WorldWideScience

Sample records for high acoustic velocity

  1. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  2. On the variations of acoustic absorption peak with particle velocity in micro-perforated panels at high level of excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayong, Rostand; Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The acoustic behavior of micro-perforated panels (MPP) is studied theoretically and experimentally at high level of pressure excitation. A model based on Forchheimer's regime of flow velocity in the perforations is proposed. This model is valid at relatively high Reynolds numbers and low Mach numbers. The experimental method consists in measuring the acoustical pressure at three different positions in an impedance tube, the two measurement positions usually considered in an impedance tube and one measurement in the vicinity of the rear surface of the MPP. The impedance tube is equipped with a pressure driver instead of the usual loudspeaker and capable of delivering a high sound pressure level up to 160 dB. MPP specimens made out of steel, dural and polypropylene were tested. Measurements using random noise or sinusoidal excitation in a frequency range between 200 and 1600 Hz were carried out on MPPs backed by air cavities. It was observed that the maximum of absorption can be a positive or a negative function of the flow velocity in the perforations. This suggests the existence of a maximum of absorption as a function of flow velocity. This behavior was predicted by the model and confirmed experimentally.

  3. On the variations of acoustic absorption peak with flow velocity in Micro-Perforated Panels at high level of excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Tayong, Rostand; Leclaire, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The acoustic behavior of micro-perforated panels (MPP) is studied theoretically and experimentally at high level of pressure excitation. A model based on Forcheimer's regime of flow velocity in the perforations is proposed. This model is valid at relatively high Reynolds numbers and low Mach numbers. The experimental method consists in measuring the acoustical pressure at three different positions in an impedance tube, the two measurement positions usually considered in an impedance tube and one measurement in the vicinity of the rear surface of the MPP. The impedance tube is equipped with a pressure driver instead of the usual loudspeaker and capable of delivering a high sound pressure level up to 160 dB. Several MPP specimens made out of steel and polypropylene were tested. Measurements using random noise or sinusoidal excitation in a frequency range between 200 and 1600 Hz were carried out on MPPs backed by air cavities. It was observed that the maximum of absorption can be a positive or a negative functio...

  4. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  5. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  6. DIASCoPE: Directly integrated acoustic system combined with pressure experiments—A new method for fast acoustic velocity measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Matthew L.; Baldwin, Kenneth J.; Huebsch, William R.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental system to measure elastic wave velocities in samples in situ under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil apparatus has been installed at Beamline 6-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This system allows for measurement of acoustic velocities via ultrasonic interferometry, and makes use of the synchrotron beam to measure sample densities via X-ray diffraction and sample lengths using X-radiographic imaging. This system is fully integrated into the automated software controls of the beamline and is capable of collecting robust data on elastic wave travel times in less than 1 s, which is an improvement of more than one to two orders of magnitude over existing systems. Moreover, this fast data collection time has been shown to have no effect on the obtained travel time results. This allows for more careful study of time-dependent phenomena with tighter snapshots in time of processes that would otherwise be lost or averaged out in other acoustic measurement systems.

  7. Simulated flight acoustic investigation of treated ejector effectiveness on advanced mechanical suppresors for high velocity jet noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brausch, J. F.; Motsinger, R. E.; Hoerst, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Ten scale-model nozzles were tested in an anechoic free-jet facility to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of a mechanically suppressed inverted-velocity-profile coannular nozzle with an accoustically treated ejector system. The nozzle system used was developed from aerodynamic flow lines evolved in a previous contract, defined to incorporate the restraints imposed by the aerodynamic performance requirements of an Advanced Supersonic Technology/Variable Cycle Engine system through all its mission phases. Accoustic data of 188 test points were obtained, 87 under static and 101 under simulated flight conditions. The tests investigated variables of hardwall ejector application to a coannular nozzle with 20-chute outer annular suppressor, ejector axial positioning, treatment application to ejector and plug surfaces, and treatment design. Laser velocimeter, shadowgraph photograph, aerodynamic static pressure, and temperature measurement were acquired on select models to yield diagnositc information regarding the flow field and aerodynamic performance characteristics of the nozzles.

  8. Supersonic Relative Velocity Effect on the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum a...

  9. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  10. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  11. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  12. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  13. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  14. Wideband high-resolution direction of arrival estimation method based on the pressure-velocity combined processing using the acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xingyu; YANG Desen; ZHAO Chunhui

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation of underwater distant wideband targets, a novel coherent signal-subspace method based on the cross spectral matrix of pressure and particle velocity using the Acoustic Vector Sensor Array (AVSA)is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods in using particle velocity information of Acoustic Vector Sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, namely, the P-V cross spectrum, has better DOA estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. By theoretical analysis, both focusing principle and eigendecomposition theory based on the P-V cross spectral matrix are given.At the same time, the corresponding criteria for source number detection is also presented.Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR).

  15. High-frequency seafloor acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, D. R; Richardson, M. D

    2007-01-01

    This title provides access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics...

  16. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kumar, Ranganathan, E-mail: ranganathan.kumar@ucf.edu [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters. -- Highlights: ► Demonstrates the importance of rotation in a levitated droplet that leads to controlled morphology. ► Provides detailed measurements of Particle Image Velocimetry inside levitated droplets. ► Shows variation of vortex strength with the droplet diameter and viscosity of the liquid.

  17. Acoustic equations of state for simple lattice Boltzmann velocity sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggen, Erlend Magnus

    2014-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method typically uses an isothermal equation of state. This is not sufficient to simulate a number of acoustic phenomena where the equation of state cannot be approximated as linear and constant. However, it is possible to implement variable equations of state by altering the LB equilibrium distribution. For simple velocity sets with velocity components ξ(iα)∈(-1,0,1) for all i, these equilibria necessarily cause error terms in the momentum equation. These error terms are shown to be either correctable or negligible at the cost of further weakening the compressibility. For the D1Q3 velocity set, such an equilibrium distribution is found and shown to be unique. Its sound propagation properties are found for both forced and free waves, with some generality beyond D1Q3. Finally, this equilibrium distribution is applied to a nonlinear acoustics simulation where both mechanisms of nonlinearity are simulated with good results. This represents an improvement on previous such simulations and proves that the compressibility of the method is still sufficiently strong even for nonlinear acoustics.

  18. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  19. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  20. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  1. Scale dependence of acoustic velocities. An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotusso, Angelamaria Pillitteri

    2001-06-01

    Reservoir and overburden data (e.g. seismic, sonic log and core data) are collected at different stages of field development, at different scales, and under different measurement conditions. A more precise reservoir characterization could be obtained by combining all the collected data. Reliable data may also be obtained from drill cuttings. This methodology can give data in quasi-real time, it is easily applicable, and cheap. It is then important, to understand the relationship between results obtained from measurements at different scales. In this Thesis acoustic velocities measured at several different laboratory scales are presented. This experimental study was made in order to give the base for the development of a model aiming to use/combine appropriately the data collected at different scales. The two main aspects analyzed are the experimental limitations due to the decrease in sample size and the significance of measurements in relation to material heterogeneities. Plexiglas, an isotropic, non-dispersive artificial material, with no expected scale effect, was used to evaluate the robustness of the measurement techniques. The results emphasize the importance of the wavelength used with respect to the sample length. If the sample length (L) is at least 5 time bigger than wavelength used ({lambda}), then the measured velocities do not depend on sample size. Leca stone, an artificial isotropic material containing spherical grains was used to evaluate the combined effects of technique, heterogeneities and sample length. The ratio between the scale of the heterogeneities and the sample length has to be taken in to account. In this case velocities increase with decreasing sample length when the ratio L/{lambda} is smaller than 10-15 and at the same time the ratio between sample length and grain size is greater than 10. Measurements on natural rocks demonstrate additional influence of grain mineralogy, shape and orientation. Firenzuola sandstone shows scale and

  2. Two-dimensional acoustic particle velocity sensors based on a crossing wires topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, O.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and realization of two-dimensional acoustic particle velocity sensors based on thermal convection. The sensors are of the order of 1 mm×1 mm and consist of two crossing wires with each wire sensing the acoustic particle velocity in the direction parallel to it. Their

  3. 高分辨率的频率空间域声波全波形速度反演-理论模型%High resolution acoustic wave full waveform velocity inversion in frequency space domain-theoretical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖建平; 刘和秀; 王华忠; 彭叶辉; 杨天春; 王齐仁

    2011-01-01

    使用最速下降法进行二维频率空间域声波波动方程全波形速度反演,讨论了如何快速实现高精度的二维频率空间域声波波动方程全波形速度反演.多尺度的思想耦合在反演框架中.把非线性问题化为逐步线性问题是我们关注的焦点,目的是把整个非线性反演的黑匣子转化成为每一步可控的过程,尽可能得到想要的反演解.仅仅使用3个离散的频率,每个频率迭代10次,对广角Marmousi模型进行地面地震声波全波形速度反演,反演得到高分辨率、高精度的速度,为全波形反演实际资料奠定了很好的基础.%We use the steepest descent method based on two-dimensional frequency space domain acoustic wave equation for full waveform velocity inversion, discuss how to quickly realize high precision two-dimensional frequency domain full waveform velocity inversion. Multi-scale criterial is coupling in the inversion framework. The nonlinear problem changes into gradually linear problem is our focus. The purpose is the whole nonlinear inverse black box into every step of controllable process as far as possible, getting an inversion solution we want. Use only three discrete frequencies, each frequency iterative ten times, we make surface seismic acoustic wave full waveform inversion on extended Marmousi and get a high resolution and high precision imaging of velocity. This gives a good foundation for full waveform inversion on real field data.

  4. Photospheric high-frequency acoustic power excess in sunspot umbra: signature of magneto-acoustic modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zharkov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present observational evidence for the presence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar photosphere deduced from SOHO/MDI (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager Dopplergram velocity observations. The magneto-acoustic perturbations are observed as acoustic power enhancement in the sunspot umbra at high-frequency bands in the velocity component perpendicular to the magnetic field. We use numerical modelling of wave propagation through localised non-uniform magnetic field concentration along with the same filtering procedure as applied to the observations to identify the observed waves. Guided by the results of the numerical simulations we classify the observed oscillations as magneto-acoustic waves excited by the trapped sub-photospheric acoustic waves. We consider the potential application of the presented method as a diagnostic tool for magnetohelioseismology.

  5. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  6. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  7. Visco-acoustic transmission waveform inversion of velocity structure in space-frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihua Long; Xiaofan Li; Meigen Zhang; Tong Zhu

    2009-01-01

    According to the least square criterion of minimizing the misfit between modeled and observed data, this paper provides a preconditioned gradient method to invert the visco-acoustic velocity structure on the basis of using sparse matrix LU factorization technique to directly solve the visco-acoustic wave forward problem in space-frequency domain. Numerical results obtained in an inclusion model inversion and a layered homogeneous model inversion demonstrate that different scale media have their own frequency responses, and the strategy of using low-frequency inverted result as the starting model in the high-frequency inversion can greatly reduce the non-uniqueness of their solutions. It can also be observed in the experi-ments that the fast convergence of the algorithm can be achieved by using diagonal elements of Hessian matrix as the pre-conditioned operator, which fully incorporates the advantage of quadratic convergence of Gauss-Newton method.

  8. High Resolution Acoustical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    1028 (September 1982). 26 G. Arfken , Mathematical Methods for Physicists (Academic Press, New York, 1971), 2nd printing, pp.662-666. 27 W. R. Hahn...difference in the approach used by the two methods , as noted in the previous paragraph, forming a direct mathematical com- parison may be impossible...examines high resolution methods which use a linear array to locate stationary objects which have scattered the fressure waves. Several;- new methods

  9. Determination of sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin chitosan films by phase-sensitive acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamanyi, Albert E.; Ahmed Mohamed, Esam T.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The biomaterial chitosan is used in the paper manufacturing industry, as a wound healing agent and in filtration amongst others. In this paper the longitudinal sound velocity and acoustic impedance of thin films of chitosan of varying thicknesses are determined by vector-contrast acoustic microscopy. The exploitation of the relative reflectivity information from the maximum amplitude images and a comparison of the experimentally obtained V(z) curves with simulations using appropriate models are applied for the evaluation of the sound velocity. These results were compared to those previously obtained results with the same instrument.

  10. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  11. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Michel L., E-mail: michel@if.usp.br [Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, 05508-090 (Brazil); Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States); Shukla, Gaurav, E-mail: shukla@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States); Minnesota supercomputer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States); Silveira, Pedro da [Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States); Wentzcovitch, Renata M., E-mail: wentz002@umn.edu [Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States); Minnesota supercomputer Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 55455 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  12. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  13. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  14. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  15. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  16. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  17. Acoustic Velocity Data for Clay Bearing Carbonate Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Shogenova, Alla

    1998-01-01

    Two sets of acoustic data on carbonates were combined to span the porosity interval from below 5% to more than 75%: dolomite and limestone of Paleozoic age from Estonia and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The carbonate content of the samples ranges from less than 50% to 100%, and it was attem...

  18. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  19. Theory and signal processing of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiqing; FENG Lei; WANG Changhong; WANG Yuling; QIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model and signal processing of acoustic correlation measurements to estimate current velocity are discussed. The sonar space-time correlation function of vol-ume reverberations within Fraunhofer zone is derived. The function, which is in exponential forms, is the theoretical model of acoustic correlation measurements. The characteristics of the correlation values around the maximum of the amplitude of the correlation function, where most information about current velocity is contained, are primarily analyzed. Localized Least Mean Squares (LLMS) criterion is put forward for velocity estimation. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is adopted as the optimization method. So the systematic sig-nal processing method of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement is established. A prototype acoustic correlation current profiler (ACCP) underwent several sea trials, the results show that theoretical model approximately coincides with experimental re-sults. Current profiles including the speed and direction from ACCP are compared with those from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The current profiles by both instruments agree reasonably well. Also, the standard deviation of velocity measurement by ACCP is statistically calculated and it is a little larger than predicted value.

  20. Experimental Study of Rock Drill-ability Anisotropy by Acoustic Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rock drill-ability anisotropy has significant effects on directional drilling and deviation control. Its evaluation is an important but difficult research subject. Definitions of drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of rock are given in this paper. The acoustic velocities and the drill-ability parameters of several rock samples from the Engineering Center for Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) are respectively measured with the device for testing the rock drill-ability and the ultrasonic testing system in laboratory, so that their drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy are respectively calculated and discussed in detail by using the experimental data. On the basis of these experimental results and calculations, correlations between drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of the rock samples are illustrated through regression analyses. Thus, a mathematical model developed may be used to evaluate the rock drill-ability anisotropy with the acoustic logging or seismic data to a certain extent.

  1. Highly Ionized Envelopes of High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zekis, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results on highly ionized gas in Galactic High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs), originally surveyed in OVI (Sembach et al. 2003). In a new FUSE/HST survey of SiII/III/IV (Shull et al. 2009) toward 37 AGN, we detected SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) absorption with a sky coverage fraction 81 +/- 5% (61 HVCs along 30 of 37 high-latitude sight lines). The SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) line is typically 4-5 times stronger than OVI (lambda 1031.926 A). The mean HVC column density of perhaps 10^19 cm^-2 of low-metallicity (0.1 - 0.2 Z_sun) ionized gas in the low halo. Recent determinations of HVC distances allow us to estimate a total reservoir of ~10^8 M_sun. Estimates of infall velocities indicate an infall rate of around 1 M_sun yr^-1, comparable to the replenishment rate for star formation in the disk. HVCs appear to be sheathed by intermediate-temperature gas (10^4.0 - 10^4.5 K) detectable in SiIII and SiIV, as well as hotter gas seen in OVI and other high ions. To prepare for HST observations of 10 HVC-selecte...

  2. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  3. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity and Electromechanical Coupling Coefficient of GaN Grown on (0001) Sapphire by Metal-Organic Vapour Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen; LI Hong-Lang; YAN Li; CHEN Xiao-Yang; LU Da-Cheng; WANG Xiao-Hui; LIU Xiang-Lin; HAN Pei-De; YUAN Hai-Rong; WANG Du; WANG Zhan-Guo; HE Shi-Tang

    2001-01-01

    High-quality and high-resistivity GaN films were grown on (0001) sapphire face by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. To measure the surface acoustic wave properties accurately, we deposited metallized interdigital trans ducers on the GaN surface. The acoustic surface wave velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient were measured, respectively, to be 5667m/s and 1.9% by the pulse method.

  5. Evaluation of performance of Son Tek Argonaut acoustic doppler velocity log in tow tank and sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Madhan, R.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Desai, R.G.P.; VijayKumar, K.; Dias, M.; Tengali, S.; Methar, A.

    Performance of a 500-kHz, 3-beam downward-looking Sontex Argonaut acoustic Doppler velocity log (DVL) based on measurements at tow-tank and sea is addressed. Its accuracy and linearity under tow-tank measurements were largely scattered...

  6. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    of particle velocity measurements and combined pressure-velocity measurements in NAH, the relation between the near-field and the far-field radiation from sound sources via the supersonic acoustic intensity, and finally, the reconstruction of sound fields using rigid spherical microphone arrays. Measurement...... of the particle velocity has notable potential in NAH, and furthermore, combined measurement of sound pressure and particle velocity opens a new range of possibilities that are examined in this study. On this basis, sound field separation methods have been studied, and a new measurement principle based on double...... layer measurements of the particle velocity has been proposed. Also, the relation between near-field and far-field radiation from sound sources has been examined using the concept of the supersonic intensity. The calculation of this quantity has been extended to other holographic methods, and studied...

  7. Effect of Solvents on the Ultrasonic Velocity and Acoustic Parameters of Polyvinylidene Fluoride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic studies provide a wealth of information in understanding the molecular behavior and intermolecular interaction of polymer solvent mixtures. Attempts were made to measure ultrasonic velocity, density, and viscosity for the mixture of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF in acetone and dimethylformamide (DMF of various stoichiometric ratios at 300 K using crystal controlled ultrasonic interferometer (Mittal make, pyknometer (specific gravity bottle, and Ostwald viscometer, respectively. The acoustic parameters adiabatic compressibility (β, intermolecular free path length (Lf, acoustic impedance (Z, relative association (RA, ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2, and relaxation time (τ have been estimated using experimental data with well-known techniques. The variation of these acoustic parameters is explained in terms of solute-solvent molecular interaction in a polymer solution.

  8. Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines at high altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally enhanced ion-acoustic lines (NEIALs between 1200 and 1900 km altitude are investigated. The NEIALs were found in the background gates of data from the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR at 78° N looking field-aligned. Only strongly enhanced lines are detected at such high altitudes. The estimated enhancement above incoherent scattering integrated over the antenna beam and preintegration time of 10 s reaches about 10 000. Both lines are always enhanced above 1000 km altitude, and the downshifted line, corresponding to upward propagating ion-acoustic waves, is always stronger than the upshifted line, for downgoing waves. The ratio of the downshifted and upshifted peaks is often remarkably constant along a profile. Using the line positions as indicators of the ion-acoustic speeds and the bulk drift velocity, we find that the bulk drift does not exceed the ion-acoustic (sound speed, but extrapolation of the profiles suggests that the sound barrier is reached around 2000 km in one event. The highest ion-acoustic speed is seen near 600 km, above the density peak, indicating that electrons are heated not only by ionizing precipitation but significantly also by upgoing waves. Upflow continues to speed up above the estimated temperature maximum. A certain qualitative similarity to the solar corona seems to be the case.

  9. Finite element analysis of solitary wave propagation by acoustic velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruoka, Akira; Uchiyama, Ichiro; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    2017-01-01

    There is discontinuity between compressible and incompressible states in fluid flows. If we subtract the thermal effect from compressible fluid flows, we obtain adiabatic fluid flows, from which incompressible fluid flows are obtained if we let the acoustic velocity tend to infinity. Thus, we employ the idea of adiabatic fluid flows to solve incompressible flows. In the computation, the physical value of the acoustic velocity is employed. This idea corresponds to an extension of artificial compressibility under physical considerations. We present the new SUPG formulation of adiabatic fluid flows, by which not only the effect of SUPG but also those of PSPG and LSIC of incompressible fluid flows are derived. After the numerical verifications, three-dimensional solitary wave propagations are computed. Close agreement between computed and experimental values is obtained.

  10. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  11. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.-B.; Chen, X.-Z.; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    on particle velocity input data than when it is based on measurements of sound pressure data, and this is confirmed by a simulation study and by experimental results. A method that combines pressure- and particle velocity-based reconstructions in order to distinguish between contributions to the sound field......The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has...... recently been demonstrated. This paper examines whether there might be a similar advantage in using the particle velocity as the input of NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM). Error sensitivity considerations indicate that ESM-based NAH is less sensitive to measurement errors when it is based...

  12. Experimental research on acoustic wave velocity of frozen soils during the uniaxial loading process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongQing Li; Xing Huang; Feng Ming; Yu Zhang; Hui Bing

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic P-wave tests of frozen silt and frozen sand were conducted during uniaxial loading by using an RSM®-SY5(T) nonmetal ultrasonic test meter to study the velocity characteristics of P-waves. The experimental results indicate that the P-wave velocity is affected by soil materials, temperature, and external loads, so the P-wave velocity is different in frozen silt and frozen sand, but all decrease with an increase of temperature and increase at first and then decrease with strain during the loading process. There is an exponential relationship between uniaxial compressive strength and P-wave ve-locity, and the correlation between them is very good. The characteristic parameters of acoustic waves can, to some extent, reflect the development of internal cracks in frozen soils during loading.

  13. Behavior of the longitudinal acoustic velocity in PBX-9404 during thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Kennedy, J.E.; Nunziato, J.W.

    1977-07-01

    Acoustic wave experiments were conducted on the heterogeneous explosive, PBX-9404, at a temperature of 116/sup 0/C and a frequency of 1 MHz to study the influence of thermal decomposition on the mechanical response of the material. The longitudinal phase velocity was approximately 2.2 km/s and was found to be essentially independent of the extent of decomposition until the stabilizer was depleted. Thereafter, the velocity increased slowly with time as the temperature was maintained. Several possible explanations for this observation are discussed in light of some information obtained in post-test chemical analysis.

  14. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  15. 3-D In Vitro Acoustic Super-Resolution and Super-Resolved Velocity Mapping Using Microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Brown, Jemma; Aljabar, Paul; Tang, Mengxing; Dunsby, Christopher; Eckersley, Robert J

    2017-07-31

    Standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies are unable to resolve microvascular structures due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. Recent demonstrations of 2D super-resolution both in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated that fine vascular structures can be visualized using acoustic single bubble localization. Visualization of more complex and disordered 3D vasculature, such as that of a tumor, requires an acquisition strategy which can additionally localize bubbles in the elevational plane with high precision in order to generate super-resolution in all three dimensions. Furthermore, a particular challenge lies in the need to provide this level of visualization with minimal acquisition time. In this work, we develop a fast, coherent US imaging tool for microbubble localization in 3D using a pair of US transducers positioned at 90°. This allowed detection of point scatterer signals in 3 dimensions with average precisions equal to 1.9 µm in axial and elevational planes, and 11 µm in the lateral plane, compared to the diffraction limited point spread function full widths at half maximum of 488 µm, 1188 µm and 953 µm of the original imaging system with a single transducer. Visualization and velocity mapping of 3D in vitro structures was demonstrated far beyond the diffraction limit. The capability to measure the complete flow pattern of blood vessels associated with disease at depth would ultimately enable analysis of in vivo microvascular morphology, blood flow dynamics and occlusions resulting from disease states.

  16. Flow velocity profiling using acoustic time of flight flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beam-forming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgan, I.; Candel, I.; Ioana, C.; Digulescu, A.; Bunea, F.; Ciocan, G. D.; Anghel, A.; Vasile, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to non-intrusive flow velocity profiling technique using multi-element sensor array and wide-band signal's processing methods. Conventional techniques for the measurements of the flow velocity profiles are usually based on intrusive instruments (current meters, acoustic Doppler profilers, Pitot tubes, etc.) that take punctual velocity readings. Although very efficient, these choices are limited in terms of practical cases of applications especially when non-intrusive measurements techniques are required and/or a spatial accuracy of the velocity profiling is required This is due to factors related to hydraulic machinery down time, the often long time duration needed to explore the entire section area, the frequent cumbersome number of devices that needs to be handled simultaneously, or the impossibility to perform intrusive tests. In the case of non-intrusive flow profiling methods based on acoustic techniques, previous methods concentrated on using a large number of acoustic transducers placed around the measured section. Although feasible, this approach presents several major drawbacks such as a complicated signal timing, transmission, acquisition and recording system, resulting in a relative high cost of operation. In addition, because of the geometrical constraints, a desired number of sensors may not be installed. Recent results in acoustic flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beamforming proved that it is possible to achieve flow velocity profiles using less acoustic transducers. In a normal acoustic time of flight path the transducers are both emitters and receivers, sequentially changing their roles. In the new configuration, proposed in this paper, two new receivers are added on each side. Since the beam angles of each acoustic transducer are wide enough the newly added transducers can receive the transmitted signals and additional time of flight estimation can be done. Thus, several flow

  17. High-overtone Bulk-Acoustic Resonator gravimetric sensitivity: towards wideband acoustic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, D; Ballandras, S; Baron, T; Lebrasseur, E; Carry, E

    2015-01-01

    In the context of direct detection sensors with compact dimensions, we investigate the gravimetric sensitivity of High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonators, through modeling of their acoustic characteristics and experiment. The high frequency characterizing such devices is expected to induce a significant effect when the acoustic field boundary conditions are modified by a thin adlayer. Furthermore, the multimode spectral characteristics is considered for wideband acoustic spectroscopy of the adlayer, once the gravimetric sensitivity dependence of the various overtones is established. Finally, means of improving the gravimetric sensitivity by confining the acoustic field in a low acoustic-impedance layer is theoretically established.

  18. Semicircular Canal Pressure Changes During High-intensity Acoustic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Anne K; Banakis Hartl, Renee M; Greene, Nathaniel T; Benichoux, Victor; Mattingly, Jameson K; Cass, Stephen P; Tollin, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Acoustic stimulation generates measurable sound pressure levels in the semicircular canals. High-intensity acoustic stimuli can cause hearing loss and balance disruptions. To examine the propagation of acoustic stimuli to the vestibular end-organs, we simultaneously measured fluid pressure in the cochlea and semicircular canals during both air- and bone-conducted sound presentation. Five full-cephalic human cadaveric heads were prepared bilaterally with a mastoidectomy and extended facial recess. Vestibular pressures were measured within the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, and referenced to intracochlear pressure within the scala vestibuli with fiber-optic pressure probes. Pressures were measured concurrently with laser Doppler vibrometry measurements of stapes velocity during stimulation with both air- and bone-conduction. Stimuli were pure tones between 100 Hz and 14 kHz presented with custom closed-field loudspeakers for air-conducted sounds and via commercially available bone-anchored device for bone-conducted sounds. Pressures recorded in the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals in response to sound stimulation were equal to or greater in magnitude than those recorded in the scala vestibuli (up to 20 dB higher). The pressure magnitudes varied across canals in a frequency-dependent manner. High sound pressure levels were recorded in the semicircular canals with sound stimulation, suggesting that similar acoustical energy is transmitted to the semicircular canals and the cochlea. Since these intralabyrinthine pressures exceed intracochlear pressure levels, our results suggest that the vestibular end-organs may also be at risk for injury during exposure to high-intensity acoustic stimuli known to cause trauma in the auditory system.

  19. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, H.; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  20. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  1. EFFECT OF VELOCITY ON DUCTILITY UNDER HIGH VELOCITY FORMING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong; LI Chunfeng

    2007-01-01

    The ring expansion procedures over various forming velocities are calculated with ANSYS software in order to show the effect of forming velocity on ductility of rate insensitive materials. Ring expansion procedures are simplified to one-dimensional tension by constraining the radial deformation, with element birth and death method, fracture problem of circular ring are considered. The calculated results show that for insensitive materials of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy, fracture strain increases corresponding to the increase of forming velocity. This trend agrees well with experimental results, and indicates inertia is the key factor to affect ductility; With element birth and death methods, fracture problems can be solved effectively. Experimental studies on formability of tubular workpieces are also conducted, experimental results show that the formability of 1060 aluminum and 3A21 aluminum alloy under electromagnetic forming is higher than that under quasistatic forming, according to the characteristics of electromagnetic forming, the forming limit diagrams of the two materials tube are also built respectively, this is very important to promote the development of electromagnetic forming and guide the engineering practices.

  2. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  3. Low Energy Gamma Radiation Induced Effects on Ultrasonic Velocity and Acoustic Parameters in Polyvinylidene Fluoride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modification of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF polymer properties with irradiation is of interest as it possesses unique piezo-, pyro-, and ferroelectric properties. In this paper, we report the results of acoustic parameters of irradiated PVDF mixed with dimethylacetamide (DMAC solution with low energy γ-source (Cs-137. The polymer solution covered with mica film assures only γ-ray passage and the duration was increased from 18 to 50 hours to achieve the higher dose rate. The dose rate was estimated using the strength of the radioactive source and the duration of the exposure. The ultrasonic velocity (v, density (ρ, and viscosity (η of 0.2 wt% and 0.5 wt% PVDF dissolved in pure DMAC solution, irradiated with different dose rate were measured using ultrasonic interferometer (Mittal make, Pyknometer, and Oswald’s viscometer, respectively. It is observed that the values of v, ρ, and η change with dose rate. The acoustic parameters such as adiabatic compressibility (β, intermolecular free path length (Lf, acoustic impedance (Z, relative association (RA, ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2, and relaxation time (τ are calculated using the experimental data. These results are interpreted in terms of the solute-solvent interaction in a polymer solution and scissoring chain damage.

  4. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  5. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by micro-PIV in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    CERN Document Server

    Barnkob, Rune; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We present micro-PIV measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 um to 10 um undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles are dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming flow, while the motion of the largest particles are dominated by the acoustic radiation force. For all particle sizes we predict theoretically how much of the particle velocity is due to radiation and streaming, respectively. These predictions include corrections for particle-wall interactions and ultrasonic thermoviscous effects, and they match our measurements within the experimental uncertainty. Finally, we predict theoretically and confirm experimentally that the ratio between the acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced particle velocities is proportional to the square of the particle size, the actuation frequency and the acoustic contrast factor, while it is inversely proportional to the kinematic viscosity.

  6. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Carleo, I; Gratton, R; Benatti, S; Bonavita, M; Oliva, E; Origlia, L; Desidera, S; Claudi, R; Sissa, E

    2016-01-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 micron) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the v...

  7. High Velocity Features in the Orion Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    O'Dell, C R

    2008-01-01

    We have used widely spaced in time Hubble Space Telescope images to determine tangential velocities of features associated with outflows from young stars. These observations were supplemented by groundbased telescope spectroscopy and from the resultant radial velocities, space velocities were determined for many outflows. Numerous new moving features were found and grouped into known and newly assigned Herbig Haro objects. It was found that stellar outflow is highly discontinuous, as frequently is the case, with long-term gaps of a few hundred years and that these outflow periods are marked by staccato bursts over periods of about ten years. Although this has been observed in other regions, the Orion Nebula Cluster presents the richest display of this property. Most of the large scale Herbig Haro objects in the brightest part of the Orion Nebula appear to originate from a small region northeast of the strong Orion-S radio and infrared sources. With the possible exception of HH 203, we are not able to identify...

  8. High undercooling of bulk water during acoustic levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Yongjun(吕勇军); CAO; Chongde(曹崇德); WEI; Bingbo(魏炳波)

    2003-01-01

    The experiments on undercooling of acoustically levitated water drops with the radius of 5-8 mm are carried out, and the maximum undercooling of 24 K is obtained in such a containerless state. Various factors influencing the undercoolability of water under acoustic levitation are synthetically analyzed. The experimental results indicate that impurities tend to decrease the undercooling level, whereas the dominant factor is the effect of ultrasound. The stirring and cavitation effects of ultrasound tend to stimulate the nucleation of water and prevent further bulk undercooling in experiments. The stirring effect provides some extra energy fluctuation to overcome the thermodynamic barrier for nucleation. The local high pressure caused by cavitation effect increases the local undercooling in water and stimulates nucleation before the achievement of a large bulk undercooling. According to the cooling curves, the dendrite growth velocity of ice is estimated, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction at the lower undercooling. The theoretical calculation predicts a dendrite growth velocity of 0.23 m/s corresponding to the maximum undercooling of 24 K, at which the rapid solidification of ice occurs.

  9. Detecting Dark Matter in High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, G F; Putman, M E; Lewis, Geraint F; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Putman, Mary E; Gibson, Brad C

    2000-01-01

    Many high velocity HI clouds (HVCs) are now believed to be scattered throughout the Galactic halo on scales of tens of kiloparsecs. Some of these clouds appear to contain substantial HI masses (>10^6 Msun). It has been suggested that these structures may be associated with dark matter `mini halos' accreting onto the Galactic halo. For a compact HVC along the sight line to a more distant galaxy, we demonstrate that `pixel gravitational lensing' provides a crucial test for the presence of a dark halo in the form of massive compact objects. The detection of pixel lensing will provide an independent means to map the mass distribution within HVCs.

  10. Accurate acoustic power measurement for low-intensity focused ultrasound using focal axial vibration velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Guo, Gepu; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Hu, Jimin

    2017-07-01

    Low-intensity focused ultrasound is a form of therapy that can have reversible acoustothermal effects on biological tissue, depending on the exposure parameters. The acoustic power (AP) should be chosen with caution for the sake of safety. To recover the energy of counteracted radial vibrations at the focal point, an accurate AP measurement method using the focal axial vibration velocity (FAVV) is proposed in explicit formulae and is demonstrated experimentally using a laser vibrometer. The experimental APs for two transducers agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, showing that AP is proportional to the square of the FAVV, with a fixed power gain determined by the physical parameters of the transducers. The favorable results suggest that the FAVV can be used as a valuable parameter for non-contact AP measurement, providing a new strategy for accurate power control for low-intensity focused ultrasound in biomedical engineering.

  11. High Velocity Droplet Rebound On Liquid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, William; Laiacona, Danielle; Chiarot, Paul; German, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Rebound of high velocity, periodic droplet streams off viscous liquid pools is studied experimentally. Droplets, approximately 60 micrometers in diameter, impact the oil surface at velocities up to 13 m/s and at angles between 2-25 degrees. The oil surface does not degrade or lose its ability to provide rebound even after millions of droplet impacts. The oil was varied to examine the effect that surface tension and viscosity had on droplet rebound. Stable rebound is achievable on oils varying in dynamic viscosity in the range 13-970 Pa.s and surface tensions in the range 19-28 mN/m. When rebound occurs, a consistent 29% loss of droplet kinetic energy is observed. This is a surprising relationship due to the fact that it holds true for all cases of stable rebound regardless of the oil used. We further observe an upper inertial limit where droplets no longer provide stable rebound and instead become fully entrained in the oil pool. This limit is governed by the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and can be characterized and predicted using a modified version of the Weber number. The droplet rebound presented in this study is unique due to the size, velocity, and frequency of the droplets used. Another unique feature is that the rebound manifests itself as an effectively static phenomenon. No motion of the interface - oscillations, waves, or otherwise - was observed during rebound. The quasi-static nature of rebound enabled distinctions to be made regarding energy dissipation and the transition from droplet rebound to entrainment.

  12. Shear wave velocity of the healthy thyroid gland in children with acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan Bilgici, Meltem; Sağlam, Dilek; Delibalta, Semra; Yücel, Serap; Tomak, Leman; Elmalı, Muzaffer

    2017-04-19

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is a kind of shear wave elastography that can be used in children for differentiating thyroid pathologies. Possible changes in the healthy thyroid gland in children may create difficulties in the use of shear wave velocities (SWV) in thyroid pathologies. The aim of this study was to define the normal values of SWV for the healthy thyroid gland in children, elucidate the correlation of the SWV values with potential influencing factors, and evaluate intra-operator reproducibility of the SWV. Between January 2015 and December 2015, a total of 145 healthy children (81 girls, 64 boys; mean age, 10.5 ± 3.14 years; range 6-17 years) were enrolled in the study. The SWV and volume of the thyroid gland were determined. The mean shear wave velocity of the thyroid gland was 1.22 ± 0.20 m/s. There was no correlation between age and the mean SWV of the thyroid gland (Spearman Rho = 0.049, p = 0.556). There was also no correlation between the thyroid gland volume or BSA and the mean SWV. The only correlation detected was between BSA and total thyroid gland volume (p thyroid gland in children was determined. There was no correlation between the SWV of the thyroid gland and age, BSA, or thyroid gland volume.

  13. Acoustic imaging and mirage effects with high transmittance in a periodically perforated metal slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a high-quality superlens to focus acoustic waves using a periodically perforated metallic structure which is made of zinc and immersed in water. By changing a geometrical parameter gradually, a kind of gradient-index phononic crystal lens is designed to attain the mirage effects. The acoustic waves can propagate along an arc-shaped trajectory which is precisely controlled by the angle and frequency of the incident waves. The negative refraction imaging effect depends delicately on the transmittance of the solid structure. The acoustic impedance matching between the solid and the liquid proposed in this article, which is determined by the effective density and group velocity of the unit-cell, is significant for overcoming the inefficiency problem of acoustic devices. This study focuses on how to obtain the high transmittance imaging and mirage effects based on the adequate material selection and geometrical design.

  14. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  15. High velocity impact and armour design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving combat survivability is the most important aspect of military technology. Hence the development of new lightweight armour systems is a key requirement. A large number of new high performance polymer fibres have been developed in recent years, which include Aramid fibres, polyethylene fibres and polypropylene fibres, amongst others, and have been applied to soft armour systems. To gain a fundamental understanding of which fibre type is the best for a specific application requires the development of techniques which can span all length scales. It has been widely recognised that multiscale modelling, which encompasses the full range of length and time scales, will be an important factor in the future design and testing of novel materials, and their application to armour design. In the present paper a new material damage model suitable for the simulation of impact on thin laminated panels fabricated from high performance fibres is implemented into the commercial ls-dyna® finite element code. The new material model links the mesoscale behaviour of the individual fibres to the macroscale behaviour within a conventional shell finite element. The implemented model is used in a parametric high velocity study to illustrate the applicability of the model to the design of thin armour panels.

  16. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations.

  17. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE FLYING VELOCITY IN HIGH VELOCITY OXYGEN FUEL SPRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiping; Dong Zujue; Huo Shubin

    2000-01-01

    Based on gas dynamics,thermodynamics,fluid dynamics of multiphase systems and other theories,the dynamic analyses of the particle flying velocity in a high velocity oxygen fuel spray (HVOF) is accomplished.The relationships between the flying velocity of a particle and the flying time or flying length,particle size,hot gas velocity,and pressure or density of the gas are proposed.Meanwhile,the influences of the velocity and mass rate of flow of the flame gas of a HVOF gun,and particle size on the particle flying velocity are discussed in detail.The dynamic pressure concept is introduced to express the flow capacity of hot gas of a HVOF gun,and the relationship between the dynamic pressure of a HVOF gun and the velocity of a particle for depositing is presented.

  18. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming.

  19. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R; Miller, James G

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (c(g)) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (c(p)) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for c(g) and alpha' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  20. Simple Motor Control Concept Results High Efficiency at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Scott; Engel, Chris

    2013-09-01

    The need for high velocity motors in space applications for reaction wheels and detectors has stressed the limits of Brushless Permanent Magnet Motors (BPMM). Due to inherent hysteresis core losses, conventional BPMMs try to balance the need for torque verses hysteresis losses. Cong-less motors have significantly less hysteresis losses but suffer from lower efficiencies. Additionally, the inherent low inductance in cog-less motors result in high ripple currents or high switching frequencies, which lowers overall efficiency and increases performance demands on the control electronics.However, using a somewhat forgotten but fully qualified technology of Isotropic Magnet Motors (IMM), extremely high velocities may be achieved at low power input using conventional drive electronics. This paper will discuss the trade study efforts and empirical test data on a 34,000 RPM IMM.

