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Sample records for hierarchical confirmatory factor

  1. The Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI): Hierarchical Confirmatory Factor Analyses and Factorial Invariance

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    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Chinese Family Assessment Instrument (C-FAI) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MCFAs). Method: A total of 3,649 students responded to the C-FAI in a community survey. Results: Results showed that there are five dimensions of the C-FAI (communication,…

  2. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

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    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  3. Factorial invariance in multilevel confirmatory factor analysis.

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    Ryu, Ehri

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a procedure to test factorial invariance in multilevel confirmatory factor analysis. When the group membership is at level 2, multilevel factorial invariance can be tested by a simple extension of the standard procedure. However level-1 group membership raises problems which cannot be appropriately handled by the standard procedure, because the dependency between members of different level-1 groups is not appropriately taken into account. The procedure presented in this article provides a solution to this problem. This paper also shows Muthén's maximum likelihood (MUML) estimation for testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-1 groups as a viable alternative to maximum likelihood estimation. Testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-2 groups and testing multilevel factorial invariance across level-1 groups are illustrated using empirical examples. SAS macro and Mplus syntax are provided.

  4. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis: Locating the Invariant Referent Sets

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    French, Brian F.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2008-01-01

    Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) is a popular method for the examination of measurement invariance and specifically, factor invariance. Recent research has begun to focus on using MCFA to detect invariance for test items. MCFA requires certain parameters (e.g., factor loadings) to be constrained for model identification, which are…

  5. Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis for Construct Validation: An Empirical Review

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    DiStefano, Christine; Hess, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the psychological assessment literature to determine what applied researchers are using and reporting from confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) studies for evidence of construct validation. One hundred and one articles published in four major psychological assessment journals between 1990 and 2002 were systematically…

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire: Evidence supporting a three-factor model.

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    Barnes, Jennifer; Prescott, Tim; Muncer, Steven

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the goodness-of-fit of a one factor model with the four factor model proposed by Fairburn (2008) and the three factor model proposed by Peterson and colleagues (2007) for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q 6.0) (Fairburn and Beglin, 1994). Using a cross-sectional design, the EDE-Q was completed by 569 adults recruited from universities and eating disorder charities in the UK. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out for both the student and non-student groups. CFA indicated that Peterson et al.'s (2007) three factor model was the best fit for both groups within the current data sample. Acceptable levels of internal reliability were observed and there was clear evidence for a hierarchical factor of eating disorder. The results of this study provide support for the three factor model of the EDE-Q suggested by Peterson and colleagues (2007) in that this model was appropriate for both the student and non-student sample populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the pervasive developmental disorders rating scale for young children with autistic disorder.

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    Eaves, Ronald C; Williams, Thomas O

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the authors examined the construct validity of the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Rating Scale (PDDRS; R. C. Eaves, 1993), which is a screening instrument used to identify individuals with autistic disorder and other pervasive developmental disorders. The PDDRS is purported to measure 3 factors--arousal, affect, and cognition-that collectively make up the construct of autism. Using scores from 199 children (aged 1-6 years) diagnosed with autistic disorder, the authors submitted data to exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. In the 1st series of analyses, the authors analyzed a user-specified 3-factor solution using principal axis factor analysis with a promax rotation to evaluate the assertion of a correlated 3-factor structure. Next, the authors analyzed 1-factor and 2-factor solutions to determine if they provided a better factor structure for the data. In the 2nd series, the authors conducted confirmatory factor analyses, which compared the theorized hierarchical 2nd-order factor model with 5 plausible competing models. The results of the exploratory analyses supported the 3-factor solution. With the confirmatory analyses, the 2nd-order factor model provided the best fit for the data. The exploratory and confirmatory analyses supported the theoretical assumptions undergirding the development of the PDDRS. The authors discuss theoretical implications, practical implications, and areas for further research.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students

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    Ronald D. Yockey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The relative fit of one- and two-factor models of the Procrastination Assessment Scale for Students (PASS was investigated using confirmatory factor analysis on an ethnically diverse sample of 345 participants. The results indicated that although the two-factor model provided better fit to the data than the one-factor model, neither model provided optimal fit. However, a two-factor model which accounted for common item theme pairs used by Solomon and Rothblum in the creation of the scale provided good fit to the data. In addition, a significant difference by ethnicity was also found on the fear of failure subscale of the PASS, with Whites having significantly lower scores than Asian Americans or Latino/as. Implications of the results are discussed and recommendations made for future work with the scale.

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF CRITICAL SSCM ACTIVITIES THROUGH CONFIRMATORY FACTOR ANALYSIS

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    V. Narasimham

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available As a developing country, economic and environmental performance has to be balanced in India. Green supply chain management (GSCM is emerging as an important proactive approach for Indian enterprises for improving environmental performance of processes and products in accordance with the requirements of environmental regulations. This study examines the consistency approaches by confirmatory factor analysis that determines the construct validity, convergent validity,construct reliability and internal consistency of the items of Sustainable supply chain management (SSCM requirements. This study examines the consistency approaches by Confirmatory factor analysis that determines the adoption and implementation of Sustainable supply chain management activities in small & medium scale industries. The requirements include Management commitment, customer coordination, sustainable design & production, green procurement and eco logistics for sustainable supply chains. This study suggested that the five factor model with eighteen items of the sustainable supply chain design had a good fit. Further, the study showed a valid and reliable measurement to identify critical items among the requirements of sustainable supply chains.

