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Sample records for high activity glasses

  1. Demonstration of sulfur solubility determinations in high waste loading, low-activity waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-25

    A method recommended by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for sulfate solubility determinations in simulated low-activity waste glasses was demonstrated using three compositions from a recent Hanford high waste loading glass study. Sodium and sulfate concentrations in the glasses increased after each re-melting step. Visual observations of the glasses during the re-melting process reflected the changes in composition. The measured compositions showed that the glasses met the targeted values. The amount of SO3 retained in the glasses after washing was relatively high, ranging from 1.6 to 2.6 weight percent (wt %). Measured SnO2 concentrations were notably low in all of the study glasses. The composition of the wash solutions should be measured in future work to determine whether SnO2 is present with the excess sulfate washed from the glass. Increases in batch size and the amount of sodium sulfate added did not have a measureable impact on the amount of sulfate retained in the glass, although this was tested for only a single glass composition. A batch size of 250 g and a sodium sulfate addition targeting 7 wt %, as recommended by PNNL, will be used in future experiments.

  2. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO3, has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer

  3. Phosphate glass core/silica clad fibres with a high concentration of active rare-earth ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O. N.; Galagan, B. I.; Denker, B. I.; Sverchkov, S. E.; Semjonov, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    We report a study of silica-clad composite optical fibres having a phosphate glass core doped with active rare-earth elements. The phosphate glass core allows a high concentration of active rare-earth ions to be obtained, and the silica cladding ensures high mechanical strength and facilitates fusion splicing of such fibres to silica fibres. Owing to the high concentration of active rare-earth ions, this type of fibre is potentially attractive for applications where a small cavity length and high lasing efficiency are needed.

  4. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  5. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    . In general CRT consists of two types of glasses: barium/strontium containing glass (panel glass) and lead containing glass (funnel and panel glass). In this work we present the possibility to produce high performance insulation material from the recycled lead-free glass. We studied the influence of foaming...... parameters on the characteristics of foamed glass. CRT panel glass was crushed, milled and sieved below 63 m. Activated carbon used as a foaming agent and MnO2 as an ‘oxidizing’ agent were mixed with glass powders by means of a planetary ball mill. Foaming effect was observed in the temperature range...

  6. Terbium-activated heavy scintillating glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Fu,J.; Kobayashi, M.; Parker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Tb-activated scintillating glasses with high Ln2O3 (Ln=Gd, Y, Lu) concentration up to 40mol% have been prepared. The effects of Ln3+ ions on the density, thermal properties, transmission and luminescence properties under both UV and X-ray excitation have been investigated. The glasses containing Gd2O3 or Lu2O3 exhibit a high density of more than 6.0g/cm3. Energy transfer from Gd3+ to Tb3+ takes place in Gd-containing glass and as a result the Gd-containing glass shows a light yield 2.5 times ...

  7. Intumescence and pore structure of alkali-activated volcanic glasses upon exposure to high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Structures formed with ground perlite, a natural volcanic glass, activated with NaOH solutions, are shown to possess the ability to expand up to ~225 % of their original volumes upon exposure to temperatures in the 200-600 °C range. Porous solid with 3-7 MPa compressive strength and ˜450 kg/m3 or higher density are obtained. The observed expansion is believed to occur due to a loss of silanol condensation water, as vapor and is accompanied by an up to ~20 % loss in mass. A drop in pH to near-neutral values supports this idea. The size and total amount of pores in the final solid are controlled by concentration of the NaOH solution and thermal processing conditions. The pores formed are observed to be ~1-10 μm to mm-sized. The ability of perlite-based solids to intumesce over specific temperature ranges could be beneficial in applications where absorption of thermal energy is necessary, such as passive fire protection.

  8. High-Entropy Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. H.

    2014-10-01

    The high-entropy alloys are defined as solid-solution alloys containing five or more than five principal elements in equal or near-equal atomic percent. The concept of high mixing entropy introduces a new way for developing advanced metallic materials with unique physical and mechanical properties that cannot be achieved by the conventional microalloying approach based on only a single base element. The metallic glass (MG) is the metallic alloy rapidly quenched from the liquid state, and at room temperature it still shows an amorphous liquid-like structure. Bulk MGs represent a particular class of amorphous alloys usually with three or more than three components but based on a single principal element such as Zr, Cu, Ce, and Fe. These materials are very attractive for applications because of their excellent mechanical properties such as ultrahigh (near theoretical) strength, wear resistance, and hardness, and physical properties such as soft magnetic properties. In this article, we review the formation and properties of a series of high-mixing-entropy bulk MGs based on multiple major elements. It is found that the strategy and route for development of the high-entropy alloys can be applied to the development of the MGs with excellent glass-forming ability. The high-mixing-entropy bulk MGs are then loosely defined as metallic glassy alloys containing five or more than five elements in equal or near-equal atomic percent, which have relatively high mixing entropy compared with the conventional MGs based on a single principal element. The formation mechanism, especially the role of the mixing entropy in the formation of the high-entropy MGs, is discussed. The unique physical, mechanical, chemical, and biomedical properties of the high-entropy MGs in comparison with the conventional metallic alloys are introduced. We show that the high-mixing-entropy MGs, along the formation idea and strategy of the high-entropy alloys and based on multiple major elements, might provide

  9. High Quantum Efficiency and High Concentration Erbium-Doped Silica Glasses Fabricated by Sintering Nanoporous Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new method was used to prepare erbium-doped high silica (SiO2%>96%) glasses by sintering nanoporous glasses. The concentration of erbium ions in high silica glasses can be considerably more than that in silica glasses prepared by using conventional methods. The fluorescence of 1532 nm has an FWHM (Full Wave at Half Maximum) of 50 nm, wider than 35 nm of EDSFA (erbium-doped silica fiber amplifer), and hence the glass possesses potential application in broadband fiber amplifiers. The Judd-Ofelt theoretical analysis reflects that the quantum efficiency of this erbium-doped glass is about 0.78, although the erbium concentration in this glass (6×103) is about twenty times higher than that in silica glass. These excellent characteristics of Er-doped high silica glass will be conducive to its usage in optical amplifiers and microchip lasers.

  10. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus.Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  11. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczaj-Cepowicz, Elżbieta; Marczuk-Kolada, Grażyna; Zalewska, Anna; Pawińska, Małgorzata; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-22

    The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC), Fuji IX (GC), Ketac Molar (3M Espe) and Ketac Silver (3M Espe). Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep) were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  12. High stored energy of metallic glasses induced by high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Yang, Z. Z.; Ma, T.; Sun, Y. T.; Yin, Y. Y.; Gong, Y.; Gu, L.; Wen, P.; Zhu, P. W.; Long, Y. W.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Modulating energy states of metallic glasses (MGs) is significant in understanding the nature of glasses and controlling their properties. In this study, we show that high stored energy can be achieved and preserved in bulk MGs by high pressure (HP) annealing, which is a controllable method to continuously alter the energy states of MGs. Contrary to the decrease in enthalpy by conventional annealing at ambient pressure, high stored energy can occur and be enhanced by increasing both annealing temperature and pressure. By using double aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is revealed that the preserved high energy, which is attributed to the coupling effect of high pressure and high temperature, originates from the microstructural change that involves "negative flow units" with a higher atomic packing density compared to that of the elastic matrix of MGs. The results demonstrate that HP-annealing is an effective way to activate MGs into higher energy states, and it may assist in understanding the microstructural origin of high energy states in MGs.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of low-melting scintillating glass doped with organic activator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Hong Sheng; Zhu Dong Mei; Wu Jing

    2000-01-01

    New colliders for high-energy physics studies require scintillators with short decay time, high density, good radiation hardness and low cost. It is possible to make glass scintillators that can meet these requirements by doping organic scintillating activators into an inorganic glass host. In this research, p-Terphenyl as the activator is doped into lead-tin-fluorophosphate glasses. There is no detectable change of the dopant on the densities and characteristic temperatures of the glass host. The hybrid scintillating glasses doped with p-TP possess 5 ns decay time and a broad fluorescence emission band, the peak of which is at about 545 nm. Although the light yields of the glasses are low, this research shows that it is possible to develop good hybrid scintillating glasses by doping organic activators into inorganic glass host.

  14. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  15. Spectroscopic Properties of Nd3+-Doped High Silica Glass Prepared by Sintering Porous Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new kind of Nd3+-doped high silica glass (SiO2>96% (mass fraction)) was obtained by sintering porous glass impregnated with Nd3+ ions. The absorption and luminescence properties of high silica glass doped with different Nd3+ concentrations were studied. The intensity parameters Ωt (t=2, 4, 6), spontaneous emission probability, fluorescence lifetime, radiative quantum efficiency, fluorescence branching ratio, and stimulated emission cross section were calculated using the Judd-Ofelt theory. The optimal Nd3+ concentration in high silica glass was 0.27% (mole fraction) because of its high quantum efficiency and emission intensity. By comparing the spectroscopic parameters with other Nd3+-doped oxide glasses and commercial silicate glasses, the Nd3+-doped high silica glasses are likely to be a promising material used for high power and high repetition rate lasers.

  16. Preparation and properties of scintillating glass doped with organic activators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; ZHAO Hong-sheng; ZHOU Wan-cheng

    2006-01-01

    A series of scintillating glasses were developed by doping organic activators into low melting temperature glasses according to different ratios. The fluorescence spectra and the transmission spectra of some scintillating glasses were explored and the actual concentration organic in scintillating glass was estimated. The results show that it is feasible to prepare the scintillating glass by doing organic scintillating activators into the low-melting glasses. There are two main reasons for the weak optical properties of the scintillation glasses: one is that the actual concentration of organic activators doped in the glasses is very low,and the other is the existence of lots of defects formed in the scintillating glasses due to the evaporation of organic activator,lowering the transmission of glasses. The fluorescence emission peaks of the glasses move to a longer wavelength compared with those in organic matrixes. To increase the light output of the glass,the optical transmittance of the glasses must be improved and the concentration of activators in the glasses must be increased.

  17. Innovated application of mechanical activation to separate lead from scrap cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenyi; Li, Jinhui; Zhang, Qiwu; Saito, Fumio

    2012-04-03

    The disposal of scrap cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass has become a global environmental problem due to the rapid shrinkage of new CRT monitor demand, which greatly reduces the reuse for remanufacturing. To detoxificate CRT funnel glass by lead recovery with traditional metallurgical methods, mechanical activation by ball milling was introduced to pretreat the funnel glass. As a result, substantial physicochemical changes have been observed after mechanical activation including chemical breakage and defects formation in glass inner structure. These changes contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated sample in solution. High yield of 92.5% of lead from activated CRT funnel glass by diluted nitric acid leaching and successful formation of lead sulfide by sulfur sulfidization in water have also been achieved. All the results indicate that the application of mechanical activation on recovering lead from CRT funnel glass is efficient and promising, which is also probably appropriate to detoxificate any other kind of leaded glass.

  18. Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weite; Chu, Cha Y.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Routbort, Jules L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

  19. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  20. Terbium-activated lithium lanthanum aluminosilicate oxyfluoride scintillating glass and glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; James, K.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Cherepy, N.; Payne, S. A.; Mu, R.; Morgan, S. H.

    2008-09-01

    Terbium-activated lithium-lanthanum-aluminosilicate oxyfluoride scintillating glasses, 55SiO 2·6Al 2O 3·28Li 2O·11LaF 3 doped with different TbF 3 concentrations, have been fabricated and investigated. By appropriate heat treatment of the as-prepared glasses above, transparent glass-ceramics were obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, and luminescence under both UV and beta-particle excitation have been investigated on as-prepared glasses and glass-ceramics. It has been found that these terbium-activated lithium-lanthanum-aluminosilicate oxyfluoride scintillating glasses exhibit good UV-excited luminescence and radioluminescence. The luminescence yield increases for glass-ceramics. The efficiency of beta-induced luminescence is comparable or nearly equal to that of the Schott IQI-301 product.

  1. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15-40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles.

  2. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... microscope above maximum foaming temperature gives a suitable foaming temperature for the remaining samples. We show that the foaming kinetics depend on the type of gas and the pressure. A critical pressure of around 20 MPa is found to give the largest expansion for all gasses. Samples are obtained with 100...

  3. Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2014-09-21

    Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as building blocks for novel functional materials with potential applications, e.g. photonic crystals. By performing Brownian dynamics simulations of glassy systems consisting of mixtures of active and passive hard spheres, we show that the crystallization of such hard-sphere glasses can be dramatically promoted by doping the system with small amounts of active particles. Surprisingly, even hard-sphere glasses of packing fraction up to ϕ = 0.635 crystallize, which is around 0.5% below the random close packing at ϕ ≃ 0.64. Our results suggest a novel way of fabricating crystalline materials from (colloidal) glasses. This is particularly important for materials that get easily kinetically trapped in glassy states, and the crystal nucleation hardly occurs.

  4. Characterization and Conduction Mechanism of Highly Conductive Vanadate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuaki Nishida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent studies of highly conductive barium iron vanadate glass with a composition of 20 BaO ∙ 10 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 (in mol %. Isothermal annealing of the vanadate glass for several ten minutes at a given temperature, higher than glass transition temperature or crystallization temperature, caused an increase in σ. Substitution of CuI (3d10, ZnII (3d10 and CuII (3d9 for FeIII (3d5 was investigated to elucidate the effect of electron configuration on the conductivity (σ. A marked decrease in the activation energy of conduction (Ea was also observed after the annealing. Values of Ea were correlated to the energy gap between the donor level and the conduction band (CB in the n-type semiconductor model. Isothermal annealing of ZnII-substituted vanadate glass (20 BaO ∙ 5 ZnO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 at 450 °C for 30 min showed an increase in σ from 2.5 × 10–6 to 2.1 × 10–1 S cm–1, which was one order of magnitude larger than that of non-substituted vanadate glass (3.4 × 10–2 S cm–1. Under the same annealing condition, σ’s of 2.0 × 10–1 and 3.2 × 10–1 S cm–1 were observed for 20 BaO ∙ 5 Cu2O ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 and 20 BaO ∙ 5 CuO ∙ 5 Fe2O3 ∙ 70 V2O5 glasses, respectively. These results demonstrate an increase in the carrier (electron density in the CB, primarily composed of anti-bonding 4s-orbitals.

  5. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  6. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  7. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.

  8. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.

  9. High-energy {gamma}-irradiation effect on physical ageing in Ge-Se glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Department of Physics of Opole University of Technology, 75 Ozimska Str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Department of Economy of Academy of Management and Administration in Opole, 18 Niedzialkowski Str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Kozyukhin, S. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of RAS, Leninsky Pr. 31, Moscow 199991 (Russian Federation); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska Str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa, PL-42201 (Poland)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2009-09-01

    Effect of Co{sup 60} {gamma}-irradiation on physical ageing in binary Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} glasses (5 {<=} x {<=} 27) is studied using conventional differential scanning calorimetry method. It is shown, that high-energy irradiation leads to additional increase in the glass transition temperature and endothermic peak area near the glass transition region over the one induced by isochronal storage of these glasses at normal conditions. This {gamma}-induced physical ageing is shown to be well-pronounced in Se-rich glasses (x < 20), while only negligible changes are recorded for glasses of 20 {<=} x {<=} 27 compositions. The effect under consideration is supposed to be associated with {gamma}-activated structural relaxation of the glass network towards thermodynamic equilibrium of supercooled liquid.

  10. High-density scintillating glasses for a proton imaging detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, I. J.; Dettmann, M. A.; Herrig, V.; Thune, Z. L.; Zieser, A. J.; Michalek, S. F.; Been, M. O.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M. M.; Koster, H. J.; Wilkinson, C. J.; Kielty, M. W.; Jacobsohn, L. G.; Akgun, U.

    2017-06-01

    High-density scintillating glasses are proposed for a novel proton-imaging device that can improve the accuracy of the hadron therapy. High-density scintillating glasses are needed to build a cost effective, compact calorimeter that can be attached to a gantry. This report summarizes the study on Europium, Terbium, and Cerium-doped scintillating glasses that were developed containing heavy elements such as Lanthanum, Gadolinium, and Tungsten. The density of the samples reach up to 5.9 g/cm3, and their 300-600 nm emission overlaps perfectly with the peak cathode sensitivity of the commercial photo detectors. The developed glasses do not require any special quenching and can be poured easily, which makes them a good candidate for production in various geometries. Here, the glass making conditions, preliminary tests on optical and physical properties of these scintillating, high-density, oxide glasses developed for a novel medical imaging application are reported.

  11. Photocatalytic activity of glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jie, E-mail: fu@ohara-inc.co.jp [R and D Department, Ohara Inc., Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5286 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Glass ceramics containing Nasicon-type crystals were prepared. ► The glass ceramics showed photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation. ► Higher activity was observed in the MgTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}- and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}-containing glass ceramics. -- Abstract: Glass ceramics were prepared by heat-treating MO–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) and R{sub 2}O–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–SiO{sub 2} (R = Li, Na and K) glasses, and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The crystalline phases precipitated in the glasses were only Nasicon-type crystals, MTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} or RTi{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Decomposition experiments of both methylene blue (MB) and acetaldehyde showed that the glass ceramics exhibited effective photocatalytic activity. The activity did not depend on the radius of the M{sup 2+} or R{sup +} ion, and higher activity was observed in the MgTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} precipitated glass ceramics.

  12. Structural role of Cu in the soil active glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Wacławska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glasses from the SiO2-P2O5-K2O-CaO-MgO-CuO system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. Influence of copper addition on structure of the glasses was evaluated by XRD, SEM, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Chemical activity of the glasses in 2 wt.% citric acid solutions was measured by ICP-AES method. It has been found that increasing content of phosphorous increased solubility of copper in the structure of the studied glasses which was the result of formation of P-O-Cu bonds.

  13. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  14. High performance ErYb:Glass for eye-safe lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Simi

    2016-03-01

    Phosphate glasses are known to produce high gain for the Er3+ emission into 1540nm, especially when sensitized with Yb. Unfortunately, the phosphate glass matrix tends to be weaker than other available amorphous materials. Unlike crystalline materials, glass chemical structure around the active ion can be optimized for both material strength and laser output. Reported here is the result from a design of experiment that was completed in order to strengthen the glass structure of a commercially available phosphate laser glass without impacting its laser output efficiencies. Laser output performance results for the glass that met the targeted thermal and mechanical limits are presented. This effort concludes with a scalable material that is ultimately released to the commercial market.

  15. Activity is strength: More active systems are stronger glass formers

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Saroj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Interplay between activity and passive transport processes in an active system may lead to complex spatio-temporal dynamics offering a rich and fascinating phenomenology compared to their passive counterparts. Understanding the properties of an active system in the dense limit is important both from biological as well as physical point of view. Here, we extend an immensely successful microscopic theory for the glassy dynamics of passive systems in their dense low-temperature limit, namely the Random First-Order Transition (RFOT) theory, for an active system generalizing and unifying the findings of recent simulations on such systems. The qualitative picture of glassy dynamics for a passive system survives when activity is introduced, however, a number interesting properties emerge. For example, activity changes the typical length scale and relaxation times, pushes the thermodynamic and dynamic glass transition points towards higher density or lower temperature and the fragility of the system changes as a func...

  16. ZERODUR® glass ceramics for high stress applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Döhring, Thorsten; Jedamzik, Ralf; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2009-08-01

    Recently SCHOTT has shown in a series of investigations the suitability of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® for applications like mirrors and support structures of complicated design used at high mechanical loads. Examples are vibrations during rocket launches, bonded elements to support single mirrors or mirrors of a large array, or controlled deformations for optical image correction, i.e. adaptive mirrors. Additional measurements have been performed on the behavior of ZERODUR® with respect to the etching process, which is capable of increasing strength significantly. It has been determined, which minimum layer thickness has to be removed in order to achieve the strength increase reliably. New data for the strength of the material variant ZERODUR K20® prepared with a diamond grain tool D151 are available and compared with the data of ZERODUR® specimens prepared in the same way. Data for the stress corrosion coefficient n of ZERODUR® for dry and normal humid environment have been measured already in the 1980s. It has been remeasured with the alternative double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) method.

  17. High thermal stability and sluggish crystallization kinetics of high-entropy bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M.; Liu, X. J.; Ruan, H. H.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.; Lu, Z. P.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses are metastable and their thermal stability is critical for practical applications, particularly at elevated temperatures. The conventional bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), though exhibiting high glass-forming ability (GFA), crystallize quickly when being heated to a temperature higher than their glass transition temperature. This problem may potentially be alleviated due to the recent developments of high-entropy (or multi-principle-element) bulk metallic glasses (HE-BMGs). In this work, we demonstrate that typical HE-BMGs, i.e., ZrTiHfCuNiBe and ZrTiCuNiBe, have higher kinetic stability, as compared with the benchmark glass Vitreoy1 (Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5) with a similar chemical composition. The measured activation energy for glass transition and crystallization of the HE-BMGs is nearly twice that of Vitreloy 1. Moreover, the sluggish crystallization region ΔTpl-pf, defined as the temperature span between the last exothermic crystallization peak temperature Tpl and the first crystallization exothermic peak temperature Tpf, of all the HE-BMGs is much wider than that of Vitreloy 1. In addition, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of the crystallized products at different temperatures and the continuous heating transformation diagram which is proposed to estimate the lifetime at any temperature below the melting point further confirm high thermal stability of the HE-BMGs. Surprisingly, all the HE-BMGs show a small fragility value, which contradicts with their low GFA, suggesting that the underlying diffusion mechanism in the liquid and the solid of HE-BMGs is different.

  18. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of a soda-lime glass containing copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban-Tejeda, L; Pecharroman, C; Moya, J S [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Malpartida, F [Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Esteban-Cubillo, A, E-mail: jsmoya@icmm.csic.es [Tolsa S A R and D Department, Camino de Vallecas-Mejorada del Campo Km 1.6, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-16

    A low melting point soda-lime glass powder containing copper nanoparticles with high antibacterial (against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria) and antifungal activity has been obtained. Sepiolite fibres containing monodispersed copper nanoparticles (d{sub 50}{approx}30 {+-} 5 nm) were used as the source of the copper nanoparticles. The observed high activity of the obtained glass powder, particularly against yeast, has been explained by considering the inhibitory synergistic effect of the Ca{sup 2+} lixiviated from the glass on the growth of the colonies.

  19. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  20. Leach behavior of high-level borosilicate glasses under deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in high-level radioactive waste glass which is considered as the most practicable form of waste, and also is intended to be used in the disposal of national high-level radioactive waste in future. Leach theory of waste glass and the leach effects of ground water, metal barrier, buffer materials and rocks on the waste glass were reviewed. The leach of waste glass was affected by various factors such as composition, pH and Eh of ground water, temperature, pressure, radiation and humic acid. The crystallization, crack, weathering and the formation of altered phases of waste glass which is expected to occur in real disposal site were reviewed. The results of leaching in laboratory and in-situ were compared. The behaviors of radioactive elements leached from waste glass and the use of basalt glass for the long-term natural analogue of waste glass were also written in this report. The appraisal of durability of borosilicate waste glass as a waste media was performed from the known results of leach test and international in-situ tests were introduced. (author). 134 refs., 15 tabs., 24 figs

  1. Leach behavior of high-level borosilicate glasses under deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    1998-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in high-level radioactive waste glass which is considered as the most practicable form of waste, and also is intended to be used in the disposal of national high-level radioactive waste in future. Leach theory of waste glass and the leach effects of ground water, metal barrier, buffer materials and rocks on the waste glass were reviewed. The leach of waste glass was affected by various factors such as composition, pH and Eh of ground water, temperature, pressure, radiation and humic acid. The crystallization, crack, weathering and the formation of altered phases of waste glass which is expected to occur in real disposal site were reviewed. The results of leaching in laboratory and in-situ were compared. The behaviors of radioactive elements leached from waste glass and the use of basalt glass for the long-term natural analogue of waste glass were also written in this report. The appraisal of durability of borosilicate waste glass as a waste media was performed from the known results of leach test and international in-situ tests were introduced. (author). 134 refs., 15 tabs., 24 figs

  2. Damage Resistant Optical Glasses for High Power Lasers: A Continuing Glass Science and Technology Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H

    2002-08-28

    A major challenge in the development of optical glasses for high-power lasers is reducing or eliminating laser-induced damage to the interior (bulk) and the polished surface of the glass. Bulk laser damage in glass generally originates from inclusions. With the development of novel glass melting and forming processes it is now possible to make both fused silica and a suit of meta-phosphate laser glasses in large sizes ({approx}>0.5-lm diameter), free of inclusions and with high optical homogeneity ({approx} 10{sup -6}). Considerable attention also has been focused on improving the laser damage resistance to polished optical glass surfaces. Studies have shown that laser-induced damage to surfaces grows exponentially with the number of shots when illuminated with nano-second pulses at 351-nm above a given fluence threshold. A new approach for reducing and eliminating laser-induced surface damage relies on a series of post-polishing treatment steps. This damage improvement method is briefly reviewed.

  3. High-temperature study of defects and homogeneity in glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang Hyun

    Glass frit has many useful applications in the glass and ceramic industries. Several attempts were made in this study to understand the origin of problems that generally occur when using glass frit. The effect of water/glass interactions on the rheology of glass suspension and the final properties of glass and glaze were studied. The dissolution of refractory inclusions and its influence on the bubble evolution, glass structure, and homogeneity of the resulting melt were also studied. The effects of long-term interaction of water with various frit suspensions were considered. The change in suspension rheology is associated with the ion concentration of the frit suspension, which strongly depends on the frit composition, additives, and solid content of frit suspension. Physical property and compositional variations resulted from dealkalization reactions between the frit particles and water. New investigative techniques for continuous monitoring and quantitative analysis of the dissolution of refractory inclusions in glass have been developed utilizing high-temperature microscopy with computer image analysis. The dissolution rates of refractory oxides in glass frit were measured utilizing hot-stage microscopy in the temperature range from 1050°C to 1400°C. The effects of dissolution on the structure of the final glass, were monitored by infrared spectroscopy. Homogenization of the resulting melts was studied using a Christiansen filter. It was found that melting temperature and time strongly influence the dissolution of refractory batch materials and subsequent homogenization rates, leading to large differences in final structures for glass melts and glazes which have not attained equilibrium.

  4. High Quality Silica Bricks for Glass Melting Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui; Chai Junlan

    2008-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification, technical requirements, test method, inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation,storage and quality certification of high quality silica bricks for glass melting furnace.

  5. Glass precursor approach to high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The available studies on the synthesis of high T sub c superconductors (HTS) via the glass precursor approach were reviewed. Melts of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system as well as those doped with oxides of some other elements (Pb, Al, V, Te, Nb, etc.) could be quenched into glasses which, on further heat treatments under appropriate conditions, crystallized into the superconducting phase(s). The nature of the HTS phase(s) formed depends on the annealing temperature, time, atmosphere, and the cooling rate and also on the glass composition. Long term annealing was needed to obtain a large fraction of the 110 K phase. The high T sub c phase did not crystallize out directly from the glass matrix, but was preceded by the precipitation of other phases. The 110 K HTS was produced at high temperatures by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures resulting in multiphase material. The presence of a glass former such as B2O3 was necessary for the Y-Ba-Cu-O melt to form a glass on fast cooling. A discontinuous YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) HTS phase crystallized out on heat treatment of this glass. Attempts to prepare Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O system in the glassy state were not successful.

  6. Germanate Glass Fiber Lasers for High Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    evidence of crystallisation after thermal cycling, and is of a low enough loss to realize a fiber laser. The glass stability is demonstrated by...2low-loss fiber can be realized . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Germanate fiber Laser, Fiber Laser, Structured Fiber 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...the profile of bare fibres and the loss value at 630 matches with the spot loss measurement done by Naveed. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution

  7. Sers-Active Silver Nanoparticles in Ion-Exchanged Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya; Jaakola, Janne; Säynätjoki, Antti; Tervonen, Ari; Honkanen, Seppo

    We study synthesis and SERS activity of glass-embedded ion-exchanged silver nanoparticles formed by two different methods. Silver-sodium ion-exchange process with heat treatment was utilized on commercial microscope slides, while masked ion-exchange technique was performed on glass Corning 0211. The distribution of particles was studied by absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. After etching the glass surface to expose the particles, SERS performance of these particles was investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy using Rhodamine 6G as the analyte.

  8. Study of the glass formation of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin C.; Kaukler, William F.; Rolin, Terry

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were elevated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical, and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass; then, with subsequent devitrification, it was formed into a bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  9. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  10. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong In Han

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  11. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  12. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  13. Active microrheology in a colloidal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M.; Abade, G. C.; Puertas, A. M.; Fuchs, M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of a probe particle driven by a constant force through a colloidal glass of hard spheres. This nonequilibrium and anisotropic problem is investigated using a new implementation of the mode-coupling approximation with multiple relaxation channels and Langevin dynamics simulations. A force threshold is found, below which the probe remains localized, while above it the probe acquires a finite velocity. We focus on the localized regime, comparing theory and simulations concerning the dynamics in the length scale of the cage and the properties of the transition to the delocalized regime, such as the critical power-law decay of the probe correlation function. Probe van Hove functions predicted by the theory show exponential tails reminiscent of an intermittent dynamics of the probe. This scenario is microscopically supported by simulations.

  14. High-contrast all-glass volumetric photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipkowski, A.; van Caloen, G.; Buczynski, R.; Kujawa, I.; Pysz, D.; Vermeulen, N.; Thienpont, H.; Stepien, R.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we designed and made a photonic crystal structure with a photonic band gap around 532 nm wavelength. The structure was to be made from two commercially available glasses. Both should have similar temperature coefficients (alpha), also melting and softening temperatures should be as close as possible in order to thermally process both glasses together. In addition the refractive indexes of chosen glasses should be as different as possible in order to facilitate a wide band gap. The pair of glasses that met those requirements is LLF1 and SF6 produced by Schott. For those two glasses we performed a series of computer simulations using MIT MPB software. After checking various structures the widest band gap for the 532 nm wavelength was found for the hexagonal structure of high dielectric constant rods in low index material with a linear fill factor of 0.12 and a lattice constant 3.75 μm. This structure was manufactured using the stack and draw method. The measurements of the final structure made by ESM show that it is regular, with diffusion between glasses at the manageable level. This assures that manufacture process is repeatable.

  15. Characterization of a silicate glass as a high dose dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farah, K., E-mail: k.farah@cnstn.rnrt.t [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Mejri, A.; Hosni, F. [Laboratoire de Radiotraitement. Centre National des Sciences et Technologie Nucleaires, 2020 Sidi-Thabet (Tunisia); Ben Ouada, H. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Interfaces, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia); Fuochi, P.G.; Lavalle, M. [ISOF-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Kovacs, A. [Institute of Isotopes, HAS, P.O. Box 77, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-02-21

    Commercial silicate glass has been investigated as a possible high dose dosimeter using an UV-vis spectrophotometer. Glass samples were irradiated by {sup 60}Co gamma rays and the results compared with those obtained with 3.4 and 8.4 MeV electron beams. The irradiated samples showed rapid fading at room temperature immediately after irradiation. In order to improve the stability of absorbance, glass samples were submitted to post-irradiation thermal treatments (150 deg. C for 20 min). The influences of the dose, type and energy of the ionizing radiation on the fading characteristics and on the response of the irradiated and thermally treated glasses were studied. Dependence of the glass response on the temperature during gamma irradiation in the range -3 to 80 deg. C is reported. The reproducibility to reuse glass dosimeter by thermal bleaching the radiation induced colour centres at 300 deg. C for 30 min was also investigated. Calibration curves in the range 0.1-17 kGy were obtained by using in-plant calibration techniques against transfer standard alanine dosimeters in the Tunisian semi-industrial gamma irradiation facility.

  16. Glass-water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, S. N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, T.; Icenhower, J. P.; McGrail, B. P.; Windisch, C. F.; Burton, S. D.; Pierce, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high-valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O-Al2O3-B2O3-HfO2-SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al + B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si-O-Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow-through experiments conducted under dilute and near-saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers with higher Si

  17. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  18. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  19. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  20. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  1. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  2. Precision glass molding of high-resolution diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans P.; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The demand of high resolution diffractive optical elements (DOE) is growing. Smaller critical dimensions allow higher deflection angles and can fulfill more demanding requirements, which can only be met by using electron-beam lithography. Replication techniques are more economical, since the high cost of the master can be distributed among a larger number of replicas. The lack of a suitable mold material for precision glass molding has so far prevented an industrial use. Glassy Carbon (GC) offers a high mechanical strength and high thermal strength. No anti-adhesion coatings are required in molding processes. This is clearly an advantage for high resolution, high aspect ratio microstructures, where a coating with a thickness between 10 nm and 200 nm would cause a noticeable rounding of the features. Electron-beam lithography was used to fabricate GC molds with highest precision and feature sizes from 250 nm to 2 μm. The master stamps were used for precision glass molding of a low Tg glass L-BAL42 from OHARA. The profile of the replicated glass is compared to the mold with the help of SEM images. This allows discussion of the max. aspect-ratio and min. feature size. To characterize optical performances, beamsplitting elements are fabricated and their characteristics were investigated, which are in excellent agreement to theory.

  3. High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustsson, A; Åström, M; Bergbäck, B; Elert, M; Höglund, L O; Kleja, D B

    2016-07-01

    This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment.

  4. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  5. High Pressure Brillouin Scattering in the Fragile Glass Former Cumene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Tim; Oliver, William

    2012-02-01

    In recent years full-spectrum analysis in light-scattering has been utilized to explore the liquid-glass transition at variable temperature and ambient pressure. In this study we present temperature- and pressure-dependent Brillouin scattering results for the fragile glass-former cumene. Both equal-angle forward scattering and depolarized backscattering geometries are used, and high pressures are attained by the use of a diamond anvil cell mounted in a custom temperature-controlled housing. Opening up the variable pressure regime to full-spectrum analysis will allow more stringent tests of mode-coupling theory as well as greater insight into the behavior of glass-forming systems.

  6. Non-Arrhenius ionic conductivities in glasses due to a distribution of activation energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, C; Schuller, K; Beckman, S P; Martin, S W

    2012-08-17

    Previously observed non-Arrhenius behavior in fast ion conducting glasses [J. Kincs and S. W. Martin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 70 (1996)] occurs at temperatures near the glass transition temperature, T(g), and is attributed to changes in the ion mobility due to ion trapping mechanisms that diminish the conductivity and result in a decreasing conductivity with increasing temperature. It is intuitive that disorder in glass will also result in a distribution of the activation energies (DAE) for ion conduction, which should increase the conductivity with increasing temperature, yet this has not been identified in the literature. In this Letter, a series of high precision ionic conductivity measurements are reported for 0.5Na(2)S + 0.5[xGeS(2) + (1-x)PS(5/2)] glasses with compositions ranging from 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. The impact of the cation site disorder on the activation energy is identified and explained using a DAE model. The absence of the non-Arrhenius behavior in other glasses is explained and it is predicted which glasses are expected to accentuate the DAE effect on the ionic conductivity.

  7. Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Dijkstra, M.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as

  8. Osmium isotopes and highly siderophile elements in lunar glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, M.; Walker, R.; Shearer, C.; Papike, J.

    2003-04-01

    The absolute and relative abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE) present in planetary mantles are primarily controlled by silicate-metal partitioning during core-mantle differentiation and by later planetary accretion. Constraints on HSE distributions in the lunar mantle will provide insights to the formation and late accretionary history of not only the Moon, but also Earth. Because no samples of the lunar mantle have been collected, the only materials presently available for constraining mantle abundances are lunar volcanic rocks. The Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glasses are spherules derived from fire-fountain eruptions of mare basalts. These glasses are more primitive than the mare basalts, and probably were derived by the melting of cumulate assemblages from the lunar magma ocean in the deep interior (> 400 km). Despite our limited understanding of mantle-melt partitioning of the HSE, even for terrestrial systems, these glasses provide the best hope for constraining the HSE composition of the lunar interior. We report Os isotopic composition data and Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd isotope dilution concentration data for green glass (15426,164) and orange glass (74001,1217). Absolute and relative abundances of HSE are variable. The green glass has elemental ratios of the HSE and an Os isotopic composition within the range defined by chondritic meteorites, suggesting that the HSE were dominated by a meteoritic contaminant. This sample probably provides little information about the lunar interior, but may help constrain the types of meteorites impacting the lunar surface. Two size fractions (180-325 mesh and 75-180 mesh) of the orange glass were analyzed. HSE patterns for both size fractions are fractionated, having higher chondrite-normalized abundances of Pt and Pd, compared with Os and Ir. The supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os ratio (0.1339) of the finer fraction indicates modestly fractionated Re/Os relative to chondritic. The coarser size fraction

  9. Development of Crystal-Tolerant High-Level Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Schaible, Micah J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Arrigoni, Alyssa L.; Tate, Rachel M.

    2010-12-17

    Twenty five glasses were formulated. They were batched from HLW AZ-101 simulant or raw chemicals and melted and tested with a series of tests to elucidate the effect of spinel-forming components (Ni, Fe, Cr, Mn, and Zn), Al, and noble metals (Rh2O3 and RuO2) on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the high-level waste (HLW) melter. In addition, the processing properties of glasses, such as the viscosity and TL, were measured as a function of temperature and composition. Furthermore, the settling of spinel crystals in transparent low-viscosity fluids was studied at room temperature to access the shape factor and hindered settling coefficient of spinel crystals in the Stokes equation. The experimental results suggest that Ni is the most troublesome component of all the studied spinel-forming components producing settling layers of up to 10.5 mm in just 20 days in Ni-rich glasses if noble metals or a higher concentration of Fe was not introduced in the glass. The layer of this thickness can potentially plug the bottom of the riser, preventing glass from being discharged from the melter. The noble metals, Fe, and Al were the components that significantly slowed down or stopped the accumulation of spinel at the bottom. Particles of Rh2O3 and RuO2, hematite and nepheline, acted as nucleation sites significantly increasing the number of crystals and therefore decreasing the average crystal size. The settling rate of ≤10-μm crystal size around the settling velocity of crystals was too low to produce thick layers. The experimental data for the thickness of settled layers in the glasses prepared from AZ-101 simulant were used to build a linear empirical model that can predict crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass. The developed model predicts the thicknesses of accumulated layers quite well, R2 = 0.985, and can be become an efficient tool for the formulation

  10. Minor component study for simulated high-level nuclear waste glasses (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Langowskim, M.H.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J.; Vienna, J.D.; Smith, D.E.

    1996-02-01

    Hanford Site single-shell tank (SSI) and double-shell tank (DSI) wastes are planned to be separated into low activity (or low-level waste, LLW) and high activity (or high-level waste, HLW) fractions, and to be vitrified for disposal. Formulation of HLW glass must comply with glass processibility and durability requirements, including constraints on melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, tendency for phase segregation on the molten glass surface, and chemical durability of the final waste form. A wide variety of HLW compositions are expected to be vitrified. In addition these wastes will likely vary in composition from current estimates. High concentrations of certain troublesome components, such as sulfate, phosphate, and chrome, raise concerns about their potential hinderance to the waste vitrification process. For example, phosphate segregation in the cold cap (the layer of feed on top of the glass melt) in a Joule-heated melter may inhibit the melting process (Bunnell, 1988). This has been reported during a pilot-scale ceramic melter run, PSCM-19, (Perez, 1985). Molten salt segregation of either sulfate or chromate is also hazardous to the waste vitrification process. Excessive (Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni) spinel crystal formation in molten glass can also be detrimental to melter operation.

  11. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-03-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials.

  12. A Highly Efficient and Self-Stabilizing Metallic-Glass Catalyst for Electrochemical Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan Chao; Wang, Yi Zhi; Su, Rui; Cao, Cheng Rong; Li, Fan; Sun, Chun Wen; Yang, Yong; Guan, Peng Fei; Ding, Da Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin; Wang, Wei Hua

    2016-12-01

    A multicomponent metallic glass (MG) with highly efficient and anomalous durability for catalyzing water splitting is reported. The outstanding performance of the MG catalyst contributed by self-optimized active sites originates from the intrinsic chemical heterogeneity and selective dealloying on the disordered surface; thus, a new mechanism for improving the durability of catalysts is uncovered.

  13. High strength bioactive glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Baino, Francesco; Verné, Enrica

    2009-02-01

    This research work is focused on the preparation of macroporous glass-ceramic scaffolds with high mechanical strength, equivalent with cancellous bone. The scaffolds were prepared using an open-cells polyurethane sponge as a template and glass powders belonging to the system SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-Na(2)O-K(2)O. The glass, named as CEL2, was synthesized by a conventional melting-quenching route, ground and sieved to obtain powders of specific size. A slurry of CEL2 powders, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a binder and water was prepared in order to coat, by a process of impregnation, the polymeric template. A thermal treatment was then used to remove the sponge and to sinter the glass powders, in order to obtain a replica of the template structure. The scaffolds were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction analysis, morphological observations, density measurements, volumetric shrinkage, image analysis, capillarity tests, mechanical tests and in vitro bioactivity evaluation.

  14. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, D. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, G. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, M. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  15. High-Power ZBLAN Glass Fiber Lasers: Review and Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiushan Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF, considered as the most stable heavy metal fluoride glass and the excellent host for rare-earth ions, has been extensively used for efficient and compact ultraviolet, visible, and infrared fiber lasers due to its low intrinsic loss, wide transparency window, and small phonon energy. In this paper, the historical progress and the properties of fluoride glasses and the fabrication of ZBLAN fibers are briefly described. Advances of infrared, upconversion, and supercontinuum ZBLAN fiber lasers are addressed in detail. Finally, constraints on the power scaling of ZBLAN fiber lasers are analyzed and discussed. ZBLAN fiber lasers are showing promise of generating high-power emissions covering from ultraviolet to mid-infrared considering the recent advances in newly designed optical fibers, beam-shaped high-power pump diodes, beam combining techniques, and heat-dissipating technology.

  16. Enhanced transparency, mechanical durability, and antibacterial activity of zinc nanoparticles on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Jin-Seok; Park, Byeong-Ju; Eom, Ji-Ho; Heo, So-Young; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2014-09-01

    Homogeneously distributed zinc nanoparticles (NPs) on the glass substrate were investigated for the transmittance, mechanical durability, and antibacterial effect. The buffered Ti NPs between Zn NPs and glass substrate were studied for an enhancement of the transmittance and mechanical endurance. The Ti NPs buffered Zn NPs showed a high transmittance of approximately 91.5% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a strong antibacterial activity for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria. The buffered Ti NPs are attractive for an excellent mechanical endurance of the Zn NPs. The Zn NPs did not require the protection layer to prevent the degradation of the performance for both the antibacterial effect and the transmittance.

  17. Realization and drive tests of active thin glass x-ray mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Basso, S.; Candia, R.; Civitani, M.; Di Cicca, G.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.; Varisco, S.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to obtain lightweight and high-resolution focusing mirror segments for large aperture X-ray telescopes is the hot slumping of thin glass foils. In this approach, already successfully experimented to manufacture the optics of the NuSTAR X-ray telescope, thin glasses are formed at high temperature onto a precisely figured mould. The formed glass foils are subsequently stacked onto a stiff backplane with a common axis and focus to form an XOU (X-ray Optical Unit), to be later integrated in the telescope optic structure. In this process, the low thickness of the glass foils guarantees a low specific mass and a very low obstruction of the effective area. However, thin glasses are subject to deformations that may arise at any stage of the production process, thereby degrading the angular resolution. To solve this problem, several groups are working on the possibility to correct the mirror profile post-manufacturing, using piezoelectric elements exerting a tangential strain on the non-optical side of the glass mirrors. In this paper we show the results of the approach we have adopted, based on the application of piezoceramic patches on the backside of thin glass foils, previously formed by hot slumping. The voltage signals are supplied to the piezoelectric elements by a system of electrodes deposited on the same side of the mirror via a photolithographic process. Finally, the matrix of voltages to be used to correct the mirror shape can be determined in X-rays illumination by detection of the intra-focal image and consequent reconstruction of the longitudinal profile. We describe the production of some active mirrors with different arrangements of piezoelectric elements and the X-ray tests performed at the XACT X-ray facility to determine the optimal actuator geometry.

  18. A highly sensitive upconverting nano-glass-ceramic-based optical thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@hdu.edu.cn; Liu, Shen; Wan, Zhongyi; Chen, Yan, E-mail: chenyan@hdu.edu.cn

    2016-07-05

    Yb/Tm: YF{sub 3} nanoparticles embedded transparent bulk glass ceramic was successfully prepared to explore its possible application in optical temperature sensors. Specifically, owing to the competition of electron population in the thermally coupled Tm{sup 3+3}F{sub 2,3} and {sup 3}H{sub 4} excited states, two upconversion emission bands corresponding to Tm{sup 3+}: {sup 3}F{sub 2,3} → {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition and {sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}F{sub 4} one exhibited opposite temperature-dependent behaviors, which resulted in monotonous enhancement of the related fluorescence intensity ratio with increase of temperature. As a consequence, Tm{sup 3+} activators in the present YF{sub 3} glass ceramic had advantages of a high sensitivity of 1.84% per K, an avoidable spectral overlapping and a negligible thermal effect for accurate temperature detecting. - Highlights: • Yb/Tm: β-YF{sub 3} embedded transparent glass ceramic was fabricated. • Glass crystallization induced greatly enhancement of upconversion luminescence. • Different T-sensitive emission behaviors of two thermally coupled states were observed. • Tm{sup 3+} fluorescence intensity ratio intensified with increase of temperature. • The glass ceramic exhibited a high sensitivity of 1.84% K{sup −1} and a negligible thermal effect.

  19. High aspect ratio channels in glass and porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, H.D. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Dang, Z.Y. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Wu, J.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Kan, J.A. van; Qureshi, S. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Ynsa, M.D.; Torres-Costa, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco Edif. 22, Faraday 3, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Maira, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Venkatesan, T.V. [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), National University of Singapore, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Breese, M.B.H., E-mail: phymbhb@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a micromachining process to produce high-aspect-ratio channels and holes in glass and porous silicon. Our process utilizes MeV proton beam irradiation of silicon using direct writing with a focused beam, followed by electrochemical etching. To increase throughput we have also developed another process for large area ion irradiation based on a radiation-resistant gold surface mask, allowing many square inches to be patterned. We present a study of the achievable channel width, depth and period and sidewall verticality for a range of channels which can be over 100 μm deep or 100 nm wide with aspect ratios up to 80. This process overcomes the difficulty of machining glass on a micro- and nanometer scale which has limited many areas of applications in different fields such as microelectronics and microfluidics.

  20. High aspect ratio channels in glass and porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H. D.; Dang, Z. Y.; Wu, J. F.; van Kan, J. A.; Qureshi, S.; Ynsa, M. D.; Torres-Costa, V.; Maira, A.; Venkatesan, T. V.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a micromachining process to produce high-aspect-ratio channels and holes in glass and porous silicon. Our process utilizes MeV proton beam irradiation of silicon using direct writing with a focused beam, followed by electrochemical etching. To increase throughput we have also developed another process for large area ion irradiation based on a radiation-resistant gold surface mask, allowing many square inches to be patterned. We present a study of the achievable channel width, depth and period and sidewall verticality for a range of channels which can be over 100 μm deep or 100 nm wide with aspect ratios up to 80. This process overcomes the difficulty of machining glass on a micro- and nanometer scale which has limited many areas of applications in different fields such as microelectronics and microfluidics.