  1. High order Nystrom method for acoustic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Yang, Siming; Song, Jiming; Roberts, Ron

    2015-03-01

    While high frequency approximation methods are widely used to solve flaw scattering in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation, full wave approaches based on integral equations have great potentials due to their high accuracy. In this work, boundary integral equations for acoustic wave scattering are solved using high order Nyström method. Compared with boundary elements method, it features the coincidence of the samples for interpolation basis and quadrature, which makes the far-field interaction free from numerical integration. The singular integral is dealt with using the Duffy transformation, while efficient singularity subtraction techniques are employed to evaluate the near singular integrals. This approach has the ease to go high order so highly accurate results can be obtained with fewer unknowns and faster convergence, and it is also amenable to incorporate fast algorithms like the multi-level fast multi-pole algorithm. The convergence of the approach for different orders of elements and interpolation basis functions is investigated. Numerical results are shown to validate this approach.

  2. MOTION VELOCITY SMOOTH LINK IN HIGH SPEED MACHINING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Kun; FU Jianzhong; CHEN Zichen

    2007-01-01

    To deal with over-shooting and gouging in high speed machining, a novel approach for velocity smooth link is proposed. Considering discrete tool path, cubic spline curve fitting is used to find dangerous points, and according to spatial geometric properties of tool path and the kinematics theory, maximum optimal velocities at dangerous points are obtained. Based on method of velocity control characteristics stored in control system, a fast algorithm for velocity smooth link is analyzed and formulated. On-line implementation results show that the proposed approach makes velocity changing more smoothly compared with traditional velocity control methods and improves productivity greatly.

  3. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - THE DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    The results of Westerbork * observations of small-scale structure in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at 1' angular and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution are presented in the form of a table of observational parameters, maps of hydrogen column density, velocity-right ascension cuts, and histograms of the line

  4. AWESoMe: A code for the calculation of phase and group velocities of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso; Soto, Juan I.

    2015-07-01

    We present AWESoMe, an implementation of a method for the evaluation of acoustic wave velocities in homogeneous solid media. The code computes the phase and group velocities for all the possible propagation directions, as well as some related parameters such as the polarization vectors, the power flow angle and the enhancement factor. The code is conveniently interfaced with GNUPLOT, thus offering immediate visualization of the results. AWESoMe is open-source software, available under the GNU General Public License v3.

  5. Acoustic velocity measurement across the diameter of a liquid metal column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, C.A.; Wilcox, W.W.

    1978-05-15

    Present techniques for measuring sound velocity in liquid metals have been limited by the use of transducers which cannot survive in extreme temperature conditions. These methods also require relatively long measurement times. An optical noncontacting method has been developed which may be used for extremely short experimental times and very high temperatures and pressures. This technique is being incorporated into an isobaric expansion apparatus in which a 1 mm diam wire sample in a high pressure argon gas environment is resistively heated to melt within a time period of only a few microseconds. Before instability of the liquid column occurs, thermal expansion, enthalpy, and temperature are measured. The addition of the sound velocity measurement permits a more complete determination of the thermophysical properties of the liquid metal.

  6. High Temperature Acoustic Noise Reduction Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is to use combustion synthesis techniques to manufacture ceramic-based acoustic liners capable of withstanding temperatures up to 2500?C....

  7. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellar, Brian [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harding, Samuel F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, Marshall C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  8. A perovskitic lower mantle inferred from high-pressure, high-temperature sound velocity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Motohiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Hirose, Kei

    2012-05-02

    The determination of the chemical composition of Earth's lower mantle is a long-standing challenge in earth science. Accurate knowledge of sound velocities in the lower-mantle minerals under relevant high-pressure, high-temperature conditions is essential in constraining the mineralogy and chemical composition using seismological observations, but previous acoustic measurements were limited to a range of low pressures and temperatures. Here we determine the shear-wave velocities for silicate perovskite and ferropericlase under the pressure and temperature conditions of the deep lower mantle using Brillouin scattering spectroscopy. The mineralogical model that provides the best fit to a global seismic velocity profile indicates that perovskite constitutes more than 93 per cent by volume of the lower mantle, which is a much higher proportion than that predicted by the conventional peridotitic mantle model. It suggests that the lower mantle is enriched in silicon relative to the upper mantle, which is consistent with the chondritic Earth model. Such chemical stratification implies layered-mantle convection with limited mass transport between the upper and the lower mantle.

  9. A HIGH VELOCITY FEED UNIT DRIVEN BY LINEAR MOTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bolin; Chen Yanji; Li Zhiying

    2000-01-01

    In order to realize high speed machining,the special requirements for feed transmission system of the CNC machine tool have to be satisfied.A high velocity feed unit driven by a induction linear motor is developed.The compositions of the high velocity CNC feed unit and main problems in the unit design are discussed.

  10. Velocity Data collected from moored Hull-Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers positioned in Vieques Sound and Virgin Passage in the US Caribbean

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Velocity data were collected from Hull-Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers moored across Virgin Passage between Culebra, Puerto Rico and St. Thomas, USVI, and...

  11. Bias in mean velocities and noise in variances and covariances measured using a multistatic acoustic profiler: the Nortek Vectrino Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. E.; Schindfessel, L.; McLelland, S. J.; Creëlle, S.; De Mulder, T.

    2017-07-01

    This paper compiles the technical characteristics and operating principles of the Nortek Vectrino Profiler and reviews previously reported user experiences. A series of experiments are then presented that investigate instrument behaviour and performance, with a particular focus on variations within the profile. First, controlled tests investigate the sensitivity of acoustic amplitude (and Signal-to-Noise Ratio, SNR) and pulse-to-pulse correlation coefficient, R 2, to seeding concentration and cell geometry. Second, a novel methodology that systematically shifts profiling cells through a single absolute vertical position investigates the sensitivity of mean velocities, SNR and noise to: (a) emitted sound intensity and the presence (or absence) of acoustic seeding; and (b) varying flow rates under ideal acoustic seeding conditions. A new solution is derived to quantify the noise affecting the two perpendicular tristatic systems of the Vectrino Profiler and its contribution to components of the Reynolds stress tensor. Results suggest that for the Vectrino Profiler: 1. optimum acoustic seeding concentrations are ~3000 to 6000 mg L-1 2. mean velocity magnitudes are biased by variable amounts in proximal cells but are consistently underestimated in distal cells; 3. noise varies parabolically with a minimum around the ‘sweet spot’, 50 mm below the transceiver; 4. the receiver beams only intersect at the sweet spot and diverge nearer to and further from the transceiver. This divergence significantly reduces the size of the sampled area away from the sweet spot, reducing data quality; 5. the most reliable velocity data will normally be collected in the region between approximately 43 and 61 mm below the transceiver.

  12. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion University; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  13. Estimation of Elastic Constants from Surface Acoustic Wave Velocity by Inverse Analysis using the Downhill Simplex Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Harumichi; Nishino, Hideo; Cho, Hideo; Ogiso, Hisato; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    1998-05-01

    The measurement of surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity is used to estimate the surface properties because the velocity depends on the elastic properties near the surface.To estimate the elastic constants, we developed a new inverse method combining the Monte Carlo method and the downhill simplex method.The initial values are determined using many random numbers, instead of an arbitrarily chosen several sets of values, in order to reduce the risk of trapping by the local pseudo minima.We confirm that the estimated elastic constants agree well with the reported elastic constants of Si and the experimental SAW velocity is quite well reproduced.We estimate the elastic constants of quartz for application purposes.

  14. Analyzing the acoustic spectra of sound velocity and absorption in amphiphilic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyzes the theoretical approaches to the study of the acoustic spectrum and the speed of sound absorption in the frequency range up to 10 GHz in liquid systems. For example ethoxylated derivatives of normal decyl alcohol EDDn, belonging to nonionic surfactants showed that at room temperature and low degrees of ethoxylation n acoustic spectra can be described in terms of the relaxation theory. It is shown that within the experimental error of the acoustic spectrum of EDDn, in the s...

  15. Imaging Fractures Through Relative Velocity Change Using Ambient Seismic Noise And Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS): A SUBTER Pilot Study At Blue Canyon Dome, Socorro NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; Grubelich, M. C.; King, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of fracture systems, including locations, morphology, and evolution, is critical for groundwater management, contaminant transport, and energy applications such as reservoir development (i.e. tight shale and geothermal) and reservoir management (i.e. carbon sequestration and wastewater injection). It has long been understood that the presence of fractures reduces bulk seismic velocity, with waves traveling perpendicular to fracture planes experiencing the strongest velocity reduction. We present results from seismic interferometry using ambient seismic noise to detect velocity changes following fracture emplacement from two energetic stimulations. Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) using fiber optic cables was used to record seismic arrivals at high spatial resolution ( 3 ft). Cables were grouted in the annulus of four cased monitoring boreholes surrounding the stimulation borehole at a radius of 4 feet. Ambient noise was recorded before and after each stimulation for 12-hour time periods. We used the Python package MSNoise to compute cross-correlations of all near-horizontal (less than 60°) channel pairs between boreholes and calculated the velocity change of each time period relative to initial conditions prior to stimulation. Results show an average velocity decrease of approximately 6% following the first fracturing event. Variations between channel pairs suggest some are more strongly affected than others, which is supported by evaluation of other geophysical data. These results show promise for locating fractures based on spatial variation in velocity changes. Unsurprisingly, results following the second stimulation are generally more scattered. Some velocities are further reduced compared to those after the first stimulation while others show a relative velocity increase. These results are roughly consistent with time-lapse seismic measurements conducted using active sources and classical sensors (e.g. hydrophones). Sandia National Laboratories is

  16. Analyzing the acoustic spectra of sound velocity and absorption in amphiphilic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Mysik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the theoretical approaches to the study of the acoustic spectrum and the speed of sound absorption in the frequency range up to 10 GHz in liquid systems. For example ethoxylated derivatives of normal decyl alcohol EDDn, belonging to nonionic surfactants showed that at room temperature and low degrees of ethoxylation n acoustic spectra can be described in terms of the relaxation theory. It is shown that within the experimental error of the acoustic spectrum of EDDn, in the studied range of frequencies and temperature, are composed of two prime areas of acoustic dispersion. The results of calculations of relaxation and thermodynamic parameters of fast and ultrafast processes of restructuring EDDn can be used in the development of combined technologies of enhanced oil recovery using surfactant solutions and various physical fields and factors.

  17. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  18. Cooperative implementation of a high temperature acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, S. E.; Nowakowski, Edward; Smith, Herbert G.; Friebele, E. J.; Putnam, Martin A.; Rogowski, Robert; Melvin, Leland D.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The current status and results of a cooperative program aimed at the implementation of a high-temperature acoustic/strain sensor onto metallic structures are reported. The sensor systems that are to be implemented under this program will measure thermal expansion, maneuver loads, aircraft buffet, sonic fatigue, and acoustic emissions in environments that approach 1800 F. The discussion covers fiber development, fabrication of an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer acoustic sensor, sensor mounting/integration, and results of an evaluation of the sensor capabilities.

  19. Vortex Tubes in Turbulence Velocity Fields at High Reynolds Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Mouri, H

    2008-01-01

    The elementary structures of turbulence, i.e., vortex tubes, are studied using velocity data obtained in laboratory experiments for boundary layers and duct flows at microscale Reynolds numbers 332-1934. While past experimental studies focused on intense vortex tubes, the present study focuses on all vortex tubes with various intensities. We obtain the mean velocity profile. The radius scales with the Kolmogorov length. The circulation velocity scales with the Kolmogorov velocity, in contrast to the case of intense vortex tubes alone where the circulation velocity scales with the rms velocity fluctuation. Since these scaling laws are independent of the configuration for turbulence production, they appear to be universal at high Reynolds numbers.

  20. Dynamic Strengthening During High Velocity Shear Experiments with Siliceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Boneh, Y.; Chen, X.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    It is generally accepted that dynamic-weakening is essential for earthquake instability, and many experimental works have documented this weakening. Recent observations revealed also opposite trends of dynamic-strengthening in experiments (Reches & Lockner, 2010). We present here our experimental results of this dynamic-strengthening and discuss possible implications to earthquake behavior. We ran hundreds of experiments on experimental faults made of siliceous rock including granite, syenite, diorite, and quartzite. The experimental fault is comprised of two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. We recognized general, three regimes of strength-velocity relations: (I) Dynamic weakening (drop of 20-60% of static strength) as slip velocity increased from ~0.0003 m/s (lowest experimental velocity) to a critical velocity, Vc=0.008-0.16 m/s; (II) Abrupt transition to dynamic strengthening regime during which the fault strength almost regains its static strength; and (III) Quasi-constant strength with further possible drops as velocity approaches ~1 m/s. The critical velocity depends on the sample lithology: Vc is ~0.06 m/s for granite, ~0.008 m/s for syenite, ~0.01 m/s for diorite, and ~0.16 m/s for quartzite. The strengthening stage is associated with temperature increase, wear-rate increase, and the occurrence of intense, high frequency stick-slip events (Reches & Lockner, 2010). Sammis et al., (this meeting) attributed this strengthening to dehydration of the thin water layer that covers the gouge particles as the temperature increases. On the other hand, we note that tens of experiments with dolomite samples (non-siliceous), which were deformed under similar conditions, did not exhibit the velocity strengthening (unpublished). Based on the analyses by Andrews (2004, 2005), we speculate that velocity strengthening may bound the slip velocity. The numerical models of Andrews show that the slip velocity along a slip

  1. Acceleration of objects to high velocity by electromagnetic forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Richard F

    2017-02-28

    Two exemplary approaches to the acceleration of projectiles are provided. Both approaches can utilize concepts associated with the Inductrack maglev system. Either of them provides an effective means of accelerating multi-kilogram projectiles to velocities of several kilometers per second, using launchers of order 10 meters in length, thus enabling the acceleration of projectiles to high velocities by electromagnetic forces.

  2. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fan; Ying LI; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be eas...

  3. Particle Filter Based Fault-tolerant ROV Navigation using Hydro-acoustic Position and Doppler Velocity Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bo; Blanke, Mogens; Skjetne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fault tolerant navigation system for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The navigation system uses hydro-acoustic position reference (HPR) and Doppler velocity log (DVL) measurements to achieve an integrated navigation. The fault tolerant functionality is based on a modied...... particle lter. This particle lter is able to run in an asynchronous manner to accommodate the measurement drop out problem, and it overcomes the measurement outliers by switching observation models. Simulations with experimental data show that this fault tolerant navigation system can accurately estimate...

  4. A high-velocity transient outflow in Eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Behar, Ehud; Soker, Noam

    2007-01-01

    We analyze velocity profiles of the X-ray spectral lines emitted by the Eta Carinae stellar binary at four epochs, just before the X-ray minimum (associated with periastron) and more than two years before the minimum (~apastron). The profiles are nicely resolved by the HETGS spectrometer on board Chandra. Far from periastron, we find symmetrical lines that are more or less centered at zero velocity. Closer to periastron, the lines broaden, shift towards the blue, and become visibly asymmetric. While the quiescent X-ray emission and slight (<200 km/sec) centroid shifts can be ascribed to the ordinary continuous binary wind interaction and to the orbital velocity of the secondary star, the observed high-velocity emission up to ~2,000 km/sec and the abrupt flares during which it occurs can not. This leads us to interpret the high-velocity flaring emission as due to a fast collimated outflow of ionized gas.

  5. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated. Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used, an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency, which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system. Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well. Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal, an experimental imaging system is also built. Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz. Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  6. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Protection from high-velocity projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, A.; Pashkov, S.

    2012-08-01

    Creation of reliable system of target protection demands research of various ways of counteraction high-speed elongated projectiles. This paper considers the interaction of projectiles with plates and rods thrown towards by explosion. At contact projectiles and rods form a crosswise configuration. Deformation and destruction of projectiles reduce their penetrability and capacity to strike armor-target.

  8. HIGH VELOCITY THERMAL GUN FOR SURFACE PREPARATION AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many surface preparation and treatment processes utilise compressed air to propel particles against surfaces in order to clean and treat them. The effectiveness of the processes depends on the velocity of the particles, which in turn depends on the pressure of the compressed air. This paper describes a thermal gun built on the principles of High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF and High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF processes. The designed apparatus can be used for abrasive blasting, coating of surfaces, cutting of rocks, removing rubber from mining equipment, cleaning of contaminations etc.

  9. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  10. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants.

  11. Basic investigation on acoustic velocity change imaging method for quantitative assessment of fat content in human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Kazune; Tanigawa, Shohei; Hori, Makoto; Yokota, Daiki; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Fatty liver is a disease caused by the excess accumulation of fat in the human liver. The early diagnosis of fatty liver is very important, because fatty liver is the major marker linked to metabolic syndrome. We already proposed the ultrasonic velocity change imaging method to diagnose fatty liver by using the fact that the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity is different in water and in fat. For the diagonosis of a fatty liver stage, we attempted a feasibility study of the quantitative assessment of the fat content in the human liver using our ultrasonic velocity change imaging method. Experimental results showed that the fat content in the tissue mimic phantom containing lard was determined by its ultrasonic velocity change in the flat temperature region formed by a circular warming ultrasonic transducer with an acoustic lens having an appropriate focal length. By considering the results of our simulation using a thermal diffusion equation, we determined whether this method could be applied to fatty liver assessment under the condition that the tissue had the thermal relaxation effect caused by blood flow.

  12. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel; Richmond, Marshall

    2015-08-01

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1 MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of C-ADP to standard divergent ADP (D-ADP) velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm s-1, standard deviation of 18 mm s-1, and an order of magnitude reduction in realisable length scale. C-ADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the C-ADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved quantification of flow turbulence. Since waves are simultaneously measured via profiled velocities, pressure measurements and surface detection, it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in

  13. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Bhutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental and analytical results of a scale model simulated flight acoustic exploratory investigation of high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles with inverted velocity and temperature profiles are summarized. Six coannular plug nozzle configurations and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. It was found that in simulate flight, the high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass struts will not significantly affect the acousticn noise reduction features of a General Electric type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insights into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further benificial research efforts.

  14. Mixing high-viscosity fluids via acoustically driven bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Sinem; Ozcelik, Adem; Lata, James; Kaynak, Murat; Wu, Mengxi; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    We present an acoustofluidic micromixer which can perform rapid and homogeneous mixing of highly viscous fluids in the presence of an acoustic field. In this device, two high-viscosity polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions were co-injected into a three-inlet PDMS microchannel with the center inlet containing a constant stream of nitrogen flow which forms bubbles in the device. When these bubbles were excited by an acoustic field generated via a piezoelectric transducer, the two solutions mixed homogenously due to the combination of acoustic streaming, droplet ejection, and bubble eruption effects. The mixing efficiency of this acoustofluidic device was evaluated using PEG-700 solutions which are ~106 times more viscous than deionized (DI) water. Our results indicate homogenous mixing of the PEG-700 solutions with a ~0.93 mixing index. The acoustofluidic micromixer is compact, inexpensive, easy to operate, and has the capacity to mix highly viscous fluids within 50 ms.

  15. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  16. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  17. Performance study of Lagrangian methods: reconstruction of large scale peculiar velocities and baryonic acoustic oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, J. A.; Nusser, A.

    2017-01-01

    NoAM for "No Action Method" is a framework for reconstructing the past orbits of observed tracers of the large scale mass density field. It seeks exact solutions of the equations of motion (EoM), satisfying initial homogeneity and the final observed particle (tracer) positions. The solutions are found iteratively reaching a specified tolerance defined as the RMS of the distance between reconstructed and observed positions. Starting from a guess for the initial conditions, NoAM advances particles using standard N-body techniques for solving the EoM. Alternatively, the EoM can be replaced by any approximation such as Zel'dovich and second order perturbation theory (2LPT). NoAM is suitable for billions of particles and can easily handle non-regular volumes, redshift space, and other constraints. We implement NoAM to systematically compare Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and N-body dynamics over diverse configurations ranging from idealized high-res periodic simulation box to realistic galaxy mocks. Our findings are (i) Non-linear reconstructions with Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and full dynamics perform better than linear theory only for idealized catalogs in real space. For realistic catalogs, linear theory is the optimal choice for reconstructing velocity fields smoothed on scales {buildrel > over {˜}} 5 h^{-1}{Mpc}.(ii) all non-linear back-in-time reconstructions tested here, produce comparable enhancement of the baryonic oscillation signal in the correlation function.

  18. Field testing of a convergent array of acoustic Doppler profilers for high-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Samuel F.; Sellar, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2016-04-25

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation.

  19. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  20. Acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Habán, Vladimír

    2006-12-22

    Recently, substantial attention is paid to the development of methods of generation of pulsations in high-pressure systems to produce pulsating high-speed water jets. The reason is that the introduction of pulsations into the water jets enables to increase their cutting efficiency due to the fact that the impact pressure (so-called water-hammer pressure) generated by an impact of slug of water on the target material is considerably higher than the stagnation pressure generated by corresponding continuous jet. Special method of pulsating jet generation was developed and tested extensively under the laboratory conditions at the Institute of Geonics in Ostrava. The method is based on the action of acoustic transducer on the pressure liquid and transmission of generated acoustic waves via pressure system to the nozzle. The purpose of the paper is to present results obtained during the research oriented at the determination of acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system. The final objective of the research is to solve the problem of transmission of acoustic waves through high-pressure water to generate pulsating jet effectively even at larger distances from the acoustic source. In order to be able to simulate numerically acoustic wave propagation in the system, it is necessary among others to determine dependence of the sound speed and second kinematical viscosity on operating pressure. Method of determination of the second kinematical viscosity and speed of sound in liquid using modal analysis of response of the tube filled with liquid to the impact was developed. The response was measured by pressure sensors placed at both ends of the tube. Results obtained and presented in the paper indicate good agreement between experimental data and values of speed of sound calculated from so-called "UNESCO equation". They also show that the value of the second kinematical viscosity of water depends on the pressure.

  1. Multi Point Velocity, Density and Temperature Measurements using LITA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a nonintrusive, transient-grating optical technique that provides simultaneous high-accuracy measurements of velocity,...

  2. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  3. (Collection of high quality acoustical records for honeybees)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, H.T.; Buchanan, M.E.

    1987-02-19

    High quality acoustical data records were collected for both European and Africanized honeybees under various field conditions. This data base was needed for more rigorous evaluation of a honeybee identification technique previously developed by the travelers from preliminary data sets. Laboratory-grade recording equipment was used to record sounds made by honeybees in and near their nests and during foraging flights. Recordings were obtained from European and Africanized honeybees in the same general environment. Preliminary analyses of the acoustical data base clearly support the general identification algorithm: Africanized honeybee noise has significantly higher frequency content than does European honeybee noise. As this algorithm is refined, it may result in the development of a simple field-portable device for identifying subspecies of honeybees. Further, the honeybee's acoustical signals appear to be correlated with specific colony conditions. Understanding these variations may have enormous benefit for entomologists and for the beekeeping industry.

  4. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  5. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  6. Studies of the acoustic transmission characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report. [nozzle transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, P. D.; Salikuddin, M.; Ahuja, K. K.; Plumblee, H. E.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; (2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be used to examine the effects of the test parameters; and (3) to validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer function versus nondimensional frequency.

  7. AWESOME 1.1: A code for the calculation of phase and group velocities of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    We present an improved version of the code AWESOME, capable of computing phase and group velocities, power flow angles and enhancement factors of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids. In this version, some algorithms are improved and the code provides a better estimation of the enhancement factor compared to the previous version. In addition, we include a quadruple-precision version of the code, which even though using the same numerical approach as the double-precision version, is able to calculate the exact values of the enhancement factor. The standard, double-precision version of the code has been interfaced and merged with the development version of CRYSTAL and will be available as part of its next stable release. Finally, we have improved the scripts for visualizing the results, which now are compatible with GNUPLOT 5.X.X, including new scripts for the visualization of the normal and ray surfaces.

  8. Digital image correlation, acoustic emission and ultrasonic pulse velocity for the detection of cracks in the concrete buffer of the Belgian nuclear supercontainer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, Sokratis; Tsangouri, Eleni; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Pyl, Lincy [Vrije Univ., Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions; Vantomme, John [Vrije Univ., Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions; Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium). Civil and Material Engineering Dept.; Marcke, Philippe van [ONDRAF/NIRAS (Belgium); Areias, Lou [EURIDICE GIE/SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Vrije Univ., Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions

    2014-11-01

    The long term management of high-level and heat emitting radioactive waste is a worldwide concern, as it directly influences the environment and future generations. To address this issue, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials has come up with the conceptual design of a massive concrete structure called Supercontainer. The feasibility to construct these structures is being evaluated through a number of scaled models that are tested using classical as well as state of the art measurement techniques. In the current paper, the results obtained from the simultaneous application of the Digital Image Correlation (DIC), the Acoustic Emission (AE) and the Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) nondestructive testing techniques on the second scaled model for the detection and monitoring of cracks will be presented.

  9. Evaluation of performance of Son Tek Argonaut acoustic doppler velocity log in tow tank and sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Madhan, R.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Desai, R.G.P.; VijayKumar, K.; Dias, M.; Tengali, S.; Methar, A.

    in its 'beam' mode of operation. However, it was possible to improve its mean accuracy to better than plus or minus 5% of the towing speed by recalculating the motion speed based on beam-velocity outputs and the orientation of the three beams relative...

  10. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles. Comprehensive data report, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Shutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Six coannular plug nozzle configurations having inverted velocity and temperature profiles, and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation in General Electric's Anechoic Free-Jet Acoustic Facility. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. The outer stream radius ratio for most of the configurations was 0.853, and the inner-stream-outer-stream area ratio was tested in the range of 0.54. Other variables investigated were the influence of bypass struts, a simple noncontoured convergent-divergent outer stream nozzle for forward quadrant shock noise control, and the effects of varying outer stream radius and inner-stream-to-outer-stream velocity ratios on the flight noise signatures of the nozzles. It was found that in simulated flight, the high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass structs will not significantly effect the acoustic noise reduction features of a General Electric-type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insight into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further beneficial research efforts.

  11. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  12. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S.

    2006-12-08

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km{sup 3} scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and

  13. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  14. Deformation, acoustic emission and ultrasound velocity during fatigue tests on paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hæggström E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the evolution of mechanical properties of paper samples during cyclic experiments. The issue is to look at the sample-to-sample variation, and we try to predict the number of loading cycles to failure. We used two concurrent methods to obtain the deformation: the strain was calculated from vertical displacement measured by laser interferometer sensor, as well as, computed by digital image correlation technique from pictures taken each 2s by a camera. Acoustic emission of fracture was also recorded, and an active ultrasonic wave method using piezoelectric transducers is used to follow the viscoelastic behaviour of each sample. We found that a sharp final increase of different variables like deformation, strain rate and fluctuations, are signs of an imminent rupture of the paper. Moreover looking at the evolution of these quantities during the first cycle only is already an indicator about the lifetime of the sample.

  15. In Vivo Acoustic Super-Resolution and Super-Resolved Velocity Mapping Using Microbubbles

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen-Jeffries, K; Browning, RJ; Tang, M-X; Dunsby, C.; Eckersley, RJ

    2014-01-01

    The structure of microvasculature cannot be resolved using standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. In this work, we use a standard clinical US system to perform in vivo sub-diffraction imaging on a CD1, female mouse aged 8 weeks by localizing isolated US signals from bubbles flowing within the ear microvasculature, and compare our results to optical microscopy. Furthermore, we develop a new technique to map blood velocity at ...

  16. Simulation chain for acoustic ultra-high energy neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, M., E-mail: max.neff@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anton, G.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Graf, K.; Hößl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-11

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water is presented. It is designed within the SeaTray/IceTray software framework. Its modular architecture is highly flexible and makes it easy to adapt to different environmental conditions, detector geometries, and hardware. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and the propagation to the sensors within the detector. In this phase of the development, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, similar to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it can be used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic source reconstruction algorithms are integrated. In this contribution, an overview of the design and capabilities of the simulation chain will be given, and some applications and preliminary studies will be presented.

  17. Simulation Chain for Acoustic Ultra-high Energy Neutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.11.147

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach for large-scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors in water. In this article, a Monte Carlo simulation chain for acoustic neutrino detection devices in water is presented. It is designed within the SeaTray/IceTray software framework. Its modular architecture is highly flexible and makes it easy to adapt to different environmental conditions, detector geometries, and hardware. The simulation chain covers the generation of the acoustic pulse produced by a neutrino interaction and the propagation to the sensors within the detector. In this phase of the development, ambient and transient noise models for the Mediterranean Sea and simulations of the data acquisition hardware, similar to the one used in ANTARES/AMADEUS, are implemented. A pre-selection scheme for neutrino-like signals based on matched filtering is employed, as it can be used for on-line filtering. To simulate the whole processing chain for experimental data, signal classification and acoustic so...

  18. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - DISCUSSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; SCHWARZ, UJ

    1991-01-01

    Six high-velocity cloud fields were observed with 1' and 1 km s-1 resolution, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The structures seen in earlier observations at 10' resolution break up into a disorderly collection of concentrations. The presence of much substructure has important implica

  19. Distances to galactic high-velocity clouds : Complex C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B. P.; York, D. G.; Howk, J. C.; Barentine, J. C.; Wilhelm, R.; Peletier, R. F.; van Woerden, H.; Beers, T. C.; Ivezic, Z.; Richter, P.; Schwarz, U. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high- velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalacti

  20. Certain optimal parameters of high-velocity Venturi ejection tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, S. B.; Reznichenko, I. G.; Pavlenko, Y. P.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of the geometrical characteristics of centrifugal nozzles in high velocity Venturi ejection tubes for atomizing liquid in gas cleaning plant is analyzed. An optimal value of the nozzle geometrical characteristic, which is a function of the degree of filling of the nozzle outlet opening by the liquid, is given, at which the throat length is independent of water pressure before the nozzle.

  1. Westerbork HI observations of two High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoppelenburg, PS; Schwarz, UJ; van Woerden, H

    1998-01-01

    Westerbork HI synthesis observations are presented for the directions of the stars 4 Lac and HD 135485. Interstellar absorption lines at high velocities had been reported in the UV spectrum of 4 Lac, setting an upper limit of 1.2 kpc on the distance of the associated, small HI cloud (Bates et al. 19

  2. Distances to galactic high-velocity clouds : Complex C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B. P.; York, D. G.; Howk, J. C.; Barentine, J. C.; Wilhelm, R.; Peletier, R. F.; van Woerden, H.; Beers, T. C.; Ivezic, Z.; Richter, P.; Schwarz, U. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high- velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalacti

  3. Electric rail gun projectile acceleration to high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, D. P.; Mccormick, T. J.; Barber, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric rail accelerators are being investigated for application in electric propulsion systems. Several electric propulsion applications require that the rail accelerator be capable of launching projectiles at velocities above 10 km/s. An experimental program was conducted to develop rail accelerator technology for high velocity projectile launch. Several 6 mm bore, 3 m long rail accelerators were fabricated. Projectiles with a mass of 0.2 g were accelerated by plasmas, carrying currents up to 150 kA. Experimental design and results are described. Results indicate that the accelerator performed as predicted for a fraction of the total projectile acceleration. The disparity between predicted and measured results are discussed.

  4. Response of composite laminates on impact of high velocity projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva Kumar, K.; Balakrishna Bhat, T. [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India)

    1998-05-01

    Past work on damage of composites subjected to low velocity and hypervelocity impact has been briefly reviewed and some new results on the glass fibre reinforced plastic composite laminates impacted with high velocity projectiles are presented. The effect of thickness of the laminates and the angle of attack on the energy absorption by the composite laminates and the area of damage caused by impact are described. A correlation is made between the energy absorption and the area of damage. Also described is a new method called infiltration radiography useful for assessing the damage in laminated composites upon ballistic impact. (orig.) 28 refs.

  5. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    that make them easily parallelizable in the manner that, for example, atmospheric or ocean general circulation models (GCMs) are parallel. Many GCMs...Enclosed is the Final Report for ONR Grant No. NOOO 14-15-1-2840 entitled "High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustjc Research," Principal...distribution is unlimited. ONR DURIP Grant Final Report High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research Timothy F. Dud a Applied Ocean

  6. Enhancing gas-phase reaction in a plasma using high intensity and high power ultrasonic acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    is absorbed into said plasma (104), and where a sound pressure level of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) is at least substantially 140 dB and where an acoustic power of said generated ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102); is at least......This invention relates to enhancing a gas-phase reaction in a plasma comprising: creating plasma (104) by at least one plasma source (106), and wherein that the method further comprises: generating ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves (102) having a predetermined amount...... of acoustic energy by at least one ultrasonic high intensity and high power gas-jet acoustic wave generator (101), where said ultrasonic high intensity and high power acoustic waves are directed to propagate towards said plasma (104) so that at least a part of said predetermined amount of acoustic energy...

  7. High-velocity gas associated ultracompact HII regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Ye(徐烨); JIANG; Dongrong(蒋栋荣); YANG; Chuanyi(杨传义); ZHENG; Xingwu(郑兴武); GU; Minfeng(顾敏峰); PEI; Chunchuan(裴春传)

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for high-velocity 12CO (1-0) emission associated H2O masers and ultracompact (UC) HII regions. The aim is to investigate the relationship between H2O masers, CO high-velocity gas (HVG) and their associated infrared sources. Our sample satisfies Wood & Churchwell criterion. Almost 70 % of the sources have full widths (FWs) greater than 15 km@ s?1 at T*a = 100 mK and 15 % have FWs greater than 30 km@ s?1. In most of our objects there is excess high velocity emission in the beam. There is a clear correlation between CO line FWs and far-infrared luminosities: the FW increases with the FIR luminosity. The relation suggests that more luminous sources are likely to be more energetic and able to inject more energy into their surroundings. As a result, larger FW of the CO line could be produced. In most of our sources, the velocities of peak of the H2O emission are in agreement with those of the CO cloud, but a number of them have a large blueshift with respect to the CO peak. These masers might stem from the amplifications of a background source, which may amplify some unobservable weak masers to an observable level.

  8. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO DongHai; LI ShunZhou; WANG ChengHao

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated.Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used,an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency,which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system.Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well.Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal,an experimental imaging system is also built.Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz.Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  9. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Watanabe

    Full Text Available Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz to high (0.15-0.40 Hz frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system.

  10. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  11. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  12. Estimating discharge using multi-level velocity data from acoustic doppler instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jane Bang; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Ovesen, Niels Bering

    been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile...... increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth...... it records the stage. The monthly control measurements made by the water authority office are made with an ADCP-instrument (Streampro, acoustic Doppler current profiler) which is pulled across the stream next to the in situ Doppler instruments. As part of the present project supplementary ADCP-data have been...

  13. In vivo acoustic super-resolution and super-resolved velocity mapping using microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Browning, Richard J; Tang, Meng-Xing; Dunsby, Christopher; Eckersley, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The structure of microvasculature cannot be resolved using standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. In this work, we use a standard clinical US system to perform in vivo sub-diffraction imaging on a CD1, female mouse aged eight weeks by localizing isolated US signals from microbubbles flowing within the ear microvasculature, and compare our results to optical microscopy. Furthermore, we develop a new technique to map blood velocity at super-resolution by tracking individual bubbles through the vasculature. Resolution is improved from a measured lateral and axial resolution of 112 μm and 94 μ m respectively in original US data, to super-resolved images of microvasculature where vessel features as fine as 19 μm are clearly visualized. Velocity maps clearly distinguish opposing flow direction and separated speed distributions in adjacent vessels, thereby enabling further differentiation between vessels otherwise not spatially separated in the image. This technique overcomes the diffraction limit to provide a noninvasive means of imaging the microvasculature at super-resolution, to depths of many centimeters. In the future, this method could noninvasively image pathological or therapeutic changes in the microvasculature at centimeter depths in vivo.

  14. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  15. High-speed imaging, acoustic features, and aeroacoustic computations of jet noise from Strombolian (and Vulcanian) explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Sesterhenn, J.; Scarlato, P.; Stampka, K.; Del Bello, E.; Pena Fernandez, J. J.; Gaudin, D.

    2014-05-01

    High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions at Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Yasur (Vanuatu) volcanoes allowed visualization of pressure waves from seconds-long explosions. From the explosion jets, waves radiate with variable geometry, timing, and apparent direction and velocity. Both the explosion jets and their wave fields are replicated well by numerical simulations of supersonic jets impulsively released from a pressurized vessel. The scaled acoustic signal from one explosion at Stromboli displays a frequency pattern with an excellent match to those from the simulated jets. We conclude that both the observed waves and the audible sound from the explosions are jet noise, i.e., the typical acoustic field radiating from high-velocity jets. Volcanic jet noise was previously quantified only in the infrasonic emissions from large, sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions. Our combined approach allows us to define the spatial and temporal evolution of audible jet noise from supersonic jets in small-scale volcanic eruptions.

  16. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  17. Gouge initiation in high-velocity rocket sled testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachau, R. D. M.; Trucano, T. G.; Yew, C. H.

    1994-07-01

    A model is presented which describes the formation of surface damage 'gouging' on the rails that guide rocket sleds. An unbalanced sled can randomly cause a very shallow-angle, oblique impact between the sled shoe and the rail. This damage phenomenon has also been observed in high-velocity guns where the projectile is analogous to the moving sled shoe and the gun barrel is analogous to the stationary rail. At sufficiently high velocity, the oblique impact will produce a thin hot layer of soft material on the contact surfaces. Under the action of a normal moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an anti-symmetric deformation and the formation of a 'hump' in front of the moving load. A gouge is formed when this hump is overrun by the sled shoe. The phenomenon is simulated numerically using the CTH strong shock physics code, and the results are in good agreement with experimental observation.

  18. Pressure and velocity cross-spectrum of normal modes in low-frequency acoustic vector field of shallow water and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Yu; Qing Ling,; Jiang Xu

    2015-01-01

    The pressure and horizontal particle velocity combined descriptions in the very low frequency acoustic field of shal ow wa-ter integrated with the concept of effective depth of Pekeris wave-guide is proposed, especial y the active component of the pressure and horizontal particle velocity cross-spectrum, also cal ed ho-rizontal complex cross acoustic intensity, when only two normal modes are trapped in the waveguide. Both the approximate theo-retic analysis and the numerical results show that the sign of the horizontal complex cross acoustic intensity active component is independent of the range when vertical y deployed receiving dual sensors are placed in appropriate depths, the sum of which is equal to the waveguide effective depth, so it can be used to tel whether the sound source is near the surface or underwater;while the range rate is expected to be measured by utilizing the sign distribution characteristic of the reactive component. The further robustness analysis of the depth classification algorithm shows that the existence of shear waves in semi infinite basement and the change of acoustic velocity profiles have few effects on the application of this method, and the seabed attenuation wil limit the detection range, but the algorithm stil has a good robustness in the valid detection range.

  19. VELOCITY BUNCHING OF HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Musumeci, P; Rosenzweig, J B; Brown, W J; England, R J; Ferrario, M; Jacob, J S; Thompson, M C; Travish, G; Tremaine, A M; Yoder, R

    2004-10-15

    Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS) experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly in ICS experiments

  20. Velocity bunching of high-brightness electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Velocity bunching has been recently proposed as a tool for compressing electron beam pulses in modern high brightness photoinjector sources. This tool is familiar from earlier schemes implemented for bunching dc electron sources, but presents peculiar challenges when applied to high current, low emittance beams from photoinjectors. The main difficulty foreseen is control of emittance oscillations in the beam in this scheme, which can be naturally considered as an extension of the emittance compensation process at moderate energies. This paper presents two scenarios in which velocity bunching, combined with emittance control, is to play a role in nascent projects. The first is termed ballistic bunching, where the changing of relative particle velocities and positions occur in distinct regions, a short high gradient linac, and a drift length. This scenario is discussed in the context of the proposed ORION photoinjector. Simulations are used to explore the relationship between the degree of bunching, and the emittance compensation process. Experimental measurements performed at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory of the surprisingly robust bunching process, as well as accompanying deleterious transverse effects, are presented. An unanticipated mechanism for emittance growth in bends for highly momentum chirped beam was identified and studied in these experiments. The second scenario may be designated as phase space rotation, and corresponds closely to the recent proposal of Ferrario and Serafini. Its implementation for the compression of the electron beam pulse length in the PLEIADES inverse Compton scattering (ICS experiment at LLNL is discussed. It is shown in simulations that optimum compression may be obtained by manipulation of the phases in low gradient traveling wave accelerator sections. Measurements of the bunching and emittance control achieved in such an implementation at PLEIADES, as well as aspects of the use of velocity-bunched beam directly

  1. Internal Ballistics of High Velocity Special Purpose Guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Gupta

    1976-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more conventional guns are being utilized as special purpose guns to achieve very high velocity by using unconventionally high C/W ratios. The existing methods of internal ballistics give satisfactory results only for low (less than one C/W ratios. In the present paper the basic internal ballistic equations have been modified to cater for non-linear rate of burning, cubical form function and a realistic pressure gradient between breech face and the projectile base. The equations have been numerically solved. The results for low and high C/W ratios have been compared with those obtained by using conventional methods.