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Social Interest Index

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    Gary K. Leak

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Social interest was Alfred Adler’s most important personality trait, and it reflects one’s genuine concern for the welfare of all individuals. Several measures of social interest are available, and the Social Interest Index (SII is one of the most popular in current use. This study is the first to report the results of a confirmatory factor analysis of the SII. Using college students, three models were tested in an effort to find support for the factorial validity of this scale. All analyses showed a poor fit between the theoretical model and scale items. The results paint a fairly negative picture of the factor structure of this important scale.

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Oral Health Impact Profile.

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    John, M T; Feuerstahler, L; Waller, N; Baba, K; Larsson, P; Celebić, A; Kende, D; Rener-Sitar, K; Reissmann, D R

    2014-09-01

    Previous exploratory analyses suggest that the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) consists of four correlated dimensions and that individual differences in OHIP total scores reflect an underlying higher-order factor. The aim of this report is to corroborate these findings in the Dimensions of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (DOQ) Project, an international study of general population subjects and prosthodontic patients. Using the project's Validation Sample (n = 5022), we conducted confirmatory factor analyses in a sample of 4993 subjects with sufficiently complete data. In particular, we compared the psychometric performance of three models: a unidimensional model, a four-factor model and a bifactor model that included one general factor and four group factors. Using model-fit criteria and factor interpretability as guides, the four-factor model was deemed best in terms of strong item loadings, model fit (RMSEA = 0·05, CFI = 0·99) and interpretability. These results corroborate our previous findings that four highly correlated factors - which we have named Oral Function, Oro-facial Pain, Oro-facial Appearance and Psychosocial Impact - can be reliably extracted from the OHIP item pool. However, the good fit of the unidimensional model and the high interfactor correlations in the four-factor solution suggest that OHRQoL can also be sufficiently described with one score.

  12. Workplace Innovation: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis for Construct Validation

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    Wipulanusat Warit

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace innovation enables the development and improvement of products, processes and services leading simultaneously to improvement in organisational performance. This study has the purpose of examining the factor structure of workplace innovation. Survey data, extracted from the 2014 APS employee census, comprising 3,125 engineering professionals in the Commonwealth of Australia’s departments were analysed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. EFA returned a two-factor structure explaining 69.1% of the variance of the construct. CFA revealed that a two-factor structure was indicated as a validated model (GFI = 0.98, AGFI = 0.95, RMSEA = 0.08, RMR = 0.02, IFI = 0.98, NFI = 0.98, CFI = 0.98, and TLI = 0.96. Both factors showed good reliability of the scale (Individual creativity: α = 0.83, CR = 0.86, and AVE = 0.62; Team Innovation: α = 0.82, CR = 0.88, and AVE = 0.61. These results confirm that the two factors extracted for characterising workplace innovation included individual creativity and team innovation.

  13. MULTIDIMENSIONAL RELIABILITY OF INSTRUMENT STUDENTS’ SATISFACTION USING CONFIRMATORY FACTOR ANALYSIS

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    Gaguk Margono

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to compare unidimensional reliability and multidimensional reliability of instrument students’ satisfaction as an internal costumer. Multidimensional reliability measurement is rarely used in the field of research. Multidimensional reliability is estimated by using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA on the Structural Equation Model (SEM. Measurements and calculations are described in this article using instrument students’ satisfaction as an internal costumer. Survey method used in this study and sampling used simple random sampling. This instrument has been tried out to 173 students. The result is concluded that the measuringinstrument of students’ satisfaction as an internal costumer by using multidimensional reliability coefficient has higher accuracy when compared with a unidimensional reliability coefficient. Expected in advanced research used another formula multidimensional reliability, including when using SEM.

  14. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the ISB - Burnout Syndrome Inventory

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    Ana Maria T. Benevides-Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AimBurnout is a dysfunctional reaction to chronic occupational stress. The present study analysis the psychometric qualities of the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (ISB through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA.MethodEmpirical study in a multi-centre and multi-occupational sample (n = 701 using the ISB. The Part I assesses antecedent factors: Positive Organizational Conditions (PC and Negative Organizational Conditions (NC. The Part II assesses the syndrome: Emotional Exhaustion (EE, Dehumanization (DE, Emotional Distancing (ED and Personal Accomplishment (PA.ResultsThe highest means occurred in the positive scales CP (M = 23.29, SD = 5.89 and PA (M = 14.84, SD = 4.71. Negative conditions showed the greatest variability (SD = 6.03. Reliability indexes were reasonable, with the lowest rate at .77 for DE and the highest rate .91 for PA. The CFA revealed RMSEA = .057 and CFI = .90 with all scales regressions showing significant values (β = .73 until β = .92.ConclusionThe ISB showed a plausible instrument to evaluate burnout. The two sectors maintained the initial model and confirmed the theoretical presupposition. This instrument makes possible a more comprehensive idea of the labour context, and one or another part may be used separately according to the needs and the aims of the assessor.