  1. Mechanical Properties of a High Lead Glass Used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Smith, Nathan A.; Ersahin, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The elastic constants, strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth parameters, and mirror constant of a high lead glass supplied as tubes and funnels were measured using ASTM International (formerly ASTM, American Society for Testing and Materials) methods and modifications thereof. The material exhibits lower Young's modulus and slow crack growth exponent as compared to soda-lime silica glass. Highly modified glasses exhibit lower fracture toughness and slow crack growth exponent than high purity glasses such as fused silica.

  2. Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer Cement and Nanoparticle Glass Carbomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Olegário

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The lack of evidence regarding the best available material for restoring occlusal-proximal cavities in primary teeth leads to the development of new restorative material, with nanoparticles, in order to enhance mechanical properties, resulting in increased restoration longevity. Aim. To evaluate the Knoop hardness and bond strength of nanoparticles material glass carbomer cement (CAR and high-viscosity glass ionomer cement (GIC in sound and caries-affected dentin. Methods. Forty bovine incisors were selected and assigned into four groups (n=10: SGIC, sound dentin and GIC; SCAR, sound dentin and CAR; CGIC, caries-affected dentin and GIC; and CCAR, caries-affected dentin and CAR. All groups were submitted to microshear bond strength (MPa. Knoop hardness was also performed. Bond strength values were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Knoop hardness data were subjected to one-way ANOVA. Results. GIC presented higher Knoop hardness (P<0.001 and bond strength (P=0.027 than CAR. Also, both materials showed better performance in sound than in caries-affected substrates (P=0.001. The interaction between factors was not statistically different (P=0.494. Conclusion. Despite nanoparticles, CAR shows inferior performance as compared to GIC for the two properties tested in vitro. Moreover, sound dentin results in better bonding performance of both restorative materials evaluated.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glasses Prepared using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    with open or closed pores. If only open pores exist, air is the dominating medium for the insulating effect. However, closed pores make it possible to trap gases inside the foam. The gas can be introduced either chemically, through foaming agents, or physically, by gas compression-decompression at high...... using helium, nitrogen, or argon. The sintering result in closed-porous body with high pressure bubbles. Subsequent reheating above the glass transition temperature resulted in an expansion of the bubbles. The entrapped gas composition was analysed by gas chromatography. Furthermore, we investigated how...

  4. ROAD MAP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.

    2014-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystaltolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will also be addressed in this road map. The planned research described in this road map is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (significant reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized if the current constraints (T1% for WTP and TL for DWPF) are approached in an appropriate and technically defensible manner for defense waste and current melter designs. The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal-tolerant high-level waste (HLW) glasses targeting high waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. The modeling effort will be an iterative process, where model form and a broader range of conditions, e.g., glass

  5. ROAD MAP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.

    2014-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystaltolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will also be addressed in this road map. The planned research described in this road map is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (significant reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized if the current constraints (T1% for WTP and TL for DWPF) are approached in an appropriate and technically defensible manner for defense waste and current melter designs. The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal-tolerant high-level waste (HLW) glasses targeting high waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. The modeling effort will be an iterative process, where model form and a broader range of conditions, e.g., glass

  6. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  7. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  8. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...

  9. Influence of wet activation of used inorganic binder on cyclically refreshed water glass moulding sands hardened by microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Stachowicz; Kazimierz Granat

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the research results of using an innovative method to reclaim the waste moulding sands containing water glass. Two of the examined processes are connected with "dry" or "wet" activation of inorganic binder in waste moulding sand mixtures physically hardened by microwave radiation. The sand mixtures consisting of high-silica sand and water-glass with average molar module 2.5, were subjected to the following cyclical process: mixing the components, compacting, microwave heati...

  10. Redox-Dependent Solubility of Technetium in Low Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-03-01

    The solubility of technetium was measured in a Hanford low activity waste glass simulant. The simulant glass was melted, quenched and pulverized to make a stock of powdered glass. A series of glass samples were prepared using the powdered glass and varying amounts of solid potassium pertechnetate. Samples were melted at 1000°C in sealed fused quartz ampoules. After cooling, the bulk glass and the salt phase above the glass (when present) were sampled for physical and chemical characterization. Technetium was found in the bulk glass up to 2000 ppm (using the glass as prepared) and 3000 ppm (using slightly reducing conditions). The chemical form of technetium obtained by x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy can be mainly assigned to isolated Tc(IV), with a minority of Tc(VII) in some glasses and TcO2 in two glasses. The concentration and speciation of technetium depends on glass redox and amount of technetium added. Solid crystals of pertechnetate salts were found in the salt cake layer that formed at the top of some glasses during the melt.

  11. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong In Han

    2013-01-01

    IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV) were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC) lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC) substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD) processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superio...

  12. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant.

  13. Synthesis and In Vitro Activity Assessment of Novel Silicon Oxycarbide-Based Bioactive Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Gonzalo-Juan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel bioactive glasses based on a Ca- and Mg-modified silicon oxycarbide (SiCaMgOC were prepared from a polymeric single-source precursor, and their in vitro activity towards hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated upon incubating the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF at 37 °C. The as-prepared materials exhibit an outstanding resistance against devitrification processes and maintain their amorphous nature even after exposure to 1300 °C. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of the SiCaMgOC samples after the SBF test showed characteristic reflections of apatite after only three days, indicating a promising bioactivity. The release kinetics of the Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the adsorption of H+ after immersion of SiCaMgOC in simulated body fluid for different soaking times were analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The results show that the mechanism of formation of apatite on the surface of the SiCaMgOC powders is similar to that observed for standard (silicate bioactive glasses. A preliminary cytotoxicity investigation of the SiOC-based bioactive glasses was performed in the presence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF as well as human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293. Due to their excellent high-temperature crystallization resistance in addition to bioactivity, the Ca- and Mg-modified SiOC glasses presented here might have high potential in applications related to bone repair and regeneration.

  14. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  15. Fabrication of highly insulating foam glass made from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    We prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. We investigated the influence of the carbon and MnO2 concentrations, the glass-powder preparation and the foaming conditions on the density and homogeneity of the pore structure...... and the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the foam density. The results show that the moderate foaming effect of the carbon is greatly improved by the addition of MnO2. A density as low as 131 kg m-3 can be achieved with fine glass powder. The foam density has a slight dependence on the carbon and MnO2...... concentrations, but it is mainly affected by the foaming temperature and the time. The thermal conductivity of the foam-glass samples is lower than that of commercial foam glasses with the same density. The lowest value was determined to be 42 mW m-1 K-1 for a foam glass with a density of 131 kg m-3. A further...

  16. High speed, high strength microwelding of Si/glass using ps-laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Hansen, Assi; Vihinen, Joma; Amberla, Tiina; Kangastupa, Jarno

    2015-02-09

    A novel microwelding procedure to join Si-to-glass using ps-laser pulses with high repetition rates is presented. The procedure provides weld joint with mechanical strength as high as 85 MPa and 45 MPa in sample pairs of Si/aluminosilicate (Si/SW-Y) and Si/borosilicate (Si/Borofloat 33), respectively, which are higher than anodic bonding, at high spatial resolution (< 20 µm) and very high throughput without pre- and post-heating. Laser-matter interaction analysis indicates that excellent weld joint of Si/glass is obtained by avoiding violent evaporation of Si substrate using ps-laser pulses. Laser welded Si/glass samples can be singulated along the weld lines by standard blade dicer without defects, demonstrating welding by ps-laser pulses is applicable to wafer-level packaging.

  17. Production of highly porous glass-ceramics from metallurgical slag, fly ash and waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangutova Bianka V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass-ceramics composites were produced based on fly-ash obtained from coal power stations, metallurgical slag from ferronickel industry and waste glass from TV monitors, windows and flasks. Using 50% waste flask glass in combination with fly ash and 20% waste glass from TV screens in combination with slag, E-modulus and bending strength values of the designed systems are increased (system based on fly ash: E-modulus from 6 to 29 GPa, and bending strength from 9 to 75 MPa. The polyurethane foam was used as a pore creator which gave the material porosity of 70(5% (fly ash-glass composite and a porosity of 65( 5% (slag-glass composite. E-modulus values of the designed porous systems were 3.5(1.2 GPa and 8.1(3 GPa, while the bending strength values were 6.0(2 MPa and 13.2(3.5 MPa, respectively. These materials could be used for the production of tiles, wall bricks, as well as for the construction of air diffusers for waste water aeration.

  18. Phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white AC-LED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Ju; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-10

    The high-powered alternating current (AC) light-emitting diode (LED) (AC-LED), featuring low cost, high energy utilization efficiency, and long service life, will become a new economic growth point in the field of semiconductor lighting. However, flicker of AC-LED in the AC cycles is not healthy for human eyes, and therefore need to be restrained. Herein we report an innovation of persistent "phosphor-in-glass" (PiG) for the remote-type AC-LED, whose afterglow can be efficiently activated by the blue light. It is experimentally demonstrated that the afterglow decay of PiG in the microsecond range can partly compensate the AC time gap. Moreover, the substitution of inorganic glass for organic resins or silicones as the encapsulants would bring out several technological benefits to AC-LED, such as good heat-dissipation, low glare, and excellent physical/chemical stability.

  19. Structural evolution of nanoscale metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion: A molecular dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S. D.; Jiao, W.; Jing, Q.; Qi, L.; Pan, S. P.; Li, G.; Ma, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Structural evolution in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses during high-pressure torsion is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Results show that the strong cooperation of shear transformations can be realized by high-pressure torsion in nanoscale Cu50Zr50 metallic glasses at room temperature. It is further shown that high-pressure torsion could prompt atoms to possess lower five-fold symmetries and higher potential energies, making them more likely to participate in shear transformations. Meanwhile, a higher torsion period leads to a greater degree of forced cooperative flow. And the pronounced forced cooperative flow at room temperature under high-pressure torsion permits the study of the shear transformation, its activation and characteristics, and its relationship to the deformations behaviors. This research not only provides an important platform for probing the atomic-level understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of high-pressure torsion in metallic glasses, but also leads to higher stresses and homogeneous flow near lower temperatures which is impossible previously.

  20. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical properties of alumina–zirconia composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Balakrishnan; B B Panigrahi; K P Sanosh; Min-Cheol Chu; T N Kim; Seong-Jai Cho

    2009-08-01

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature. This could be attributed to the drastic drop in the coefficient of thermal expansion due to the compositional change in the soda lime glass during infiltration. There was a significant improvement in the Weibull modulus after glass infiltration. Glass infiltrated samples showed better thermal shock resistance. The magnitude of strength increment was found to be in the order of the surface residual stress generated by thermo-elastic properties mismatch between the composite and the penetrated glass.

  1. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  2. Fracture characteristics of bulk metallic glass under high speed impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bao-Ru; Zhan Zai-Ji; Liang Bo; Zhang Rui-Jun; Wang Wen-Kui

    2012-01-01

    High speed impact experiments of rectangular plate-shaped Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass(BMG)were performed using a two-stage light gas gun.Under spherical shock waves with impact velocities ranging from 0.503 km/s to 4.917 km/s,obvious traces of laminated spallation at the back(free)surface and melting(liquid droplets)at the impact point were observed.The angles about 0°,17°,36°,and 90° to the shocking direction were shown in the internal samples because of the interaction between the compressive shock waves and the rarefaction waves.The compressive normal stress was found to induce the consequent temperature rise in the core of the shear band.

  3. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOME HIGH CHEMICALLY RESISTANCE SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Abo-Mosallam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi component silicate glasses based on Li₂O-MgO-P₂O₅-SiO₂ system were synthesized and modified by Na₂O /Li₂O, SrO /MgO and CaO /SrO replacements. The prepared glasses have been characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Additionally, bulk density, microhardness, chemical durability and in vitro bioactivity were evaluated as a function of introducing different alkali and alkaline element substitutions. For comprehension the in vitro bioactivity, the glass samples were soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF solution at 37°C for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX and (FTIR were used to characterize forming hydroxyapatite layer produced on glass specimen surfaces. The results show that Na₂O/Li₂O and CaO/SrO replacements led to enhance the bioactivity behavior of the glasses. The results are harmonious with a weaker network glass structure consequence of Na₂O/Li₂O and SrO/MgO replacement in the glasses. However, the glass network connectivity increased with addition of the higher charge to size ratio of Ca2+ instead of Sr2+. The prepared glass samples had microhardness in the range, 4920-6017 MPa; density values in the range, 2.46-2.78 g/cm³ and the weight loss percent was ranged between 0.72 and 1.67 %.

  4. Crystallization of high-strength fine-sized leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Chadwick, T C; Wilson, R M; Hill, R; Cattell, M J

    2010-12-01

    Manufacturing of leucite glass-ceramics often leads to materials with inhomogeneous microstructures. Crystal-glass thermal mismatches which produce microcracking around larger crystals-agglomerates are associated with reduced mechanical properties. The hypotheses were that fine (ceramics were characterized by XRD, SEM, and Dilatometry. Experimental (A, M1A and M2A) and commercial glass-ceramics were tested by the BFS test. Experimental glass-ceramics showed an increased leucite crystal number and decreased crystal size with glass particle size reduction. Leucite glass-ceramics (ceramics M1A and M2A had higher mean BFS and characteristic strength than the IPS Empress Esthetic glass-ceramic (p ceramics were synthesized and produced high mean BFS.

  5. Effect of high-energy heavy ion irradiation on the crystallization kinetics of Co-based metallic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rohit Jain; Deepika Bhandari; N S Saxena; S K Sharma; A Tripathi

    2001-02-01

    Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is employed to study the crystallization kinetics of irradiated (at three different fluences with high-energy heavy ion; Ni11+ of 150 MeV) specimens of two Co-based metallic glasses. It is found that the crystallization process in both the glasses is completed in two phases. The DSC data have been analysed in terms of kinetic parameters viz. activation energy (), Avrami exponent (), dimensionality of growth (), using two different theoretical models. The results obtained have been compared with that of virgin samples. The lower activation energy in case of second crystallization occurring at higher temperature indicates the easier nucleation of second phase. The abnormally high value of Avrami exponent in Co–Ni glass indicates very high nucleation rate during first crystallization.

  6. SETTLING OF SPINEL IN A HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS MELTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-07

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 decrees C to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling.

  7. Enhanced transparency, mechanical durability, and antibacterial activity of zinc nanoparticles on glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung-Jin; Choi, Jin-Seok; Park, Byeong-Ju; Eom, Ji-Ho; Heo, So-Young; Jung, Min-Wook; An, Ki-Seok; Yoon, Soon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneously distributed zinc nanoparticles (NPs) on the glass substrate were investigated for the transmittance, mechanical durability, and antibacterial effect. The buffered Ti NPs between Zn NPs and glass substrate were studied for an enhancement of the transmittance and mechanical endurance. The Ti NPs buffered Zn NPs showed a high transmittance of approximately 91.5% (at a wavelength of 550 nm) and a strong antibacterial activity for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria. The buffered Ti NPs are attractive for an excellent mechanical endurance of the Zn NPs. The Zn NPs did not require the protection layer to prevent the degradation of the performance for both the antibacterial effect and the transmittance. PMID:25183360

  8. PERFORMANCE OF A BURIED RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS AFTER 24 YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Daniel Kaplan, D; Ned Bibler, N; David Peeler, D; John Plodinec, J

    2008-05-05

    A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in the SRS burial ground for 24 years but lysimeter data was only available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed and analyzed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed the durability response. The laboratory results indicated that the glass was very durable as did analysis of the lysimeter data. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with the results of the laboratory and field tests. No detectable Pu, Am, Cm, Np, or Ru leached from the glass into the surrounding sediment. Leaching of {beta}/{delta} from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in the glass was diffusion controlled. Less than 0.5% of the Cs and Sr in the glass leached into the surrounding sediment, with >99% of the leached radionuclides remaining within 8 centimeters of the glass pellet.

  9. Polyimide/Glass Composite High-Temperature Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Vasquez, Peter; Chatlin, Richard L.; Smith, Donald L.; Skalski, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary S.; Chu, Sang-Hyon

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight composites of RP46 polyimide and glass fibers have been found to be useful as extraordinarily fire-resistant electrical-insulation materials. RP46 is a polyimide of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PMR) type, developed by NASA Langley Research Center. RP46 has properties that make it attractive for use in electrical insulation at high temperatures. These properties include high-temperature resistance, low relative permittivity, low dissipation factor, outstanding mechanical properties, and excellent resistance to moisture and chemicals. Moreover, RP46 contains no halogen or other toxic materials and when burned it does not produce toxic fume or gaseous materials. The U. S. Navy has been seeking lightweight, high-temperature-resistant electrical-insulation materials in a program directed toward reducing fire hazards and weights in ship electrical systems. To satisfy the requirements of this program, an electrical-insulation material must withstand a 3-hour gas-flame test at 1,600 F (about 871 C). Prior to the development reported here, RP46 was rated for use at temperatures from -150 to +700 F (about -101 to 371 C), and no polymeric product - not even RP46 - was expected to withstand the Navy 3-hour gas-flame test.

  10. Differences in Radiation Activity Between Glass and Resin 90Y Microspheres in Treating Unresectable Hepatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Trent; Hill, Jacqueline; Fahrbach, Thomas; Collins, Zachary

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the difference in prescribed radiation activity between glass and resin yttrium-90 (Y) microspheres for radioembolization of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastases at a tertiary care teaching institution. The authors performed a retrospective analysis on 126 patients with primary HCC and hepatic metastatic disease from extrahepatic primary cancers who underwent radioembolization with glass or resin particles between 2008 and 2013 at their institution. Radiation activity estimates for prescribed treatments, as well as for the alternate embolization particles, were calculated using commonly employed formulae for both glass and resin particles for all treatments. A total of 217 treatments were performed on 126 patients, with 136 (62.7%) using glass particles and 81 (37.3%) using resin particles. Forty-six (36.5%) patients had metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), 51 (40.5%) had primary HCC, while 11 (8.7%) had neuroendocrine carcinoma, and 18 (14.3%) had metastases from other primary tumors. The average prescribed activity was 2.66 GBq for glass treatments and 1.06 GBq for resin treatments across all cancer types. When the alternative treatment activity was calculated, activities were projected to decrease by an average of 1.52 GBq per treatment if resin microspheres were used instead of glass microspheres (-52.5%), while activities were projected to increase by an average of 1.57 GBq per treatment if glass microspheres were used instead of resin microspheres (148.9%; p glass microspheres.

  11. Novel Ag-doped glass frits for high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Chen, Yongji; Mei, Zongwei; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Gao, Zhou; Wang, Xingbo; Jiang, Xing; Pan, Feng

    2017-06-06

    Glass frits play an important role in the front contact electrodes of crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. In this work, we developed a novel glass frit by doping Ag into a glass frit in the process of high-temperature synthesis. When the Ag paste including this novel glass frit was used as the front contact electrode of silicon solar cells, the conversion efficiency of poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) solar cells was improved by 1.9% compared to the glass frit without Ag. Through SEM characterisation and calculation of series resistance, we further found that the interface between Ag and Si was improved and the contact resistance of Ag and Si was greatly reduced, which were believed to be responsible for the improvement of solar cell performance. This work shows great guidance significance to develop novel and highly efficient commercial glass frits applied in solar cells in the future.

  12. High pressure die casting of Fe-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Parthiban; Szabo, Attila; Borzel, Stefan; Eckert, Jürgen; Stoica, Mihai; Bárdos, András

    2016-10-01

    Soft ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glass key-shaped specimens with a maximum and minimum width of 25.4 and 5 mm, respectively, were successfully produced using a high pressure die casting (HPDC) method, The influence of die material, alloy temperature and flow rate on the microstructure, thermal stability and soft ferromagnetic properties has been studied. The results suggest that a steel die in which the molten metal flows at low rate and high temperature can be used to produce completely glassy samples. This can be attributed to the laminar filling of the mold and to a lower heat transfer coefficient, which avoids the skin effect in the steel mold. In addition, magnetic measurements reveal that the amorphous structure of the material is maintained throughout the key-shaped samples. Although it is difficult to control the flow and cooling rate of the molten metal in the corners of the key due to different cross sections, this can be overcome by proper tool geometry. The present results confirm that HPDC is a suitable method for the casting of Fe-based bulk glassy alloys even with complex geometries for a broad range of applications.

  13. Design and fabrication of high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging based on glass-silicon-glass bonding techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Jilong; Yang, Huabing

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on GSG triple-layer sealing structure for encapsulating large mass inertial MEMS devices fabricated by silicon-on-glass bulk micromachining technology is presented. Roughness controlling strategy of bonding surfaces was proposed and described in detail. Silicon substrate was thinned and polished by CMP after the first bonding with the glass substrate and was then bonded with the glass micro-cap. Zr thin film was embedded into the concave of the micro-cap by a shadow-mask technique. The glass substrate was thinned to about 100 µm, wet etched through and metalized for realizing vertical feedthrough. During the fabrication, all patterning processes were operated carefully so as to reduce extrusive fragments to as little as possible. In addition, a high-performance micro-Pirani vacuum gauge was integrated into the package for monitoring the pressure and the leak rate further. The result shows that the pressure in the package is about 120 Pa and has no obvious change for more than one year indicating 10-13 stdcc s-1 leak rate.

  14. Imprinting the nanostructures on the high refractive index semiconductor glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Paivasaari, K.; Kaakkunen, J. J. J.; Tikhomirov, V. K.; Lehmuskero, A.; Vahimaa, P.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The centimeter range one- and two-dimensional nanostructures of 70 nm pitch have been imprinted by hot pressing with a quartz, silicon or nickel mold, at 240 °C, onto the surface of Ge 20As 20Se 14Te 46 semiconductor glass. Excellent glass stability of this glass allows multiple re-pressing of the nano-structures. With increasing the Te/Se ratio in the glass formula, the refractive index reaches a value of 3.5 with an option of free electron absorption at elevated temperatures pointing out the use of such nanostructures in submicron and micron scale electronic devices/chips, moth eye structures and photonic crystals.

  15. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  16. Evaluation of High Permittivity Glass Ceramics for Millimeter Wave Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    patterns were run from room temperature to 1200QCwith a heating rate of 100C/minute. Each of the glasses exhib.ited an endothermic peak...corresponding to a glass transition temperature of 760*C, and a large exothermic peak at 900°C, presumably corresponding to the crystallization of SrTi0 3...the SrTiO 3 , although definitive dielectric loss data supporting these proposed mechanisms were not presented. In this paper, low temperature

  17. Systematic approach to preparing ceramic-glass composites with high translucency for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Humberto N; Chimanski, Afonso; Cesar, Paulo F

    2015-10-01

    Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of approximate measurements of activation-free-energy spectra of shear transformation zones in metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, JongDoo [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Atzmon, Michael, E-mail: atzmon@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We simulate measured activation energy spectra for anelastic relaxation in metallic glasses. • Simulated spectra exhibit the same shape as earlier data obtained by temperature stepping. • The drop previously observed at high activation free energy is an artifact of the measurements. - Abstract: For many years, the only experimental activation free energy spectrum for shear transformations in metallic glasses had been obtained by quenching from high temperature during creep, followed by temperature stepping (Argon and Kuo, 1980). We show that the approximation associated with attributing a single activation energy to each temperature leads to an artificial drop in the spectrum at high activation energies. The detailed spectra of potential shear transformation zones we have recently obtained, which exhibit an atomically quantized hierarchy and are monotonic, lead to the same spectrum shape as obtained by Argon and Kuo when the approximation inherent to the temperature stepping method is applied.

  19. Formation and mechanical properties of bulk Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni metallic glasses with high glass forming ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ying-jun; KANG Fu-wei; XING Da-wei; SUN Jian-fei; SHEN Qing-ke; SHEN Jun

    2007-01-01

    Bulk amorphous Cu52.5Ti30Zr11.5Ni6 and Cu53.1Ti31.4Zr9.5Ni6 alloys with a high glass forming ability can be quenched into single amorphous rods with a diameter of 5 mm, and exhibit a high fracture strength of 2 212 MPa and 2 184 MPa under compressive condition, respectively. The stress-strain curves show nearly 2% elastic strain limit, yet display no appreciable macroscopic plastic deformation prior to the catastrophic fracture due to highly localized shear bands. The present work shows clearly evidence of molten droplets besides well-developed vein patterns typical of bulk metallic glasses on the fracture surface, suggesting that localized melting induced by adiabatic heating may occur during the final failure event.

  20. Highly Sensitive Fluorescent-labeled Probes and Glass Slide Hybridization for the Detection of Plant RNA Viruses and a Viroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyou DU; Bo JIN; Wenhong LIU; Liang CHEN; Jishuang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a modified method of the conventional RNA dot-blot hybridization was established, by replacing 32P labels with CY5 labels and replacing nylon membranes with positive-charged glass slides, for detecting plant RNA viruses and a viroid. The modified RNA dot-blot hybridization method was named glass slide hybridization. The optimum efficiency of RNA binding onto the surfaces of activated glass slide was achieved using aminosilane-coated glass slide as a solid matrix and 5×saline sodium citrate (SSC) as a spotting solution. Using a CY5-labeled DNA probe prepared through PCR amplification, the optimized glass slide hybridization could detect as little as 1.71 pg of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA.The sensitivity of the modified method was four times that of dot-blot hybridization on nylon membrane with a 32P-labeled probe. The absence of false positive within the genus Potyvirus [potato virus A, potato virus Y (PVY) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus] showed that this method was highly specific. Furthermore,potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) was also detected specifically. A test of 40 field potato samples showed that this method was equivalent to the conventional dot-blot hybridization for detecting PVY and PSTVd. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using dot-blot hybridization on glass slides with fluorescent-labeled probes for detecting plant RNA viruses and a viroid.

  1. Final Report - Crystal Settling, Redox, and High Temperature Properties of ORP HLW and LAW Glasses, VSL-09R1510-1, Rev. 0, dated 6/18/09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Wang, C.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Chaudhuri, M.; Kot, W.; Feng, Z.; Viragh, C.; McKeown, D. A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Cecil, R.; Zhao, W.

    2013-11-13

    The radioactive tank waste treatment programs at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) have featured joule heated ceramic melter technology for the vitrification of high level waste (HLW). The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) employs this same basic technology not only for the vitrification of HLW streams but also for the vitrification of Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams. Because of the much greater throughput rates required of the WTP as compared to the vitrification facilities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) or the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the WTP employs advanced joule heated melters with forced mixing of the glass pool (bubblers) to improve heat and mass transport and increase melting rates. However, for both HLW and LAW treatment, the ability to increase waste loadings offers the potential to significantly reduce the amount of glass that must be produced and disposed and, therefore, the overall project costs. This report presents the results from a study to investigate several glass property issues related to WTP HLW and LAW vitrification: crystal formation and settling in selected HLW glasses; redox behavior of vanadium and chromium in selected LAW glasses; and key high temperature thermal properties of representative HLW and LAW glasses. The work was conducted according to Test Plans that were prepared for the HLW and LAW scope, respectively. One part of this work thus addresses some of the possible detrimental effects due to considerably higher crystal content in waste glass melts and, in particular, the impact of high crystal contents on the flow property of the glass melt and the settling rate of representative crystalline phases in an environment similar to that of an idling glass melter. Characterization of vanadium redox shifts in representative WTP LAW glasses is the second focal point of this work. The third part of this work focused on key high temperature thermal properties of

  2. Properties of high-density, well-ordered, and high-energy metallic glass phase designed by pressurized quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Narumasa; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Wakeda, Masato; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2016-08-01

    We applied gigapascal-level compressive hydrostatic pressure to the melt-quenching process of metallic glass to obtain a unique high-pressure glass state with high density that is well-ordered yet has high energy. This state contradicts the common understanding that high-density, well-ordered metallic glass states have low energy. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the high-pressure glass state of the metallic glass Zr50Cu40Al10 has a rich anti-free volume and that its relaxation is dominated by the annihilation of full icosahedra and the rich anti-free volume. The aging rate of the high-pressure metallic glass state (energy reduction rate) is almost the same as that of typical high-energy metallic glass, suggesting that it has a lifetime similar to that of a typical high-energy metallic glass that has been experimentally realized and reported previously [Wakeda et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 10545 (2015)]. Thus, the high-pressure phase can be realized even under the experimental cooling rate, suggesting its suitability for practical applications.

  3. Sub-Tg features of glasses formed by cooling glycerol under pressure - Additional incompatibility of vibrational with configurational states in the depressurized, high density glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G. P.

    2016-11-01

    The vibrational state of a glass is naturally incompatible with its configurational state, which makes the glass structurally unstable. When a glass is kept at constant temperature, both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass change with time until it becomes metastable (equilibrium) liquid and the two states become compatible. The process, known as structural relaxation, occurs at a progressively higher rate during heating, and the properties of a glass change accordingly. We add to this incompatibility by depressurizing a glass that had been formed by cooling a liquid under a high pressure, p, and then investigate the effects of the added incompatibility by studying thermal conductivity, κ , and the heat capacity per unit volume ρ Cp of the depressurized glass. We use glycerol for the purpose and study first the changes in the features of κ and of ρ Cp during glass formation on cooling under a set of different p. We then partially depressurize the glass and study the effect of the p-induced instability on the features of κ and ρ Cp as the glass is isobarically heated to the liquid state. At a given low p, the glass configuration that was formed by cooling at high-p had a higher κ than the glass configuration that was formed by cooling at a low p. The difference is more when the glass is formed at a higher p and/or is depressurized to a lower p. On heating at a low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range is reached. The effect is the opposite of the increase in κ observed on heating a glass at the same p under which it was formed. It is caused by thermally assisted loss of the added incompatibility of configurational and vibrational states of a high-p formed glass kept at low p. If a glass formed under a low-p is pressurized and then heated under high p, it would show the opposite effect, i.e., its κ would first increase to its high p value before its glass-to-liquid transition range.

  4. The highly insulated glass house. Results and experiences; Det hoejisolerede glashus - resultater og erfarigner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.; Aggerholm, S. [Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    The aim of the present project was to demonstrate the possibility of constructing a house with a large part of the facade made of glass, within the energy frame of the Danish Building Regulations and without compromising with the thermal indoor climate. The project demonstrates the wide possibilities that exist in the Building Regulations for glass areas by using the rule of the energy frame. Construction of The Highly Insulated Glass house, analysis of measurements collected over almost two years and interviews with the residents made it clear that it is possible to build a house with a high percentage of glass in the facades without compromising with the thermal indoor climate and - with some minor adjustments of constructions and installations - the energy consumption. The Highly Insulated Glass House is not necessarily the answer to future single-family houses. Still, by going to the extremes lessons are learned which can be exploited in future architectonic successful low-energy houses. (LN)

  5. A Simple Demonstration of the High-Temperature Electrical Conductivity of Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverina, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We usually think of glass as a good electrical insulator; this, however, is not always the case. There are several ways to show that glass becomes conducting at high temperatures, but the following approach, devised by Brown University demonstration manager Gerald Zani, may be one of the simplest to perform.

  6. A Simple Demonstration of the High-Temperature Electrical Conductivity of Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaverina, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We usually think of glass as a good electrical insulator; this, however, is not always the case. There are several ways to show that glass becomes conducting at high temperatures, but the following approach, devised by Brown University demonstration manager Gerald Zani, may be one of the simplest to perform.

  7. [Strength and transparency of dental porcelain consisting of high refractive germanate-glass and alumina crystal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, M

    1990-07-01

    A translucent aluminous porcelain was developed for dentistry. The effects of refractive indexes and sintering behaviors on transparency and strength of the aluminous porcelains consisting of high refractive germanate-glass (Na2O-TiO2-GeO2) and alumina crystal powders were examined. The various germanate-glass specimens with a high refractive index were made by fusion at about 1,300 degrees C. The refractive indexes of fused Na2O-TiO2-GeO2 glass specimens were 1.64-1.76, heightened with an increasing TiO2 content. The sintered aluminous porcelains were made from the mixed compacts consisting of 80 wt% germanate-glass and 20 wt% alumina at the densification temperature of 580-820 degrees C. Sintered aluminous porcelains prepared with high refractive germante-glass had a high transparency compared with the other aluminous porcelains, with almost the same transparency as a commercial feldspathic porcelain (body). Aluminous porcelains had lower transparency with different refractive index due to generation of crystals following the crystallization of glass matrix than that without crystallizing property. Bending strength value was 120 MPa, which is similar to that for the glass-alumina ceramics with the same content of alumina volume as germanate-glass aluminous porcelains. Non-crystallized aluminous porcelain had a higher strength compared with the crystallized one.

  8. Effect of insertion method on knoop hardness of high viscous glass ionomer cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Bonifácio, C.C.; Bönecker, M.; Imparato, J.C.P.; de Gee, A.J.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Knoop hardness of three high viscous glass ionomer cements: G1 - Ketac Molar; G2 - Ketac Molar Easymix (3M ESPE) and G3 - Magic Glass ART (Vigodent). As a parallel goal, three different methods for insertion of Ketac Molar Easymix were tested: G4 - conventiona

  9. History of the development and industrial production of low thermal emissivity coatings for high heat insulating glass units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Hans J

    2008-05-01

    Low-emissivity (low-E) coatings play a dominate role in high heat insulating multiple glass units with which an essential part of heat energy can be saved in buildings. With such coatings as the main part, and to a lesser part with low thermal conductive filling gases of the units' interspaces, their heat transmittance can be reduced from 6.0 W/m(2)? K for a single glazing--still glazed to a high degree--to 0.4 W/m(2) K for a triple insulating glass unit. This astonishing development is regarded as one of the most important innovations of the flat glass industry in the past century. The roots of low-E coatings in the 1960s, their startup for production in the 1970s, and, most important, further development steps accompanied by, and partly also codesigned actively by the author, are depicted.

  10. Large aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass for use in a high power laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili; Hu; Shubin; Chen; Jingping; Tang; Biao; Wang; Tao; Meng; Wei; Chen; Lei; Wen; Junjiang; Hu; Shunguang; Li; Yongchun; Xu; Yasi; Jiang; Junzhou; Zhang; Zhonghong; Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Large aperture Nd:phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for an inertial confinement fusion(ICF) facility. N31,one type of neodymium doped phosphate glasses, was developed for high peak power laser facility applications in China. The composition and main properties of N31 glass are given, together with those of LHG-8, LG-770, and KGSS-0180 Nd:phosphate laser glasses, from Hoya and Schott, and from Russia. The technologies of pot melting, continuous melting, and edge cladding of large size N31 phosphate laser glass are briefly described. The small signal gain profiles of N31 glass slabs from both pot melting and continuous melting at various values of the pumping energy of the xenon lamp are presented. N31 glass is characterized by a stimulated emission cross section of 3.8 × 10-20cm2 at 1053 nm,an absorption coefficient of 0.10–0.15% cm-1at laser wavelength, small residual stress around the interface between the cladding glass and the laser glass, optical homogeneity of ~2 × 10-6in a 400 mm aperture, and laser damage threshold larger than 42 J/cm2 for a 3 ns pulse width at 1064 nm wavelength.

  11. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2016-12-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  12. Research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass for high power laser application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; He, Dongbing; Chen, Huiyu; Wang, Xin; Meng, Tao; Wen, Lei; Hu, Junjiang; Xu, Yongchun; Li, Shunguang; Chen, Youkuo; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shubin; Tang, Jingping; Wang, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Neodymium phosphate laser glass is a key optical element for high-power laser facility. In this work, the latest research and development of neodymium phosphate laser glass at the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM), China, is addressed. Neodymium phosphate laser glasses, N31, N41, NAP2, and NAP4, for high peak power and high average power applications have been developed. The properties of these glasses are presented and compared to those of other commercial neodymium phosphate laser glass from the Schott and Hoya companies and the Vavilov State Optical Institute (GOI), Russia. Continuous melting and edge cladding are the two key fabrication techniques that are used for the mass production of neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs. These techniques for the fabrication of large-aperture N31 neodymium phosphate laser glass slabs with low stress birefringence and residual reflectivity have been developed by us The effect of acid etching on the microstructure, optical transmission, and mechanical properties of NAP2 glass is also discussed.

  13. High-Power ZBLAN Glass Fiber Lasers: Review and Prospect

    OpenAIRE

    Xiushan Zhu; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-01-01

    ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF), considered as the most stable heavy metal fluoride glass and the excellent host for rare-earth ions, has been extensively used for efficient and compact ultraviolet, visible, and infrared fiber lasers due to its low intrinsic loss, wide transparency window, and small phonon energy. In this paper, the historical progress and the properties of fluoride glasses and the fabrication of ZBLAN fibers are briefly described. Advances of infrared, upconversion, and supe...

  14. Rigid bonded glass ceramic seals for high temperature membrane reactors and solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Ove

    2009-05-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel cells (SOFC) and dense gas separation membranes based on mixed ionic and electronic conductors have gained increased interest the resent years due the search for new technologies for clean energy generation. These technologies can be utilized to produce electricity from fossil fuel with low CO{sub 2} emission compared to conventional gas or coal based energy plants. One crucial challenge with high temperature membrane reactors and SOFCs is the sealing of the active membranes/electrolytes to prevent leakage of air to fuel side or vice versa. Due to the high operating temperatures of typical 800-1000 degrees Celsius the selection of reliable sealing materials is limited. The seals have to remain gas tight during the life time of the reactor/SOFC, they need to be chemical compatible with the sealed materials and stable in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres containing water vapour and CO{sub 2}, and finally they should be cheap, readily available and easy to process. The main purpose of the present work was to evaluate rigid bonded glass ceramic seals for dense oxygen ion and proton conducting membranes and electrolytes for SOFCs and high temperature (HT) membrane reactors. First, a review of sealing technologies has been carried out with emphasis on SOFC and ceramic membranes technologies applicable for zero emission power plants. Regarding sealing, the best and cheapest materials at the present time are based on silicate glass and glass ceramics. In the present work aluminate glass without silica is introduced as a new class of seals expanding the material selection for HT membrane sealing technologies. The main reason for studying silica free systems is that silica is known to be unstable in humid atmospheres and/or reducing conditions at elevated temperatures. Two glass systems have been evaluated. The first was based on aluminate glasses in the system RO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R=Mg, Ba, Sr) with special focus on the CaO-MgO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3

  15. Minor alloying behavior in bulk metallic glasses and high-entropy alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of minor alloying on several bulk metallic glasses and high-entropy al-loys was studied. It was found that minor Nb addition can optimize the interface structure between the W fiber and the Zr-based bulk metallic glass in the compos-ites,and improve the mechanical properties. Minor Y addition can destabilize the crystalline phases by inducing lattice distortion as a result to improve the glass-forming ability,and the lattice distortion energy is closely related to the effi-ciency of space filling of the competing crystalline phases. A long-period ordered structure can precipitate in the Mg-based bulk metallic glass by yttrium alloying. For the high-entropy alloys,solid solution can be formed by alloying,and its me-chanical properties can be comparable to most of the bulk metallic glasses.

  16. High-sensitivity and high-Q-factor glass photonic crystal cavity and its applications as sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siraji, Ashfaqul Anwar; Zhao, Yang

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the properties of a planar photonic crystal cavity on glass and its applications as sensors. An airbridged twofold defect cavity on Schott glass background and Gorilla glass substrate has been designed for high Q-factor up to 4459. The average sensitivity of the cavity resonance to background refractive index is 388 nm/Refractive Index Unit. The resonant wavelength is sensitive to background temperature by 18.5 pm/°C. The designed sensors show much higher sensitivity than those based on waveguide interferometers or photonic bandgap structures without cavity resonance. The results are also useful for experimental studies of glass photonic devices.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of factors affecting the in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of bioactive glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, two novel silicate glass-ceramics having chemical composition 38SiO2-41CaO-6P2O5-(15 - x)Na2O-xCaF2 (x = 0, 0.43 mol%) were synthesized. These glass derivatives were subjected to stimulated body fluid for 24 days in SBF under static condition at 37∘C in order to evaluate the bioactive properties of specimens. The antibacterial activity of glass ceramics against three pathogenic bacteria was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. It was found that the antibacterial activity primarily depends on the dissolution rate; faster release of ions caused rapid increase in the pH of the solution. Antibacterial properties were found to be strongly affected by changes in the pH of supernatant. The in vitro bioactivity assays showed that both glass derivatives were capable of bonding with bone and secondly effectively inhibit bacteria. However, the glass ceramic without CaF2 (B2) showed high dissolution rate, better bioactive ability and stronger antibacterial efficacy.

  18. Chemical composition measurements of the low activity waste (LAW) EPA-Series glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste glasses provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 100.2 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %.

  19. Transparent form-active system with structural glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, M.S.N.; Veer, F.A.; Eigenraam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Free-form transparent wide-span spatial structures which have being constructed so far, are based on the concept of three sets of components, the structural components, usually steel elements to ensure both compressive and tensional capacity; the glass cladding elements for expressing transparency;

  20. Transparent form-active system with structural glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaou, M.S.N.; Veer, F.A.; Eigenraam, P.

    2015-01-01

    Free-form transparent wide-span spatial structures which have being constructed so far, are based on the concept of three sets of components, the structural components, usually steel elements to ensure both compressive and tensional capacity; the glass cladding elements for expressing transparency;

  1. High spatial resolution geochemistry and textural characteristics of 'microtektite' glass spherules in proximal Cretaceous-Paleogene sections: Insights into glass alteration patterns and precursor melt lithologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Joke; Goderis, Steven; Smit, Jan; Vanhaecke, Frank; Baert, Kitty; Terryn, Herman; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we have conducted spatially resolved trace element analysis on fresh, unaltered microtektite glasses linked to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary Chicxulub crater and on their surrounding alteration phases. This unique approach offers the opportunity to study in situ and at high spatial resolution both the mixing of different target lithologies and the variation of the major and trace element budget during the alteration process. In addition, two-dimensional element distribution maps reveal important geochemical information beyond the capabilities of single spot laser drilling. Glasses from two localities in opposite quadrants from the source crater were studied. At the Beloc locality (Haiti), the glass population is dominated by the presence of yellow high-Ca glass and black andesitic glass formed by admixture of carbonate/dolomite/anhydrite platform lithologies with crystalline basement. These glasses alter according to the well-established hydration-palagonitization model postulated for mafic volcanic glasses. REEs become progressively leached from the glass to below the detection limit for the applied spot size, while immobile Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta passively accumulate in the process exhibiting both inter-element ratios and absolute concentrations similar to those for the original glass. In contrast, The Arroyo El Mimbral locality (NE Mexico) is characterized by abundant green glass fragments high in Si, Al and alkalis, and low in Mg, Ca, Fe. Low Si black glass is less abundant though similar in composition to the black glass variety at Beloc. The alteration pattern of high-Si, Al green glass at the Mimbral locality is more complex, including numerous competing reaction processes (ion-exchange, hydration, dissolution, and secondary mineral precipitation) generally controlled by the pH and composition of the surrounding fluid. All green, high-Si, Al glasses are hydrated and

  2. High modulus rare earth and beryllium containing silicate glass compositions. [for glass reinforcing fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 16 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of approximately, by weight, 20 to 43% SiO2, 8 to 21% Al2O3, 4 to 10% BeO, 27 to 58% of at least one oxide selected from a first group consisting of Y2O3, La2O3, Nd2O3, Ce2O3, Ce2O3, and the mixed rare earth oxides, and 3 to 12% of at least one oxide selected from a second group consisting of MgO, ZrO2, ZnO and CaO are described. The molar ratio of BeO to the total content of the first group oxides is from 1.0 to 3.0.

  3. Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

  4. Redox dynamics in multicomponent, iron-bearing silicate melts and glasses: Application to the float-glass processing of high-temperature silicate glassmelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Glen Bennett

    Processing high-strain-point glasses by the float process is challenged by the relative thermochemical properties of glassmelts and the liquid-metal float medium. As the chemical reaction between the glassmelt and the float metal involves dynamic reduction of the glassmelt, this research has examined the constraints on high-temperature float processing of glassmelts by combining metal-alloy/oxide reaction thermodynamics and Wagnerian kinetic models for redox reactions in silicate melts. The dynamic response of Fe-bearing, p-type (polaronic) semiconducting amorphous silicates to a chemical potential gradient of oxygen has been shown to be rate-limited by the chemical diffusion of network-modifying cations. The persistence of this mechanism to very low Fe concentrations in Fe-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glasses was proven with Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Three glasses, with 0.1, 0.5, and 1.25 mol. % FeO were reacted with air at temperatures from 710-845sp°C. For all compositions and temperatures, oxidation was dominated by network modifier diffusion; an activation energy of 475 kJ*molsp{-1} characterized the process. Chemical dynamics in a high-temperature float environment were characterized on liquid-liquid reaction couples between two low-Fe sodium-aluminoborosilicate (NABS) glassmelts (0.01 and 0.08 mol. % FeO) and Au-30Sn and Au-28Ge (atomic basis) alloys. Experiments were performed in the temperature range 1250-1450sp°C for 30 min; wavelength-dispersive and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopies were employed. These exothermic liquid-metal alloys display large negative deviations from ideal solution behavior, with significantly depressed chemical activities. Diffusion of Sn or Ge in the NABS glassmelts (depth and concentration) was limited at all temperatures to levels comparable to conventional soda-lime (NCS) float glass (˜2 min on pure Sn at 1100sp°C). Incorporation of Sn or Ge was reduced significantly in the higher-Fe-content NABS

  5. High effective silica fume alkali activator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimír Živica

    2004-04-01

    Growing demands on the engineering properties of cement based materials and the urgency to decrease unsuitable ecologic impact of Portland cement manufacturing represent significant motivation for the development of new cement corresponding to these aspects. One category represents prospective alkali activated cements. A significant factor influencing their properties is alkali activator used. In this paper we present a new high effective alkali activator prepared from silica fume and its effectiveness. According to the results obtained this activator seems to be more effective than currently used activators like natrium hydroxide, natrium carbonate, and water glass.

  6. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenu Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF was finally evaluated.

  7. A new synthesis route to high surface area sol gel bioactive glass through alcohol washing

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Mukundan, Lakshmi; Nirmal, Remya; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Nair, Prabha D.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive glass is one of the widely used bone repair material due to its unique properties like osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity and biodegradability. In this study bioactive glass is prepared by the sol gel process and stabilized by a novel method that involves a solvent instead of the conventional calcinations process. This study represents the first attempt to use this method for the stabilization of bioactive glass. The bioactive glass stabilized by this ethanol washing process was characterized for its physicochemical and biomimetic property in comparison with similar composition of calcined bioactive glass. The compositional similarity of the two stabilized glass powders was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravimetric analysis. Other physicochemical characterizations together with the cell culture studies with L929 fibroblast cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells proved that the stabilization was achieved with the retention of its inherent bioactive potential. However an increase in the surface area of the glass powder was obtained as a result of this ethanol washing process and this add up to the success of the study. Hence the present study exhibits a promising route for high surface area bioactive glass for increasing biomimicity. PMID:23512012

  8. Preparation and Mechanical Properties of Glass Coats with High Temperature Radar Absorber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Dong-mei; LUO Fa; XIONG Liang-ming; ZHOU Wan-cheng

    2006-01-01

    BaO-La2O3-B2O3 (BLB) glass, suitable to be used as a sealing between metals, was chosen to be the binder in preparing glass coats on the Ti-alloy substrate. The SiCN nano-powder was introduced as the filler for the absorbing coat because it is considered to be a good high temperature absorber. The effect of the coating temperature and coating time on the tensile strength of the glass coat was investigated and the proper coating parameters to get good mechanical properties were determined. In addition, the effects of the SiCN content on the tensile strength of the absorbing coat were also discussed. Results show that it is possible to prepare the glass coat using the BLB glass as a binder. That the coat formed at 730 ℃ for 30 min has the best tensile strength witnesses 730 ℃, 30 min to be the proper parameter to prepare the glass coat. The BLB glass coat without SiCN powder possesses good tensile strength and the introduction of the SiCN absorber into the glass coat will lower the tensile strength. As the SiCN content increases, the tensile strength of the absorbing coat decreases, which could be attributed to the aggregation of SiCN in the coats.