  2. Dynamical evolution of high velocity clouds in the intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Konz, C; Birk, G T

    2002-01-01

    HI observations of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) indicate, that they are interacting with their ambient medium. Even clouds located in the very outer Galactic halo or the intergalactic space seem to interact with their ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical evolution of high velocity neutral gas clouds moving through a hot magnetized ambient plasma by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic plasma-neutral gas simulations. This situation is representative for the fast moving dense neutral gas cloudlets in the Magellanic Stream as well as for high velocity clouds in general. The question on the dynamical and thermal stabilization of a cold dense neutral cloud in a hot thin ambient halo plasma is numerically investigated. The simulations show the formation of a comet-like head-tail structure combined with a magnetic barrier of increased field strength which exerts a stabilizing pressure on the cloud and hinders hot plasma from diffusing into the cloud. The simulations can explain both the...

  3. Aerosol production by high-velocity molten-metal droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D J; Benson, D A

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by high-velocity molten-metal droplets. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. The primary droplets are produced by the heating and electromagnetic launch of metal wires; velocities approaching Mach 1 can be obtained at present. Size distributions obtained tungsten and zirconium droplets burning in air. Lognormal size distributions were observed in both cases with DMPS-equivalent mean diameters of about 0.4 ..mu..m and geometric standard deviations of about two. SEM and TEM analysis of aerosol samples collected by a point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator showed that the majority of these particles were web-like chain agglomerates. Tests performed in argon atmospheres produced several orders-of-magnitude less aerosol mass than in equivalent air tests, supporting the key role combustion plays in secondary aerosol generation. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. High-Frequency Acoustic Sediment Classification in Shallow Water

    CERN Document Server

    Bentrem, F W; Kalcic, M T; Duncan, M E; Bentrem, Frank W.; Sample, John; Kalcic, Maria T.; Duncan, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    A geoacoustic inversion technique for high-frequency (12 kHz) multibeam sonar data is presented as a means to classify the seafloor sediment in shallow water (40-300 m). The inversion makes use of backscattered data at a variety of grazing angles to estimate mean grain size. The need for sediment type and the large amounts of multibeam data being collected with the Naval Oceanographic Office's Simrad EM 121A systems, have fostered the development of algorithms to process the EM 121A acoustic backscatter into maps of sediment type. The APL-UW (Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington) backscattering model is used with simulated annealing to invert for six geoacoustic parameters. For the inversion, three of the parameters are constrained according to empirical correlations with mean grain size, which is introduced as an unconstrained parameter. The four unconstrained (free) parameters are mean grain size, sediment volume interaction, and two seafloor roughness parameters. Acoustic sediment cla...

  5. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  6. High Frequency Acoustic Microscopy for the Determination of Porosity and Young's Modulus in High Burnup Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mara; Laux, Didier; Cappia, Fabiola; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Wiss, T.; Despaux, G.

    2016-06-01

    During irradiation UO2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of both porosity and elastic properties in high burnup UO2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. For this purpose ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A UO2 pellet with a burnup of 67 GWd/tU was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the JRC-ITU at a 90 MHz frequency, with methanol as coupling liquid. VR was measured at different radial positions. A good agreement was found, when comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using SEM image analysis, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition, Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile and to the hardness radial profile data obtained by Vickers micro-indentation.

  7. Low and high velocity impact response of thick hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiel, Clement; Ishai, Ori

    1993-01-01

    The effects of low and high velocity impact on thick hybrid composites (THC's) were experimentally compared. Test Beams consisted of CFRP skins which were bonded onto an interleaved syntactic foam core and cured at 177 C (350 F). The impactor tip for both cases was a 16 mm (0.625 inch) steel hemisphere. In spite of the order of magnitude difference in velocity ranges and impactor weights, similar relationships between impact energy, damage size, and residual strength were found. The dependence of the skin compressive strength on damage size agree well with analytical open hole models for composite laminates and may enable the prediction of ultimate performance for the damaged composite, based on visual inspection.

  8. Analysis of high velocity impact on hybrid composite fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the analysis of high velocity impact of composite blades using a computerized capability which consists of coupling a composites mechanics code with the direct-time integration features of NASTRAN. The application of the capability to determine the linear dynamic response of an intraply hybrid composite aircraft engine fan blade is described in detail. The predicted results agree with measured data. The results also show that the impact stresses reach sufficiently high magnitudes to cause failures in the impact region at early times of the impact event.

  9. High transmission acoustic focusing by impedance-matched acoustic meta-surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Al Jahdali, Rasha

    2016-01-19

    Impedance is an important issue in the design of acoustic lenses because mismatched impedance is detrimental to real focusing applications. Here, we report two designs of acoustic lenses that focus acoustic waves in water and air, respectively. They are tailored by acoustic meta-surfaces, which are rigid thin plates decorated with periodically distributed sub-wavelength slits. Their respective building blocks are constructed from the coiling-up spaces in water and the layered structures in air. Analytic analysis based on coupled-mode theory and transfer matrix reveals that the impedances of the lenses are matched to those of the background media. With these impedance-matched acoustic lenses, we demonstrate the acoustic focusing effect by finite-element simulations.

  10. Intermediate- and High-Velocity Ionized Gas toward zeta Orionis

    CERN Document Server

    Welty, D E; Raymond, J C; Mallouris, C; York, D G

    2002-01-01

    We combine UV spectra obtained with the HST/GHRS echelle, IMAPS, and Copernicus to study the abundances and physical conditions in the predominantly ionized gas seen at high (-105 to -65 km/s) and intermediate velocities (-60 to -10 km/s) toward zeta Ori. We have high resolution (FWHM ~ 3.3-4.5 km/s) and/or high S/N spectra for at least two significant ions of C, N, Al, Si, S, and Fe -- enabling accurate estimates for both the total N(H II) and the elemental depletions. C, N, and S have essentially solar relative abundances; Al, Si, and Fe appear to be depleted by about 0.8, 0.3-0.4, and 0.95 dex, respectively. While various ion ratios would be consistent with collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) for T ~ 25,000-80,000 K, the widths of individual high-velocity absorption components indicate that T ~ 9000 K -- so the gas is not in CIE. Analysis of the C II fine-structure excitation equilibrium yields estimated densities (n_e ~ n_H ~ 0.1-0.2 cm^{-3}), thermal pressures (2 n_H T ~ 2000-4000 cm^{-3}K), and thi...

  11. Decision making in high-velocity environments: implications for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanovich, P L; Uhrig, J D

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare can be considered a high-velocity environment and, as such, can benefit from research conducted in other industries regarding strategic decision making. Strategic planning is not only relevant to firms in high-velocity environments, but is also important for high performance and survival. Specifically, decision-making speed seems to be instrumental in differentiating between high and low performers; fast decision makers outperform slow decision makers. This article outlines the differences between fast and slow decision makers, identifies five paralyses that can slow decision making in healthcare, and outlines the role of a planning department in circumventing these paralyses. Executives can use the proposed planning structure to improve both the speed and quality of strategic decisions. The structure uses planning facilitators to avoid the following five paralyses: 1. Analysis. Decision makers can no longer afford the luxury of lengthy, detailed analysis but must develop real-time systems that provide appropriate, timely information. 2. Alternatives. Many alternatives (beyond the traditional two or three) need to be considered and the alternatives must be evaluated simultaneously. 3. Group Think. Decision makers must avoid limited mind-sets and autocratic leadership styles by seeking out independent, knowledgeable counselors. 4. Process. Decision makers need to resolve conflicts through "consensus with qualification," as opposed to waiting for everyone to come on board. 5. Separation. Successful implementation requires a structured process that cuts across disciplines and levels.

  12. Acoustic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  13. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  14. Reconstructing the vibro-acoustic quantities on a highly non-spherical surface using the Helmholtz equation least squares method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Logesh Kumar; Wu, Sean F

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents helpful guidelines and strategies for reconstructing the vibro-acoustic quantities on a highly non-spherical surface by using the Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS). This study highlights that a computationally simple code based on the spherical wave functions can produce an accurate reconstruction of the acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity on planar surfaces. The key is to select the optimal origin of the coordinate system behind the planar surface, choose a target structural wavelength to be reconstructed, set an appropriate stand-off distance and microphone spacing, use a hybrid regularization scheme to determine the optimal number of the expansion functions, etc. The reconstructed vibro-acoustic quantities are validated rigorously via experiments by comparing the reconstructed normal surface velocity spectra and distributions with the benchmark data obtained by scanning a laser vibrometer over the plate surface. Results confirm that following the proposed guidelines and strategies can ensure the accuracy in reconstructing the normal surface velocity up to the target structural wavelength, and produce much more satisfactory results than a straight application of the original HELS formulations. Experiment validations on a baffled, square plate were conducted inside a fully anechoic chamber.

  15. Influences of the Air in Metal Powder High Velocity Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process of metal powder high velocity impact compaction, the air is compressed sharply and portion remains in the compacts. In order to study the Influences, a discrete density volleyball accumulation model for aluminium powder was established with the use of ABAQUS. Study found that the powder porosity air obstruct the pressing process because remaining air reduced strength and density of the compacts in the current high-speed pressing (V≤100m/s. When speed further increased (V≥100m/s, the temperature of the air increased sharply, and was even much higher than the melting point of the material. When aluminium powder was compressed at a speed of 200m/s, temperatures of air could reach 2033 K, far higher than the melting point of 877 K. Increased density of powders was a result of local softening and even melt adhesive while air between particles with high temperature and pressure flowed past.

  16. Performance study of Lagrangian methods: reconstruction of large scale peculiar velocities and baryonic acoustic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Keselman, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    NoAM for "No Action Method" is a framework for reconstructing the past orbits of observed tracers of the large scale mass density field. It seeks exact solutions of the equations of motion (EoM), satisfying initial homogeneity and the final observed particle (tracer) positions. The solutions are found iteratively reaching a specified tolerance defined as the RMS of the distance between reconstructed and observed positions. Starting from a guess for the initial conditions, NoAM advances particles using standard N-body techniques for solving the EoM. Alternatively, the EoM can be replaced by any approximation such as Zel'dovich and second order perturbation theory (2LPT). NoAM is suitable for billions of particles and can easily handle non-regular volumes, redshift space, and other constraints. We implement NoAM to systematically compare Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and N-body dynamics over diverse configurations ranging from idealized high-res periodic simulation box to realistic galaxy mocks. Our findings are (i) Non-li...

  17. Paradoxes of high and low velocities in modern geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, P. V.

    2016-11-01

    An analysis of the data on the vertical and horizontal movements of the Earth's crust obtained within recent 40 years has revealed paradoxical deviations of its deformations from the movements inherited from the past geological times. Currently, high local deformation velocities are observed both in the aseismic and seismically active regions. There are no clues to this phenomenon within the conventional concepts of geodynamics and mechanics of deformed solids. It is shown in this work that the paradoxes of high and low velocities could be solved if deformation processes taking place in the Earths' crust would be treated as the evolution of the stress-strain state of the loaded medium as a typical non-linear dynamic system. In this case, fracture develops in two stages—a comparatively slow quasi-stationary stage and a superfast catastrophic one, wherein the spatial localization of parameters is followed by the localization of the deformation process in time. This property is a fundamental characteristic of any non-linear dynamic systems.

  18. High-velocity molecular outflows hear massive young stellar objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴月芳; 李月兴; 杨传义; 雷成明; 孙金江; 吕静; 韩溥

    1999-01-01

    By mapping the 12CO J=1—0 lines in IRAS 05391-0217, 06114+1745 and 06291+0421, three new high-velocity bipolar molecular outflows are found. Parameters of these outflows are derived, which suggest that they are massive and energetic outflows with total kinetic energies of about 1038 J and mass loss rates about 10-5 M⊙/a. The driving sources are identified by analyzing the positions, intensities and color temperatures of the associated infrared sources. These outflows are most likely driven by single sources which correspond to massive young stellar objects. In these regions H2O masers have been detected located near the embedded infrared sources, which indicates that their exciting mechanism may be correlated with that of the CO outflows. The relationship between the parameters of outflows and central sources shows that high-velocity outflow and thermal radiation of a star are two basic correlated but different features in the evolution of young stars.

  19. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  20. Split Hopkinson resonant bar test for sonic-frequency acoustic velocity and attenuation measurements of small, isotropic geological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 °C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described split Hopkinson resonant bar test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples, and a natural rock sample.

  1. Rapid Growth of Ice Dendrite in Acoustically Levitated and Highly Undercooled Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2002-01-01

    Water drops with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 4 mm are highly undercooled by up to 24 K with the acousticlevitation technique. Compared to the case of water contained in a tube, acoustic levitation has efficientlyavoided the heterogeneous nucleation from container walls and consequently increased the undercooling level.However, the cavitation effect induced by ultrasound may prematurely catalyse nucleation, which hinders thefurther achievement of bulk undercooling. The growth velocity of ice dendrite determined experimentally inhighly undercooled water is characteristic of rapid dendritic growth, which reaches 0.17m/s at the undercoolingof 24 K. The Lipton-Kurz-Trivedi dendritic growth model is used to predict the kinetic characteristics of rapidgrowth of ice dendrite under high undercooling conditions, which shows good agreement with the experimentalresults.

  2. MEMS acoustic emission transducers designed with high aspect ratio geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, H.; Ozevin, D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, micro-electro-mechanic systems (MEMS) acoustic emission (AE) transducers are manufactured using an electroplating technique. The transducers use a capacitance change as their transduction principle, and are tuned to the range 50-200 kHz. Through the electroplating technique, a thick metal layer (20 μm nickel + 0.5 μm gold) is used to form a freely moving microstructure layer. The presence of the gold layer reduces the potential corrosion of the nickel layer. A dielectric layer is deposited between the two electrodes, thus preventing the stiction phenomenon. The transducers have a measured quality factor in the range 15-30 at atmospheric pressure and are functional without vacuum packaging. The transducers are characterized using electrical and mechanical tests to identify the capacitance, resonance frequency and damping. Ultrasonic wave generation using a Q-switched laser shows the directivity of the transducer sensitivity. The comparison of the MEMS transducers with similar frequency piezoelectric transducers shows that the MEMS AE transducers have better response characteristics and sensitivity at the resonance frequency and well-defined waveform signatures (rise time and decay time) due to pure resonance behavior in the out-of-plane direction. The transducers are sensitive to a unique wave direction, which can be utilized to increase the accuracy of source localization by selecting the correct wave velocity at the structures.

  3. High Velocity Cloud Edges and Mini-HVCs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, G L; Salpeter, E E

    2002-01-01

    Arecibo mapping is reported of the neutral hydrogen distribution along selected directions out from the centers of two small High Velocity Clouds (HVC), W486 and W491. Both HVCs have a small inner region where the neutral hydrogen column density N_HI decreases slowly and a larger outer region where N_HI declines more rapidly, smoothly and exponentially from ~ 2 X 10^19 atoms cm^-2 down to < 10^18 atoms cm^-2. Line widths, and presumably temperature and turbulence, do not increase in the outermost regions. Therefore pressure decreases smoothly, making confinement by dark matter gravity more likely than confinement by external pressure. The more extended HVC, W491, has a superimposed small cloud (which we dub a ``mini-HVC''), offset by 66 km s^-1 in velocity along the line of sight with peak column density about 5 X 10^18 atoms cm^-2. Preliminary data toward future mapping of two more HVCs reveals two more mini-HVCs of similarly small size and central column density a bit less than 1 X 10^19 atoms cm^-2. We ...

  4. Methods of Measurement of High Air Velocities by the Hot-wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weske, John R.

    1943-01-01

    Investigations of strengths of hot wires at high velocities were conducted with platinum, nickel, and tungsten at approximately 200 Degrees Celcius hot-wire temperature. The results appear to disqualify platinum for velocities approaching the sonic range; whereas nickel withstands sound velocity, and tungsten may be used for supersonic velocities under standard atmospheric conditions. Hot wires must be supported by rigid prolongs at high velocities to avoid wire breakage. Resting current measurements for constant temperature show agreement with King's relation.

  5. High energy neutrino acoustic detection activities in Lake Baikal: Status and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aynutdinov, V.; Avrorin, A.; Balkanov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belolaptikov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bogorodsky, D. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Budnev, N. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: nbudnev@api.isu.ru; Danilchenko, I.; Domogatsky, G.; Doroshenko, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dyachok, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Dzhilkibaev, Zh.-A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fialkovsky, S. [Nizhni Novgorod State Technical University, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gaponenko, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golubkov, K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grishin, O. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Klabukov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, A. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kochanov, A. [Applied Physics Institute of Irkutsk State University, Gagarin blvd. 20, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-06-01

    We review the status of high-energy acoustic neutrino detection activities in Lake Baikal. The Baikal collaboration constructed a hydro-acoustic device which may be regarded as a prototype subunit for a future underwater acoustic neutrino telescope. The device is capable of common operation with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200+, and is operating at a depth of about 150 m on the 'NT200+ instrumentation string'. Our measurements show that the integral noise power in the frequency band 20-40 kHz can reach levels as low as about 1 mPa, i.e. one of the lowest noise levels measured at the currently considered acoustic neutrino sites. At the same time, short acoustic pulses with different amplitudes and shapes have been observed. Low sound absorption in Baikal freshwater and absence of strong acoustic noise sources do motivate further activities towards a large-scale acoustic neutrino detector in Lake Baikal.

  6. Sensitivities of phase-velocity dispersion curves of surface waves due to high-velocity-layer and low-velocity-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Yixian; Pan, Yudi; Wang, Ao; Gao, Lingli

    2016-12-01

    High-velocity-layer (HVL) and low-velocity-layer (LVL) models are two kinds of the most common irregular layered models in near-surface geophysical applications. When calculating dispersion curves of some extreme irregular models, current algorithms (e.g., Knopoff transfer matrix algorithm) should be modified. We computed the correct dispersion curves and analyzed their sensitivities due to several synthetic HVL and LVL models. The results show that phase-velocity dispersion curves of both Rayleigh and Love waves are sensitive to variations in S-wave velocity of an LVL, but insensitive to that of an HVL. In addition, they are both insensitive to those of layers beneath the HVL or LVL. With an increase in velocity contrast between the irregular layer and its neighboring layers, the sensitivity effects (high sensitivity for the LVL and low sensitivity for the HVL) will amplify. These characteristics may significantly influence the inversion stability, leading to an inverted result with a low level of confidence. To invert surface-wave phase velocities for a more accurate S-wave model with an HVL or LVL, priori knowledge may be required and an inversion algorithm should be treated with extra caution.

  7. RESPONSE OF STRUCTURES TO HIGH VELOCITY IMPACTS: A GENERALIZED ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aversh'ev Anatoliy Sergeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a high velocity impact produced by a spherical striker and a target are considered; different stages of loading and unloading, target deformations and propagation of non-stationary wave surfaces within the target are analyzed. The problem of the strike modeling and subsequent deformations is solved by using not only the equations of mechanics of deformable rigid bodies, but also fluid mechanics equations. The target material is simulated by means of an ideal "plastic gas". Modeling results and theoretical calculations are compared to the experimental results. The crater depth, its correlation with the striker diameter, values of the pressure and deformations of the target underneath the contact area are determined as the main characteristics of dynamic interaction.

  8. Low velocity impact behaviour of ultra high strength concrete panels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smitha Gopinath; R Ayashwarya; V Ramesh Kumar; Prabhat Ranjan Prem; A Rama Chandra Murthy; C K Madheswaran; R Nagesh Iyer

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation carried out on Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHSC) panels subjected to low velocity projectile impact to assess impact resistance. UHSC panel of size 350 × 350 mm and thickness 15 mm is studied under drop weight impact loading for three different pre-determined drop heights ranging from 100 mm to 300 mm. The response of UHSC panel in terms of acceleration vs time is obtained experimentally. Numerical model has been developed to simulate the impact behaviour of UHSC panel. The Brittle cracking model is used to simulate the behaviour of UHSC panel under impact loading and to perform parametric studies by varying the volume fraction of steel fibres.

  9. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  10. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  11. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  12. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, W B; Chengalur, J N

    2001-01-01

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles...

  13. High velocity vortex channeling in vicinal YBCO thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puica, I; Lang, W; Durrell, J H

    2012-09-01

    We report on electrical transport measurements at high current densities on optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films grown on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates. Data were collected by using a pulsed-current technique in a four-probe arrangement, allowing to extend the current-voltage characteristics to high supercritical current densities (up to 24 MA cm(-2)) and high electric fields (more than 20 V/cm), in the superconducting state at temperatures between 30 and 80 K. The electric measurements were performed on tracks perpendicular to the vicinal step direction, such that the current crossed between ab planes, under magnetic field rotated in the plane defined by the crystallographic c axis and the current density. At magnetic field orientation parallel to the cuprate layers, evidence for the sliding motion along the ab planes (vortex channeling) was found. The signature of vortex channeling appeared to get enhanced with increasing electric field, due to the peculiar depinning features in the kinked vortex range. They give rise to a current-voltage characteristics steeper than in the more off-plane rectilinear vortex orientations, in the electric field range below approximately 1 V/cm. Roughly above this value, the high vortex channeling velocities (up to 8.6 km/s) could be ascribed to the flux flow, although the signature of ohmic transport appeared to be altered by unavoidable macroscopic self-heating and hot-electron-like effects.

  14. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  15. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  16. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  17. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air

    OpenAIRE

    Cees van der Geld; Twan Wernaart; Mart Grooten; Wilhelm van Schaik

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temp...

  18. Collisional Disruption of Ice by High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Masahiko

    1999-11-01

    High-velocity impact among icy planetesimals is a physical phenomenon important to the planetary evolution process in the outer Solar System. In order to study this phenomenon, impact experiments on water ice were made by using a two-stage light gas gun installed in a cold room (-10°C) to clarify the elementary processes of collisional disruption and to study the reaccumulation and the escape conditions of the impact fragments. Cubic ice targets ranging in size from 15 to 100 mm were impacted by a nylon projectile of 7 mg with an impact velocity ( vi) from 2.3 to 4.7 km/s. The corresponding mass ratio of the projectile to the target ( mp/ Mt) ranged from 10 -3 to 10 -6, which is two orders of magnitude lower than that used in previous studies (Arakawa et al. 1995, Icarus118, 341-354). As a result, we obtained data on elementary processes such as attenuation of the shock wave and fragmentation dynamics. We found that the shock pressure attenuates in the ice target according to the relation of P∝( Lp/ r2, irrespective of the mass ratio between 10 -3 and 10 -5, where Lp is the projectile size and r is a propagation distance. The largest fragment mass ( ml) normalized by the original target mass has a good relationship to a nondimensional impact stress ( PI, NDIS) defined as the ratio of the antipodal pressure to the material strength. This relationship is described as ml/ Mt ∝ PI-1.7 for a wide range of impact conditions (50 m/s20 km) reaccumulated. On the other hand, when smaller icy bodies (radius<2 km) disrupted catastrophically, all fragments escaped and a rubble pile was never formed.

  19. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  20. Signal processing for high speed underwater acoustic transmission of image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiqing; ZHU Min; WANG Junwei; HUANG Haiyun; YANG Bo; XU Lijun; ZHAO Liang

    2009-01-01

    A signal processing method for high-speed underwater acoustic transmission of image is presented. It has two parts. Part 1 introduces signal processing for underwater acoustic coherent communication. Part 1 includes 3 technical points. (1) Doppler shift compensation.Chirp signals are inserted between data packages. A correlation process between two copy correlation functions gives more accurate estimation of the mean Doppler shift. Then it could be compensated by resampling the data. In adaptive decision feedback equalizer (DFE) an adaptive phase compensator with fast self-optimized least mean square (FOLMS) adaptation algorithm is utilized resulting in better motion tolerance than compensators with 2nd order Phase-Lock Loop algorithm. The performance of the combination of mean Doppler shift compensation and adaptive phase compensator is quite good. (2) A diversity combiner (DC) used in advance of equalizer. Both combiner and adaptive DFE are based on FOLMS adaptation algorithm. This results in reduced computation complexity and better performance. (3) Cascaded equalizer and Turbo-Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM) decoder and the iteration algorithm. A new bitsymbol converter based on Soft Output Viterbi Algorithm (SOVA) is studied. Comparing with the traditional decision, coding and mapping algorithm, the new converter can reduce Bit Error Rate(BER) by nearly 2 orders. Part 2 is mainly around a robust image compression algorithm. Based on Discrete wavelet transform and fixed length coding, a robust compression algorithm for acoustic image is studied. The algorithm includes 4 technical points. (1) Utilizes CDF9/7 wavelet bases to transform the images. (2) Analyses the energy distribution of subband coefficients. Suitable transformation layer number is 3. (3) Applies different quantization steps to different subbands in accordance with their energy distribution. (4) Uses fixed length coding to prevent error propagation. The results show the algorithm achieves a balance

  1. Particle-turbulence-acoustic interactions in high-speed free-shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Buchta, David; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the injection of micro-water droplets in turbulent flows can be used to reduce the intensity of near-field pressure fluctuations. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to evaluate the effects of particle-turbulence-acoustic coupling for the first time. Simulations of temporally developing mixing layers are conducted for a range of Mach numbers and mass loadings. Once the turbulence reaches a self-similar state, the air-density shear layer is seeded with a random distribution of mono disperse water-density droplets. For M =0.9 to M =1.75, preliminary results show reductions in the near-field pressure fluctuations for moderate mass loadings, consistent with experimental studies under similar conditions. At high speed, the principle reduction of the normal velocity fluctuations, which increases with particle mass loading, appears to correlate to the reduction of the near-field radiated pressure fluctuations. These findings demonstrate that the DNS reproduces the observed particle-turbulence-acoustic phenomenology, and its complete space-time database can be used to further understand their interactions.

  2. Innovative High Temperature Acoustic Liner Development and Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The massive acoustic loads produced by launch vehicles can detrimentally affect the proper functioning of vehicle components, payloads, and launch support...

  3. Acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao-Bo; Zhang Jian-Run; Li Pu

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic pressure model of bubble bursting is proposed.An experiment studying the acoustic characteristics of the bursting bubble at the surface of a high-viscosity liquid is reported.It is found that the sudden bursting of a bubble at the high-viscosity liquid surface generates N-shape wave at first,then it transforms into a jet wave.The fundamental frequency of the acoustic signal caused by the bursting bubble decreases linearly as the bubble size increases.The results of the investigation can be used to understand the acoustic characteristics of bubble bursting.

  4. Development of acoustic devices for ultra-high energy neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C; Salomon, K; Schwemmer, S

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic neutrino detection is a promising approach to instrument the large detector volumes needed for the detection of the small neutrino fluxes expected at ultra-high energies (E > 1 EeV). We report on several studies investigating the feasibility of such an acoustic detector. High-precision lab measurements using laser and proton beams aiming at the verification of the thermo-acoustic model have been performed. Different types of acoustic sensors have been developed and characterized. An autonomous acoustic system, attached to the ANTARES prototype string "Line0", has been deployed and operated successfully at 2400 m depth, allowing for in-situ studies of the acoustic background in the Mediterranean Sea.

  5. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    I will discuss new instrumentation and techniques designed to maximize the Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of next generation exoplanet discovery instruments. These systems include a novel wavelength calibration device based on an all-fiber fabry-perot interferometer, a compact and efficient optical fiber image scrambler based on a single high-index ball lens, and a unique optical fiber mode mixer. These systems have been developed specifically to overcome three technological hurdles that have classically hindered high precision RV measurements in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR), namely: lack of available wavelength calibration sources, inadequate decoupling of the spectrograph from variable telescope illumination, and speckle-induced noise due to mode interference in optical fibers. The instrumentation presented here will be applied to the Habitable-zone Planet Finder, a NIR RV instrument designed to detect rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M-dwarfs, and represents a critical technological step towards the detection of potentially habitable Earth-like planets. While primarily focused in the NIR, many of these systems will be adapted to future optical RV instruments as well, such as NASA's new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope.

  6. Detection of number of sources and DOA stimation based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity using acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (direction of arrival) estimation of underwater remote targets, a novel subspace-decomposition method based on the cross covariance matrix of the pressure and the particle velocity of acoustic vector sensor arrays (AVSA) was proposed.Whereafter, using spatio-temporal virtual tapped-delay-line, a new eigenvector-based criteria of detection of number of sources and of subspace partition is also presented. The theoretical analysis shows that the new source detection and direction finding method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods using particle velocity information of acoustic vector sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, has better estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate, the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  7. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Yunhou Sun; Cuncheng Shi; Zheng Liu; Desheng Wen

    2015-01-01

    With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape,...

  8. Fault strength evolution during high velocity friction experiments with slip-pulse and constant-velocity loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic analyses show that slip during large earthquakes evolves in a slip-pulse mode that is characterized by abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration. We experimentally analyze the friction evolution under slip-pulse proxy of a large earthquake, and compare it with the evolution at loading modes of constant-velocity and changing-velocity. We present a series of 42 experiments conducted on granite samples sheared in a high-velocity rotary apparatus. The experiments were conducted on room-dry, solid granite samples at slip-velocities of 0.0006-1 m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5 MPa. The constitutive relations are presented with respect to mechanical power-density: PD= [shear stress * slip velocity], with units of power per area (MW/m^2). The experimental constitutive relations strongly depend on the loading mode. Constant velocity mode displays initial weakening with increasing PD that is followed by strengthening for PD = 0.02-0.5 MW/m^2, and abrupt weakening at PD > 0.5 MW/m^2. Changing-velocity modes display gentle strengthening for PD < 0.2 MW/m^2 that is followed by abrupt weakening as PD reaches 0.7-0.8 MW/m^2. Beyond this level of power-density, the two loading modes diverge: in changing-velocity of quake-mode the experimental fault continues to weaken with friction coefficient approaching 0.2, whereas in changing-velocity of ramp-mode the fault strengthens with friction coefficient approaching 1.0. The analysis demonstrates that (1) the strength evolution and constitutive parameters of the granite fault strongly depend on the loading mode, and (2) the slip-pulse mode is energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. The results suggest that the frictional strength determined in slip-pulse experiments, is more relevant to simulations of earthquake rupture than frictional strength determined in constant-velocity experiments.Figure 1. Friction

  9. Computational Aero-Acoustic Using High-order Finite-Difference Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a high-order technique to accurately predict flow-generated noise is introduced. The technique consists of solving the viscous incompressible flow equations and inviscid acoustic equations using a incompressible/compressible splitting technique. The incompressible flow equations ar...... discretizations of the acoustic equations. The classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta time scheme is applied to the acoustic equations for time discretization....

  10. Acoustic biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  11. Bulk sound velocity of porous materials at high pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿华运; 吴强; 谭华; 蔡灵仓; 经福谦

    2002-01-01

    A correction of Walsh's method for bulk sound velocity calculation for shocked porous materials is accomplishedbased on the Wu-Jing thermodynamic equation of state. The corrected bulk velocities for solid and porous sampleswith low porosities are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data published previously. On the basisof this corrected equation, the influence of thermoelectrons on the bulk velocity of shocked materials is discussed indetail at pressures of 50, 70 and 200 GPa. Some interesting phenomena are revealed, which seem to be the uniquefeatures of a dynamic-pressure-loading process and could not be found in static experiments.

  12. Improvement of a High Velocity Compaction Technique for Iron Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dil Faraz KHAN; Haiqing YIN; Zahid USMAN; Matiullah KHAN; Xianjie YUAN; Wenhao WANG; Xuanhui QU

    2013-01-01

    Water atomized pure iron powder was compacted by high velocity compaction (HVC) with and without upper relaxation assist (URA) device.The influence of URA device on green density,spring back,green strength and hardness was studied.Morphological characteristics of the samples were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).Green strength of the samples was measured by computer controlled universal testing machine.The results show that as stroke length increases,the green density,green strength and hardness of the compacts increase gradually.At the identical stroke length,the green density of the compacts pressed with URA devise was 2% higher than the compacts pressed without URA device.The green strength and hardness of the compacts pressed with URA device were higher than the compacts pressed without URA device.Furthermore,the radial spring back of the compacts decreased gradually with the increment in stroke length,whilst that of compacts prepared with URA device was lower.

  13. Configuration optimization of high velocity arc spraying gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-xiong; ZHU Zi-xin; LIU Yan; XU Bin-shi

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve the in-flight characteristics of the atomizing droplets during high velocity wire arc spraying (HVAS), some changes have been operated on the original design of the HVAS gun configuration. A comparative study was carried out to investigate the microstructure and properties of the coatings produced by the original design spraying gun and the modified one, using 3Cr13 wires of 3 mm in diameter. The characteristics of their jets were examined during spraying. The results indicate that, the included angle between the two wires and the distance from the nozzle to the meeting point of the two vires may have a strong influence on the characteristics of the in-flight droplets and then the coatings. The jet divergence is found to be lower than that of the original one (about 12° against 25°). By modified gun, the adhesion strength, the microhardness and porosity of the coating deposited by modified gun are increased by 39% and 9% respectively. And the porosity of the coatings is decreased by 57%.

  14. Are Compact High-Velocity Clouds Extragalactic Objects?

    CERN Document Server

    Maloney, P R; Maloney, Philip R.; Putman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) are the most distant of the HVCs in the Local Group model and would have HI volume densities of order 0.0003/cm^3. Clouds with these volume densities and the observed neutral hydrogen column densities will be largely ionized, even if exposed only to the extragalactic ionizing radiation field. Here we examine the implications of this process for models of CHVCs. We have modeled the ionization structure of spherical clouds (with and without dark matter halos) for a large range of densities and sizes, appropriate to CHVCs over the range of suggested distances, exposed to the extragalactic ionizing photon flux. Constant-density cloud models in which the CHVCs are at Local Group distances have total (ionized plus neutral) gas masses roughly 20-30 times larger than the neutral gas masses, implying that the gas mass alone of the observed population of CHVCs is about 40 billion solar masses. With a realistic (10:1) dark matter to gas mass ratio, the total mass in such CHVCs is a s...

  15. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Romero-García, Vicent; García-Raffi, Lluis M; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically and experimentally reported in this work. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on-axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow to obtain Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  16. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, R.; Sánchez-Morcillo, V.; Romero-García, V.; García-Raffi, L. M.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-11-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically, and experimentally reported in this paper. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow for obtaining Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  17. Formation of high-order acoustic Bessel beams by spiral diffraction gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Noé; Picó, R; Sánchez-Morcillo, V; Romero-García, V; García-Raffi, L M; Staliunas, K

    2016-11-01

    The formation of high-order Bessel beams by a passive acoustic device consisting of an Archimedes' spiral diffraction grating is theoretically, numerically, and experimentally reported in this paper. These beams are propagation-invariant solutions of the Helmholtz equation and are characterized by an azimuthal variation of the phase along its annular spectrum producing an acoustic vortex in the near field. In our system, the scattering of plane acoustic waves by the spiral grating leads to the formation of the acoustic vortex with zero pressure on axis and the angular phase dislocations characterized by the spiral geometry. The order of the generated Bessel beam and, as a consequence, the size of the generated vortex can be fixed by the number of arms in the spiral diffraction grating. The obtained results allow for obtaining Bessel beams with controllable vorticity by a passive device, which has potential applications in low-cost acoustic tweezers and acoustic radiation force devices.

  18. High-velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Jack F.; Elitzur, Moshe; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A.; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E.; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-09-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J=6\\to 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to ±70 km s-1 relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12 × 7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to ±400 km s-1) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (≃80°) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the active galactic nucleus obscuring torus.

  19. High-Velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Gallimore, Jack F; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C M V; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J = 6 - 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to +/- 70 km/s relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12x7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to +/- 400 km/s) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (roughly 80 degrees) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the AGN obscuring torus.

  20. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario Roa, S. Alex Schumaker...disclose the work. PA Clearance Number: 16308 Clearance Date: 6/17/2016 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For presentation at AIAA Propulsion and Energy; Salt...the coupling between the impact waves created by impinging jets and high frequency acoustic pressure perturbations. High speed, backlit imaging was

  1. High-accuracy measurement of ship velocities by DGPS; DGPS ni yoru sensoku keisoku no koseidoka ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Koterayama, W. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-10

    The differential global positioning system (DGPS) can eliminate most of errors in ship velocity measurement by GPS positioning alone. Through two rounds of marine observations by towing an observation robot in summer 1995, the authors attempted high-accuracy measurement of ship velocities by DGPS, and also carried out both positioning by GPS alone and measurement using the bottom track of ADCP (acoustic Doppler current profiler). In this paper, the results obtained by these measurement methods were examined through comparison among them, and the accuracy of the measured ship velocities was considered. In DGPS measurement, both translocation method and interference positioning method were used. ADCP mounted on the observation robot allowed measurement of the velocity of current meter itself by its bottom track in shallow sea areas less than 350m. As the result of these marine observations, it was confirmed that the accuracy equivalent to that of direct measurement by bottom track is possible to be obtained by DGPS. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Development of anticavitation hydrophone using a titanium front plate: Effect of the titanium front plate in high-intensity acoustic field with generation of acoustic cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiiba, Michihisa; Okada, Nagaya; Kurosawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    Novel anticavitation hydrophones were fabricated by depositing a hydrothermally synthesized lead zirconate titanate polycrystalline film at the back of a titanium front plate. These anticavitation hydrophones were not damaged by the measurement of the acoustic field formed by a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device. Their sensitivity was improved by approximately 20 dB over that of the conventional anticavitation hydrophone by modifying their basic structure and materials. The durability of the anticavitation hydrophone that we fabricated was compared by exposing it to a high-intensity acoustic field at the focal point of the HIFU field and in the water tank of an ultrasound cleaner. Therefore, the effect of the surface of the titanium front plate on acoustic cavitation was investigated by exposing such a surface to the high-intensity acoustic field. We found that the fabricated anticavitation hydrophone was robust and was not damaged easily, even in the focused acoustic field where acoustic cavitation occurs.

  3. Velocity measurement technique for high-speed targets based on digital fine spectral line tracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Shuliang; Yuan Qi

    2006-01-01

    Target velocity and acceleration are two of the most important features for identification of warheads and decoys in ballistic missile defense phased array radar systems. Velocity compensation is also the necessary step for one-dimensional range profile imaging. According to the high-velocity characteristics of ballistic objects and the low data rate of phased array radars with multiple target tracking, a fine spectral line digital velocity tracking frame is presented and a new method is developed to extract velocity error and resolve the velocity ambiguity in the measurement loop. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  4. Dynamic weakening by nanoscale smoothing during high velocity fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Bickmore, B. R.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Rock friction is commonly determined through measurements on rock samples with areas from a few cm^2 to 1 m^2. On the other hand, theoretical models suggest that frictional processes are scale-dependent, and active at scales of a few microns or less. We used Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to determine the frictional strength and roughness of experimental fault surfaces that slipped under high velocity (Sierra White granite (SWG) and Kasota dolomite (KD), and the sheared surfaces were sampled for the nanoscale measurements by the AFM. The friction coefficient (FC) at the sub-micron scale was measured by using the AFM to press & shear a tiny silica glass bead against the rock surface (Stiernstedt et al., 2005). The 3D morphology of the fault surfaces at the nano- to microscale was measured with the standard AFM intermittent contact mode with sharp tip probe. In the AFM friction measurements, a total of 43 sites have been measured and each site was repeated hundreds of times; 33 of these sites were measured under air and 10 sites were measured under deionized water. The SWG and KD samples display FC values that vary systematically with orientation and conditions. Room-dry, un-sheared surfaces have FC = 0.64 ± 0.05 for both rock types. KD normal to striations has FC = 0.60 ± 0.15. SWG rough, sheared surface display FC = 0.71 ± 0.02. Significant friction drop was observed under dry, parallel to striations, with FC = 0.34 ± 0.08 (KD) and FC = 0.52 ± 0.03 (SWG). Under wet (water covered) conditions parallel to slickensides, the friction dropped even further to FC = 0.15 ± 0.05 (dolomite) and FC = 0.31 ± 0.05 (granite). The nanoscale FC (room dry, parallel to striations) is comparable to the macroscopic FC for the host experiments. Roughness calculations are based on AFM topographic images, and analyzed by both Power Spectral Density (PSD) and RMS. The PSD curves display a clear, expected trend: the cleaved biotite is the smoothest surface, the un-sheared surface is

  5. Acoustic Search for High Energy Neutrinos in Lake Baikal: Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budnev N.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The status and perspectives of the feasibility study to detect high energy cosmic neutrinos acoustically in Lake Baikal is presented. The concept of on acoustic array as a part of the Baikal Gigaton Volume Neutrino Telescope GVD based on results of simulation and background measurements is described.