  15. Reliability estimation in a multilevel confirmatory factor analysis framework.

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    Geldhof, G John; Preacher, Kristopher J; Zyphur, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Scales with varying degrees of measurement reliability are often used in the context of multistage sampling, where variance exists at multiple levels of analysis (e.g., individual and group). Because methodological guidance on assessing and reporting reliability at multiple levels of analysis is currently lacking, we discuss the importance of examining level-specific reliability. We present a simulation study and an applied example showing different methods for estimating multilevel reliability using multilevel confirmatory factor analysis and provide supporting Mplus program code. We conclude that (a) single-level estimates will not reflect a scale's actual reliability unless reliability is identical at each level of analysis, (b) 2-level alpha and composite reliability (omega) perform relatively well in most settings, (c) estimates of maximal reliability (H) were more biased when estimated using multilevel data than either alpha or omega, and (d) small cluster size can lead to overestimates of reliability at the between level of analysis. We also show that Monte Carlo confidence intervals and Bayesian credible intervals closely reflect the sampling distribution of reliability estimates under most conditions. We discuss the estimation of credible intervals using Mplus and provide R code for computing Monte Carlo confidence intervals.

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Career Factors Inventory on a Community College Sample

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    Simon, Merril A.; Tovar, Esau

    2004-01-01

    A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted using AMOS 4.0 to validate the 21-item Career Factors Inventory on a community college student sample. The multidimensional inventory assesses types and levels of career indecision antecedents. The sample consisted of 512 ethnically diverse freshmen students; 46% were men and 54% were women.…

  17. Assessing an organizational culture instrument based on the Competing Values Framework: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses

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    Mohr David C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Competing Values Framework (CVF has been widely used in health services research to assess organizational culture as a predictor of quality improvement implementation, employee and patient satisfaction, and team functioning, among other outcomes. CVF instruments generally are presented as well-validated with reliable aggregated subscales. However, only one study in the health sector has been conducted for the express purpose of validation, and that study population was limited to hospital managers from a single geographic locale. Methods We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the underlying structure of data from a CVF instrument. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a work environment survey conducted in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA. The study population comprised all staff in non-supervisory positions. The survey included 14 items adapted from a popular CVF instrument, which measures organizational culture according to four subscales: hierarchical, entrepreneurial, team, and rational. Results Data from 71,776 non-supervisory employees (approximate response rate 51% from 168 VHA facilities were used in this analysis. Internal consistency of the subscales was moderate to strong (α = 0.68 to 0.85. However, the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales had higher correlations across subscales than within, indicating poor divergent properties. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors, comprising the ten items from the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales loading on the first factor, and two items from the hierarchical subscale loading on the second factor, along with one item from the rational subscale that cross-loaded on both factors. Results from confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-subscale solution provides a more parsimonious fit to the data as compared to the original four-subscale model. Conclusion This study suggests that there may be problems

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on the Big 5 Personality Test Inventory

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    Kamarulzaman, Wirawani; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2012-01-01

    This paper is intended to examine the validity of Big 5 Personality test inventory of 44 questions with 5-Likert Scale measurement. Confirmatory factory analysis (CFA) was conducted to determine the good fit indices of the 5 personality types. Those types are 1) extraversion, 2) agreeableness, 3) conscientiousness, 4) openness and 5) neuroticism.…

  19. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model

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    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D.

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed. PMID:28210232

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Combined Social Phobia Scale and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale: Support for a Bifactor Model.

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    Gomez, Rapson; Watson, Shaun D

    2017-01-01

    For the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) together, this study examined support for a bifactor model, and also the internal consistency reliability and external validity of the factors in this model. Participants (N = 526) were adults from the general community who completed the SPS and SIAS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of their ratings indicated good support for the bifactor model. For this model, the loadings for all but six items were higher on the general factor than the specific factors. The three positively worded items had negligible loadings on the general factor. The general factor explained most of the common variance in the SPS and SIAS, and demonstrated good model-based internal consistency reliability (omega hierarchical) and a strong association with fear of negative evaluation and extraversion. The practical implications of the findings for the utilization of the SPS and SIAS, and the theoretical and clinical implications for social anxiety are discussed.

  1. A confirmatory factor analytic study of a self-leadership measure in South Africa

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    Bright Mahembe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Self-leadership is considered to be essential for effective individual functioning in occupational and academic contexts. The revised self-leadership questionnaire (RSLQ is widely utilised for measuring self-leadership, but its psychometric properties have not been established on a South African sample. By implication, important questions also exist about the theoretical structure of self-leadership in the South African context. Research purpose: The research aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and factorial validity of the revised self-leadership questionnaire on a South African sample. In doing so, the results of the research would also provide valuable insights into the latent factor structure of the self-leadership construct. Motivation for the study: On a practical level, the research sought internal validity evidence for the use of the RSLQ in the South African context. On a theoretical level, questions remain about the best conceptual representation of self-leadership as a construct. Research design, approach and method: The revised self-leadership questionnaire was administered to a non-probability sample of 375 South African young adults. The first and second-order factor structure underlying contemporary models of self-leadership using confirmatory factor analytic techniques was tested. Main findings: Results showed that the RSLQ measured self-leadership with suitable reliability and internal validity. All eight subscales had high internal consistency coefficients. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA of the first and second-order models conclusively demonstrated good factorial validity. Practical/managerial implications: The study found that the RSLQ has good measurement properties for a South African context. Academics, practitioners and managers are urged to use the measure in its present form for applications such as leadership development and promoting self-management. Contribution/value-addition: The

