched waste concentrate (HEWC) (resulting from the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuel) has been selected for illustration. During the process qualification phase, the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Wiederaufarbeitung von Kernbrennstoffen mbH, responsible for the development of the vitrification process of PAMELA, defined and performed and R and D programmed for each glass product originating from the vitrification of the different HEWC solutions stored at the BELGOPROCESS site. At the end of this qualification phase a data catalogue was prepared. In order to ensure that the active glass product corresponds with the selected product from the data catalogue, the QA/QC handbook for the vitrification process describes all measures to be taken by the waste producer, BELGOPROCESS, during the vitrification. Finally, verification analyses are performed by the characterization of inactive and active samples by an independent laboratory. This phase is called the product quality verification phase. The details of the characterization programmes performed during the different phases and their results

  11. Use of long-term stable CsPbBr3 perovskite quantum dots in phospho-silicate glass for highly efficient white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Zemin; Jiang, Jutao; He, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Xiang, Weidong; Liang, Xiaojuan

    2017-10-05

    We report the synthesis of CsPbBr 3 QDs with great stability and high quantum yield in phospho-silicate glass, which was fabricated by using a heat-treatment approach, for white light emitting devices. QD glasses exhibited excellent photo- and thermal stability, and significantly prolonged the lifetime of light emitters under ambient air conditions.

  12. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.B.; Flintoff, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 1000 0 C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm 3 , depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF 2 , CaZrTi 207 , CaTiO 3 , monoclinic ZrO 2 , and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO 2 , CaO, and SiO 2 ) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U 238 . The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO 2 . Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm 3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF 2 , Al 203 , and ZrSi 04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  13. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Pegg, Ian L.; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan Tao; Buechele, Andrew; Rielley, Elizabeth; Gan, Hao; Muller, Isabelle S.; Cecil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements

  14. Effect of different glasses in glass bonded zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.A.; Ackerman, J.P.; Verma, S.

    1995-01-01

    A mineral waste form has been developed for chloride waste salt generated during the pyrochemical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of salt-occluded zeolite powders bound within a glass matrix. The zeolite contains the salt and immobilizes the fission products. The zeolite powders are hot pressed to form a mechanically stable, durable glass bonded zeolite. Further development of glass bonded zeolite as a waste form requires an understanding of the interaction between the glass and the zeolite. Properties of the glass that enhance binding and durability of the glass bonded zeolite need to be identified. Three types of glass, boroaluminosilicate, soda-lime silicate, and high silica glasses, have a range of properties and are now being investigated. Each glass was hot pressed by itself and with an equal amount of zeolite. MCC-1 leach tests were run on both. Soda-lime silicate and high silica glasses did not give a durable glass bonded zeolite. Boroaluminosilicate glasses rich in alkaline earths did bind the zeolite and gave a durable glass bonded zeolite. Scanning electron micrographs suggest that the boroaluminosilicate glasses wetted the zeolite powders better than the other glasses. Development of the glass bonded zeolite as a waste form for chloride waste salt is continuing

  15. Judd-Ofelt Analysis of Dy3+-Activated Aluminosilicate Glasses Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengthong, Buonyavong; Van Tuyen, Ho; An, Nguyen Thi Thai; Van Do, Phan; Hai, Nguyen Thi Quy; Chau, Pham Thi Minh; Quang, Vu Xuan

    2018-04-01

    Aluminosilicate (AS) glasses doped with different Dy3+ concentrations were synthesized via sol-gel method. Absorption, photoluminescence spectra and lifetime of this material have been studied. From analytical results of absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt (JO) parameters of prepared samples have been determined. These JO parameters combined with photoluminescence spectra have been used to evaluate transition probabilities ( A R), branching ratios ( β) and the calculated oscillator strengths of AS:Dy3+ glasses. The radiative branching ratio of 4F9/2 → 6H13/2 transition has a minimum value at 62.2% for β R which predicts that this transition in AS:Dy3+ glasses can give rise to lasing action. JO parameters show that the Ω2 increases with the increasing of Dy3+ ion concentration due to the increased polarizability of the average coordination medium and decreased average symmetry.