  6. High-frequency acoustic charge transport in GaAs nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükköse, S.; Hernandez-Minguez, A.; Vratzov, B.; Somaschini, C.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Santos, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    The oscillating piezoelectric fields accompanying surface acoustic waves are able to transport charge carriers in semiconductor heterostructures. Here, we demonstrate high-frequency (above 1 GHz) acoustic charge transport in GaAs-based nanowires deposited on a piezoelectric substrate. The short

  7. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming...

  8. High-pressure acoustic properties of glycerol studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min-Seok; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic properties of glycerol was investigated in a wide pressure range from ambient pressure to 30.9 GPa by using a multi-pass Fabry-Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependences of the sound velocity and the Brillouin linewidth showed substantial changes at low pressures below ~4 GPa. This was attributed to the coupling between the main structural relaxation process and the longitudinal acoustic waves. The pressure dependence of the refractive index and the density of glycerol could be obtained by using two scattering geometries and the Lorentz-Lorenz relation.

  9. High-pressure acoustic properties of glycerol studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min-Seok [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jae-Hyeon, E-mail: hwangko@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo [Agency for Defense Development, 4-2-2, P.O. Box 35, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic properties of glycerol was investigated in a wide pressure range from ambient pressure to 30.9 GPa by using a multi-pass Fabry–Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependences of the sound velocity and the Brillouin linewidth showed substantial changes at low pressures below ~4 GPa. This was attributed to the coupling between the main structural relaxation process and the longitudinal acoustic waves. The pressure dependence of the refractive index and the density of glycerol could be obtained by using two scattering geometries and the Lorentz–Lorenz relation.

  10. A compact acoustic calibrator for ultra-high energy neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Llorens, C D; Martínez-Mora, J A

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to optimize and test the method of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in underwater telescopes a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed. The acoustic parametric effect is used to reproduce the acoustic signature of an ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction. Different reseach and development studies are presented in order to show the viability of the parametric sources technique to deal with the difficulties of the acoustic signal generation: a very directive transient bipolar signal with pancake directivity. The design, construction and characterization of the prototype are described, including simulation of the propagation of an experimental signal, measured in a pool, over a distance of 1 km. Following these studies, next steps will be testing the device in situ, in underwater neutrino telescope, or from a vessel in a sea campaign.

  11. Backcoupling of acoustic streaming on the temperature field inside high-intensity discharge lamps

    CERN Document Server

    Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Operating high-intensity discharge lamps in the high frequency range (20-300 kHz) provides energy-saving and cost reduction potentials. However, commercially available lamp drivers do not make use of this operating strategy because light intensity fluctuations and even lamp destruction are possible. The reason for the fluctuating discharge arc are acoustic resonances in this frequency range that are excited in the arc tube. The acoustic resonances in turn generate a fluid flow that is caused by the acoustic streaming effect. Here, we present a 3D multiphysics model to determine the influence of acoustic streaming on the temperature field in the vicinity of an acoustic eigenfrequency. In that case a transition from stable to instable behavior occurs. The model is able to predict when light flicker can be expected. The results are in very good accordance with accompanying experiments.

  12. High-frequency acoustic for nanostructure wetting characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sizhe; Lamant, Sebastien; Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Campistron, Pierre; Xu, Xiumei; Vereecke, Guy; Senez, Vincent; Thomy, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    2014-07-01

    Nanostructure wetting is a key problem when developing superhydrophobic surfaces. Conventional methods do not allow us to draw conclusions about the partial or complete wetting of structures on the nanoscale. Moreover, advanced techniques are not always compatible with an in situ, real time, multiscale (from macro to nanoscale) characterization. A high-frequency (1 GHz) acoustic method is used for the first time to characterize locally partial wetting and the wetting transition between nanostructures according to the surface tension of liquids (the variation is obtained by ethanol concentration modification). We can see that this method is extremely sensitive both to the level of liquid imbibition and to the impalement dynamic. We thus demonstrate the possibility to evaluate the critical surface tension of a liquid for which total wetting occurs according to the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We also manage to identify intermediate states according to the height of the nanotexturation. Finally, our measurements revealed that the drop impalement depending on the surface tension of the liquid also depends on the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We do believe that our method may lead to new insights into nanoscale wetting characterization by accessing the dynamic mapping of the liquid imbibition under the droplet.

  13. Simulations of Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves with Variable Velocity Resolution Grids and High-Order Time-Splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros; Crouseilles, Nicolas; Dodhy, Adila; Faou, Erwan; Mehrenberger, Michel; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2014-01-01

    KEEN waves are nonlinear, non-stationary, self-organized asymptotic states in Vlasov plasmas outside the scope or purview of linear theory constructs such as electron plasma waves or ion acoustic waves. Nonlinear stationary mode theories such as those leading to BGK modes also do not apply. The range in velocity that is strongly perturbed by KEEN waves depends on the amplitude and duration of the ponderomotive force used to drive them. Smaller amplitude drives create highly localized structures attempting to coalesce into KEEN waves. These cases have much more chaotic and intricate time histories than strongly driven ones. The narrow range in which one must maintain adequate velocity resolution in the weakly driven cases challenges xed grid numerical schemes. What is missing there is the capability of resolving locally in velocity while maintaining a coarse grid outside the highly perturbed region of phase space. We here report on a new Semi-Lagrangian Vlasov-Poisson solver based on conservative non-uniform c...

  14. Quantitative measurement of high flow velocities by a spin echo MR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Yigun (First Military Medical Coll., Quangzhou, FJ (China)); Kojima, Akihiro; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Sakamoto, Yuji; Ueno, Sukeyoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    A new method of flow measurement using a spin echo (SE) technique has been developed on the basis of the flow effect that at high velocities signal intensity decreases linearly with increasing flow velocity. Flow velocity is calculated from the signal intensity ratio of the flowing material in two images with the same imaging parameters but different echo times. The linear relationship between the signal intensity and flow velocity was examined with a steady flow phantom. When assessed with steady flows in the phantom, flow velocities calculated by this method were in good agreement with velocities measured by a flow meter. This method was used with ECG gating to measure the blood flow of the right common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer. The measured peak flow velocity and the pattern of flow velocities during systole correlated well with the results obtained by Doppler ultrasound. (author).

  15. High-speed noncontact acoustic inspection method for civil engineering structure using multitone burst wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Sugimoto, Kazuko; Kosuge, Nobuaki; Utagawa, Noriyuki; Katakura, Kageyoshi

    2017-07-01

    The noncontact acoustic inspection method focuses on the resonance phenomenon, and the target surface is measured by being vibrated with an airborne sound. It is possible to detect internal defects near the surface layer of a concrete structure from a long distance. However, it requires a fairly long measurement time to achieve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio just to find some resonance frequencies. In our method using the conventional waveform “single-tone burst wave”, only one frequency was used for one-sound-wave emission to achieve a high S/N ratio using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) at a safe low power (e.g., He-Ne 1 mW). On the other hand, in terms of the difference in propagation velocity between laser light and sound waves, the waveform that can be used for high-speed measurement was devised using plural frequencies for one-sound-wave emission (“multitone burst wave”). The measurement time at 35 measurement points has been dramatically decreased from 210 to 28 s when using this waveform. Accordingly, 7.5-fold high-speed measurement became possible. By some demonstration experiments, we confirmed the effectiveness of our measurement technique.

  16. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mario...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  17. Acoustic doppler velocity monitoring within Main Spring, Barton Springs, Austin, Texas, April-September 2004-enhancing the accuracy of springflow data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, W.H.; Gary, M.O.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler velocity (ADV) meters are sophisticated underwater monitoring instruments that use sound waves to measure water velocity in as many as three directions. In April 2004, an ADV meter was installed inside the principal orifice and discharge point of Main Spring at Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. This instrument collects velocity data that can be used to enhance the accuracy of springflow data and identify previously unrecognized hydrologic patterns.An accurate record of springflow at Barton Springs is important for several reasons. First, Barton Springs is the only known habitat for the Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sosorum), a federally-listed endangered species that is dependent on reliable springflow to survive. Determination of sustainable Edwards aquifer yields compatible with the survival of the species is impossible without an accurate springflow record. Second, the 3-acre swimming pool fed by Barton Springs is enjoyed by about 340,000 people per year (2003) and is an important tourist attraction. Third, Barton Springs provides a part of Austin's municipal water supply; water from Barton Springs discharges into Town Lake on the Colorado River about 0.4 mile upstream from one of Austin's three water-supply plants. Fourth, flow in Barton Springs reflects water levels in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, which currently (2005) is designated a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, briefly summarizes the results of recent ADV-based velocity and springflow data acquisition at Barton Springs and describes an application of velocity monitoring to enhance the accuracy of springflow data.

  18. High-Fidelity Prediction of Launch Vehicle Liftoff Acoustic Fields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The high-intensity level acoustic load generated by large launch vehicle lift-off propulsion is of major concern for the integrity of the launch complex and the...

  19. Simultaneously measuring thickness, density, velocity and attenuation of thin layers using V(z,t) data from time-resolved acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-02-01

    To meet the need of efficient, comprehensive and automatic characterization of the properties of thin layers, a nondestructive method using ultrasonic testing to simultaneously measure thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation through V(z,t) data, recorded by time-resolved acoustic microscopy is proposed. The theoretical reflection spectrum of the thin layer at normal incidence is established as a function of three dimensionless parameters. The measured reflection spectrum R(θ,ω) is obtained from V(z,t) data and the measured thickness is derived from the signals when the lens is focused on the front and back surface of the thin layer, which are picked up from the V(z,t) data. The density, sound velocity and attenuation are then determined by the measured thickness and inverse algorithm utilizing least squares method to fit the theoretical and measured reflection spectrum at normal incidence. It has the capability of simultaneously measuring thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation of thin layer in a single V(z,t) acquisition. An example is given for a thin plate immersed in water and the results are satisfactory. The method greatly simplifies the measurement apparatus and procedures, which improves the efficiency and automation for simultaneous measurement of basic mechanical and geometrical properties of thin layers.

  20. Acoustics of dual-stream high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiasi, Marco Tullio

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the results of noise measurements in high-speed, round jets whose Mach number and velocity simulate the conditions of jet engines at take-off. The Mach number of the jet potential core ranged from 1.27 to 1.77 and the velocity ranged from 550 m/s to 1010 m/s. Most of the jets were silenced with a coflow that prevented the formation of Mach waves, a dominant contribution to supersonic jet noise. This method, called Mach Wave Elimination, relies on the shielding effect of the coflow which makes the motion of the eddies subsonic with respect to the surrounding streams, thus impeding the creation of Mach waves. Schlieren photography and pitot probe surveys were used to detect the principal features and the growth rate of the jets. Microphone measurements were performed inside an anechoic chamber at many positions around the jet exit. The results were corrected for the microphone response and for the effect of human sensitivity to sound. Equal-thrust comparison of different experimental results shows that elimination of Mach waves is very effective in reducing noise in the direction of strongest emission. Except for localized shock-associated components, noise emission was found to be insensitive to nozzle exit pressure and to depend principally on the values of fully-expanded Mach number and velocity in the jet potential core. Jets with a shorter Mach wave emitting region exhibited better noise suppression. Best results were obtained with an eccentric coflow that allows the shear layer of the upper part of the jet to grow naturally while silencing the jet in the downward direction. Coflows are capable of reducing the near-field screech peaks by up to 10 dB in imperfectly-expanded jets. Scaling the experimental results to a fall-size engine shows that eccentric coflows reduce the noise perceived in the direction of peak emission by up to 11 dB. Preliminary analysis of the application of this silencing technique to engine design indicates that Mach

  1. Velocity potential formulations of highly accurate Boussinesq-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2009-01-01

    processes on the weather side of reflective structures. Coast. Eng. 53, 929-945). An exact infinite series solution for the potential is obtained via a Taylor expansion about an arbitrary vertical position z=(z) over cap. For practical implementation however, the solution is expanded based on a slow...... variation of (z) over cap and terms are retained to first-order. With shoaling enhancement, the new models obtain a comparable accuracy in linear shoaling to the original velocity formulation. General consistency relations are also derived which are convenient for verifying that the differential operators...

  2. High-resolution observations of the spatial and velocity distribution of cometary hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael E.; Spinrad, Hyron

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained high velocity and spatial resolution long-slit H alpha spectra of comets Austin (1989c1) and Levy (1990c). Spectra of both comets clearly show the existence of a low velocity thermalized component of hydrogen gas. The amount of slow hydrogen is estimated for comet Austin. The Levy spectrum shows an unusual high-velocity spatially-confined blob of hydrogen emission of unknown origin.

  3. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    is to measure and model very high frequency underwater sound generated by processes at the sea surface, relevant to the high-frequency underwater...realizations generated from wave gauge data synchronized with the acoustic measurements. The curves are not generally smooth because of the limited...on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling Grant B. Deane Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla, CA

  4. An Acoustic Charge Transport Imager for High Definition Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, William D.; Brennan, Kevin; May, Gary; Glenn, William E.; Richardson, Mike; Solomon, Richard

    1999-01-01

    This project, over its term, included funding to a variety of companies and organizations. In addition to Georgia Tech these included Florida Atlantic University with Dr. William E. Glenn as the P.I., Kodak with Mr. Mike Richardson as the P.I. and M.I.T./Polaroid with Dr. Richard Solomon as the P.I. The focus of the work conducted by these organizations was the development of camera hardware for High Definition Television (HDTV). The focus of the research at Georgia Tech was the development of new semiconductor technology to achieve a next generation solid state imager chip that would operate at a high frame rate (I 70 frames per second), operate at low light levels (via the use of avalanche photodiodes as the detector element) and contain 2 million pixels. The actual cost required to create this new semiconductor technology was probably at least 5 or 6 times the investment made under this program and hence we fell short of achieving this rather grand goal. We did, however, produce a number of spin-off technologies as a result of our efforts. These include, among others, improved avalanche photodiode structures, significant advancement of the state of understanding of ZnO/GaAs structures and significant contributions to the analysis of general GaAs semiconductor devices and the design of Surface Acoustic Wave resonator filters for wireless communication. More of these will be described in the report. The work conducted at the partner sites resulted in the development of 4 prototype HDTV cameras. The HDTV camera developed by Kodak uses the Kodak KAI-2091M high- definition monochrome image sensor. This progressively-scanned charge-coupled device (CCD) can operate at video frame rates and has 9 gm square pixels. The photosensitive area has a 16:9 aspect ratio and is consistent with the "Common Image Format" (CIF). It features an active image area of 1928 horizontal by 1084 vertical pixels and has a 55% fill factor. The camera is designed to operate in continuous mode

  5. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  6. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  7. Inlet Acoustic Data from a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    In February 2017, aerodynamic and acoustic testing was completed on a scale-model high bypass ratio turbofan rotor, R4, in an internal flow component test facility. The objective of testing was to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of fan casing treatments designed to reduce noise. The baseline configuration consisted of the R4 rotor with a hardwall fan case. Data are presented for a baseline acoustic run with fan exit instrumentation removed to give a clean acoustic configuration.

  8. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France); Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois [IFP Energies nouvelles, BP3 rond-point de l' echangeur de Solaize (France)

    2014-11-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C{sub 4}H{sub 10} + H{sub 2} + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  9. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  10. Acoustic model of micro-pressure wave emission from a high-speed train tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, T.

    2017-03-01

    The micro-pressure wave (MPW) radiated from a tunnel portal can, if audible, cause serious problems around tunnel portals in high-speed railways. This has created a need to develop an acoustic model that considers the topography around a radiation portal in order to predict MPWs more accurately and allow for higher speed railways in the future. An acoustic model of MPWs based on linear acoustic theory is developed in this study. First, the directivity of sound sources and the acoustical effect of topography are investigated using a train launcher facility around a portal on infinitely flat ground and with an infinite vertical baffle plate. The validity of linear acoustic theory is then discussed through a comparison of numerical results obtained using the finite difference method (FDM) and experimental results. Finally, an acoustic model is derived that considers sound sources up to the second order and Green's function to represent the directivity and effect of topography, respectively. The results predicted by this acoustic model are shown to be in good agreement with both numerical and experimental results.

  11. High amplitude nonlinear acoustic wave driven flow fields in cylindrical and conical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antao, Dion Savio; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2013-08-01

    A high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the flow, pressure, and density fields generated in a cylindrical and a conical resonator by a vibrating end wall/piston producing high-amplitude standing waves. The waves in the conical resonator are found to be shock-less and can generate peak acoustic overpressures that exceed the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. A cylindrical (consonant) acoustic resonator has limitations to the output response observed at one end when the opposite end is acoustically excited. In the conical geometry (dissonant acoustic resonator) the linear acoustic input is converted to high energy un-shocked nonlinear acoustic output. The model is validated using past numerical results of standing waves in cylindrical resonators. The nonlinear nature of the harmonic response in the conical resonator system is further investigated for two different working fluids (carbon dioxide and argon) operating at various values of piston amplitude. The high amplitude nonlinear oscillations observed in the conical resonator can potentially enhance the performance of pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerators and these conical resonators can be used as efficient mixers.

  12. High resolution hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor maps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, C.; Inglis, G.

    2013-12-01

    This abstract presents a method for creating hybrid optical and acoustic sea floor reconstructions at centimeter scale grid resolutions with robotic vehicles. Multibeam sonar and stereo vision are two common sensing modalities with complementary strengths that are well suited for data fusion. We have recently developed an automated two stage pipeline to create such maps. The steps can be broken down as navigation refinement and map construction. During navigation refinement a graph-based optimization algorithm is used to align 3D point clouds created with both the multibeam sonar and stereo cameras. The process combats the typical growth in navigation error that has a detrimental affect on map fidelity and typically introduces artifacts at small grid sizes. During this process we are able to automatically register local point clouds created by each sensor to themselves and to each other where they overlap in a survey pattern. The process also estimates the sensor offsets, such as heading, pitch and roll, that describe how each sensor is mounted to the vehicle. The end results of the navigation step is a refined vehicle trajectory that ensures the points clouds from each sensor are consistently aligned, and the individual sensor offsets. In the mapping step, grid cells in the map are selectively populated by choosing data points from each sensor in an automated manner. The selection process is designed to pick points that preserve the best characteristics of each sensor and honor some specific map quality criteria to reduce outliers and ghosting. In general, the algorithm selects dense 3D stereo points in areas of high texture and point density. In areas where the stereo vision is poor, such as in a scene with low contrast or texture, multibeam sonar points are inserted in the map. This process is automated and results in a hybrid map populated with data from both sensors. Additional cross modality checks are made to reject outliers in a robust manner. The final

  13. Acoustic Methods for Evaluation of High Energy Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanovsky, Yury I

    2013-01-01

    Two independent acoustic methods were used to verify the results of earlier explosion energy calculations of Chelyabinsk meteoroid. They are: estimations through a path length of infrasound wave and through maximum concentration of the wave energy. The energy of this explosion turned out the same as in earlier calculations, and it is close to 58 Mt of TNT. The first method, as well as evaluations through seismic signals and barograms, have confirmed the energy of Tunguska meteoroid explosion at 14.0 - 14.5 Mt level. Moreover, there is a good agreement between acoustic estimations and other data for the explosion energy of another meteoroid that was ended its flight over the southern part of Indian Ocean, and for two catastrophic volcanoes explosions - Bezymyanny and Krakatoa.

  14. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzit, Omar, E-mail: omar.bouzit@yahoo.fr; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5E2 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  15. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  16. Coherent Path Beamformer Front End for High Performance Acoustic Modems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    data were transmitted using a standard AUV modem towed by a boat moving in a zig - zag pattern within a 120 degrees cone, at distances from 1km to 1.5...16kHz to 32kHz, using a 32 by 32 Mills -Cross array and a single-channel acoustic modem. The intents are to measure and characterize the underwater

  17. Isolation of ATP from a yeast fermentation broth using a cryogel column at high flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Wang, Lianghua; Yao, Kejian; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2008-12-01

    This communication presents an effective method for isolating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from a yeast fermentation broth using an anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel column at high flow velocities. The breakthrough and elution behaviors of pure ATP in the cryogel bed were investigated at flow velocities of 2, 5, and 10 cm/min and the ATP binding capacities were determined. Then the ATP-containing yeast fermentation broth was employed as the test feedstock and various chromatographic runs were conducted to isolate ATP by the cryogel at different high flow velocities. The ATP samples obtained were analyzed quantitatively by HPLC. The results showed that even at a flow velocity of 5 or 10 cm/min, a product purity of 97.4 or 98.0% can be achieved, illustrating the potential of the present method for separation of high-purity ATP directly from fermentation feedstock at high flow velocities.

  18. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of Eastern Tibet and Adjacent Regions (Post Print)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    mantle in this region. Similarly, a high velocity and high Q block in southeastern Tibet around eastern Bangong-Nujiang Suture and Eastern Himalaya ...Similarly, a high velocity and high Q block in southeastern Tibet around eastern Bangong-Nujiang Suture and Eastern Himalaya Syntaxis correlates well...underthrusting Indian plate. Azimuthal fast directions are consistent at all depths up to approximately 200 km, which suggests a vertical coherent

  19. Coupled High Speed Imaging and Seismo-Acoustic Recordings of Strombolian Explosions at Etna, July 2014: Implications for Source Processes and Signal Inversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Ricci, T.; Andronico, D.; Kueppers, U.; Cannata, A.; Sesterhenn, J.; Spina, L.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and acoustic surveillance is routinely performed at several persistent activity volcanoes worldwide. However, interpretation of the signals associated with explosive activity is still equivocal, due to both source variability and the intrinsically limited information carried by the waves. Comparison and cross-correlation of the geophysical quantities with other information in general and visual recording in particular is therefore actively sought. At Etna (Italy) in July 2014, short-lived Strombolian explosions ejected bomb- to lapilli-sized, molten pyroclasts at a remarkably repeatable time interval of about two seconds, offering a rare occasion to systematically investigate the seismic and acoustic fields radiated by this common volcanic source. We deployed FAMoUS (FAst, MUltiparametric Setup for the study of explosive activity) at 260 meters from the vents, recording more than 60 explosions in thermal and visible high-speed videos (50 to 500 frames per second) and broadband seismic and acoustic instruments (1 to 10000 Hz for the acoustic and from 0.01 to 30 Hz for the seismic). Analysis of this dataset highlights nonlinear relationships between the exit velocity and mass of ejecta and the amplitude and frequency of the acoustic signals. It also allows comparing different methods to estimate source depth, and to validate existing theory on the coupling of airwaves with ground motion.

  20. Impact of layer and substrate properties on the surface acoustic wave velocity in scandium doped aluminum nitride based SAW devices on sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillinger, M., E-mail: manuel.gillinger@tuwien.ac.at; Knobloch, T.; Schneider, M.; Schmid, U. [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Shaposhnikov, K.; Kaltenbacher, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Mechatronics, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-06

    This paper investigates the performance of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices consisting of reactively sputter deposited scandium doped aluminum nitride (Sc{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}N) thin films as piezoelectric layers on sapphire substrates for wireless sensor or for RF-MEMS applications. To investigate the influence of piezoelectric film thickness on the device properties, samples with thickness ranging from 500 nm up to 3000 nm are fabricated. S{sub 21} measurements and simulations demonstrate that the phase velocity is predominantly influenced by the mass density of the electrode material rather than by the thickness of the piezoelectric film. Additionally, the wave propagation direction is varied by rotating the interdigital transducer structures with respect to the crystal orientation of the substrate. The phase velocity is about 2.5% higher for a-direction compared to m-direction of the sapphire substrate, which is in excellent agreement with the difference in the anisotropic Young's modulus of the substrate corresponding to these directions.

  1. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  2. Effect of acoustic streaming on tissue heating due to high-intensity focused ultrasound

    CERN Document Server

    Solovchuk, Maxim A; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2011-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors is studied. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can change considerably the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be taken into account. The predicted temperature ...

  3. Accurate Solution of Navigation Equations in GPS Receivers for Very High Velocities Using Pseudorange Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GPS is a satellite-based navigation system that is able to determine the exact position of objects on the Earth, sky, or space. By increasing the velocity of a moving object, the accuracy of positioning decreases; meanwhile, the calculation of the exact position in the movement by high velocities like airplane movement or very high velocities like satellite movement is so important. In this paper, seven methods for solving navigation equations in very high velocities using least squares method and its combination with the variance estimation methods for weighting observations based on their qualities are studied. Simulations on different data with different velocities from 100 m/s to 7000 m/s show that proposed method can improve the accuracy of positioning more than 50%.

  4. Acoustic minor losses in high amplitude resonators with single-sided junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doller, Andrew J.

    Steady flow engineering handbooks like Idelchik20 do not exist for investigators interested in acoustic (oscillating) fluid flows in complex resonators. Measurements of acoustic minor loss coefficients are presented in this dissertation for a limited number of resonator configurations having single-sided junctions. While these results may be useful, the greater purpose of this work is to provide a set of controlled measurements that can be used to benchmark computational models of acoustic flows used for more complicated resonator structures. The experiments are designed around a driver operating at 150 Hz enabling acoustic pressures in excess of 10k Pa in liquid cooled, temperature controlled resonators with 90°, 45° and 25° junctions. These junctions join a common 109 cm long 4.7 cm diameter section to a section of 8.4 mm diameter tube making two sets of resonators: one set with a small diameter length approximately a quarter-wavelength (45 cm), the other approximately a half-wavelength (112 cm). The long resonators have a velocity node at the junction; the short resonators have a velocity anti-node generating the greatest minor losses. Input power is measured by an accelerometer and a pressure transducer at the driver. A pressure sensor at the rigid termination measures radiation pressure from the driver and static junction pressure, as well as the acoustic pressure used to calculate linear thermal and viscous resonator wall losses. At the largest amplitudes, the 90° junction was found to dissipate as much as 0.3 Watt, 1/3 the power of linear losses alone. For each junction, the power dissipation depends on acoustic pressure differently: pressure cubed for the 90°, pressure to the 3.76 for the 45° and pressure to the 4.48 for the 25°. Common among all resonators, blowing acoustic half-cycle minor losses (KB) are excited at lower amplitudes than the suction half-cycle (KS) minor losses. Data collected for the 90° junction shows KB reaches an asymptotic

  5. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  6. Investigation of the Spatial Patterns of Velocity and Bed Morphology Within Actively Evolving Neck Cutoffs on a Highly Sinuous River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, D.; Konsoer, K. M.; Turnipseed, C.; Willson, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Meander bend cutoffs and oxbow lakes are essential and ubiquitous features of meandering river floodplains. Yet, the processes involved in the evolution of an elongated bend to neck cutoff and oxbow lake are incompletely understood. Five neck cutoffs occurring on the White River, Arkansas, with two types of planform geometries, and one elongate meander loop prior to cutoff were examined for this study. Three-dimensional velocities were obtained using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and high-resolution channel bathymetry was collected using multi-beam echo sounder (MBES). Results show similar patterns of acceleration of velocity with nearly 180 degree redirection of the flow through the cutoff, strong advection of high momentum toward the far bank, and multiple zones of flow separation and recirculation. This pattern of velocity leads to increased bank erosion rates on the downstream bank opposite of the cutoff, bar formation downstream of the cutoff along the adjacent banks, and relatively deep scour pools located within the region of flow acceleration immediately downstream of the cutoff. Analysis of high-resolution channel bathymetry show a wide range in bedform morphology, the presence of amalgamating unit bars, and a lack of sediment accumulation within the entrance and exit to the abandoned meander loops. The findings from this investigation reveal that the evolution of these neck cutoffs do not conform to current conceptual models of meander cutoff and oxbow lake formation, suggesting that cutoff location, planform geometry, and length of channel removed are important factors in determining planform evolution and the hydrologic connectivity of the abandoned bend to the active channel.

  7. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence.

  8. High-Velocity Quadriceps Exercises Compared to Slow-Velocity Quadriceps Exercises Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Deborah; Gurney, Burke; Mermier, Christine; Rauh, Mitchell; Black, Liza; Andrews, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvement in pain and perceived function in older adults following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), objective outcome measures of muscular impairment and ambulatory function demonstrate significant deficits. Evidence suggests that quadriceps power may play a greater role in ambulatory function than measures of strength alone following TKA. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of high-velocity (HV) quadriceps exercises with that of slow-velocity (SV) quadriceps exercises on functional outcomes and quadriceps power following TKA. This study was a randomized clinical study conducted in an outpatient physical therapy clinic. Twenty-one participants who were 4 to 6 weeks post unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to an HV or SV group. Participants performed an evidence-based standardized progressive resistance exercise program in addition to HV quadriceps exercises or SV quadriceps exercises. Participants attended 2 sessions per week for 8 weeks. Before and after the 8-week exercise intervention, participants completed a functional questionnaire, health survey, functional testing, and underwent quadriceps strength and power testing. Both groups demonstrated improvements in ambulatory outcome measures, strength, speed, and power. The HV group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in distance walked and quadriceps strength than the SV group. These data should be considered preliminary because of a small sample size. HV quadriceps exercises may be an effective rehabilitation strategy in conjunction with a standardized progressive resistance exercise program beginning 4 to 6 weeks after TKA.

  9. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  10. Field acoustic measurements of high-speed train sound along BTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, HuaHua; Li, JiaChun

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, single-point field measurements of noise radiated from high-speed trains were performed at two sites along Beijing-Tianjin intercity railway (BTIR), aiming at acquiring the realistic acoustic data for validation and verification of physical model and computational prediction. The measurements showed that A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were between 80 and 87 dBA as trains passed. The maximum noise occurred at the moment when the pantograph arrived, suggesting that pantograph noise was one of the most significant sources. Sound radiated from high-speed trains of BTIR was a typical broadband spectrum with most acoustic power restricted in the range of medium-high frequency from about 400 Hz to 5 kHz. Aerodynamic noise was shown to be the dominant one over other acoustic sources for high-speed trains.

  11. Highly spatially resolved velocity measurements of a turbulent channel flow by a fiber-optic heterodyne laser-Doppler velocity-profile sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, K.; Pfister, T.; Buettner, L.; Czarske, J. [Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Chair for Measurement and Testing Techniques, Dresden (Germany); Mueller, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig (PTB), Department 1.4 Gas Flow, Braunschweig (Germany); Becker, S.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Velocity measurements with a high spatial resolution are important in turbulent flow research. In this paper, we report on the development of a new fiber-optic laser-Doppler velocity-profile sensor exhibiting a spatial resolution of up to 5 {mu}m and its application to turbulent boundary layers. The sensor developed in the present work employs a frequency-division-multiplexing technique in order to separate two measurement signals from the two fringe systems. Velocity measurements close to zero at the solid wall were realized using heterodyne technique. The use of fiber optics improved a robustness of the sensor. The measurement accuracy of the sensor was experimentally investigated with respect to the spatial resolution and velocity. Universal velocity profile of a turbulent flow was obtained in a fully developed channel flow. Mean and fluctuating velocity are presented with a high spatial resolution. (orig.)

  12. D33 mode piezoelectric diaphragm based acoustic transducer with high sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of an acoustic transducer using a piezoelectric freestanding bulk diaphragm as the sensing element. The diaphragm bearing the spiral electrode operates in d 33 mode, which allows the in-plane deformation of the diaphragm to be converted to the out-of-plane deformation and generates an acoustic wave in the same direction. A finite element code is developed to reorient the material polarization distribution according to the poling field calculated. The first four resonance modes have been simulated and verified by impedance and velocity spectra. The sensitivity and the sound pressure level of the transducer were characterized. The realized sensitivity of 126.21 μV/Pa at 1 kHz is nearly twenty times of the sensitivity of a sandwich d31 mode transducer. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Nonlinear electron acoustic structures generated on the high-potential side of a double layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pottelette

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High-time resolution measurements of the electron distribution function performed in the auroral upward current region reveals a large asymmetry between the low- and high-potential sides of a double-layer. The latter side is characterized by a large enhancement of a locally trapped electron population which corresponds to a significant part (~up to 30% of the total electron density. As compared to the background hot electron population, this trapped component has a very cold temperature in the direction parallel to the static magnetic field. Accordingly, the differential drift between the trapped and background hot electron populations generates high frequency electron acoustic waves in a direction quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The density of the trapped electron population can be deduced from the frequency where the electron acoustic spectrum maximizes. In the auroral midcavity region, the electron acoustic waves may be modulated by an additional turbulence generated in the ion acoustic range thanks to the presence of a pre-accelerated ion beam located on the high-potential side of the double layer. Electron holes characterized by bipolar pulses in the electric field are sometimes detected in correlation with these electron acoustic wave packets.

  14. Design and construction of a reverberation chamber for high-intensity acoustic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A high-intensity acoustic test facility was constructed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support the Mariner Mars 1971 project. For ease of construction, the reverberation chamber itself is rectangular, which resulted in very little sacrifice in acoustic performance. Levels as high as 156 dB can be achieved with the chamber empty and test levels of 150 dB have been used with a Mariner Mars spacecraft model (full size) in the chamber. Levels as high as this must be generated using electropneumatic transducers, which modulate gaseous nitrogen to this facility.

  15. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Al Haj [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Véronique, Peres, E-mail: peres@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Eric, Serris [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital [IFP Energies nouvelles, Rond-point de l’échangeur de Solaize BP3, 69360 Solaize (France); Michel, Cournil [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thermogravimetry associated to acoustic emission (AE) improves knowledge on the corrosion of metals at high temperature. • Kinetic transition is detected under air oxidation tests at 900 °C of Zircaloy-4 by a change in the rate of mass gain and by the AE activity. • AE analysis is complementary to characterizations of post mortem oxidized samples. • AE allows us to distinguish the cracks which occur during the Zircaloy-4 oxidation from the cracks which arise during the cooling of the samples. - Abstract: Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO{sub 2} layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and

  16. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  17. Flow and Acoustic Features of a Mach 0.9 Free Jet Using High-Frequency Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Alvi, Farrukh

    2016-11-01

    This study focuses on active control of a Mach 0.9 (ReD = 6 ×105) free jet using high-frequency excitation for noise reduction. Eight resonance-enhanced microjet actuators with nominal frequencies of 25 kHz (StD 2 . 2) are used to excite the shear layer at frequencies that are approximately an order of magnitude higher than the jet preferred frequency. The influence of control on mean and turbulent characteristics of the jet is studied using Particle Image Velocimetry. Additionally, far-field acoustic measurements are acquired to estimate the effect of pulsed injection on noise characteristics of the jet. Flow field measurements revealed that strong streamwise vortex pairs, formed as a result of control, result in a significantly thicker initial shear layer. This excited shear layer is also prominently undulated, resulting in a modified initial velocity profile. Also, the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy revealed that forcing results in increased turbulence levels for near-injection regions, followed by a global reduction for all downstream locations. Far-field acoustic measurements showed noise reductions at low to moderate frequencies. Additionally, an increase in high-frequency noise, mostly dominated by the actuators' resonant noise, was observed. AFOSR and ARO.

  18. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Deepak S [UNLV; Trabia, Mohamed [UNLV; O' Toole, Brendan [UNLV; Hixson, Robert S [NSTec

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  19. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  20. The Development of High Power Materials with Enhanced Vibrational Velocity and Related Origin Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Introduction Ultrasonic transducers for high power applications, such as ultrasonic motors and piezoelectric actuators have been intensively...investigated in recent years 1-5. The materials with low loss and high vibrational velocity vo are desirable for ultrasonic motors application. Higher...velocity are an important issue, which to date has proven difficult to achieve. Heat generation is the most serious problem in ultrasonic motors , which

  1. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  2. High speed coding for velocity by archerfish retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretschmer Viola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archerfish show very short behavioural latencies in response to falling prey. This raises the question, which response parameters of retinal ganglion cells to moving stimuli are best suited for fast coding of stimulus speed and direction. Results We compared stimulus reconstruction quality based on the ganglion cell response parameters latency, first interspike interval, and rate. For stimulus reconstruction of moving stimuli using latency was superior to using the other stimulus parameters. This was true for absolute latency, with respect to stimulus onset, as well as for relative latency, with respect to population response onset. Iteratively increasing the number of cells used for reconstruction decreased the calculated error close to zero. Conclusions Latency is the fastest response parameter available to the brain. Therefore, latency coding is best suited for high speed coding of moving objects. The quantitative data of this study are in good accordance with previously published behavioural response latencies.

  3. Ultra-High Q Acoustic Resonance in Superfluid ^4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, L. A.; Schwab, K. C.

    2017-02-01

    We report the measurement of the acoustic quality factor of a gram-scale, kilohertz-frequency superfluid resonator, detected through the parametric coupling to a superconducting niobium microwave cavity. For temperatures between 400 mK and 50 mK, we observe a T^{-4} temperature dependence of the quality factor, consistent with a 3-phonon dissipation mechanism. We observe Q factors up to 1.4× 10^8, consistent with the dissipation due to dilute ^3He impurities, and expect that significant further improvements are possible. These experiments are relevant to exploring quantum behavior and decoherence of massive macroscopic objects, the laboratory detection of continuous gravitational waves from pulsars, and the probing of possible limits to physical length scales.

  4. High tech cognitive and acoustic enrichment for captive elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Fiona; Mancini, Clara; Sharp, Helen

    2017-09-23

    This paper investigates the potential for using technology to support the development of sensory and cognitive enrichment activities for captive elephants. It explores the usefulness of applying conceptual frameworks from interaction design and game design to the problem of developing species-specific smart toys that promote natural behaviours and provide stimulation. We adopted a Research through Design approach, and describe how scientific inquiry supported our design process, while the creation of artefacts guided our investigations into possible future solutions. Our fieldwork resulted in the development of an interactive prototype of an acoustic toy that elephants are able to control using interface elements constructed from a range of natural materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furmanski, Jevan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rae, Philip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clements, Bradford E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  6. A study of the mechanical properties of highly porous ceramics using acoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aué, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of indirect tensile tests on highly porous ceramics are presented. A relation between the mechanical strength of the highly porous ceramic materials and Acoustic Emission (AE) has been established. We have shown that the amplitude distribution of the AE events depends on th

  7. Ignition Process Evolution at High Supersonic Velocities in Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.A. Goldfeld; A.V. Starov; K.Yu. Timofeev; V.A. Vinogradov

    2009-01-01

    The results of experimental research of multi-injector combustors in the regime of the attached pipe are presented.As a source of high-enthalpy working gas (air), hot shot wind tunnel IT-302M of ITAM, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences was used. Tests have been carried out at Mach numbers 3, 4 and 5, in a range of change of total temperature from 2000K up to 3000K and static pressure from 0.08MPa up to 0.23MPa. Injector section has been manufactured in two versions with a various relative height of wedge-shaped injectors with par-allel fuel injection. Influence of conditions on the entrance of the combustion chamber on ignition and a stable combustion of hydrogen was investigated. Intensive combustion of hydrogen has been received only at Mach numbers 3 and 4. Advantage of injector section with the greater relative height of injectors is revealed. The mechanism of fuel ignition in the combustion chamber of the given configuration was investigated: two-step igni-tion process including "kindling" and intensive combustion over all channel volume.

  8. Airflow energy harvesting with high wind velocities for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Z. J.; Tuddenham, S. B.; Zhu, M.

    2016-11-01

    An airflow energy harvester capable of harvesting energy from vortices at high speed is presented in this paper. The airflow energy harvester is implemented using a modified helical Savonius turbine and an electromagnetic generator. A power management module with maximum power point finding capability is used to manage the harvested energy and convert the low voltage magnitude from the generator to a usable level for wireless sensors. The airflow energy harvester is characterized using vortex generated by air hitting a plate in a wind tunnel. By using an aircraft environment with wind speed of 17 m/s as case study, the output power of the airflow energy harvester is measured to be 126 mW. The overall efficiency of the power management module is 45.76 to 61.2%, with maximum power point tracking efficiency of 94.21 to 99.72% for wind speed of 10 to 18 m/s, and has a quiescent current of 790 nA for the maximum power point tracking circuit.