  2. Construct Validity of the Korean Dental Licensing Examination using Confirmatory Factor Analysis

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    Mi Kyoung Yim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Confirmatory factor analysis based on a measurement model of a structural equation model was used to test the construct validity of 13 subjects in the Korean Dental Licensing Examination (KDLE. The results of 1,086 examinees who wrote the KDLE in 2004 were analyzed. The thirteen subjects were classified into 62 major categories and 122 intermediate categories. There were 364 items. A hierarchical model was constructed, including major and intermediate categories. The impact of the variables was determined by the standardized regression coefficient that related latent and measured variables in the measurement model. The KDLE showed a high goodness-of-fit with a root mean square error of approximation of 0.030 and a non-normed fit index of 0.998. When the latent variables for the major and intermediate categories were analyzed, the standardized regression coefficients of all of the subjects, with the exception of Health and Medical Legislation, were significant. From the result, we concluded that the 13 subjects showed constructive validity. In addition, the study model and data were very compatible. The subject Health and Medical Legislation had a low explanatory impact with respect to testing the ability of dentists to perform their jobs. This study suggests that similar psychometric studies are needed before integrating or deleting subjects on the KDLE, and to improve item development.

  3. Dimensionality of the Chinese Dyadic Adjustment Scale Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

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    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Cheung, C. K.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the responses of 1,501 Chinese married adults to the Chinese version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (C-DAS), confirmatory factor analyses showed that four factors were abstracted from the C-DAS (Dyadic Consensus, Dyadic Cohesion, Dyadic Satisfaction and Affectional Expression) and these four primary factors were subsumed under a…

  4. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses of the WISC-IV with Gifted Students

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    Rowe, Ellen W.; Dandridge, Jessica; Pawlush, Alexandra; Thompson, Dawna F.; Ferrier, David E.

    2014-01-01

    These 2 studies investigated the factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-4th edition (WISC-IV; Wechsler, 2003a) with exploratory factor analysis (EFA; Study 1) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA; Study 2) among 2 independent samples of gifted students. The EFA sample consisted of 225 children who were referred for a…

  5. The Infinite Hierarchical Factor Regression Model

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    Rai, Piyush

    2009-01-01

    We propose a nonparametric Bayesian factor regression model that accounts for uncertainty in the number of factors, and the relationship between factors. To accomplish this, we propose a sparse variant of the Indian Buffet Process and couple this with a hierarchical model over factors, based on Kingman's coalescent. We apply this model to two problems (factor analysis and factor regression) in gene-expression data analysis.

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WISC-IV in a Hospital Referral Sample

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    Devena, Sarah E.; Gay, Catherine E.; Watkins, Marley W.

    2013-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to determine the factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) scores of 297 children referred to a children's hospital in the Southwestern United States. Results support previous findings that indicate the WISC-IV is best represented by a direct hierarchical…

  7. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

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    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  8. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach to Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

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    Edwards, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis has a rich tradition in both the structural equation modeling and item response theory frameworks. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate a novel combination of various Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation routines to estimate parameters of a wide variety of confirmatory item factor analysis models. Further, I show…

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Elementary School Success Profile for Teachers

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    Webber, Kristina C.; Rizo, Cynthia F.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines the factor structure and scale quality of data collected with the online Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Teachers from a sample of teachers of 1,145 third through fifth graders. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using Mplus and weighted least squares means and variances adjusted (WLSMV)…

  10. The Internal Structure of Positive and Negative Affect: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PANAS

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    Tuccitto, Daniel E.; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Leite, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested five confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) models of the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) to provide validity evidence based on its internal structure. A sample of 223 club sport athletes indicated their emotions during the past week. Results revealed that an orthogonal two-factor CFA model, specifying error…

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

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    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

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    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Persian Adaptation of Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (MSLSS)

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    Hatami, Gissou; Motamed, Niloofar; Ashrafzadeh, Mahshid

    2010-01-01

    Validity and reliability of Persian adaptation of MSLSS in the 12-18 years, middle and high school students (430 students in grades 6-12 in Bushehr port, Iran) using confirmatory factor analysis by means of LISREL statistical package were checked. Internal consistency reliability estimates (Cronbach's coefficient [alpha]) were all above the…

  14. Psychometric Evaluation of the Student Authorship Questionnaire: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Approach

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    Ballantine, Joan; Guo, Xin; Larres, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This research provides new insights into the measurement of students' authorial identity and its potential for minimising the incidence of unintentional plagiarism by providing evidence about the psychometric properties of the Student Authorship Questionnaire (SAQ). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) are employed to…