  9. Leaching and mechanical properties of cabal glasses developed as matrices for immobilization high-level wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezz-Eldin, F. M.

    2001-10-01

    This paper discusses the leaching behavior of simulated high-level-waste cabal glass (CaO-B 2O 3-Al 2O 3) as a bulk specimen. During leach tests, the glass is immersed in either deionized water or in groundwater for up to 57 days at 70°C. Based on the results, mechanisms observed with the leaching of the glass in deionized water or groundwater are discussed. Three factors, i.e., time of immersion, type of leaching solution and irradiation effect, are extensively studied. The corrosion was found to be linear with time in the limit of investigation (1-57 days) but with different rates depending on the type of solution and glass composition. Effects of γ-irradiation on the glass together with groundwater were found to decrease the glass durability. The evolution of the damage on mechanical and physical properties of the glass before and after leaching or irradiation was also discussed. The addition of waste oxide changes the properties of the glass matrix, so the influence of the guest oxides on the properties of host materials is also discussed.

  10. Alteration Development of the Simulated HLW Glass at High Temperature in Beishan Underground Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhentao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulated HLW glass was found to be altered in Beishan underground water at high temperature in two different stages starting with slow leaching of the immobilized elements for a period followed by a sharp degradation of the glass matrix. Immersed at 150°C in Beishan underground water with glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume ratio of 6000 m-1, the glass was alterated rapidly with the sharp release of B, Na, Li, Cs, and Mo from the cold HLW glass after a stable period of 180 days. The glass was degraded up to 73.6% for the immersion period of 730 days resulting in the release of Mo and Cs up to 73.6% and 2.7% from the glass, respectively. With the alteration underway, new minerals were identified to be zeolite P, mordenite, nontronite, dickite, okonite, quartz, saponite, and tincalconite. However, at low temperature of 90°C, the glass was very stable with limited leaching of Na, B, and Li.

  11. Round-robin testing of a reference glass for low-activity waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L.; Wolf, S. F.

    1999-12-06

    A round robin test program was conducted with a glass that was developed for use as a standard test material for acceptance testing of low-activity waste glasses made with Hanford tank wastes. The glass is referred to as the low-activity test reference material (LRM). The program was conducted to measure the interlaboratory reproducibility of composition analysis and durability test results. Participants were allowed to select the methods used to analyze the glass composition. The durability tests closely followed the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A, except that tests were conducted at both 40 and 90 C and that parallel tests with a reference glass were not required. Samples of LRM glass that had been crushed, sieved, and washed to remove fines were provided to participants for tests and analyses. The reproducibility of both the composition and PCT results compare favorably with the results of interlaboratory studies conducted with other glasses. From the perspective of reproducibility of analysis results, this glass is acceptable for use as a composition standard for nonradioactive components of low-activity waste forms present at >0.1 elemental mass % and as a test standard for PCTS at 40 and 90 C. For PCT with LRM glass, the expected test results at the 95% confidence level are as follows: (1) at 40 C: pH = 9.86 {+-} 0.96; [B] = 2.30 {+-} 1.25 mg/L; [Na] = 19.7 {+-} 7.3 mg/L; [Si] = 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mg/L; and (2) at 90 C: pH = 10.92 {+-} 0.43; [B] = 26.7 {+-} 7.2 mg/L; [Na] = 160 {+-} 13 mg/L; [Si] = 82.0 {+-} 12.7 mg/L. These ranges can be used to evaluate the accuracy of PCTS conducted at other laboratories.

  12. Mesoporous Nitrogen Doped Carbon-Glass Ceramic Cathode for High Performance Lithium-Oxygen Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Hardwick, and J.- M. Tarascon, Nature Materials, vol. 11, pp 19-29, 2012. 2. Linden , D. (Ed), Handbook of Batteries , 2nd Edition, Mc-Graw-Hill, New...AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2015-0053 MESOPOROUS NITROGEN DOPED CARBON-GLASS CERAMIC CATHODE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LITHIUM-OXYGEN BATTERY (POSTPRINT...DOPED CARBON-GLASS CERAMIC CATHODE FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LITHIUM-OXYGEN BATTERY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  13. SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES ACTIVATED WITH MANGANESE AND CADMIUM SULPHIDE QUANTUM DOTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanna O. Lipatova; Vladimir A. Aseev; Elena V. Kolobkova

    2014-01-01

    Research and development of phosphors based on quantum dots (QD) is a perspective problem of photonics. The main advantages of fluorophosphate glass with quantum dots are: high absorption coefficient, solid matrix and a broad band luminescence with high quantum efficiency of QD. Manganese ions have an intense band luminescence in the red region of the spectrum. Thus, the addition of manganese ions in the glass with quantum dots leads to a broadening of the spectrum in the long wav...

  14. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  15. In situ inspection of inclusions in toughened glass panels of high-rise buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Fang, Zhong Ping; Reading, Ivan; Zhao, Liping; Chow, Siew Loong

    2005-04-01

    Transparent toughened glass panels are widely installed in high-rise buildings. There is a growing need for inspection to detect the presence of detrimental inclusions of Nickel Sulfide. These inclusions can cause toughened glass to shatter, possibly causing property damage or injury. Optical equipment has been developed which can detect the inclusions in-situ. Light is coupled into a glass panel and propagates along the glass by total internal reflection. An inclusion in the glass will cause the light to scatter. Once an inclusion is found, it will be observed at higher magnification and the detailed image will be processed. By the analysis of its key features, the inclusion type can be identified. The coupling medium is made of a transparent, soft and deformable material. The equipment can be attached to a glass panel by vacuum suction. The optical system can scan the whole glass panel with a constant force spring as anti-weight structure. The whole system is fast, convenient and highly effective. A patent has been filed for this apparatus.

  16. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  17. Enhancement of glass-forming ability of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with high saturation magnetic flux density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiao Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of substituting Fe with Ni on thermal properties, glass-forming ability (GFA and magnetic properties of Fe76-xNixMo3.5P10C4B4Si2.5 (x = 0−30 at.% alloys were investigated in detail. The breadth of the supercooled liquid region was found to gradually increase from 42 to 55 K with increasing Ni content to 30 at.%. When x = 5 at.%, the alloy composition approached a eutectic point, resulting in an increase in GFA. As a result, FeNiMoPCBSi bulk metallic glasses with critical diameters up to 5.5 mm were successfully synthesized by copper mold casting. These glassy alloys exhibit a high saturation magnetic flux density of 0.75−1.21 T and excellent soft magnetic properties, i.e., low coercive force of 1.1−2.0 A/m, and high effective permeability of 14400−19700 at 1 kHz under a field of 1 A/m. The reasons for the high stability of the supercooled liquid, and the high GFA as well as excellent soft magnetic properties are discussed in this article.

  18. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David; Fox, Kevin; Herman, Connie; Kruger, Albert A.

    2014-05-31

    This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystal-tolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is also addressed in this road map.

  19. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David; Fox, Kevin; Herman, Connie; Kruger, Albert A.

    2014-05-31

    This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystal-tolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford waste glasses without jeopardizing melter operation by crystal accumulation in the melter or melter discharge riser. The potential applicability to the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is also addressed in this road map.

  20. Retrospective assessment of indoor radon exposure by measurements of embedded 210Po activity in glass objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Prasad, Ganesh

    In most of the epidemiological studies contemporary radon measurements have been used as surrogates for radon concentrations in past decades even though changes in radon levels and residence may have occurred. Short-lived radon progeny may deposit on available surfaces in dwellings thus giving rise over time to a build up of long-lived progeny. Airborne radon decay products can be deposited and implanted through alpha recoil into the glass surfaces. On glass surface, activities of 210Po may arise as a result of the decay of recoil implanted activity following the alpha decay of surface deposited 218Po or 214Po. Measurement of 210Po implanted on a household glass is a method that can be employed to retrospectively determine the historic level of radon in dwellings. This method is based on the assumption that levels of recoil implanted 210Po in the glass provide a measure of time integrated radon concentration in the environment in which the glass has been located. The surface deposited activity of the radon progenies, which then become implanted in the glass by alpha recoil, is believed to reflect past exposure to airborne activity. Such retrospective measurements on glass are valuable in estimating the human dose derived from radon during the time of exposure. In this paper an account is given of the principles and some field applications of a retrospective technique, using the alpha track detectors, CR-39 and LR-115, to measure 210Po implanted in glass surfaces (surface traps). By using this CR-LR difference technique, the cumulative radon exposure in a dwelling in past decades may be estimated. This method provides reliable radon exposure data as a support to epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of radon exposure in the living environment.

  1. High field electrical behaviour in lithium–phospho–vanadate glass system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Narayana Reddy; S Asokan; R V Anavekar

    2007-02-01

    The high field electrical switching behaviour of lithium–phospho–vanadate glasses has been studied by determining the current–voltage characteristics. The investigated glasses exhibit temperature, thickness and composition dependent trends. At low current, the – characteristics obey Ohm’s law followed by a negative resistance region where the bulk behaviour dominates and at higher values of current the sample goes to a low resistance state. The studied glasses exhibit memory type switching. It is suggested that electrical switching is due to the formation of conducting channels that are due to electronic origin while thermal effects dominate once the channels are formed resulting in crystallization.

  2. Glass formability of high T(sub c) Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    A number of compositions of ceramic oxide high T(sub c) superconductors were evaluated for their glass formation ability by means of rapid thermal analysis during quenching, optical and electron microscopy of the quenched samples, and with subsequent DSC measurements. Correlations between experimental measurements and the methodical composition changes identified the formulations of superconductors that can easily form glass. The superconducting material was first formed as a glass, then with subsequent devitrification it was formed into bulk crystalline superconductor by a series of processing methods.

  3. Technical Note: Updated durability/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, G.F.; Hartley, S.A.; Redgate, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    This technical note presents empirical models developed in FYI 995 to predict durability as functions of glass composition. Models are presented for normalized releases of B, Li, Na, and Si from the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) applied to quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses as well as from the 28-day Materials Characterization Center-1 (MCC-1) test applied to quenched glasses. Models are presented for Composition Variation Study (CVS) data from low temperature melter (LTM) studies (Hrma, Piepel, et al. 1994) and high temperature melter (HTM) studies (Vienna et al. 1995). The data used for modeling in this technical note are listed in Appendix A.

  4. INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

    2008-09-23

    The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted

  5. Cladding glass ceramic for use in high powered lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Alexander J.; Campbell, John H.

    1998-01-01

    A Cu-doped/Fe-doped low expansion glass ceramic composition comprising in Wt. %: SiO{sub 2} 50--65; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} 18--27; P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 0--10; Li{sub 2}O 2--6; Na{sub 2}O 0--2; K{sub 2}O 0--2; B{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1; MgO 0--4; ZnO 0--5; CaO 0--4; BaO 0--5; TiO{sub 2} 1--3; ZrO{sub 3} 1--3; As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1.5; CuO 0--3; and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0--1 wherein the total amount of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is 80--89 wt. %, and said glass ceramic contains as a dopant 0.1--3 wt. % CuO, 0.1--1 wt. % Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a combined CuO+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount of 0.1--4 wt. %. The glass ceramic composition is suitable for use as a cladding material for solid laser energy storage mediums as well as for use in beam attenuators for measuring laser energy level and beam blocks or beam dumps used for absorbing excess or unused laser energy.

  6. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  7. Second-surface silvered glass solar mirrors of very high reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, Guillaume P.; Coughenour, Blake M.; Macleod, H. Angus; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Olbert, Blain H.; Angel, J. Roger P.

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports methods developed to maximize the overall reflectance second-surface silvered glass. The reflectance at shorter wavelengths is increased with the aid of a dielectric enhancing layer between the silver and the glass, while at longer wavelengths it is enhanced by use of glass with negligible iron content. The calculated enhancement of reflectance, compared to unenhanced silver on standard low-iron float glass, corresponds to a 4.4% increase in reflectance averaged across the full solar spectrum, appropriate for CSP, and 2.7% for CPV systems using triple junction cells. An experimental reflector incorporating these improvements, of drawn crown glass and a silvered second-surface with dielectric boost, was measured at NREL to have 95.4% solar weighted reflectance. For comparison, non-enhanced, wetsilvered reflectors of the same 4 mm thickness show reflectance ranging from 91.6 - 94.6%, depending on iron content. A potential drawback of using iron-free drawn glass is reduced concentration in high concentration systems because of the inherent surface errors. This effect is largely mitigated for glass shaped by slumping into a concave mold, rather than by bending.

  8. High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively.

  9. Glass ceramic of high hardness and fracture toughness developed from iron-rich wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixin HAN

    2009-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the feasibility of using high iron content wastes, gen-erated during steel making, as a raw material for the production of glass ceramic. The iron-rich wastes were mixed and melted in different proportions with soda-lime glass cullet and sand. The devitrification of the parent glasses produced from the different mixtures was investigated using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were assessed by hardness and indentation fracture toughness measurement. A glass ce-ramic with mixture of 60 wt pct iron-rich wastes, 25 wt pct sand, and 15 wt pct glass cullet exhibited the best combination of properties, namely, hardness 7.9 GPa and fracture toughness 3.75 MPa.m1/2, for the sake of containing magnetite in marked dendritic morphology. These new hard glass ceramics are candidate materials for wear resistant tiles and paving for heavy industrial floors.

  10. Glass transition of ionic liquids under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Pádua, Agílio A. H.; Gomes, Margarida F. Costa

    2014-06-01

    The glass transition pressure at room temperature, pg, of six ionic liquids based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations and the anions [BF4]-, [PF6]-, and bis(trifluromethanesulfonyl)imide, [NTf2]-, has been obtained from the pressure dependence of the bandwidth of the ruby fluorescence line in diamond anvil cells. Molar volume, Vm(pg), has been estimated by a group contribution model (GCM) developed for the ionic liquids. A density scaling relation, TVγ, has been considered for the states Vm(pg, 295 K) and Vm(Tg, 0.1 MPa) using the simplifying condition that the viscosity at the glass transition is the same at pg at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure at Tg. Assuming a constant γ over this range of density, a reasonable agreement has been found for the γ determined herein and that of a previous density scaling analysis of ionic liquids viscosities under moderate conditions. Further support for the appropriateness of extrapolating the GCM equation of state to the GPa pressure range is provided by comparing the GCM and an equation of state previously derived in the power law density-scaling regime.

  11. A New Approach on the Active Treatment for Electroless Copper Plating on Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Zheng-Chun; HE,Quan-Guo; TANG,Jian-Xin; XIAO,Peng-Feng; HE,Nong-Yue; LU,Zu-Hong

    2003-01-01

    A new method is described for the electroless deposition of copper onto glass. Commercially available glass slide was modified with γ-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane to form self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on it. Then it was dipped directly into PdCl2 solutlon instead of the conventional SnCl2 sensitization followed by PdCl2 activation. Experimental results showed that the Pd2+ ions from PdCl2solution were coordinated to the amino groups on the glass surfaceresulting in the formation of N-Pd complex. In an electroless copper bath containing a formaldehyde reducing agent, the N-Pd complexes were reduced to Pd0 atoms, which then acted as catalysts and initiated the deposition of copper metal. Although the copper deposition rate on SAM-modified glass was slow at the beginning, it reached to that of conventional method in about 5 min.

  12. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad, E-mail: terpil@umcs.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Rymuszka, Diana [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun’ko, Vladimir M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • New modified silica materials synthesis. • Support surface plasma activation. • Apparent surface free energy determination. • Equilibrium contact angle calculation. - Abstract: Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γ{sub S}) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γ{sub S} decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m{sup 2} (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2} for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  13. Abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramics containing apatite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I Sevim; M K Kulekci

    2006-06-01

    In this study, abrasive wear behaviour of bio-active glass ceramic materials produced with two different processes is studied. Hot pressing process and conventional casting and controlled crystallization process were used to produce bio-active ceramics. Fracture toughness of studied material was calculated by fracture toughness equations using experimental hardness results of the bio-active glass ceramic material. Two fracture toughness equations in the literature were used to identify the wear behaviour of studied ceramics. Wear resistance results that identified with both of the equations were similar. The results showed that the abrasive wear resistance of the bio-active glass ceramics produced with hot pressing process was found to be higher than that of the ceramics produced by conventional casting and controlled crystallization process.

  14. Investigations into the stabilization of drugs by sugar glasses : III. The influence of various high-pH buffers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H C; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of the high-pH buffers ammediol, borax, CHES, TRIS, and Tricine on the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrated fraction (Tg') of trehalose/buffer and inulin/buffer solutions at pH 6.0 and pH 9.8. Also, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of sugar glasse

  15. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high η CMS muon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, F.; Gouzevitch, M.; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A. A. O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, H. M. I.; Awan, I. M.; Hoorani, R.; Muhammad, S.; Shahzad, H.; Shah, M. A.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S. Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. H.; Park, S. K.; Kim, M. S.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Pedraza, I.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L. M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-09-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to 6 · 1034 cm-2s-1. The region of the forward muon spectrometer (|η| > 1.6) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles flux up to 2 kHz/cm2 (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The current CMS RPC technology cannot sustain the expected background level. The new technology that will be chosen should have a high rate capability and provide a good spatial and timing resolution. A new generation of Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low-resistivity glass is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high η muon stations of CMS. First the design of small size prototypes and studies of their performance in high-rate particles flux are presented. Then the proposed designs for large size chambers and their fast-timing electronic readout are examined and preliminary results are provided.

  16. Comparison of mechanical properties of glass-bonded sodalite and borosilicate glass high-level waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Holleran, T. P.; DiSanto, T.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    2000-05-09

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a glass-bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of 75 vol.% crystalline sodalite and 25 vol.% glass. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on this material and borosilicate glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confined for the glass-bonded sodalite waste form, while median-radial cracking occurred in the borosilicate glass. The elastic modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus values are reported for both waste forms.

  17. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-01

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ˜20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  18. Evaluation the microwave heating of spinel crystals in high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-18

    In this report, the microwave heating of a crystal-free and a partially (24 wt%) trevorite-crystallized waste glass simulant were evaluated. The results show that a 500 mg piece of partially crystallized waste glass can be heated from room-temperature to above 1600 °C (as measured by infrared radiometry) within 2 minutes using a single mode, highly focused, 2.45 GHz microwave, operating at 300 W. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the partially crystallized glass experiences an 87 % reduction in trevorite following irradiation and thermal quenching. When a crystal-free analogue of the same waste glass simulant composition is exposed to the same microwave radiation it could not be heated above 450 °C regardless of the heating time.

  19. Float processing of high-temperature complex silicate glasses and float baths used for same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Reid Franklin (Inventor); Cook, Glen Bennett (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A float glass process for production of high melting temperature glasses utilizes a binary metal alloy bath having the combined properties of a low melting point, low reactivity with oxygen, low vapor pressure, and minimal reactivity with the silicate glasses being formed. The metal alloy of the float medium is exothermic with a solvent metal that does not readily form an oxide. The vapor pressure of both components in the alloy is low enough to prevent deleterious vapor deposition, and there is minimal chemical and interdiffusive interaction of either component with silicate glasses under the float processing conditions. Alloys having the desired combination of properties include compositions in which gold, silver or copper is the solvent metal and silicon, germanium or tin is the solute, preferably in eutectic or near-eutectic compositions.

  20. High modulus invert analog glass compositions containing beryllia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consisting essentially of, in mols, 10-45% SiO2, 2-15% Li2O, 3-34% BeO, 12-36% of at least one bivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of CaO, ZnO, MgO and CuO, 10-39% of at least one trivalent oxide selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, B2O3, La2O3, Y2O3 and the mixed rare earth oxides, the total number of said bivalent and trivalent oxides being at least three, and up to 10% of a tetravalent oxide selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2.

  1. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high ${\\eta}$ CMS muon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A.A.O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.F.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharmag, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M.I.; Awan, I.M.; Hoorani, R.; Muhammad, S.; Shahzad, H.; Shah, M.A.; Cho, S.W.; Choi, S.Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M.H.; Lee, K.S.; Lim, J.H.; Park, S.K.; Kim, M.S.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Pedraza, I.; Uribe Estradam, C.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L.M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S.J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J.C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-01-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to $6.10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ . The region of the forward muon spectrometer ($|{\\eta}| > 1.6$) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles rate up to $2 kHz/cm^{2}$ (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The actual RPC technology of CMS cannot sustain the expected background level. The new technology that will be chosen should have a high rate capability and provides a good spatial and timing resolution. A new generation of Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low-resistivity (LR) glass is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high ${\\eta}$ muon stations of CMS. First the design of small size prototypes and studies of their perfor...

  2. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high $\\eta$ CMS muon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gouzevitch, Maxime; Laktineh, Imad; Buridon, Victor; Chen, Xiushan; Combaret, Christophe; Eynard, Alexis; Germani, Lionel; Grenier, Gerald; Mathez, Hervé; Mirabito, Laurent; Petrukhin, Alexei; Steen, Arnaud; Tromeur, William; Wang, Yi; Gong, A.; Moreau, Nathalie; de la Taille, Christophe; Dulucq, Fréderic

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to $6 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The region of the forward muon spectrometer ($|\\eta| > 1.6$) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles rate up to 2 kHz/cm$^2$ ( including a safety factor 3 ) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The actual RPC technology of CMS cannot sustain the expected background level. A new generation Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low resistivity glass (LR) is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high eta muon stations of CMS. The design of small size prototypes and the studies of their performances under high rate particles flux is presented.

  3. Damage behavior of Nd:glass of high-power disk amplifier medium in ICF Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shaobo; Chen, Lin; Yuan, Xiaodong; Chen, Yuanbin; Cheng, Xiaofeng; Xie, Xudong; Wang, Wenyi; Zu, Xiaotao

    2016-12-01

    Large aperture Nd:glass disk is often used as the amplifier medium in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. The typical size of Nd:glass is up to 810mm×460mm×40mm and more than 3,000 Nd:glass components are needed in the ICF facility. At present, the 3ω fused silica glass and DKDP crystal are mainly responsible for the damage of driver used for ICF. However, with the enlargement of the facility and increase of laser shot number, the laser damage of Nd:glass at 1ω waveband is still an important problem to limit the stable operation of facility and improvement of laser beam quality. In this work, the influence of Nd:glass material itself, mechanical processing, service environment, and laser beam quality on its damage behavior is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The results and conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) It is very important to control the concentration of platinum impurity particles during melting and the sputtering effect of the cladding materials. (2) The number and length of fractural and brittle scratches should be strictly suppressed during mechanical processing of Nd:glass. (3) The B-integral of high power laser beam should be rigorously controlled. Particularly, the top shape of pulses must be well controlled when operating at high peak laser power. (4) The service environment should be well managed to make sure the cleanness of the surface of Nd:glass better than 100/A level during mounting and running. (5) The service environment and beam quality should be monitored during operation.

  4. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  5. Thin film metal sensors in fusion bonded glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Martin; Ek, Johan; Hedman, Ludvig; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehlstedt, Viktor; Stocklassa, Jesper; Snögren, Pär; Pettersson, Victor; Larsson, Jonas; Vizuete, Olivier; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure microfluidics offers fast analyses of thermodynamic parameters for compressed process solvents. However, microfluidic platforms handling highly compressible supercritical CO2 are difficult to control, and on-chip sensing would offer added control of the devices. Therefore, there is a need to integrate sensors into highly pressure tolerant glass chips. In this paper, thin film Pt sensors were embedded in shallow etched trenches in a glass wafer that was bonded with another glass wafer having microfluidic channels. The devices having sensors integrated into the flow channels sustained pressures up to 220 bar, typical for the operation of supercritical CO2. No leakage from the devices could be found. Integrated temperature sensors were capable of measuring local decompression cooling effects and integrated calorimetric sensors measured flow velocities over the range 0.5-13.8 mm s-1. By this, a better control of high-pressure microfluidic platforms has been achieved.

  6. A high resolution large x-ray mission based on thin glass: optomechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Stefano; Buratti, Enrico; Civitani, Marta; Pareschi, Giovanni; Salmaso, Bianca; Spiga, Daniele; Ghigo, Mauro; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Eder, Josef

    2014-07-01

    The technology of X-ray optics based on very thin glass sheets curved on mandrels figured to an optical quality have been quickly developed in these last years, as the on flight NUSTAR or the glass solutions for the IXO mission have demonstrated. Different possibilities to freeze the correct shape can be chosen and the constrains to the glass can widely affect the response in term of strength and quality. This study shows the opto-mechanical performances of the design based on the hot slumped glass sheets stiffed with reinforcing ribs. With this concept a glass stack can be integrated into a mechanical structure in order to form a module that can be assembled in a large structure. The considered input data and requirements are those specified for the proposed Athena mission. Different types of materials are considered following the latest progress in the slumping and the availability of alternative tougher glass. Static and dynamic FE analyses coupled with ray-tracing are performed in order to reach a high resolution (less than 5 arcsec). Also an optimization of the ribs distribution is implemented in function of the radius of curvature.

  7. Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-12-01

    Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 °C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ≈ 4.0-8.0 × 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ≈ 2.0-4.0 × 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

  8. Optical glass with tightest refractive index and dispersion tolerances for high-end optical designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedamzik, R.; Reichel, S.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-03-01

    In high end optical designs the quality of the optical system not only depends on the chosen optical glasses but also on the available refractive index and Abbe number tolerances. The primary optical design is based on datasheet values of the refractive index and Abbe number. In general the optical position of the delivered glass will deviate from the catalog values by given tolerances due to production tolerances. Therefore in many cases the final optical design needs to be modified based on real glass data. Tighter refractive index and Abbe number tolerances can greatly reduce this additional amount of work. The refractive index and Abbe number of an optical glass is a function of the chemical composition and the annealing process. Tight refractive index tolerances require not only a close control and high reliability of the melting and fine annealing process but also best possible material data. These data rely on high accuracy measurement and accurate control during mass production. Modern melting and annealing procedure do not only enable tight index tolerances but also a high homogeneity of the optical properties. Recently SCHOTT was able to introduce the tightest available refractive index and Abbe number tolerance available in the market: step 0.5 meaning a refractive index tolerance of +/- 0.0001 and an Abbe number tolerance of +/- 0.1%. This presentation describes how the refractive index depends on the glass composition and annealing process and describes the requirements to get to this tightest refractive index and Abbe number tolerance.

  9. The Curious Case of Glass I: High Ionization and Variability of Different Types

    CERN Document Server

    Kruger, Andrew J; Carr, John S; Najita, Joan R; Moerchen, Margaret M; Doppmann, Greg W; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Our Spitzer IRS observation of the infrared companion Glass Ib revealed fine structure emission with high ionization ([NeIII]/[NeII]=2.1 and [SIV]/[SIII]=0.6) that indicates the gas is likely illuminated by hard radiation. While models suggest extreme ultraviolet radiation could be present in T Tauri stars (Hollenbach & Gorti 2009 and references therein), this is the first detection of [SIV] and such a high [NeIII]/[NeII] ratio in a young star. We also find that Glass Ib displays the molecules HCN, CO2, and H2O in emission. Here we investigate the Glass I binary system and consider possible mechanisms that may have caused the high ionization, whether from an outflow or disk irradiation. We also model the spectral energy distributions of Glass Ia and Ib to test if the system is a young member of the Chameleon I star-forming region, and consider other possible classifications for the system. We find Glass Ib is highly variable, showing changes in continuum strength and emission features at optical, near-inf...

  10. Advances in Glass Formulations for Hanford High-Alumimum, High-Iron and Enhanced Sulphate Management in HLW Streams - 13000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-01-16

    The current estimates and glass formulation efforts have been conservative in terms of achievable waste loadings. These formulations have been specified to ensure that the glasses are homogenous, contain essentially no crystalline phases, are processable in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters and meet Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract terms. The WTP?s overall mission will require the immobilization of tank waste compositions that are dominated by mixtures of aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), bismuth (Bi), iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zirconium (Zr), and sulphur (S) compounds as waste-limiting components. Glass compositions for these waste mixtures have been developed based upon previous experience and current glass property models. Recently, DOE has initiated a testing program to develop and characterize HLW glasses with higher waste loadings and higher throughput efficiencies. Results of this work have demonstrated the feasibility of increases in waste loading from about 25 wt% to 33-50 wt% (based on oxide loading) in the glass depending on the waste stream. In view of the importance of aluminum limited waste streams at Hanford (and also Savannah River), the ability to achieve high waste loadings without adversely impacting melt rates has the potential for enormous cost savings from reductions in canister count and the potential for schedule acceleration. Consequently, the potential return on the investment made in the development of these enhancements is extremely favorable. Glass composition development for one of the latest Hanford HLW projected compositions with sulphate concentrations high enough to limit waste loading have been successfully tested and show tolerance for previously unreported tolerance for sulphate. Though a significant increase in waste loading for high-iron wastes has been achieved, the magnitude of the increase is not as substantial as those achieved for high-aluminum, high-chromium, high-bismuth or sulphur

  11. High-Precision Dispensing of Nanoliter Biofluids on Glass Pedestal Arrays for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yang; Xu, QianFeng; Zhu, Jing; Poget, Sébastien F; Lyons, Alan M

    2016-05-04

    Precise dispensing of nanoliter droplets is necessary for the development of sensitive and accurate assays, especially when the availability of the source solution is limited. Conventional approaches are limited by imprecise positioning, large shear forces, surface tension effects, and high costs. To address the need for precise and economical dispensing of nanoliter volumes, we developed a new approach where the dispensed volume is dependent on the size and shape of defined surface features, thus freeing the dispensing process from pumps and fine-gauge needles requiring accurate positioning. The surface we fabricated, called a nanoliter droplet virtual well microplate (nVWP), achieves high-precision dispensing (better than ±0.5 nL or ±1.6% at 32 nL) of 20-40 nL droplets using a small source drop (3-10 μL) on isolated hydrophilic glass pedestals (500 μm on a side) bonded to arrays of polydimethylsiloxane conical posts. The sharp 90° edge of the glass pedestal pins the solid-liquid-vapor triple contact line (TCL), averting the wetting of the glass sidewalls while the fluid is prevented from receding from the edge. This edge creates a sufficiently large energy barrier such that microliter water droplets can be poised on the glass pedestals, exhibiting contact angles greater >150°. This approach relieves the stringent mechanical alignment tolerances required for conventional dispensing techniques, shifting the control of dispensed volume to the area circumscribed by the glass edge. The effects of glass surface chemistry and dispense velocity on droplet volume were studied using optical microscopy and high-speed video. Functionalization of the glass pedestal surface enabled the selective adsorption of specific peptides and proteins from synthetic and natural biomolecule mixtures, such as venom. We further demonstrate how the nVWP dispensing platform can be used for a variety of assays, including sensitive detection of proteins and peptides by fluorescence

  12. Glycogenotic hepatocellular carcinoma with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes: A heuristically highly relevant phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Bannasch

    2012-01-01

    Glycogenotic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes has recently been described as an allegedly "novel variant" of HCC,but neither the historical background nor the heuristic relevance of this observation were put in perspective.In the present contribution,the most important findings in animal models and human beings related to the emergence and further evolution of excessively glycogen storing (glycogenotic) hepatocytes with and without ground glass features during neoplastic development have been summarized.Glycogenotic HCCs with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes represent highly differentiated neoplasms which contain subpopulations of cells phenotypically resembling those of certain types of preneoplastic hepatic foci and benign hepatocellular neoplasms.It is questionable whether the occurrence of glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes in a glycogenotic HCC justifies its classification as a specific entity.The typical appearance of ground-glass hepatocytes is due to a hypertrophy of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum,which is usually associated with an excessive storage of glycogen and frequently also with an expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen.Sequential studies in animal models and observations in humans indicate that glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes are a facultative,integral part of a characteristic cellular sequence commencing with focal hepatic glycogenosis potentially progressing to benign and malignant neoplasms.During this process highly differentiated glycogenotic cells including ground-glass hepatocytes are gradually transformed via various intermediate stages into poorly differentiated glycogen-poor,basophilic (ribosome-rich) cancer cells.Histochemical,microbiochemical,and molecular biochemical studies on focal hepatic glycogenosis and advanced preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in tissue sections and laser-dissected specimens in rat and mouse models have provided compelling evidence for an early insulinomimetic

  13. Femtosecond laser direct writing of gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnubhatla, K C; Kumar, R Sai Santosh; Rao, D Narayana [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, S Venugopal [ACRHEM, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Osellame, R; Ramponi, R [IFN - CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133, Milano (Italy); Bhaktha, S N B; Mattarelli, M; Montagna, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, CSMFO Lab., Universita di Trento, 38050 Trento (Italy); Turrell, S [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Batiment C5 - UMR CNRS 8516, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Chiappini, A; Chiasera, A; Ferrari, M [CNR-IFN, CSMFO Lab., Via alla Cascata 56/c, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy); Righini, G C, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.i, E-mail: svrsp@uohyd.ernet.i, E-mail: krishna.vishunubhatla@polimi.i [CNR-IFAC, MDF Lab., Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy)

    2009-10-21

    The femtosecond laser direct writing technique was employed to inscribe gratings and waveguides in high quantum efficiency erbium-doped Baccarat glass. Using the butt coupling technique, a systematic study of waveguide loss with respect to input pulse energy and writing speed was performed to achieve the best waveguide with low propagation loss (PL). By pumping at 980 nm, we observed signal enhancement in these active waveguides in the telecom spectral region. The refractive index change was smooth and we estimated it to be {approx}10{sup -3}. The high quantum efficiency ({approx}80%) and a best PL of {approx}0.9 dB cm{sup -1} combined with signal enhancement makes Baccarat glass a potential candidate for application in photonics.

  14. The TVT Glass Pavilion: Theoretical Study on a Highly Transparent Building Made with Long-Spanned TVT Portals Braced with Hybrid Glass-Steel Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Froli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary buildings, the architectural demand for a complete dematerialisation of load bearing structures can be satisfied only in limited cases with the exclusive structural use of glass. Otherwise, for challenging applications such as long spanned or high-rise structures, the use of hybrid glass-steel systems is mandatory. Glass, fragile but highly compressive resistant, is associated with steel, ductile and tensile resistant. The present research shows the feasibility study for a fully glazed pavilion made of six TVT (Travi Vitree Tensegrity portal frames longitudinally braced by pre-stressed hybrid glass panels. The frames are about 20 m in span and 8 m in height. Appropriate multiscalar FEM numerical analyses, calibrated on the collapse tests performed on previous TVT large-scale prototypes, stated that the structural performance would be able to withstand heavy static and dynamic loads and stated the observance of the Fail-Safe Design principles.

  15. High strain rate sensitivity of hardness in quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high entropy metallic glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shaofan; Wang, Haibin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Nan; Zhao, Delin; Yao, Kefu; Chen, Na

    2017-10-01

    Quinary Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni high-entropy metallic glass thin films were produced by magnetron sputter deposition. Nanoindentation tests indicate that the deposited film exhibits a relatively large hardness of 10.4±0.6 GPa and a high elastic modulus of 131±11 GPa under the strain rate of 0.5 s-1. Specifically, the strain rate sensitivity of hardness measured for the thin film is 0.05, the highest value reported for metallic glasses so far. Such high strain rate sensitivity of hardness is likely due to the high-entropy effect which stabilizes the amorphous structure with enhanced homogeneity.

  16. Tribological and mechanical properties of high power laser surface-treated metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2007-01-01

    The processing power of high power Nd:YAG laser has been utilised to achieve the inherently high cooling rates required to form many of today's bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The production of thick (>= 250 mu m) amorphous surface layers has been considered. Microstructural and chemical observation t

  17. Investigations into the Structure and Dynamics of Chalcogenide Glasses using High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseman, Derrick Charles

    Chalcogenide glasses constitute an important class of materials that are sulfides, selenides or tellurides of group IV and/or V elements, namely Ge, As, P and Si with minor concentrations of other elements such as Ga, Sb, In. Because of their infrared transparency that can be tuned by changing chemistry and can be actively altered by exposure to band gap irradiation, chalcogenide glasses find use in passive and active optical devices for applications in the areas of photonics, remote sensing and memory technology. Therefore, it is important to establish predictive models of structure-property relationships for these materials for optimization of their physical properties for various applications. Structural elucidation of chalcogenide glasses is experimentally challenging and in order to make predictive structural models, structural units at both short and intermediate -range length scales must be identified and quantified. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an element-specific structural probe that is uniquely suited for this task, but resolution and sensitivity issues have severely limited the applications of such techniques in the past. The recent development of multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques, such as Phase Adjusted Spinning Sidebands (PASS) and Magic Angle Turning (MAT) can potentially alleviate such issues. In this study novel two-dimensional, high-resolution 77Se and 125Te MATPASS NMR spectroscopic techniques are utilized to elucidate quantitatively the compositional evolution of the short- and intermediate- range atomic structure in three binary chalcogenide glass-forming systems, namely: GexSe100-x, AsxSe100-x , and AsxTe100-x. The spectroscopic results provide unambiguous site speciation and quantification for short- and intermediate-range structural motifs present in these glasses. In turn, for all systems, robust structural models and the corresponding structure-property relationships are successfully established as a function

  18. Settling of Spinel in a High-Level Waste Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Schill, Pert; Nemec, Lubomir

    2002-01-18

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors called melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150?C (or even higher in advanced melters) to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling. This process is slow and expensive. Moreover, the melters that are currently in use or are going to be used in the U.S. are sensitive to clogging and thus cannot process melt in which solid particles are suspended. These particles settle and gradually accumulate on the melter bottom. Such particles, most often small crystals of spinel (a mineral containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other minor oxides), inevitably occur in the melt when the content of the waste in the glass (called waste loading) increases above a certain limit. To avoid the presence of solid particles in the melter, the waste loading is kept rather low, in average 15% lower than in glass formulated for more robust melters.

  19. Settling of Spinel in A High-Level Waste Glass Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel Hrma; Pert Schill; Lubomir Nemec

    2002-01-07

    High-level nuclear waste is being vitrified, i.e., converted to a durable glass that can be stored in a safe repository for hundreds of thousands of years. Waste vitrification is accomplished in reactors call melters to which the waste is charged together with glass-forming additives. The mixture is electrically heated to a temperature as high as 1150 degree C (or even higher in advanced melters) to create a melt that becomes glass on cooling. This process is slow and expensive. Moreover, the melters that are currently in use or are going to be used in the U.S. are sensitive to clogging and thus cannot process melt in which solid particles are suspended. These particles settle and gradually accumulate on the melter bottom. Such particles, most often small crystals of spinel ( a mineral containing iron, nickel, chromium, and other minor oxides), inevitably occurred in the melt when the content of the waste in the glass (called waste loading) increases above a certain limit. To avoid the presence of solid particles in the melter, the waste loading is kept rather low, in average 15% lower than in glass formulated for more robust melters.

  20. Preparation and Fluorescent Property of Eu-Doped High Silica Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A method to fabricate europium ions doped-high silica glass for transparent fluorescence materials based on the fabrication and sintering technique of nano-porous silica glass was reported. Glasses impregnated with Eu ions and sintered at above 1150 ℃ in a reduction atmosphere show a very strong blue light from an emission band at about 430 nm due to the 4f65d→4f7(8S7/2) transition of the Eu2+ ions. On the other hand, the Eu-doped glass obtained by co-impregnated with Y3+ and V5+ ions and sintering in oxidation atmosphere behaves a very strong red emission band at about 615 nm with a UV excitation. An appearance of vanadate band in the excitation spectrum of Eu3+, Y3+ and V5+ ions co-doped high silica glass implies an effective energy transferring from VO43- to Eu3+ and effective excitation of Eu3+ by about 500 nm strong broad emission of VO43-.

  1. Borate glasses with high lanthanide oxids solubility for the cold crucible induction melter(CCIM) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.; Heo, J. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Pyro-processing is being investigated to reuse radioactive uranium and trans-uranium elements from the spent fuels. Previous researches regarding waste forms for rare-earth oxides waste generated from pyro-processing reported low elemental release (< 10{sup 4} g/m2) of RE ions at the product consistency test (PCT). Current work reports the continuing effort on the enhancement of the waste loading and process-ability using cold crucible induction melter(CCIM). Borate glasses are well-known for their low melting temperatures with high rare-earth oxide solubility compared to silicate glasses. Borate glasses were investigated as potential waste forms with high waste loading for immobilization of lanthanide ion wastes produced by pyro-processing. Process-ability of them was investigated by characterizing several important processing parameters for cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) process. Borate glasses containing 0 - 20 mol% Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were fabricated by melting the starting powders at 1300 .deg. C for 30 min with maximum loading of 56.8 wt % (22 mol %). The released concentration of Nd were < 0.1 ppm. Crystallization did not appear at the temperature below 800 .deg. C. Viscosity and electric conductivity of these glasses meet requirements to apply to CCIM.

  2. Structure and spectral properties of the silver-containing high-silica glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girsova, M. A.; Golovina, G. F.; Anfimova, I. N.; Arsent'ev, M. Yu; Antropova, T. V.

    2016-08-01

    Silver-containing high-silica glasses were synthesized by an impregnation of the silica porous glasses (PGs) first with AgNO3 aqueous solution (with or without the presence of the sensitizers, such as Cu(NO3)2 or Ce(NO3)3), next in the mixed halide salt (NH4Cl, KBr, KI) solution. Then some part of the samples was sintered at the temperatures from 850 to 900°C up to closing of the pores. The structure of glasses was studied by UV-VIS-NIR and IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. According to XRD data the silver-containing high-silica glasses contain the AgBr, AgI, Ag3PO4, (CuBr)0.75(CuI)0.25 phases. IR spectra confirmed B-O-B, Si- O-Si, P-O-P, O-P-O, O-B-O bonds, (PO4)3- and P-O- groups in glasses.

  3. An in vitro evaluation of selective demineralised enamel removal using bio-active glass air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avijit; Pabari, Hiten; Paolinelis, George; Thompson, Ian D; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-12-01

    Unnecessary over-preparation of carious enamel often occurs clinically during operative caries management. The working hypothesis to be investigated in this study is the potential for bio-active glass air abrasion to remove selectively only demineralised enamel in artificial enamel lesions when compared to equivalent alumina air abrasion, so potentially minimising cavity over-preparation. Bisected artificial, paired smooth surface enamel lesions on ethics-approved, extracted sound human molars were created and subsequently air abraded with 27 μm alumina (n = 19) and bio-active glass (n = 19). The difference between pre-operative lesion boundary and post-operative cavity margin was calculated following optical confocal fluorescent assessment of the lesion boundary. Data indicated mean% over-preparation (sound enamel removal) of 176% with alumina and 15.2% for bio-active glass (p = 0.005). Bio-active glass abrasion removed completely the demineralised enamel from artificial lesions with clinically insignificant over-preparation of sound tissue, indicating technique selectivity towards grossly demineralised enamel. Alumina air abrasion resulted in substantial enamel removal in both sound and demineralised tissues indicating the operator selectivity required to use the techniques effectively in clinical practice.

  4. Unconventional critical activated scaling of two-dimensional quantum spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoz-Fernandez, D. A.; Romá, F.

    2016-07-01

    We study the critical behavior of two-dimensional short-range quantum spin glasses by numerical simulations. Using a parallel tempering algorithm, we calculate the Binder cumulant for the Ising spin glass in a transverse magnetic field with two different short-range bond distributions, the bimodal and the Gaussian ones. Through an exhaustive finite-size analysis, we show that the cumulant probably follows an unconventional activated scaling, which we interpret as new evidence supporting the hypothesis that the quantum critical behavior is governed by an infinite randomness fixed point.

  5. Single-exponential activation behavior behind the super-Arrhenius relaxations in glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianwen; Li, Jiangong; Fecht, Hans-Jörg

    2010-11-17

    The reported relaxation time for several typical glass-forming liquids was analyzed by using a kinetic model for liquids which invoked a new kind of atomic cooperativity--thermodynamic cooperativity. The broadly studied 'cooperative length' was recognized as the kinetic cooperativity. Both cooperativities were conveniently quantified from the measured relaxation data. A single-exponential activation behavior was uncovered behind the super-Arrhenius relaxations for the liquids investigated. Hence the mesostructure of these liquids and the atomic mechanism of the glass transition became clearer.

  6. Excited state absorption in glasses activated with rare earth ions: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowski, Dawid; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    We present semiempirical approach based on the Judd-Ofelt theory and apply it for modeling the spectral properties of fluoride glasses activated with the rare earth (RE) ions. This method provide a powerful tool for simulating both ground state absorption (GSA) and excited state absorption (ESA) spectra of RE ions, e.g. Nd3+, Ho3+, Er3+ and Tm3+ in the ZBLAN glass matrix. The results of theoretical calculations correspond to the experimentally measured data. We also demonstrate that the spectra obtained using the presented approach are applicable in the analysis of up-conversion excitation schemes in these optoelectronically relevant materials.

  7. Nd3+,Yb3+ and Ho3+ Codoped Oxyfluoride Glass Ceramics with High Efficient Green Upconversion Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-Jie; KAWAMOTO Yoji; DAI Shi-Xun; ZHANG Li-Yan; HU Li-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ New oxyfluoride glasses and glass ceramic codoped with Nd3+, Yb3+ and Ho3+ were prepared. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the heat treatments of the oxyfluoride glasses could cause the precipitation of (Nd3+, Yb3+, Ho3+)-doped fluorite-type crystals. Very strong green up-conversion luminescence due to the Ho3+: (5F4, 5S2) → 5I8 transition under 800-nm excitation was observed in these transparent glass ceramics.The intensity of the green up-conversion luminescence in a 1-mo1% YbF3-containing glass ceramic was found to be about 120 times stronger than that in the precursor oxyfluoride glass. The reason for the highly efficient Ho3+up-conversion luminescence in the oxyfluoride glass ceramics is discussed.