  9. Theoretical Research Progress in High-Velocity/Hypervelocity Impact on Semi-Infinite Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhou Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the hypervelocity kinetic weapon and hypersonic cruise missiles research projects being carried out, the damage mechanism for high-velocity/hypervelocity projectile impact on semi-infinite targets has become the research keystone in impact dynamics. Theoretical research progress in high-velocity/hypervelocity impact on semi-infinite targets was reviewed in this paper. The evaluation methods for critical velocity of high-velocity and hypervelocity impact were summarized. The crater shape, crater scaling laws and empirical formulae, and simplified analysis models of crater parameters for spherical projectiles impact on semi-infinite targets were reviewed, so were the long rod penetration state differentiation, penetration depth calculation models for the semifluid, and deformed long rod projectiles. Finally, some research proposals were given for further study.

  10. High velocity HI in the inner 5 KPC of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, E.

    New radio frequency position-velocity maps of HI whithin 5 kpc of the M31 galactic center are reported. The maps were generated from 21 cm line studies performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope directed at regions +6 arcmin, 0 arcmin, and -6 arcmin distance from the nucleus. High velocity neutral hydrogen displayed the same signature at high velocities previously observed in the visible range (Rubin and Ford, 1970), but no HI was detected within the inner 500 pc. The data indicate that rotation produces the high velocities rather than an infall to or an ejection from the nucleus. The region around the M31 nucleus is suggested to be similar to that of the Galaxy.

  11. Unipolar and Bipolar High-Magnetic-Field Sensors Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewczyk, V.; Dumesnil, K.; Lacour, D.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Mjahed, H.; Tiercelin, N.; Petit Watelot, S.; Mishra, H.; Dusch, Y.; Hage-Ali, S.; Elmazria, O.; Montaigne, F.; Talbi, A.; Bou Matar, O.; Hehn, M.

    2017-08-01

    While surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been used to measure temperature, pressure, strains, and low magnetic fields, the capability to measure bipolar fields and high fields is lacking. In this paper, we report magnetic surface acoustic wave sensors that consist of interdigital transducers made of a single magnetostrictive material, either Ni or TbFe2 , or based on exchange-biased (Co /IrMn ) multilayers. By controlling the ferromagnet magnetic properties, high-field sensors can be obtained with unipolar or bipolar responses. The issue of hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic material is especially addressed, and the control of the magnetic properties ensures the reversible behavior in the SAW response.

  12. High-Velocity Line-Forming Regions in the Type Ia Supernova 2009ig

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, G H "Howie"; Wheeler, J Craig; Foley, Ryan J; Hsiao, Eric Y; Brown, Peter J; Challis, Peter; Filippenko, Alexei V; Garnavich, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P; Landsman, Wayne B; Parrent, Jerod T; Pritchard, Tyler A; Roming, Peter W A; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements and analysis of high-velocity (> 20,000 km/s) and photospheric absorption features in a sequence of spectra of SN Ia 2009ig obtained between -14d and +13d with respect to the time of B-band maximum light. We identify lines of Si II, Si III, S II, Ca II and Fe II that produce simultaneous high-velocity (HV) and photospheric velocity (PS) components from -12d to -5d. SN 2009ig is unusual in the number of lines with detectable HV features in its spectra but the light-curve parameters, M_B = -19.46 mag and the Delta m15(B) = 0.90 mag, correspond to a slightly overluminous but unexceptional SN Ia. The velocity of 13,400 km/s for Si II 6355 at the time of B-max is above "normal" for SN Ia but not unusual. The early start and high cadence of our data permit a detailed study of the transition in SN Ia from features dominated by high-velocity components to features with exclusively photospheric components. The -14d and -13d spectra in our sample are the first to clearly resolve high-velocity Si ...

  13. High-energy radiation from the impact of high-velocity clouds on the galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ana Laura; Romero, Gustavo Esteban; del Valle, Maŕıa Victoria

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) are HI clouds with velocities of more than 100 km s-1. These clouds do not partake of the differential Galactic rotation; a significant fraction of them are falling down towards the Galactic disk. The typical mass of these clouds is ˜ 104 M⊙, so in a collision with the disk energies of the order of ˜ 1051 erg can be released into the interstellar medium. Such collisions should produce strong shocks propagating through both the cloud and the disk. Under adequate conditions, these shocks can accelerate particles up to relativistic energies by Fermi mechanism. In this work, we study the hydrodynamical inter-actions and the relevant radiative processes (thermal and non-thermal) associated with HVC-disk collisions. We find that a shock propagating through a typical cloud should give rise to significant non-thermal radio emission, whereas the protons accelerated there diffuse and might emit elsewhere. A shock propagating through the disk, on the other hand, produces extended gamma-ray emission and injects protons with energies from 10 GeV to ˜1 TeV. Taking into account the injected mass rate of HI in our Galaxy by cloud bombardement, we found that ˜ 10 % of the Galactic cosmic ray power could be generated by these cloud-disk collisional events.

  14. Two-Phase Flow Modelling Perspectives Based on Novel High-Resolution Acoustic Measurements of Uniform Steady Sheet-Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.; Hurther, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sheet flow is believed to be a major process for morphological evolution of natural systems. An important research effort has been dedicated to laboratory and numerical studies of sheet flow regime that have allowed to make some progress in the understanding of the underlying physical processes. Recent advances made in high resolution measurement techniques allows to give new insights into the small scale physical processes. In this contribution, a novel uniform and steady sheet flow dataset based on an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) is presented. Profile of colocated velocities (streamwise and wall-normal) and sediment concentration has been measured at high-resolution (3 mm ; 78 Hz for the velocities and 4.9 Hz for the concentration). The measured profiles extend over the whole water column, from the free surface down to the fixed bed and an ensemble averaging over eleven realisations of the same experimental conditions has been used to obtain mean profiles of streamwise velocity, concentration, sediment flux and turbulent shear stress. The present experiment corresponds to a Shields number of θ=0.44 and a suspension number of ws/u*=1.1 corresponding to the lower limit of the no-suspension sheet flow regime. The analysis of the mixing length profile allows to identify two layers, a dilute suspension layer dominated by turbulence and a dense moving bed layer dominated by granular interactions. Our measurements show that the Von Karman parameter is reduced by a factor of more than two and that the Schmidt number is almost constant with a mean value of σs=0.44. Frictional and collisional interactions are encountered in the bed layer. Frictional interactions dominate close to the fixed bed interface whereas collisional interactions seems to control the flow at the transition between the dense and dilute layers. The relevancy of different constitutive laws for two-phase flow models are discussed.

  15. Study on resonance frequency distribution of high-overtone bulk acoustic resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; WANG Zuoqing; ZHANG Shuyi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the method of characterizing piezo-films by the resonance frequency distributions, the factors influencing the resonance frequency distribution of a High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) consisting of a piezoelectric thin film with twoelectrodes and a substrate are studied. Some HBARs are simulated. The results manifest that changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the substrate to piezo-film the distribution of the space of the parallel resonance frequency and the effective electromechanical coupling factor are changed. When the fundamental mode of the piezo-film is at high frequency, changing the acoustic impedance ratio of the electrode to piezo-film and the thickness of the electrodes make the resonance frequency distribution of HBARs change. These results manifest that the HBARs can be resonant at specified frequencies by means of adjusting the factors affecting the resonance frequency distribution.

  16. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Dept. de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain)); Pitarke, J.M. (Materia Kondentsatuaren Fisika Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Univ., Bilbo (Spain))

    1994-05-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  17. High Velocity Impact Interaction of Metal Particles with Porous Heterogeneous Materials with an Inorganic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazunov, A. A.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanasyeva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Khabibulin, M. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2016-03-01

    A computational-experimental investigation of stress-strain state and fracture of a porous heterogeneous material with an inorganic matrix, used as a thermal barrier coating of flying vehicles, under conditions of a high-velocity impact by a spherical steel projectile imitating a meteorite particle is discussed. Ballistic tests are performed at the velocities about 2.5 km/s. Numerical modeling of the high-velocity impact is described within the framework of a porous elastoplastic model including fracture and different phase states of the materials. The calculations are performed using the Euler and Lagrange numerical techniques for the velocities up to 10 km/s in a complete-space problem statement.

  18. High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-20

    bottom). complicated tectonics . Lg appears to propagate well in the Arabian plate but is dramatically attenuated in the Lesser Caucasus. This may be...AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2010-1022 High-Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region Robert J. Mellors...Resolution Seismic Velocity and Attenuation Models of the Caucasus-Caspian Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0007 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  19. Acoustic radiation force of high-order Bessel beam standing wave tweezers on a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2009-12-01

    Particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of Bessel beams is an active field of research. In a previous investigation, [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 1604-1620] an expression for the radiation force of a zero-order Bessel beam standing wave experienced by a sphere was derived. The present work extends the analysis of the radiation force to the case of a high-order Bessel beam (HOBB) of positive order m having an angular dependence on the phase phi. The derivation for the general expression of the force is based on the formulation for the total acoustic scattering field of a HOBB by a sphere [F.G. Mitri, Acoustic scattering of a high-order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2840-2850; F.G. Mitri, Equivalence of expressions for the acoustic scattering of a progressive high order Bessel beam by an elastic sphere, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control 56 (2009) 1100-1103] to derive the general expression for the radiation force function YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave incident upon a rigid sphere immersed in non-viscous water are computed. The rigid sphere calculations for YJm,st(ka,beta,m)Bessel beam standing wave (m=0). The proposed theory is of particular interest essentially due to its inherent value as a canonical problem in particle manipulation using the acoustic radiation force of a HOBB standing wave on a sphere. It may also serve as the benchmark for comparison to other solutions obtained by strictly numerical or asymptotic approaches.

  20. High Precision UTDR Measurements by Sonic Velocity Compensation with Reference Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Stade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic sensor design with sonic velocity compensation is developed to improve the accuracy of distance measurement in membrane modules. High accuracy real-time distance measurements are needed in membrane fouling and compaction studies. The benefits of the sonic velocity compensation with a reference transducer are compared to the sonic velocity calculated with the measured temperature and pressure using the model by Belogol’skii, Sekoyan et al. In the experiments the temperature was changed from 25 to 60 °C at pressures of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 MPa. The set measurement distance was 17.8 mm. Distance measurements with sonic velocity compensation were over ten times more accurate than the ones calculated based on the model. Using the reference transducer measured sonic velocity, the standard deviations for the distance measurements varied from 0.6 to 2.0 µm, while using the calculated sonic velocity the standard deviations were 21–39 µm. In industrial liquors, not only the temperature and the pressure, which were studied in this paper, but also the properties of the filtered solution, such as solute concentration, density, viscosity, etc., may vary greatly, leading to inaccuracy in the use of the Belogol’skii, Sekoyan et al. model. Therefore, calibration of the sonic velocity with reference transducers is needed for accurate distance measurements.

  1. Improving estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.; Chen, Y.; Lin, Y.; Huang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Injection and migration of CO2 during the geological carbon sequestration change the pore pressure and stress distribution in the reservoir. The change in stress may induce brittle failure on fractures, causing microseismic events. Focal mechanisms of induced microseismic events are useful for understanding stress evolution in the reservoir. An accurate estimation of microseismic focal mechanism depends on the accuracy of velocity models. In this work, we study the improvement on estimation of microseismic focal mechanisms using a high-resolution velocity model. We obtain the velocity model using a velocity inversion algorithm with a modified total-variation scheme rather than the commonly used Tikhonov regularization technique. We demonstrate with synthetic microseismic data that the velocity inversion method with a modified total-variation regularization scheme improves velocity inversion, and the improved velocity models enhance the accuracy of estimated focal mechanisms of microseismic events. We apply the new methodology to microseismic data acquired at a CO2-EOR (enhanced oil recovery) site at Aneth, Utah.

  2. Properties and Localizations of Acoustic Sources in High Speed Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Pinqing; Lewalle, Jacques; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team

    2014-11-01

    Jet noise has become one major concern for aircraft engine design in recent decades. The problem is to identify the near-field (NF) structures that produce far-field (FF) noise and develop noise control and reduction strategies. We developed an algorithm to identify the events that are responsible for NF and FF cross-correlations. Two sets of experimental data from Mach 0.6 jets are analyzed. They consist of 10 kHz TRPIV measurement and pressure sampling in both near- and far-field. Several NF diagnostics (velocity, vorticity, Q criterion, etc.) are calculated to represent the 2D velocity fields. The main contributors between these NF diagnostics and FF pressure are extracted as Diagnostic-Microphone (DM) events. The NF localization of DM event clusters will be compared to the NF triangulation of MM events, which were acquired using FF signals alone. In the time-frequency domain, the events are short wave packets, distorted by ambient perturbations. As a result, the matching of DM to MM events at physical lags is particularly difficult. We will report on different algorithms using time, frequency and space information to improve the reliability of the matches. We will also relate the event localization to the NF flow fields that correspond to FF ``loud'' POD modes (Low et al. 2013 and Berger et al. 2014). This work is supported by Spectra Energies LLC, Syracuse University MAE Department and the Glauser group at Syracuse University.

  3. High frequency surface acoustic wave resonator-based sensor for particulate matter detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanju; Cole, Marina; Villa-López, Farah Helue; Gardner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of high frequency Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator-based (SAWR) sensors, for the detection of micron and sub-micron sized particles. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh wave SAWRs where one is used for particle detection and the other as a reference. Electro-acoustic detection of different sized particles shows a strong relationship between mass sensitivity (Δf/Δm) and particle diameter (Dp). This enables frequency-dependent S...

  4. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  5. A novel fiber optic geophone with high sensitivity for geo-acoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhui; Yang, Huayong; Xiong, Shuidong; Luo, Hong; Cao, Chunyan; Ma, Shuqing

    2014-12-01

    A novel interferometric fiber optic geophone is introduced in this paper. This geophone is mainly used for geo-acoustic signal detection. The geophone use one of the three orthogonal components of mandrel type push-pull structure in mechanically and single-mode fiber optic Michelson interferometer structure with Faraday Rotation Mirror (FRM) elements in optically. The resonance frequency of the geophone is larger than 1000Hz. The acceleration sensitivity is as high as 56.6 dB (0dB re 1rad/g) with a slight sensitivity fluctuation of +/-0. 2dB within the frequency band from 20Hz to 200Hz. The geo-acoustic signals generated by underwater blasting are detected successfully. All the channels show good uniformity in the detected wave shape and the amplitudes exhibit very slight differences. The geo-acoustic signal excitated by the engine of surface vehicles was also detected successfully.

  6. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  7. Surface acoustic admittance and absorption of highly porous, layered, fibrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, J. S.; Lambert, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some acoustic properties of Kevlar-29 - a fine fibered, layered material is investigated. Kevlar is characterized by very high strength, uniform filaments arranged in a parallel batt where most filaments are random in the x-y plane but ordered as planes in the z direction. For experimental purposes, volume porosity, static flow resistance and mean filament diameter are used to identify the material. To determine the acoustic surface admittance of Kevlar, batts of the material are cut into small pads and placed into a standing wave tube terminated by a rigid brass plug. The attenuation and relative phase shift are recorded at each frequency in the range of 50 to 6000 Hz. Normalized conductance and susceptance are combined to form the acoustic absorption coefficient. The data are compared with theory by plotting the normalized admittance and normal incident absorption coefficient versus cyclic frequency.

  8. Frequency-Preserved Acoustic Diode Model with High Forward-Power-Transmission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Du, Zongliang; Sun, Zhi; Gao, Huajian; Guo, Xu

    2015-06-01

    The acoustic diode (AD) can provide brighter and clearer ultrasound images by eliminating acoustic disturbances caused by sound waves traveling in two directions at the same time and interfering with each other. Such an AD could give designers new flexibility in making ultrasonic sources like those used in medical imaging or nondestructive testing. However, current AD designs, based on nonlinear effects, only partially fill this role by converting sound to a new frequency and blocking any backward flow of the original frequency. In this work, an AD model that preserves the frequencies of acoustic waves and has a relatively high forward-power-transmission rate is proposed. Theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed AD has forward, reverse, and breakdown characteristics very similar to electrical diodes. The significant rectifying effect of the proposed AD is verified numerically through a one-dimensional example. Possible schemes for experimental realization of this model as well as more complex and efficient AD designs are also discussed.

  9. Sound velocity of high-strength polymer with negative thermal expansion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, R.; Ueno, M.; Okuda, Y.; Burmistrov, S.; Yamanaka, A

    2003-05-01

    Sound velocities of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) were measured along the fiber axis at temperatures between 360 and 77 K. We used two kinds of the high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which have negative thermal expansion coefficients. They also have high thermal conductivities and high resistances for flash over voltage, and are expected as new materials for coil bobbins or spacers at cryogenic temperatures. They have very large sound velocities of about 9000 (m/s) at 77 K, which are 4.5 times larger than that of the ordinary polyethylene fiber.

  10. High-Velocity H2O Masers Associated Massive Star Formation Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐烨; 蒋栋荣; 郑兴武; 顾敏峰; 俞志尧; 裴春传

    2001-01-01

    We report on the results of 12 CO (1-0) emission associated with H2O masers and massive star formation regions to identify high-velocity H2O masers. Several masers have a large blueshift, even up to 120 km.s-1, with respect to the CO peak, but no large redshifted maser appears. This result suggests that high-velocity H2O masers can most probably occur in high mass star-forming regions and quite a number of masers stem from the amplifications of a background source, which may enable those undetectable weak masers to come to an observable level.

  11. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High Velocity Features and Late Velocity Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, M J; Sim, S A; Tucker, B E; Yuan, F; Schmidt, B P; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Contreras, C; Hsiao, E Y; Phillips, M; Morrell, N; Jha, S W; McCully, C; Filippenko, A V; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; de Jaeger, T; Forster, F; Gal-Yam, A; Guillou, L Le; Maguire, K; Maund, J; Mazzali, P A; Pignata, G; Smartt, S; Spyromilio, J; Sullivan, M; Taddia, F; Valenti, S; Bayliss, D D R; Bessell, M; Blanc, G A; Carson, D J; Clubb, K I; de Burgh-Day, C; Desjardins, T D; Fang, J J; Fox, O D; Gates, E L; Ho, I-T; Keller, S; Kelly, P L; Lidman, C; Loaring, N S; Mould, J R; Owers, M; Ozbilgen, S; Pei, L; Pickering, T; Pracy, M B; Rich, J A; Schaefer, B E; Scott, N; Stritzinger, M; Vogt, F P A; Zhou, G

    2013-01-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN 2012fr, of which 33 were obtained before maximum light. At early times SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II 6355 line which can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II 6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of v~12,000 km/s until at least 5 weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared (IR) triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v~12,000 km/s with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as a high-velocity component beginning at v~31,000 km/s two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. (2009) classification scheme, and on the border between normal and "high-velocity" SNe Ia in the Wang et al. (2009a) system. Though it is a ...

  12. A high velocity impact experiment of micro-scale ice particles using laser-driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Kim, Jungwook; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    A jet engine for high speed air breathing propulsion is subject to continuous wear as a result of impacts of micro-scale ice particles during a flight in the atmosphere. The inlet duct and compressor blades are exposed to on-coming frozen moisture particles that may result in the surface damage and significantly shorten the designed lifetime of the aircraft. Under such prolonged high-speed impact loading, the performance parameters such as flight instability and power loss of a jet engine can be significantly degraded. In this work, a laser-driven system was designed to accelerate micro-scale ice particles to the velocity up to Mach 2 using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam at 100-600 mJ with 1064 nm wavelength and 9 ns pulse duration. The high speed images (Phantom v711) and double exposure shadowgraphs were used to calculate the average velocity of ice particles and their deceleration. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also utilized for the analysis of free surface velocity of a metal foil in order to understand the interfacial dynamics between the impacting particles and accepting metal target. The velocity of our ice particles is sufficiently fast for studying the effect of moisture particle collision on an air-breathing duct of high speed aircraft, and thus the results can provide insight into how minute space debris or micrometeorites cause damage to the orbiting spacecraft at large.

  13. On the Origin of High Shear Wave Velocities in the Deep Roots of Cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Duncan, M. S.; Garber, J. M.; Hernandez, J. A.; Maurya, S.; Zhang, H.; Faul, U.; McCammon, C. A.; Montagner, J. P.; Moresi, L. N.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Rudnick, R. L.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2016-12-01

    Some seismic models derived from tomographic studies indicate very high shear wave velocities around 150 km depth, which cannot be explained by standard cratonic peridotite compositions derived from kimberlites, even under the assumption of very cold geotherms (i.e. 28mW/m3 surface heat flux). We present the results of a multi-disciplinary study conducted at the CIDER Summer 2016 program in Santa Barbara (CA), in which we have reviewed various geophysical and petrological constraints on the nature of cratonic roots (seismic velocities, electrical conductivity, gravity, lithologies) and explored a range of possible solutions. We find that matching the high shear wave velocities requires a large proportion of eclogite that is not matched by observed eclogite proportions in kimberlite samples. The high shear velocity of diamond makes it a viable candidate to account for such high velocities, in a proportion that is compatible with the global carbon budget. Our most recent results will be presented as well as suggestions for possible mechanisms for diamond formation and emplacement.

  14. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomograp...

  15. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography......, prior information makes up for this lack of data. We restrict the target velocity space through the measured absence of FIDA light, impose phase-space densities to be non-negative, and encode the known geometry of neutral beam injection (NBI) sources. We further use a numerical simulation as prior...... information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI...

  16. High-resolution HI and CO observations of high-latitude intermediate-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Röhser, T; Bekhti, N Ben; Winkel, B

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are HI halo clouds that are likely related to a Galactic fountain process. In-falling IVCs are candidates for the re-accretion of matter onto the Milky Way. We study the evolution of IVCs at the disk-halo interface, focussing on the transition from atomic to molecular IVCs. We compare an atomic IVC to a molecular IVC and characterise their structural differences in order to investigate how molecular IVCs form high above the Galactic plane. With high-resolution HI observations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) observations with the IRAM 30m telescope, we analyse the small-scale structures within the two clouds. By correlating HI and far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission from the Planck satellite, the distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) is estimated. We conduct a detailed comparison of the HI, FIR, and CO data and study variations of the $X_\\rm{CO}$ conversion factor. The atomic IVC does not disclose detectable CO emission. The a...

  17. Isolated Bacterial Spores at High-velocity Survive Surface Impacts in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel; Barney, Brandon

    We present experiments in which bacterial spores were found to survive being accelerated in vacuum to velocities in the range 30-120 m/s and impacted on a dense target. In these experiments, spores of Bacillus subtilis spores were charged using electrospray at atmospheric pressure, dried, and then introduced into high vacuum. Through choice of skimmers and beam tubes, different velocity ranges were achieved. An image-charge detector observed the charged spores, providing total charge and velocity. The spores then impacted a glass target within a collection vessel. After the experiment, the collection vessel contents were extracted and cultured. Several positive and negative controls were used, including the use of antibiotic-resistant spores and antibiotic-containing (rifampicin) agar for culturing. These impact velocities are of particular interest for possible transport of bacterial spores from Mars to Phobos, and may have implications for planetary protection in a Phobos sample return mission. In addition, bacteria may reach similar velocities during a spacecraft crash (e.g., within components, or from spacecraft to surface materials during impact, etc.), raising concerns about forward contamination. The velocities of interest to transport of life between planets (panspermia) are somewhat higher, but these results complement shock-based experiments and contribute to the general discussion of impact survivability of organisms.

  18. Reduction of steel-ball velocity using sand or water layer accelerated by high explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homae, Tomotaka; Wakabayashi, Kunihiko; Matsumura, Tomoharu; Nakayama, Yoshio

    2007-06-01

    The reduction of steel-ball velocity using sand or water was studied. A steel ball, diameter of 9.525 mm, was accelerated using comp. C-4 explosive of 37-52 g. After free flight of about 500-750 mm, the steel ball passed through a sand layer in thickness of 30-125 mm, or a water layer in thickness of 75 or 150 mm. The velocities before and after passage of the layer were determined using a high-speed camera. Although the velocity before the passage was varied from about 300 m/s to about 750 m/s, the velocity after passage was almost constant. The velocity depended only on the kind of materials or thickness of the layer. Sand was more effective in reduction than water for same areal density. Moreover, the steel-ball was accelerated in contact with sand layer in thickness of 30-125 mm. The terminal velocity in such case was comparable to that experienced free fright described above.

  19. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, Stuart Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jensen, Niels G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  20. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  1. Demonstration of novel high-power acoustic through-the-wall sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    A high-power acoustic sensor, capable of detecting and tracking persons through steel walls of cargo containers, trailer truck bodies, and train cars, has been developed and demonstrated. The sensor is based on a new concept for narrowband mechanical-impact acoustic transmitters and matched resonant receivers. The lightweight, compact, and low-cost transmitters produce high-power acoustic pulses at one or more discrete frequencies with little input power. The energy for each pulse is accumulated over long times at low powers, like a mousetrap, and therefore can be operated with ordinary batteries and no power conditioning. A breadboard impact-transmitter and matched-receiver system that detected human motion through thick walls with only rudimentary signal processing is described, and results are presented. A conceptual design is presented of an acoustic through-the-wall sensor, costing about $10,000 per unit and capable of remotely and non-intrusively scanning steel cargo containers for stowaways at a rate o...

  2. A Investigation of Gouge Initiation in High-Velocity Sliding Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachau, Robert David Mazur

    1991-02-01

    Surface damage has been observed on the rails of rocket sled tracks and on the barrels of high-velocity guns. The phenomenon is generally referred to as "gouging". Damage to a stationary surface (guider) is created from the oblique impact of a high-velocity object (slider) moving over its surface. The surface damage (gouge) is typically a shallow crater in the shape of a teardrop with the leading edge characterized by the wider end and a slightly raised lip. For rocket sleds, rail gouging occurs when the sled velocity is greater than 1.5 km/sec; while in guns, barrel gouging occurs when the velocity exceeds 4 km/sec. A model is developed to describe the phenomenon of gouging. An unbalanced slider randomly causes a shallow -angle, oblique impact between the slider and the guider. At sufficiently high velocity, the impact produces a thin, but very hot, layer of soft material at the contact surface. Under the action of a moving load, the soft layer lends itself to an antisymmetric deformation and a gouge is formed when this soft material is over-run by the slider. The model is simulated numerically with a hydrodynamic (CTH) code. The results of the simulations are in good agreement with the observed phenomena. Based on the simulated temperature and pressure profiles at the contact surface, design criteria for gouge mitigation are developed in this study.

  3. MECHANISM AND PREDICTION OF MATERIAL ABRASION IN HIGH-VELOCITY SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xi-bin; YUAN Yin-zhong

    2006-01-01

    The wall surface of material is prone to silt abrasion by high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The silt abrasion is different form cavitation erosion. In this article, the characteristics of silt abrasion were discussed. The mechanism of silt abrasion was analyzed and the formation and development of ripple shape on wall surface of material were explained thereafter. Based on turbulence theory and test data, some formulas were derived for predicting the abrasion rate of concrete wall surface in high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Determination of minority-carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity with high spacial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M.; Actor, G.; Gatos, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the electron beam induced current in conjunction with high-resolution scanning makes it possible to evaluate the minority-carrier lifetime three dimensionally in the bulk and the surface recombination velocity two dimensionally, with a high spacial resolution. The analysis is based on the concept of the effective excitation strength of the carriers which takes into consideration all possible recombination sources. Two-dimensional mapping of the surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon diodes is presented as well as a three-dimensional mapping of the changes in the minority-carrier lifetime in ion-implanted silicon.

  5. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. High-fidelity simulation capability for virtual testing of seismic and acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Moran, Mark L.; Ketcham, Stephen A.; Lacombe, James; Anderson, Thomas S.; Symons, Neill P.; Aldridge, David F.; Marlin, David H.; Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes development and application of a high-fidelity, seismic/acoustic simulation capability for battlefield sensors. The purpose is to provide simulated sensor data so realistic that they cannot be distinguished by experts from actual field data. This emerging capability provides rapid, low-cost trade studies of unattended ground sensor network configurations, data processing and fusion strategies, and signatures emitted by prototype vehicles. There are three essential components to the modeling: (1) detailed mechanical signature models for vehicles and walkers, (2) high-resolution characterization of the subsurface and atmospheric environments, and (3) state-of-the-art seismic/acoustic models for propagating moving-vehicle signatures through realistic, complex environments. With regard to the first of these components, dynamic models of wheeled and tracked vehicles have been developed to generate ground force inputs to seismic propagation models. Vehicle models range from simple, 2D representations to highly detailed, 3D representations of entire linked-track suspension systems. Similarly detailed models of acoustic emissions from vehicle engines are under development. The propagation calculations for both the seismics and acoustics are based on finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) methodologies capable of handling complex environmental features such as heterogeneous geologies, urban structures, surface vegetation, and dynamic atmospheric turbulence. Any number of dynamic sources and virtual sensors may be incorporated into the FDTD model. The computational demands of 3D FDTD simulation over tactical distances require massively parallel computers. Several example calculations of seismic/acoustic wave propagation through complex atmospheric and terrain environments are shown.

  7. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  8. IUE observations of high velocity gas towards the M16 nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, B. Y.

    1984-03-01

    The star HD 168183, which is part of the giant H II region-molecular cloud complex of M16 (NGC 6611), has been observed at high resolution using the IUE satellite. High velocity interstellar absorption components have been detected at velocities of -83, -38 and +40 km s-1 and it is proposed that a stellar wind-driven shock-front, interacting with the ambient neutral interstellar gas, is responsible for such complex velocity structure. Strong absorption from five of the 12C16O UV molecular lines has also been detected and the present UV absorption line data seem consistent with radio observations of M16 in which the Tenorio-Tagle 'champagne' model has been invoked to explain the ionized and neutral gas outflows from the nebula.

  9. P-wave velocities of main upper mantle minerals at high temperature and high pressure and its geological implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋茂双; 谢鸿森; 郑海飞; 徐有生; 郭捷; 许祖鸣

    1996-01-01

    At 0 - 5.0GPa and room temperature to 1400℃, the P-wave velocities of olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, which are three common minerals from upper mantle, are measured under both simulated oceanic and continental geothermal gradients. The experimental results indicate that the P-wave velocities of these minerals increase with depth under both geothermal gradients. This implicates that pressure is more important than temperature in deep earth in controlling the P-wave velocities of mantle minerals, but the increase of temperature has greater effect on P-wave velocities of main mantle minerals at greater depth than at smaller depth. At low pressure, the measured P-wave velocities of mantle minerals are smaller than their true values due to fracturing, compaction process and recrystallization of mineral powder. The true P-wave velocities of mantle minerals can be obtained at lower pressure by the extrapolation of measured velocities at a high pressure. At higher depth, all these three minerals sho

  10. High levels of sound pressure: acoustic reflex thresholds and auditory complaints of workers with noise exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Scalli Mathias Duarte

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The clinical evaluation of subjects with occupational noise exposure has been difficult due to the discrepancy between auditory complaints and auditory test results. This study aimed to evaluate the contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds of workers exposed to high levels of noise, and to compare these results to the subjects' auditory complaints.METHODS: This clinical retrospective study evaluated 364 workers between 1998 and 2005; their contralateral acoustic reflexes were compared to auditory complaints, age, and noise exposure time by chi-squared, Fisher's, and Spearman's tests.RESULTS: The workers' age ranged from 18 to 50 years (mean = 39.6, and noise exposure time from one to 38 years (mean = 17.3. We found that 15.1% (55 of the workers had bilateral hearing loss, 38.5% (140 had bilateral tinnitus, 52.8% (192 had abnormal sensitivity to loud sounds, and 47.2% (172 had speech recognition impairment. The variables hearing loss, speech recognition impairment, tinnitus, age group, and noise exposure time did not show relationship with acoustic reflex thresholds; however, all complaints demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with Metz recruitment at 3000 and 4000 Hz bilaterally.CONCLUSION: There was no significance relationship between auditory complaints and acoustic reflexes.

  11. Broadband manipulation of acoustic wavefronts by pentamode metasurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ye; Wei, Qi, E-mail: weiqi@nju.edu.cn; Cheng, Ying [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Zheng [School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu, Xiaojun, E-mail: liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-11-30

    An acoustic metasurface with a sub-wavelength thickness can manipulate acoustic wavefronts freely by the introduction of abrupt phase variation. However, the existence of a narrow bandwidth and a low transmittance limits further applications. Here, we present a broadband and highly transparent acoustic metasurface based on a frequency-independent generalized acoustic Snell's law and pentamode metamaterials. The proposal employs a gradient velocity to redirect refracted waves and pentamode metamaterials to improve impedance matching between the metasurface and the background medium. Excellent wavefront manipulation based on the metasurface is further demonstrated by anomalous refraction, generation of non-diffracting Bessel beam, and sub-wavelength flat focusing.

  12. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  13. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping, E-mail: liping@cqu.edu.cn; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng [Research Center of Sensors and Instruments, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  14. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  16. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  17. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  18. An investigation of constant-pressure gas well testing influenced by high-velocity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, Sergio; Samaniego, Fernando; Cinco, Heber [PEMEX E and P and UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, Mexico (Mexico)

    1997-11-05

    This paper presents the results of a study of transient pressure analysis of gas flow under either constant bottom-hole pressure conditions or the constant wellhead pressure conditions. The effects of formation damage, wellbore storage and high-velocity flow are included in the model. The analysis of simulated well tests showed that the interpretation methods used for liquid flow are generally accurate when the m(p) is used. For these conditions, a graph of 1/q{sub D} vs. logt{sub D} presents gradually lower values of 1.1513 as the value of p{sub wf} decreases: for pressure buildup conditions, a graph of m{sub D}(1, {Delta}t{sub a{sub D}})/q{sub D}({Delta}t{sub a{sub D}}=0) vs. (t{sub a{sub D}}+{Delta}t{sub a{sub D}})/{Delta}t{sub a{sub D}} shows values of this slope within 1% of the 1.1513 value. However, when high-velocity flow influences constant pressure production tests, the slope can yield errors up to 13%. This upper limit occurs when the formation has a relatively `high` permeability (around 1 mD) and the rate performance test is affected by high-velocity flow. It was found that pressure buildup tests are superior to rate performance tests because high-velocity flow does not affect the slope of the straight line portion of the buildup curve. Derivative analysis of simulated buildup tests showed that the skin factor is considerably miscalculated when the high-velocity flow effect is significant. This problem could lead to errors in the calculation of the skin factor, s, up to 300%

  19. Zero-velocity solitons in high-index photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    -light modes in a solid core chalcogenide PCF are used to parameterize the model, which is shown to support standing and moving spatial solitons. Inclusion of Raman scattering slows down moving solitons exponentially, so that the zero-velocity soliton becomes an attractor state. An analytical expression......Nonlinear propagation in slow-light states of high-index photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is studied numerically. To avoid divergencies in dispersion and nonlinear parameters around the zero-velocity mode, a time-propagating generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is formulated. Calculated slow...

  20. Role of the leader in the rail gun channel at high launching velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorskii, A. V.; Katsnel'Son, S. S.; Pravdin, S. S.; Fomichev, V. P.

    1992-08-01

    An analysis of the performance of a number of rail guns indicates that one of the factors limiting the launching velocity is the formation of a leader. In experiments, the leader is usually formed as a result of a plasma breakdown between the dielectric projectile and the channel walls. This can be prevented by various technical means. However, at high launching velocities (5 km/s and greater) a leader may form as a result of a breakdown in the ionized gas in the wake of a strong shock wave ahead of the projectile. Further research is needed to find ways of preventing the formation of a leader in the latter case.

  1. Laser-strophometry high-resolution technique for velocity gradient measurements in fluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Staude, Wilfried

    2001-01-01

    This book describes techniques that allow the measurement of arbitrary velocity gradient components in fluids with high spatial and temporal resolution, e.g. turbulent fluids. The techniques are based on the properties of scattered laser light. The book gives a detailed and rigorous treatment of the physical and mathematical background in a pedagogical presentation accessible to students in physics and engineering. From both the theoretical and experimental points of view, four different schemes are discussed in detail; the schemes differ in the way the velocity of the moving pattern of the scattered laser light is measured.

  2. Fabry-Perot images of NGC 1275 and its puzzling high-velocity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulet, Adeline; Woodgate, Bruce E.; Brown, Larry W.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Lowenthal, James D.; Oliversen, Ronald J.; Ziegler, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot imager is used to obtain a velocity sequence of calibrated narrow-band CCD images to cover 3000 km/s velocity space between the redshifted H-alpha emission lines of NGC 1275, its extended associated system of low-velocity (LV) filaments, and the high-velocity (HV) system of knots, projected on the same line of sight in the sky. The lack of intermediate-velocity emission-line gas between the two systems leads to an upper limit of 1.5 x 10 exp -16 ergs/sq cm s sq arcsec (3 sigma) on stripped ionized gas due to the dynamical interaction between NGC 1275 and its HV companion galaxy. It also confirms previous reports that the level of continuum light arising from stellar and nonstellar sources must be very low in otherwise bright, strongly concentrated emission-line knots with unresolved diameters of 425/h pc. The H-alpha luminosities of the emission-line regions of the two systems were measured and star formation rates derived in order to investigate quantitatively the physical relation between the HV galaxy, NGC 1275, and the surrounding cooling flow filaments.

  3. High-Velocity Features of Calcium and Silicon in the Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Marion, G H; Wheeler, J Craig; Barna, Barnabas; Szalai, Tamas; Mulligan, Brian; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    "High-velocity features" (HVFs) are spectral features in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that have minima indicating significantly higher (by greater than about 6000 km/s) velocities than typical "photospheric-velocity features" (PVFs). The PVFs are absorption features with minima indicating typical photospheric (i.e., bulk ejecta) velocities (usually ~9000-15,000 km/s near B-band maximum brightness). In this work we undertake the most in-depth study of HVFs ever performed. The dataset used herein consists of 445 low-resolution optical and near-infrared (NIR) spectra (at epochs up to 5 d past maximum brightness) of 210 low-redshift SNe Ia that follow the "Phillips relation." A series of Gaussian functions is fit to the data in order to characterise possible HVFs of Ca II H&K, Si II {\\lambda}6355, and the Ca II NIR triplet. The temporal evolution of the velocities and strengths of the PVFs and HVFs of these three spectral features is investigated, as are possible correlations with other SN Ia observables. We f...

  4. A High Order Element Based Method for the Simulation of Velocity Damping in the Hyporheic Zone of a High Mountain River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi-Ribero, Antonio; Peñaloza-Giraldo, Jorge; Escobar-Vargas, Jorge; Donado-Garzón, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater - Surface water interaction is a topic that has gained relevance among the scientific community over the past decades. However, several questions remain unsolved inside this topic, and almost all the research that has been done in the past regards the transport phenomena and has little to do with understanding the dynamics of the flow patterns of the above mentioned interactions. The aim of this research is to verify the attenuation of the water velocity that comes from the free surface and enters the porous media under the bed of a high mountain river. The understanding of this process is a key feature in order to characterize and quantify the interactions between groundwater and surface water. However, the lack of information and the difficulties that arise when measuring groundwater flows under streams make the physical quantification non reliable for scientific purposes. These issues suggest that numerical simulations and in-stream velocity measurements can be used in order to characterize these flows. Previous studies have simulated the attenuation of a sinusoidal pulse of vertical velocity that comes from a stream and goes into a porous medium. These studies used the Burgers equation and the 1-D Navier-Stokes equations as governing equations. However, the boundary conditions of the problem, and the results when varying the different parameters of the equations show that the understanding of the process is not complete yet. To begin with, a Spectral Multi Domain Penalty Method (SMPM) was proposed for quantifying the velocity damping solving the Navier - Stokes equations in 1D. The main assumptions are incompressibility and a hydrostatic approximation for the pressure distributions. This method was tested with theoretical signals that are mainly trigonometric pulses or functions. Afterwards, in order to test the results with real signals, velocity profiles were captured near the Gualí River bed (Honda, Colombia), with an Acoustic Doppler

  5. The Effects of Drag and Tidal Forces on the Orbits of High-Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Benjamin, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, orbital constraints have been obtained for several high velocity cloud complexes surrounding the Milky Way: Complex GCP (Smith Cloud), Complex A, Complex H, Complex GCN, and the Magellanic Stream. We summarize what is known about the orbits of these clouds and and discuss how well each of these complexes fits a balistic trajectory, and discuss how the length of a complex across the sky is related to the inital "fragmentation" and velocity dispersion of the clouds. We then introduce gas drag into the simulation of the orbits of these complexes. We present analytical tests of our numerical method and characterize the departure of the clouds from the ballistic trajectory as a function of drag parameters (ambient gas density and velocity and cloud column density). Using the results of these simulations we comment on the survivability and ultimate fate of HVC in the context of the different models of drag forces.