  15. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

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    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  16. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

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    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  17. Dimensionality of an Early Childhood Scale Using Rasch Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

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    Banerji, Madhabi; Smith, Richard M.; Dedrick, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper explores the use of Rasch analysis and linear confirmatory factor analysis to investigate the dimensionality of an early childhood test, the Gesell School Readiness Screening Test (F. Ilg and others, 1978). Discusses empirical analyses of results from 523 kindergarten students using both methods. (SLD)

  18. Classification of L2 Vocabulary Learning Strategies: Evidence from Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

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    Zhang, Bo; Li, Changyu

    2011-01-01

    This research presents a classification theory for the L2 vocabulary learning strategies. Based on the exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of strategies that adult Chinese English learners used, this theory identifies six categories, four of which are related to the cognitive process in lexical acquisition and the other two are…

  19. The Effect of Missing Data Handling Methods on Goodness of Fit Indices in Confirmatory Factor Analysis

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    Köse, Alper

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the effect of missing data on goodness of fit statistics in confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). For this aim, four missing data handling methods; listwise deletion, full information maximum likelihood, regression imputation and expectation maximization (EM) imputation were examined in terms of…

  20. Psychometric Properties and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills

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    Brigman, Greg; Wells, Craig; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Carey, John C.; Harrington, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the confirmatory factor analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills (SESSS) instrument. The results of this study confirm that the SESSS has potential to be a useful self-report measure of elementary students' use of strategies and skills associated with enhanced academic learning and achievement.

  1. Dimensionality of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale: Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia M. S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the dimensionality and factorial invariance of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale (CPYDS) using multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA). Secondary 1 students (N = 5,649) responded to the CPYDS in the context of a positive youth development program. Results showed that there are 15 basic dimensions of the CPYDS…

  2. Assessing Model Fit: Caveats and Recommendations for Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, John L.; Nicholls, Adam R.; Clough, Peter J.; Crust, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Despite the limitations of overgeneralizing cutoff values for confirmatory factor analysis (CFA; e.g., Marsh, Hau, & Wen, 2004), they are still often employed as golden rules for assessing factorial validity in sport and exercise psychology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the appropriateness of using the CFA approach with these…

  3. Psychometric Properties and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigman, Greg; Wells, Craig; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Carey, John C.; Harrington, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the confirmatory factor analysis of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills (SESSS) instrument. The results of this study confirm that the SESSS has potential to be a useful self-report measure of elementary students' use of strategies and skills associated with enhanced academic learning and achievement.

  4. Collinear Latent Variables in Multilevel Confirmatory Factor Analysis: A Comparison of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Seda; van de Schoot, Rens; Hox, Joop

    2015-01-01

    Because variables may be correlated in the social and behavioral sciences, multicollinearity might be problematic. This study investigates the effect of collinearity manipulated in within and between levels of a two-level confirmatory factor analysis by Monte Carlo simulation. Furthermore, the influence of the size of the intraclass correlation…

  5. Collinear Latent Variables in Multilevel Confirmatory Factor Analysis: A Comparison of Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Estimations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Can, Seda; van de Schoot, Rens; Hox, Joop

    2014-01-01

    Because variables may be correlated in the social and behavioral sciences, multicollinearity might be problematic. This study investigates the effect of collinearity manipulated in within and between levels of a two-level confirmatory factor analysis by Monte Carlo simulation. Furthermore, the influ

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version in Offenders With Axis I Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christie D.; Neumann, Craig S.; Rogers, Richard

    2004-01-01

    One hundred forty-nine inpatients within a maximum security psychiatric facility were assessed with the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV; S. D. Hart, D. N. Cox, & R. D. Hare, 1995). Within the total sample, 68% had a psychotic disorder and 30% met criteria for psychopathy. Using confirmatory factor analysis, the authors tested the…

  7. Confirmatory factor analysis of a Spanish version of the sex fantasy questionnaire: assessing gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Juan Carlos; Ortega, Virgilio; Zubeidat, Ihab

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the factor structure of Wilson's Sex Fantasy Questionnaire (SFQ; Wilson, 1978; Wilson & Lang, 1981) using a Spanish version. In order to do this, we conducted confirmatory factor analysis on two nonclinical samples containing 195 men and 315 women. Both groups were tested for the structure proposed by Wilson and also for some alternative models. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that four factors were reasonably distinct, especially for the men. We proposed shortened version of the instrument that would have sufficient psychometric guarantees for assessing sexual fantasies in both genders. This abridged version improved the fit of the four-factor oblique factor equally for both the samples of men and women. In the light of the results of the validation hypothesis established with some criterion variables (dyadic sexual desire, unconventional sex, homophobia), we discuss discrepancies between both versions.