  8. Effect of silver concentration on the silver-activated phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.M. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yung, S.W., E-mail: hwyang@nuu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, 1, Lin Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miao-Li 36003, Taiwan (China); Brow, R.K. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); Hsu, W.L.; Lu, C.C.; Wu, F.B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National United University, 1, Lin Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miao-Li 36003, Taiwan (China); Ching, S.H. [City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2010-09-01

    The effects of silver concentration on the structure and properties of silver-activated phosphate glasses, with the nominal molar compositions xAg{sub 2}O.(1 - x)(30Na{sub 2}O.10Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.60P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and 0 {<=} x {<=} 10 mol%, were studied. Increasing the Ag{sub 2}O-content decreases the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), increases the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and increases the glass dissolution rate in water. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies indicate that the addition of Ag{sub 2}O leads to the formation of chain-terminating P-tetrahedra, and {sup 27}Al NMR spectra indicate that Al-octahedra are the preferred structural moiety. Optical spectroscopy indicates that Ag{sub 2}O-additions shift the UV-absorption edge to longer wavelengths. Irradiating glasses with {<=}1.0 mol% Ag{sub 2}O with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays creates a photoluminescence (PL) center that emits near 605 nm when excited with UV light (337.1 nm). The intensity of this PL center is proportional to the radiation dosage (up to 200 Gy), and the relative sensitivity is maximized in glasses with 0.05 mol% Ag{sub 2}O. When x > 1 mol% Ag{sub 2}O, a second PL center, emitting at 470 nm, is activated. The formation of this second PL center is associated with the loss of radiation sensitivity for glasses with greater Ag{sub 2}O-contents.

  9. 2.7 μm emission of high thermally and chemically durable glasses based on AlF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feifei; Ma, Yaoyao; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Xueqiang; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2014-01-01

    AlF3-based glasses (AlF3-YF3-CaF2-BaF2-SrF2-MgF2) with enhanced thermal and chemical stability were synthesized and compared with the well-known fluorozirconate glass (ZBLAN). The 2.7 μm mid-infrared emission in the AlF3-based glasses was also investigated through the absorption and emission spectra. Both the temperature of glass transition and the characteristic temperatures (ΔT, Hr, kgl) of the fluoroaluminate glasses were much larger than those of the ZBLAN glasses. The corrosion phenomenon can be observed by naked-eye, and the transmittance dropped dramatically (0% at 3 μm) when the ZBLAN glass was placed into distilled water. However, the AlF3-based glass was relatively stable. The fluoroaluminate glasses possessed large branching ratio (20%) along with the emission cross section (9.4×10-21 cm-2) of the Er3+:4I11/2-->4I13/2 transition. Meanwhile, the enhanced 2.7 μm emission in highly Er3+-doped AYF glass was obtained. Therefore, these results showed that this kind of fluoride glass has a promising application for solid state lasers at 3 μm.

  10. Flexible strain sensors with high performance based on metallic glass thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, H. J.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Zhu, X. S.; Hu, Y. C.; Huang, Y. F.; Meng, S.; Gu, L.; Liu, Y. H.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-09-01

    Searching strain sensitive materials for electronic skin is of crucial significance because of the restrictions of current materials such as poor electrical conductivity, large energy consumption, complex manufacturing process, and high cost. Here, we report a flexible strain sensor based on the Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 metallic glass thin film which we name metallic glass skin. The metallic glass skin, synthesized by ion beam deposition, exhibits piezoresistance effects with a gauge factor of around 2.86, a large detectable strain range (˜1% or 180° bending angle), and good conductivity. Compared to other e-skin materials, the temperature coefficient of resistance of the metallic glass skin is extremely low (9.04 × 10-6 K-1), which is essential for the reduction in thermal drift. In addition, the metallic glass skin exhibits distinct antibacterial behavior desired for medical applications, also excellent reproducibility and repeatability (over 1000 times), nearly perfect linearity, low manufacturing cost, and negligible energy consumption, all of which are required for electronic skin for practical applications.

  11. Structural Investigation of SBGESE Glasses by High Resolution X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golovchak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the structure of Sb8Ge32Se60 (Z=2.72 and Sb20Ge20Se60 (Z=2.60 chalcogenide glasses is determined by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Glasses with Z=2.60 the structure consists of deformed tetrahedra and pyramids, in which at least one Se atom is substituted by Ge or Sb atom. For the Z=2.72 structure consisting of shared pyramids and tetrahedra with two or more Se atoms substituted by the cations. At the same time, Se-Se dimers are present in both compositions.

  12. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}d) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition, and the spinel solubility (c{sub o}) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of T{sub L} as a function of composition are based on T{sub L} measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c{sub o} versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates T{sub L} as a function of composition based on c{sub o} data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  13. THE CRYSTALLIZATION OF POTASSIUM GERMANATE GLASS WITH HIGH CONTENT OF NIOBIUM OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRĐAN D.MATIJAŠEVIĆ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium germanate glass with molar ratio [GeO2]/[K2O] = 1.2 and Nb2O5 content of 34 mol% have been synthesized by a melt-quenching method. The crystallization behavior under non-isothermal and isothermal crystallization conditions was investigated. The results showed that this glass exposed complex primary crystallization. In the temperature range 800 °C. K10Nb22Ge4O68 and metastable KNbO3 and K4Nb6O17 were formed as secondary phases. The crystallization commenced at T > 640 °C with high homogeneous nucleation rate and spherulite crystal growth morphology. DTA curves recorded for powder samples particle size 0.1 mm showed two exothermic peaks and two endothermic peaks within temperature range of T = 640-1020 °C. The analysis of the dominant crystallization mechanism of powder glass sample and kinetics of crystallization is presented.

  14. Effect of insertion method on knoop hardness of high viscous glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggio, Daniela Prócida; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Bönecker, Marcelo; Imparato, José Carlos P; Gee, Anton J de; Amerongen, Willem Evert van

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Knoop hardness of three high viscous glass ionomer cements: G1 - Ketac Molar; G2 - Ketac Molar Easymix (3M ESPE) and G3 - Magic Glass ART (Vigodent). As a parallel goal, three different methods for insertion of Ketac Molar Easymix were tested: G4 - conventional spatula; G5 - commercial syringe (Centrix) and G6 - low-cost syringe. Ten specimens of each group were prepared and the Knoop hardness was determined 5 times on each specimen with a HM-124 hardness machine (25 g/30 s dwell time) after 24 h, 1 and 2 weeks. During the entire test period, the specimens were stored in liquid paraffin at 37ºC. Significant differences were found between G3 and G1/G2 (two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test; pMagic Glass ART showed the lowest hardness, while the insertion technique had no significant influence on hardness.

  15. High-level nuclear waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sproull, J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Bourcier, W.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); McGrail, B.P. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    With the imminent startup, in the United States, of facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, a document has been prepared that compiles the scientific basis for understanding the alteration of the waste glass products under the range of service conditions to which they may be exposed during storage, transportation, and eventual geologic disposal. A summary of selected parts of the content of this document is provided. Waste glass alterations in a geologic repository may include corrosion of the glass network due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. Experimental testing results are described and interpreted in terms of the underlying chemical reactions and physical processes involved. The status of mechanistic modeling, which can be used for long-term predictions, is described and the remaining uncertainties associated with long-term simulations are summarized.

  16. High-level nuclear waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Feng, X.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sproull, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McGrail, B.P. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    With the imminent startup, in the United States, of facilities for vitrification of high-level nuclear waste, a document has been prepared that compiles the scientific basis for understanding the alteration of the waste glass products under the range of service conditions to which they may be exposed during storage, transportation, and eventual geologic disposal. A summary of selected parts of the content of this document is provided. Waste glass alterations in a geologic repository may include corrosion of the glass network due to groundwater and/or water vapor contact. Experimental testing results are described and interpreted in terms of the underlying chemical reactions and physical processes involved. The status of mechanistic modeling, which can be used for long-term predictions, is described and the remaining uncertainties associated with long-term simulations are summarized.

  17. High-resolution and high-temperature {sup 19} F MAS NMR study of fluorozirconate glasses and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngman, R.E.; Sem, S. [Corning Inc., NY (United States)

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports the first results of a high-resolution and high-temperature {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectroscopic study of the atomic structure and its temperature dependence in two binary Zr F{sub 4} (Z B) glasses with 62 and 70 mol % Zr F{sub 4} and a multicomponent ZBLAN (51.7% Zr-F{sub 4}-20.7% Ba F{sub 2}-4.5% La F{sub 3}-3.4% Al F{sub 3}-19.7% Na F) glass.

  18. SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES ACTIVATED WITH MANGANESE AND CADMIUM SULPHIDE QUANTUM DOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna O. Lipatova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research and development of phosphors based on quantum dots (QD is a perspective problem of photonics. The main advantages of fluorophosphate glass with quantum dots are: high absorption coefficient, solid matrix and a broad band luminescence with high quantum efficiency of QD. Manganese ions have an intense band luminescence in the red region of the spectrum. Thus, the addition of manganese ions in the glass with quantum dots leads to a broadening of the spectrum in the long wavelength region. Such emission is closer to natural sunlight and has a high color rendering index. The work objective is the study of the spectral and luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses doped with manganese and CdS quantum dots. Fluorophosphate glasses (47NaPO3-30H3PO4-10Ga2O3-5ZnO-xMnS-7,5NaALF6-4,2CdS, where x = 3, 6, 8 mol. % were synthesized. The secondary heat treatment at the temperature of 430 ° C for 90 minutes has led to the growth of quantum dots in glass volume. Absorption spectra have been measured in the visible range (from 300 to 600 nm. Heat treatment has led to a shift of the fundamental absorption edge in the visible region of the spectrum. This change is due to the growth of quantum dots. Maximum intensity of luminescence is shifted to the red region of the spectrum from 620 nm to 660 nm under laser excitation at 410 nm. The maximum shift was observed in the glass with a concentration of 3 mol. % of manganese, the minimum one - in the glass with a concentration of 8 mol. %. Values of manganese ions lifetime from18 ms for a sample with a concentration of MnS 3 mol. % to15 ms for MnS 8 mol % were obtained. The decrease in the lifetime with concentration increasing of manganese ions is due to the concentration quenching of the luminescence. The growth of CdS quantum dots in the heat treatment leads to a decrease of the lifetimes to the values below 9-3 ms (3 and 8 - mol. % MnS, respectively. Obtained findings prove that fluorophosphate

  19. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  20. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high-level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  1. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M.

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  2. Glasses having a low non-linear refractive index for laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulstich, Marga (Mainz, DE); Jahn, Walter (Ingelheim, DE); Krolla, Georg (Mainz, DE); Neuroth, Norbert (Mainz-Mombach, DE)

    1980-01-01

    Glass composition ranges are described which permit the introduction of laser activators into fluorphosphate glass with exceptionally high fluorine content while forming glasses of high crystallization stability and permitting the realization of large melt volumes. The high fluorine content imparts to the glasses an exceptionally low nonlinear refractive index n.sub.2 down to O,4 .times.10.sup.-13 esu.

  3. High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano Velez

    2008-03-31

    Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500°C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

  4. Inkjet nanoinjection for high-thoughput chemiluminescence immunoassay on multicapillary glass plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengming; Mao, Sifeng; Zeng, Hulie; Xue, Shuhua; Yang, Jianmin; Nakajima, Hizuru; Lin, Jin-Ming; Uchiyama, Katsumi

    2013-08-06

    We report a novel chemiluminescence diagnosis system for high-throughput human IgA detection by inkjet nanoinjection on a multicapillary glass plate. As proof-of-concept, microhole-based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets were aligned on a multicapillary glass plate to form a microwell array as microreactors for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The multicapillary glass plate was utilized as a switch that controlled the holding/passing of the solution. Further, anti-IgA-labeled polystyrene (PS) microbeads was assembled into the microwell array, and an inkjet nanoinjection was specially used to distribute the sample and reagent solution for chemiluminescence ELISA, enabling high-throughput detection of human IgA. As a result, the performance of human IgA tests revealed a wider range for the calibration curve and a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 ng mL(-1) than the ELISA by a standard 96-well plate. The analysis time and reagent consumption were significantly decreased. The IgA concentrations in saliva samples were determined after 10000-fold dilution by the developed ELISA system showing comparable results by conventional immune assay with 96-wells. Thus, we believe that the inkjet nanoinjection for high-throughput chemiluminescence immunoassay on a multicapillary glass plate will be promising in disease diagnosis.

  5. Sulfone-Containing Dipolar Glass Polymers with High Dielectric Constant and Low Loss Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhongbo; Litt, Morton; Zhu, Lei

    Sulfone-containing polyoxetanes are designed and synthesized for high dielectric constant and low loss dipolar glasses. The precursor polymer, poly(3,3-bis(chloromethyl)oxetane) (PBCMO) is synthesized by bulk cationic polymerization with boron trifluoride diethyl etherate as initiator. The number-average molecular weight of PBCMO is 73 kDa, with a polydispersity of 1.53 as obtained from size-exclusion chromatography results. Post-modification of PBCMO yields the dipolar glass polymer, poly(3,3-bis(methylsulfonylmethyl)oxetane) (MST). Nuclear magnetic resonance result shows 100% conversion. Differential scanning calorimetry result indicates that MST has a glass transition temperature of ca. 120 °C. Due to the large dipole moment (4.25 D) and small size of the side-chain sulfone groups, MST exhibits a high dielectric constant of 8.7 and a low dissipation factor of 0.01 at 25 °C and 1 Hz. This study suggests that dipolar glass polymers with large dipole moments and small-sized dipoles in the side chains are promising candidates for high energy density and low loss dielectric applications. This work is supported by NSF Polymers Program (DMR-1402733).

  6. High strain rate compression testing of glass fibre reinforced polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloete T.J.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper details an investigation of the high strain rate compression testing of GFPP with the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB in the through-thickness and in-plane directions. GFPP posed challenges to SHPB testing as it fails at relatively high stresses, while having relatively low moduli and hence mechanical impedance. The modifications to specimen geometry and incident pulse shaping in order to gather valid test results, where specimen equilibrium was achieved for SHPB tests on GFPP are presented. In addition to conventional SHPB tests to failure, SHPB experiments were designed to achieve specimen equilibration at small strains, which permitted the capture of high strain rate elastic modulus data. The strain rate dependency of GFPP’s failure strengths in the in-plane and through-thickness direction is modelled using a logarithmic law.

  7. High-energy Nd:glass laser for oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchenkov, Vyatcheslav A.; Utenkov, Boris I.; Zaitsev, V. K.; Bayanov, Valentin I.; Serebryakov, Victor A.

    1991-07-01

    The use of high energy solid state lasers for the treatment of human skin neoplasia was based on the experiments and clinic studies by Helsper and Goldman (1964), McGuff (1966). The heat of precise local volume is emitted due to the pulse laser radiation. The thermal effect results in the superficial necrosis of tissues with their integrity destruction, vascular repture accompanied by bloodstoke in some cases and by capillary embolism in others. Obvious tumour destruction is note only in case of high density irradiation. General tumour destruction depends on biological neoplasia features as well as the laser type.

  8. Novel Chemically Stable Er3+-Yb3+ Codopded Phosphate Glass for Ion-Exchanged Active Waveguide Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝玉; 赵士龙; 胡丽丽

    2003-01-01

    A novel Er3+-Yb3+ codoped phosphate glass,which combines good chemical durability with good spectroscopic properties,is developed for the ion-exchange process.The relevant properties of this glass are presented for reference in the design and modelling of ion-exchanged active waveguide devices.The weight-loss rate of this glass is 1.45 × 10-5 g.cm-2.h-1 in boiling water,which is comparable to that of Kigre's Q-246 silicate glass.The emission cross section of Er3+ in this glass is calculated to be 0.72 × 10-20 cm2 using the McCumber theory.It is found that a planar waveguide with three modes at 632.8 nm is readily realized in this glass from our primary ion-exchange experiments.

  9. Low temperature high density plasma nitriding of stainless steel molds for stamping of oxide glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a die for mold- and direct-stamping processes of optical oxide glasses. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical oxide-glass elements. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness over 1400 HV within its thickness of 50 μm without any formation of nitrides after plasma nitriding at 693 K for 14.4 ks. This plasma-nitrided mold was utilized for mold-stamping of two colored oxide glass plates at 833 K; these plates were successfully deformed and joined into a single glass plate by this stamping without adhesion or galling of oxide glasses onto the nitrided mold surface.

  10. Er3+ and Yb3+ Codoped Phosphate Laser Glass for High Power Flashlamp Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yong-Zheng; JIN Ming-Lin; WEN Lei; LI Shun-Guang; HU Li-Li

    2007-01-01

    A novel Yb3+-Er3+ codoped phosphate glass for high power flashlamp pumping and high repetition rate laser at 1.54 μm, designated EAT5-2, is developed. The weight-loss rate of is 1.3×10-5 gcm-2h-l in boiling water, which is comparable to Kigre's QX-Er glass. Some spectroscopic parameters are analysed by Judd-Ofelt theory and McCumber theory. The emission cross section is calculated to be 0.73×10-20 cm2. The thermo-mechanical properties of EAT5-2 are modified after an ion-exchange chemical strengthening process in a KNO3/NaNO3 molten salt bath. The thresholds for optical damage from the nashlamp pumping are tested on glass rods. A repetition rate of 15 Hz is achieved for chemically strengthened glass. The laser experimental results at 1.54 μm from nashlamp pumping are also reported.

  11. Dash line glass- and sapphire-cutting with high power USP laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchik, Konstantin; Chassagne, Bruno; Javaux-Léger, Clémentine; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Kling, Rainer; Lopez, John

    2016-03-01

    Glass cutting is a subject of high interest for flat panel display and consumer electronics industries. Among laser-based, water jet-based and diamond tool-based existing solutions, ultra-short pulses (USP) appear as a promising technology since this laser technology has the unique capacity to produce highly localized bulk modification owing to non-linear absorption. The cutting using USP lasers could be performed either by full ablation which is slow and generates a lot of dust, by controlled fracture propagation which is slow as well and may lead to path deviation, by stealth dicing which produces rough sidewalls, or by self-breaking induced by in-volume laser irradiation. The laser treatment is often continuous which is not necessary to perform glass cutting and may lead to over-exposure. In this paper we report on single pass glass and sapphire cutting using an USP laser (20W @200kHz or 8W@2MHz) using dash line laser treatment along the cutting trajectory. In-volume energy deposition was done along the glass thickness owing to a Bessel beam. The results will be discussed in terms of sidewall profile and roughness, path deviation, rim sharpness, energy dose and feed rate. Dash line treatment enables to tune the energy deposition and to produce the cutting effect but with a narrower heat affected zone, a better sidewall quality and a more accurate trajectory control of the cutting path.

  12. DUV high power lasers processing for glass and CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kakizaki, Kouji; Oizumi, Hiroaki; Mimura, Toshio; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2017-05-01

    A laser processing is widely applied to cutting, drilling, welding, bending and surface treatment in industry. Lasers with a wavelength of 1 μm are mainly used and the processing is realized by melting materials. This thermal process has a high productivity but the processed surface is hard to use for precision machining. This report is focusing on two materials which are classified in wide band gap. Ablation rate was measured with a laser microscope and an optical one. Excimer laser is expected to be a useful tool for these materials

  13. Thermal poling of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas J.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2012-04-01

    Per the rectification model of thermal poling, it has been proposed that intrinsic breakdown strength plays a strong limiting role in the internal DC fields supported by the glass from the poling process. One might therefore hypothesize proportionately larger second-order nonlinearity (SON) in glasses with intrinsically high dielectric breakdown strength. We test these ideas by thermal poling of two different commercial alkali-free alkaline-earth boroaluminosilicate display glasses—one with barium only (AF45 from Schott), and the other with a mixture of alkaline-earth ions (OA-10 G from NEG). Not only are such compositions relevant from a commercial standpoint, they are also interesting in that they have been recently shown to exhibit remarkably high intrinsic dielectric breakdown strengths of 11-14 MV/cm. Quantitative Maker fringe and stack Maker-fringe measurements provide an accurate evaluation of the poling-induced SON susceptibilities, and indicate maximum χ(2) values of 0.44 and 0.26 pm/V in these glasses. These values are comparable to those reported for silica and other multicomponent glasses. Thus, the hypothesis that higher χ(2) would be observed in high intrinsic breakdown strength glasses was not validated. Based on our application of the rectification model, internal fields of the order 2-4 MV/cm were calculated, which are well below the measured intrinsic breakdown strengths at room temperature. The most plausible explanation for these observations is nonlinear electronic conduction effects taking place within the depletion region at the poling temperature, limiting internal fields to a fraction of the breakdown field.

  14. Optimization of TM-Doped Phosphosilicate Glass for High Power Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    High power fiber lasers have been revolutionizing machining in manufacturing in the past decade. Increasingly, automotive industries are turning to the...micro- machining at precision much beyond current mechanical tools with a focused laser beam and high throughput machining of much harder materials...such as glass and ceramics, again way beyond the capability of current mechanical tools. Some of the key applications include drilling micron-size

  15. Current trends in the development of laser glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunter, S.G.; Mit' kin, V.M.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Fedorov, IU.K.

    1988-02-01

    The principal requirements for glasses suitable for use in solid state lasers are briefly discussed, and some current trends in the development of thermally stable laser-grade phosphate glasses based on I-III elements are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the optimization of glass composition with respect to structural strength and low brittleness; development of new methods for machining and protecting the side surfaces of active elements; development of new glasses with low concentration quenching, such as a lithium-neodymium-lanthanum-phosphate glass; new neodymium glasses with high chemical stability and low crystallizability; and methods for the dehydration of erbium phosphate glasses. 24 references.

  16. High-throughput Exploration of Glass Formation via Laser Deposition and the Study of Heterogeneous Microstructure in a Bulk Metallic Glass Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Peter T.

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively novel class of engineering alloys characterized by a "disordered" atomic structure devoid of long-range translational symmetry. Compared to crystalline alloys, the confluence of metallic bonding and amorphous structure imbues bulk metallic glasses with a unique set of properties that makes them particularly attractive for a wide variety of structural applications. Such properties include exceptional yield strengths, high elastic resilience, resistance to corrosion, and in particular, the unparalleled ability among metals to be thermoplastically formed across a wide range of length scales when heated above the glass transition temperature. Formation of metallic glass from a molten liquid depends on whether cooling is sufficiently rapid to bypass crystallization and vitrify into an amorphous solid; for a given alloy composition, the ease with which full vitrification can occur upon cooling from the liquid state is termed the alloy's "glass forming ability". Unfortunately, relatively few excellent glass formers have been reported in the vast, multicomponent composition space in which they reside. The apparent slowness of progress may be attributed largely to the inefficiency of the one-at-a-time experimental approach to discovery and design. In this thesis work, a high-throughput combinatorial methodology was developed to expedite the discovery process of new bulk metallic glasses. Laser deposition was used to fabricate continuously-graded composition libraries of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Ti alloys. By processing the libraries with a range of laser heat input, the best glass formers in each alloy system could be efficiently and systematically deduced. Furthermore, instrumented nanoindentation performed on the libraries enabled rapid evaluation of mechanical property trends. Despite boasting high strengths, monolithic bulk metallic glasses generally suffer from an intrinsic lack of damage tolerance compared to other high performance alloys

  17. Change energy photons of radiation, stimulating a photoluminescence in glasses and optical fiber, activated by bismuth

    CERN Document Server

    Ogluzdin, Valeriy E

    2011-01-01

    In the offered review ordering received and published by domestic and foreign researchers of the experimental results showing the phenomenon of a photoluminescence in glasses and optical fiber, activated by bismuth is executed, and from uniform positions representations about the process responsible for a photoluminescence in case of use for excitation of this environment of various laser sources are considered. At interpretation of process of a photoluminescence the known model considering mirror symmetry of features of frequency spectra of a photoluminescence (in this case the maximum values is used: humps or peaks of spectra of a photoluminescence) and the spectra characterising optical losses (absorption) of glass, activated by (atomic) bismuth. For the analysis values of lines of the bismuth, published in reference media are used. This model is added by earlier published specification of the author, according to which to a point of mirror symmetry of such spectra there corresponds frequency of radiation ...

  18. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L., E-mail: plfeng@sandia.gov

    2016-10-01

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. The combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.

  19. Eu{sup 3+} emission in phosphate glasses with high UV transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, G.H. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Anjos, V., E-mail: virgilio@fisica.ufjf.br [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Bell, M.J.V. [Laboratório de Espectroscopia de Materiais (LEM), Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP 36036-900 Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Carmo, A.P. [Instituto Federal Fluminense-Campus Cabo Frio, CP 112015, CEP 28909-971 Cabo Frio, RJ (Brazil); Pinheiro, A.S.; Dantas, N.O. [Laboratório de Novos Materiais Isolantes e Semicondutores (LNMIS), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, CP 593, CEP 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We report a study of the phosphate glass PZABP (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–BaO–PbO) doped with europium (Eu{sup 3+}) in different concentrations. Absorption, photoluminescence and time resolved photoluminescence were used to investigate the influence of increasing Eu{sup 3+} concentrations. The present glass exhibits Eu{sup 3+} absorption bands in the ultraviolet region (about 300 nm) due to the high transparency of the system compared to other phosphate glasses. In this way, it was possible to obtain the Judd–Ofelt parameters from the emission and absorption spectra. Moreover, a strong red emission attributed to the transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} of Eu{sup 3+} (611 nm) was observed. It was found that the radiative lifetime and the quantum efficiency of the Eu{sup 3+} level, {sup 5}D{sub 0}, do not suffer a significant change as the concentration of Eu{sup 3+} ions increases. - Highlights: • UV transparent glass matrix is used for Eu{sup 3+} doping. • Judd–Ofelt parameters from the emission and absorption spectra were obtained. • Red emission attributed to the transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} of Eu{sup 3+} (611 nm) was observed.

  20. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature.

  1. Series multilayer internal electrodes for high energy density glass-ceramic capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jun; DU Jun; TANG Qun; MAO ChangHui

    2009-01-01

    The glass-ceramic dielectrics and internal electrode structures are investigated for improving the general energy storage density of capacitors.Calculation indicates that glass-ceramics acquired from glass matrix annealing at 850℃ for 3 hours can be approximately up to 17 J/cm3 in energy storage density.They are appropriately chosen as the dielectrics for preparing high energy storage density capacitors (HESDCs).A series multilayer structure of internal electrode is developed for the HESDCs,in which each layer is a combination of gold film and silver paste.This electrode structure promises the capacitor immune from the residual porosity defects inevitably brought by electrode paste sintering process,and specifically improves the electrical breakdown strength of the capacitor.Based on this new electrode structure,the energy storage densities of capacitors are increased by more than one order of magnitude compared with those traditional ones with only single layer of internal electrode.Thus,HESDCs based on the optimized glass-ceramic dielectrics can potentially achieve 7.5 J/cm3 in energy storage density,even taking into consideration the enlargement of total capacitor volumes while encapsulating practicable capacitors from dielectrics media.

  2. High-Performance, High-Index-Contrast Chalcogenide Glass Photonics on Silicon and Unconventional Non-planar Substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Yi; Lin, Hongtao; Li, Lan; Moreel, Loise; Zhou, Jie; Du, Qingyang; Ogbuu, Okechukwu; Danto, Sylvain; Musgraves, J David; Richardson, Kathleen; Dobson, Kevin D; Birkmire, Robert; Hu, Juejun

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a versatile, roll-to-roll and backend compatible technique for the fabrication of high-index-contrast photonic structures on both silicon and plastic substrates. The fabrication technique combines low-temperature chalcogenide glass film deposition and resist-free single-step thermal nanoimprint to process low-loss (1.6 dB/cm), sub-micron single-mode waveguides with a smooth surface finish using simple contact photolithography. Using this approach, the first chalcogenide glass micro-ring resonators are fabricated by thermal nanoimprint. The devices exhibit an ultra-high quality-factor of 400,000 near 1550 nm wavelength, which represents the highest value reported in chalcogenide glass micro-ring resonators. Furthermore, sub-micron nanoimprint of chalcogenide glass films on non-planar plastic substrates is demonstrated, which establishes the method as a facile route for monolithic fabrication of high-index-contrast devices on a wide array of unconventional substrates.

  3. Manufacturing and testing a thin glass mirror shell with piezoelectric active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Basso, S.; Candia, R.; Civitani, M.; Di Bella, M.; Di Cicca, G.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Riva, M.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.; Varisco, S.

    2015-09-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or silicon in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optical modules based on thin slumped glass foils are being developed at various institutes, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. On the other hand, this offers the opportunity to actively correct the residual deformation: a viable possibility to improve the mirror figure is the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors, and several groups are already at work on this approach. The concept we are developing consists of actively integrating thin glass foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays. The actuators are commercial components, while the tension signals are carried by a printed circuit obtained by photolithography, and the driving electronic is a multi-channel low power consumption voltage supply developed inhouse. Finally, the shape detection and the consequent voltage signal to be provided to the piezoelectric array are determined in X-rays, in intra-focal setup at the XACT facility at INAF/OAPA. In this work, we describe the manufacturing steps to obtain a first active mirror prototype and the very first test performed in X-rays.

  4. Influence of wet activation of used inorganic binder on cyclically refreshed water glass moulding sands hardened by microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stachowicz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research results of using an innovative method to reclaim the waste moulding sands containing water glass. Two of the examined processes are connected with "dry" or "wet" activation of inorganic binder in waste moulding sand mixtures physically hardened by microwave radiation. The sand mixtures consisting of high-silica sand and water-glass with average molar module 2.5, were subjected to the following cyclical process: mixing the components, compacting, microwave heating, cooling-down, thermally loading the mould to 800 °C, cooling-down to ambient temperature, and knocking-out. After being knocked-out, the waste moulding sands were subjected to either dry or wet activation of the binder. To activate thermally treated inorganic binder, each of the examined processes employed the surface phenomenon usually associated to mechanical reclamation. The study also covered possible use of some elements of wet reclamation to rehydrate waste binder. To evaluate the effectiveness of the two proposed methods of waste binder activation, selected strength and technological parameters were measured. After each subsequent processing cycle, the permeability, tensile strength and bending strength were determined. In addition, the surface of activated sand grains was examined with a scanning electron microscope. Analysis of the results indicates that it is possible to re-activate the used binder such as sodium silicate, and to stabilize the strength parameters in both activation processes. Permeability of the refreshed moulding sands strongly depends on the surface condition of high-silica grains. The wet activation process by wetting and buffering knocked-out moulding sands in closed humid environment makes it possible to reduce the content of refreshing additive in water-glass. The moulding sands cyclically prepared in both processes do not require the addition of fresh high-silica sand. The relatively high quality achieved in the

  5. Biaxial flexural strength of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements heat-cured with an LED lamp during setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molina, G. Fabian; Cabral, R.J.; Mazzola, I.; Lascano, L. Brain; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ket

  6. Investigations into the stabilization of drugs by sugar glasses : III. The influence of various high-pH buffers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Jonas H C; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W; Frijlink, Henderik W

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of the high-pH buffers ammediol, borax, CHES, TRIS, and Tricine on the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrated fraction (Tg') of trehalose/buffer and inulin/buffer solutions at pH 6.0 and pH 9.8. Also, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of sugar

  7. High index glass thin film processing for photonics and photovoltaic (PV) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu Anthony

    To favorably compete with fossil-fuel technology, the greatest challenge for thin film solar-cells is to improve efficiency and reduce material cost. Thickness scaling to thin film reduces material cost but affects the light absorption in the cells; therefore a concept that traps incident photons and increases its optical path length is needed to boost absorption in thin film solar cells. One approach is the integration of low symmetric gratings (LSG), using high index material, on either the front-side or backside of 30 um thin c-Si cells. In this study, Multicomponent TeO2--Bi2O 3--ZnO (TBZ) glass thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering under different oxygen flow rates. The influences of oxygen flow rate on the structural and optical properties of the resulting thin films were investigated. The structural origin of the optical property variation was studied using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that TBZ glass thin film is a suitable material for front side LSG material photovoltaic and photonics applications due to their amorphous nature, high refractive index (n > 2), broad band optical transparency window, low processing temperature. We developed a simple maskless method to pattern sputtered tellurite based glass thin films using unconventional agarose hydrogel mediated wet etching. Conventional wet etching process, while claiming low cost and high throughput, suffers from reproducibility and pattern fidelity issues due to the isotropic nature of wet chemical etching when applied to glasses and polymers. This method overcomes these challenges by using an agarose hydrogel stamp to mediate a conformal etching process. In our maskless method, agarose hydrogel stamps are patterned following a standard soft lithography and replica molding process from micropatterned masters and soaked in a chemical etchant. The micro-scale features on the stamp are

  8. Transparent and High Refractive Index Thermoplastic Polymer Glasses Using Evaporative Ligand Exchange of Hybrid Particle Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongyu; Lu, Zhao; Mahoney, Clare; Yan, Jiajun; Ferebee, Rachel; Luo, Danli; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    Development of high refractive index glasses on the basis of commodity polymer thermoplastics presents an important requisite to further advancement of technologies ranging from energy efficient lighting to cost efficient photonics. This contribution presents a novel particle dispersion strategy that enables uniform dispersion of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix to facilitate hybrid glasses with inorganic content exceeding 25% by weight, optical transparency in excess of 0.8/mm, and a refractive index greater than 1.64 in the visible wavelength range. The method is based on the application of evaporative ligand exchange to synthesize poly(styrene-r-acrylonitrile) (PSAN)-tethered zinc oxide (ZnO) particle fillers. Favorable filler-matrix interactions are shown to enable the synthesis of isomorphous blends with high molecular PMMA that exhibit improved thermomechanical stability compared to that of the pristine PMMA matrix. The concurrent realization of high refractive index and optical transparency in polymer glasses by modification of a thermoplastic commodity polymer could present a viable alternative to expensive specialty polymers in applications where high costs or demands for thermomechanical stability and/or UV resistance prohibit the application of specialty polymer solutions.

  9. Development of high angular resolution x-ray telescopes based on slumped glass foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Borsa, F.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Conconi, P.; Pagano, G.; Pareschi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Salmaso, B.; Sironi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zambra, A.; Parodi, G.; Martelli, F.; Gallieni, D.; Tintori, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Wille, E.

    2012-09-01

    The mirrors of the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) were based on a large number of high quality segments, aiming at achieving a global spatial resolution better than 5” HEW while giving a large collecting area (around 3m2@ 1 keV). A study concerning the hot slumping of thin glass foils was started in Europe, funded by ESA and led by the Brera Astronomical Observatory (INAF-OAB), for the development of a replication technology based on glass material. The study is currently continuing even after the IXO program has been descoped and renamed ATHENA, in the perspective of using the technology under development for other future missions or applications. INAF-OAB efforts have been focused on the "Direct" slumping approach with convex moulds, meaning that during the thermal cycle the optical surface of the glass is in direct contact with the mould surface. The single mirror segments are made of thin glass plates (0.4 mm thick), with a reflecting area of 200 mm × 200 mm. The adopted integration process foresees the use of glass reinforcing ribs for bonding together the plates in such a way to form a rigid and stiff stack of segmented mirror shells; the stack is supported by a thick backplane. During the bonding process, the plates are constrained in close contact with the surface of a precisely figured integration master by the application of vacuum pump suction. In this way, the springback deformations and the low frequency errors still present in the plates' profile after slumping can be corrected. The status of the technology development is presented in this paper, together with the description and metrology of the prototypes already realized or under construction at the Observatory laboratories.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  11. Highly Nonlinear Luminescence Induced by Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Surfaces with Continuous-Wave Laser Illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    We report on highly nonlinear luminescence being observed from individual spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on a borosilicate glass surface and illuminated by continuous-wave (CW) lasers with relatively low power. The nonlinear luminescence shows optical super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit in three dimensions compared to the scatting of the excitation laser light. The luminescence intensity from most nanoparticles is proportional to the 5th--7th power of the excitation laser power and has wide excitation and emission spectra across the visible wavelength range. Strong nonlinear luminescence is only observed near the glass surface. High optical nonlinearity excited by low CW laser power is related to a long-lived dark state of the gold nanoparticles, where the excitation light is strongly absorbed. This phenomenon has potential biological applications in super-resolution and deep tissue imaging.

  12. Calcite precipitation on glass substrates and active stalagmites in Katerloch Cave (Austria): Constraints from environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoparnig, Marlene; Boch, Ronny; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Ke; Spötl, Christoph; Leis, Albrecht; Gollowitsch, Anna; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Located near Graz at the SE-rim of the Alps Katerloch is well-known for its impressive dripstone decoration, e.g. several metres tall and relatively fast growing (0.2-0.7 mm/yr on average) candle-stick-type stalagmites. In the course of an ongoing multi-annual and partially high-resolution cave monitoring program we study modern (active) sites of carbonate deposition focusing on the site-specific growth dynamics and connection of modern regional and cave environmental conditions with petrographic, chemical and stable isotopic information captured in the speleothems. Fresh calcite precipitates on artificial (glass) substrates underneath active drip sites were collected continuously from 2006 to 2014 (eight years!). The samples (up to 7 mm thick) represent cave sections of different temperature and drip sites of partially different characteristics (e.g. drip rate). We also recovered short drill cores (up to 3 cm length, 1 cm diameter) from the top of active stalagmites probably representing the last decades to centuries of calcite crystallization. Moreover, an actively growing stalagmite (K10) comprising both modern and past calcite deposition was collected. 238U-234U-230Th dating using MC-ICP-MS of K10 (71 cm long) revealed several distinct growth intervals (separated by growth interruptions) starting at 129.1 ±1.2 kyr BP (Last Interglacial) up to now, mostly reflecting warm and humid climate intervals. High-resolution (100 μm) isotope profiles micromilled from the multi-annual modern calcite precipitates on artificial substrates revealed low δ13C values of -12.8 to -8.3 ‰ (VPDB) and relatively high δ18O of -6.9 to -4.9 ‰Ṫhe δ18O curves from all collection sites (different growth rate) record a pronounced decrease during their most recent growth period most likely corresponding to a significant decrease towards lower oxygen isotope values observed in drip waters collected in the year 2014 compared with samples from 2005 to 2007. Drip water δ2H /δ18O

  13. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  14. Mechanical properties of short carbon/glass fiber reinforced high mechanical performance epoxy resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张竞; 黄培

    2009-01-01

    To research the relationship between epoxy and fiber inherent property and mechanical properties of composite,we prepared a series of composites using three kinds of high mechanical performance epoxy resins as matrices and reinforced by the same volume fraction(5%)of short carbon and glass fiber.Their mechanical properties were investigated from the perspective of chemical structure and volume shrinkage ratio of epoxy.We analyzed their tensile strength and modulus based on the mixing rule and Halpin-Tsai eq...

  15. High-throughput in-volume processing in glass with isotropic spatial resolutions in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yuanxin; Chu, Wei; Liao, Yang; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of three dimensional (3D) microstructures in glass with isotropic spatial resolutions. To achieve high throughput fabrication, we expand the focal spot size with a low-numerical-aperture lens, which naturally results in a degraded axial resolution. We solve the problem with simultaneous spatial temporal focusing which leads to an isotropic laser-affected volume with a spatial resolution of ~100 micron.

  16. Manufacturing and testing a thin glass mirror shell with piezoelectric active control

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Collura, A; Basso, S; Candia, R; Civitani, M; Di Bella, M; Di Cicca, G; Cicero, U Lo; Lullo, G; Pelliciari, C; Riva, M; Salmaso, B; Sciortino, L; Varisco, S

    2016-01-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or silicon in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optical modules based on thin slumped glass foils are being developed at various institutes, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. On the other hand, this offers the opportunity to actively correct the residual deformation: a viable possibility to improve the mirror figure is the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors, and several groups are already at work on this approach. The concept we are developing consists of actively integrating thin glass foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays. The actuators are commercial components, while the tension signal...

  17. Evaluation of Photocatalytic Active Coatings on Sintered Glass Tubes by Methylene Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Awungacha Lekelefac

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study between ten different photocatalytic active coatings was done. The effectiveness and photocatalytic activity of the coatings were studied by degradation experiments of methylene blue (MB dye under UV light illumination. The reactor design consisting of sintered glass packed in a borosilicate tube placed between two planar dielectric barrier discharge lamps (Osram Planon is reported for the first time. The coatings consisted of either titania, silica, or zinc on sintered borosilicate glass. The advantage of sol-gel in catalyst preparation was exploited to combine catalyst to act as cocatalyst. TiO2-P25 widely applied in suspension systems was effectively immobilized on sintered glass support with the aid of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS solution which acted as support material. Results indicated that TiO2-P25+SiO2, TiO2-P25+SiO2+Pt, and TiOSO4_30,6wt% films showed highest degradation rates close to 100% after 90 min illumination with degradation rates exceeding 50% after 30 minutes. TTIP+Pt showed lowest degradation rate.

  18. Active shape correction of a thin glass/plastic x-ray mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Collura, A.; Dell'Agostino, S.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Riva, M.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.

    2014-09-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or plastic in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optics based on thin slumped glass foils are currently in use in the NuSTAR telescope and are being developed at various institutes like INAF/OAB, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Another possibility would be the use of thin plastic foils, being developed at SAO and the Palermo University. Even if relevant progresses in the achieved angular resolution were recently made, a viable possibility to further improve the mirror figure would be the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors. In fact, thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. This however offers the possibility to actively correct the residual deformation. Even if other groups are already at work on this idea, we are pursuing the concept of active integration of thin glass or plastic foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays, in intra-focal setup at the XACT facility at INAF/OAPA. In this work, we show the preliminary simulations and the first steps taken in this project.

  19. Understanding the glass-forming ability of active pharmaceutical ingredients for designing supersaturating dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Usui, Toshinori; Hattori, Mitsunari

    2012-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions have great potential for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs. Crystallization behavior during storage and after exposure to aqueous media must be examined in detail for designing stable and effective amorphous formulations, and it is significantly affected by the intrinsic properties of an amorphous drug. Many attempts have been made to correlate various thermodynamic parameters of pharmaceutical glasses with their crystallization behavior; however, variations in model drugs that could be used for such investigation has been limited because the amorphous characteristics of drugs possessing a high crystallization tendency are difficult to evaluate. In this study, high-speed differential scanning calorimetry, which could inhibit their crystallization using high cooling rates up to 2000°C/s, was employed for assessing such drugs. The thermodynamic parameters of the glasses, including glass transition temperature (T(g)) and fragility, were obtained to show that their crystallization tendency cannot be explained simply by the parameters, although there have been general thought that fragility may be correlated with crystallization tendency. Also investigated was correlation between the thermodynamic parameters and crystallization tendency upon contact with water, which influences in vivo efficacy of amorphous formulations. T(g) was correlated well with the crystallization tendency upon contact with water.

  20. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  1. Degradation of phosphor-in-glass encapsulants with various phosphor types for high power LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Fauzia; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Hyungsun

    2017-10-01

    In order to replace conventional silicone-based phosphor light emitting diodes (LEDs), inorganic color converters with high thermal stabilities and transparencies, i.e., phosphors-in-glass (PiGs), have been investigated as encapsulants for high-power LEDs. In this paper, the effect of various types of phosphors, i.e., LuAG (green, Lu3Al5O12:Ce3+), silicate (yellow, Sr2SiO4:Eu2+), CASN (red, CaAlSiN3:Eu2+), and oxynitride (yellow, (Sr,Ba) Si2O2N2:Eu2+), on the reliability/degradation of the remote PiG encapsulants is explored for high power LEDs. For this purpose, a glass composition (SiO2-B2O3-ZnO-Na2O) was separately mixed with each type of phosphor and then sintered at appropriate temperatures to make the corresponding PiG. The reliabilities of the formed PiGs were evaluated by standard accelerated-aging tests (85 °C/85% RH) for 1000 h. Luminosity losses and shifts in the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the PiGs were measured before and after aging. Thermal, and moisture-induced quenching behavior was also analyzed. The surface of PiGs with different phosphors degraded differently, possibly because of structural incompatibilities between the glass matrix and phosphor type. Determining the compatibility of the glass composition with the type of phosphor used is therefore important in order to ensure the long-term stabilities of encapsulants for use in commercial LEDs.

  2. Low-loss, high performance hybrid photonics devices enabled by ion-exchanged glass waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araci, Ismail Emre

    Robust ion-exchanged glass waveguides exhibit low optical losses in a broad spectral range and they allow integration of several devices on the same chip due to their planar structure. Consequently, they can be a low cost alternative to semiconductors for fabricating various integrated optical devices. Two high performance photonic devices were designed and realized, demonstrating the potential of glass waveguides. The well-controlled silver-film ion-exchange process allowed the fabrication of: i) a highly sensitive biosensor based on optical absorption and, ii) a low loss hybrid electro-optic (EO) polymer modulator with a narrow coplanar electrode gap. The single-mode, channel integrated optical ion-exchange waveguide on borosilicate glass (Corning 0211) is described for broad spectral band (400-650 nm) detection and analysis of heme-containing protein films at a glass/water interface. The evanescent wave interaction is improved significantly by fabricating ion-exchange waveguides with a step-like index profile. Silver nano-particle formation is reduced in order to achieve low loss in the Soret-band (˜400 nm). Unlike other surface-specific techniques (e.g. SPR, interferometry) that probe local refractive-index changes and therefore are susceptible to temperature fluctuations, the integrated optical waveguide absorption technique probes molecular-specific transition bands and is expected to be less vulnerable to environmental perturbations. The hybrid integration of phosphate glass (IOG-1) and EO polymer is realized for the first time. The critical alignment steps which are typically required for hybrid optoelectronic devices are eliminated with a simple alignment-free fabrication technique. The low loss adiabatic transition from glass to EO polymer waveguide is enabled by gray scale patterning of the novel EO polymer, AJLY. Total insertion loss of 5 dB and electrode gap of 8 mum is obtained for an optimized device design. EO polymer poling at 135 °C and 75 V

  3. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  4. Comparative study of photocatalytic activities of hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorod on Si(001) wafer and FTO glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun Hee; Yang, Sena; Kim, Yeonwoo; Kim, Namdong; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Baik, Jaeyoon; Kim, Hyun Sung; Lee, Hangil

    2015-09-01

    ZnO nanorods have been grown on Si(001) wafer and fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates for 1 and 4 h with the hydrothermal methods. The morphologies and photocatalytic activities of the ZnO nanorods were found to depend on the substrates. We investigated their properties by using spectroscopic analysis and demonstrated that the shape of nanorod and the ratios of external defects can be controlled by varying the substrates. Our experiments revealed that the nanorods grown on Si(001) have a single-crystalline wurtzite structure with (002) facets and that the number of surface oxygen defects increases with their length as the growth time increases. The nanorods grown on Si(001) have different facets, in particular wider (002) facets, and a higher ratio of the oxygen defect than the nanorods on FTO glass substrate. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities with respect to 2-aminothiophenol (2-ATP) of these nanorods were investigated with high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy (HRPES). We demonstrated that their photocatalytic activity is influenced by the ratios of surface oxygen defects, which varies with the substrate surface.

  5. Development of a transparent, non-cytotoxic, silver ion-exchanged glass with antimicrobial activity and low ion elution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Gyu-In; Kim, Seong-Hwan; Eom, Hyung-Woo; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Se-Young

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, skin irritation, and ion elution behaviors of glass doped with silver ions with respect to its application to electronic equipment such as phones and tablet screens. The microbes tested were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Penicillium funiculosum. AgNO3 powder was spread on both sides of aluminosilicate glass, and it was heated to 250-280°C for 10min. Under optimized heating conditions (260°C, 10min), the antimicrobial activity of ion-exchanged glass against bacteria and fungi was over 99.9% after 24 weeks. The glass failed to irritate the skin of experimental animals and was considered non-cytotoxic. The maximum amount of Ag ions that were eluted from the ion-exchanged glass into drinking water was measured at 0.037±0.003μgL(-1), an amount which is several orders of magnitude below the standard limit of 0.1mgL(-1) in drinking water. Ag ion-exchanged glass had characteristics suitable for use as a display screen, such as a light transmittance of 90% and a surface roughness of 0.704nm. Our findings suggest that glass doped with silver ions is more hygienic than non-doped glass is, and should be applied to display screens and glassware.