  16. Revealing flow behaviors of metallic glass based on activation of flow units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, T. P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y., E-mail: hybai@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-05-28

    Atomic level flow plays a critical role in the mechanical behavior of metallic glass (MG) while the connection between the flow and the heterogeneous microstructure of the glass remains unclear. We describe the heterogeneity of MGs as the elastic matrix with “inclusions” of nano-scale liquid-like flow units, and the plastic flow behavior of MGs is considered to be accommodated by the flow units. We show that the model can explain the various deformation behaviors, the transformation from inhomogeneous deformation to homogeneous flow upon strain rate or temperature, and the deformation map in MGs, which might provide insights into the flow mechanisms in glasses and inspiration for improving the plasticity of MGs.

  17. The effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass containing simulated high level liquid waste (HLLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro; Sumarbagiono; Martono, H.

    1996-01-01

    Effect of devitrification on leaching rate of glass named G1 and G2 each contains 20 wt% and 30wt% of waste has been studied. devitrification of waste - glass has been carried out by heating those specimens at 850 o C for 10, 18, 26, 34, 42 and 50 hours respectively. The weight percentage of crystal in waste glass was determined by X-ray diffractometer and leaching rate was determined by soxhlet apparatus at 100 o C for 24 hours. The longer heating time, the more weight percentage of crystal is formed. The results show that leaching rate of G2 specimens are higher than those of G1. For G1 the leaching rate at 850 o C in 20 times than without heating, and for G2 leaching rate is 15.7 times than without heating. (author)

  18. Fabrication and characterization of high impact hybrid matrix composites from thermoset resin and dyneema-glass fabric reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Pansuriya, T.; Malgani, E. V.; Sevkani, V.

    2018-05-01

    Hybrid composites have been fabricated by hand lay-up technique with epoxy resin and diethylene tri amine as a hardener for high impact energy absorption with sandwich stacking of different reinforcements of dyneema and glass fabric. High impact grade composites are nowadays gaining a lot of importance in the field of high mechanical load bearing applications, ballistics and bulletproofing. The present work emphases on the fabrication and mechanical properties of the hybrid composites of cut resistant dyneema fabric along with glass fabric reinforced in the thermosetting resin. i.e. epoxy. The prime importance while fabricating such materials have been given to the processing along with selection of the raw materials. High impact resistive materials with low density and henceforth low weight have been manufactured and characterized by IZOD impact tester, UTM, Archimedes density meter and SEM. Throughout the work, satisfactory results have been obtained. Impact resistance was observed to be boosted three times as that of the reference sample of glass fabric and epoxy. The density of the hybrid composite is observed to be 25% as that of the reference sample.

  19. Effect of Ti(+4) on in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Ikhram, Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    A novel glass-ceramic series in (48-x) SiO2-36 CaO-4 P2O5-12 Na2O-xTiO2 (where x=0, 3.5, 7, 10.5 and 14mol %) system was synthesized by crystallization of glass powders, obtained by melt quenching technique. The differential scanning calorimetric analysis (DSC) was used to study the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the as prepared glasses. The crystallization behaviour of glasses was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions, and qualitative phase analysis of glass-ceramics was made by X-ray diffraction. The in vitro bioactivity of synthesized glass-ceramics was studied in stimulated body fluid at 37°C under static condition for 24days. The formation of hydroxyl-carbonated apatite layer; evident of bioactivity of the material, was elucidated by XRD, FTIR, AAS, SEM and EDX analysis. The result showed that partial substitution of TiO2 with SiO2 negatively influenced bioactivity; it decreased with increase in concentration of TiO2. As Ti(+4) having stronger field strength as compared to Si(+4) so its replacement became the cause for reduction in degradation that in turn improved the chemical stability. The compressive strength was also enhanced with progress addition of TiO2 in the system. The antibacterial properties were examined against Staphylococcus Epidermidis. Strong antibacterial efficacy was observed with the addition of TiO2 in the system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glasses for the solidification of high-level radioactive waste: their behavior in the presence of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1983-02-01

    Because of their amorphous structure, glasses are particularly suitable for the solidification of the mixture of high-level radioactive wastes resulting from reactor fuel reprocessing: they are not sensitive to variations in the compositions of waste oxides and are resistant to the damaging effects of radiation. The borosilicate glasse