  8. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted

    2013-12-01

    The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale measures readiness for self-directed learning among undergraduate healthcare students. While several exploratory factor analyses and one confirmatory factor analysis have examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale, questions have been raised regarding the underlying latent constructs being measured. The objective of this study was to determine the best-fitting Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale factorial structure among three models published in the literature. Data from the three-factor 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale completed by 233 undergraduate paramedic students from four Australian universities (response rate of 26%) were analyzed using maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis. Comparison of model fit from the 40-item version was undertaken with the previously documented four-factor 36-item and three-factor 29-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scales. The model fit indices of the three one-factor congeneric models with maximum likelihood analysis demonstrate that the 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale does not fit the data well. The best fitting model was the four-factor 36-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale followed by the three-factor 29-item models. The confirmatory factor analysis results did not support the overall construct validity of the original 40-item Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Multidimensional Inventory of Perfectionism in Sport

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives and Method: The Multidimensional Inventory of Perfectionism in Sport (MIPS; Stoeber, Otto, & Stoll, 2006) is a commonly used measure of perfectionism in sport. However, there is limited empirical evidence supporting its subscale structure and composition. Therefore, the present study investigated the factor structure of the MIPS in a sample of 470 athletes (mean age 20.0 years).\\ud \\ud Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the data supported the hypothesized four-factor...

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Work Locus of Control Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph E.; Jose, Paul E.; Brough, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Original formulations of the Work Locus of Control Scale (WLCS) proposed a unidimensional structure of this measure; however, more recently, evidence for a two-dimensional structure has been reported, with separate subscales for internal and external loci of control. The current study evaluates the one- and two-factor models with confirmatory…

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kathryn Betts; Matto, Holly C.; Sanders, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) is widely used in clinical and research settings to screen older adults for depressive symptoms. Although several exploratory factor analytic structures have been proposed for the scale, no independent confirmation has been made available that would enable investigators to confidently identify scores…

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Sport Organizational Effectiveness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karteroliotis, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Dimitra

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the 5-factor model of sport organizational effectiveness developed by Papadimitriou and Taylor. This questionnaire has 33 items which assess five composite effectiveness dimensions pertinent to the operation of sport organizations: calibre of the board and external liaisons, interest in athletes, internal procedures, long term planning, and sport science support. The multiple constituency approach was used as a theoretical framework for developing this scale. Data were obtained from respondents affiliated with 20 Greek national sport organizations with a questionnaire. Analysis indicated that the 5-factor model of effectiveness is workable in assessing the organizational performance of nonprofit sport organizations. The application of the multiple constituency approach in studying sport organizational effectiveness was also suggested.

  13. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21

    OpenAIRE

    Apóstolo,João Luís Alves; Tanner,Barry Allen; Arfken,Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Structure of Statistics Anxiety Measure: An Examination of Four Alternative Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bevrani, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to explore the confirmatory factor analysis results of the Persian adaptation of Statistics Anxiety Measure (SAM, proposed by Earp.Method: The validity and reliability assessments of the scale were performed on 298 college students chosen randomly from Tabriz University in Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was carried out to determine the factor structures of the Persian adaptation of SAM.Results: As expected, the second order model provided a better fit to the data than the three alternative models. Conclusions: Hence, SAM provides an equally valid measure for use among college students. The study both expands and adds support to the existing body of math anxiety literature.

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among Florida nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jason W

    2002-11-01

    Burnout among human service professionals, such as nurses, has been studied in various countries for years using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). This paper reports on confirmatory factor analyses using LISREL that examined the factorial validity of the MBI. The sample consisted of 151 registered nurses from west-central Florida. Modifications of the initial hypothesized three-factor structure were necessary to adequately fit the data. Findings are compared to the published normative values for the MBI and to similar studies of European nurses. Recommendations for measurement models of the MBI in future studies that use structural equation modeling techniques are offered.

  17. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Structure of Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahman Farrokhi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: The aim of this study is to explore the confirmatory factor analysis results of the Persian adaptation of Abbreviated Math Anxiety Scale (AMAS, proposed by Hopko, Mahadevan, Bare & Hunt. "nMethod: The validity and reliability assessments of the scale were performed on 298 college students chosen randomly from Tabriz University in Iran. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was carried out to determine the factor structures of the Persian version of AMAS. "nResults: As expected, the two-factor solution provided a better fit to the data than a single factor. Moreover, multi-group analyses showed that this two-factor structure was invariant across sex. Hence, AMAS provides an equally valid measure for use among college students. "nConclusions:  Brief AMAS demonstrates adequate reliability and validity. The AMAS scores can be used to compare symptoms of math anxiety between male and female students. The study both expands and adds support to the existing body of math anxiety literature.

  18. The Italian version of the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, Giulio; Cioffi, Raffaele; Saggino, Aristide; Wilson, Glenn

    2008-12-01

    An experimental version of the Italian Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire with a 5-point scale was administered to a group of 1,000 high school students, 200 within each age group from 11 to 15 years. Following a previous exploratory factor analysis, which yielded a fourth factor in addition to the original three, the aim of the present research was to study the factor structure of the Italian version using confirmatory factor analysis. Three models were tested, a three-factor orthogonal model, a three-factor oblique model, and a four-factor model based on an a priori separation of extraversion items into two sets. None of the considered models converged satisfactorily. An interpretation of the results was proposed.