  6. Highly Mobile Metastable State of He-4 Thin Films: A Glass Transition by Mechanical Perturbation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoguchi, Tomoki

    2017-01-01

    Solid layers of helium on graphite surface are known to go into a highly mobile state (HMS) once the solid layer is enforced to slip on the substrate. The HMS collapses to the stable inert state with the lifetime extending over 10^4 s. In this paper, we suggest that the HMS is a structural glass by showing the similarities between the present system and an organic conductor named BEDT-TTF. The latter was recently discovered to be an electronic glass if the cooling rate is rapid enough across the freezing temperature (Wigner crystal formation temperature). We then address a novel annealing process promoted by a local condensate which should be seen for the present He-4 case as the condensation fraction grows in the liquid overlayer.

  7. Effect of sintering temperature on structure and properties of highly porous glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Iatsenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly porous biomaterials with a structure close to that of cancellous bone have been prepared using biogenic hydroxyapatite and glass of the SiO2-Na2O-CaO system by a replication of the polymer template structure. It has been established that during sintering of the samples the hydroxyapatite decomposes, which involves the formation of glass-ceramics containing phases of renanit NaCaPO4, calcium phosphate silicate Ca5(PO42SiO4, calcium pyrophosphate Ca2P2O7 and impurities of hydroxyapatite Ca5(PO43(OH. Structural characteristics and mechanical properties of the obtained materials are promising for the replacement of defective cancellous bone.

  8. Applications of high resolution NMR to geochemistry: crystalline, glass, and molten silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.

    1985-11-01

    The nuclear spin interactions and the associated quantum mechanical dynamics which are present in solid state NMR are introduced. A brief overview of aluminosilicate structure is presented and crystalline structure is then reviewed, with emphasis on the contributions made by /sup 29/Si NMR spectroscopy. The local structure of glass aluminosilicates as observed by NMR, is presented with analysis of the information content of /sup 29/Si spectra. A high-temperature (to 1300/sup 0/C) NMR spectroscopic investigation of the local environment and dynamics of molecular motion in molten aluminosilicates is described. A comparison is made of silicate liquid, glass, and crystalline local structure. The atomic and molecular motions present in a melt are investigated through relaxation time (T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/) measurements as a function of composition and temperature for /sup 23/Na and /sup 29/Si.

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurement of glass at high temperature by using flash method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabayabaya, Thomas; Yu, Fan; Zhang, Xinxin

    2004-02-01

    A measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a semi-transparent material (glass) by means of the “Flash Method” is investigated in the present work. By taking into account the heat losses on the two faces of the sample, and using a new experimental technique design, an improvement of the determination of the thermal diffusivity of the semi-transparent material (glass) at high temperature is realized. The experimental design presented here is an original technical concept that enables a significant reduction in heat loss during the experiments. A very simple model based on the quadrupole method is used to theoretically determine the thermal diffusivity of the semitransparent material by taking into account both conduction and radiation. Theoretical results clarify the effect of the absorption coefficient and the thickness of the sample on the heat transfer in the semi-transparent medium.

  10. Hydration of Rhyolitic Glasses: Comparison Between High- and Low-Temperature Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, L.; Fayek, M.; Cole, D. R.; Carter, T.

    2012-12-01

    While a great deal is known about the interaction between water and rhyolitic glasses and melts at temperatures above the glass transition, the nature of this interaction at lower temperatures is more obscure. Comparisons between high- and low-temperature diffusive studies suggest that several factors play an important role under lower-temperatures conditions that are not significant at higher temperatures. Surface concentrations, which equilibrate quickly at high temperature, change far more slowly as temperatures decrease, and may not equilibrate at room temperature for hundreds or thousands of years. Coupled with temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients this complicates calculation of diffusion profiles as a function of time. A key factor in this process appears to be the inability of "self-stress", caused by the in-diffusing species, to relax at lower temperatures, a result expected below the glass transition. Regions of the glass hydrated at low temperatures are strongly optically anisotropic, and preliminary calculations suggest that the magnitude of stress involved may be very high. On the microstuctural scale, extrapolations of high-temperature FTIR data to lower temperatures suggests there should be little or no hydroxyl present in glasses "hydrated" at low temperatures. Analyses of both block and powder samples suggest that this is generally true in the bulk of the hydrated glass, excluding hydroxyl groups that formed during the initial cooling of the melt. However, hydroxyl do groups appear to be present at the glass surface, where both SIMS and neutron reflectometry data suggest hydration levels may be higher than projected from the bulk of the glass. Isotopic exchange experiments also suggest that bonding is relatively weak, as hydration water exchanges readily with the enviroment. All of these observations lead to the conclusion that the observed stress is due to the presence of interstructural, rather than bonded, water. This likely explains the

  11. Fine-pitch glass GEM for high-resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Toyokawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The fine-pitch G-GEM is made of a 400 μm thick photo-etchable glass substrate with 150 μm pitch holes. It is fabricated using the same wet etching technique as that for the standard G-GEM. In this work, we present the experimental results obtained with a single fine-pitch G-GEM with a 50 × 50 mm2 effective area. We recorded an energy resolution of 16.2% and gas gain up to 5,500 when the detector was irradiated with 5.9 keV X-rays. We present a 50 × 50 mm2 X-ray radiograph image acquired with a scintillation gas and optical readout system.

  12. Mechanical properties of solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic seal at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhans, Jacqueline; Li, Dongsheng; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Sun, Xin; Al-Haik, Marwan; Harris, Adrian; Garmestani, Hamid

    2011-04-20

    Mechanical properties of solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic seal material, G18, are studied at high temperatures. Samples of G18 are aged for either 4h or 100h, resulting in samples with different crystallinity. Reduced modulus, hardness, and time-dependent behavior are measured by nanoindentation. The nanoindentation is performed at room temperature, 550, 650, and 750°C, using loading rates of 5 mN/s and 25 mN/s. Results show a decrease in reduced modulus with increasing temperature, with significant decrease above the glass transition temperature (Tg). Hardness generally decreases with increasing temperature, with a slight increase before Tg for the 4h aged sample. Dwell tests show that creep increases with increasing temperature, but decrease with further aging.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers

    CERN Document Server

    Yushou, Song; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1\\,$\\mu$m, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optic...

  14. In situ structural analysis of calcium aluminosilicate glasses under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, R. F.; de Ligny, D.; Martinet, C.; Sandrini, M.; Medina, A. N.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Lima, S. M.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Guyot, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In situ micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the structural evolution of OH--free calcium aluminosilicate glasses, under high pressure and at room temperature. Evaluation was made of the role of the SiO2 concentration in percalcic join systems, for Al/(Al  +  Si) in the approximate range from 0.9 to 0.2. Under high pressure, the intensity of the main band related to the bending mode of bridging oxygen ({ν\\text{B}} [T-O-T], where T  =  Si or Al) decreased gradually, suggesting that the bonds were severely altered or even destroyed. In Si-rich glasses, compression induced a transformation of Q n species to Q n-1. In the case of Al-rich glass, the Al in the smallest Q n units evolved from tetrahedral to higher-coordinated Al ([5]Al and [6]Al). Permanent structural changes were observed in samples recovered from the highest pressure of around 15 GPa and, particularly for Si-rich samples, the recovered structure showed an increase of three-membered rings in the Si/Al tetrahedral network.

  15. High plastic Zr-Cu-Fe-Al-Nb bulk metallic glasses for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-shen; Wang, Yun-liang; Wu, Yi-dong; Wang, Tan; Hui, Xi-dong

    2015-06-01

    Four Zr-Cu-Fe-Al-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with Zr contents greater than 65at% and minor additions of Nb were designed and prepared. The glass forming abilities, thermal stabilities, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance properties of the prepared BMGs were investigated. These BMGs exhibit moderate glass forming abilities along with superior fracture and yield strengths compared to previously reported Zr-Cu-Fe-Al BMGs. Specifically, the addition of Nb into this quaternary system remarkably increases the plastic strain to 27.5%, which is related to the high Poisson's ratio and low Young's and shear moduli. The Nb-bearing BMGs also exhibit a lower corrosion current density by about one order of magnitude and a wider passive region than 316L steel in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). The combination of the optimized composition with high deformation ability, low Young's modulus, and excellent corrosion resistance properties indicates that this kind of BMG is promising for biomedical applications.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGHLY POROUS 63S BIOACTIVE GLASS SCAFFOLDS FABRICATED BY TWO FOAMING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mehdi Mirhadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resorbable 3D macroporous nanostructure 63S bioactive glass scaffolds were fabricated using the two methods of direct foaming of bioactive glass sol and foaming glass slurry for tissue engineering applications. The scaffolds contained an interconnected pore network with macropore sizes in the range of 100 - 400 μm, which provided the potential for tissue ingrowth and vascularization in the human body. The mean values of compressive strength were in the ranges of 0.53 - 0.68 MPa and 0.8 - 0.92 MPa, respectively, for the scaffolds prepared by the first and second methods. The mean values of total and interconnected porosities were in the ranges of 88 - 93 % and 76 - 86 %, respectively. The highly porous and nanosized structure gave rise to a high specific surface area in the scaffolds which stimulated mineralization in the surrounding bones by enhancing bioreactions and leaching of ions from the surface, which facilitate bone repair and fixation. Finally, it was observed that the prepared scaffolds could satisfy the criteria of an ideal scaffold for tissue engineering applications.

  17. Structural analysis and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kobzi, Balázs; Sinkó, Katalin; Homonnay, Zoltán [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Kuzmann, Ernő [Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmany P. s., 1/A, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1512 (Hungary); Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko [Division of Materials Chemistry, RuđerBošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Nishida, Tetsuaki [Department of Biological and Environmental Chemistry, Faculty of Humanity-Oriented Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 11-6 Kayanomori, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8555 (Japan); Kubuki, Shiro, E-mail: kubuki@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachi-Oji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Hematite was precipitated by heat treatment of iron aluminosilicate glass. • The hematite phase shows visible light photocatalytic activity. • We could prepare an effective photocatalyst from ‘ubiquitous elements’. - Abstract: A relationship between structure and visible light-activated photocatalytic activity of iron-containing soda lime aluminosilicate (15Na{sub 2}O⋅15CaO⋅40Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅xAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}⋅(30−x)SiO{sub 2}) glass (xNCFAS) was investigated by means of {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and UV–visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV–VIS). The {sup 57}Fe-Mössbauer spectrum of 11NCFAS glass measured after heat-treatment at 1000 °C for 100 min was composed of a paramagnetic doublet due to Fe{sup III}(T{sub d}) and two magnetic sextets due to regular hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and hematite with larger internal magnetic field. X-ray diffraction patterns of heat-treated xNCFAS samples resulted in decrease of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and increase of Ca{sub 2}Fe{sub 22}O{sub 33} or CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with alumina content. A quick decrease in methylene blue (MB) concentration from 15.6 to 4.7 μmol L{sup −1} was observed in the photocatalytic reaction test with 40 mg of heat-treated 11NCFAS glass under visible light-exposure. The largest first-order rate constant of MB decomposition (k) was estimated to be 9.26 × 10{sup −3} min{sup −1}. Tauc’s plot yielded a band gap energy (E{sub g}) of 1.88 eV for heat-treated 11NCFAS glass, which is smaller than previously reported E{sub g} of 2.2 eV for α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. These results prove that addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} into iron-containing soda lime silicate glass is favorable for the preparation of improved visible light-photocatalyst with ‘ubiquitous’ elements.

  18. Optically erasable samarium-doped fluorophosphate glasses for high-dose measurements in microbeam radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, B.; Okada, G.; Vahedi, S.; Koughia, C.; Edgar, A.; Varoy, C.; Belev, G.; Wysokinski, T.; Chapman, D.; Sammynaiken, R.; Kasap, S. O.

    2014-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that fluorophosphate (FP) glasses doped with trivalent samarium (Sm3+) can be used as a dosimetric detector in microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) to measure high radiation doses and large dose variations with a resolution in the micrometer range. The present work addresses the use of intense optical radiation at 405 nm to erase the recorded dose information in Sm3+-doped FP glass plates and examines the underlying physics. We have evaluated both the conversion and optical erasure of Sm3+-doped FP glasses using synchrotron-generated high-dose x-rays at the Canadian Light Source. The Sm-ion valency conversion is accompanied by the appearance of x-ray induced optical absorbance due to the trapping of holes and electrons into phosphorus-oxygen hole (POHC) and electron (POEC) capture centers. Nearly complete Sm2+ to Sm3+ reconversion (erasure) may be achieved by intense optical illumination. Combined analysis of absorbance and electron spin resonance measurements indicates that the optical illumination causes partial disappearance of the POHC and the appearance of new POEC. The suggested model for the observed phenomena is based on the release of electrons during the Sm2+ to Sm3+ reconversion process, the capture of these electrons by POHC (and hence their disappearance), or by PO groups, with the appearance of new and/or additional POEC. Optical erasure may be used as a practical means to erase the recorded data and permits the reuse of these Sm-doped FP glasses in monitoring dose in MRT.

  19. Evaluation of Anorthite Glass Standards for High Precision SIMS Al-Mg Dating of Early Solar System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, N.; Fournelle, J.; Mendybaev, R.; Knight, K.; Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.; Ushikubo, T.

    2009-12-01

    The decay of extinct nuclide 26Al to daughter nuclide 26Mg (half life of 7.3×105y) is considered to be a useful chronometer for the early solar system. The initial 26Al/26Al ratio of the solar system is estimated to be ~5×10-5 from the analyses of Ca, Al-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) in primitive meteorites by the linear regression of multiple data on 26Al/26Mg vs. 26Mg/26Mg isochron diagram. Anorthite grains in CAIs show high 26Al/26Mg ratios (~400) with an excess of 26Mg/26Mg ratios as high as 100‰. By using the WiscSIMS IMS-1280, the Mg isotope ratio of anorthite can be obtained with a precision of better than 1‰, from which we can resolve time differences of only 10 ky among formation of individual CAIs. In order to obtain highly precise 26Al-26Mg isochrons, it is important to determine an accurate SIMS relative sensitivity factor (RSF) of 26Al/26Mg ratios from the analyses of plagioclase standard. However, uncertainties of Mg concentration in plagioclase standards are typically ~10% due to low concentrations of MgO (≤0.1wt.%) in naturally occurring plagioclase crystals. In order to obtain accurate initial 26Al/26Al ratios of CAIs, anorthite glass standards were prepared at the University of Chicago with MgO contents of 0.1%, 0.5% and 1.0 wt.% by melting Mg-, Ca-, Al-, and Si-oxides at 1620°C in N2 for 22 to 35 hours. Major and minor element concentrations (including MgO) of the glasses were analyzed precisely by EPMA (Cameca SX51 at University of Wisconsin). Operating conditions were 15 kV, 10 nA, 10 μm wide beam; for Mg, both peak and background were measured for 30 seconds each, and differential PHA was used. A synthetic akermanite standard was used, and a blank correction (0.01 wt% Mg) in Probe for EPMA software was applied. By obtaining ~30 EPMA point analyses for esch glass, MgO concentrations in these glasses were determined with precision of 1-3%. The homogeneity of Mg concentrations in the individual glass were examined by using SIMS and

  20. Theory of activated dynamics and glass transition of hard colloids in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Hui-shu; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2014-03-07

    The microscopic nonlinear Langevin equation theory is applied to study the localization and activated hopping of two-dimensional hard disks in the deeply supercooled and glass states. Quantitative comparisons of dynamic characteristic length scales, barrier, and their dependence on the reduced packing fraction are presented between hard-disk and hard-sphere suspensions. The dynamic barrier of hard disks emerges at higher absolute and reduced packing fractions and correspondingly, the crossover size of the dynamic cage which correlates to the Lindemann length for melting is smaller. The localization lengths of both hard disks and spheres decrease exponentially with packing fraction. Larger localization length of hard disks than that of hard spheres is found at the same reduced packing fraction. The relaxation time of hard disks rises dramatically above the reduced packing fraction of 0.88, which leads to lower reduced packing fraction at the kinetic glass transition than that of hard spheres. The present work provides a foundation for the subsequent study of the glass transition of binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard disks, normally adopted in experiments and simulations to avoid crystallization, and further, the rheology and mechanical response of the two-dimensional glassy colloidal systems.

  1. A new synthesis route to high surface area sol gel bioactive glass through alcohol washing: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Lakshmi M; Nirmal, Remya; Vaikkath, Dhanesh; Nair, Prabha D

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive glass is one of the widely used bone repair material due to its unique properties like osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity and biodegradability. In this study bioactive glass is prepared by the sol gel process and stabilized by a novel method that involves a solvent instead of the conventional calcinations process. This study represents the first attempt to use this method for the stabilization of bioactive glass. The bioactive glass stabilized by this ethanol washing process was characterized for its physicochemical and biomimetic property in comparison with similar composition of calcined bioactive glass. The compositional similarity of the two stabilized glass powders was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravimetric analysis. Other physicochemical characterizations together with the cell culture studies with L929 fibroblast cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells proved that the stabilization was achieved with the retention of its inherent bioactive potential. However an increase in the surface area of the glass powder was obtained as a result of this ethanol washing process and this add up to the success of the study. Hence the present study exhibits a promising route for high surface area bioactive glass for increasing biomimicity.

  2. Sulfur incorporation in high level nuclear waste glass: A S K-edge XAFS investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendebach, B.; Denecke, M. A.; Roth, G.; Weisenburger, S.

    2009-11-01

    We perform X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy measurements at the sulfur K-edge to elucidate the electronic and geometric bonding of sulfur atoms in borosilicate glass used for the vitrification of high level radioactive liquid waste. The sulfur is incorporated as sulfate, most probably as sodium sulfate, which can be deduced from the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) by fingerprint comparison with reference compounds. This finding is backed up by Raman spectroscopy investigation. In the extended XAFS data, no second shell beyond the first oxygen layer is visible. We argue that this is due to the sulfate being present as small clusters located into voids of the borosilicate network. Hence, destructive interference of the variable surrounding prohibits the presence of higher shell signals. The knowledge of the sulfur bonding characteristics is essential for further optimization of the glass composition and to balance the requirements of the process and glass quality parameters, viscosity and electrical resistivity on one side, waste loading and sulfur uptake on the other side.

  3. Dynamic Heterogeneity in Highly Cross-linked Epoxy in the Vicinity of Glass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Han; Khare, Rajesh

    2010-03-01

    Cross-linked epoxy has been widely used in aerospace and electronics industries. The highly cross-linked nature of these systems leads to different chain dynamics as compared to the linear polymeric systems. In this work, we have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the dynamic heterogeneity in cross-linked epoxy near the glass transition temperature. Well-relaxed atomistic models of cross-linked epoxy were first created by employing the simulated annealing polymerization approach. The specific epoxy system studied consisted of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as the epoxy monomer and trimethylene glycol di-p-aminobenzoate (TMAB) as the cross-linker. The glass transition temperature of these model structures was determined from MD simulation by monitoring their volume-temperature behaviour in a stepwise cooling run. The chain dynamics of these systems were characterized by their local translational and orientational mobility. Furthermore, dynamic heterogeneity was studied by analyzing the spatial distribution of the mobile and immobile atoms in the system near the glass transition temperature.

  4. High-Level waste glass dissolution in simulated internal waste package environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V.; Pan, Y.M. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The rate of radionuclide release as a result of leaching of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass is important to the performance of engineered barriers. The modified product consistency test (PCT), with regular leachant exchanges, was used to determine the leaching rate of simulated HLW glasses (West Valley Demonstration Project Reference 6 and Defense Waste Processing Facility Blend 1) in aqueous solutions of FeCl{sub 2} and FeCl{sub 3} at 90 EC. These conditions were selected to simulate an internal waste package (WP) environment containing steel corrosion products and oxidized by radiolysis. Substantially higher initial B and alkali release rates, approximately a factor of 50 to 70 times greater than those in deionized water, were measured in 0.25 M FeCl{sub 3} solutions. The initial leaching rate for B and alkali was found to be pH-dependent and decreased as the leachate pH was increased. While the leach rate for Si did not show any significant change in the pH range studied, the leach rate for Al showed a minimum. The minimum in the leach rate of Al occurred at different pH values. The study indicates that elements in the glass matrix are released incongruently. (authors)

  5. Influence of high magnetic field on the luminescence of Eu{sup 3+}-doped glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Weibo; Chen, Ping; Xu, Beibei; Zheng, Shuhong; Guo, Qiangbing; Liu, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xfliu@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang, Junpei; Han, Junbo [Wuhan National High Magnetic field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Qiu, Jianrong, E-mail: xfliu@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510640 (China)

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth (RE) doped materials have been widely exploited as the intriguing electronic configuration of RE ions offers diverse functionalities from optics to magnetism. However, the coupling of magnetism with photoluminescence (PL) in such materials has been rarely reported in spite of its fundamental significance. In the present paper, the effect of high pulsed magnetic field on the photoluminescence intensity of Eu{sup 3+}-doped nano-glass-ceramics has been investigated. In our experiment, Eu-doped oxyfluoride glass and glass ceramic were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching process and controlled heat treatment. The results demonstrate that the integrated PL intensity of Eu{sup 3+} decreases with the enhancement of magnetic field, which can be interpreted in terms of cooperation effect of Zeeman splitting and magnetic field induced change in site symmetry. Furthermore, as a result of Zeeman splitting, both blue and red shift in the emission peaks of Eu{sup 3+} can be observed, and this effect becomes more prominent with the increase of magnetic field. Possible mechanisms associated with the observed magneto-optical behaviors are suggested. The results of the present paper may open a new gate for modulation of luminescence by magnetic field and remote optical detection of magnetic field.

  6. Influence of high magnetic field on the luminescence of Eu3+-doped glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Junpei; Chen, Weibo; Chen, Ping; Han, Junbo; Xu, Beibei; Zheng, Shuhong; Guo, Qiangbing; Liu, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-09-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped materials have been widely exploited as the intriguing electronic configuration of RE ions offers diverse functionalities from optics to magnetism. However, the coupling of magnetism with photoluminescence (PL) in such materials has been rarely reported in spite of its fundamental significance. In the present paper, the effect of high pulsed magnetic field on the photoluminescence intensity of Eu3+-doped nano-glass-ceramics has been investigated. In our experiment, Eu-doped oxyfluoride glass and glass ceramic were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching process and controlled heat treatment. The results demonstrate that the integrated PL intensity of Eu3+ decreases with the enhancement of magnetic field, which can be interpreted in terms of cooperation effect of Zeeman splitting and magnetic field induced change in site symmetry. Furthermore, as a result of Zeeman splitting, both blue and red shift in the emission peaks of Eu3+ can be observed, and this effect becomes more prominent with the increase of magnetic field. Possible mechanisms associated with the observed magneto-optical behaviors are suggested. The results of the present paper may open a new gate for modulation of luminescence by magnetic field and remote optical detection of magnetic field.

  7. Modification of magnetic anisotropy in metallic glasses using high-energy ion beam irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Amrute; U R Mhatre; S K Sinha; D C Kothari; R Nagarajan; D Kanjilal

    2002-05-01

    Heavy ion irradiation in the electronic stopping power region induces macroscopic dimensional change in metallic glasses and introduces magnetic anisotropy in some magnetic materials. The present work is on the irradiation study of ferromagnetic metallic glasses, where both dimensional change and modification of magnetic anisotropy are expected. Magnetic anisotropy was measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy of virgin and irradiated Fe40Ni40B20 and Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 metallic glass ribbons. 90 MeV 127I beam was used for the irradiations. Irradiation doses were 5 × 1013 and 7.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The relative intensity ratios 23 of the second and third lines of the Mössbauer spectra were measured to determine the magnetic anisotropy. The virgin samples of both the materials display in-plane magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the spins are oriented parallel to the ribbon plane. Irradiation is found to cause reduction in magnetic anisotropy. Near-complete randomization of magnetic moments is observed at high irradiation doses. Correlation is found between the residual stresses introduced by ion irradiation and the change in magnetic anisotropy.

  8. Demonstration of high-Q mid-infrared chalcogenide glass-on-silicon resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongtao; Li, Lan; Zou, Yi; Danto, Sylvain; Musgraves, J David; Richardson, Kathleen; Kozacik, Stephen; Murakowski, Maciej; Prather, Dennis; Lin, Pao T; Singh, Vivek; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel C; Hu, Juejun

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrated high-index-contrast, waveguide-coupled As2Se3 chalcogenide glass resonators monolithically integrated on silicon fabricated using optical lithography and a lift-off process. The resonators exhibited a high intrinsic quality factor of 2×10(5) at 5.2 μm wavelength, which is among the highest values reported in on-chip mid-infrared (mid-IR) photonic devices. The resonator can serve as a key building block for mid-IR planar photonic circuits.

  9. High energy pA collisions in the color glass condensate approach II. Quark production

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, J P; Venugopalan, R

    2004-01-01

    We compute the production of quark-antiquark pairs in high energy collisions between a small and a large projectile, as in proton-nucleus collisions, in the framework of the Color Glass Condensate. We derive a general expression for quark pair-production, which is not k_t-factorizable. However, k_t-factorization is recovered in the limit of large mass pairs or large quark--anti-quark momenta. Our results are amenable to a simple interpretation and suggest how multi-parton correlations at small x can be quantified in high-energy proton/deuteron-nucleus collisions.

  10. High-Field Faraday Effect of Tb-Doped Glass Above Paramagnetic Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoshiaki; Hori, Hidenobu; Yonenobu, Kenji; Yamagishi, Akio; Date, Muneyuki

    1987-08-01

    High-field Faraday effect is investigated in Tb-doped glass under a pulsed high magnetic field up to 40 tesla(T). The nonlinear Faraday effect due to saturation of the paramagnetic moment appears below about 20 T at 4.2 K. A considerably large Faraday rotation with the Verdet constant of -45.0 rad. T-1 m-1 is found above the paramagnetic saturation field, and this is explained by the field-induced level mixing in the multiplet levels.

  11. Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States); Newhouse, Norman L. [PPG Industries, Inc., Cheswick, PA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Led by PPG and partnered with Hexagon Lincoln and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the team recently carried out a project “Achieving Hydrogen Storage Goals through High-Strength Fiber Glass”. The project was funded by DOE’s Fuel Cell Technologies office within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, starting on September 1, 2014 as a two-year project to assess technical and commercial feasibilities of manufacturing low-cost, high-strength glass fibers to replace T700 carbon fibers with a goal of reducing the composite total cost by 50% of the existing, commercial 700 bar hydrogen storage tanks used in personal vehicles.

  12. Transition from stress-driven to thermally activated stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, J. C.; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhao, L. Z.; Dai, L. H.; Crespo, D.; Pelletier, J. M.; Keer, L. M.; Yao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The short-range ordered but long-range disordered structure of metallic glasses yields strong structural and dynamic heterogeneities. Stress relaxation is a technique to trace the evolution of stress in response to a fixed strain, which reflects the dynamic features phenomenologically described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The KWW equation describes a broad distribution of relaxation times with a small number of empirical parameters, but it does not arise from a particular physically motivated mechanistic picture. Here we report an anomalous two-stage stress relaxation behavior in a Cu46Zr46Al8 metallic glass over a wide temperature range and generalize the findings in other compositions. Thermodynamic analysis identifies two categories of processes: a fast stress-driven event with large activation volume and a slow thermally activated event with small activation volume, which synthetically dominates the stress relaxation dynamics. Discrete analyses rationalize the transition mechanism induced by stress and explain the anomalous variation of the KWW characteristic time with temperature. Atomistic simulations reveal that the stress-driven event involves virtually instantaneous short-range atomic rearrangement, while the thermally activated event is the percolation of the fast event accommodated by the long-range atomic diffusion. The insights may clarify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the phenomenological description and shed light on correlating the hierarchical dynamics and structural heterogeneity of amorphous solids.

  13. Scintillation and luminescence properties of Sm3+-activated Lu2O3-CaO-SiO2-B2O3 (LuCSB) scintillating glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdsiri, K.; Kaewkhao, J.; Park, J. M.; Ha, D. H.

    2016-09-01

    Lutetium (Lu) is a high atomic number material and readily interacts with X-rays, which makes it a good scintillation material. In this work, Lu-glass scintillators from the series xSm2O3: 25Lu2 O3: 10SiO2: 10CaO: (55- x)B2O3 (LuCSB) were synthesized at 1500 ° C by using a simple melt quenching technique. The influence of the Sm3+ ion on their physical, optical, photo-, X-rayand proton-induced properties has been characterized. The amorphous nature of the samples was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction. The density and the molar volume were found to be increased at higher concentrations of Sm3+. The X-ray- and the proton-induced emission spectra of the Sm3+:LuCSB glasses showed an intense reddish-orange emission around 604 nm (4G5/2 → 6H7/2), which matched the photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum well. Among the prepared glasses, the 1.0-mol% Sm3+ ion-activated LuCSB glass exhibited the highest value of the characteristic emission parameters. The X-ray-induced luminescence of the LuCSB glass was also compared with that of a commercial bismuth germinate Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystal.

  14. Properties and solubility of chrome in iron alumina phosphate glasses containing high level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji Univ., Shanghai, SH (China); Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Kim, C.W.; Reis, S.T.D. [Univ. of Missouri-Rolla (United States). Graduate Center for Materials Research

    2004-10-01

    Chemical durability, glass formation tendency, and other properties of iron alumina phosphate glasses containing 70 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW), doped with different amounts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, have been investigated. All of the iron alumina phosphate glasses had an outstanding chemical durability as measured by their small dissolution rate (1 . 10{sup -9} g/(cm{sup 2} . min)) in deionized water at 90 C for 128 d, their low normalized mass release as determined by the product consistency test (PCT) and a barely measurable corrosion rate of <0.1 g/(m{sup 2} . d) after 7 d at 200 C by the vapor hydration test (VHT). The solubility limit for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the iron phosphate melts was estimated at 4.1 wt%, but all of the as-annealed melts contained a few percent of crystalline Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} that had no apparent effect on the chemical durability. The chemical durability was unchanged after deliberate crystallization, 48 h at 650 C. These iron phosphate waste forms, with a waste loading of at least 70 wt%, can be readily melted in commercial refractory crucibles at 1250 C for 2 to 4 h, are resistant to crystallization, meet all current US Department of Energy requirements for chemical durability, and have a solubility limit for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} which is at least three times larger than that for borosilicate glasses. (orig.)

  15. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study.

  16. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M.

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  17. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho(3+)-activated ZBLAN glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K; Piatkowski, D; Malinowski, M

    2009-01-21

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho(3+) ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  18. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho3+-activated ZBLAN glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K.; Piatkowski, D.; Malinowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho3+ ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  19. In vitro activity of zinc oxide-eugenol and glass ionomer cements on Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the antimicrobial activity of glass ionomer (GIC) and zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cements against Candida albicans. Standardized GIC and ZOE specimens were maintained in contact with C. albicans suspension (1 ´ 10(6) cells/ml) at 37°C for 24 h, 48 h or 7 days. A control group without any testing cement was included. After the incubation period, aliquots of 0.1 ml were plated on Sabouraud's agar, and then the number of colonies was counted....

  20. Trace element abundances of high-MgO glasses from Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala volcanoes, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.P.; Clague, D.A.; Hauri, E.H.; Grove, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    We performed an ion-microprobe study of eleven high-MgO (6.7-14.8 wt%) tholeiite glasses from the Hawaiian volcanoes Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala. We determined the rare earth (RE), high field strength, and other selected trace element abundances of these glasses, and used the data to establish their relationship to typical Hawaiian shield tholeiite and to infer characteristics of their source. The glasses have trace element abundance characteristics generally similar to those of typical shield tholeiites, e.g. L(light)REE/H(heavy)REE(C1) > 1. The Kilauea and Mauna Loa glasses, however, display trace and major element characteristics that cross geochemical discriminants observed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa shield lavas. The glasses contain a blend of these discriminating chemical characteristics, and are not exactly like the typical shield lavas from either volcano. The production of these hybrid magmas likely requires a complexly zoned source, rather than two unique sources. When corrected for olivine fractionation, the glass data show correlations between CaO concentration and incompatible trace element abundances, indicating that CaO may behave incompatibly during melting of the tholeiite source. Furthermore, the tholeiite source must contain residual garnet and clinopyroxene to account for the variation in trace element abundances of the Kilauea glasses. Inversion modeling indicates that the Kilauea source is flat relative to C1 chondrites, and has a higher bulk distribution coefficient for the HREE than the LREE.

  1. Preparation and Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity for Photocatalyst of Permeable Glass Membrane/TiO2 Doped with Co

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ke-Yan; CUI Ping; CHEN Xiao-Ming; ZHANG Min; LI Yong

    2007-01-01

    @@ The photocatalyst of permeable glass membrane/TiO2 doped with Co (permeable glass membrane/TiO2 doped with Co) is prepared by the sol-gel method. The morphology and phase of the samples are determined by the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction experiment, respectively. The photocatalytic results show that the photocatalyst is sensitive to the visible light and exhibits excellent photocatalytic activity of photodegradation methylene blue. The photocatalytic mechanism is also discussed.

  2. Lanthanide-activated Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Yan, E-mail: chenyan@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Hua; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Zhenguo [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: phuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties.

  3. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  4. Unusual energy state evolution in Ce-based metallic glass under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, T. P.; Wang, C.; Tan, J.; Ma, T.; Yu, X. H.; Jin, C. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Metallic Glasses (MGs) are always aging toward the lower energy state, which leads to higher density, modulus, and hardness. We find that high pressure (HP) could lead to similar densification and hardening while the energy is increased. The comparison between two processes under HP and ambient pressure shows that densification happens in denser regions in MGs under HP, while it happens in looser regions under ambient pressure, which leads to the opposite energy changes in the two conditions. This result breaks the common wisdom about the relationship between the free volume and enthalpy and displays different structural and energy evolutions in MGs.

  5. Structural modifications of GeO2 glass under high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Antoine; Molherac, Rémy; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Vitreous GeO2 has been compressed at high temperature to investigate the effect of thermal activation on the structural reorganization during compression. The measurements were performed in-situ using micro Raman spectroscopy under pressure up to 6 GPa and temperature up to 400 °C. The evolution of the Raman shift of the main band (400-500 cm-1) with temperature during compression evidences a pressure window around 3 GPa within which temperature has a remarkable influence on the structure, in particular, the intermediate range order. We find that this change is well correlated with previous ex-situ density measurements from high pressure-high temperature densifications. Moreover, coordination changes from tetrahedrally (GeO4) to octahedrally (GeO6) coordinated GeO2 are accelerated with the heating during the compression.

  6. A glasses-type wearable device for monitoring the patterns of food intake and facial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jungman; Chung, Jungmin; Oh, Wonjun; Yoo, Yongkyu; Lee, Won Gu; Bang, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a new method for automatic and objective monitoring of ingestive behaviors in comparison with other facial activities through load cells embedded in a pair of glasses, named GlasSense. Typically, activated by subtle contraction and relaxation of a temporalis muscle, there is a cyclic movement of the temporomandibular joint during mastication. However, such muscular signals are, in general, too weak to sense without amplification or an electromyographic analysis. To detect these oscillatory facial signals without any use of obtrusive device, we incorporated a load cell into each hinge which was used as a lever mechanism on both sides of the glasses. Thus, the signal measured at the load cells can detect the force amplified mechanically by the hinge. We demonstrated a proof-of-concept validation of the amplification by differentiating the force signals between the hinge and the temple. A pattern recognition was applied to extract statistical features and classify featured behavioral patterns, such as natural head movement, chewing, talking, and wink. The overall results showed that the average F1 score of the classification was about 94.0% and the accuracy above 89%. We believe this approach will be helpful for designing a non-intrusive and un-obtrusive eyewear-based ingestive behavior monitoring system.

  7. Highly (0001)-oriented Al-doped ZnO polycrystalline films on amorphous glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Junichi; Inaba, Katsuhiko; Osada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Makino, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-09-01

    Very thin aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films with a well-defined (0001) orientation and a surface roughness of 0.357 nm were deposited on amorphous glass substrates at a temperature of 200 °C by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, which are promising, particularly in terms of orientation evolution, surface roughness, and carrier transport, as buffer layers for the subsequent deposition of highly (0001)-oriented AZO polycrystalline films of 490 nm thickness by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. Sintered AZO targets with an Al2O3 content of 2.0 wt. % were used. DC magnetron sputtered AZO films on bare glass substrates showed a mixed (0001) and the others crystallographic orientation, and exhibited a high contribution of grain boundary scattering to carrier transport, resulting in reduced Hall mobility. Optimizing the thickness of the AZO buffer layers to 10 nm led to highly (0001)-oriented bulk AZO films with a marked reduction in the above contribution, resulting in AZO films with improved Hall mobility together with enhanced carrier concentration. The surface morphology and point defect density were also improved by applying the buffer layers, as shown by atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  8. Highly sensitive ammonia sensor using reflection of light at a glass - photonic crystal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchyanov, A S; Spisser, H; Plekhanov, A I

    2013-01-01

    We have discovered and studied the effect of the asymmetric deformation of a photonic crystal in the form of a change in the slope of the crystal planes as it is filled with a gaseous analyte. We have demonstrated that the use of a new effect leading to the displacement of the stop band against the unchanged spectrum of diffracted white light at the (glass-thin opal film) interface can be used as fast, compact, high sensitive and reproducible optical chemical sensor for ammonia. Low cost and simplicity of sensor fabrication, the response of which can be easily observed without resorting to spectral instruments are therefore likely to be attractive. The basis for high sensitivity (1 ppm), fast response (120 ms) is capillary vapor condensation. On the basis of this effect a cheap high-speed and highly sensitive gas sensors has been built.

  9. Expanded High-Level Waste Glass Property Data Development: Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Lang, Jesse B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Raszewski, F. C.; Peeler, David K.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Best, D. R.; Reamer, Irene A.; Riley, W. T.; Simmons, P. T.; Workman, R. J.

    2011-01-21

    Two separate test matrices were developed as part if the EM-21 Glass Matrix Crucible Testing. The first matrix, developed using a single component-at-a-time design method and covering glasses of interest primarily to Hanford, is addressed in this data package. This data package includes methods and results from glass fabrication, chemical analysis of glass compositions, viscosity, electrical conductivity, liquidus temperature, canister centerline cooling, product consistency testing, and the toxicity characteristic leach procedure.

  10. Evaluation of Foaming Behavior of Glass Melts by High-Temperature Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Optical monitoring techniques can record in situ the size of glass samples during a dynamic heating process. This allowed us to study sintering and expansion rate of panel glass from cathode ray tube using MnO2 as foaming agent. We show the maximum expansion rate of glass melt foaming (in situ va...

  11. High-Temperature Studies of Glass Dissolution Rates Close to Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Zhao, P; Williams, R; Rose, T; Rainer, A; Pawloski, G

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are incorporated into a melt glass and are released by glass dissolution to become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) (Pawloski et al., 2001). Although the rates of rhyolite glass dissolution are well known under conditions where the fluid is far from saturation with respect to glass, the rates are not well known under conditions where the fluid approaches saturation. These rates are commonly much lower than the far-fromsaturation rates, often by a factor greater than 100. In recent HST simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001; Pawloski et al., 2000; Tompson et al., 1999), we conservatively estimated steady-state release rates based on a far-from-saturation fluid conditions. In recent CHESHIRE near-field simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001), it was predicted that {approx}30% of the nuclear melt glass dissolved over 1000 years. Although the ''far-from-saturation rate'' approach provides a conservative estimate of glass dissolution, it may greatly overestimate the rates of melt glass dissolution. At CHESHIRE, less conservative estimates suggest that only {approx}1% of the nuclear melt glass will dissolve in 1000 years. Lower glass dissolution rates result in lower radionuclide release rates from nuclear melt glass. The following report documents glass dissolution experiments performed to measure glass dissolution rates close to saturation.

  12. The antimicrobial activity of as-prepared silver-loaded phosphate glasses and zirconium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Wang; Jiang, Ji Zhi; Yang, Yang; Yan, Zhao Chun; Yan, Wang Xiao [China Building Materials Academy, Beijing (China); He, Shui Zhong [Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-03-15

    The antimicrobial activities of silver-loaded zirconium phosphate (JDG) and silver-loaded phosphate glasses (ZZB) against Escherichia coli were studied. Although the silver content in JDG was higher than that in ZZB, ZZB suspensions showed better antimicrobial property than JDG suspensions, especially at low concentrations. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed using minimum inhibitory concentrations, bacterial inhibition ring tests, and detection of silver ions in the suspensions. Furthermore, the amounts of silver ions in suspensions with/without bacterial cells were analyzed. Results revealed that only a portion of released silver ions could be adsorbed by E. coli cells, which are critical to cell death. The damaged microstructures of E. coli cells observed by transmission electron microscopy may further prove that the adsorbed silver ions play an important role in the antimicrobial process.

  13. Selection of compositions with high glass forming ability in the Ni-Nb-B alloy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Andreato Batista Mendes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A combination of an extension of the topological instability "λ criterion" and the "average electronegativity" has been recently reported in the literature to predict compositions with high glass-forming ability (GFA. In the present work, both criteria have been applied to select the Ni61.0Nb36.0B3 alloy with a high glass-forming ability. Ingots were prepared by arc-melting and were used to produce ribbons processed by the melt-spinning technique further characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The Ni61.0Nb36.0B3 alloy revealed a complete amorphization and supercooled liquid region ΔTx = 68 K. In addition, wedge-shaped samples were prepared using copper mold casting in order to determine the critical thickness for amorphous formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that fully amorphous samples could be obtained, reaching up to ~800 µm in thickness.

  14. Novel high-pressure windows made of glass-like carbon for x-ray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testemale, Denis; Prat, Alain; Lahera, Eric; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    Original high-pressure glass-like carbon windows developed for x-ray spectroscopy applications are presented. The scientific and technological background of this new technical development is exposed, in particular the limitations of our existing beryllium windows in the context of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of solutions with very low solute concentrations at hydrothermal conditions (0.1-200 MPa, 30-600 °C). The benefits of glass-like carbon are exposed, notably its non-crystalline character, the absence of impurities which has been verified by micro-fluorescence laboratory measurements, and its non-toxicity which makes its machining safer. Finite elements mechanical calculations and experimental pressure tests were conducted to determine the pressure limits of windows with two different geometries: cylindrical (thickness 0.5 mm) and inversed-dome shape (thickness 0.5 mm at the tip of the dome). The former break at 150 MPa and the latter show no sign of rupture at 400 MPa. Recent XAS measurements conducted with the new dome shaped windows are presented to show the advantages of the design that allow for the detection of very low concentrations in the transmission mode (down to 30 ppm) and the acquisition of fluorescence XAS spectra in diluted solutions at high pressure. Eventually the perspectives of this original development are discussed.

  15. Depolarized Photon Correlation Spectroscopic Study of the Glass-Forming Liquid Cumene at Very High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Kevin; Ransom, Tim; Oliver, William

    2014-03-01

    In recent years full-spectrum analysis of light-scattering data has been utilized to explore the liquid-glass transition at variable temperatures and ambient pressure. We have developed methods for doing depolarized photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) in the diamond anvil cell in order to probe directly the structural relaxation time of glass-forming liquids at very high pressures. Here we present results for liquid cumene at 25 C between 1 bar and pressures approaching the room-temperature glass transition at 2.1 GPa. Data along higher-temperature isotherms will also be presented. Methods for minimizing any undesired heterodyne component in the collected light as well as the use of the longitudinal modes of the Brillouin spectrum to aid in the acquisition and spatial filtering of the scattered light will be discussed. Intensity-intensity correlation data were found to be well represented by the KWW equation with a nearly constant stretching parameter of g = 0.66 for 25 C. Furthermore, the relaxation time as a function of pressure is described will using a modified VTF expression: (P)=0exp{DP/(P0-P)}, with values of 0 = 11.9 ps, D = 18.6, and P0 = 3.4 GPa at T = 25 °C. Thus, (P) has been obtained at 25 °C for Cumene over seven decades from about a microsecond to several seconds and is found to be in excellent agreement with previously determined values for the alpha relaxation at lower pressures obtained from Brillouin data [G. Li, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2280 (1995)]. Partially supported by NSF Grant Number: DMR 0552944.

  16. Hundred-Joule-level,nanosecond-pulse Nd:glass laser system with high spatiotemporal beam quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sensen Li; Yulei Wang; Zhiwei Lu; Lei Ding; Yi Chen; Pengyuan Du; Dexin Ba; Zhenxing Zheng; Xin Wang; Hang Yuan; Chengyu Zhu; Weiming He; Dianyang Lin; Yongkang Dong; Dengwang Zhou; Zhenxu Bai; Zhaohong Liu; Can Cui

    2016-01-01

    A 100-J-level Nd:glass laser system in nanosecond-scale pulse width has been constructed to perform as a standard source of high-fluence-laser science experiments. The laser system, operating with typical pulse durations of 3–5 ns and beam diameter 60 mm, employs a sequence of successive rod amplifiers to achieve 100-J-level energy at 1053 nm at3 ns. The frequency conversion can provide energy of 50-J level at 351 nm. In addition to the high stability of the energy output, the most valuable of the laser system is the high spatiotemporal beam quality of the output, which contains the uniform square pulse waveform, the uniform flat-top spatial fluence distribution and the uniform flat-top wavefront.

  17. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  18. Active shape correction of a thin glass/plastic X-ray mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Basso, S; Civitani, M; Collura, A; Dell'Agostino, S; Cicero, U Lo; Lullo, G; Pelliciari, C; Riva, M; Salmaso, B; Sciortino, L

    2015-01-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or plastic in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optics based on thin slumped glass foils are currently in use in the NuSTAR telescope and are being developed at various institutes like INAF/OAB, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Another possibility would be the use of thin plastic foils, being developed at SAO and the Palermo University. Even if relevant progresses in the achieved angular resolution were recently made, a viable possibility to further improve the mirror figure would be the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors. In fact, thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. This however offers the possibility to actively correct the residual deformation. Even if other groups are alre...

  19. Detection and qualification of optimum antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of silver-doped bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Nezafati, Nader; Hajibaki, Leila; Mozafari, Masoud; Moztarzadeh, F; Hesaraki, Saeed; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to detect the optimum antibacterial activity of silver-doped bioactive glasses (Ag-BGs) for prevention of post-transplant infections in tissue engineering. The results have shown that the Ag-BG samples had broad-spectrum antibacterial efficacy in an Ag concentration-dependent manner. The 2% Ag-BG had the highest effect during the first 10 min to 72 h. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 2% Ag-BG was estimated to be 2 mg/ml for Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and 2.66 mg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). A concentration of 0.5% Ag-BG repressed growth of E. coli after 1 h, but did not have any detectable antibacterial effect for longer periods. Evaluation of the effects of prepared Ag-BG on human osteoblast cells viability showed that 1 and 2% samples changed the cell proliferation rate in masses of more than 3.33 and 2 mg/ml, respectively. Moreover, in a typical manner, the release of Ag ions from the glass structure started immediately, continued steadily and affected bacterial growth when it reached its critical concentration in the medium. This systematic study can illustrate the optimum antibacterial property of the Ag-BG samples in masses of 3.33 and 2 mg/ml for 1 and 2% Ag, respectively, for prevention of post-transplant infections.