  6. Velocity measurement in life combustion systems with high temperature anemometer - HTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudinger, G.; Mory, A.; Pilz, R.; Zimmel, M. [Technische Universitaet Graz, Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Verfahrenstechnik, Abt. fuer Apparatebau und Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik

    1998-12-31

    An anemometer was developed which allows to measure velocities in dusty atmospheres at temperatures up to 1200{degree}C in a range between 1 and 40 m/s. The most important features of this vane-anemometer are its frictionless aerostatic bearing and the internal air cooling. The frequency of rotation is detected with a high temperature resistant optical fibre. In the project velocities and velocity-fields were measured in the combustion chambers of a 300 MW{sub el} power plant, a 27 MW{sub th} waste incinerator and in different pilot- and semi-industrial plants. The fuels used were coal, biomass, and municipal waste. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Numerical Simulation on Supersonic Flow in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Hideki YAMAMOTO; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of coating particles as well as the gas flow both inside and outside of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun by using a quasi-one-dimensional analysis and a numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axially symmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside of the HVOF gun are predicted. The velocity and temperature of the coating particles at the exit of the gun calculated by the present method agree well with the previous experimental results. Therefore, the present method of calculation is considered to be useful for predicting the HVOF gas and particle flows.

  8. Group velocity locked vector dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Li, Lei; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Vectorial nature of dissipative solitons (DSs) with high repetition rates is studied for the first time in a normal-dispersion fiber laser. Despite the fact that the formed DSs are strongly chirped and the repetition rate is greater than 100 MHz, polarization locked and polarization rotating group velocity locked vector DSs can be formed under 129.3 MHz fundamental mode-locking and 258.6 MHz harmonic mode-locking of the fiber laser, respectively. The two orthogonally polarized components of these vector DSs possess distinctly different central wavelengths and travel together at the same group velocity in the laser cavity, resulting in a gradual spectral edge and small steps on the optical spectra, which can be considered as an auxiliary indicator of the group velocity locked vector DSs.

  9. Comparison between length and velocity gauges in quantum simulations of high-order harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for atomic hydrogen in an intense field using spherical coordinates with a radial grid and a spherical harmonic basis for the angular part. We present the high-order harmonic spectra based on three different forms, the dipole, dipole velocity......, and acceleration forms, and two gauges, the length and velocity gauges. The relationships among the harmonic phases obtained from the Fourier transform of the three forms are discussed in detail. Although quantum mechanics is gauge invariant and the length and velocity gauges should give identical results, the two...... gauges present different computation efficiencies, which reflects the different behavior in terms of characteristics of the physical couplings acting in the two gauges. In order to obtain convergence, more angular momentum states are required in the length gauge, while more grid points are required...

  10. High resolution spectroscopy of bright subdwarf B stars - I. Radial velocity variables

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, H; Altmann, M; Karl, C; Lisker, T

    2005-01-01

    Radial velocity curves for 15 bright subdwarf B binary systems have been measured using high precision radial velocity measurements from high S/N optical high-resolution spectra. In addition, two bright sdB stars are discovered to be radial velocity variable but the period could not yet be determined. The companions for all systems are unseen. The periods range from about 0.18 days up to more than ten days. The radial velocity semi amplitudes are found to lie between 15 and 130 km/s. Using the mass functions, the masses of the unseen companions have been constrained to lower limits of 0.03 up to 0.55 M_sun, and most probable values of 0.03 up to 0.81 M_sun. The invisible companions for three of our program stars are undoubtedly white dwarfs. In the other cases they could be either white dwarfs or main sequence stars. For two stars the secondaries could possibly be brown dwarfs. As expected, the orbits are circular for most of the systems. However, for one third of the program stars we find slightly eccentric ...

  11. Ion acoustic shock and solitary waves in highly relativistic plasmas with nonextensive electrons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) -like equation is derived to study the characteristics of nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic solitions in a highly relativistic plasma containing relativistic ions and nonextensive distribution of electrons and positrons using the well known reductive perturbation technique. The KdVB-like equation is solved employing the Bernoulli's equation method taking unperturbed positron to electron concentration ratio, electron to positron temperature ratio, strength of nonextensivity, ion kinematic viscosity, and highly relativistic streaming factor. It is found that these parameters significantly modify the structures of the solitonic excitation. The ion acoustic shock profiles are observed due to the influence of ion kinematic viscosity. In the absence of dissipative term to the KdVB equation, compressive and rarefactive solitons are observed in case of superthermality, but only compressive solitons are found for the case of subthermality.

  12. A Catalogue of Field Horizontal Branch Stars Aligned with High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Thom, C; Christlieb, N; Thom, Christopher; Gibson, Brad K.; Christlieb, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 430 Field Horizontal Branch (FHB) stars, selected from the Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), which fortuitously align with high column density neutral hydrogen (HI) High-Velocity Cloud (HVC) gas. These stars are ideal candidates for absorption-line studies of HVCs, attempts at which have been made for almost 40 years with little success. A parent sample of 8321 HES FHB stars was used to extract HI spectra along each line-of-sight, using the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey. All lines-of-sight aligned with high velocity HI emission with peak brightness temperatures greater than 120mK were examined. The HI spectra of these 430 probes were visually screened and cross-referenced with several HVC catalogues. In a forthcoming paper, we report on the results of high-resolution spectroscopic observations of a sample of stars drawn from this catalogue.

  13. The effects of varying resistance-training loads on intermediate- and high-velocity-specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K; Bishop, P; Hunter, G; Fleisig, G

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in velocity-specific adaptations in moderately resistance-trained athletes who trained with either low or high resistances. The study used tests of sport-specific skills across an intermediate- to high-velocity spectrum. Thirty NCAA Division I baseball players were randomly assigned to either a low-resistance (40-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) training group or a high-resistance (70-90% 1RM) training group. Both of the training groups intended to maximallv accelerate each repetition during the concentric phase (IMCA). The 10 weeks of training consisted of 4 training sessions a week using basic core exercises. Peak force, velocity, and power were evaluated during set angle and depth jumps as well as weighted jumps using 30 and 50% 1RM. Squat 1RMs were also tested. Although no interactions for any of the jump tests were found, trends supported the hypothesis of velocity-specific training. Percentage gains suggest that the combined use of heavier training loads (70-90% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak force in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. Trends also show that the combined use of lighter training loads (40-60% 1RM) and IMCA tend to increase peak power and peak velocity in the lower-body leg and hip extensors. The high-resistance group improved squats more than the low-resistance group (p IMCA to increase 1RM strength in the lower bodies of resistance-trained athletes.

  14. Friction properties and deformation mechanisms of halite(-mica) gouges from low to high sliding velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Loes; Niemeijer, André R.; Han, Raehee; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of friction as a function of slip rate is important in understanding earthquake nucleation and propagation. Many laboratory experiments investigating friction of fault rocks are either conducted in the low velocity regime (10-8-10-4 ms-1) or in the high velocity regime (0.01-1 m s-1). Here, we report on the evolution of friction and corresponding operating deformation mechanisms in analog gouges deformed from low to high slip rates, bridging the gap between these low and high velocity regimes. We used halite and halite-muscovite gouges to simulate processes, governing friction, active in upper crustal quartzitic fault rocks, at conditions accessible in the laboratory. The gouges were deformed over a 7 orders of magnitude range of slip rate (10-7-1 m s-1) using a low-to-high velocity rotary shear apparatus, using a normal stress of 5 MPa and room-dry humidity. Microstructural analysis was conducted to study the deformation mechanisms. Four frictional regimes as a function of slip rate could be recognized from the mechanical data, showing a transitional regime and stable sliding (10-7-10-6 m s-1), unstable sliding and weakening (10-6-10-3 m s-1), hardening (10-2-10-1 m s-1) and strong weakening (10-1-1 m s-1). Each of the four regimes can be associated with a distinct microstructure, reflecting a transition from mainly brittle deformation accompanied by pressure solution healing to temperature activated deformation mechanisms. Additionally, the frictional response of a sliding gouge to a sudden acceleration of slip rate to seismic velocities was investigated. These showed an initial strengthening, the amount of which depended on the friction level at which the step was made, followed by strong slip weakening.

  15. High Resolution Velocity Map Imaging Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Beryllium Oxide Anion, BeO-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, Amanda Reed; Mascaritolo, Kyle; Heaven, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The photodetachment spectrum of BeO- has been studied using high resolution velocity map imaging photoelectron spectroscopy. The vibrational contours were imaged and compared with Franck-Condon simulations for the ground and excited states of the neutral. The electron affinity of BeO was measured for the first time, and anisotropies of several transitions were determined. Experimental findings are compared to high level ab initio calculations.

  16. Highly Mass-Sensitive Thin Film Plate Acoustic Resonators (FPAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapan, Lilia; Alexieva, Gergana; Avramov, Ivan D.; Radeva, Ekaterina; Strashilov, Vesseline; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2011-01-01

    The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO)-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented. PMID:22163994

  17. Highly mass-sensitive thin film plate acoustic resonators (FPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapan, Lilia; Alexieva, Gergana; Avramov, Ivan D; Radeva, Ekaterina; Strashilov, Vesseline; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2011-01-01

    The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN) film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO)-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented.

  18. Highly Mass-Sensitive Thin Film Plate Acoustic Resonators (FPAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventsislav Yantchev

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mass sensitivity of thin aluminum nitride (AlN film S0 Lamb wave resonators is theoretically and experimentally studied. Theoretical predictions based on modal and finite elements method analysis are experimentally verified. Here, two-port 888 MHz synchronous FPARs are micromachined and subsequently coated with hexamethyl-disiloxane(HMDSO-plasma-polymerized thin films of various thicknesses. Systematic data on frequency shift and insertion loss versus film thickness are presented. FPARs demonstrate high mass-loading sensitivity as well as good tolerance towards the HMDSO viscous losses. Initial measurements in gas phase environment are further presented.

  19. Three-dimensional nonlinear acoustical holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaying

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH algorithms developed and improved by many researchers can result in significant reconstruction errors when they are applied to reconstruct 3-D acoustic fields that are radiated from a high-level noise source and include significant nonlinear components. Here, planar, nonlinear acoustical holography procedures are developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D, nonlinear acoustic fields radiated from a high-level noise source based on 2-D acoustic pressure data measured on a hologram surface. The first nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic pressure fields radiated from a high-level pulsating sphere and an infinite-size, vibrating panel are used to validate this procedure. Although the WWE-based algorithm is successfully validated by those two numerical simulations, it still has several limitations: (1) Only the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic nonlinear components can be reconstructed; (2) the application of this algorithm is limited to mono-frequency source cases; (3) the effects of bent wave rays caused by transverse particle velocities are not included; (4) only acoustic pressure fields can be reconstructed. In order to address the limitations of the steady-state, WWE-based procedure, a transient, planar, nonlinear acoustic holography algorithm is developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D nonlinear acoustic pressure and particle velocity fields. This procedure is based on Kuznetsov Wave Equation (KWE) that is directly solved by using temporal and spatial Fourier Transforms. When compared

  20. Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer: Toward Next-Generation High-Throughput MS Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Ian; Stearns, Rick; Pringle, Steven; Wingfield, Jonathan; Datwani, Sammy; Hall, Eric; Ghislain, Luke; Majlof, Lars; Bachman, Martin

    2016-02-01

    High-throughput, direct measurement of substrate-to-product conversion by label-free detection, without the need for engineered substrates or secondary assays, could be considered the "holy grail" of drug discovery screening. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to be part of this ultimate screening solution, but is constrained by the limitations of existing MS sample introduction modes that cannot meet the throughput requirements of high-throughput screening (HTS). Here we report data from a prototype system (Echo-MS) that uses acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) to transfer femtoliter-scale droplets in a rapid, precise, and accurate fashion directly into the MS. The acoustic source can load samples into the MS from a microtiter plate at a rate of up to three samples per second. The resulting MS signal displays a very sharp attack profile and ions are detected within 50 ms of activation of the acoustic transducer. Additionally, we show that the system is capable of generating multiply charged ion species from simple peptides and large proteins. The combination of high speed and low sample volume has significant potential within not only drug discovery, but also other areas of the industry.

  1. A laboratory acoustic emission experiment and numerical simulation of rock fracture driven by a high-pressure fluid source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglin Lei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve our understanding of rock fracture and fault instability driven by high-pressure fluid sources, the authors carried out rock fracture tests using granite under a confining pressure of 80 MPa with fluid injection in the laboratory. Furthermore, we tested a number of numerical models using the FLAC3D modeling software to find the best model to represent the experimental results. The high-speed multichannel acoustic emission (AE waveform recording system used in this study made it possible to examine the total fracture process through detailed monitoring of AE hypocenters and seismic velocity. The experimental results show that injecting high-pressure oil into the rock sample can induce AE activity at very low stress levels and can dramatically reduce the strength of the rock. The results of the numerical simulations show that major experimental results, including the strength, the temporal and spatial patterns of the AE events, and the role of the fluid can be represented fairly well by a model involving (1 randomly distributed defect elements to model pre-existing cracks, (2 random modification of rock properties to represent inhomogeneity introduced by different mineral grains, and (3 macroscopic inhomogeneity. Our study, which incorporates laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, indicates that such an approach is helpful in finding a better model not only for simulating experimental results but also for upscaling purposes.

  2. High-Precision Timing of 5 Millisecond Pulsars: Space Velocities, Binary Evolution and Equivalence Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M E; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Nice, D J; Demorest, P B; Ransom, S M; Kramer, M; Camilo, F; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2011-01-01

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km/s, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M_sun. The implications of the results pr...

  3. High-velocity gas towards the LMC resides in the Milky Way halo

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, P; Werner, K; Rauch, T

    2015-01-01

    To explore the origin of high-velocity gas in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) we analyze absorption lines in the ultraviolet spectrum of a Galactic halo star that is located in front of the LMC at d=9.2 kpc distance. We study the velocity-component structure of low and intermediate metal ions in the spectrum of RXJ0439.8-6809, as obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard HST, and measure equivalent widths and column densities for these ions. We supplement our COS data with a Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum of the nearby LMC star Sk-69 59 and with HI 21cm data from the Leiden-Argentina-Bonn (LAB) survey. Metal absorption towards RXJ0439.8-6809 is unambiguously detected in three different velocity components near v_LSR=0,+60, and +150 km/s. The presence of absorption proves that all three gas components are situated in front of the star, thus being located in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. For the high-velocity cloud (HVC) at v_LSR=+150 km/s we deri...

  4. SU-D-210-07: The Dependence On Acoustic Velocity of Medium On the Needle Template and Electronic Grid Alignment in Ultrasound QA for Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, P; Kapoor, R; Curran, B [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); HH McGuire VA Hospital, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze the impact on acoustic velocity (AV) of two different media (water and milk) using the needle template/electronic grid alignment test. Water, easily available, makes a good material to test the alignment of the template and grid although water’s AV (1498 m/s at 25°C) is significantly different from tissue (1540 m/s). Milk, with an AV much closer (1548 m/s) to prostate tissue, may be a good substitute for water in ultrasound quality assurance testing. Methods: Tests were performed using a Hitachi ultrasound unit with a mechanical arrangement designed to position needles parallel to the transducer. In this work, two materials – distilled water and homogenized whole milk (AVs of 1498 and 1548 m/s at 25°C) were used in a phantom to test ultrasound needle/grid alignment. The images were obtained with both materials and analyzed for their placement accuracy. Results: The needle template/electronic grid alignment tests showed displacement errors between measured and calculated values. The measurements showed displacements of 2.3mm (water) and 0.4mm (milk), and 1.6mm (water) and 0.3mm (milk) at depths of 7cm and 5cm respectively from true needle positions. The calculated results showed a displacement of 2.36 mm (water); 0.435mm (milk), and 1.66mm (water) and 0.31mm (milk) at a depth of 7cm and 5cm respectively. The displacements in the X and Y directions were also calculated. At depths of 7cm and 5cm, the (ΔX,ΔY) displacements in water were (0.829mm, 2.21mm) and (0.273mm, 1.634mm) and for milk were (0.15mm, 0.44mm) and (0.05mm, 0.302mm) respectively. Conclusion: The measured and calculated values were in good agreement for all tests. They show that milk provides superior results when performing needle template and electronic grid alignment tests for ultrasound units used in prostate brachytherapy.

  5. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  6. Chemical reactions induced by high-velocity molecular impacts: challenges for closed-source mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of upper atmosphere composition using closed-source neutral mass spectrometers (e.g., Cassini INMS, MAVEN NGIMS) is subject to error due to chemical reactions caused by the high-velocity impacts of neutral molecules on the source surfaces. In addition to species traditionally considered "surface reactive" (e.g., O, N) it is likely that many or all impacting molecules are vibrationally excited to the point that chemical changes can occur. Dissociation, fragmentation, formation of radicals and ions, and other reactions likely obscure analysis of the native atmospheric composition, particularly of organic compounds. Existing techniques are not capable of recreating the relevant impact chemistry in the lab. We report on the development of a new capability allowing reactions of high-velocity neutrals impacting surfaces to be characterized directly. Molecules introduced into a vacuum chamber are impacted at several km/s by the surface of a high-speed rotor. These molecules subsequently impact multiple times on other surfaces within the vacuum chamber until they are thermalized, after which they are cryogenically collected and analyzed. Reaction pathways and thermodynamics for volatile compounds are then determined. We will present current results on this project, including data from low- and mid-range velocity experiments. This type of information is critical to clarify prior flight results and plan for future missions. Finally, we present a new type of inlet intended to significantly reduce fragmentation for impact velocities typical of a fly-by mission. Theoretical analysis indicates that this new inlet may reduce fragmentation by more than an order of magnitude for any encounter velocity.

  7. Electromyography normalization methods for high-velocity muscle actions: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nick; Scurr, Joanna

    2013-10-01

    Electromyograms used to assess neuromuscular demand during high-velocity tasks require normalization to aid interpretation. This paper posits that, to date, methodological approaches to normalization have been ineffective and have limited the application of electromyography (EMG). There is minimal investigation seeking alternative normalization methods, which must be corrected to improve EMG application in sports. It is recognized that differing normalization methods will prevent cross-study comparisons. Users of EMG should aim to identify normalization methods that provide good reliability and a representative measure of muscle activation. The shortcomings of current normalization methods in high-velocity muscle actions assessment are evident. Advances in assessing alternate normalization methods have been done in cycling and sprinting. It is advised that when normalizing high-intensity muscle actions, isometric methods are used with caution and a dynamic alternative, where the muscle action is similar to that of the task is preferred. It is recognized that optimal normalization methods may be muscle and task dependent.

  8. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Callahan, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dittrich, T. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmonson, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Springer, P. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Church, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dixit, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dylla-Spears, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edgell, D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Field, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Grim, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guler, N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herrmann, H. W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hsing, W. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Knauer, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Kohut, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kritcher, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meezan, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Parham, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosen, M. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sater, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sayre, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, M. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaughnessy, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Town, R.P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Volegov, P. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yeamans, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  9. Design and Construction of a One-Stage Gas Gun for High Velocity Impact Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamboa-Castellanos Ricardo Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High impact tests are characterized by a projectile traveling at high speed as well as complex events such as flying fragments due to the velocity at which the impact occurs; however, these tests have become increasingly popular due to the need for more stringent protective material requirements nowadays. In this paper, the design and construction of a one-stage light gas gun for ballistic testing is presented. This particular design is characterized by its simplicity, excellent performance at low cost and compact dimensions, when compared to commercial systems, presenting an affordable option for materials characterization for high velocity impact tests. The results are completed with the characterization of an armor grade material, obtaining the ballistic limit of the material, as well as demonstrating the effectiveness and versatility of the equipment.

  10. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lakshtanov, D. L.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Chen, B.; Shen, G.; Bass, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high- temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells with Ne or Ar as pressure medium. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  11. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO and Ringwoodite by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S.; Lakshtanov, D.; Prakapenka, V.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Shen, G.; Bass, J.

    2009-05-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high-temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (Ks) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. In addition we demonstrate that successful P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements can be performed on certain polycrystalline materials, e.g. Ringwoodite (γ-Mg2SiO4). The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  12. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Benetti, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bufano, F., E-mail: mjc@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2013-06-10

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  13. Comparative experimental study on several methods for measuring elastic wave velocities in rocks at high pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Hongsen(谢鸿森); ZHOU; Wenge; 周文戈); LIU; Yonggang; (刘永刚); GUO; Jie; (郭捷); HOU; Wei; (侯渭); ZHAO; Zhidan(赵志丹)

    2002-01-01

    To measure elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure is an important way to acquire the mechanics and thermodynamics data of rocks in the earth's interior and also a substantial approach to studying the structure and composition of materials there. In recent years, a rapid progress has been made in methodology pertaining to the measurements of elastic wave velocities in rocks at high temperature and high pressure with solids as the pressure-transfer media. However, no strict comparisons have been made of the elastic wave velocity data of rocks measured at high temperature and high pressure by various laboratories. In order to compare the experimental results from various laboratories, we have conducted a comparative experimental study on three measuring methods and made a strict comparison with the results obtained by using the transmission method with fluid as the pressure-transfer medium. Our experimental results have shown that the measurements obtained by the three methods are comparable in the pressure ranges of their application. The cubic sample pulse transmission method used by Kern is applicable to measuring elastic wave velocities in crustal rocks at lower temperature and lower pressure. The prism sample pulse reflection-transmission method has some advantages in pressure range, heating temperature and measuring precision. Although the measurements obtained under relatively low pressure conditions by the prism sample pulse transmission method are relatively low in precision, the samples are large in length and their assemblage is simple. So this method is suitable to the experiments that require large quantities of samples and higher pressures. Therefore, in practical application the latter two methods are usually recommended because their measurements can be mutually corrected and supplemented.

  14. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilton, Richie J., E-mail: richard.shilton@iit.it [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Travagliati, Marco [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Beltram, Fabio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cecchini, Marco, E-mail: marco.cecchini@nano.cnr.it [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-08-18

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754 MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w ≳ 10 λ, where λ is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  15. Generation of High-order Group-velocity-locked Vector Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, X X; Zhang, Q; Li, L; Tang, D Y; Shen, D Y; Fu, S N; Liu, D M; Zhao, L M

    2015-01-01

    We report numerical simulations on the high-order group-velocity-locked vector soliton (GVLVS) generation based on the fundamental GVLVS. The high-order GVLVS generated is characterized with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization. The phase difference between the two humps could be 180 degree. It is found that by appropriate setting the time separation between the two components of the fundamental GVLVS, the high-order GVLVS with different pulse width and pulse intensity could be obtained. 1+2 and 2+2 type high-order GVLVS could be either obtained.

  16. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  17. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  18. Imaging living cells with a combined high-resolution multi-photon-acoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Selma; Weiss, Eike; Stark, Martin; Stracke, Frank; Riemann, Iris; Lemor, Robert; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    With increasing demand for in-vivo observation of living cells, microscope techniques that do not need staining become more and more important. In this talk we present a combined multi-photon-acoustic microscope with the possibility to measure synchronously properties addressed by ultrasound and two-photon fluorescence. Ultrasound probes the local mechanical properties of a cell, while the high resolution image of the two-photon fluorescence delivers insight in cell morphology and activity. In the acoustic part of the microscope an ultrasound wave, with a frequency of GHz, is focused by an acoustic sapphire lens and detected by a piezo electric transducer assembled to the lens. The achieved lateral resolution is in the range of 1μm. Contrast in the images arises mainly from the local absorption of sound in the cells, related to properties, such as mass density, stiffness and viscose damping. Additionally acoustic microscopy can access the cell shape and the state of the cell membrane as it is a intrinsic volume scanning technique.The optical part bases on the emission of fluorescent biomolecules naturally present in cells (e.g. NAD(P)H, protophorphyrin IX, lipofuscin, melanin). The nonlinear effect of two-photon absorption provides a high lateral and axial resolution without the need of confocal detection. In addition, in the near-IR cell damages are drastically reduced in comparison to direct excitation in the visible or UV. Both methods can be considered as minimal invasive, as they relay on intrinsic contrast mechanisms and dispense with the need of staining. First results on living cells are presented and discussed.

  19. Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-26

    inversion testing. Due to time limitations and to facilitate the deployments of both sonars, the 7125s were deployed using a pole mount on the...FINAL REPORT Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXOs SERDP...2015 Inversion of High Frequency Acoustic Data for Sediment Properties Needed for the Detection and Classification of UXO’s W912HQ-12-C-0049 MR

  20. Scaling invariance of spherical projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin continuous shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myagkov, N. N., E-mail: nn-myagkov@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Mechanics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The problem of aluminum projectile fragmentation upon high-velocity impact on a thin aluminum shield is considered. A distinctive feature of this description is that the fragmentation has been numerically simulated using the complete system of equations of deformed solid mechanics by a method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics in three-dimensional setting. The transition from damage to fragmentation is analyzed and scaling relations are derived in terms of the impact velocity (V), ratio of shield thickness to projectile diameter (h/D), and ultimate strength (σ{sub p}) in the criterion of projectile and shield fracture. Analysis shows that the critical impact velocity V{sub c} (separating the damage and fragmentation regions) is a power function of σ{sub p} and h/D. In the supercritical region (V > V{sub c}), the weight-average fragment mass asymptotically tends to a power function of the impact velocity with exponent independent of h/D and σ{sub p}. Mean cumulative fragment mass distributions at the critical point are scale-invariant with respect to parameters h/D and σ{sub p}. Average masses of the largest fragments are also scale-invariant at V > V{sub c}, but only with respect to variable parameter σ{sub p}.

  1. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  2. Experimental and analytical study of high velocity impact on Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Rahul; Velmurugan, Raman; Madhu, Velmuri

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, impact behavior of Kevlar/Epoxy composite plates has been carried out experimentally by considering different thicknesses and lay-up sequences and compared with analytical results. The effect of thickness, lay-up sequence on energy absorbing capacity has been studied for high velocity impact. Four lay-up sequences and four thickness values have been considered. Initial velocities and residual velocities are measured experimentally to calculate the energy absorbing capacity of laminates. Residual velocity of projectile and energy absorbed by laminates are calculated analytically. The results obtained from analytical study are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is observed from the study that 0/90 lay-up sequence is most effective for impact resistance. Delamination area is maximum on the back side of the plate for all thickness values and lay-up sequences. The delamination area on the back is maximum for 0/90/45/-45 laminates compared to other lay-up sequences.

  3. The High Velocity Galaxy Problem of $\\Lambda$CDM in the Local Group $-$ Including External Perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    We recently used an axisymmetric model of the Local Group (LG) to show that the observed positions and velocities of galaxies inside it are difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model, $\\Lambda$CDM (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We now extend this investigation using a 3D model of the LG. This makes it feasible to directly include several other mass concentrations within and just outside the LG e.g. M33 and IC 342, respectively. As before, LG dwarf galaxies are treated as test particles. Although our best-fitting 3D model yields different velocity predictions for individual galaxies, the overall picture remains unchanged. In particular, observed radial velocities (RVs) tend to exceed $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our earlier axisymmetric analysis, with a root mean square value of $\\sim$50 km/s. \\emph{Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy prob...

  4. Comparison between Normal and HeII Two-phase Flows at High Vapor Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Van Weelderen, R; Rousset, B; Thibault, P; Wolf, P E

    2006-01-01

    We present results on helium co-current two-phase flow experiments at high vapor velocity obtained with the use of the new CEA/SBT 400 W/1.8 K refrigerator [1]. For vapor velocities larger than typically 4 m/s, a mist of droplets develops from the bulk liquid interface accompanied by an increase in heat transfer at the wall. Experiments were conducted in a 10 m long, 40 mm I.D. straight pipe, both in helium II and in helium I to compare these two situations. The respective roles of vapor density, vapor velocity and liquid level on atomization were systematically investigated. Light scattering experiments were performed to measure sizes, velocities and interfacial areas of droplets in a complete cross section. In-house-made heat transfer sensors located in the mist allowed us to deduce an upper value of the extra cooling power of the dispersed phase. The practical interest of atomized flow for cooling large cryogenic facilities is discussed by considering the balance between increase in heat transfer and press...

  5. Residual stresses in high-velocity oxy-fuel metallic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, T. C.; Wright, R. N.; Swank, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray based residual stress measurements were made on type 316 stainless steel and Fe3Al coatings that were high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed onto low-carbon and stainless steel substrates. Nominal coating thicknesses varied from 250 to 1500 µm. The effect of HVOF spray particle velocity on residual stress and deposition efficiency was assessed by preparing coatings at three different torch chamber pressures. The effect of substrate thickness on residual stress was determined by spraying coatings onto thick (6.4 mm) and thin (1.4 mm) substrates. Residual stresses were compressive for both coating materials and increased in magnitude with spray velocity. For coatings applied to thick substrates, near-surface residual stresses were essentially constant with increasing coating thickness. Differences in thermal expansion coefficient between low-carbon and stainless steels led to a 180 MPa difference in residual stress for Fe3Al coatings. Deposition efficiency for both materials is maximized at an intermediate (˜600 m/s) velocity. Considerations for X-ray measurement of residual stresses in HVOF coatings are also presented.

  6. Smith's Cloud: A High-velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Lockman, Felix J; Heroux, A J; Langston, Glen I

    2008-01-01

    New 21cm HI observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic ISM. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/-1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 x 1 kpc in size and its tip at (l,b)=(39 deg,-13 deg) is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has greater than 10^6 M solar masses in HI. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km/s, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73+/-26 km/s, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. Smith's Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way needed to explain certain persistent anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  7. Nonlinear free vibrations of centrifugally stiffened uniform beams at high angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhoucha, F.; Rechak, S.; Duigou, L.; Cadou, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the bending nonlinear free vibrations of a centrifugally stiffened beam with uniform cross-section and constant angular velocity. The nonlinear intrinsic equations of motion used here are geometrically exact and specific to beams exhibiting large amplitude displacements and rotations associated with small strains. Based on the Timoshenko beam model, these equations are derived from Hamilton's principle, in which the warping is considered. All coupling terms are considered including Coriolis terms. The studied beams are isotropic with clamped-free boundary conditions. By combining the Galerkin method with the harmonic balance method, the equations of motion are converted into a quadratic function treated with a continuation method: the Asymptotic Numerical Method, where the generalized displacement vector is presented as a series expansion. While analysing the effect of the angular velocity, we determine the amplitude versus frequency variations which are plotted as backbone curves. Considering the first lagging and flapping modes, the changes in beam behaviour from hardening to softening are investigated and identified as a function of the angular velocity and the effect of shear. Particular attention is paid to high angular velocities for both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams and the natural frequencies so obtained are compared with the results available in the literature.

  8. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  9. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  10. High Power test of a low group velocity X-band Accelerator Structure for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, S; Riddone, G; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W; Zennaro, R; Fukuda, S; Higashi, Y; Higo, T; Matsumoto, S; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Adolphsen, C; Dolgashev, V; Laurent, L; Lewandowski, J; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, JW

    2008-01-01

    In recent years evidence has been found that the maximum sustainable gradient in an accelerating structure depends on the rf power flow through the structure. The CLIC study group has consequently designed a new prototype structure for CLIC with a very low group velocity, input power and average aperture ( = 0.13). The 18 cell structure has a group velocity of 2.6 % at the entrance and 1 % at the last cell. Several of these structures have been made in a collaboration between KEK, SLAC and CERN. A total of five brazed-disk structures and two quadrant structures have been made. The high power results of the first KEK/SLAC built structure is presented which reached an unloaded gradient in excess of 100 MV/m at a pulse length of 230 ns with a breakdown rate below 10-6 per meter active length. The high-power testing was done using the NLCTA facility at SLAC.

  11. Mapping Metal-Enriched High Velocity Clouds to Very Low HI Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Masiero, J R; Churchill, Chris; Charlton, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Our galaxy is the nearest known quasar absorption line system, and it uniquely provides us with an opportunity to probe multiple lines of sight through the same galaxy. This is essential for our interpretations of the complex kinematic profiles seen in the MgII absorption due to lines of sight through intermediate redshift galaxies. The Milky Way halo has never been probed for high velocity clouds below the 21-cm detection threshold of N(HI)~10^18 cm-2. Through a survey of MgII absorption looking toward the brightest AGNs and quasars, it will be possible to reach down a few orders of magnitude in HI column density. The analogs to the high velocity components of the MgII absorption profiles due to intermediate redshift galaxies should be seen. We describe a program we are undertaking, and present some preliminary findings.

  12. The distance to two neutral hydrogen clouds : The high-velocity complex A and the low-latitude intermediate-velocity cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B; Howk, C; Schwarz, U; vanWoerden, H; Beers, T; Wilhelm, R; Kalberla, P; Danly, L

    1996-01-01

    A lower limit to the distance of the high-velocity cloud (HVC) complex A of 4 kpc (z > 3 kpc) is derived. The HVC is detected toward the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 106 in Mg II lambda lambda 2796, 2803 absorption spectra taken with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) proving that Mg+ is present in the cloud. It is

  13. A study of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen using Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    Lyophilized samples of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen were measured at room temperature using Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution. An increase in the velocity resolution of Moessbauer spectroscopy permitted us to increase accuracy and decrease experimental error in determining the hyperfine parameters of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen. Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution may be very useful for revealing small differences in hyperfine parameters during biomedical research.

  14. Chronic symptoms after vestibular neuritis and the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Arshad, Qadeer; Roberts, R Edward; Ahmad, Hena; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis As the anterior and posterior semicircular canals are vital to the regulation of gaze stability, particularly during locomotion or vehicular travel, we tested whether the high velocity vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of the three ipsilesional semicircular canals elicited by the modified Head Impulse Test would correlate with subjective dizziness or vertigo scores after vestibular neuritis (VN). Background Recovery following acute VN varies with around half reporting persistent symptoms long after the acute episode. However, an unanswered question is whether chronic symptoms are associated with impairment of the high velocity VOR of the anterior or posterior canals. Methods Twenty patients who had experienced an acute episode of VN at least three months earlier were included in this study. Participants were assessed with the video head impulse test (vHIT) of all six canals, bithermal caloric irrigation, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and the Vertigo Symptoms Scale short-form (VSS). Results Of these 20 patients, 12 felt that they had recovered from the initial episode whereas 8 did not and reported elevated DHI and VSS scores. However, we found no correlation between DHI or VSS scores and the ipsilesional single or combined vHIT gain, vHIT gain asymmetry or caloric paresis. The high velocity VOR was not different between patients who felt they had recovered and patients who felt they had not. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic symptoms of dizziness following VN are not associated with the high velocity VOR of the single or combined ipsilesional horizontal, anterior or posterior semicircular canals. PMID:26719963

  15. Generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons in fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Xinxin; Li, Lei; Ge, Yanqi; Luo, Jiaolin; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming; Zhao, Luming

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons (GVLVS) in a fiber laser using a SESAM as the mode locker. With the help of an external all-fiber polarization resolved system, a GVLVS with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization could be obtained. The phase difference between the two humps is 180 degree.

  16. Direct and sustained intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules using acoustic-transfection with high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Chiu, Chi Tat; Hwang, Jae Youn; Kim, Hyung Ham; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-02-01

    Controlling cell functions for research and therapeutic purposes may open new strategies for the treatment of many diseases. An efficient and safe introduction of membrane impermeable molecules into target cells will provide versatile means to modulate cell fate. We introduce a new transfection technique that utilizes high frequency ultrasound without any contrast agents such as microbubbles, bringing a single-cell level targeting and size-dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules. The transfection apparatus consists of an ultrasonic transducer with the center frequency of over 150 MHz and an epi-fluorescence microscope, entitled acoustic-transfection system. Acoustic pulses, emitted from an ultrasonic transducer, perturb the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane of a targeted single-cell to induce intracellular delivery of exogenous molecules. Simultaneous live cell imaging using HeLa cells to investigate the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ and propidium iodide (PI) and the delivery of 3 kDa dextran labeled with Alexa 488 were demonstrated. Cytosolic delivery of 3 kDa dextran induced via acoustic-transfection was manifested by diffused fluorescence throughout whole cells. Short-term (6 hr) cell viability test and long-term (40 hr) cell tracking confirmed that the proposed approach has low cell cytotoxicity.

  17. Numerical simulation of the processes in the normal incidence tube for high acoustic pressure levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, E. S.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic processes in an impedance tube at high levels of acoustic pressure is a way to solve a problem of noise suppressing by liners. These studies used liner specimen that is one cylindrical Helmholtz resonator. The evaluation of the real and imaginary parts of the liner acoustic impedance and sound absorption coefficient was performed for sound pressure levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB. The numerical simulation used experimental data having been obtained on the impedance tube with normal incidence waves. At the first stage of the numerical simulation it was used the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe well the imaginary part of the liner impedance whatever the sound pressure level. These equations were solved by finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics program in axisymmetric formulation. At the second stage, the complete Navier-Stokes equations were solved by direct numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX in axisymmetric formulation. As the result, the acceptable agreement between numerical simulation and experiment was obtained.

  18. High-sensitivity open-loop electronics for gravimetric acoustic-wave-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, David; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Ballandras, Sylvain; Martin, Gilles; Carry, Emile; Blondeau-Patissier, Virginie

    2013-06-01

    Detecting chemical species in gas phase has recently received an increasing interest mainly for security control, trying to implement new systems allowing for extended dynamics and reactivity. In this work, an open-loop interrogation strategy is proposed to use radio-frequency acoustic transducers as micro-balances for that purpose. The resulting system is dedicated to the monitoring of chemical compounds in gaseous or liquid-phase state. A 16 Hz standard deviation is demonstrated at 125 MHz, with a working frequency band in the 60 to 133 MHz range, answering the requirements for using Rayleigh- and Love-wave-based delay lines operating with 40-μm acoustic wavelength transducers. Moreover, this electronic setup was used to interrogate a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR) microbalance, a new sensor class allowing for multi-mode interrogation for gravimetric measurement improvement. The noise source still limiting the system performance is due to the analog-to-digital converter of the microcontroller, thus leaving open degrees-of-freedom for improving the obtained results by optimizing the voltage reference and board layout. The operation of the system is illustrated using a calibrated galvanic deposition at the surface of Love-wave delay lines to assess theoretical predictions of their gravimetric sensitivity and to compare them with HBAR-based sensor sensitivity.

  19. High-definition velocity-space tomography of fast-ion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Hansen, P. C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nocente, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Stejner, M.; Weiland, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    Velocity-space tomography of the fast-ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is usually a photon-starved tomography method due to limited optical access and signal-to-noise ratio of fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy as well as the strive for high-resolution images. In high-definition tomography, prior information makes up for this lack of data. We restrict the target velocity space through the measured absence of FIDA light, impose phase-space densities to be non-negative, and encode the known geometry of neutral beam injection (NBI) sources. We further use a numerical simulation as prior information to reconstruct where in velocity space the measurements and the simulation disagree. This alternative approach is demonstrated for four-view as well as for two-view FIDA measurements. The high-definition tomography tools allow us to study fast ions in sawtoothing plasmas and the formation of NBI peaks at full, half and one-third energy by time-resolved tomographic movies.

  20. High Velocity Outflow in CO J=7-6 from the Orion Hot Core

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Ray S

    2009-01-01

    Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10.4-meter telescope, we performed sensitive mapping observations of 12CO J=7-6 emission at 807 GHz towards Orion IRc2. The image has an angular resolution of 10", which is the highest angular resolution data toward the Orion Hot Core published for this transition. In addition, thanks to the on-the-fly mapping technique, the fidelity of the new image is rather high, particularly in comparison to previous images. We have succeeded in mapping the northwest-southeast high-velocity molecular outflow, whose terminal velocity is shifted by ~70-85 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity of the cloud. This yields an extremely short dynamical time scale of ~900 years. The estimated outflow mass loss rate shows an extraordinarily high value, on the order of 10^{-3} Msun/yr. Assuming that the outflow is driven by Orion IRc2, our result agrees with the picture so far obtained for a 20 Msun (proto)star in the process of formation.