  19. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (Korean version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Il; Lee, Soonmook; Patton, Lauren L; Kim, Hae-Young

    2016-04-01

    Empirical support for the factor structure of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP) has not been fully established. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the factor structure of the Korean version of the COHIP (COHIP-K) empirically using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on the theoretical framework and then to assess whether any of the factors in the structure could be grouped into a simpler single second-order factor. Data were collected through self-reported COHIP-K responses from a representative community sample of 2,236 Korean children, 8-15 yr of age. Because a large inter-factor correlation of 0.92 was estimated in the original five-factor structure, the two strongly correlated factors were combined into one factor, resulting in a four-factor structure. The revised four-factor model showed a reasonable fit with appropriate inter-factor correlations. Additionally, the second-order model with four sub-factors was reasonable with sufficient fit and showed equal fit to the revised four-factor model. A cross-validation procedure confirmed the appropriateness of the findings. Our analysis empirically supported a four-factor structure of COHIP-K, a summarized second-order model, and the use of an integrated summary COHIP score.

  20. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery of the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moleiro, Carla; Madureira, Sofia; Verdelho, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Age-related white matter changes have been associated with cognitive functioning, even though their role is not fully understood. This work aimed to test a 3-factor model of the neuropsychological assessment battery and evaluate how the model fit the data longitudinally. Confirmatory factor...... analysis (CFA) was used to investigate the dimensions of a structured set of neuropsychological tests administered to a multicenter, international sample of independent older adults (LADIS study). Six hundred and thirty-eight older adults completed baseline neuropsychological, clinical, functional...... and motor assessments, which were repeated each year for a 3-year follow-up. CFA provided support for a 3-factor model. These factors involve the dimensions of executive functions, memory functions, and speed and motor control abilities. Performance decreased in most neuropsychological measures. Results...

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, João Luís Alves; Tanner, Barry Allen; Arfken, Cynthia Lee

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.

  2. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part II: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-11-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition, planning, monitoring, evaluation, debugging, and information management. The college students' scores on the inventory were found to be reliable and related to students' physics motivation and physics grade. However, the results of the exploratory factor analysis indicated that the questionnaire could be revised to improve its construct validity. The goal of this study was to revise the questionnaire and establish its construct validity through a confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, a Rasch analysis was applied to the data to better understand the psychometric properties of the inventory and to further evaluate the construct validity. Results indicated that the final, revised inventory is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing student metacognition for physics problem solving.

  3. Structural validity of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Chinese undergraduate students: A confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suran Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the structural validity of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI in Chinese undergraduate students. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey with 631 Chinese undergraduate students was conducted, and the questionnaire package included a measure of demographic characteristics, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Chinese editions of Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression, State- Trait Anxiety Inventory, Rumination Response Scale, and Perceived Social Support Scale. Results showed that the item use of sleep medicine was not suitable for use with this population, that a two-factor model provided the best fit to the data as assessed through confirmatory factor analysis, and that other indices were consistently correlated with the sleep quality but not the sleep efficiency factor.

  4. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David

    2014-04-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean.

  5. The Construct Validity of Scores on the Ways of Coping Questionnaire: Confirmatory Analysis of Alternative Factor Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, Regina M.

    1998-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate alternative factor structures, based on previous exploratory factor analyses and coping dimensions derived from the theory of R. Lazarus, for the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (S. Folkman and R. Lazarus, 1988). Results from responses of 654 college graduates provide little support for the factor…

  6. Identification of Effective Leadership Indicators in Ghanaian Retail Banks Using AMOS-Based Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanda, Aminu; Kuada, John

    2013-01-01

    to the data. Based on the findings from both factor analysis and Confirmatory factor analysis, the study established that managers of retail banks in Ghana could be perceived by their employees as good leaders if they give employees full credit for the work that they do. Handling employee issues very well......In the light of the importance of banks to the economic growth process in Ghana, this study sought to identify the determinants of effective leadership style that is appreciated by employees in retail banking firms in Ghana, towards providing practitioners with crucial information that could enable...... and taking care of their complaints as well as putting in place systems for enhancing employees’ career advancement into specialist departments or management positions are also perceived as good determinant of leadership. It is therefore hypothesized that managers of retail banks in Ghana could be perceived...

  7. Distinguishing affective and somatic dimensions of pain and depression: a confirmatory factor analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Sheera F; Rudich, Zvia; Shahar, Golan

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we examined the overlap between pain and depression in a sample of 342 chronic pain patients treated at a specialty pain clinic. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to test the differentiation of pain and depression measured as latent factors derived from the subscales of the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. The affective pain subscale did not load on latent depression and the somatic depression subscale loaded weakly on latent pain. Although pain and depression are linked, we found that affective pain is distinct from depression, and that somatic depression is distinct from pain. This finding justifies further examination of the casual relationship between pain and depression.