  20. INCORPORATION OF MONO SODIUM TITANATE AND CRYSTALLINE SILICOTITANATE FEEDS IN HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2010-11-23

    Four series of glass compositions were selected, fabricated, and characterized as part of a study to determine the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. All of the glasses studied were considerably more durable than the benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses were compared with the predicted values from the current DWPF durability model. One of the KT01-series and two of the KT03-series glasses had measured PCT responses that were outside the lower bound of the durability model. All of the KT04 glasses had durabilities that were predictable regardless of heat treatment or compositional view. In general, the measured viscosity values of the KT01, KT03, and KT04-series glasses are well predicted by the current DWPF viscosity model. The results of liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) measurements for the KT01-series glasses were mixed with regard to the predictability of the T{sub L} for each glass. All of the measured T{sub L} values were higher than the model predicted values, although most fell within the 95% confidence intervals. Overall, the results of this study show a reasonable ability to incorporate the anticipated SCIX streams into DWPF-type glass compositions with TiO{sub 2} concentrations of 4-5 wt % in glass.

  1. High-Throughput Laser Peening of Metals Using a High-Average-Power Nd: Glass Laser System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Halpin, J.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.; Harris, J.

    1999-11-01

    Laser shot peening, a surface treatment for metals, is known to induce residual compressive stresses to depths of over 1 mm providing improved component resistance to various forms of failure. Recent information also suggests that thermal relaxation of the laser induced stress is significantly less than that experienced by other forms of surface stressing that involve significantly higher levels of cold work. We have developed a unique solid state laser technology employing Nd:glass amplifier slabs and SBS phase conjugation that enables this process to move into high throughput production processing.

  2. Measurement of the figure of merit of indigenously developed Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods for use in high power lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Kulkarni; S Jain; M P Kamath; A S Joshi; P A Naik; P D Gupta; K Annapurna; A K Mandal; B Karmakar; R Sen

    2014-01-01

    High energy, high power (HEHP) Nd:glass laser systems are used for inertial confinement fusion and equation of state (EOS) studies of materials at high temperature and pressure. A program has been undertaken for the indigenous development of Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods and discs for HEHP lasers. In this paper, we report the characterization of the Nd-doped phosphate laser glass rods produced under this program and compare the indigenously developed laser glass to LHG-8 laser glass of M/s Hoya, Japan. We experimentally measured the values of the stimulated emission cross-section () and coefficient of intensity-dependent refractive index (2) and hence the figure of merit = /2 of the indigenous phosphate laser glass rods. This value of figure of merit is found comparable to the reported value of identically doped Nd:glass rods.

  3. Making Glasses Conduct: Electrochemical Doping of Redox-Active Polymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouris, Bryan

    Optoelectronically-active macromolecules have been established as promising materials in myriad organic electronic applications (e.g., organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices). To date, however, the majority of the work surrounding these materials has focused on materials with a great deal of conjugation along their macromolecular backbones and with varying degrees of crystalline structure. Here, we describe an emerging class of macromolecular charge conductors, radical polymers, that: (1) do not contain conjugation and (2) are completely amorphous glasses. Radical polymers contain non-conjugated macromolecular backbones and stable radical sites along the side chains of the electronically-active materials. In contrast to conjugated polymer systems, these materials conduct charge in the solid state through oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions along these pendant groups. Specifically, we demonstrate that controlling the chemical functionality of the pendant groups and the molecular mobility of the macromolecular backbones significantly impacts the charge transport ability of the pristine (i.e., not doped) radical polymers species. Through proper control of these crucial parameters, we show that radical polymers can have electrical conductivity and charge mobility values on par with commonly-used conjugated polymers. Importantly, we also highlight the ability to dope radical polymers with redox-active small molecule species. This doping, in turn, increases the electrical conductivity of the glassy radical polymer thin films in a manner akin to what is observed in traditional conjugated polymer systems. In this way, we establish a means by which to fabricate optically-transparent and colorless thin film glasses capable of conducting charge in a rather rapid manner. We anticipate that these fundamental insights will prove crucial in developing new transparent conducting layers for future electronic applications.

  4. Liquidus Temperature of High-Level Waste Borosilicate Glasses with Spinel Primary Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Vienna, John D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Crum, Jarrod V.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Piepel, Gregory F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Mika, Martin (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Robert W. Smith; David W. Shoesmith

    2000-01-01

    Liquidus temperatures (TL) were measured for high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasses covering a Savannah River composition region. The primary crystallization phase for most glasses was spinel, a solid solution of trevorite (NiFe2O4) with other oxides (FeO, MnO, and Cr2O3). The TL values ranged from 859 to 1310?C. Component additions increased the TL (per mass%) as Cr2O3 261?C, NiO 85?C, TiO2 42?C, MgO 33?C, Al2O3 18?C, and Fe2O3 18?C and decreased the TL (per mass%) as Na2O -29?C, Li2O -28?C, K2O -20?C, and B2O3 -8?C. Other oxides (CaO, MnO, SiO2, and U3O8) had little effect. The effect of RuO2 is not clear.

  5. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad; Rymuszka, Diana; Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun'ko, Vladimir M.

    2015-10-01

    Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γS) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γS decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m2 (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m2 for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  6. Transfer-free synthesis of highly ordered Ge nanowire arrays on glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, M.; Toko, K., E-mail: toko@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Jevasuwan, W.; Fukata, N. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N. [Electron Microscope Facility, TIA, AIST, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8569 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Vertically aligned Ge nanowires (NWs) are directly synthesized on glass via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth using chemical-vapor deposition. The use of the (111)-oriented Ge seed layer, formed by metal-induced crystallization at 325 °C, dramatically improved the density, uniformity, and crystal quality of Ge NWs. In particular, the VLS growth at 400 °C allowed us to simultaneously achieve the ordered morphology and high crystal quality of the Ge NW array. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the resulting Ge NWs had no dislocations or stacking faults. Production of high-quality NW arrays on amorphous insulators will promote the widespread application of nanoscale devices.

  7. Ductile Bulk Aluminum-Based Alloy with Good Glass-Forming Ability and High Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Long-Chao; PANG Shu-Jie; WANG Hui; ZHANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    Based on a new approach for designing glassy alloy compositions,bulk Al-based alloys with good glass-forming ability (GFA) are synthesized.The cast Al86Si0.5Ni4.06Co2.94 Y6Sc0.5 rod with a diameter of 1 mm shows almost fully amorphous structure besides about 5% fcc-Al nucleated in the center of the rod.The bulk alloy with high Al concentration exhibits an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.18 Gpa and maximum strength of 1.27 Gpa as well as an obvious plastic strain of about 2.4% during compressive deformation.This light Al-based alloy with good GFA and mechanical properties is promising as a new high specific strength material with good deformability.

  8. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hrma@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Re did not volatilize from a HLW feed until 1000 °C. • Re began to volatilize from LAW feeds at ∼600 °C. • The vigorous foaming and generation of gases from salts enhanced Re evaporation in LAW feeds. • The HLW glass with less foaming and salts is a promising medium for Tc immobilization. - Abstract: We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min{sup −1} until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO{sub 4}. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  9. High refractive index gold nanoparticle doped Bi2O3-B2O3 glasses for THz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Shivani; Achanta, Venu Gopal; Mahendru, Nancy; Prabhu, Shriganesh S.; Falconieri, Mauro; Sharma, Gopi

    2017-10-01

    Direct incorporation of gold nanoparticles from suspensions in 30%Bi2O3:70%B2O3 glass was achieved. This method has advantage over traditional methods where a gold salt is added to the precursor mixture and gold nanoparticles are obtained with subsequent heat treatment, eventually inducing crystallization with associated scattering of light and hence resulting in reduced optical quality of material. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis were carried out in order to confirm the amorphous nature of the material and thermal properties of the prepared glasses, respectively. The size of the gold nanoparticles in the prepared glass matrix was measured using scanning electron microscopy. Optical characterization of prepared glass samples in ultraviolet-visible and terahertz regions was performed using ellipsometry, UV-VIS spectrophotometry and THz-time-domain spectroscopy. Comparison was made between glasses with and without gold nanoparticles and the effect of gold nanoparticle concentration on their optical behaviour is studied. These glasses are found to have high refractive index in the THz region making them suitable for photonic applications.

  10. Structural model of homogeneous As–S glasses derived from Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R.; Shpotyuk, O.; Mccloy, J. S.; Riley, B. J.; Windisch, C. F.; Sundaram, S. K.; Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H.

    2010-11-28

    The structure of homogeneous bulk As x S100- x (25 ≤ x ≤ 42) glasses, prepared by the conventional rocking–melting–quenching method, was investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the main building blocks of their glass networks are regular AsS3/2 pyramids and sulfur chains. In the S-rich domain, the existence of quasi-tetrahedral (QT) S = As(S1/2)3 units is deduced from XPS data, but with a concentration not exceeding ~3–5% of total atomic sites. Therefore, QT units do not appear as primary building blocks of the glass backbone in these materials, and an optimally-constrained network may not be an appropriate description for glasses when x < 40. Finally, it is shown that, in contrast to Se-based glasses, the ‘chain-crossing’ model is only partially applicable to sulfide glasses.

  11. IMPACT OF URANIUM AND THORIUM ON HIGH TIO2 CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-01-11

    This study focused on the potential impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is also considered in the study. The KT08-series of glasses was designed to evaluate any impacts of the inclusion of uranium and thorium in glasses containing the SCIX components. All but one of the study glasses were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction (XRD). One of the slowly cooled glasses contained a small amount of trevorite, which is typically found in DWPF-type glasses and had no practical impact on the durability of the glass. The measured Product Consistency Test (PCT) responses for the study glasses and the viscosities of the glasses were well predicted by the current DWPF models. No unexpected issues were encountered when uranium and thorium were added to the glasses with SCIX components.

  12. Electrospun Polyhydroxybutyrate/Poly(ε-caprolactone)/58S Sol-Gel Bioactive Glass Hybrid Scaffolds with Highly Improved Osteogenic Potential for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaping; Li, Wei; Müller, Teresa; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Yao, Qingqing; Roether, Judith A

    2016-07-13

    Electrospinning of biopolymer and inorganic substances is one of the efficient ways to combine various advantageous properties in one single fibrous structure with potential for tissue engineering applications. In the present study, to integrate the high stiffness of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the flexibility of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and the bioactivity of 58S bioactive glass, PHB/PCL/58S sol-gel bioactive glass hybrid scaffolds were fabricated using combined electrospinning and sol-gel method. Physical features such as fiber diameter distribution, mechanical strength and Young's modulus were characterized thoroughly. FTIR analysis demonstrated the successful incorporation of 58S bioactive glass into the blend polymers, which greatly improved the hydrophilicity of PHB/PCL fibermats. The primary biological response of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells on the prepared fibrous scaffolds was evaluated, proving that the 58S glass sol containing hybrid scaffold were not only favorable to MG-63 cell adhesion but also slightly enhanced cell viability and significantly increased alkaline phosphate activity .

  13. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  14. Effect of reduced pressure, vibration and orientation to simulate high altitude testing of liquid pharmaceutical glass and plastic bottles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S. Paul; Burgess, Gary; Kremer, Matt; Lockhart, Hugh

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of high-altitude shipments of glass and plastic bottles on package integrity. High altitudes are encountered when trucks travel over mountain passes and when cargo and feeder aircraft transport packages in non-pressurized or partially pressurized cargo holds. This is

  15. New glass coatings for high insulating greenhouses without light losses - energy saving, crop production and economic potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming, S.

    2009-01-01

    More than 90% of Dutch greenhouse area is covered with single glass. Energy losses through the covering are high during heating period (winter) but energy requirements are also high during cooling period (summer) in the case of semiclosed greenhouses. Until now, light losses of insulating coverings

  16. High temperature electrical behaviour and failure mechanisms of glass-ceramic dielectrics in thick film multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Manca, Jean

    1994-01-01

    Glass-ceramics are polycrystalline materials obtained from glasses after an appropriate thermal treatment. They are of importance because they offer combinations of physical properties not available with other classes of materials. Glass-ceramics have become established as commercially important materials in fields such as consumer products, applications for the aerospace industry and protective coatings for metals. Recently, their technological importance has also been recognized in the fiel...

  17. Dynamics of one-dimensional Heisenberg spin glasses in the high-field limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of the distribution and localization of the magnon modes in one-dimensional Heisenberg spin glasses with nearest-neighbor interactions. The analysis is limited to high fields and frequencies near the precession frequency. Both symmetric and asymmetric distributions of exchange interactions of the form P(J)~||J||-α (α<1) are treated in detail. The results of approximate calculations based on the coherent-exchange approximation are shown to be in good agreement with numerical data obtained by applying mode-counting techniques to arrays of 107 spins. Particular emphasis is placed on the qualitative differences in the behavior that arise depending on whether the average values of J-1 and J-2 are zero, nonzero, or infinite.

  18. Heat accumulation during high repetition rate ultrafast laser interaction: Waveguide writing in borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibin; Eaton, Shane M; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R [The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON, M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2007-04-15

    During high repetition rate (>200 kHz) ultrafast laser waveguide writing, visible heat modified zones surrounding the formed waveguide occur as a result of heat accumulation. The radii of the heat-modified zones increase with the laser net fluence, and were found to correlate with the formation of low-loss and cylindrically symmetric optical waveguides. A numerical thermal model based on the finite difference method is applied here to account for cumulative heating and diffusion effects. The model successfully shows that heat propagation and accumulation accurately predict the radius of the 'heat modified' zones observed in borosilicate glass waveguides formed across a wide range of laser exposure conditions. Such modelling promises better control of thermal effects for optimizing the fabrication and performance of three-dimensional optical devices in transparent materials.

  19. Fracture toughness measurements on a glass bonded sodalite high-level waste form.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSanto, T.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; O' Holleran, T. P.

    1999-05-19

    The electrometallurgical treatment of metallic spent nuclear fuel produces two high-level waste streams; cladding hulls and chloride salt. Argonne National Laboratory is developing a glass bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream. The waste form consists of 75 Vol.% crystalline sodalite (containing the salt) with 25 Vol.% of an ''intergranular'' glassy phase. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on representative samples of this material using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confirmed by post-indentation polishing of a test sample. Young's modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and Young's modulus values are reported, along with results from scanning electron microscopy studies.

  20. Soft-ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys with large magnetostriction and high glass-forming ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawei Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Dy addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA, magnetostriction as well as soft-magnetic properties and fracture strength in FeDyBSiNb glassy alloys was investigated. In addition to the increase of supercooled liquid region from 55 to 100 K, the addition of Dy is effective in approaching alloy to an eutectic point and increasing the saturation magnetostrction (λs. Accordingly, bulk glassy alloy (BGA rods with diameters up to 4 mm were produced, which exhibit a large λs as high as 65×10-6. Besides, the BGA system exhibits superhigh fracture strength of 4000 MPa, combined with good soft-magnetic properties.

  1. Broadband directional couplers fabricated in bulk glass with high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Jen; Eaton, Shane M; Zhang, Haibin; Herman, Peter R

    2008-07-21

    A femtosecond fiber laser was applied to fabricate broadband directional couplers inside bulk glass for general power splitting application in the 1250 to 1650-nm wavelength telecom spectrum. The broadband response was optimized over the 400-nm bandwidth by tailoring the coupling strength and the waveguide interaction length to balance the differing wavelength dependence of the straight interaction and bent transition regions. High spatial finesse of the femtosecond-laser writing technique enabled close placement (approxiamtely 6 microm) of adjacent waveguides that underpinned the wavelength-flattened broadband response at any coupling ratio in the 0% to 100% range. The spectral responses were well-represented by coupled mode theory, permitting simple design and implementation of broadband couplers for bulk 3D optical circuit integration.

  2. Development of chemical and topological structure in aluminosilicate liquids and glasses at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewitt, James W. E.; Jahn, Sandro; Sanloup, Chrystèle; de Grouchy, Charlotte; Garbarino, Gaston; Hennet, Louis

    2015-03-01

    The high pressure structure of liquid and glassy anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) and calcium aluminate (CaAl2O4) glass was measured by using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell up to 32.4(2) GPa. The results, combined with ab initio molecular dynamics and classical molecular dynamics simulations using a polarizable ion model, reveal a continuous increase in Al coordination by oxygen, with 5-fold coordinated Al dominating at 15 GPa and a preponderance of 6-fold coordinated Al at higher pressures. The development of a peak in the measured total structure factors at 3.1 Å-1 is interpreted as a signature of changes in topological order. During compression, cation-centred polyhedra develop edge- and face- sharing networks. Above 10 GPa, following the pressure-induced breakdown of the network structure, the anions adopt a structure similar to a random close packing of hard spheres.

  3. Hydrothermal growth of VO2 nanoplate thermochromic films on glass with high visible transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiasong; Li, Jingbo; Chen, Pengwan; Rehman, Fida; Jiang, Yijie; Cao, Maosheng; Zhao, Yongjie; Jin, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    The preparation of thermochromic vanadium dioxide (VO2) films in an economical way is of interest to realizing the application of smart windows. Here, we reported a successful preparation of self-assembly VO2 nanoplate films on TiO2-buffered glass by a facile hydrothermal process. The VO2 films composed of triangle-shaped plates standing on substrates exhibit a self-generated porous structure, which favors the transmission of solar light. The porosity of films is easily controlled by changing the concentration of precursor solutions. Excellent thermochromic properties are observed with visible light transmittance as high as 70.3% and solar modulating efficiency up to 9.3% in a VO2 film with porosity of ~35.9%. This work demonstrates a promising technique to promote the commercial utilization of VO2 in smart windows.

  4. High-cycle Fatigue Life Extension of Glass Fiber/Polymer Composites with Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher S Grimmer; C K H Dharan

    2009-01-01

    The present work shows that the addition of small volume fractions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the matrix results in a significant increase in the high-cycle fatigue life. It is proposed that carbon nanotubes tend to inhibit the formation of large cracks by nucleating nano-scale damage zones. In addition, the contribution to energy absorption from the fracture of nanotubes bridging across nano-scale cracks and from nanotube pull-out from the matrix are mechanisms that can improve the fatigue life. An energy-based model was proposed to estimate the additional strain energy absorbed in fatigue. The distributed nanotubes in the matrix appear to both distribute damage as well as inhibit damage propagation resulting in an overall improvement in the fatigue strength of glass fiber composites.

  5. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations

  6. Preparation of high density heavy metal fluoride glasses with extended ultraviolet and infra red ranges, and such high density heavy metal fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Steven W. (Inventor); Huebsch, Jesse (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) consisting essentially of: (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24)InF.sub.3 or GaF.sub.3.(4-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-22)ZnF.sub.2. In an alternative embodiment, a heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) comprises (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24) of (0-24)InF.sub.3, (0-24)GaF.sub.3 and (0-19)AlF.sub.3.(1-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-26)ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass produced in accordance with the present invention comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.7InF.sub.3.5GaF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3. 16ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass has maximum thickness of most preferably about 3 mm. Another preferred heavy metal fluoride glass comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.12AlF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3.16ZnF.sub.2.

  7. Infrared Transparent Selenide Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-14

    crystalline halides, silica and fluoride glasses, and chalcogenide glasses. Crystalline halides undergo plastic deformation and are hygroscopic...mainly for applications operating at wavelengths less than 3 microns. Silicate and fluoride glasses have been developed as optical fiber amplifiers...activity. Preferred rare earths includes praseodymium, neodymium, erbium, cerium , dysprosium, holmium, thulium, terbium, ytterbium or mixtures of

  8. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at glass buttes, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Perkin, Doug [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Martini, Brigette [Corescan Inc., Ascot (Australia); Boshmann, Darrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The engineering and studies phase of the Glass Buttes project was aimed at reducing risk during the early stages of geothermal project development. The project’s inclusion of high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys allowed Ormat to evaluate the value of these surveys both independently and in combination to quantify the most valuable course of action for exploration in an area where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The sizes of the thermal anomalies at Glass Buttes are unusually large. Over the course of Phase I Ormat acquired high resolution LIDAR data to accurately map fault manifestations at the surface and collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys to map subsurface structural features. In addition, Ormat collected airborne hyperspectral data to assist with mapping the rock petrology and mineral alteration assemblages along Glass Buttes faults and magnetotelluric (MT) survey to try to better constrain the structures at depth. Direct and indirect identification of alteration assemblages reveal not only the geochemical character and temperature of the causative hydrothermal fluids but can also constrain areas of upflow along specific fault segments. All five datasets were merged along with subsurface lithologies and temperatures to predict the most likely locations for high permeability and hot fluids. The Glass Buttes temperature anomalies include 2 areas, totaling 60 km2 (23 mi2) of measured temperature gradients over 165° C/km (10° F/100ft). The Midnight Point temperature anomaly includes the Strat-1 well with 90°C (194 °F) at 603 m (1981 ft) with a 164 °C/km (10°F/100ft) temperature gradient at bottom hole and the GB-18 well with 71°C (160 °F) at 396 m (1300 ft) with a 182°C/km (11°F/100ft) gradient. The primary area of alteration and elevated temperature occurs near major fault intersections associated with Brothers Fault Zone and Basin and Range systems. Evidence for faulting is

  9. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua, E-mail: nzhangh@aliyun.com [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-93, 102413 Beijing (China); Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn{sub 0.60}Ni{sub 0.20}Mg{sub 0.20})(Cr{sub 1.37}Fe{sub 0.63})O{sub 4}. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q{sup 3} species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O base glass up to 28 days, due to

  10. MgZnO High Voltage Thin Film Transistors on Glass for Inverters in Building Integrated Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wen-Chiang; Ku, Chieh-Jen; Li, Rui; Abbaslou, Siamak; Reyes, Pavel; Wang, Szu-Ying; Li, Guangyuan; Lu, Ming; Sheng, Kuang; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-10-01

    Building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) have attracted considerable interests because of its aesthetically attractive appearance and overall low cost. In BIPV, system integration on a glass substrate like windows is essential to cover a large area of a building with low cost. However, the conventional high voltage devices in inverters have to be built on the specially selected single crystal substrates, limiting its application for large area electronic systems, such as the BIPV. We demonstrate a Magnesium Zinc Oxide (MZO) based high voltage thin film transistor (HVTFT) built on a transparent glass substrate. The devices are designed with unique ring-type structures and use modulated Mg doping in the channel - gate dielectric interface, resulting in a blocking voltage of over 600 V. In addition to BIPV, the MZO HVTFT based inverter technology also creates new opportunities for emerging self-powered smart glass.

  11. MgZnO High Voltage Thin Film Transistors on Glass for Inverters in Building Integrated Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wen-Chiang; Ku, Chieh-Jen; Li, Rui; Abbaslou, Siamak; Reyes, Pavel; Wang, Szu-Ying; Li, Guangyuan; Lu, Ming; Sheng, Kuang; Lu, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    Building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) have attracted considerable interests because of its aesthetically attractive appearance and overall low cost. In BIPV, system integration on a glass substrate like windows is essential to cover a large area of a building with low cost. However, the conventional high voltage devices in inverters have to be built on the specially selected single crystal substrates, limiting its application for large area electronic systems, such as the BIPV. We demonstrate a Magnesium Zinc Oxide (MZO) based high voltage thin film transistor (HVTFT) built on a transparent glass substrate. The devices are designed with unique ring-type structures and use modulated Mg doping in the channel - gate dielectric interface, resulting in a blocking voltage of over 600 V. In addition to BIPV, the MZO HVTFT based inverter technology also creates new opportunities for emerging self-powered smart glass. PMID:27721484

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of the laser micro-machining of glass using high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri; Liu, Qiang

    2006-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the ultrafast laser micro-machining of glass using a Ti:Spp laser with moderate pulse energy (<5 μJ) at a high repetition rate (50 kHz). Optimal conditions were identified for high resolution surface laser etching, and via drilling. Several practical applications were developed: glass templates for micro fluid diffraction devices, phase gratings for excimer laser projection techniques, micro fluid vertical channel-connectors, etc. It is demonstrated that the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses with glass combines several different processes (direct ablation, explosive material ejection, and thermal material modification). A dynamic numerical model was developed for this process. It was successfully used for modelling of laser micro-machining with arbitrary 3D translations of the target.

  13. Mapping Activity Variations for Ru2O3 in Lunar Volcanic Green Glass Analogs Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malum, K. M.; Colson, R. O.; Sawarynski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Using differential pulse voltammetry, we are mapping variations in activities for NiO and Ru2O3 as a function of compositional variation for compositions centered around an Apollo 15 green glass analog. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Antibacterial activity evaluation of bioactive glass and biphasic calcium phosphate nanopowders mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, Zahra; Mehdikhani-Nahrkhalaji, Mehdi; Haghbin-Nazarpak, Masoumeh; Staji, Hamid; Kalani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive glass (BG) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) nanopowders mixtures for the first time. 37S BG and BCP (50% HA-50% β-TCP) nanopowders were prepared via sol-gel technique. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescent. The antibacterial activity was studied using Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi as gram-negative, and Staphylococcus aureus as gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial effect of BG, BCP nanopowders, and their mixtures was evaluated at different concentrations. The 37S BG nanopowders showed minimum bactericidal concentration at 25 mg/ml. At broth concentrations below 300 mg/ml, BCP showed no antibacterial activity. BCP and BG nanopowders mixture (M2) with 60/40 ratio of BCP/BG showed noticeable antibacterial effect. It was concluded that BCP and 37S BG nanopowders mixture could be used as a good candidate for dental and orthopedic applications.

  15. Volumetric properties of magnesium silicate glasses and supercooled liquid at high pressure by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesher, Charles E.; Wang, Yanbin; Gaudio, Sarah; Clark, Alisha; Nishiyama, Nori; Rivers, Mark; (UCD); (UC)

    2009-06-01

    The volumetric properties of silicate glasses and supercooled liquid are examined at high pressures and temperatures using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and absorption. The high pressure X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) system at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (GeoSoilEnvironCARS 13-BM-D beamline) consists of two opposing anvils compressed within an X-ray-transparent containment ring supported by thrust bearings and loaded using a 250-ton hydraulic press. This system permits the pressure cell to rotate under the load, while collecting radiographs through at least 180{sup o} of rotation. The 13-BM-D beamline permits convenient switching between monochromatic radiation required for radiography and polychromatic radiation for pressure determination by energy dispersive diffraction. We report initial results on several refractory magnesium silicate glasses synthesized by levitation laser heating. Volume changes during room temperature compression of Mg-silicate glasses with 33 mol% and 38 mol% SiO2 up to 11.5 GPa give an isothermal bulk moduli of 93--100 GPa for a K' of 1. These values are consistent with ultrasonic measurements of more silica-rich glasses. The volumetric properties of amorphous MgSiO{sub 3} at 2 GPa were examined during annealing up to 1000 C. We consider the consequences of heating through the glass transition and the implications for thermal expansivity of supercooled liquids at high pressure. Our results illustrate the capabilities of HPXMT for studies of refractory glasses and liquids at high pressure and offer strategies for future studies of liquid densities within the melting interval for magmas in planet interiors.

  16. The effect of high energy concentration source irradiation on structure and properties of Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses exhibit metastable structure and maintain this relatively stable amorphous state within certain temperature range. High intensity laser beam was used for the surface irradiation of Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb bulk metallic glasses. The variable parameter was laser beam pulse energy. For the analysis of structure and properties of bulk metallic glasses and their surface after laser remelting the X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and test of mechanical properties were carried out. Examination of the nanostructure of amorphous materials obtained by high pressure copper mold casting method and the irradiated with the use of TITAN 80-300 HRTEM was carried out. Nanohardness and reduced Young's modulus of particular amorphous and amorphous-crystalline material zone of the laser beam were examined with the use of Hysitron TI950 Triboindenter nanoindenter and with the use of Berkovich's indenter. The XRD and microscopic analysis showed that the test material is amorphous in its structure before irradiation. Microstructure observation with electron transmission microscopy gave information about alloy crystallization in the irradiated process. Identification of given crystal phases allows to determine the kind of crystal phases created in the first place and also further changes of phase composition of alloy. The main value of the nanohardness of the surface prepared by laser beam has the order of magnitude similar to bulk metallic glasses formed by casting process irrespective of the laser beam energy used. Research results analysis showed that the area between parent material and fusion zone is characterized by extraordinarily interesting structure which is and will be the subject of further analysis in the scope of bulk metallic glasses amorphous structure and high energy concentration source. The main goal of this work is the results' presentation of structure and chosen properties of the selected bulk metallic glasses after casting process and after irradiation

  17. High-pressing preparation of rock glasses and their elastic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xi; ZHOU Wenge; XIE Hongsen; LIU Yonggang; FAN Dawei; WAN Fang

    2008-01-01

    Melt glasses for seven types of rock ranging from acid to basic were prepared under 1.0 GPa on a multi-anvil pressure apparatus, YJ-3000 ton press. Densities and elastic properties of the melt glasses were compared with those described in previous studies. It was found that the glasses melted under 1.0 GPa were consistent in density with both naturally-occurring glassy rocks and artificially prepared glasses melted at ambient pressure. The densities of glasses are negatively correlated with the SiO2 contents and positively correlated with the (MgO+FeO) contents. The compressive velocity (Vp) of glass tends to increase with decreasing SiO2 contents and increasing (MgO+FeO) contents. The shear velocity (Vs) of glass tends to increase slightly with increasing SiO2 contents, which has little connection with the (MgO+FeO) contents. It was calculated from densities and velocities that the elastic moduli of glasses are negatively correlated with the SiO2 contents and positively correlated with the (MgO+FeO) contents.

  18. Communication: High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Lisa Anita; Niss, Kristine; Jakobsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependences of the characteristic time scale associated with the specific heat...

  19. The High-Frequency Dielectric Properties of Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic and Honeycomb Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-29

    The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss angle tangent of glass fibre reinforced plastic are both relatively small; it is a good wave...practical value. This paper introduces the work we have done in this area. The dielectric properties of glass fibre reinforced plastic have a close

  20. Heating Rate Effect on the Activation of Viscoelastic Relaxation in Silicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Mohamed; Piazza, Francesco; Guimbretière, Guillaume; Canizarès, Aurèlien; Ory, Sandra; Vaills, Yann

    Here we present a direct investigation of the heating rate effect on structural relaxation of sodium silicate glass near the glass transition by means of differential scanning calorimetry, and show the sensitivity of Brillouin light spectroscopy to the dynamic of structural relaxation in the medium range order (∼100 nm).

  1. In vitro and in vivo studies on biodegradable CaMgZnSrYb high-entropy bulk metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Xie, X H; Zhao, K; Wang, Y B; Zheng, Y F; Wang, W H; Qin, L

    2013-11-01

    In order to enhance the corrosion resistance of the Ca65Mg15Zn20 bulk metallic glass, which has too fast a degradation rate for biomedical applications, we fabricated the Ca20Mg20Zn20Sr20Yb20 high-entropy bulk metallic glass because of the unique properties of high-entropy alloys. Our results showed that the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior were enhanced. The in vitro tests showed that the Ca20Mg20Zn20Sr20Yb20 high-entropy bulk metallic glass could stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of cultured osteoblasts. The in vivo animal tests showed that the Ca20Mg20Zn20Sr20Yb20 high-entropy bulk metallic glass did not show any obvious degradation after 4 weeks of implantation, and they can promote osteogenesis and new bone formation after 2 weeks of implantation. The improved mechanical properties and corrosion behavior can be attributed to the different chemical composition as well as the formation of a unique high-entropy atomic structure with a maximum degree of disorder.

  2. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository.

  3. Manufacturing an active X-ray mirror prototype in thin glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, D; Barbera, M; Collura, A; Basso, S; Candia, R; Civitani, M; Di Bella, M S; Di Cicca, G; Lo Cicero, U; Lullo, G; Pelliciari, C; Riva, M; Salmaso, B; Sciortino, L; Varisco, S

    2016-01-01

    Adjustable mirrors equipped with piezo actuators are commonly used at synchrotron and free-electron laser (FEL) beamlines, in order to optimize their focusing properties and sometimes to shape the intensity distribution of the focal spot with the desired profile. Unlike them, X-ray mirrors for astronomy are much thinner in order to enable nesting and reduce the areal mass, and the application of piezo actuators acting normally to the surface appears much more difficult. There remains the possibility to correct the deformations using thin patches that exert a tangential strain on the rear side of the mirror: some research groups are already at work on this approach. The technique reported here relies on actively integrating thin glass foils with commercial piezoceramic patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays, while the tension signals are carried by electrodes on the back of the mirror, obtained by photolithography. Finally, the shape detection and the consequent voltage signal to be provided to the piezoelectric array will be determined by X-ray illumination in an intra-focal setup at the XACT facility. In this work, the manufacturing steps for obtaining a first active mirror prototype are described.

  4. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ZnO based glass-ceramics against pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Ikram, Hafeez; Bashir, Farooq

    2015-12-01

    The antibacterial activity of ZnO (0-15.53 mol%) based SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2 bioactive glass-ceramics synthesized by controlled crystallisation were studied against eight micro-organisms using modified Kirby Bauer method. The antibacterial activity of the specimens was statistically evaluated using one-way analysis of variance and P < 0.05 was used as the level of significance. In vitro dissolution tests were performed in stimulated body fluid for 48 h at 37 °C for different time intervals to correlate the dissolution behaviour of test samples with antibacterial effects. The results illustrate that specimen BZn15.53 having the highest concentration of ZnO (15.53 mol%) demonstrated the strongest effect against Staph.aureus, S. epidermidis, B. subtilis and K. pneumonia. The effectiveness of BZn15.53 in inhibiting bacteria was due to accumulation of Zn(+2) ions around the surface of the bacteria cell release that caused the death of the cell, besides the presence of hydroxyapatite phase was also responsible for damaging the cell membrane of bacteria.

  5. Active glass-type human augmented cognition system considering attention and intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ojha, Amitash; Lee, Minho

    2015-10-01

    Human cognition is the result of an interaction of several complex cognitive processes with limited capabilities. Therefore, the primary objective of human cognitive augmentation is to assist and expand these limited human cognitive capabilities independently or together. In this study, we propose a glass-type human augmented cognition system, which attempts to actively assist human memory functions by providing relevant, necessary and intended information by constantly assessing intention of the user. To achieve this, we exploit selective attention and intention processes. Although the system can be used in various real-life scenarios, we test the performance of the system in a person identity scenario. To detect the intended face, the system analyses the gaze points and change in pupil size to determine the intention of the user. An assessment of the gaze points and change in pupil size together indicates that the user intends to know the identity and information about the person in question. Then, the system retrieves several clues through speech recognition system and retrieves relevant information about the face, which is finally displayed through head-mounted display. We present the performance of several components of the system. Our results show that the active and relevant assistance based on users' intention significantly helps the enhancement of memory functions.

  6. Design, development and performance characteristics of a large aperture disc amplifier for high power Nd: Glass laser chain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Kamath; P K Tripathi; A P Kulkarni; R Chandra; A S Joshi; C P Navathe; P D Gupta

    2008-08-01

    A large aperture disc amplifier has been designed, set-up and characterized for its performance on small signal gain, spatial variation of gain, and thermal recovery time. This amplifier, consisting of three elliptical Nd: phosphate glass discs of size 214 × 114 × 20 mm mounted at Brewster angle and pumped by ten xenon filled flash lamps of 600 mm arc length, provided a small signal gain of 6 at electrical pump energy of 36 kJ (in a pulse of 450 s) using an in-house developed dual-polarity capacitor bank based power supply. It was coupled to a high power Nd: phosphate glass laser chain and a maximum output pulse energy exceeding 100 J in a 1·5 ns (FWHM) pulse has been measured. A dry nitrogen gas based cooling system was developed for cooling the glass discs with a thermal recovery time of ∼ 20 minutes.

  7. The influence of removing sizing on strength and stiffness of conventional and high modulus E-glass fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    Two types of E-glass fibres, a conventional and a high modulus where the last one in the following will be denoted as ECR-glass fibre, were investigated regarding density, diameter, stiffness and strength. The fibres were analysed as pristine and after sizing removal treatments. The sizing...... was removed by either burning at 565◦C or soxhlet extraction with acetone. It was found that the density and the stiffness increased after removing the sizing by the two removal treatments whereas the diameter did not change significantly. The strength of the fibres decreased after burning as the sizing......, protecting against water and fibre-fibre damage, had been removed. The strength of the fibres after extraction was not significantly different from the strength of the pristine fibres despite removing the sizing. This indicates that the bonded part of sizing is still protecting the glass fibre surface....

  8. Notch fatigue behavior: Metallic glass versus ultra-high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. D.; Qu, R. T.; Wu, S. J.; Duan, Q. Q.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of notch on the fatigue behavior of structural materials is of significance for the reliability and safety designing of engineering structural components. In this work, we conducted notch fatigue experiments of two high-strength materials, i.e. a Ti32.8Zr30.2Ni5.3Cu9Be22.7 metallic glass (MG) and a 00Ni18Co15Mo8Ti ultra-high strength steel (CM400 UHSS), and compared their notch fatigue behavior. Experimental results showed that although both the strength and plasticity of the MG were much lower than those of the UHSS, the fatigue endurance limit of the notched MG approached to that of the notched UHSS, and the fatigue ratio of the notched MG was even higher. This interesting finding can be attributed to the unique shear banding mechanism of MG. It was found that during fatigue process abundant shear bands formed ahead of the notch root and in the vicinity of the crack in the notched MG, while limited plastic deformation was observed in the notched UHSS. The present results may improve the understanding on the fatigue mechanisms of high-strength materials and offer new strategies for structural design and engineering application of MG components with geometrical discontinuities. PMID:27752136

  9. Notch fatigue behavior: Metallic glass versus ultra-high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. D.; Qu, R. T.; Wu, S. J.; Duan, Q. Q.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-10-01

    Studying the effect of notch on the fatigue behavior of structural materials is of significance for the reliability and safety designing of engineering structural components. In this work, we conducted notch fatigue experiments of two high-strength materials, i.e. a Ti32.8Zr30.2Ni5.3Cu9Be22.7 metallic glass (MG) and a 00Ni18Co15Mo8Ti ultra-high strength steel (CM400 UHSS), and compared their notch fatigue behavior. Experimental results showed that although both the strength and plasticity of the MG were much lower than those of the UHSS, the fatigue endurance limit of the notched MG approached to that of the notched UHSS, and the fatigue ratio of the notched MG was even higher. This interesting finding can be attributed to the unique shear banding mechanism of MG. It was found that during fatigue process abundant shear bands formed ahead of the notch root and in the vicinity of the crack in the notched MG, while limited plastic deformation was observed in the notched UHSS. The present results may improve the understanding on the fatigue mechanisms of high-strength materials and offer new strategies for structural design and engineering application of MG components with geometrical discontinuities.

  10. Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 2, Additional appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. The status of the CDB is summarized in Volume I of this report. Volume II contains appendices that present data from the data base and an evaluation of glass durability models applied to the data base.

  11. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of composition and temperature on the properties of High-Level Waste (HLW) glasses melting above 1200{degrees}C (Draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.; Schweiger, M.J. [and others

    1996-02-01

    Increasing the melting temperature of HLW glass allows an increase of waste loading (thus reducing product volume) and the production of more durable glasses at a faster melting rate. However, HLW glasses that melt at high temperatures differ in composition from glasses formulated for low temperature ({approximately}1150{degree}C). Consequently, the composition of high-temperature glasses falls in a region previously not well tested or understood. This report represents a preliminary study of property/composition relationships of high-temperature Hanford HLW glasses using a one-component-at-a-time change approach. A test matrix has been designed to explore a composition region expected for high-temperature high-waste loading HLW glasses to be produced at Hanford. This matrix was designed by varying several key components (SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, UO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and others) starting from a glass based on a Hanford HLW all-blend waste. Glasses were fabricated and tested for viscosity, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, crystallinity, liquidus temperature, and PCT release. The effect of individual components on glass properties was assessed using first- and second- order empirical models. The first-order component effects were compared with those from low-temperature HLW glasses.

  13. Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Strachan

    2004-10-20

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of a model for calculating the release rate for radionuclides and other key elements from high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses under exposure conditions relevant to the performance of the repository. Several glass compositions are planned for the repository, some of which have yet to be identified (i.e., glasses from Hanford and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). The mechanism for glass dissolution is the same for these glasses and the glasses yet to be developed for the disposal of DOE wastes. All of these glasses will be of a quality consistent with the glasses used to develop this report.

  14. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  15. An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gin, Stephane [CEA Marcoule DTCD SECM LCLT, Bagnols/Ceze (France); Abdelouas, Abdessalam [SUBATECH, Nantes (France); Criscenti, Louise J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ferrand, Karine [SCK·CEN, Mol (Belgium); Geisler, Thorsten [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany); Harrison, Mike T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Kyushu Univ. (Japan). Dept. Appl. Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Mitsui, Seiichiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Mueller, Karl T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental and Molecular Science Lab.; Marra, James C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Pierce, Eric M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schofield, James M. [AMEC, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Steefel, Carl I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Nations producing borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive wastes resulting from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing have reinforced scientific collaboration to obtain consensus on mechanisms controlling the long-term dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research with modern materials science techniques. The paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programmes of the six participant nations and summarizes the state-of-the-art of glass corrosion science, emphasizing common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

  16. High-insulated glass house, Egebjerggaard, Ballerup; Det hoejisolerede glashus. Egebjerggaard, Ballerup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.; Aggerholm, S.

    1999-11-01

    New, super-insulating transparent and translucent glazing offers new perspectives for use of glass in architecture to achieve new facade idioms, spatial and light effects and low energy consumption. The new types of glazing are being tested in practice through the construction of a super-insulated glass house for Ballerup Ejendomsselskab in the district of Egebjerggaard west of Copenhagen. The project is based on SBI Report 220, Super-insulated glass houses (1993), in which use of new, super-insulating transparent and translucent glazing is analysed in relation to architecture, light conditions, indoor climate and energy consumption - for a detached house and a terraced house. (EHS)

  17. An international initiative on long-term behavior of high-level nuclear waste glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nations using borosilicate glass as an immobilization material for radioactive waste have reinforced the importance of scientific collaboration to obtain a consensus on the mechanisms controlling the long-term dissolution rate of glass. This goal is deemed to be crucial for the development of reliable performance assessment models for geological disposal. The collaborating laboratories all conduct fundamental and/or applied research using modern materials science techniques. This paper briefly reviews the radioactive waste vitrification programs of the six participant nations and summarizes the current state of glass corrosion science, emphasizing the common scientific needs and justifications for on-going initiatives.

  18. Glass formation and crystallization of high lead content PbO-B2O3 compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Michael C.; Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.

    1986-01-01

    The glass-forming and undercooling ability of PbO-B2O3 melts in the 2PbO.B2O3 to 4PbO.B2O3 composition range were studied. The glass formation propensities were investigated as a function of cooling rate and sample mass. A qualitative investigation of the crystallization process(es) preventing glass formation was made, and it was concluded that under normal circumstances heterogeneous nucleation was the common occurrence. Hence, it was concluded that such compositions are prime candidates for containerless experiments aboard the Space Shuttle.

  19. Transparent ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave based high performance ultraviolet light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Bo; Gu, Hang; He, Xing-Li; Xuan, Wei-Peng; Chen, Jin-Kai; Wang, Xiao-Zhi; Luo, Ji-Kui

    2015-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are a type of ultraviolet (UV) light sensors with high sensitivity, and they have been extensively studied. Transparent SAW devices are very useful and can be developed into various sensors and microfluidics for sensing/monitoring and lab-on-chip applications. We report the fabrication of high sensitivity SAW UV sensors based on piezoelectric (PE) ZnO thin films deposited on glass substrates. The sensors were fabricated and their performances against the post-deposition annealing condition were investigated. It was found that the UV-light sensitivity is improved by more than one order of magnitude after annealing. The frequency response increases significantly and the response becomes much faster. The optimized devices also show a small temperature coefficient of frequency and excellent repeatability and stability, demonstrating its potential for UV-light sensing application. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274037 and 61301046) and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20120101110031 and 20120101110054).

  20. Glass-coated Individual Dispersed MWNTs in Alumina & Its High Temperature Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Keqing; LIANG Jiayi; XU Hongyan; BAI Rong

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonication assisted sol-gel processing route for MWNTs/Alumina was proposed.Using aluminum ethoxide as an alumina precursor and ethanol/water as a solvent,the dura-tion of the transformation from sol to gel under ultrasonication can be controlled by adjusting the water content.Purified MWNTs added under ultrasonication should be functionalized by alcohol at first and a well dispersion in alumina sol could be attained under the help of ultrasonic.With the evaporation of ethanol,sol transfers to gel and MWNTS dispersion can be kept in gel.Gel and calcine-powder show that individual MWNTs are enwrapped by amorphous alumina.As-received powders after a following heating-treatment under vacuum shows a good high stability for a glass coat formed on MWNTs.Raman results show the processing route has no obvious effect on the structure of MWNTs,even a high temperature(1273K)treatment is done under vacuum.

  1. Improvements in processing characteristics and engineering properties of wood flour-filled high density polyethylene composite sheeting in the presence of hollow glass microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris Yalcin; Steve E Amos; Andrew S D Souza; Craig M Clemons; I Sedat Gunes; Troy K Ista

    2012-01-01

    Hollow glass microspheres were introduced into wood flour/high density polyethylene composites by melt compounding in a twin-screw extruder. The prepared composites were subsequently converted to extruded profiles in order to obtain composite sheeting. The presence of hollow glass microspheres highly reduced the density of the extruded sheets down to 0.9 g/cc, while...

  2. Do light cured ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants perform better than resin-composite sealants: a 4-year randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Chen, X.; Fan, M.W.; Mulder, J.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The hypotheses tested were: the cumulative survival rates of dentin caries lesion-free pits and fissures of ART conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer sealants with light-curing (high-intensity LED) and glass-carbomer sealants are higher than those of conventional ART sealants and resi

  3. Glass surface metal deposition with high-power femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Deng, Cheng; Bai, Shuang

    2016-12-01

    Using femtosecond fiber laser-based additive manufacturing (AM), metal powder is deposited on glass surface for the first time to change its surface reflection and diffuse its transmission beam. The challenge, due to mismatch between metal and glass on melting temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, brittleness, is resolved by controlling AM parameters such as power, scan speed, hatching, and powder thickness. Metal powder such as iron is successfully deposited and demonstrated functions such as diffusion of light and blackening effects.

  4. Determination of absorption coefficients of glasses at high tempera-tures, by measuring the thermal emission

    OpenAIRE

    Loenen, E.; Van der Tempel, L.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental setup built in 1995 measures the spectral absorptioncoefficient of glass as a function of temperature and wavelength bythe emissive method. The setup was improved, as well as the softwarefor processing the measurement data. The measurement results of quartzwere validated by comparison with several literature sources. Theabsorption spectra of Philips 360, GE 180, Schott 8486 Suprax, Corning1724 and Philips 441 glass were determined as a function of temperature.