  1. High-rate wireless data communications: An underwater acoustic communications framework at the physical layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessios Anthony G.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of signal processing functions are performed by Underwater Acoustic Systems. These include: 1 detection to determine presence or absence of information signals in the presence of noise, or an attempt to describe which of a predetermined finite set of possible messages { m i , i , ... , M } the signal represents; 2 estimation of some parameter θ ˆ associated with the received signal (i.e. range, depth, bearing angle, etc.; 3 classification and source identification; 4 dynamics tracking; 5 navigation (collision avoidance and terminal guidance; 6 countermeasures; and 7 communications. The focus of this paper is acoustic communications. There is a global current need to develop reliable wireless digital communications for the underwater environment, with sufficient performance and efficiency to substitute for costly wired systems. One possible goal is a wireless system implementation that insures underwater terminal mobility. There is also a vital need to improve the performance of the existing systems in terms of data-rate, noise immunity, operational range, and power consumption, since, in practice, portable high-speed, long range, compact, low-power systems are desired. We concede the difficulties associated with acoustic systems and concentrate on the development of robust data transmission methods anticipating the eventual need for real time or near real time video transmission. An overview of the various detection techniques and the general statistical digital communication problem is given based on a statistical decision theory framework. The theoretical formulation of the underwater acoustic data communications problem includes modeling of the stochastic channel to incorporate a variety of impairments and environmental uncertainties, and proposal of new compensation strategies for an efficient and robust receiver design.

  2. Experimental studies of electrical conductivities and P-wave velocities of gabbro at high pressures and high temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白利平; 杜建国; 刘巍; 周文戈

    2003-01-01

    The P-wave velocities and electrical conductivities of gabbro were measured using ultrasonic transmission method and impedance spectroscopy from room temperature to 1100℃ at 1-2 GPa, and the factors controlling the P-wave velocity and the microscopic conductance mechanisms of the rock were analyzed. The experimental results show that the P-wave velocities of gabbro drop abruptly at temperatures of 800-850℃ and under pressures of 1-2 GPa due to the occurrence of grain boundary phases and dehydration melting; however, the electrical conductivities and electronic conduction mechanisms have not changed obviously at temperatures of 800-850℃. At temperatures Below 680℃, only one impedance arc (I) corresponding to grain interior conduction occurs at frequencies between 12 Hz and 105 Hz, the second arc (II) corresponding to grain boundary conduction occurs at temperatures above 680℃. The total conductivity of this rock is dominated by the grain interior conductivity as the occurrence of grain boundary conduction has a small effect on the total conductivity. The laboratory-measured velocities are consistent with the average P-wave velocity observations of lower crust and upper mantle. The conductivity values correspond well with the gabbroite composition of the lower crust and upper mantle; however, they are about 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than MT data from the high conductive layers. The experiments confirm that the dehydration of hydrous minerals can induce the partial melting, and the low seismic velocity zones might be correlated with the high conductive layers if partial melting occurs.

  3. A comprehensive statistical investigation of schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) using high-velocity helium jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayan; Qiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    A detailed statistical assessment of seedless velocity measurement using Schlieren Image Velocimetry (SIV) was explored using open source Robust Phase Correlation (RPC) algorithm. A well-known flow field, an axisymmetric turbulent helium jet, was analyzed near and intermediate region (0≤ x/d≤ 20) for two different Reynolds numbers, Re d = 11,000 and Re d = 22,000 using schlieren with horizontal knife-edge, schlieren with vertical knife-edge and shadowgraph technique, and the resulted velocity fields from SIV techniques were compared to traditional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. A novel, inexpensive, easy to setup two-camera SIV technique had been demonstrated to measure high-velocity turbulent jet, with jet exit velocities 304 m/s (Mach = 0.3) and 611 m/s (Mach = 0.6), respectively. Several image restoration and enhancement techniques were tested to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR) in schlieren and shadowgraph images. Processing and post-processing parameters for SIV techniques were examined in detail. A quantitative comparison between self-seeded SIV techniques and traditional PIV had been made using correlation statistics. While the resulted flow field from schlieren with horizontal knife-edge and shadowgraph showed excellent agreement with PIV measurements, schlieren with vertical knife-edge performed poorly. The performance of spatial cross-correlations at different jet locations using SIV techniques and PIV was evaluated. Turbulence quantities like turbulence intensity, mean velocity fields, Reynolds shear stress influenced spatial correlations and correlation plane SNR heavily. Several performance metrics such as primary peak ratio (PPR), peak to correlation energy (PCE), the probability distribution of signal and noise were used to compare capability and potential of different SIV techniques.

  4. An Eulerian joint velocity-concentration PDF method for solute dispersion in highly heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.; Jenny, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    In risk analysis applications involving heterogeneous formations, the knowledge of the solute concentration probability density function (PDF) at different spatial locations and times is crucial. We propose a new joint velocity-concentration PDF method applicable for highly heterogeneous porous media that accounts for advective transport, pore-scale dispersion and molecular diffusion. Unlike in low order approximation (LOA) methods that are valid for low conductivity variances ?Y 2 and where the one-point velocity PDF is typically assumed to be a Gaussian, the proposed joint PDF method honors the increasingly non-Gaussian velocity one-point PDF and the long-term velocity correlations that were reported in different Monte Carlo (MC) studies for ?Y 2 > 0.5 [e.g., Salandin, P. and V. Fiorotto, WRR, 1998. 34(5) and Trefry, M.G., F.P. Ruan, and D. McLaughlin, WRR, 2003. 39(3)]. Furthermore, the new joint PDF method does not involve any a-priori assumption about the shape of the resulting marginal concentration PDF. LOA methods that provide information on the concentration mean and variance [Fiori, A. and G. Dagan, Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 2000. 45(1-2)] on the other hand are typically complemented by assuming that the concentration PDF has a β-PDF shape [Bellin, A. and D. Tonina, Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 2007. 94(1-2)]. The Eulerian joint velocity-concentration PDF transport equation in our model is numerically solved with a computationally efficient particle method. The suggested joint PDF method is validated by comparison with MC data reported by Caroni and Fiorotto for Péclet numbers ranging from 10 to 104 and ?Y 2 = 1 and 2 [Caroni, E. and V. Fiorotto, Transport in Porous Media, 2005. 59(1)].

  5. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  6. Velocity and pressure characteristics of a model SSME high pressure fuel turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, D. G-N.; Sabnis, J. S.; Mcdonald, H.

    1991-01-01

    Under the present effort an experiment rig has been constructed, an instrumentation package developed and a series of mean and rms velocity and pressure measurements made in a turbopump which modelled the first stage of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump. The rig was designed so as to allow initial experiments with a single configuration consisting of a bell-mouth inlet, a flight impeller, a vaneless diffuser and a volute. Allowance was made for components such as inlet guide vanes, exit guide vanes, downstream pumps, etc. to be added in future experiments. This flexibility will provide a clear baseline set of experiments and allow evaluation in later experiments of the effect of adding specific components upon the pump performance properties. The rotational speed of the impeller was varied between 4260 and 7680 rpm which covered the range of scaled SSME rotation speeds when due allowance is made for the differing stagnation temperature, model to full scale. The results at the inlet obtained with rotational speeds of 4260, 6084 and 7680 rpm showed that the axial velocity at the bell-mouth inlet remained roughly constant at 2.2 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump near the center of the inlet, but it decreased rapidly with increasing radius at all three speeds. Reverse flow occurred at a radius greater than 0.9 R for all three speeds and the maximum negative velocity reduced from 1.3 of the bulk velocity at the exit of the turbopump at 4260 rpm to 0.35 at 7680 rpm, suggesting that operating at a speed closer to the design condition of 8700 rpm improved the inlet characteristics. The reverse flow caused positive prerotation at the impeller inlet which was negligibly small near the center but reached 0.7 of the impeller speed at the outer annulus. The results in the diffuser and the volute obtained at 7680 rpm show that the hub and shroud walls of the diffuser were characterized by regions of transient reverse flow with

  7. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  8. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-11-30

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa ) . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  9. Two-step simulation of velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Schmidt number in turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, K. Jeff; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of passive scalar in the high Schmidt number turbulent mixing process requires higher computational cost than that of velocity fields, because the scalar is associated with smaller length scales than velocity. Thus, full simulation of both velocity and passive scalar with high Sc for a practical configuration is difficult to perform. In this work, a new approach to simulate velocity and passive scalar mixing at high Sc is suggested to reduce the computational cost. First, the velocity fields are resolved by Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, by extracting the velocity information from LES, the scalar inside a moving fluid blob is simulated by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). This two-step simulation method is applied to a turbulent jet and provides a new way to examine a scalar mixing process in a practical application with smaller computational cost. NSF, Samsung Scholarship.

  10. High-velocity Hα Absorption Events in B8 Ia - A2 Ia Supergiant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Nancy D.; Markova, N.; Rother, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Late B- and early A-type supergiants are notorious for the time variability of their Hα line profiles, but the physical cause of the variations is poorly understood. Usually, the line is filled in by emission, and the blue absorption wing does not extend to the terminal wind speed, which is roughly defined by the blue edges of the ultraviolet resonance lines. On rare occasions, however, the blue wing of Hα goes strongly into absorption over a wide velocity range, from the photospheric velocity almost all the way to the terminal wind speed. This phenomenon was first described by Kaufer et al. (1996, A&A, 314, 599), who denoted it by the term, "High-Velocity Absorption Event." In this report, high-resolution spectra from Ritter Observatory will be combined with published spectra to examine the temporal recurrence behavior and strength distribution of high-velocity absorption events and their incidence as a function of stellar parameters for the available sample of stars. All B8- and A0-type, Ia-class, stars in the sample that have been sufficiently well observed, as well as one A2-type star, show the events. However, there is some evidence that hyperluminous stars (luminosity class Ia+) do not show the events. In one of the most extensively observed stars in the sample (Rigel, B8 Ia), there is no clear periodicity in the recurrence times of the events. In addition to the strong events discovered by Kaufer et al. (1996), there is a broad distribution of more frequent, weaker events. Ritter Observatory receives operating support from the National Science Foundation Program for Research and Education with Small Telescopes (PREST) award AST-0440784.

  11. Piezoelectric Shunt Vibration Damping of F-15 Panel under High Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Yau; Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    At last year's SPIE symposium, we reported results of an experiment on structural vibration damping of an F-15 underbelly panel using piezoelectric shunting with five bonded PZT transducers. The panel vibration was induced with an acoustic speaker at an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of about 90 dB. Amplitude reductions of 13.45 and 10.72 dB were achieved for the first and second modes, respectively, using single- and multiple-mode shunting. It is the purpose of this investigation to extend the passive piezoelectric shunt-damping technique to control structural vibration induced at higher acoustic excitation levels, and to examine the controllability and survivability of the bonded PZT transducers at these high levels. The shunting experiment was performed with the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) at the NASA Langley Research Center using the same F-15 underbelly panel. The TAFA is a progressive wave tube facility. The panel was mounted in one wall of the TAFA test section using a specially designed mounting fixture such that the panel was subjected to grazing-incidence acoustic excitation. Five PZT transducers were used with two shunt circuits designed to control the first and second modes of the structure between 200 and 400 Hz. We first determined the values of the shunt inductance and resistance at an OASPL of 130 dB. These values were maintained while we gradually increased the OASPL from 130 to 154 dB in 6-dB steps. During each increment, the frequency response function between accelerometers on the panel and the acoustic excitation measured by microphones, before and after shunting, were recorded. Good response reduction was observed up to the 148dB level. The experiment was stopped at 154 dB due to wire breakage from vibration at a transducer wire joint. The PZT transducers, however, were still bonded well on the panel and survived at this high dB level. We also observed shifting of the frequency peaks toward lower frequency when the OASPL

  12. GASS High Velocity Clouds in the Region of the Magellanic Leading Arm

    CERN Document Server

    For, Bi-Qing; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2012-01-01

    We present a new catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (HI) from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS). Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 407. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is compared with simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. Using the velocity structure of the Leading Arm we derive the distance for the c...

  13. Prescribed Velocity Gradients for Highly Viscous SPH Fluids with Vorticity Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Andreas; Teschner, Matthias

    2016-12-06

    Working with prescribed velocity gradients is a promising approach to efficiently and robustly simulate highly viscous SPH fluids. Such approaches allow to explicitly and independently process shear rate, spin, and expansion rate. This can be used to, e.g., avoid interferences between pressure and viscosity solvers. Another interesting aspect is the possibility to explicitly process the vorticity, e.g. to preserve the vorticity. In this context, this paper proposes a novel variant of the prescribed-gradient idea that handles vorticity in a physically motivated way. In contrast to a less appropriate vorticity preservation that has been used in a previous approach, vorticity is diffused. The paper illustrates the utility of the vorticity diffusion. Therefore, comparisons of the proposed vorticity diffusion with vorticity preservation and additionally with vorticity damping are presented. The paper further discusses the relation between prescribed velocity gradients and prescribed velocity Laplacians which improves the intuition behind the prescribed-gradient method for highly viscous SPH fluids. Finally, the paper discusses the relation of the proposed method to a physically correct implicit viscosity formulation.

  14. High-precision measurement of satellite velocity using the EISCAT radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of measuring the velocity of a hard target using radar pulses reflected from the target flying through the radar beam. The method has two stages. First, the Doppler shifts of the echo pulses are calculated at a high accuracy with an algorithm which largely improves the accuracy given by the Fourier transform. The algorithm also calculates the standard deviations of the Doppler frequencies with Monte Carlo simulation. The second step is to fit the results from a sequence of radar pulses to a velocity model allowing linear variation of the second time derivative of target range. The achieved accuracies are demonstrated using radio pulses reflected by a satellite passing through the beam of the EISCAT UHF radar working at 930-MHz frequency. At high SNR levels, the standard deviations of the frequency from a single pulse reach typically down to 0.2 Hz. The best standard deviations of velocity fit are below 5 mm s−1 while those of the second time derivative of range are below 1 cm s−2.

  15. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: Evidence for a Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey-Smith, L; Green, J A; Bannister, K W; Chippendale, A; Edwards, P G; Heywood, I; Hotan, A W; Lenc, E; Marvil, J; McConnell, D; Phillips, C P; Sault, R J; Serra, P; Stevens, J; Voronkov, M; Whiting, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at $-$409 and $-$562 km/s (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100$-$4156 could be explained by a ~50 pc molecular ring enclosing an approximately 3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined w...

  16. High-Velocity Interstellar Bullets in IRAS05506+2414: A Very Young Protostar

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Contreras, Carmen Sánchez; Morris, Mark; Sarkar, Geetanjali

    2008-01-01

    We have made a serendipitous discovery of an enigmatic outflow source, IRAS 05506+2414 (hereafter IRAS 05506), as part of a multi-wavelength survey of pre-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The HST optical and near-infrared images show a bright compact central source with a jet-like extension, and a fan-like spray of high-velocity (with radial velocities upto 350 kms/s) elongated knots which appear to emanate from it. These structures are possibly analogous to the near-IR "bullets" seen in the Orion nebula. Interferometric observations at 2.6 mm show the presence of a high-velocity CO outflow and a continuum source also with a faint extension, both of which are aligned with the optical jet structure. IRAS 05506 is most likely not a PPN. We find extended NH3 (1,1) emission towards IRAS 05506; these data together with the combined presence of far-IR emission, H2O and OH masers, and CO and CS J=2-1 emission, strongly argue for a dense, dusty star-forming core associated with IRAS 05506. IRAS 05506 is probably an intermed...

  17. Ultrasound Velocity Measurements in High-Chromium Steel Under Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunev, Aleksey; Bochkareva, Anna; Barannikova, Svetlana; Zuev, Lev

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the variation of the propagation velocity of ultrasound in the plastic deformation of corrosion-resistant high-chromium steel 40X13 with ferrite-carbide (delivery status), martensitic (quenched) and sorbitol (after high-temperature tempering) structures have beem studied/ It is found that each state shows its view of the loading curve. In the delivery state diagram loading is substantially parabolic throughout, while in the martensitic state contains only linear strain hardening step and in the sorbitol state the plastic flow curve is three-step. The velocity of ultrasonic surface waves (Rayleigh waves) was measured simultaneously with the registration of the loading curve in the investigated steel in tension. It is shown that the dependence of the velocity of ultrasound in active loading is determined by the law of plastic flow, that is, the staging of the corresponding diagram of loading. Structural state of the investigated steel is not only changing the type of the deformation curve under uniaxial tension, but also changes the nature of ultrasound speed of deformation.

  18. The collisions of high-velocity clouds with the galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Jelinek, Petr; 10.1016/j.cpc.2011.01.023

    2011-01-01

    Spiral galaxies are surrounded by a widely distributed hot coronal gas and seem to be fed by infalling clouds of neutral hydrogen gas with low metallicity and high velocities. We numerically study plasma waves produced by the collisions of these high-velocity clouds (HVCs) with the hot halo gas and with the gaseous disk. In particular, we tackle two problems numerically: 1) collisions of HVCs with the galactic halo gas and 2) the dispersion relations to obtain the phase and group velocities of plasma waves from the equations of plasma motion as well as further important physical characteristics such as magnetic tension force, gas pressure, etc. The obtained results allow us to understand the nature of MHD waves produced during the collisions in galactic media and lead to the suggestion that these waves can heat the ambient halo gas. These calculations are aiming at leading to a better understanding of dynamics and interaction of HVCs with the galactic halo and of the importance of MHD waves as a heating proce...

  19. Chemical abundances in a high velocity RR Lyrae star near the bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Camilla Juul; Koch, Andreas; Xu, Siyi; Kunder, Andrea; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, variable, high-velocity stars are interesting study cases for many aspects of Galactic structure and evolution. Until recently, the only known high- or hyper-velocity stars were young stars thought to originate from the Galactic centre. Wide-area surveys like APOGEE and BRAVA have found several low-mass stars in the bulge with Galactic rest-frame velocities larger than 350 km/s. In this study we present the first abundance analysis of a low-mass, RR Lyrae star, located close to the Galactic bulge, with a space motion of ~ -400 km/s. Using medium-resolution spectra, we derive abundances (including upper limits) of 11 elements. These allow us to chemically tag the star and discuss its origin, although our derived abundances and metallicity, at [Fe/H] =-0.9 dex, do not point toward one unambiguous answer. Based on the chemical tagging, we cannot exclude that it originated in the bulge. However, combining its retrograde orbit and the derived abundances suggests that the star was accelerated from the out...

  20. Exploring High-Velocity NH_3(6,6) Emission at the Center of our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, J L; Ho, P T P; Donovan, Jennifer L.; Herrnstein, Robeson M.; Ho, Paul T.P.

    2006-01-01

    Using the NH\\3 (6,6) transition, which samples dense ($\\sim 10^{5}$) molecular gas with an energy above ground of 412 K, we find hot gas at high velocities (--142 to --210 km s$^{-1}$) associated with the central 2 pc of the Galactic center. This material may be either infalling gas due to shocks or tidal stripping, or possibly gas swept from the nuclear region. We identify two high-velocity features, which we call the Southern Runner and the Cap, and correlate these features with others detected in various molecular observations of the Galactic center. The characteristic linewidths of the Southern Runner and Cap, 10 -- 15 \\kms, are similar to those of other hot Galactic center clouds. The estimated H$_{2}$ masses of these clouds are 4$\\times 10^{3}$ M$\\sol$ and 2$\\times 10^{3}$ M$\\sol$, consistent with the masses of the western streamer and northern ridge, NH\\3 (6,6) emission features detected within the central 10 pc at lower velocities. Three possible explanations for this emission are discussed assuming t...

  1. Electrical conductivity and velocity of highly ionized plasma flows - Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendell, E. W.; Park, C.; Posch, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an immersible, three-coil, magnetic-induction probe, previously tested in a low-density supersonic argon jet, to measure electrical conductivity and velocity profiles of a highly ionized high-density nitrogen jet in the continuum flow regime where effects due to probe bow shocks and boundary layers might not be negligible. Measured centerline values of electrical conductivity and velocity were compared with predictions based on a theoretical analysis previously developed to study the gas as it expanded adiabatically and inviscidly from an equilibrium sonic state to the nozzle exit. The resulting numerical exit plane values for electron density and electron temperature were then substituted into the Spitzer-Haerm conductivity formula to compute a theoretical conductivity which agreed within 40% of the measured conductivity, while the calculated and experimental velocity values differed by as much as 50%. The lack of agreement was attributed to the possible use of invalid assumptions and boundary conditions in the computer analysis or to the unknown effects of shocks on the probe data.

  2. The Collisions Of High-Velocity Clouds With A Magnetized Gaseous Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Santillan, A; Martos, M A; Kim, J; Santillan, Alfredo; Franco, Jose; Martos, Marco; Kim, Jongsoo

    1999-01-01

    We present two-dimensional MHD numerical simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with both magnetic and non-magnetic Galactic thick gaseous disks. For the magnetic models, the initial magnetic field is oriented parallel to the disk, and we consider two different field topologies (with and without tension effects): parallel and perpendicular to the plane of motion of the clouds. The impinging clouds move in oblique trajectories and fall toward the central disk with different initial velocities. The $B$-field lines are distorted and compressed during the collision, increasing the field pressure and tension. This prevents the cloud material from penetrating into the disk, and can even transform a high-velocity inflow into an outflow, moving away from the disk. The perturbation creates a complex, turbulent, pattern of MHD waves that are able to traverse the disk of the Galaxy, and induce oscillations on both sides of the plane. Thus, the magnetic field efficiently transmits the perturbation over a...

  3. A Compact Circumstellar Shell as the Source of High--velocity Features in SN 2011fe

    CERN Document Server

    Mulligan, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    High--velocity features (HVF), especially of Ca II, are frequently seen in Type Ia supernovae observed prior to B-band maximum (Bmax). These HVF start at more than 25,000 km/s in the days after first light, and slow to about 18,000 km/s near Bmax. To recreate the Ca II near-infrared triplet (CaNIR) HVF in SN 2011fe, we consider the interaction between a Type Ia supernova and a compact circumstellar shell, employing a hydrodynamic 1-D simulation using FLASH. We generate synthetic spectra from the hydrodynamic results using syn++. We show that the CaNIR HVF and its velocity evolution is better explained by a supernova model interacting with a shell than a model without a shell, and briefly discuss the implications for progenitor models.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF 6061 T651 ALUMINUM PLATES SUBJECTED TO HIGH-VELOCITY IMPACT LOADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren ÖZŞAHİN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic response of single or multi-layered metal armor systems subjected to kinetic energy pro-jectiles was investigated in many experimental, theoretical and numerical studies.In this study, 6061 T651 aluminum plates impacted by 9 mm bullets were investigated. Microstructural investigations have been carried out using optical microscopy. Microhardness values were used to determine the strength behavior of the plates. Influence of the plate thickness and impact velocity on the microstructure has been evaluated. It was concluded from the study that thinner plates are more prone to deformation hardening with high penetration depth values even at low impact velocities while thick plates are more susceptible to thermal softening with less penetration depths. Maximum hardness values were obtained just below the impact zone in both plate thicknesses.

  5. The experimental studies on electrical conductivities and P-wave velocities of anorthosite at high pressure and high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白利平; 杜建国; 刘巍; 周文戈

    2002-01-01

    Results of P-wave velocity (vP) and electrical conductivity measurements on anorthosite are presented from room temperature to 880 (C at 1.0 GPa using ultrasonic transmission technique and impedance spectra technique respectively. The experiments show that the P-wave velocities in anorthosite decrease markedly above 680 (C following the dehydration of hydrous minerals in the rock, and the complex impedances collected from 12 Hz to 105 Hz only indicate the grain interior conduction mechanism at 1.0 GPa, from 410 (C to 750 (C. Because the fluids in the rock have not formed an interconnected network, the dehydration will not pronouncedly enhance the electrical conductivity and change the electrical conduction mechanism. It is concluded that the formation and evolution of the low-velocity zones and high-conductivity layers in the crust may have no correlations, and the dehydration can result in the formation of the low-velocity zones, but cannot simultaneously result in the high-conductivity layers.

  6. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of an Iron-Nickel Alloy at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Murphy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g., 1]. Therefore, understanding the behavior of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure is important for interpreting seismic data and for modeling the interior of the Earth. While many studies have investigated the properties of pure Fe at high pressure, the elastic and vibrational properties of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure are not well known. We measured sound velocities and thermodynamic properties of 95%-enriched 57Fe alloyed with 10 wt% Ni at high-pressures in a Ne pressure medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [e.g., 2 & 3]. The sample volume was determined at each compression point with in-line x-ray diffraction at 3ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. In this contribution, we will present derived partial phonon density of states, Debye sound velocities, and compressional and shear sound velocities for Fe0.9-Ni0.1 at high-pressures. [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531.

  7. On the plasma confinement by acoustic resonance. An innovation for electrodeless high-pressure discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courret, Gilles; Nikkola, Petri; Wasterlain, Sébastien; Gudozhnik, Olexandr; Girardin, Michel; Braun, Jonathan; Gavin, Serge; Croci, Mirko; Egolf, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    In an applied research project on the development of a pulsed microwave sulfur lamp prototype of 1 kW, we have discovered an amazing phenomenon in which the plasma forms a ball staying at the center of the bulb despite gravity, thus protecting the glass from melting. In this paper, it is shown that this results from an acoustic resonance in a spherical mode. Measurements of the plasma response to short pulses are presented showing beats at the spherical resonance. It is demonstrated that the beats could result from the simultaneous excitation of two normal modes with a frequency difference of approximately 1%. One of the two frequencies matches precisely the microwave pulses repetition, a little below 30 kHz. Thus this one is due to a forced oscillation, whereas the other one is due to a free oscillation. The phase velocity of sound was calculated as a function of temperature in order to find the series of temperatures at which a resonance would occur if the bulb were an isothermal solid sphere. The mean temperature inside the actual bulb was determined from the only doublet of this series, that has characteristic frequencies close enough to cause the observed beats. In addition, one of these two modes has a spherical symmetry that can explain the plasma ball formation. The obtained mean temperature is consistent with the direct measurements on the bulb surface as well as with the temperature in the core of a similar plasma found in the literature. We have also proposed a model of the resonance onset based on the acoustic dispersion and the sound amplification due to electromagnetic coupling.

  8. Wide Binaries among High-Velocity and Metal-Poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.; Herrera, M. A.; Poveda, A.

    The properties of old disk and halo binaries are of interest for the understanding of the processes of formation and early dynamical evolution of the Galaxy. The luminosity function of the components of wide binaries and multiples, their mass function, the fraction of halo or old disk stars that are members of wide binaries, and the distribution of its separations are some of the basic properties that are poorly understood, mainly because of the paucity of known wide binaries among halo and old disk stars. The present work is an attempt to ameliorate this situation. We have elaborated a list of 130 halo and old disk wide binaries by searching for common proper motion companions to the high-velocity and metal-poor stars studied by Schuster and Nissen (1988, 1993). Based on Stromgren photometry, these authors have derived distances, metallicities and ages for their stars. Since each star has a large and well determined proper motion it was possible to compare this value with that of NLTT stars of its vicinity. In this way we were able to identify 130 high-velocity and metal-poor common proper motion binary systems. Each system was carefully checked to avoid misidentifications, and when possible, distances were updated using the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes. We have determined the distribution of angular separations for our wide binaries. Reliable distances are available for all of our systems, so this distribution can be converted into a separation distribution in AU. We find that 12 systems have separations in excess of 10000 AU, and their existence poses interesting dynamical problems. Since many systems also have known radial velocities, space velocities for them can be determined, and galactic orbits have been computed and characterized. The secondaries of these wide binaries are interesting in themselves, since they represent a sampling of the faint end of the main sequence of old disk and halo stars.

  9. Simulation of compact circumstellar shells around Type Ia supernovae and the resulting high-velocity features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    For Type Ia supernovae that are observed prior to B-band maximum (approximately 18-20 days after the explosion) Ca absorption features are observed at velocities of order 10,000 km/s faster than the typical photospheric features. These high velocity features weaken in the first couple of weeks, disappearing entirely by a week after B-band maximum. The source of this high velocity material is uncertain: it may be the result of interaction between the supernova and circumstellar material or may be the result of plumes or bullets of material ejected during the course of the explosion. We simulate interaction between a supernova and several compact circumstellar shells, located within 0.03 solar radii of the progenitor white dwarf and having masses of 0.02 solar masses or less. We use FLASH to perform hydrodynamic simulations of the system to determine the structure of the ejecta and shell components after the interaction, then use these results to generate synthetic spectra with 1 day cadence for the first 25 days after the explosion. We compare the evolution of the velocity and pseudo-equivalent width of the Ca near-infrared triplet features in the synthetic spectra to observed values, demonstrating that these models are consistent with observations. Additionally, we fit the observed spectra of SN 2011fe (Parrent 2012, Pereira 2013) prior to B-band maximum using these models and synthetic spectra and provide an estimate for Ca abundance within the circumstellar material with implications for the mechanism by which the white dwarf explodes.

  10. Oxidation performance of Fe-Al/WC composite coatings produced by high velocity arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fan-jun; XU Bin-shi; ZHU Sheng; MA Shi-ning; ZHANG wei

    2005-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallics with remarkable high-temperature intensity and excellent erosion, high-temperature oxidation and sulfuration resistance are potential low cost high-temperature structural materials. But the room tem perature brittleness induces shape difficult and limits its industrial application. The Fe-Al intermetallic coatings were prepared by high velocity arc spraying technology with cored wire on 20G steel, which will not only obviate the problems faced in fabrication of these alloys into useful shapes, but also allow the effective use of their outstanding high-temperature performance. The Fe-Al/WC intermetallic composite coatings were prepared by high velocity arc spraying technology on 20G steel and the oxidation performance of Fe-Al/WC composite coatings was studied by means of thermogrativmetic analyzer at 450, 650 and 800 ℃. The results demonstrate that the kinetics curve of oxidation at three temperatures approximately follows the logarithmic law. The composition of the oxidized coating is mainly composed of Al2 O3, Fe2 O3, Fe3 O4 and FeO. These phases distribute unevenly. The protective Al2 O3 film firstly forms and preserves the coatings from further oxidation.

  11. High Velocity Precessing Jets from the Water Fountain IRAS 18286-0959 Revealed by VLBA Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Bosco; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Diamond, Philip; Kwok, Sun

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of multi-epoch VLBA observations of the 22.2GHz water maser emission associated with the "water fountain" IRAS 18286-0959. We suggest that this object is the second example of a highly collimated bipolar precessing outflow traced by water maser emission, the other is W43A. The detected water emission peaks are distributed over a velocity range from -50km/s to 150km/s. The spatial distribution of over 70% of the identified maser features is found to be highly collimated a...

  12. Shells, holes, worms, high-velocity gas and the z-distribution of gas in galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, R. J.

    The author gives an overview of the current observational understanding of vertically extended gas components in spiral galaxies and the various phenomena which come under such names as shells, holes, worms, and high-velocity gas. For the most part, the focus is on recent high-resolution interferometric studies. The author concentrates on cold gas, and briefly on warm ionized gas, in the Milky Way and a few nearby spirals. Along the way, it is seen how phenomena such as worms and shells may be related to the formation and maintenance of the vertically extended components.

  13. Use of acoustic backscatter and vertical velocity to estimate concentration and dynamics of suspended solids in Upper Klamath Lake, south-central Oregon: Implications for Aphanizomenon flos-aquae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical velocity and acoustic backscatter measurements by acoustic Doppler current profilers were used to determine seasonal, subseasonal (days to weeks), and diel variation in suspended solids in a freshwater lake where massive cyanobacterial blooms occur annually. During the growing season, the suspended material in the lake is dominated by the buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Measured variables (water velocity, relative backscatter [RB], wind speed, and air and water temperatures) were averaged over the deployment season at each sample time of day to determine average diel cycles. Phase shifts between diel cycles in RB and diel cycles in wind speed, vertical water temperature differences (delta T(degree)), and horizontal current speeds were found by determining the lead or lag that maximized the linear correlation between the respective diel cycles. Diel cycles in RB were more in phase with delta T(degree) cycles, and, to a lesser extent, wind cycles, than to water current cycles but were out of phase with the cycle that would be expected if the vertical movement of buoyant cyanobacteria colonies was controlled primarily by light. Clear evidence of a diel cycle in vertical velocity was found only at the two deepest sites in the lake. Cycles of vertical velocity, where present, were out of phase with expected vertical motion of cyanobacterial colonies based on the theoretical cycle for light-driven vertical movement. This suggests that water column stability and turbulence were more important factors in controlling vertical distribution of colonies than light. Variations at subseasonal time scales were determined by filtering data to pass periods between 1.2 and 15 days. At subseasonal time scales, correlations between RB and currents or air temperature were consistent with increased concentration of cyanobacterial colonies near the surface when water column stability increased (higher air temperatures or weaker currents) and

  14. 声学法深海热液速度场测量重建算法研究%Reconstruction algorithm for acoustic measurement of velocity field of deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白燕; 毛洁; 樊炜; 潘华辰; 刘云峰

    2011-01-01

    介绍了利用声学法测量深海热液速度场的基本原理.利用往返飞渡时间差与流场速度的关系,应用反问题求解技术重建测量区域的速度场.应用最小二乘法对两种典型的热液口速度场模型进行了仿真重建,分析了换能器数量、实验测量误差以及换能器的布放对重建结果的影响,并对重建结果进行了流量分析.仿真重建的绝对误差、相对误差以及流量分析结果表明,最小二乘法具有较高重建精度,增加声学换能器及细化网格可提高重建精度,换能器对称分布时具有最优重建结果.最后对声学法深海热液温度场速度场测量系统进行了介绍和说明.深海热液速度场的测量重建可为热液热通量的测量奠定基础.%The basic theory of acoustic velocity field measurement in deep-sea hydrothermal vents was introduced.The time of flight (TOF) of acoustic signals through hydrothermal vents was dependent on temperature and velocity.The velocity field was reconstructed by inverse problem solving techniques based on the relationship between the round-trip TOF difference and velocity of flow. The reconstruction of velocity field using the least square method was presented. At the same time, flow flux of reconstruction results was analyzed. The results show that the least square method has good accuracy. Increase of the number of acoustic transducers and mesh density can improve the reconstruction accuracy effectively.

  15. Generating, Detecting, and Analyzing High Frequency Acoustic Signals in Accelerator-Grade Copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Elizabeth L

    2002-12-11

    One of the major limitations on the Next Linear Collider (NLC), a high-gradient particle accelerator in development, is that sparks form within the copper structure, damaging the material. The sparks also generate high frequency acoustic signals that can be used as diagnostics to solve the problem. First, however, the signals' location, attenuation, and propagation must be established, so an effective method for generating and detecting these signals in a simple copper block is necessary. Impact trials with ball bearings and a BB gun as well as tests with a grinder, a laser, and a sparker were conducted to determine how to produce the greatest ratio of high to low frequency acoustic signals. The laser had the largest ratio, but the sparker was chosen because it also had high ratios and was both more practical and more analogous to the actual signals in the accelerator. Further tests were then conducted to determine the best sensor; an International Transducer Corporation 9020 1 N57 was chosen. Subsequent analysis of signals using this setup could establish the location and types of signals and, ultimately, how to solve the problem in the structure.

  16. Velocity gap mode of capillary electrophoresis developed for high-resolution chiral separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Li, Youxin; Zhao, Lumeng; Shen, Jianguo; Zhang, Yong; Bao, James J

    2014-10-01

    A new CE method based on velocity gap (VG) theory has been developed for high-resolution chiral separations. In VG, two consecutive electric fields are adopted to drive analytes passing through two capillaries, which are linked together through a joint. The joint is immersed inside another buffer vial which has conductivity communication with the buffer inside the capillary. By adjusting the field strengths onto the two capillaries, it is possible to observe different velocities of an analyte when it passes through those two capillaries and there would be a net velocity change (NVC) for the same analyte. Different analytes may have different NVC which may be specifically meaningful for enantioseparations because enantiomers are usually hard to resolve. By taking advantage of this NVC, it is possible to enhance the resolution of a chiral separation if a proper voltage program is applied. The feasibility of using NVC to enhance chiral separation was demonstrated in the separations of three pairs of enantiomers: terbutaline, chlorpheniramine, and promethazine. All separations started with partial separation in a conventional CE and were significantly improved under the same experimental conditions. The results indicated that VG has the potential to be used to improve the resolving power of CE in chiral separations.

  17. A high stellar velocity dispersion for a compact massive galaxy at redshift z = 2.186.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Kriek, Mariska; Franx, Marijn

    2009-08-06

    Recent studies have found that the oldest and most luminous galaxies in the early Universe are surprisingly compact, having stellar masses similar to present-day elliptical galaxies but much smaller sizes. This finding has attracted considerable attention, as it suggests that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five over the past ten billion years (10 Gyr). A key test of these results is a determination of the stellar kinematics of one of the compact galaxies: if the sizes of these objects are as extreme as has been claimed, their stars are expected to have much higher velocities than those in present-day galaxies of the same mass. Here we report a measurement of the stellar velocity dispersion of a massive compact galaxy at redshift z = 2.186, corresponding to a look-back time of 10.7 Gyr. The velocity dispersion is very high at km s(-1), consistent with the mass and compactness of the galaxy inferred from photometric data. This would indicate significant recent structural and dynamical evolution of massive galaxies over the past 10 Gyr. The uncertainty in the dispersion was determined from simulations that include the effects of noise and template mismatch. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that some subtle systematic effect may have influenced the analysis, given the low signal-to-noise ratio of our spectrum.

  18. Design and Analyses of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles for Distributed Propulsion Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2016-01-01

    A series of three convergent round-to-rectangular high-aspect ratio nozzles were designed for acoustics measurements. The nozzles have exit area aspect ratios of 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1. With septa inserts, these nozzles will mimic an array of distributed propulsion system nozzles, as found on hybrid wing-body aircraft concepts. Analyses were performed for the three nozzle designs and showed that the flow through the nozzles was free of separated flow and shocks. The exit flow was mostly uniform with the exception of a pair of vortices at each span-wise end of the nozzle.

  19. Ion-Acoustic Instability in the Presence of High Frequency Oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sandu, D.; Schrittwieser, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a standing ion-acoustic wave instability, which is excited by a positively biased grid inserted perpendicularly into the plasma column of a single-ended Q-machine, under the influence of a high frequency signal superimposed onto the positive voltage at the grid....... The experimental results show that in certain regions of the frequency and amplitude of the h.f. signal the ion wave instability is stabilized or destabilized. A possible explanation of these effects is presented....

  20. High Frequency Acoustic Reflectometry for Solid/Liquid Interface Characterization: Application to Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Li, Sizhe; Campistron, Pierre; Callens, Dorothée; Thomy, Vincent; Senez, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    Evolution of the local concentration in a 1 μL droplet of ethanol/water mixture during an evaporation process has been followed using high frequency acoustic reflectometry. This method has been developed for wetting characterization on micro/nanostructures and makes it possible to follow concentration evolution in a droplet deposited on a solid surface. This information gives the opportunity to predict wetting depending on surface tension linked to alcohol concentration evolution. The calibration of the method and concentration evolution in 50% and 30% ethanol droplets are presented. The evolution of a pure ethanol droplet composition is tracked so as to follow hydration process.

  1. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  2. Discovery of very high velocity outflow in V Hydra - Wind from an accretion disk in a binary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, R.; Wannier, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of lines from the CO v = 1-0 vibration-rotation band at 4.6 microns, taken with the FTS/KPNO 4-m telescope, are reported for the carbon-rich red giant V Hydra, which is surrounded by an extended expanding molecular envelope resulting from extensive mass loss. The spectrum shows, in addition to the expected absorption at the outflow velocity of the envelope, absorption extending up to 120 km/s bluewards of the stellar velocity. A comparison of the spectrum observed at two epochs shows that the high-velocity absorption features change with time. It is suggested that the observed high-velocity features in V Hydra arise in a high-velocity polar outflow from an accretion disk in a binary system, as proposed in the mass-loss model for bipolar envelopes by Morris (1988).

  3. Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, T

    2006-01-01

    This thesis investigates the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond bipolar acoustic pulses by neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detection an approach complementary to todays optical Cerenkov and radio Cerenkov detectors, and could help to reduce the respective systematic uncertainties. In this work a complete simulation / reconstruction chain for a submarine acoustic neutrino telescope is developed, and the sensitivity of such a detector to a diffuse flux of ultra highenergy cosmic neutrinos is estimated.

  4. The head-tail structure of high-velocity clouds. A survey of the northern sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüns, C.; Kerp, J.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Mebold, U.