  5. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BP McGrail, WL Ebert, DH Bacon, DM Strachan

    1998-02-18

    Privatized services are being procured to vitrify low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. Over 500,000 metric tons of low-activity waste glass will be generated, which is among the largest volumes of waste within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex and is one of the largest inventories of long-lived radionuclides planned for disposal in a low-level waste facility. Before immobilized waste can be disposed, DOE must approve a "performance assessment," which is a document that describes the impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Because the release rate of radionuclides from the glass waste form is a key factor determining these impacts, a sound scientific basis for determining their long-term release rates must be developed if this disposal action is to be accepted by regulatory agencies, stakeholders, and the public. In part, the scientific basis is determined from a sound testing strategy. The foundation of the proposed testing strategy is a well accepted mechanistic model that is being used to calculate the glass corrosion behavior over the geologic time scales required for performance assessment. This model requires that six parameters be determined, and the testing program is defined by an appropriate set of laboratory experiments to determine these parameters, and is combined with a set of field experiments to validate the model as a whole. Three general classes of laboratory tests are proposed in this strategy: 1) characterization, 2) accelerated, and 3) service condition. Characterization tests isolate and provide specific information about processes or parameters in theoretical models. Accelerated tests investigate corrosion behavior that will be important over the regulated service life of a disposal system within a laboratory time frame of a few years or less. Service condition tests verify that the techniques used in accelerated tests do not change

  6. 1998 Annual Study Report. Standardization of methods for evaluating properties of new glass at high temperature; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. New glass koon bussei no hyoka hoho no hyojunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    High-temperature properties of glass melts, e.g., density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium and gas solubility, are basic factors that must be considered in high quality glass melting technology and computer simulation of the glass tank furnace. The structure of the glass melts is also important for understanding these properties. This R and D program is aimed at proposing the international standards for the methods of measuring these high-temperature properties of the melts. The 1988 efforts are directed to the measuring technologies for density, volume expansion coefficient, surface tension, viscosity, specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity, redox equilibrium, gas solubility and melt structures of soda-lime-silica glass melts. The R and D for measuring methods for high-temperature melts through international cooperation and establishment of the international standards for these methods are proposed in the joint CGR/HVG/TNO/GPF conference, which provides the arena for information exchange by glass manufacturers. (NEDO)

  7. COMBINED RETENTION OF MOLYBDENUM AND SULFUR IN SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2009-10-16

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of elevated sulfate and molybdenum concentrations in nuclear waste glasses. A matrix of 24 glasses was developed and the glasses were tested for acceptability based on visual observations, canister centerline-cooled heat treatments, and chemical composition analysis. Results from the chemical analysis of the rinse water from each sample were used to confirm the presence of SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} and MoO{sub 3} on the surface of glasses as well as other components which might form water soluble compounds with the excess sulfur and molybdenum. A simple, linear model was developed to show acceptable concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and MoO{sub 3} in an example waste glass composition. This model was constructed for scoping studies only and is not ready for implementation in support of actual waste vitrification. Several other factors must be considered in determining the limits of sulfate and molybdenum concentrations in the waste vitrification process, including but not limited to, impacts on refractory and melter component corrosion, effects on the melter off-gas system, and impacts on the chemical durability and crystallization of the glass product.

  8. Study of interaction of high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam with Ag$^+$-doped glass

    CERN Document Server

    Nahal, A; Payami, M

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the interaction of a high-power Ar$^+$ laser beam, in a continuous multi-line regime, with Ag$^+$-doped glass samples. The samples were subjected to the irradiation after the ion-exchange step. As a result of the irradiation, a peak appears in the absorption spectrum; its evolution depends on both the exposure time and the laser beam power. Interaction of the beam with the clusters causes them break into smaller ones which has been confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Depending on the increment steps of the laser-beam power, different results are obtained. It is found that, in addition to the fragmentations of the nano-clusters, clusters of micro-meter size ($d\\sim 3\\mu m$) are formed in the sample, if the laser power is increased in a fast regime. The fragmentation processes have been explained in the framework of the density-functional theory with stabilized jellium model.

  9. Neutral polymers as coatings for high resolution electrophoretic separation of Aβ peptides on glass microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Kiarach; Verpillot, Romain; Chiari, Marcella; Pallandre, Antoine; Taverna, Myriam

    2014-12-21

    This study reports a comparison of the performances of two neutral polymers, poly ethylene-oxide (PEO) and poly(dimethylacrylamide-co-allyl glycidyl ether) (EpDMA), in glass microchips to achieve zone electrophoresis separation of several truncated forms of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptides, sharing very similar structures. The peptides were derivatized by FluoProbes 488 NHS to allow their fluorescence detection. Two protocols based either on PEO or EpDMA led to good pH stabilities in addition to a significant reduction of the electroosmotic flow. These two polymer coatings allowed repeatable analyses and high resolution for the simultaneous analysis of three Aβ peptides, Aβ 1-38, Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42, considered as potential biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease. A recovery study showed that EpDMA was superior in reducing the adsorption of the Aβ peptides on the coated inner wall. Finally, the separation method relying on the EpDMA coated microchips was validated as linear using a calibration curve and the LOD was estimated to be close to 200 nM. Despite very short migration distances, different N-terminal or C-terminal truncated Aβ peptides, corresponding to promising biomarker combinations for the future diagnostic, were fully resolved. The method was successfully applied to detect these peptides in spiked cerebrospinal fluid and has provided a first achievement towards the development of a microsystem that would integrate preconcentration and separation steps.

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of MnO2 and SiO2 Containing Soil-Active Phosphate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumera, M.; Łagowska, B.

    2017-01-01

    FT-IR and Raman spectra were measured and structurally interpreted for glasses of the 41P2O5·8SiO2·6K2O·(26 - x) MgO·(19 - y)CaO·(x+y)MnO2 system where 0 ≤ x+y ≤ 40 mol.%, acting as slow-release fertilizers. It was shown that increasing the amount of MnO2 in the structure of the investigated glasses causes their gradual depolymerization, as is particularly apparent in the case of the phospho-oxygen subnetwork. Spectroscopic methods, on the other hand, showed no influence of manganese ions on the silicate subnetwork. Research on the chemical activity of the analyzed glasses conducted under conditions simulating a natural soil environment showed their low solubility with a simultaneous gradual increase in solubility occurring with an increasing number of manganese ions in the glass composition. It was found that this behavior resulted from the formation of less chemically stable bonds of the P-O-Mn2+ type, as compared with bonds of the P-O-Ca2+ and P-O-Mg2+ types. This is consistent with the depolymerizing influence of manganese ions on the analyzed vitreous structure as shown by the FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy and, thus, its weakening.

  11. High-contrast visualization of graphene oxide on dye-sensitized glass, quartz, and silicon by fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treossi, Emanuele; Melucci, Manuela; Liscio, Andrea; Gazzano, Massimo; Samorì, Paolo; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2009-11-04

    We present a novel approach for detecting and visualizing graphene oxide (GO) with high contrast on different substrates, including glass, quartz, and silicon. Visualization of GO sheets is accomplished through quenching the fluorescence of a thiophene dye, giving high optical contrast without the need to use interference methods. A comparison of fluorescence, AFM, and XRD measurements confirmed that even a single GO sheet can completely quench the fluorescence and thus be quickly visualized.

  12. High-efficiency ytterbium-free erbium-doped all-glass double cladding silicate glass fiber for resonantly-pumped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Zexuan; Geng, Jihong; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shibin

    2014-02-01

    A highly efficient ytterbium-free erbium-doped silicate glass fiber has been developed for high-power fiber laser applications at an eye-safe wavelength near 1.55 μm. Our preliminary experiments show that high laser efficiency can be obtained from a relatively short length of the gain fiber when resonantly pumped at 1535 nm in both core- and cladding-pumping configurations. With a core-pumping configuration as high as 75%, optical-to-optical efficiency and 4 W output power were obtained at 1560 nm from a 1 m long gain fiber. When using a cladding-pumping configuration, approximately 13 W output power with 67.7% slope efficiency was demonstrated from a piece of 2 m long fiber. The lengths of silicate-based gain fiber are much shorter than their silica-based counterparts used in other experiments, which is significantly important for high-power narrow-band and/or pulsed laser applications.

  13. The high-birefringence asymmetric SF57 glass microstructured optical fiber at 1060.0 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ting-Hang; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhang, Yilei

    2017-07-01

    Many high-birefringence asymmetric microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have been numerically designed and analyzed, but the fabrication of asymmetric MOF is challenging, especially those with elliptical structures. In this work, we designed, fabricated and modelled an asymmetric glass MOF in which the structure is asymmetric and the air holes are elliptical. SF57 glass was selected due to the high refraction index and low absorption in the Terahertz region. From simulations based on the finite difference (FD) method at 1060.0 μm, the polarizations of the first two modes are perpendicular to each other and the effective refraction indices are different, which lead to the birefringence of this MOF as high as 0.090. The plane-wave expansion method was used to verify the FD calculations, where both results are consistent and the difference is about 0.1%.

  14. Cold and Hot Slumped Glass Optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Banham, R.; Breuning, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G.; Menz, B.

    2016-07-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, e.g. the approved Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The latest advancements in the production of thin glass substrates may allow a great simplification of this process, avoiding the preforming step via hot slumping. In fact, the strength and the flexibility of glass foils with thickness lower than 0.1 mm allow their bending up to very small radius of curvature without breaking. In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we present the results obtained on several prototypes that have been assembled with different integration approaches.

  15. High-performance calcium-doped zinc oxide thin-film transistors fabricated on glass at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Han, Dedong; Cui, Guodong; Cong, Yingying; Dong, Junchen; Zhang, Xiaomi; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    High-performance calcium-doped zinc oxide thin-film transistors (Ca-ZnO TFTs) have been successfully fabricated on transparent glass at low temperature by RF magnetron sputtering. To study the effects of calcium doping on zinc oxide thin-film transistors, the characteristics of Ca-ZnO TFTs and ZnO TFTs are compared and analyzed in detail from different perspectives, including electrical performance, surface morphology, and crystal structure of the material. The results suggest that the incorporation of calcium element can decrease the root-mean-square roughness of the material, suppress growth of a columnar structure, and improve device performance. The TFTs with Ca-ZnO active layer exhibit excellent electrical properties with the saturation mobility (μsat) of 147.1 cm2 V-1 s-1, threshold voltage (V t) of 2.91 V, subthreshold slope (SS) of 0.271 V/dec, and I on/I off ratio of 2.34 × 108. In addition, we also study the uniformity of the devices. The experimental results show that the Ca-ZnO TFTs possess good uniformity, which is important for large-area application.

  16. Effect of storage conditions on the biological activity of phenolic compounds of blueberry extract packed in glass bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anita; Akoh, Casimir C; Yi, Weiguang; Fischer, Joan; Krewer, Gerard

    2007-04-04

    Recent research suggests that blueberries are rich in total polyphenols and total anthocyanins. Phenolic compounds are highly unstable and may be lost during processing, particularly when heat treatment is involved. There is no systematic study available providing information on the fate of phenolic compounds during storage and how that affects their biological activity. We provide a systematic evaluation of the changes observed in total polyphenols (TPP), total anthocyanins (TACY), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), phenolic acids, and individual anthocyanins of blueberry extract stored in glass bottles and the ability of blueberry extract to inhibit cell proliferation. The extract was stored at different temperatures (-20 +/- 1, 6 +/- 1, 23 +/- 1, and 35 +/- 1 degrees C). Two cultivars, Tifblue and Powderblue, were chosen for the study. The recoveries of TPP, TACY, and TEAC in blueberry extract after pressing and heating were approximately 25, approximately 29, and approximately 69%, respectively, for both cultivars. The recovery of gallic acid, catechin, and quercetin was approximately 25%. Ferulic acid was not detected in the final extract in both Tifblue and Powderblue cultivars. The recovery of peonidin, malvidin, and cyanidin glycosides was approximately 20% in the final extract in both cultivars. Losses due to storage were less when compared with initial losses due to processing. At -20 degrees C, no statistically significant loss of TPP, TACY, and TEAC was observed up to 30 days (P blueberry extract in order to retain the bioactive components.

  17. [INVITED] Laser welding of glasses at high repetition rates - Fundamentals and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We report on the welding of various glasses with ultrashort laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses at repetition rates in the MHz range are focused at the interface between two substrates, resulting in multiphoton absorption and heat accumulation from successive pulses. This leads to local melting and subsequent resolidification which can be used to weld the glasses. The fundamental interaction process was studied using an in-situ micro Raman setup to measure the laser induced temperature distribution and its temporal decay. The induced network changes were analyzed by Raman spectrocopy identifying an increase of three and four membered silicon rings within the laser irradiated area. In order to determine the stability of the laser welded samples a three point bending test was used. Thereby, we identified that the maximal achievable breaking strength is limited by laser induced stress surrounding the modified material. To minimize the amount of stress bursts of laser pulses or an post processing annealing step can be applied. Besides fused silica, we welded borosilicate glasses and glasses with a low thermal expansion coefficient. Even the welding of different glass combinations is possible demonstrating the versatility of ultrashort pulse induced laser welding.

  18. Upconverted fluorescence in Er-doped ZBLAN glasses for high efficiency solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Bastian; Ahrens, Bernd; Johnson, Jacqueline A.; Miclea, Paul T.; Schweizer, Stefan

    2009-08-01

    Transparent erbium-doped fluorozirconate (FZ) glasses are attractive systems for upconversion-based solar cells. Upconverted fluorescence intensity vs. excitation power dependence was investigated for a series of erbium-doped FZ glasses. It was found that the ratio of the 2-photon upconverted emission in the near infrared at 980 nm to the 3-photon upconverted emissions in the visible at 530, 550, and 660 nm decreases with increasing excitation power. The integrated upconverted fluorescence intensity per excitation power shows "saturation" upon increasing the excitation power, while the point of saturation shifts to lower excitation power with increasing erbium doping level. To demonstrate the potential of these upconverters for photovoltaic applications, the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of a commercial monocrystalline silicon solar cell with an Er-doped FZ glass on top of it was measured. For an excitation power of 1 mW at a wavelength of 1540 nm an EQE of 1.6% was found for a 9.1 mol% Er-doped FZ glass. The samples investigated were not optically coupled to the solar cell and no optical coating was applied to the glass surface.

  19. Emission and excitation mechanism of radiophotoluminescence in Ag{sup +}-activated phosphate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Y. [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, 3681 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1313 (Japan); Advanced Materials, Science Research and Development Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Hakusann-shi, Ishikawa-ken 924-0838 (Japan); Kinoshita, K.; Koyama, S.; Takei, Y. [Advanced Materials, Science Research and Development Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Hakusann-shi, Ishikawa-ken 924-0838 (Japan); Nanto, H., E-mail: hnanto@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.j [Advanced Materials, Science Research and Development Center, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 3-1 Yatsukaho, Hakusann-shi, Ishikawa-ken 924-0838 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, 3681 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1313 (Japan); Sakakura, M.; Shimotsuma, Y.; Miura, K.; Hirao, K. [Department of Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, A3-119 Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto-hu 615-8510 (Japan)

    2010-07-21

    The objective of this study is to investigate the emission mechanism of radiophotoluminescence (RPL) in the Ag{sup +}-doped phosphate glass (glass dosimeter), which is now used as the individual radiation dosimeter, because the emission mechanism of RPL in the glass dosimeter was not fully understood. Optical properties such as RPL emission and excitation spectra and change of RPL spectrum as a function of X-ray irradiation dose were measured for commercially available glass dosimeter. In this study, we discuss the emission mechanism of two RPL peaks at about 2.70 eV (460 nm) and 2.21 eV (560 nm), based on the fact that electrons and holes produced by X-ray irradiation are trapped at Ag{sup +} ions to produce Ag{sup 0} and Ag{sup 2+} ions, respectively, when the Ag{sup +}-doped phosphate glass is exposed to X-ray. We propose the emission mechanism of RPL peaks at about 2.70 and 2.21 eV, regarding Ag{sup 2+} and Ag{sup 0} ions.

  20. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  1. Antibacterial effects of glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSchepper, E J; White, R R; von der Lehr, W

    1989-04-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been shown to possess antimicrobial activity. Proposed mechanisms of action include acidity and fluoride. It was the purpose of this study to determine the antimicrobial effect of 11 glass ionomer cements, their individual powder and liquid components and one resin-bonded liner containing high fluoride ionomer glass against Streptococcus mutans #6715. The role of fluoride and pH in the antibacterial activity was also studied. Using agar diffusion assay methodology, the following results were obtained. All of the glass ionomer cements were inhibitory against S. mutans. The antibacterial cements and slurries that were tested for fluoride, released the ion in excess of reported minimum inhibitory values. The antimicrobial activity of the liquid components, that were tested for the effects of pH changes, was totally lost when the pH was adjusted to 5. The resin bonded liner was inactive against S. mutans and did not release inhibitory concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that freshly-mixed glass ionomer cements are antimicrobial against S. mutans and that the mechanism of action is probably a function of both fluoride and pH although additional factors may be involved.

  2. Microstructural characterization and mechanical properties of self-reinforced Si3N4 ceramics containing high oxynitride glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuetao Luo; Lifu Chen; Qianjun Huang; Litong Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Self-reinforced Si3N4 ceramics containing high oxynitride glass have been fabricated by the control of microstructure evolution and a-Si3N4 grain growth. The effects of the size distribution of the elongated a-Si3N4 grains, and the a-Si3N4 grain growth as well as the oxynitride glass chemical characteristic on the microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The experimental results show that the a-Si3N4 grains in high oxynitride glass grow to elongated rod-like crystals and form the stereo-network structure. Under the sintering conditions of 1800℃ and 60 min, a quite uniform microstructure with an average aspect ratio of 6.5temperature fracture toughness because of its high softening temperature and high viscosity. In the present material, the crack deflection and pullout of the elongated rod-like a-Si3N4 grains are the primary toughening mecl anisms.

  3. High-Efficiency Glass and Printable Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Water-Based Electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Moudam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a flexible and glass dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC with water-based electrolyte solutions is described. High concentrations of alkylamidazoliums were used to overcome the deleterious effect of water and, based on this variable, pure water-based electrolyte DSSCs were tested displaying the highest recorded efficiency so far of 3.45% and 6% for flexible and glass cells, respectively, under a simulated air mass 1.5 solar spectrum illumination at 100 mWcm−2. An improvement in the Jsc with high water content and the positive impact of GuSCN on the enhancement of the performance of pure water-based electrolytes were also observed.

  4. Effect of Ti(+4) on in vitro bioactivity and antibacterial activity of silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Ikhram, Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    A novel glass-ceramic series in (48-x) SiO2-36 CaO-4 P2O5-12 Na2O-xTiO2 (where x=0, 3.5, 7, 10.5 and 14mol %) system was synthesized by crystallization of glass powders, obtained by melt quenching technique. The differential scanning calorimetric analysis (DSC) was used to study the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of the as prepared glasses. The crystallization behaviour of glasses was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions, and qualitative phase analysis of glass-ceramics was made by X-ray diffraction. The in vitro bioactivity of synthesized glass-ceramics was studied in stimulated body fluid at 37°C under static condition for 24days. The formation of hydroxyl-carbonated apatite layer; evident of bioactivity of the material, was elucidated by XRD, FTIR, AAS, SEM and EDX analysis. The result showed that partial substitution of TiO2 with SiO2 negatively influenced bioactivity; it decreased with increase in concentration of TiO2. As Ti(+4) having stronger field strength as compared to Si(+4) so its replacement became the cause for reduction in degradation that in turn improved the chemical stability. The compressive strength was also enhanced with progress addition of TiO2 in the system. The antibacterial properties were examined against Staphylococcus Epidermidis. Strong antibacterial efficacy was observed with the addition of TiO2 in the system.

  5. Toward Understanding the Effect of Low-Activity Waste Glass Composition on Sulfur Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Muller, Isabelle S.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2014-10-01

    The concentration of sulfur in nuclear waste glass melter feed must be maintained below the point where salt accumulates on the melt surface. The allowable concentrations may range from 0.37 to over 2.05 weight percent (of SO3 on a calcined oxide basis). If the amount of sulfur exceeds its tolerance level a molten salt will accumulate and upset melter operations and potentially shorten melter useful life. Therefore relatively conservative limits have been placed on sulfur loading in melter feed which in-turn significantly impacts the amount of glass that will be produced, in particular at the Hanford site. Crucible-scale sulfur solubility data and scaled melter sulfur tolerance data have been collected on simulated Hanford waste glasses over the last 15 years. These data were compiled and analyzed. A model was developed to predict the solubility of SO3 in glass based on 312 individual glass compositions. This model was shown to well represent the data, accounting for over 80% of the variation in data and was well validated. The model was also found to accurately predict the tolerance for sulfur in melter feed based on 19 scaled melter tests. The model is appropriate for control of waste glass processing which includes uncertainty quantification. The model also gives quantitative estimates of component concentration effects on sulfur solubility. The components that most increase sulfur solubility are Li2O > V2O5 ≈ TiO2 < CaO < P2O5 ≈ ZnO. The components that most decrease sulfur solubility are Cl > Cr2O3 > SiO2 ≈ ZrO2 > Al2O3.

  6. Glass–water interaction: Effect of high-valence cations on glass structure and chemical durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopf, J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Angeli, F.; Charpentier, Thibault M.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, Bernard P.; Windisch, Charles F.; Burton, Sarah D.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2016-05-15

    Borosilicate glass is a durable solid, but it dissolves when in contact with aqueous fluids. The dissolution mechanism, which involves a variety of sequential reactions that occur at the solid-fluid interface, has important implications for the corrosion resistance of industrial and nuclear waste glasses. In this study, spectroscopic measurements, dissolution experiments, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the effect of high–valence cations (HVC) on the mechanisms of glass dissolution under dilute and near-saturated conditions. Raman and NMR spectroscopy were used to determine the structural changes that occur in glass, specifically network formers (e.g., Al, Si, and B), with the addition of the HVC element hafnium in the Na2O–Al2O3–B2O3–HfO2–SiO2 system (e.g., Na/[Al+B] = 1.0 and HfO2/SiO2 from 0.0 to 0.42). Spectroscopic measurements revealed that increasing hafnium content decreases N4 (tetrahedral boron/total boron) and increases the amount of Si—O—Hf moieties in the glass. Results from flow–through experiments conducted under dilute and near–saturated conditions show a decrease of approximately 100× or more in the dissolution rate over the series from 0 to 20 mol% HfO2. Comparing the average steady-state rates obtained under dilute conditions to the rates obtained for near-saturated conditions reveals a divergence in the magnitude between the average steady state rates measured in these different conditions. The reason for this divergence was investigated more thoroughly using Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations indicate that the divergence in glass dissolution behavior under dilute and near-saturated conditions result from the stronger binding of Si sites that deposit on the surface from the influent when Hf is present in the glass. As a result, the residence time at the glass surface of these newly-formed Si sites is longer in the presence of Hf, which increases the density of anchor sites from which altered layers

  7. A new ester hardener for moulding sands with water glass having slower activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major-Gabryś

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The article takes into consideration the researches concerning inputting the new hardener to moulding sands with water glass, carried out in ester technology. Investigations are continuation of works connected to hardener based on carbonic acid’s esters, that significantly upgrades the ability of these moulding sands to mechanical reclamation. Its’ nuisance is short vitality. This is why, new investigations were taken to elaborate another hardener keeping the positive characteristics of the previous one and allowing the wider usage of technologies of loose self-hardened moulding sands with water glass.

  8. Flexible nanocrystal-coated glass fibers for high-performance thermoelectric energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Daxin; Yang, Haoran; Finefrock, Scott W; Wu, Yue

    2012-04-11

    Recent efforts on the development of nanostructured thermoelectric materials from nanowires (Boukai, A. I.; et al. Nature 2008, 451, (7175), 168-171; Hochbaum, A. I.; et al. Nature 2008, 451, (7175), 163-167) and nanocrystals (Kim, W.; et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, (4), 045901; Poudel, B.; et al. Science 2008, 320, (5876), 634-638; Scheele, M.; et al. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009, 19, (21), 3476-3483; Wang, R. Y.; et al. Nano Lett. 2008, 8, (8), 2283-2288) show the comparable or superior performance to the bulk crystals possessing the same chemical compositions because of the dramatically reduced thermal conductivity due to phonon scattering at nanoscale surface and interface. Up to date, the majority of the thermoelectric devices made from these inorganic nanostructures are fabricated into rigid configuration. The explorations of truly flexible composite-based flexible thermoelectric devices (See, K. C.; et al. Nano Lett. 2010, 10, (11), 4664-4667) have thus far achieved much less progress, which in principle could significantly benefit the conversion of waste heat into electricity or the solid-state cooling by applying the devices to any kind of objects with any kind of shapes. Here we report an example using a scalable solution-phase deposition method to coat thermoelectric nanocrystals onto the surface of flexible glass fibers. Our investigation of the thermoelectric properties yields high performance comparable to the state of the art from the bulk crystals and proof-of-concept demonstration also suggests the potential of wrapping the thermoelectric fibers on the industrial pipes to improve the energy efficiency.

  9. Feasibility Study of Using High-Temperature Raman Spectroscopy for On-Line Monitoring and Product Control of the Glass Vitrification Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Piepel, G.F.; Li, H.; Elliott, M.L.; Su, Y.

    1999-01-04

    A pulse-gating Raman spectroscopy setup was developed in this project. The setup was capable of performing in-situ high-temperature Raman measurements for glasses at temperatures as high as 1412 C. In the literature, high-temperature Raman measurements have only been performed on thin films of glass to minimize black-body radiation effects. The pulse-gating Raman setup allows making high-temperature measurements for bulk melts while effectively minimizing black-body radiation effects. A good correlation was found between certain Raman characteristic parameters and glass melt temperature for sodium silicate glasses measured in this project. Comparisons were made between the high-temperature Raman data from this study and literature data. The results suggest that an optimization of the pulse-gating Raman setup is necessary to further improve data quality (i.e., to obtain data with a higher signal-to-noise ratio). An W confocal Raman microspectrometer with continuous wave laser excitation using a 325 nm excitation line was evaluated selectively using a transparent silicate glass ad a deep-colored high-level waste glass in a bulk quantity. The data were successfully collected at temperatures as high as approximately 1500 C. The results demonstrated that the UV excitation line can be used for high-temperature Raman measurements of molten glasses without black-body radiation interference from the melt for both transparent and deep-color glasses. Further studies are needed to select the best laser system that can be used to develop high-temperature Raman glass databases.

  10. Gibbs Free Energy and Activation Energy of ZrTiAlNiCuSn Bulk Glass Forming Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfei SUN; Jun SHEN; Zhenye ZHU; Gang WANG; Dawei XING; Yulai GAO; Bide ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy differences between the supercooled liquid and the crystalline mixture for the (Zr52.5Ti5Al10- Ni14.6Cu17.9)(100-x)/100Snx ·(x=0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) glass forming alloys are estimated by introducing the equation proposed by Thompson, Spaepen and Turnbull. It can be seen that the Gibbs free energy differences decrease first as the increases of Sn addition smaller than 3, then followed by a decrease due to the successive addition of Sn larger than 3, indicating that the thermal stabilities of these glass forming alloys increase first and then followed by a decrease owing to the excessive addition of Sn. Furthermore, the activation energy of Zr52.5Ti5Al10Ni14.6Cu17.9 and (Zr5 2.5Ti5 Al10 Ni14.6 Cu 17.9)0.97Sn3 was evaluated by Kissinger equation. It is noted that the Sn addition increases the activation energies for glass transition and crystallization, implying that the higher thermal stability can be obtained by appropriate addition of Sn.

  11. ILAW Glass Testing for Disposal at IDF: Phase 1 Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papathanassiu, Adonia [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Barkatt, Aaron [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Joseph, Innocent [EnergySolutions Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Virteous State Lab.; Brown, Elvie E. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-04-11

    This document reports the results of the testing of phase 1 ORP LAW (low activity waste) glasses, also identified as enhanced LAW glasses. Testing involved are SPFT (Single Pass Flow Through), VHT (Vapor Hydration Test), and PCT (Product Consistency Test), along with the analytical tests (XRD and SEM-EDS). This report contains the data of the high waste loading ORP LAW glasses that will be used for the performance assessment of the IDF (Integrated Disposal Facility).

  12. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  13. Determination of absorption coefficients of glasses at high tempera-tures, by measuring the thermal emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenen, E.; Van der Tempel, L.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental setup built in 1995 measures the spectral absorptioncoefficient of glass as a function of temperature and wavelength bythe emissive method. The setup was improved, as well as the softwarefor processing the measurement data. The measurement results of quartzwere validated by compariso

  14. The highly insulated glass house. State report; Det hoejisolerede glashus. Statusrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.; Aggerholm, S.

    1997-11-01

    A house with glass facades and translucent thermo insulating glazing is being tested with regard to its thermal comfort, ventilation, interior architecture and energy conservation. The core of the house is constructed of concrete, and in this part the kitchen, bathroom etc. are located. Heating and ventilation are automated. Advantages and drawbacks (leaks, steam condensates etc) are summarized. (EG)

  15. Exploring high-strength glass-ceramic materials for upcycling of industrial wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Gu-Seul; Park, Hyun Seo; Seo, Sung Mo; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2015-11-01

    To promote the recycling of industrial waste and to develop value-added products using these resources, the possibility of manufacturing glass-ceramic materials of SiO2-CaO-Al2O3 system has been investigated by various heat treatment processes. Glass-ceramic materials with six different chemical compositions were prepared using steel industry slags and power plant waste by melting, casting and heat treatment. The X-ray diffraction results indicated that diopside and anorthite were the primary phases in the samples. The anorthite phase was formed in SiO2-rich material (at least 43 wt%). In CaO-rich material, the gehlenite phase was formed. By the differential scanning calorimetry analyses, it was found that the glass transition point was in the range of 973-1023 K, and the crystallization temperature was in the range of 1123-1223 K. The crystallization temperature increased as the content of Fe2O3 decreased. By the multi-step heat treatment process, the formation of the anorthite phase was enhanced. Using FactSage, the ratio of various phases was calculated as a function of temperature. The viscosities and the latent heats for the samples with various compositions were also calculated by FactSage. The optimal compositions for glass-ceramics materials were discussed in terms of their compressive strength, and micro-hardness.

  16. Determination of absorption coefficients of glasses at high tempera-tures, by measuring the thermal emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loenen, E.; Van der Tempel, L.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental setup built in 1995 measures the spectral absorptioncoefficient of glass as a function of temperature and wavelength bythe emissive method. The setup was improved, as well as the softwarefor processing the measurement data. The measurement results of quartzwere validated by compariso

  17. A New Ni-Based Metallic Glass with High Thermal Stability and Hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Hitit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Glass forming ability (GFA, thermal stability and microhardness of Ni51−xCuxW31.6B17.4 (x = 0, 5 metallic glasses have been investigated. For each alloy, thin sheets of samples having thickness of 20 µm and 100 µm were synthesized by piston and anvil method in a vacuum arc furnace. Also, 400 µm thick samples of the alloys were synthesized by suction casting method. The samples were investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Crystallization temperature of the base alloy, Ni51W31.6B17.4, is found to be 996 K and 5 at.% copper substitution for nickel increases the crystallization temperature to 1063 K, which is the highest value reported for Ni-based metallic glasses up to the present. In addition, critical casting thickness of alloy Ni51W31.6B17.4 is 100 µm and copper substitution does not have any effect on critical casting thickness of the alloys. Also, microhardness of the alloys are found to be around 1200 Hv, which is one of the highest microhardness values reported for a Ni-based metallic glass until now.

  18. Viscosity of lead borate glasses in the region of high PbO concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarova, N.V.; Nemilov, S.V.; Davydenko, L.S.

    1988-05-01

    It has been established that glasses of the PbO-B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system containing more than 65 mole% of PbO melted from different reagents (PbO and Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/) under comparable conditions with fairly rapid melting are characterized by distinctive viscosity parameters. The glasses melted from Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ have a steeper temperature dependence of viscosity with /eta/ 10/sup 11/ P; this is due to the absence of equilibrium in the redox reactions in the system when Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ is used as the batch material for the melting. The cast glass, even after careful agitation of the melt, showed nonuniformity of the chemical composition. The temperature dependence of the viscosity in the region of 10/sup 13/-10/sup 9/ P of glasses melted from PbO or Pb/sub 3/O/sub 4/ but in conditions which provide for the removal of excess oxygen is identical.

  19. Broad-spectrum bactericidal activity of Ag(2)O-doped bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellantone, Maria; Williams, Huw D; Hench, Larry L

    2002-06-01

    Bioactive glass has found extensive application as an orthopedic and dental graft material and most recently also as a tissue engineering scaffold. Here we report an initial investigation of the in vitro antibacterial properties of AgBG, a novel bioactive glass composition doped with Ag(2)O. The bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties of this new material and of two other bioactive glass compositions, 45S5 Bioglass and BG, have been studied by using Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus as test microorganisms. Concentrations of AgBG in the range of 0.05 to 0.20 mg of AgBG per ml of culture medium were found to inhibit the growth of these bacteria. Not only was AgBG bacteriostatic, but it also elicited a rapid bactericidal action. A complete bactericidal effect was elicited within the first hours of incubation at AgBG concentrations of 10 mg ml(-1). 45S5 Bioglass and BG had no effect on bacterial growth or viability. The antibacterial action of AgBG is attributed exclusively to the leaching of Ag(+) ions from the glass matrix. Analytical measurements rule out any contribution to AgBG-mediated bacterial killing by changes in pH or ionic strength or the dissolution of other ionic species from the biomaterials. Our observations of the dissolution profiles of Ag(+) from AgBG in the presence and absence of bacteria are consistent with silver accumulation by the bacteria.

  20. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  1. Red light generation through the lead boro-telluro-phosphate glasses activated by Eu3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, S.; Marimuthu, K.; Suriya Murthy, N.; Muralidharan, G.

    2016-09-01

    Lead boro-telluro-phosphate glasses containing 0.05 to 2.0 wt% of Eu3+ ions were prepared through melt quenching technique. Structural characteristics of title glasses were identified through XRD, FTIR and Raman studies. The optical properties of the prepared glasses were studied using UV-Vis-NIR absorption and photoluminescence spectra. From the resultant spectra, we have obtained the bonding parameters (δ), nephelauxetic ratio (β), direct and indirect band gaps and Urbach energy (ΔE) values. A deep red luminescence due to 5D0 → 7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions could be observed for the title glasses. The local site symmetry around the Eu3+ ions and the degree of Eu3+-O2- covalence were assessed from the luminescence intensity ratio of 5D0 → 7F2/5D0 → 7F1 transitions. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters, calculated from the luminescence spectra, were used to estimate the radiative parameters like transition probability (A), branching ratio (βexp, βcal) and stimulated emission cross-section (σPE) concerning the 5D0 → 7FJ (J = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4) transitions. The important laser parameters, gain bandwidth and optical gain are also estimated. The decay curves associated with the transition from 5D0 state was found to be single-exponential at all Eu3+ ion concentrations. CIE colour coordinates and colour purity of the prepared glasses were estimated from the CIE chromaticity diagram.

  2. Measurements of liquid and glass structures using in-situ high energy x-ray and neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Benmore, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Skinner, Lawrie [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Tumber, Sonia [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Jennings, G [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Santodonato, Louis J [ORNL; Jin, D [Materials Development, Inc., Evanston, IL; Du, Jincheng [University of North Texas; Parise, John B [Stony Brook University (SUNY)

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of high temperature molten materials and their evolution to the amorphous state is often hampered by unwanted reactions with container surfaces. This work used aerodynamic levitation in combination with laser beam heating to study high melting point materials that can form supercooled liquids or glasses. Details of the instruments that are being used at the Advanced Photon Source and the Spallation Neutron Source to study molten oxides with high energy x-ray scattering and neutron diffraction with isotope substitution are presented. Examples of measurements are used to illustrate the use of the instruments. Plans for further development and application of the capabilities are presented.

  3. Searching for high-k RE2O3 nanoparticles embedded in SiO2 glass matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.; Lin, Y. H.; Kao, T. H.; Chou, C. C.; Yang, H. D.

    2012-03-01

    Significant experimental effort has been explored to search and characterize high-k materials with magnetodielectric effect (MDE) of series of rare earth (RE) oxide (RE2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in SiO2 glass matrix by a sol-gel route. Properly annealed sol-gel glass (in which RE = Sm, Gd, and Er) shows colossal response of dielectric constant along with diffuse phase transition and MDE around room temperature. The radial distribution functions, reconstructed from extended x-ray absorption fine structure, show the shortening of RE3 + -O depending on the RE2O3 NP size, which is consistent with oxygen vacancy induced dielectric anomaly. The magnetoresistive MDE is very much conditioned by magnetic property of RE2O3 NP grain, the degree of deformation of the lattice and constituent host.

  4. Kinematic analysis of the daily activity of drinking from a glass in a population with cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de los Reyes-Guzmán Ana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-dimensional kinematic analysis equipment is a valuable instrument for studying the execution of movement during functional activities of the upper limbs. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinematic differences in the execution of a daily activity such as drinking from a glass between two groups of patients with tetraplegia and a control group. Methods A total of 24 people were separated into three groups for analysis: 8 subjects with metameric level C6 tetraplegia, 8 subjects with metameric level C7 tetraplegia and 8 control subjects (CG. A set of active markers that emit infrared light were positioned on the upper limb. Two scanning units were used to record the sessions. The activity of drinking from a glass was broken down into a series of clearly identifiable phases to facilitate analysis. Movement times, velocities, and the joint angles of the shoulder, elbow and wrist in the three spatial planes were the variables analyzed. Results The most relevant differences between the three groups were in the wrist. Wrist palmar flexion during the back transport phase was greater in the patients with C6 and C7 tetraplegia than in the CG, whereas the highest wrist dorsal flexion values were in forward transport in the subjects with C6 or C7 tetraplegia, who required complete activation of the tenodesis effect to complete grasping. Conclusions A detailed description was made of the three-dimensional kinematic analysis of the task of drinking from a glass in healthy subjects and in two groups of patients with tetraplegia. This was a useful application of kinematic analysis of upper limb movement in a clinical setting. Better knowledge of the execution of this movement in each of these groups allows therapeutic recommendations to be specifically adapted to the functional deficit present. This information can be useful in designing wearable robots to compensate the performance of AVD, such as drinking, in people with

  5. Development and application of high-precision laser welding technology for manufacturing Ti alloy frames of glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. S.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Leem, B. C.; Shin, J. S.; Lee, D. H

    1999-12-01

    The research and development efforts of the high precision laser welding technology for manufacturing titanium alloy frames of glasses. For this purpose, laser welding device with the high beam quality is designed and fabricated, which consists of a optical fiber transmission part, a welding monitoring part and a welding controller. The welding nozzle and holding fixtures for manufacturing titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses. Titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses to be developed were experimentally manufactured by utilizing the laser welding using the optical fiber of GI 400 {mu}m. As a result, the seam welding with the bead width of 0.3 mm or less and the weld penetration of 0.3-0.4mm could be accomplished. The fundamental technology was established through design of welding jigs with a variety of configurations and adequate welding conditions. Also, for the purpose to enable the companies participating in this project to commercialize the developed technology acceleratedly, a training program for the engineers belonging to such companies was conducted along with the technology transfer through joint experiments with the engineers. (author)

  6. Method for Fabricating Textured High-Haze ZnO:Al Transparent Conduction Oxide Films on Chemically Etched Glass Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeongsik; Nam, Sang-Hun; Shin, Myunghun; Ju, Minkyu; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yu, Jung-Hoon; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Sunbo; Ahn, Shihyun; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    We developed a technique for forming textured aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) transparent conductive oxide (TCO) films on glass substrates, which were etched using a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF) and hydrochloric (HCl) acids. The etching depth and surface roughness increased with an increase in the HF content and the etching time. The HF-based residues produced insoluble hexafluorosilicate anion- and oxide impurity-based semipermeable films, which reduced the etching rate. Using a small amount of HCl dissolved the Ca compounds, helping to fragment the semipermeable film. This formed random, complex structures on the glass substrates. The angled deposition of three layers of ZnO:Al led to the synthesis of multiscaled ZnO:Al textures on the glass substrates. The proposed approach resulted in textured ZnO:Al TCO films that exhibited high transmittance (-80%) and high haze (> 40%) values over wavelengths of 400-1000 nm, as well as low sheet resistances (ZnO:Al textured TCO films exhibited photocurrents and cell efficiencies that were 40% higher than those of cells with conventional TCO films.

  7. Fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass by high fluence ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Geng, Feng; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Feng, Shiquan; Ren, Dahua; Cheng, Xinlu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-11-01

    In order to explore the damage mechanisms of K9 glass irradiated by high energy density ultraviolet laser, laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectra were investigated. Compared the fluorescence spectra of damaged area, undamaged area and sub-damaged area, it can be conclude that the fluorescence spectrum of sub-damaged area is different from the structure of the other two areas. Especially, the main peak of the spectra at 415 nm reveals the unique characteristics of K9 glass. The structure at the sub-damaged area enhances intensity of the Raman scattering spectra. Three peaks of the spectra at about 500 nm and two characteristic peaks at about 550 nm exhibit the characterization of damaged area. A peak of the Raman scattering spectra at 350 nm which related to water can be observed. The relationship between intensity of Raman scattering and laser intensity at 355 nm is investigated by confocal Raman microscopy. At sub-damage area, signal of Raman scattering is rather high and decreased dramatically with respect to energy density. The major band at about 1470 cm-1 sharpened and moved to higher frequency with densification. These phenomena demonstrate that the structure of sub-damaged area has some characterization compared with the damaged area. The investigation of defect induced fluorescence and Raman spectra on surface of K9 glass is important to explore the damage mechanisms of optical materials irradiated by ultraviolet laser irradiation at 355 nm.

  8. EFFECT OF DAILY FLUORIDE EXPOSURE ON FLUORIDE RELEASE BY HIGH STRENGTH GLASS IONOMER RESTORATIVE MATERIAL USED WITH ATRAUMATIC RESTORATIVE TECHNIQUE: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Mithra N.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An in-vitro study was done to evaluate the effect of fluoride exposure, fluoride release and recharging capability by High strength Glass Ionomer restorative material used with Atraumatic restorative technique. 20 specimens were divided into four groups of five specimens each. The results showed that High strength Glass ionomer cements (Fuji IX release fluoride, the greatest release takes place between 24- 48 hours.High viscous High Strength Glass ionomer cements have the ability to recharge by external sources like fluoridated dentifrices and varnishes and thus acts as a fluoride reservoir. The recommendation that individuals with a high caries rate and glass ionomer restoration should have fluoride treatment with dentifrice and varnish seems appropriate.

  9. Glass shards, pumice fragments and volcanic aerosol particles - diagenesis a recorder of volcanic activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Schroettner, H.; Poelt, P.; Delgado, H.

    2003-04-01

    Detailed SEM/EDS studies of Triassic (Southern Alps, A, I, Sl) and Miocene (Mixteca Alta, Mexico) tuffs revealed that volcanic glass shards can be replaced by zeolites (analcite), chlorites and smectites preserving the shape of primary shards (1). The Triassic pyroclastic deposits have been incorporated in the pre-Alpine burial diagenesis, the Miocene pyroclastic deposits are bentonites. The volcanologist is impressed by the circumstances that million years old pyroclast relict textures can be sized. Shape parameters obtained by image analysis can be compared with much younger pyroclastic deposits (2). Both deposits have not been effected by shearing. The alteration of pumice fragments of Triassic age is not a simple replacement process. Intergrowth of different illites and chlorites and probably vesicle filling by SiO2 and subsequent overgrowth make a reconstruction sometimes difficult. These processes are accompanied by the formation of REE-, Y- and Zr-bearing minerals as well as with the alteration of zircons. Studies of recently erupted ash from Popocatepetl volcano reveal the presence of a variety of µm-sized contact-metamorphosed clasts being a part of the volcanic ash (3). Such clasts should be present in many older pyroclastic deposits, especially where volcanoes had been situated on massive sedimentary units providing contact metamorphism in the realm of a magma chamber or during magma ascent. Volcanic aerosol particles collected in 1997 from the passively degassing plume of Popocatepetl volcano revealed in FESEM/EDS analysis (H. Schroettner and P. Poelt) a wide spectrum of fluffy, spherical and coagulated spherical particles (µm-sized). Under pre-vacuum conditions they remained stable for ca. 3 years (3). In nature the fate of these particles in the atmosphere is unknown. Are there relicts in marine, lacustrine sediments and ice cores, which could be used as proxies of volcanic activity? (1) Obenholzner &Heiken,1999. Ann.Naturhist.Mus.Wien, 100 A, 13

  10. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  11. Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar+ laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niry, M. D.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R.; Ahangary, A.; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y.

    2012-02-01

    Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar+ laser beam (intensity: 9.2 × 104 W/cm2) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

  12. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... laminated float glass beam is constructed and tested in four-point bending. The beam consist of 4 layers of glass laminated together with a slack steel band glued onto the bottom face of the beam. The glass parts of the tested beams are \\SI{1700}{mm} long and \\SI{100}{mm} high, and the total width of one...

  13. Implementing an Inexpensive and Accurate Introductory Gas Density Activity with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Patrick; Joseph, Christopher; Morey, Samantha; Santos Romo, Ana; Shope, Cullen; Strang, Jonathan; Yang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A simplified activity examined gas density while employing cost-efficient syringes in place of traditional glass bulbs. The exercise measured the density of methane, with very good accuracy and precision, in both first-year high school and AP chemistry settings. The participating students were tasked with finding the density of a gas. The…

  14. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, R. F., E-mail: robsonfmuniz@yahoo.com.br [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Ligny, D. de [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Guyot, Y. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Baesso, M. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil)

    2016-06-28

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca{sub 3}Mg(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}] and diopside [CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} transition of Eu{sup 3+} was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  15. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, R. F.; de Ligny, D.; Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M.; Baesso, M. L.; Guyot, Y.

    2016-06-01

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca3Mg(SiO4)2] and diopside [CaMgSi2O6]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f65d1 → 4f7 transition of Eu2+ was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the 5D0 → 7FJ transition of Eu3+ was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  16. High-temperature expansion and knock-out properties of moulding sands with water glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major-Gabryś K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the topic of improving the knock-out properties of moulding sand with water glass and ester hardener. It is settled that the cause of worse knock-out properties of moulding sand can be brought by their thermal expansion in increased temperatures. There is a presentation of the influence of different additives, containing Al2O3, on moulding sands’ expansion in increased temperatures. Within the frames of research, there was an elaboration of the influence of authors own additive- Glassex, on the expansion phenomenon of moulding sands with water glass and ester hardener. It is concluded, that the new additive stops the expansion of moulding sands and as well it improves their knock-out properties.

  17. Effectiveness of high temperature innovative geometry fixed ceramic matrix regenerators used in glass furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołkowycki Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effectiveness of waste heat recovery regenerators equipped with innovative ceramic matrix forming an integral part of a real glass furnace. The paper full description of the regenerators’ matrix structure with its dimensions, thermo-physical properties and operating parameters is included experimentally determined was the effectiveness of the regenerators has been descrbed using the obtained experimental data such as the operating temperature, gas flows as well as the gases generated during the liquid glass manufacturing process. The effectiveness values refer not only to the heating cycle when the regenerator matrix is heated by combustion gases but also to the cooling cycle in which the matrix is cooled as a result of changes in the direction of the flowing gas. On the basis of the determined effectiveness values for both cycles and measurement uncertainties it was possible, to calculate the weighted average efficiency for each of the regenerators.

  18. Effectiveness of high temperature innovative geometry fixed ceramic matrix regenerators used in glass furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołkowycki, Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the effectiveness of waste heat recovery regenerators equipped with innovative ceramic matrix forming an integral part of a real glass furnace. The paper full description of the regenerators' matrix structure with its dimensions, thermo-physical properties and operating parameters is included experimentally determined was the effectiveness of the regenerators has been descrbed using the obtained experimental data such as the operating temperature, gas flows as well as the gases generated during the liquid glass manufacturing process. The effectiveness values refer not only to the heating cycle when the regenerator matrix is heated by combustion gases but also to the cooling cycle in which the matrix is cooled as a result of changes in the direction of the flowing gas. On the basis of the determined effectiveness values for both cycles and measurement uncertainties it was possible, to calculate the weighted average efficiency for each of the regenerators.

  19. Development of alkali activated cements and concrete mixture design with high volumes of red mud

    OpenAIRE

    KRIVENKO PAVEL; O. Kovalchuk; PASKO ANTON; CROYMANS TOM; HULT MIKAEL; LUTTER GUILLAUME; VANDEVENNE N.; SCHREURS S.; Schroeyers, W.

    2017-01-01

    Dedicated cement compositions were formulated to enable the incorporation of large volume fractions of red mud in alkali activated cements, taking into account the role of the aluminosilicate phase in the processes of hydration and hardening. High volume red mud alkali activated cements were synthesized using a proper combination of red mud, low basic aluminosilicate compounds with a glass phase (blast-furnace slag) and additives selected from high-basic Ca-containing cements with a crystalli...

  20. Preparation and evaluation of a high-strength biocompatible glass-ionomer cement for improved dental restoratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, D; Zhao, J; Park, J; Chu, T M [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Yang, Y; Zhang, J T [Department of Phamacology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)], E-mail: dxie@iupui.edu

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a high-strength light-cured glass-ionomer cement (LCGIC). The polymer in the cement was composed of the 6-arm star-shape poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), which was synthesized using atom-transfer radical polymerization. The polymer was used to formulate with water and Fuji II LC filler to form LCGIC. Compressive strength (CS) was used as a screening tool for evaluation. Commercial glass-ionomer cement Fuji II LC was used as control. The results show that the 6-arm PAA polymer exhibited a lower viscosity in water as compared to its linear counterpart that was synthesized via conventional free-radical polymerization. This new LCGIC system was 48% in CS, 77% in diametral tensile strength, 95% in flexural strength and 59% in fracture toughness higher but 93.6% in shrinkage lower than Fuji II LC. An increasing polymer content significantly increased CS, whereas an increasing glass filler content increased neither yield strength nor ultimate CS except for modulus. During aging, the experimental cement showed a significant and continuous increase in yield strength, modulus and ultimate CS, but Fuji II LC only showed a significant increase in strength within 24 h. The experimental cement was very biocompatible in vivo to bone and showed little in vitro cytotoxicity. It appears that this novel LCGIC cement will be a better dental restorative because it demonstrated significantly improved mechanical strengths and better in vitro and in vivo biocompatibilities as compared to the current commercial LCGIC system.

  1. REDOX state analysis of platinoid elements in simulated high-level radioactive waste glass by synchrotron radiation based EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Nakada, Masami; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji; Akabori, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analyses were performed to evaluate REDOX (REDuction and OXidation) state of platinoid elements in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass samples prepared under different conditions of temperature and atmosphere. At first, EXAFS functions were compared with those of standard materials such as RuO2. Then structural parameters were obtained from a curve fitting analysis. In addition, a fitting analysis used a linear combination of the two standard EXAFS functions of a given elements metal and oxide was applied to determine ratio of metal/oxide in the simulated glass. The redox state of Ru was successfully evaluated from the linear combination fitting results of EXAFS functions. The ratio of metal increased at more reducing atmosphere and at higher temperatures. Chemical form of rhodium oxide in the simulated glass samples was RhO2 unlike expected Rh2O3. It can be estimated rhodium behaves according with ruthenium when the chemical form is oxide.

  2. Fast Response and High Sensitivity ZnO/glass Surface Acoustic Wave Humidity Sensors Using Graphene Oxide Sensing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weipeng; He, Mei; Meng, Nan; He, Xingli; Wang, Wenbo; Chen, Jinkai; Shi, Tianjin; Hasan, Tawfique; Xu, Zhen; Xu, Yang; Luo, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    We report ZnO/glass surface acoustic wave (SAW) humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response using graphene oxide sensing layer. The frequency shift of the sensors is exponentially correlated to the humidity change, induced mainly by mass loading effect rather than the complex impedance change of the sensing layer. The SAW sensors show high sensitivity at a broad humidity range from 0.5%RH to 85%RH with SAW humidity sensors, complemented with full humidity range measurement, highlights their potential in a wide range of applications.

  3. A Novel SOFC/SOEC Sealing Glass with a Low SiO2 Content and a High Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    the amount of Si emission, a low Si containing sealing glass (chemical composition: 50 mol% CaO, 20 mol% ZnO, 20 mol% B2O3 and 10 mol% SiO2) was developed at DTU. In this work, the results from thermal characterization, the crystallization behavior of the glass and the long-term stability and adhesion......Solid oxide cells require seals that can function in harsh, elevated temperature environments. In addition, a low Si content can be advantageous, since Si impurities from the glass sealant can be transported to the active fuel electrode and poison the Ni-YSZ triple phase boundaries. To reduce...

  4. A Novel SOFC/SOEC Sealing Glass with a Low SiO2 Content and a High Thermal Expansion Coefficient  

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Agersted, Karsten; Zielke, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    phase boundaries. To reduce the amount of Si emission, a low Si containing sealing glass (chemical composition: 48 mol% CaO, 19 mol% ZnO, 21 mol% B2O3 and 12 mol% SiO2) was developed at DTU. In this presentation, the results from thermal characterization, like thermal expansion coefficient, glass......Solid oxide cells require seals that can function in harsh, elevated temperature environments. In the case of solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC), also a low Si content is desired, since Si impurities from the glass sealing can be transported to the active fuel electrode and poison the Ni-YSZ triple...

  5. Spectroscopic properties of Nd-doped phosphate glass with a high emission cross section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛艳丽; 孙真荣; 蒋秀丽; 邓佩珍; 干福熹

    2002-01-01

    Neodymium doped phosphate glasses have been prepared by the semi-continuous melting technique. Their ab-sorption and emission spectra have been recorded at room temperature. The Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to ewluate the stimulated emission cross sections of 4F3/2→4I11/2 transition for Nd3+. The higher stimulated emission cross section, 4.0×10-20cm2, is obtained. The fluorescence decays of the 4F3/2→411/2 transition of Nd3+ are mea-sured for the samples doped (0.7-10) wt% of Nd2O3 at room temperature. The concentration quenching of Nd-doped phosphate glass is mainly attributed to cross-relaxation and energy migration. The site-dependent properties of fluores-cence spectra and the fluorescence lifetime of the Nd3+-doped phosphate glass (with 2.2wt% Nd2O3) are studied using laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing techniques, and the site-to-site variations of optical properties are observed at low temperature.

  6. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests supporting refinement of the Nepheline Model for the high aluminum Hanford glass composition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated high level waste (HLW) glasses fabricated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing nepheline crystallization study. The results of these analyses will be used to improve the ability to predict crystallization of nepheline as a function of composition and heat treatment for glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations.

  7. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Using Water Glass and Aluminum Sulfate to Treat Complications in High Liquid Limit Soil Subgrade

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using water glass and aluminum sulfate to treat high liquid limit soil subgrade diseases is studied through laboratory experiments, and the following results were observed. After improving the high liquid limit clay with water glass and aluminum sulfate, the liquid limit decreases, the plastic limit increases, and the plasticity index decreases. Compared with untreated soil, the clay content of the improved soil decreases, while the silt and coarse contents increase. The ab...

  8. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  9. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  10. Competition between two types of anti-Stokes emission in Ho{sup 3+}-activated ZBLAN glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, Cz; Wisniewski, K; Piatkowski, D [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Malinowski, M [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: koepke@fizyka.umk.pl

    2009-01-21

    A competition between two anti-Stokes emissions has been observed and interpreted in ZBLAN glass activated by Ho{sup 3+} ions. The first anti-Stokes emission intensity was seen to increase with temperature, whereas another, upconverted emission, was seen to decrease under the same conditions. Both observed tendencies are believed to be caused by the same effect: the multiphonon anti-Stokes excitation of the state responsible for the first emission. Analysis of the kinetics and fits of the theoretical model to experimental data are presented.

  11. Comparison between different types of glass and aluminum as containers for irradiation samples by neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroor, A; El-Dine, N W; El-Shershaby, A; Abdel-Haleem, A S

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of glass and four different kinds of aluminum sheet have been analyzed using neutron activation analysis. The irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1) and a hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detection system were used for the analysis. Among the 34 identified elements, the isotopes 60Co, 65Zn, 110mAg, 123mTe, 134Cs, 152Eu and 182Ta are of special significance because of their long half-lives, providing a background interference for analyzed samples. A comparison between the different types of containers was made to select the preferred one for sample irradiation.

  12. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  13. Highly matched spectrum needed for photosynthesis in Ce{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} tri-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weirong; Gao, Huiping [School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute for Computational Materials Science, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Mao, Yanli, E-mail: ylmao@henu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Institute for Computational Materials Science, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2015-11-05

    A series of oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing CaF{sub 2} nano-crystals tri-doped with Ce{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} ions were prepared by high temperature melting method and subsequent heat treatment. The structural properties were examined by X-ray diffraction measurements. The absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass ceramics were investigated. Difference in erbium emission spectra between glass and glass ceramics had been studied. The emission bands originating from the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} state of Er{sup 3+} were enhanced when the CaF{sub 2} nano-crystal created. By down-converting the ultraviolet wavelength region (280∼400 nm) light and up-converting the near-infrared wavelength region (900∼1100 nm) light, the glass ceramics can also emit strong reddish orange emission. The emission spectra consisting of bluish violet (400∼500 nm) and reddish orange (640∼680 nm) bands match well with the action spectrum of photosynthesis and absorption spectra of chlorophylls. Our materials will be favored to promote the development of glass greenhouses for green plant. - Highlights: • Ce{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} tri-doped oxyfluoride glass ceramics were prepared by high temperature melting method. • 668 nm red emission was obtained under 320 nm, 380 nm and 980 nm excitation, respectively. • The emission of samples matched well with the spectrum for photosynthesis.

  14. Tin-phosphate glass anode for sodium ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Honma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical property of tin-phosphate (designate as GSPO glass anode for the sodium ion battery was studied. During the first charge process, sodium ion diffused into GSPO glass matrix and due to the reduction of Sn2+ to Sn0 state sodiated tin metal nano-size particles are formed in oxide glass matrix. After the second cycle, we confirmed the steady reversible reaction ∼320 mAh/g at 0–1 V cutoff voltage condition by alloying process in NaxSn4. The tin-phosphate glass is a promising candidate of new anode active material that realizes high energy density sodium ion batteries.

  15. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency.

  16. Molecular Mobility in Sugar Glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dries, van den I.J.

    2000-01-01

    Glasses are liquids that exhibit solid state behavior as a result of their extremely high viscosity. Regarding their application to foods, glasses play a role in the preservation of foods, due to their high viscosity and the concomitant low molecular mobility. This thesis focuses on sugar glasses. S

  17. Commercial high-level-waste management: options and economics. A comparative analysis of the ceramic and glass waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKisson, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Guon, J.; Recht, H.L.

    1983-02-25

    Results of an estimate of the waste management costs of the commercial high-level waste from a 3000 metric ton per year reprocessing plant show that the judicious use of the ceramic waste form can save about $2 billion during a 20-year operating campaign relative to the use of the glass waste form. This assumes PWR fuel is processed and the waste is encapsulated in 0.305-m-diam canisters with ultimate emplacement in a BWIP-type horizontal-borehole repository. The estimated total cost (capital and operating) of the management in the ceramic form is $2.0 billion, and that of the glass form is $4.0 billion. Waste loading and waste form density are the driving factors in that the low-waste loading (25%) and relatively low density (3.1 g/cm/sup 3/) characteristic of the glass form require several times as many canisters to handle a given waste throughput than is needed for the ceramic waste form whose waste loading capability exceeds 60% and whose waste density is nominally 5.2 g/cm/sup 3/) characteristic of the glass form requires several times as many canisters to handle a given waste throughput than is needed for the ceramic waste form whose waste loading capability exceeds 60% and whose waste density is nominally 5.2 g/cm/sup 3/. The minimum-cost ceramic waste form has a 60 wt. % waste loading of commercial high-level waste and requires 25 years storage before emplacement in basalt with delayed backfill. Because of the process flexibility allowed by the availability of the high-waste loading of the ceramic form, the intermediate-level liquid waste stream can be mixed with the high-level liquid waste stream and economically processed and emplaced. The cost is greater by $0.3 billion than that of the best high-level liquid waste handling process sequence ($2.3 billion vs $2.0 billion), but this difference is less than the cost of the separate disposal of the intermediate-level liquid waste.

  18. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V., E-mail: budruev@gmail.com

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  19. Thin monolithic glass shells for future high angular resolution and large collecting area x-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M. M.; Citterio, O.; Ghigo, M.; Mattaini, E.; Pareschi, G.; Parodi, G.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most difficult requests to be accomplished from the technological point of view for next generation x-ray telescopes is to combine high angular resolution and effective area. A significant increase of effective area can be reached with high precision but at the same time thin (2-3 mm thickness for mirror diameters of 30-110 cm) glass mirror shells. In the last few years the Brera Observatory has lead a development program for realizing this kind of monolithic thin glass shell. The fused silica has been chosen as shell substrate due to its thermal and mechanical properties. To bring the mirror shells to the needed accuracy, we have adopted a deterministic direct polishing method (already used for past missions as Einstein, Rosat, Chandra) to ten time thinner shells. The technological challenge has been solved using a temporary stiffening structure that allows the handling and the machining of so thin glass shells. The results obtained with a prototype shell at an intermediate stage of its development (17'' HEW measured in full illumination mode with x-ray) indicate that the working concept is feasible and can be further exploited using the very large Ion Beam Facility available in our labs for the final high accuracy figuring of the thin shells. In this paper we present the required tolerances for the shell realization, the shells production chain flow and the ion beam facility up grading. Forecast on figuring time and expected performances of the figuring will also be given on the basis on the metrological data collected during past shell development.

  20. High-pitch metal-on-glass technology for pad pitch adaptation between detectors and readout electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Ullán, Miguel; Campabadal, Francesca; Fleta, Celeste; Garcia, Carmen; Gonzalez, Francisco; Bernabeu, Jose

    2004-01-01

    Modern high-energy physics and astrophysics strip detectors have increased channel density to levels at which their connection with readout electronics has become very complex due to high pad pitch. Also, direct wire bonding is prevented by the fact that typically detector's pad pitch and electronics' pad pitch do not match. A high- pitch metal-on-glass technology is presented, that allows pad pitch adaptation between detectors and readout electronics. It consists of high-density metal lines on top of an insulating glass substrate. A photoresist layer is deposited covering the metal tracks for passivation and protection The technology is tested for conductivity, bondability, bonding pull force, peel off, and radiation hardness, and it is an established technology in the clean room of the CNM Institute in Barcelona. This technology has been chosen by the ATLAS Collaboration for the pad pitch adapters (PPA) of the SCT Endcap Modules, by a Compton camera project, and by other HEP groups for interconnection betwe...

  1. Low-loss waveguides fabricated in BK7 glass by high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Shane M; Ng, Mi Li; Bonse, Jörn; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre; Zhang, Haibin; Rosenfeld, Arkadi; Herman, Peter R

    2008-04-20

    For the first time femtosecond-laser writing has inscribed low-loss optical waveguides in Schott BK7 glass, a commercially important type of borosilicate widely used in optical applications. The use of a variable repetition rate laser enabled the identification of a narrow processing window at 1 MHz repetition rate with optimal waveguides exhibiting propagation losses of 0.3 dB/cm and efficient mode matching to standard optical fibers at a 1550 nm wavelength. The waveguides were characterized by complementary phase contrast and optical transmission microscopy, identifying a micrometer-sized guiding region within a larger complex structure of both positive and negative refractive index variations.

  2. High efficiency metal marking with CO2 laser and glass marking with excimer laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastue, Jens; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    with a thoroughly tested ray-tracing model is presented and compared with experimental results. Special emphasis is put on two different applications namely marking in metal with TEA-CO2 laser and marking in glass with excimer laser. The results are evaluated on the basis of the achievable energy enhancement......Today, mask based laser materials processing and especially marking is widely used. However, the energy efficiency in such processes is very low [1].This paper gives a review of the results, that may be obtained using the energy enhancing technique [1]. Results of simulations performed...

  3. Castable Bulk Metallic Glass Strain Wave Gears: Towards Decreasing the Cost of High-Performance Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Polit-Casillas, Raul; Roberts, Scott N.; Borgonia, John-Paul; Dillon, Robert P.; Hilgemann, Evan; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Montemayor, Lauren; Suh, Jong-Ook; Hoff, Andrew; Carpenter, Kalind; Parness, Aaron; Johnson, William L.; Kennett, Andrew; Wilcox, Brian

    2016-11-01

    The use of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) as the flexspline in strain wave gears (SWGs), also known as harmonic drives, is presented. SWGs are unique, ultra-precision gearboxes that function through the elastic flexing of a thin-walled cup, called a flexspline. The current research demonstrates that BMGs can be cast at extremely low cost relative to machining and can be implemented into SWGs as an alternative to steel. This approach may significantly reduce the cost of SWGs, enabling lower-cost robotics. The attractive properties of BMGs, such as hardness, elastic limit and yield strength, may also be suitable for extreme environment applications in spacecraft.

  4. Design of photonic crystal fibers with highly nonlinear glasses for four-wave-mixing based telecom applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanka, Jiri

    2008-12-08

    A fully-vectorial mode solver based on the finite element method is employed in a combination with the downhill simplex method the dispersion optimization of photonic crystal fibers made from highly nonlinear glasses. The nonlinear fibers are designed for telecom applications such as parametric amplification, wavelength conversion, ultra-fast switching and regeneration of optical signals. The optimization is carried in terms of the zero dispersion wavelength, dispersion magnitude and nonlinear coefficient and confinement loss in the wavelength range around 1.55 microm. We restrict our work to the index-guiding fiber structures a small number of hexagonally arrayed air holes.

  5. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    As well as accelerators to boost particles up to high energy, physicists need detectors to see what happens when those particles collide. This lead glass block is part of a CERN detector called OPAL. OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  6. Glass for Solid State Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Glass film has low intrinsic compressive stress for isolating active layers of magnetic-bubble and other solid-state devices. Solid-state device structure incorporates low-stress glasses as barrier and spacer layers. Glass layers mechanically isolate substrate, conductor, and nickel/iron layers.

  7. Effect of the Medium Composition on the Zn2+ Lixiviation and the Antifouling Properties of a Glass with a High ZnO Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Esteban-Tejeda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution of an antimicrobial ZnO-glass in the form of powder and in the form of sintered pellets were studied in water, artificial seawater, biological complex media such as common bacterial/yeast growth media (Luria Bertani (LB, yeast extract, tryptone, and human serum. It has been established that the media containing amino acids and proteins produce a high lixiviation of Zn2+ from the glass due to the ability of zinc and zinc oxide to react with amino acids and proteins to form complex organic compounds. The process of Zn2+ lixiviation from the glass network has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. From these results we can state that the process of lixiviation of Zn2+ from the glass network is similar to the one observed in sodalime glasses, where Na+ is lixiviated to the media first and the fraction of Zn that acts as modifiers (~2/3 is lixiviated in second place. After the subsequent collapse of the outer surface glass layer (about 200–300 nm thick layer the dissolution process starts again. Antifouling properties against different bacteria (S. epidermidis, S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and M. lutea have also been established for the glass pellets.

  8. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests supporting refinement of the Nepheline model for the high aluminum Hanford Glass composition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Mcclane, D. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for a series of simulated HLW glasses fabricated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing nepheline crystallization study. The results of these analyses will be used to improve the ability to predict crystallization of nepheline as a function of composition and heat treatment for glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations.

  9. Leaching of actinides and technetium from simulated high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.J.; Harvey, C.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1979-08-01

    Leach tests were conducted using a modified version of the IAEA procedure to study the behavior of glass waste-solution interactions. Release rates were determined for Tc, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Si in the following solutions: WIPP B salt brine, NaCl (287 g/l), NaCl (1.76 g/1), CaCl/sub 2/ (1.66 g/l), NaHCO/sub 3/ (2.52 g/l), and deionized water. The leach rates for all elements decreased an order of magnitude from their initial values during the first 20 to 30 days leaching time. The sodium bicarbonate solution produced the highest elemental release rates, while the saturated salt brine and deionized water in general gave the lowest release. Technetium has the highest initial release of all elements studied. The technetium release rates, however, decreased by over four orders of magnitude in 150 days of leaching time. In the prepared glass, technetium was phase separated, concentrating on internal pore surfaces. Neptunium, in all cases except CaCl/sub 2/ solution, shows the highest actinide release rate. In general, curium and uranium have the lowest release rates. The range of actinide release rates is from 10/sup -5/ to 10/sup -8/ g/cm/sup 2//day. 25 figures, 7 tables.

  10. Tapered Glass-Fiber Microspike: High-Q Flexural Wave Resonator and Optically Driven Knudsen Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennetta, Riccardo; Xie, Shangran; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2016-12-01

    Appropriately designed optomechanical devices are ideal for making ultra-sensitive measurements. Here we report a fused-silica microspike that supports a flexural resonance with a quality factor greater than 100 000 at room temperature in vacuum. Fashioned by tapering single-mode fiber (SMF), it is designed so that the core-guided optical mode in the SMF evolves adiabatically into the fundamental mode of the air-glass waveguide at the tip. The very narrow mechanical linewidth (20 mHz) makes it possible to measure extremely small changes in resonant frequency. In a vacuum chamber at low pressure, the weak optical absorption of the glass is sufficient to create a temperature gradient along the microspike, which causes it to act as a microscopic Knudsen pump, driving a flow of gas molecules towards the tip where the temperature is highest. The result is a circulating molecular flow within the chamber. Momentum exchange between the vibrating microspike and the flowing molecules causes an additional restoring force that can be measured as a tiny shift in the resonant frequency. The effect is strongest when the mean free path of the gas molecules is comparable with the dimensions of the vacuum chamber. The system offers a novel means of monitoring the behavior of weakly absorbing optomechanical sensors operating in vacuum.

  11. Glass interface effect on high-strain-rate tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The glass interface effect on dynamic tensile response of a soft polyurethane elastomeric polymer material has been investigated by subjecting a glass-polymer system of this polymer material matrix embedded a single 3 mm-diameter glass particle to impact loading in a split Hopkinson tension bar (SHT

  12. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  13. High haze textured surface B-doped ZnO-TCO films on wet-chemically etched glass substrates for thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinliang, Chen; Jieming, Liu; Jia, Fang; Ze, Chen; Ying, Zhao; Xiaodan, Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Textured glass substrates with crater-like feature sizes of ˜5-30 μm were obtained using the chemical etching method through adjusting the treatment round (R). Pyramid-like boron-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:B) films with feature sizes of ˜300-800 nm were deposited on the etched glass substrates by the metal organic chemical deposition (MOCVD) technique using water, diethylzinc and 1%-hydrogen-diluted diborane. The ZnO:B films on the etched glass with micro/nano double textures presented a much stronger light-scattering capability than the conventional ZnO:B on the flat glass and their electrical properties changed little. Typical etched glass-3R/ZnO:B exhibited a high root mean square (RMS) roughness of ˜160 nm. The haze values at the wavelengths of 550 nm and 850 nm for etched glass-3R/ZnO:B sample were 61% and 42%, respectively. Finally, the optimized etched glass/ZnO:B was applied in the silicon (Si) based thin film solar cells. The high haze etched glass/ZnO:B substrates have potential merits for thin film solar cells. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Nos. 2011CBA00706, 2011CBA00707), the Tianjin Applied Basic Research Project and Cutting-Edge Technology Research Plan (No. 13JCZDJC26900), the Tianjin Major Science and Technology Support Project (No. 11TXSYGX22100), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA050302), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 65010341).

  14. Development of DMBZ-15 High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides as PMR-15 Replacements Given R&D 100 Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    PMR-15, a high-temperature polyimide developed in the mid-1970s at the NASA Lewis Research Center,1 offers the combination of low cost, easy processing, and good high-temperature performance and stability. It has been recognized as the leading polymer matrix resin for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites used in aircraft engine components. The state-of-the-art PMR-15 polyimide composite has a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 348 C (658 F). Since composite materials must be used at temperatures well below their glass-transition temperature, the long-term use temperatures of PMR-15 composites can be no higher than 288 C (550 F). In addition, PMR-15 is made from methylene dianiline (MDA), a known liver toxin. Concerns about the safety of workers exposed to MDA during the fabrication of PMR-15 components and about the environmental impact of PMR-15 waste disposal have led to the industry-wide implementation of special handling procedures to minimize the health risks associated with this material. These procedures have increased manufacturing and maintenance costs significantly and have limited the use of PMR-15 in commercial aircraft engine components.

  15. Biaxial Flexural Strength of High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Cements Heat-Cured with an LED Lamp during Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fabián Molina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding heat to glass ionomers during setting might improve mechanical properties. The aim was to compare the biaxial flexural strength (BFS between and within four glass ionomers, by time of exposure to a high-intensity LED light-curing unit. Materials and methods. Samples of Fuji 9 Gold Label, Ketac Molar Easymix, ChemFil Rock, and the EQUIA system were divided into three treatment groups (n=30: without heating (Group 1, heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm2 for 30 s while setting (Group 2, and heated with LED lamp of 1400 mW/cm2 for 60 s while setting (Group 3. Samples were stored for 48 hours in distilled water at 37°C until tested. BFS was tested, using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed, using ANOVA test with the Bonferroni correction (α=0.05. Heating the glass-ionomer cements with an LED curing light of 1400 mW/cm2 during setting for 30 s increased the BFS value of all GICs. No statistically significant difference in mean BFS scores was found between the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock at 30 s and 60 s. The mean BFS value was statistically significantly higher for the EQUIA system and ChemFil Rock than for Fuji 9 Gold Label and Ketac Molar Easymix at all exposure times.

  16. End-pumped Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with high energy and narrow pulse for glass carving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ming; Jin, Guang-yong; Tan, Xue-chun; Wu, Zhi-chao; Liang, Zhu

    2009-05-01

    In order to raise the accuracy of glass carving and improve deep cutting, a novel diode end-pumed solid-state laser is researched. Selecting proper volume of laser crytal, one continue wave laser diode which longitudinally pumped Nd:YAG crystal is performed and an applied optics coupling system is designed with self focusing.Computing with ray trace software and MATLAB software, the best parameter is obtained, so pumping beam is coupled efficiently to Nd:YAG.Used a Cr4+:YAG crystal with the singnal transmission of 82% and a line plane-concave cavity, nanosecond narrow pulse is gotten. After two thermal-electrical coolers kept the laser to work at constant temperature instead of water cooling, the volume of laser is markedly reduced. The method of thermal-electrical cooling could increase the system efficiency,achieve the effect of low mode output.Experimental results indicate that the maximum laser output energy in 1064 nm is 118mJ,pulse width is 5 ns, conversion efficiency from light to light is 15.7% under the condition of the incident power of 5 W and the diameter of the output laser spot is less than 1 mm. This end-pumped Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with the light output of high quality and long life, which has 0.01 mm accuracy after lens focusing can satisfy the glass carving with higher precision, rapid speed as well as easy control. It can be used in carving all kinds of glass and replace current CO2 laser.

  17. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full-scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  18. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  19. Shear stress measurements during high-speed impacts with sand and glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William

    2012-03-01

    Right-circular (φ 15 mm x 26 mm) and spherical (φ 10mm) projectiles were fired verticallydownward (300-1,000 m/s) into acrylic containers (φ 100-190 mm) containing either quartz Eglin sand or solid, amorphous glass beads. A variety of shearing conditions were observed; allowing estimation of stresses along the various shearing surfaces. Under certain conditions a false nose was formed of partially-crushed particles on the front of the projectile and the particulate media sheared along the false nose surface. The included angle of the false nose varies with impact velocity (up to a velocity of 375 m/s) and appears to be a residual artifact of initial impact conditions. An analytical model is presented to explain the false nose formation and stability during the projectile deceleration. Other impact conditions (especially on the front face of the spherical projectiles) resulted in shearing along the surface or surface abrasion.

  20. High-dimensional surprises neat the glass and the jamming transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The glass problem is notoriously hard and controversial. Even at the mean-field level, there is little agreement about how a fluid turns sluggish while exhibiting but unremarkable structural changes. It is clear, however, that the process involves self-caging, which provides an order parameter for the transition. It is also broadly assumed that this cage should have a Gaussian shape in the mean-field limit. Here we show that this ansatz does not hold, and explore its consequences. Non-Gaussian caging, for instance, persists all the way to the jamming limit of infinitely compressed hard spheres, which affects mechanical stability. We thus obtain new scaling relations, and establish clear mileposts for the emergence of a mean-field theory of jamming.

  1. Crystallization effect on rare-earth activated biocompatible glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balda, R.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.; Fernández, J.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we report the influence of the crystallization stage of the host matrix on the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in CaSiO3/Ca3(PO4)2 biocompatible eutectic glass-ceramics grown by the laser floating zone technique. The microstructural analysis shows that either a growth rate increase or a rod diameter decrease leads the system to a structural arrangement from three (two crystalline and one amorphous) to two phases (one crystalline and one amorphous). The crystalline phases correspond to apatite-like and Ca2SiO4 structures. Site-selective laser spectroscopy allows to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous environments for the Nd3+ ions and to correlate the spectroscopic properties with the microstructure of these eutectics.

  2. Structure of shock compressed model basaltic glass: Insights from O K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution 27Al NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo-Im; Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (UNLV); (SNU); (CIT); (CIW)

    2012-05-29

    The detailed atomic structures of shock compressed basaltic glasses are not well understood. Here, we explore the structures of shock compressed silicate glass with a diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di{sub 64}An{sub 36}), a common Fe-free model basaltic composition, using oxygen K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR spectroscopy and report previously unknown details of shock-induced changes in the atomic configurations. A topologically driven densification of the Di{sub 64}An{sub 36} glass is indicated by the increase in oxygen K-edge energy for the glass upon shock compression. The first experimental evidence of the increase in the fraction of highly coordinated Al in shock compressed glass is found in the {sup 27}Al NMR spectra. This unambiguous evidence of shock-induced changes in Al coordination environments provides atomistic insights into shock compression in basaltic glasses and allows us to microscopically constrain the magnitude of impact events or relevant processes involving natural basalts on Earth and planetary surfaces.

  3. Is there a glass ceiling for highly cited scientists at the top of research universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2010-12-01

    University leaders aim to protect, shape, and promote the missions of their institutions. I evaluated whether top highly cited scientists are likely to occupy these positions. Of the current leaders of 96 U.S. high research activity universities, only 6 presidents or chancellors were found among the 4009 U.S. scientists listed in the ISIHighlyCited.com database. Of the current leaders of 77 UK universities, only 2 vice-chancellors were found among the 483 UK scientists listed in the same database. In a sample of 100 top-cited clinical medicine scientists and 100 top-cited biology and biochemistry scientists, only 1 and 1, respectively, had served at any time as president of a university. Among the leaders of 25 U.S. universities with the highest citation volumes, only 12 had doctoral degrees in life, natural, physical or computer sciences, and 5 of these 12 had a Hirsch citation index m < 1.0. The participation of highly cited scientists in the top leadership of universities is limited. This could have consequences for the research and overall mission of universities.

  4. Ion-Exchange Interdiffusion Model with Potential Application to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Glass Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2016-05-05

    Abstract: Ion exchange is an integral mechanism influencing the corrosion of glasses. Due to the formation of alteration layers in aqueous conditions, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the process of ion exchange from other processes, principally dissolution of the glass matrix. Therefore, we have developed a method to isolate alkali diffusion that involves contacting glass coupons with a solution of 6LiCl dissolved in functionally inert dimethyl sulfoxide. We employ the method at temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 °C with various glass formulations. Glass compositions include simulant nuclear waste glasses, such as SON68 and the international simple glass (ISG), glasses in which the nature of the alkali element was varied, and glasses that contained more than one alkali element. An interdiffusion model based on Fick’s second law was developed and applied to all experiments to extract diffusion coefficients. The model expands established models of interdiffusion to the case where multiple types of alkali sites are present in the glass. Activation energies for alkali ion exchange were calculated and the results are in agreement with those obtained in glass strengthening experiments but are nearly five times higher than values reported for diffusion-controlled processes in nuclear waste glass corrosion experiments. A discussion of the root causes for this apparent discrepancy is provided. The interdiffusion model derived from laboratory experiments is expected to be useful for modeling glass corrosion in a geological repository when the silicon concentration is high.

  5. Comparison of radon exposure assessment results: {sup 210}Po surface activity on glass objects vs. contemporary air radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, F. E-mail: francesco.bochicchio@iss.it; McLaughlin, J.P.; Walsh, C

    2003-06-01

    Radon exposure assessment in case-control studies on radon and lung cancer is generally based on contemporary radon concentration measurements, which can be affected by significant changes in the building structures or in living habits. Another method to estimate the radon exposure of the subjects is the recently developed retrospective dosimetry technique based on the {sup 210}Po surface activity from glass objects. In order to compare the results obtained by the two methods, a study has been carried out in a sample of 26 dwellings in Rome, with radon concentration values ranging from 28 to 623 Bq m{sup -3}. Retrospective detectors based on CR-39 and LR 115 were exposed on 50 glass objects in bedrooms and living rooms. The correlation factor between the two sets of data, after removing six extreme values, is 0.67, which is similar to results obtained in other validation studies of similar sample size. The correlation increases to 0.83 if the 21 objects exposed in non-smoky dwellings are selected, while it vanishes to -0.01 for the 23 objects exposed in smoky dwellings, suggesting quite larger variations of plate-out in presence of environmental tobacco smoke.

  6. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 1150{degrees}C volume 2: Chapters 12-16 and appendices A-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  7. Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115{degrees}C volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

    1994-12-01

    A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g} ), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

  8. High efficiency, high energy second-harmonic generation of Nd glass laser radiation in large aperture CsLiB sub 6 O sub 1 sub 0 crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kiriyama, H; Yamakawa, K

    2002-01-01

    We have demonstrated the generation of a high-energy green laser pulse using large aperture CsLiB sub 6 O sub 1 sub 0 (CLBO) crystals. A pulsed energy of 25 J at 532-nm was generated using the 1064-nm incident Nd:glass laser radiation with an energy of 34 J. High conversion efficiency of 74% at intensities of only 370 MW/cm sup 2 was obtained using a two-stage crystal architecture. This result represents the highest green pulse energy ever reported using the CLBO crystals. We discuss in detail the design and performance of SHG using CLBO crystals.

  9. Characterization of ancient glass excavated in Enez (Ancient Ainos) Turkey by combined Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyuz, Sevim, E-mail: s.akyuz@iku.edu.tr [Physics Department, Science and Letters Faculty, Istanbul Kultur University, Atakoy Campus, Bakirkoy 34156, Istanbul (Turkey); Akyuz, Tanil [Physics Department, Science and Letters Faculty, Istanbul Kultur University, Atakoy Campus, Bakirkoy 34156, Istanbul (Turkey); Mukhamedshina, Nuranya M.; Mirsagatova, A. Adiba [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 702132, Ulugbek, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Basaran, Sait; Cakan, Banu [Department of Restoration and Conservation of Artefacts, Letters Faculty, Istanbul University, Vezneciler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-05-15

    Ancient glass fragments excavated in the archaeological district Enez (Ancient Ainos)-Turkey were investigated by combined Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry techniques. Multi-elemental contents of 15 glass fragments that belong to Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Periods, were determined by INAA. The concentrations of twenty six elements (Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Sb, Cs, Ba, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Au and Th), which might be present in the samples as flux, stabilizers, colorants or opacifiers, and impurities, were examined. Chemometric treatment of the INAA data was performed and principle component analysis revealed presence of 3 distinct groups. The thermal history of the glass samples was determined by FTIR spectrometry. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INAA was performed to determine elemental compositions of ancient glass fragments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Basic, coloring/discoloring elements and impurities have been determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA discriminated the glasses depending on their chronological order. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal history of the glass samples was determined by FTIR spectrometry.

  10. Faraday Rotator Glass for Laser Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ya-si; ZHOU Bei-ming; WANG Biao; HU Li-li

    2007-01-01

    Glasses with strong Faraday rotation are interest for laser applications. The principles of diamagnetic and paramagnetic Faraday rotator glasses are described theoretically and experimentally. High performance Tb-paramagnetic glass series were developed and produced at Kigre in the US and SIOM in Shanghai. Large aperture glass disks have been used for high power laser fusion systems.

  11. Time-resolved dose evaluation in an X- and gamma-ray irradiated silver-activated glass detector for three-dimensional imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurobori, T., E-mail: kurobori@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Itoi, H. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yanagida, Y. [Oarai Research Center, Chiyoda Technol Corporation, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); Chen, Y.Q. [China Techwin Co., Ltd, Dongguan, Guangdong 523467 (China)

    2015-09-01

    Ag-activated phosphate glass based on the radiophotoluminescence (RPL) phenomenon has been used as the most commonly known RPL material and as an accumulated-type passive detector. In this work, the transient-state evaluation of the dose distributions achieved by X- and gamma-ray irradiations within the Ag-activated phosphate glass was performed using a time-resolved technique for the first time. Specifically, the blue RPL intensity ascribed to the electron-trapped Ag{sup 0} centres as a function of the depth at the vicinity of the surface was investigated for different types of radiation and a wide range of energies. In addition, the dose distributions at each layer within the glass confirmed by the time-resolved measurement were compared with those reconstructed by a disk-type transparent glass detector based on the blue RPL with a diameter of 100 mm. - Highlights: • The time-resolved dose evaluation of Ag-activated glass was performed. • The RPL intensity as a function of the depth was investigated for X- and gamma-rays. • The origin and mechanisms for the RPL enhancement in the near-surface layers were discussed.

  12. High Capacity, Superior Cyclic Performances in All-Solid-State Lithium-Ion Batteries Based on 78Li2S-22P2S5 Glass-Ceramic Electrolytes Prepared via Simple Heat Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Chen, Rujun; Liu, Ting; Shen, Yang; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2017-08-30

    Highly Li-ion conductive 78Li2S-22P2S5 glass-ceramic electrolytes were prepared by simple heat treatment of the glass phase obtained via mechanical ball milling. A high ionic conductivity of ∼1.78 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) is achieved at room temperature and is attributed to the formation of a crystalline phase of high lithium-ion conduction. All-solid-state lithium-ion batteries based on these glass-ceramic electrolytes are assembled by using Li2S nanoparticles or low-cost commercially available FeS2 as active cathode materials and Li-In alloys as anode. A high discharge capacity of 535 mAh g(-1) is achieved after at least 50 cycles for the all-solid-state cells with Li2S as cathode materials, suggesting a rather high capacity retention of 97.4%. Even for the cells using low-cost FeS2 as cathode materials, same high discharge capacity of 560 mAh g(-1) is also achieved after at least 50 cycles. Moreover, the Coulombic efficiency remain at ∼99% for these all-solid-state cells during the charge-discharge cycles.

  13. Glass and glass-ceramic photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Lidia; Thi Ngoc Tran, Lam; Meneghetti, Marcello; Varas, Stefano; Armellini, Cristina; Ristic, Davor; Chiasera, Alessandro; Scotognella, Francesco; Pelli, Stefano; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Boulard, Brigitte; Zonta, Daniele; Dorosz, Dominik; Lukowiak, Anna; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2017-02-01

    The development of optically confined structure is a major topic in both basic and applied physics not solely ICT oriented but also concerning lighting, laser, sensing, energy, environment, biological and medical sciences, and quantum optics. Glasses and glass-ceramics activated by rare earth ions are the bricks of such structures. Glass-ceramics are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing developing new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. The dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the fabrication protocol still remain an important task of the research in material science. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters. This paper presents some results obtained by our consortium regarding glass-based photonics systems. We will comment the energy transfer mechanism in transparent glass ceramics taking as examples the up and down conversion systems and the role of SnO2 nanocrystals as sensitizers. Coating of spherical resonators by glass ceramics, 1D-Photonic Crystals for luminescence enhancement, laser action and disordered 1-D photonic structures will be also discussed. Finally, RF-Sputtered rare earth doped P2O5- SiO2-Al2O3-Na2O-Er2O3 planar waveguides, will be presented.

  14. A Combinatorial Approach to the Investigation of Metal Systems that Form Both Bulk Metallic Glasses and High Entropy Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Brian A.; Gibson, Mark A.; Fraser, Hamish L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, compositionally graded specimens were deposited using the laser engineered net-shaping (LENS™) additive manufacturing technique to study the glass-forming ability of two bulk metallic glass (BMG) and high entropy alloy (HEA) composite systems. The first graded specimen varied from Zr57Ti5Al10Cu20Ni8 (BMG) to CoCrFeNiCu0.5 (HEA) and the second graded specimen varied from TiZrCuNb (BMG) to (TiZrCuNb)65Ni35 (HEA). After deposition, laser surface melting experiments were performed parallel to the gradient to remelt and rapidly solidify the specimen. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to determine the morphology and composition variations in the as-deposited and laser surface melted phases. Selected area diffraction of the melt pool regions confirmed an almost fully amorphous region in the first gradient and an amorphous matrix/crystalline dendrite composite structure in the second gradient.

  15. Optimization of laser energy deposition for single-shot high aspect-ratio microstructuring of thick BK7 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, Valerio; Grigutis, Robertas [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, University of Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Jukna, Vytautas [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); LOA, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris Saclay, F-91762 Palaiseau (France); Couairon, Arnaud [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Di Trapani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, University of Insubria and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia, E-mail: ottavia.jedrkiewicz@ifn.cnr.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    We investigate the generation of high aspect ratio microstructures across 0.7 mm thick glass by means of single shot Bessel beam laser direct writing. We study the effect on the photoinscription of the cone angle, as well as of the energy and duration of the ultrashort laser pulse. The aim of the study is to optimize the parameters for the writing of a regular microstructure due to index modification along the whole sample thickness. By using a spectrally resolved single pulse transmission diagnostics at the output surface of the glass, we correlate the single shot material modification with observations of the absorption in different portions of the retrieved spectra, and with the absence or presence of spectral modulation. Numerical simulations of the evolution of the Bessel pulse intensity and of the energy deposition inside the sample help us interpret the experimental results that suggest to use picosecond pulses for an efficient and more regular energy deposition. Picosecond pulses take advantage of nonlinear plasma absorption and avoid temporal dynamics effects which can compromise the stationarity of the Bessel beam propagation.

  16. Optimization of laser energy deposition for single-shot high aspect-ratio microstructuring of thick BK7 glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzillo, Valerio; Jukna, Vytautas; Couairon, Arnaud; Grigutis, Robertas; Di Trapani, Paolo; Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the generation of high aspect ratio microstructures across 0.7 mm thick glass by means of single shot Bessel beam laser direct writing. We study the effect on the photoinscription of the cone angle, as well as of the energy and duration of the ultrashort laser pulse. The aim of the study is to optimize the parameters for the writing of a regular microstructure due to index modification along the whole sample thickness. By using a spectrally resolved single pulse transmission diagnostics at the output surface of the glass, we correlate the single shot material modification with observations of the absorption in different portions of the retrieved spectra, and with the absence or presence of spectral modulation. Numerical simulations of the evolution of the Bessel pulse intensity and of the energy deposition inside the sample help us interpret the experimental results that suggest to use picosecond pulses for an efficient and more regular energy deposition. Picosecond pulses take advantage of nonlinear plasma absorption and avoid temporal dynamics effects which can compromise the stationarity of the Bessel beam propagation.

  17. Slumped glass optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray astronomy: a progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Breunig, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G. D.; Menz, B.

    2015-09-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, as e.g. the proposed Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration, and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The achievable global angular resolution of the optics relies on the surface shape accuracy of the slumped foils, on the smoothness of the mirror surfaces and on the correct integration and co-alignment of the mirror segments achieved with a dedicated Integration Machine (IMA). In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we will present the results obtained with full illumination X-ray tests for the last developed prototypes.

  18. Superhydrophobic and highly luminescent polyfluorene/silica hybrid coatings deposited onto glass and cellulose-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francisco, Raquel; Hoyos, Mario; García, Nuria; Tiemblo, Pilar

    2015-03-31

    Neat poly(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene) (PFO) and composites of PFO and a modified organonanosilica P(7) at weight ratios 90/10, 70/30, and 50/50 have been employed to prepare fluorescent and superhydrophobic coatings by spraying onto three different substrates: glass, Whatman paper, and a filtration membrane of mixed cellulose esters. The water repellency of the coatings and their photophysical properties are therein studied. It is found that, irrespective of the substrate and the composite composition, all coatings remain fluorescent. In some of the coatings prepared, confined morphologies are created, which fluoresce with a wavelength distribution resembling that of an ordered planar β-phase. Among the coatings prepared in this work, those with a ratio PFO/P(7) of 50/50 are the ones with the strongest chain confinement and the highest surface roughness, being highly emissive at the β-phase wavelengths and also superhydrophobic. Depending on the substrate these materials are also tough and flexible (cellulose based substrates) or display a remarkable light transmittance (glass). A final merit of these multifunctional materials is the simplicity of the preparation procedure, adequate for large surfaces and industrial applications.

  19. Highly bioactive polysiloxane modified bioactive glass-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids monoliths with controlled surface structure for bone tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Que, Wenxiu; Xing, Yonglei; Lei, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Crack-free monoliths with controllable surface microstructure have high bioactivities and therefore potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. In this paper, crack-free polydimethylsiloxane-modified bioactive glass-poly (ethylene glycol) (PDMS-BG-PEG) hybrids monoliths were fabricated via using a modified sol-gel process. Results show that the addition of PEG plays an important part in the formation of crack-free and gelation of the monoliths, and surface microstructures of the as-prepared hybrid monoliths were significantly influenced by the concentration and molecular weight of PEG. The samples obtained from PEG 300 had porous surface result in higher bioactivity (apatite formation) in simulated body fluid (SBF), while the samples obtained from PEG 600 had the smooth surface and inhibited the formation of apatite layer in SBF. These as-prepared hybrid monoliths can be used as a good candidate of implant and scaffold for highly efficient bone tissue regeneration.

  20. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...