    2000-05-01

    We present new observational results on high-velocity clouds (HVCs) based on an analysis of the Leiden/Dwingeloo \\ion{HI} survey. We cataloged all HVCs with N_HI>= 1*1019 cm-2 and found 252 clouds that form a representative flux limited sample. The detailed analysis of each individual HVC in this sample revealed a significant number of HVCs (nearly 20%) having simultaneously a velocity and a column density gradient. These HVCs have a cometary appearance in the position-velocity representation and are called henceforward head-tail HVCs (HT HVCs). The head is the region with the highest column density of the HVC, while the column density of the tail is in general much lower (by a factor of 2-4). The absolute majority of the cataloged HVCs belongs to the well known HVC complexes. With exception of the very faint HVC complex L, all HVC complexes contain HT HVCs. The HT HVCs were analyzed statistically with respect to their physical parameters like position, velocity (v_LSR, v_GSR), and column density. We found a linear correlation between the fraction of HVCs having a head-tail structure and the peak column density of the HVCs. While there is no correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and v_LSR, we found a dependence of the fraction of HT HVCs and v_GSR. There is no significant correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and the parameters galactic longitude and latitude. The HT HVCs may be interpreted as HVCs that are currently interacting with their ambient medium. In the context of this model the tails represent material that is stripped off from the HVC core. We discuss the implications of this model for galactic and extragalactic HVCs.

  5. High-Fidelity Prediction of Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustic Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch vehicles experience extreme acoustic loads during liftoff driven by the interaction of rocket plumes and plume-generated acoustic waves with ground...

  6. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  7. An experimental study to estimate ballistic limit velocity for glass epoxy composite under high velocity impact with two different projectile geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfan Ebadi Afshar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research a study in estimating velocity ballistic in glass epoxy composite sheet with construction process of padding-manually, under high velocity impact was conducted for laboratory with gas gun device and ballistic limit velocity for composite sheet with a thickness 2 mm were obtained under geometry of projectile. So that result is obtained in construction of military armor, aerospace industry, automotive, and general any industry to be used with impact challenges and faced dealt. That is down strength and toughness and resistance to crack growth in structural weight. Glass epoxy composite (three layers made and for build projectile of steel rod VCN200 (Brand steel 1.6580 was used to manually peeling method; amounting to 16 gas gun device was performed to dimensions of 65 × 65 mm on the samples. With results analysis obtained ballistic tests were two important conclusions: first, in compare of two projectile geometry together, projectile with spherical tip compared to projectile with conical tip for better performance in penetrate and pass of this armor; second ballistic limit velocity for armor was obtained under spherical tip projectile 136.6 (meters per second and under conic tip projectile 143.6 (meters per second.

  8. Experimental investigation on dynamic response of aircraft panels excited by high-intensity acoustic loads in thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    WU, Z. Q.; LI, H. B.; ZHANG, W.; CHENG, H.; KONG, F. J.; LIU, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Metallic and composite panels are the major components for thermal protection system of aircraft vehicles, which are exposed to a severe combination of aerodynamic, thermal and acoustic environments during hypersonic flights. A thermal-acoustic testing apparatus which simulates thermal and acoustic loads was used to validate the integrity and the reliability of these panels. Metallic and ceramic matrix composite flat panels were designed. Dynamic response tests of these panels were carried out using the thermal acoustic apparatus. The temperature of the metallic specimen was up to 400 °C, and the temperature of the composite specimen was up to 600 °C. Moreover, the acoustic load was over 160 dB. Acceleration responses of these testing panels were measured using high temperature instruments during the testing process. Results show that the acceleration root mean square values are dominated by sound pressure level of acoustic loads. Compared with testing data in room environment, the peaks of the acceleration dynamic response shifts obviously to the high frequency in thermal environment.

  9. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  10. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  11. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  12. Towards high velocity deformation characterisation of metals and composites using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulieu-Barton J.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterisation of materials subject to high velocity deformation is necessary as many materials behave differently under such conditions. It is particularly important for accurate numerical simulation of high strain rate events. High velocity servo-hydraulic test machines have enabled material testing in the strain rate regime from 1 – 500 ε/s. The range is much lower than that experienced under ballistic, shock or impact loads, nevertheless it is a useful starting point for the application of optical techniques. The present study examines the possibility of using high speed cameras to capture images and then extracting deformation data using Digital Image Correlation (DIC from tensile testing in the intermediate strain rate regime available with the test machines. Three different materials, aluminium alloy 1050, S235 steel and glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP were tested at different nominal strain rates ranging from quasi static to 200 ε/s. In all cases DIC was able to analyse data collected up to fracture and in some cases post fracture. The use of highspeed DIC made it possible to capture phenomena such as multiple necking in the aluminium specimens and post compression failure in GFRP specimens.

  13. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenju; Xiang, Shikai; Gu, Jianbing; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Yin; Yan, Xiaozhen; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  14. Detection of high velocity outflows in Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Anjali; Krongold, Yair

    2014-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert~1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blue-shifted absorption lines of OVIII and NeIX in the medium energy grating spectrum and SiXIC and MgXII in the high energy grating spectrum on board Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameter and high column density, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi et al. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta et al. in Ark~564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity vs. ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter sp...

  15. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 1. Spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bed sediment classification using high-frequency hydroacoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain scale roughness. Here a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel, and rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from georeferenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed "stochastic geometries." Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological scale and grain scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  16. HIGH-PRECISION PREDICTIONS FOR THE ACOUSTIC SCALE IN THE NONLINEAR REGIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Mehta, Kushal; Metchnik, Marc; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Pinto, Phillip; Takahashi, Ryuichi; White, Martin; Xu, Xiaoying

    2010-09-10

    We measure shifts of the acoustic scale due to nonlinear growth and redshift distortions to a high precision using a very large volume of high-force-resolution simulations. We compare results from various sets of simulations that differ in their force, volume, and mass resolution. We find a consistency within 1.5-sigma for shift values from different simulations and derive shift alpha(z) -1 = (0.300\\pm 0.015)% [D(z)/D(0)]^{2} using our fiducial set. We find a strong correlation with a non-unity slope between shifts in real space and in redshift space and a weak correlation between the initial redshift and low redshift. Density-field reconstruction not only removes the mean shifts and reduces errors on the mean, but also tightens the correlations: after reconstruction, we recover a slope of near unity for the correlation between the real and redshift space and restore a strong correlation between the low and the initial redshifts. We derive propagators and mode-coupling terms from our N-body simulations and compared with Zeldovich approximation and the shifts measured from the chi^2 fitting, respectively. We interpret the propagator and the mode-coupling term of a nonlinear density field in the context of an average and a dispersion of its complex Fourier coefficients relative to those of the linear density field; from these two terms, we derive a signal-to-noise ratio of the acoustic peak measurement. We attempt to improve our reconstruction method by implementing 2LPT and iterative operations: we obtain little improvement. The Fisher matrix estimates of uncertainty in the acoustic scale is tested using 5000 (Gpc/h)^3 of cosmological PM simulations from Takahashi et al. (2009). (abridged)

  17. Building America Case Study: Standard- Versus High-Velocity Air Distribution in High-Performance Townhomes, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Poerschke, R. Beach, T. Begg

    2017-06-01

    IBACOS investigated the performance of a small-diameter high-velocity heat pump system compared to a conventional system in a new construction triplex townhouse. A ductless heat pump system also was installed for comparison, but the homebuyer backed out because of aesthetic concerns about that system. In total, two buildings, having identical solar orientation and comprised of six townhomes, were monitored for comfort and energy performance.

  18. An efficient, compact, and versatile fiber double scrambler for high precision radial velocity instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Halverson, Samuel; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Levi, Eric; Schwab, Christian; Hearty, Fred; MacDonald, Nick

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and test results of a compact optical fiber double-scrambler for high-resolution Doppler radial velocity instruments. This device consists of a single optic: a high-index $n$$\\sim$2 ball lens that exchanges the near and far fields between two fibers. When used in conjunction with octagonal fibers, this device yields very high scrambling gains and greatly desensitizes the fiber output from any input illumination variations, thereby stabilizing the instrument profile of the spectrograph and improving the Doppler measurement precision. The system is also highly insensitive to input pupil variations, isolating the spectrograph from telescope illumination variations and seeing changes. By selecting the appropriate glass and lens diameter the highest efficiency is achieved when the fibers are practically in contact with the lens surface, greatly simplifying the alignment process when compared to classical double-scrambler systems. This prototype double-scrambler has demonstrated significant pe...

  19. High resolution velocity structure beneath Mount Vesuvius from seismic array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Tronca, Fabrizio; Bianco, Francesca; Del Pezzo, Edoardo

    2002-11-01

    A high resolution P-wave image of Mt. Vesuvius edifice has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes, land based shots and small aperture array data. The results give details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km below the central crater, distributed in a major cluster, centered at 3 km below the central crater and in a minor group, with diffuse hypocenters inside the volcanic edifice. The two clusters are separated by an anomalously high Vp region at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation. The highest energy quakes (up to M = 3.6) are located in the deeper cluster, in a high P-wave velocity zone. Our results favor an interpretation in terms of absence of shallow magma reservoirs.

  20. A DAMAGE ACCUMULATING MODELING OF FAILURE WAVES IN GLASS UNDER HIGH VELOCITY IMPACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘占芳; 姚国文; 詹先义

    2001-01-01

    The failure wave phenomenon was interpreted in glass media under the high velocity impact with the stress levels below the Hugoniot elastic limit. In view of the plate impact experimental observations a damage-accumulating model predominated by the deviatoric stress impulse was proposed while Heaviside function was adopted in the damageaccumulating model to describe the failure delay in the interior of materials. Features of the failure layer and propagation mechanism as well as their dynamic characteristics were further presented. The reduction in failure wave propagation speed is pointed out as the reflected rarefaction waves reflect again from the failure layer boundary.

  1. Acceleration to high velocities and heating by impact using Nike KrF lasera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max; Weaver, J. L.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Watari, T.; Arikawa, Y.; Sakaiya, T.; Oh, J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Murakami, M.; Azechi, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Nike krypton fluoride laser [S. P. Obenschain, S. E. Bodner, D. Colombant, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] is used to accelerate planar plastic foils to velocities that for the first time reach 1000 km/s. Collision of the highly accelerated deuterated polystyrene foil with a stationary target produces ˜Gbar shock pressures and results in heating of the foil to thermonuclear temperatures. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with ˜106 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2-3 keV.

  2. Double electron capture of He sup 2+ from He at high velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuch, R.; Justiniano, E.; Vogt, H. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Physikalisches Inst.); Deco, G.; Gruen, N. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1991-03-14

    The double electron capture process by He{sup 2+} ions in collisions with helium is studied in the high velocity regime with the measurement of total cross sections at 1.5, 4 and 6 MeV beam energy and angular differential cross sections for 1.5 MeV. The experimental results compare well with theoretical calculations which include correlation effects in the initial and final He ground states for the derivation of the capture amplitude in a continuum distorted-wave approximation. (author).

  3. Mapping High-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    OpenAIRE

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of high-velocity H-$\\alpha$ and Lyman-$\\alpha$ emission in the outer debris of SN~1987A. The H-$\\alpha$ images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H$\\alpha$ imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms cr...

  4. High-velocity H I clouds and the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Shandarin, S.F.

    1979-05-01

    The intergalactic interpretation of high-velocity H I clouds is examined in terms of the evolutionary theory of galaxy formation. From 21-cm line measurements and the representation of the intergalactic medium according to the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation (the ''pancake'' theory), parameters (density, mass, radius, entropy, distance) are calculated for various clouds, regarded as quasistationary. The observational and theoretical estimates are consistent. The assumption that many H I clouds are extragalactic is in good accord with the evolutionary theory.

  5. A high sensitivity wireless mass-loading surface acoustic wave DNA biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yi-Han; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Guo, Cang-Ran; Liu, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor with gold delay area on LiNbO3 substrate detecting DNA sequences is proposed. By well-designed device parameters of the SAW sensor, it achieves a high performance for highly sensitive detection of target DNA. In addition, an effective biological treatment method for DNA immobilization and abundant experimental verification of the sensing effect have made it a reliable device in DNA detection. The loading mass of the probe and target DNA sequences is obtained from the frequency shifts, which are big enough in this work due to an effective biological treatment. The experimental results show that the biosensor has a high sensitivity of 1.2 pg/ml/Hz and high selectivity characteristic is also verified by the few responses of other substances. In combination with wireless transceiver, we develop a wireless receiving and processing system that can directly display the detection results.

  6. Comment on "Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L

    2014-03-01

    The phase and group velocities of elastic guided waves are important in the physical interpretation of high frequency scattering by fluid-loaded elastic shells. Outside the context of scattering, those properties are also important for understanding the energy flow in acoustic metamaterials. In a recent investigation of acoustic metamaterials exhibiting anomalous wave propagation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)] criticism of negative group velocity terminology was generalized to elastic waves guided on ordinary materials. Some context and justification for retaining the identification of negative group velocities associated with a type of backscattering enhancement for shells are explained here. The phase evolution direction is determined by the boundary conditions.

  7. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  8. Acceleration to High Velocities and Heating by Impact Using Nike KrF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Max

    2009-11-01

    Shock ignition, impact ignition, as well as higher intensity conventional hot spot ignition designs reduce driver energy requirement by pushing the envelope in laser intensity and target implosion velocities. This talk will describe experiments that for the first time reach target velocities in the range of 700 -- 1000 km/s. The highly accelerated planar foils of deuterated polystyrene, some with bromine doping, are made to collide with a witness foil to produce extreme shock pressures and result in heating of matter to thermonuclear temperatures. Target acceleration and collision are diagnosed using large field of view monochromatic x-ray imaging with backlighting as well as bremsstrahlung self-emission. The impact conditions are diagnosed using DD fusion neutron yield, with over 10^6 neutrons produced during the collision. Time-of-flight neutron detectors are used to measure the ion temperature upon impact, which reaches 2 -- 3 keV. The experiments are performed on the Nike facility, reconfigured specifically for high intensity operation. The short wavelength and high illumination uniformity of Nike KrF laser uniquely enable access to this new parameter regime. Intensities of (0.4 -- 1.2) x 10^15 W/cm^2 and pulse durations of 0.4 -- 2 ns were utilized. Modeling of the target acceleration, collision, and neutron production is performed using the FAST3D radiation hydrodynamics code with a non-LTE radiation model. Work is supported by US Department of Energy.

  9. Earthquake Energy Dissipation in Light of High-Velocity, Slip-Pulse Shear Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Z.; Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the energy dissipation during earthquakes by analysis of high-velocity shear experiments conducted on room-dry, solid samples of granite, tonalite, and dolomite sheared at slip-velocity of 0.0006-1m/s, and normal stress of 1-11.5MPa. The experimental fault were loaded in one of three modes: (1) Slip-pulse of abrupt, intense acceleration followed by moderate deceleration; (2) Impact by a spinning, heavy flywheel (225 kg); and (3) Constant velocity loading. We refer to energy dissipation in terms of power-density (PD=shear stress*slip-velocity; units of MW/m^2), and Coulomb-energy-density (CED= mechanical energy/normal stress; units of m). We present two aspects: Relative energy dissipation of the above loading modes, and relative energy dissipation between impact experiments and moderate earthquakes. For the first aspect, we used: (i) the lowest friction coefficient of the dynamic weakening; (ii) the work dissipated before reaching the lowest friction; and (iii) the cumulative mechanical work during the complete run. The results show that the slip-pulse/impact modes are energy efficient relatively to the constant-velocity mode as manifested by faster, more intense weakening and 50-90% lower energy dissipation. Thus, for a finite amount of pre-seismic crustal energy, the efficiency of slip-pulse would amplify earthquake instability. For the second aspect, we compare the experimental CED of the impact experiments to the reported breakdown energy (EG) of moderate earthquakes, Mw = 5.6 to 7.2 (Chang et al., 2012). In is commonly assumed that the seismic EG is a small fraction of the total earthquake energy, and as expected in 9 out of 11 examined earthquakes, EG was 0.005 to 0.07 of the experimental CED. We thus speculate that the experimental relation of Coulomb-energy-density to total slip distance, D, CED = 0.605 × D^0.933, is a reasonable estimate of total earthquake energy, a quantity that cannot be determined from seismic data.

  10. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  11. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  12. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  13. Formation and transformation of amino acids and amino acid precursors by high-velocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Yamori, A.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been found in extraterrestrial bodies such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites. It is plausible that these extraterrestrial bodies carried organic compounds such as amino acids or their precursors to the early Earth. It is claimed, however, that these extraterrestrial organics were destroyed during impacts to the Earth. We therefore examined possible transformation of amino acids and their precursors during high-velocity impacts by using a rail gun "HYPAC" in ISAS. Starting materials used in the impact experiments were (i) aqueous solution of glycine (10 mM or 1.0 M), and (ii) a mixture of ammonia, methanol and water. The target materials were sealed in stainless steel capsules, and shocked by impact with a polycarbonate projectile accelerated with "HYPAC" to the velocities of 2.5 - 7.0 km/s. A part of the products was acid-hydrolyzed. Both hydrolyzed an unhydrolyzed products were analyzed by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis and chromatography. When an aqueous solution containing ammonia, methanol and water was shocked by impact at the velocity of 6.4 km/s, a number of amino acids (e.g., serine and glycine) were detected after hydrolysis. The present results suggest that amino acid precursors could be formed during cometary impacts. When glycine solution was used as a starting material, about 40 % of glycine was recovered even after 6 km/s impact. Methylamine and ammonia, which are known as pyrolytic products of glycine, were detected, besides them, diketopiperazine and an unidentified product whose molecular weight was 134, were detected, while no glycine peptides were identified in them. It was shown that the impact processes resulted in the formation of amino acid condensates. Thermal stability of glycine precursor is comparable with glycine. The present results suggest that organic material could survive and/or formed during an impact process. Most of organic

  14. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  15. Mapping High-Velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha Emission from Supernova 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Fransson, Claes; Larsson, Josefin; Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Garnavich, Peter; Heng, Kevin; Lawrence, Stephen S.; Lundqvist, Peter; Smith, Nathan; Sonneborn, George

    2015-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity H-alpha and Lyman-alpha emission in the outer debris of SN 1987A. The H-alpha images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H-alpha imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals (-7,500 < V(sub obs) < -2,800 km/s) and (1,000 < V(sub obs) < 7,500 km/s), ?M(sub H) = 1.2 × 10(exp -3) M/ y. We also present the first Lyman-alpha imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-alpha emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-alpha/H-alpha photon ratio, R(L-alpha/H-alpha) approx. = 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of approx. = 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-alpha emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-alpha and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-alpha production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.

  16. Tribological properties of high velocity arc sprayed Fe-Al based composite coatings at elevated temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; ZHANG Shu; XU Wei-pu; ZU Zi-xin; XU Bin-shi

    2004-01-01

    Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were in-situ synthesized using Fe-Al/Cr3C2 or Fe-Al/WC cored wires and high velocity are spraying (HVAS) technology. The tribological properties of the Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were investigated using a ball-on-disc tribotester from room temperature to 650 ℃. The results show that the coatings have relatively high bond strength and micro-hardness. The tribological properties of Fe-Al/Cr3C2 and Fe-Al/WC composite coatings were further analyzed and compared. Low and stable wear rates of the Fe-Al based intermetallic composite coatings were indicated from room temperature to 650 ℃. The excellent wear resistance of the composite coatings in high temperature was discussed.

  17. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  18. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  19. Time-Efficient High-Rate Data Flooding in One-Dimensional Acoustic Underwater Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Kyun; Seo, Bo-Min; Yun, Kyungsu; Cho, Ho-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Because underwater communication environments have poor characteristics, such as severe attenuation, large propagation delays and narrow bandwidths, data is normally transmitted at low rates through acoustic waves. On the other hand, as high traffic has recently been required in diverse areas, high rate transmission has become necessary. In this paper, transmission/reception timing schemes that maximize the time axis use efficiency to improve the resource efficiency for high rate transmission are proposed. The excellence of the proposed scheme is identified by examining the power distributions by node, rate bounds, power levels depending on the rates and number of nodes, and network split gains through mathematical analysis and numerical results. In addition, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing packet train method.

  20. Time-Efficient High-Rate Data Flooding in One-Dimensional Acoustic Underwater Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kyun Kwon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Because underwater communication environments have poor characteristics, such as severe attenuation, large propagation delays and narrow bandwidths, data is normally transmitted at low rates through acoustic waves. On the other hand, as high traffic has recently been required in diverse areas, high rate transmission has become necessary. In this paper, transmission/reception timing schemes that maximize the time axis use efficiency to improve the resource efficiency for high rate transmission are proposed. The excellence of the proposed scheme is identified by examining the power distributions by node, rate bounds, power levels depending on the rates and number of nodes, and network split gains through mathematical analysis and numerical results. In addition, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing packet train method.

  1. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogia, Maria; Gan, Tat-Hean; Balachandran, Wamadeva; Livadas, Makis; Kappatos, Vassilios; Szabo, Istvan; Mohimi, Abbas; Round, Andrew

    2016-04-22

    Guided Wave Testing (GWT) using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH₀) waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C) has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  2. High Temperature Shear Horizontal Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer for Guided Wave Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided Wave Testing (GWT using novel Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs is proposed for the inspection of large structures operating at high temperatures. To date, high temperature EMATs have been developed only for thickness measurements and they are not suitable for GWT. A pair of water-cooled EMATs capable of exciting and receiving Shear Horizontal (SH0 waves for GWT with optimal high temperature properties (up to 500 °C has been developed. Thermal and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulations of the EMAT design have been performed and experimentally validated. The optimal thermal EMAT design, material selection and operating conditions were calculated. The EMAT was successfully tested regarding its thermal and GWT performance from ambient temperature to 500 °C.

  3. An investigation of constant pressure gas well testing influenced by high velocity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, S. [PEMEX Exploracion-Produccion, Mexico City (Mexico); Samaniego, F. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Cinco-Ley, H. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Bouhroum, A.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of transient pressure analysis of gas flow under either constant bottom-hole conditions or the constant wellhead pressure conditions. The effect of formation damage, wellbore storage and high velocity flow are included in the model. The analysis of simulated well tests showed that the interpretation methods used for liquid flow are generally accurate when the p{sub p}(p) is used. For these conditions, a graph of 1/q{sub D} vs log t{sub D} presents gradually lower values of 1.1513 as the value of p{sub wf} decreases: For pressure buildup conditions a graph of p{sub pD}(1, {Delta}t{sub aD})/q{sub D}({Delta}t{sub aD}=0) vs (t{sub aD}+{Delta}t{sub aD})/{Delta}t{sub aD} shows values of this slope within 1% of the 1.1513 value. The maximum error was in the rate performance simulated cases that included high-velocity flows; being less than 13%. This upper limit occurs when the formation has a relatively `high` permeability (around 1 mD) and the rate performance test is affected by high-velocity flow. It was found that pressure buildup tests are superior to rate performance tests because high-velocity flow does not affect the slope of the straight line portion of the buildup curve. However, it was also found, through derivative analysis of simulated buildup tests, that the skin factor is sensibly miscalculated when the high-velocity flow effect is singificant. This problem could lead to errors in the calculation of the skin factor, s, up to 300%. (orig.) [Deutsch] Vorgestellt werden instationaere Testergebnisse an Gas-Sonden unter konstanten Bohrlochsohlenbedingungen bzw. konstantem Bohrlochkopfdruck. Folgende Stoereffekte: Sondennahe Tragerschaedigung, Speicherkapazitaet des Bohrloches und die bei der Gasstroemung eintretende hohe Fliessgeschwindigkeit werden beruecksichtigt. Die Auswertung von simulierten Testergebnissen zeigt, dass die zur Interpretation von Erdoelsonden bewaehrten Verfahren in der Darstellung p{sub p}(p) gute

  4. Magnetized High Velocity Clouds in the Galactic Halo: A New Distance Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønnow, Asger; Tepper-García, Thor; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-08-01

    High velocity gas that does not conform to Galactic rotation is observed throughout the Galaxy’s halo. One component of this gas, H i high velocity clouds (HVCs), have attracted attention since their discovery in the 1960s and remain controversial in terms of their origins, largely due to the lack of reliable distance estimates. The recent discovery of enhanced magnetic fields toward HVCs has encouraged us to explore their connection to cloud evolution, kinematics, and survival as they fall through the magnetized Galactic halo. For a reasonable model of the halo magnetic field, most infalling clouds see transverse rather than radial field lines. We find that significant compression (and thereby amplification) of the ambient magnetic field occurs in front of the cloud and in the tail of material stripped from the cloud. The compressed transverse field attenuates hydrodynamical instabilities. This delays cloud destruction, though not indefinitely. The observed {\\boldsymbol{B}} field compression is related to the cloud’s distance from the Galactic plane. As a result, the observed rotation measure provides useful distance information on a cloud’s location.

  5. Semi-analytical method for calculating aeroelastic effect of profiled rod flying at high velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-jun Ning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The key technique of a kinetic energy rod (KER warhead is to control the flight attitude of rods. The rods are usually designed to different shapes. A new conceptual KER named profiled rod which has large L/D ratio is described in this paper. The elastic dynamic equations of this profiled rod flying at high velocity after detonation are set up on the basis of Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the aeroelastic deformation of profiled rod is calculated by semi-analytical method for calculating the vibration characteristics of variable cross-section beam. In addition, the aeroelastic deformation of the undeformed profiled rod and the aeroelastic deformation of deformed profiled rod which is caused by the detonation of explosive are simulated by computational fluid dynamic and finite element method (CFD/FEM, respectively. A satisfactory agreement of these two methods is obtained by the comparison of two methods. The results show that the semi-analytical method for calculating the vibration characteristics of variable cross-section beam is applied to analyze the aeroelastic deformation of profiled rod flying at high velocity.

  6. Treatment of open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubović, Zoran; Vukajinović, Zoran; Stojiljković, Predrag; Golubović, Ivan; Visnjić, Aleksandar; Radovanović, Zoran; Najman, Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Tibia fracture caused by high velocity missiles is mostly comminuted and followed by bone defect which makes their healing process extremely difficult and prone to numerous complications. A 34-year-old male was wounded at close range by a semi-automatic gun missile. He was wounded in the distal area of the left tibia and suffered a massive defect of the bone and soft tissue. After the primary treatment of the wound, the fracture was stabilized with an external fixator type Mitkovic, with convergent orientation of the pins. The wound in the medial region of the tibia was closed with the secondary stitch, whereas the wound in the lateral area was closed with the skin transplant after Thiersch. Due to massive bone defect in the area of the rifle-missile wound six months after injury, a medical team placed a reconstructive external skeletal fixator type Mitkovic and performed corticotomy in the proximal metaphyseal area of the tibia. By the method of bone transport (distractive osteogenesis), the bone defect of the tibia was replaced. After the fracture healing seven months from the secondary surgery, the fixator was removed and the patient was referred to physical therapy. Surgical treatment of wounds, external fixation, performing necessary debridement, adequate antibiotic treatment and soft and bone tissue reconstruction are essential in achieving good results in patients with the open tibial fracture with bone defect caused by high velocity missiles. Reconstruction of bone defect can be successfully treated by reconstructive external fixator Mitkovic.

  7. HIGH-VELOCITY RESISTANCE EXERCISE PROTOCOLS IN OLDER WOMEN: EFFECTS ON CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo P. da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute cardiovascular responses to different high-velocity resistance exercise protocols were compared in untrained older women. Twelve apparently healthy volunteers (62.6 ± 2.9 y performed three different protocols in the bench press (BP. All protocols involved three sets of 10 repetitions performed with a 10RM load and 2 minutes of rest between sets. The continuous protocol (CP involved ten repetitions with no pause between repetitions. The discontinuous protocols were performed with a pause of five (DP5 or 15 (DP15 seconds between the fifth and sixth repetitions. Heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, rate pressure product (RPP, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE, and blood lactate (BLa were assessed at baseline and at the end of all exercise sets. Factorial ANOVA was used to compare the cardiovascular response among different protocols. Compared to baseline, HR and RPP were significantly (p < 0.05 higher after the third set in all protocols. HR and RPP were significantly (p < 0.05 lower in DP5 and DP15 compared with CP for the BP exercise. Compared to baseline, RPE increased significantly (p < 0.05 with each subsequent set in all protocols. Blood lactate concentration during DP5 and DP15 was significantly lower than CP. It appears that discontinuous high-velocity resistance exercise has a lower cardiovascular demand than continuous resistance exercise in older women

  8. Estimation of Rotational Velocity of Baseball Using High-Speed Camera Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuya; Uematsu, Yuko; Saito, Hideo

    Movies can be used to analyze a player's performance and improve his/her skills. In the case of baseball, the pitching is recorded by using a high-speed camera, and the recorded images are used to improve the pitching skills of the players. In this paper, we present a method for estimating of the rotational velocity of a baseball on the basis of movies recorded by high-speed cameras. Unlike in the previous methods, we consider the original seam pattern of the ball seen in the input movie and identify the corresponding image from a database of images by adopting the parametric eigenspace method. These database images are CG Images. The ball's posture can be determined on the basis of the rotational parameters. In the proposed method, the symmetric property of the ball is also taken into consideration, and the time continuity is used to determine the ball's posture. In the experiments, we use the proposed method to estimate the rotational velocity of a baseball on the basis of real movies and movies consisting of CG images of the baseball. The results of both the experiments prove that our method can be used to estimate the ball's rotation accurately.

  9. Accretion by a Neutron Star Moving at a High Kick Velocity in the Supernova Ejecta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Ye Lu; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    We suggest a two-dimensional time dependent analytic model to describe the accretion of matter onto a neutron star moving at a high speed across the ejecta left in the aftermath of a supernova explosion. The formation of a strange star resulting from the accretion is also addressed. The newborn neutron star is assumed to move outward at a kick velocity of vns ~ 103 km s-1, and the accretion flow is treated as a dust flow. When the neutron star travels across the ejecta with high speed, it sweeps up material, and when the accreted mass has reached a critical value, the neutron star will undergo a phase transition,for instance, to become a strange star. Our results show that the accretion rate decreases in a complicated way in time, not just a power law dependence: it drops much faster than the power law derived by Colpi et al. We also found that the total accreted mass and the phase transition of the neutron star depend sensitively on the velocity of supernova ejecta.

  10. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Cannon, John M; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the ALFALFA HI survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210" (comparable to Arecibo) and 105" angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'" resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth HI morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the source...

  11. High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from a Compact Circumstellar Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-05-01

    High-velocity features (HVF) of Ca prior to B-band maximum light are a ubiquitous property of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), but the origin of this high-velocity material is unknown. It may result from ejection of material during the explosion, detonation of material on the surface prior to the supernova or interaction with a companion or material in the nearby environment. Here, we introduce the methods we use to simulate the interaction of SN Ia ejecta with a shell of material surrounding the progenitor at a distance of less than 1 R⊙. Assuming free expansion, constant ion state and excitation temperature, we generate synthetic spectra from the data showing the effect of equation of state, explosion model, and the width, initial density profile and mass of the shell on the appearance and temporal evolution of the Ca ii near-infrared triplet (CaNIR). The Ca abundance of the shell is taken to be a free parameter. We compare the evolution of the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the CaNIR feature resulting from these models to observational results from Silverman et al. We find that the mass of the shell must be less than 0.012 ± 0.004 M⊙. We discuss potential ambiguities in observational methods of determining the pEW of the HVF.

  12. The collision of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Franco, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk are presented. The impinging clouds are assumed to be spherical and the target disk is represented by a constant density slab, n(g) = 1/cu cm, with a total width W(g) = 200 pc. The numerical experiments cover a wide range of cloud densities, between 0.1 and 100/cu cm, and velocities between 100 and 300 km/s. At a time approximately 10 to the 7th yr after impact, two types of final configurations are found. In the first case, the infalling cloud is completely shocked in a time short compared with the crossing time of the disk. Then, the generated cavity has time to grow sideways and large scale structures with a round shape, and in some cases nearly spherical, are produced. In the second case, which occurs for high density clouds, the cloud is shocked on a time scale longer than or comparable to the crossing time. The resultant cylindrical holes drilled across the entire disk have the dimensions of the impinging cloud. Cloud-galaxy interactions are compared with other energy sources and the morphologies of the resultant structures are suggested to resemble the large scale structures observed in H I.

  13. High-Velocity Features in Type Ia Supernovae from a Compact Circumstellar Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Brian W.; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity features (HVF) of Ca prior to B-band maximum light are a ubiquitous property of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), but the origin of this high-velocity material is unknown. It may result from ejection of material during the explosion, detonation of material on the surface prior to the supernova, or interaction with a companion or material in the nearby environment. Here we introduce the methods we use to simulate the interaction of SN Ia ejecta with a shell of material surrounding the progenitor at a distance of less than 1 R⊙. Assuming free expansion, constant ion state and excitation temperature, we generate synthetic spectra from the data showing the effect of equation of state, explosion model, and the width, initial density profile, and mass of the shell on the appearance and temporal evolution of the Ca II near-infrared triplet (CaNIR). The Ca abundance of the shell is taken to be a free parameter. We compare the evolution of the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the CaNIR feature resulting from these models to observational results. We find that the mass of the shell must be less than 0.012 ± 0.004 M⊙. We discuss potential ambiguities in observational methods of determining the pEW of the HVF.

  14. Discovery of Outlying, High-Velocity Oxygen-Rich Ejecta in Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Fesen, R A; Morse, J; Chevalier, R A; Borkowski, K J; Dopita, M A; Gerardy, C L; Lawrence, S S; Raymond, J C; Van den Bergh, S

    2006-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images of the young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A reveal a far larger population of outlying, high-velocity knots of ejecta with a broader range of chemical properties than previously suspected. We identify three main classes of outer ejecta: 1) Knots dominated by [N II] 6548,6583 emission; 2) Knots dominated by oxygen emission lines especially [O II] 7319,7330; and 3) Knots with emission line strengths similar to the [S II] strong FMK ejecta commonly seen in the main emission shell. The discovery of a significant population of O-rich ejecta situated in between the suspected N-rich outer photospheric layer and S-rich FMK-like ejecta suggests that the Cas A progenitor's chemical layers were not completely disrupted by the supernova explosion outside of the remnant's NE and SW high velocity `jet' regions. In addition, we find the majority of O-rich outer ejecta at projected locations out beyond (v = 6500 - 9000 km/s) the remnant's fastest moving Fe-rich X-ray emission material (...

  15. Electrostatic Comb-Drive Actuator with High In-Plane Translational Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomna M. Eltagoury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the design and opto-mechanical characterization of high velocity comb-drive actuators producing in-plane motion and fabricated using the technology of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE of silicon-on-insulator (SOI substrate. The actuators drive vertical mirrors acting on optical beams propagating in-plane with respect to the substrate. The actuator-mirror device is a fabrication on an SOI wafer with 80 μm etching depth, surface roughness of about 15 nm peak to valley and etching verticality that is better than 0.1 degree. The travel range of the actuators is extracted using an optical method based on optical cavity response and accounting for the diffraction effect. One design achieves a travel range of approximately 9.1 µm at a resonance frequency of approximately 26.1 kHz, while the second design achieves about 2 µm at 93.5 kHz. The two specific designs reported achieve peak velocities of about 1.48 and 1.18 m/s, respectively, which is the highest product of the travel range and frequency for an in-plane microelectromechanical system (MEMS motion under atmospheric pressure, to the best of the authors’ knowledge. The first design possesses high spring linearity over its travel range with about 350 ppm change in the resonance frequency, while the second design achieves higher resonance frequency on the expense of linearity. The theoretical predications and the experimental results show good agreement.

  16. A dynamic study of fragmentation and energy loss during high velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1992-07-01

    Research conducted under this contract can be divided into two main areas: hypervelocity (in the range up to 7 km/s) and high velocity (less than 1 km/s). Work in the former was performed at NASA-MSFC using the Light Gas Gun Facility. The lower velocity studies were conducted at Auburn University using the ballistic gun. The emphasis of the project was on the hypervelocity phenomenon especially in the characterization of the debris cloud formed by the primary impact events. Special devices were made to determine the angular distributions of momentum and energy of the debris cloud as a function of impact conditions. After several iteration processes, it was decided to concentrate on the momentum effort. Prototype devices were designed, fabricated, and tested. These devices were based on the conservation of momentum. Distributions of the debris cloud formed were measured by determining the amount of momentum transferred from the debris cloud to strategically placed pendulum measurement devices. The motion of the pendula was monitored using itegrated opto-interrupters. The distribution of momentum in the debris cloud was found to be a strong function of the impact condition. Small projectiles at high velocities were observed to produce finely dispersed debris whereas large projectiles generated discrete particles in the debris. Results also show that the momentum in the forward direction was enhanced due to the impact. This phenomenon of momentum multiplication was also observed in other studies and in computer simulations. It was initially planned to determine the energy distribution using deformation energy in a rod with strain gauges. Results from preliminary studies show that this technique is acceptable but too tedious. A new technique was explored based on measuring the heating effect of the debris cloud using an IR camera. The feasibility and sensitivity was established at Auburn University.

  17. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of High-Velocity Interstellar Absorption-Line Profiles in the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walborn, Nolan R.; Danks, Anthony C.; Vieira, Gladys; Landsman, Wayne B.

    2002-06-01

    An atlas of ultraviolet interstellar absorption-line profiles toward four stars in the Carina Nebula is presented. The observations have been made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, with a resolving power of 114,000. Low-ionization, high-ionization, and excited-state lines from a wide array of chemical species are included. Extensive measurements of radial velocities, velocity dispersions, and column densities of individual components in these profiles are also given. The unprecedented capabilities of STIS reveal many more velocity components than previously known; most of the high-velocity components in previous observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer are now resolved into multiple subcomponents, and even higher velocities are seen. The great range of line strengths available permits the detection of the low-velocity components in the weakest lines, and progressively higher velocities in stronger lines (in which the low-velocity components become completely blended). The weak and high-ionization lines trace global structure in the H II region, while the strong low-ionization lines show intricate high-velocity structure that likely originates relatively near to the O stars observed. The extreme velocities found in the low-ionization lines toward these four stars are -388 and +127 km s-1, with 23-26 resolved components in each. Some components in different stars may be related, but many are different in each line of sight. A remarkably well-defined Routly-Spitzer effect is found in this region. Temporal variations toward one star observed twice have already been reported. These measurements will be used in subsequent astrophysical analyses to further constrain the origins of the phenomena. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract

  18. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  19. Role of acoustic interface layer during high intensity focused ultrasound therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    After interface layer was simulated by the magnetic nano-particles in the egg white phantom, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at the same dosage was introduced to radiate the phantom in different depths to blow the acoustic interface layer to mimic "point" exposure. The results showed that the volumes of biological focal region (BFR) were enlarged when the acoustic focal region (AFR) is close with interface layer. This meant that the magnetic nano-particles enhanced the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU. When the distance of the AFR from the interface layer was 10 mm, the size and shape of the BFR were similar with those of the control group, but a larger lesion at the interface, which was harmful for treatment, was observed. When the distance of the AFR to the interface layer increased to 30 mm, the size and shape of the BFR were also similar to those of the control group. When the thickness of the interface layer diminished, the utility of enhancement decreased. Continuous increase of the safe area for treatment and decrease of the utility of enhancement were observed along with the abatement of the thickness of the interface layer

  20. Demodulation of acoustic telemetry binary phase shift keying signal based on high-order Duffing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing-Nan; Liu, Chong-Xin; Ni, Jun-Kang; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the downhole situation immediately, logging while drilling (LWD) technology is adopted. One of the LWD technologies, called acoustic telemetry, can be successfully applied to modern drilling. It is critical for acoustic telemetry technology that the signal is successfully transmitted to the ground. In this paper, binary phase shift keying (BPSK) is used to modulate carrier waves for the transmission and a new BPSK demodulation scheme based on Duffing chaos is investigated. Firstly, a high-order system is given in order to enhance the signal detection capability and it is realized through building a virtual circuit using an electronic workbench (EWB). Secondly, a new BPSK demodulation scheme is proposed based on the intermittent chaos phenomena of the new Duffing system. Finally, a system variable crossing zero-point equidistance method is proposed to obtain the phase difference between the system and the BPSK signal. Then it is determined that the digital signal transmitted from the bottom of the well is ‘0’ or ‘1’. The simulation results show that the demodulation method is feasible. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51177117) and the National Key Science & Technology Special Projects, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05021-005).