  8. A Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ - 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velikova Galina

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ - 12 was designed as a short questionnaire to assess psychiatric morbidity. Despite the fact that studies have suggested a number of competing multidimensional factor structures, it continues to be largely used as a unidimensional instrument. This may have an impact on the identification of psychiatric morbidity in target populations. The aim of this study was to explore the dimensionality of the GHQ-12 and to evaluate a number of alternative models for the instrument. Methods The data were drawn from a large heterogeneous sample of cancer patients. The Partial Credit Model (Rasch was applied to the 12-item GHQ. Item misfit (infit mean square ≥ 1.3 was identified, misfitting items removed and unidimensionality and differential item functioning (age, gender, and treatment aims were assessed. The factor structures of the various alternative models proposed in the literature were explored and optimum model fit evaluated using Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Results The Rasch analysis of the 12-item GHQ identified six misfitting items. Removal of these items produced a six-item instrument which was not unidimensional. The Rasch analysis of an 8-item GHQ demonstrated two unidimensional structures corresponding to Anxiety/Depression and Social Dysfunction. No significant differential item functioning was observed by age, gender and treatment aims for the six- and eight-item GHQ. Two models competed for best fit from the confirmatory factor analysis, namely the GHQ-8 and Hankin's (2008 unidimensional model, however, the GHQ-8 produced the best overall fit statistics. Conclusions The results are consistent with the evidence that the GHQ-12 is a multi-dimensional instrument. Use of the summated scores for the GHQ-12 could potentially lead to an incorrect assessment of patients' psychiatric morbidity. Further evaluation of the GHQ-12 with different target populations is warranted.

  9. Confirmatory factor analysis and job burnout correlates of the Health Professions Stress Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Syed; Lee, Jenny S Y

    2002-02-01

    Previous research in 1994 by Gupchup and Wolfgang identified four factors from Wolfgang's Health Professions Stress Inventory (1988) that were common among a sample of practicing pharmacists. The factors were labeled Professional Recognition. Patient Care Responsibilities, Job Conflicts, and Professional Uncertainty, respectively. We used confirmatory factor analysis to assess whether this factor structure was generalizable to nurses. To examine concurrent validity, we correlated the factors with Maslach and Jackson's three dimensions of job burnout, i.e., Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishment. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of a random sample of 9,380 nurses from across 43 public hospitals in Hong Kong, from which 2,267 (24.2%) responded. Analysis indicated statistically acceptable goodness of fit indices for the four-factor solution. Except for the factor Patient Care Responsibilities. all other factors had moderate correlations between .44 and .53 with Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization. Correlations between the factors of Stress Inventory and Personal Accomplishment were small but significant, ranging from -.25 to .13. Areas for further improving the psychometric properties of the inventory are discussed.

  10. Confirmatory factor analysis of teaching and learning guiding principles instrument among teacher educators in higher education institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuwai, Azwani; Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd; Saad, Noor Shah

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and establish the validity and reliability of an instrument to generate teaching and learning guiding principles using Teaching and Learning Guiding Principles Instrument (TLGPI). Participants consisted of 171 Malaysian teacher educators. It is an essential instrument to reflect in generating the teaching and learning guiding principles in higher education level in Malaysia. Confirmatory Factor Analysis has validated all 19 items of TLGPI whereby all items indicated high reliability and internal consistency. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis also confirmed that a single factor model was used to generate teaching and learning guiding principles.

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale - Revised 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacciarini, Thaís Santos Guerra; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the factor structure of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adapted for Brazil. Method: methodological study conducted with 150 individuals with diabetes mellitus cared for by the Family Health Strategy, most of whom are elderly with low educational levels. The test of the hypothesis concerning the confirmatory factor composition of the ASAS-R was performed using latent variables structural equations. Results: the model’s goodness-of-fit indexes were satisfactory (χ2 = 259.19; χ2/g.l = 2.97, p < 0.001; GFI = 0.85; RMR = 0.07; RMSEA = 0.09); the factor loads were greater than 0.40; and most item-to-factor-correlations presented moderate to strong magnitude (0.34 to 0.58); total alpha value was 0.74, while the alpha of the three factors were 0.69, 0.38 and 0.69, respectively. Conclusion: the scale’s factor structure presented satisfactory validity and reliability results, with the exception of one factor. Application of this scale to samples of the general population is desirable in order to strengthen analyses of internal consistency and the dimensionality of the factor structure. This study is expected to contribute to further studies addressing the self-care agency construct and the development of the ASAS-R. PMID:28146182

  12. A confirmatory factor analysis of the PTSD checklist 5 in veteran and college student samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Eddinger, Jasmine; E McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan

    2017-09-01

    An important change in the conceptualization of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been the shift from a three-factor model used in the DSM-IV-TR to the current four-factor model used in DSM-5. Early research initially supported the three-factor model, but most recent data suggest a four-factor model provides the best fit. Still other research has examined evidence for a five-factor model that would include depression sequelae. By way of a confirmatory factor analysis, we demonstrate the reliability of DSM-5 PTSD criteria clustering in a sample of 124 OEF/OIF/OND Veterans treated at a VAMC (49% white, 89% men) and a sample of 737 college students (48% white, 78% women). All participants were trauma-exposed, and completed the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5. The current study shows both samples best support a five-factor model over two four factor models considered for the DSM-5, though none provided better than moderate fit. Implications of the current findings regarding the reliability of the new DSM-5 criteria of PTSD will be discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Recovery of weak factor loadings when adding the mean structure in confirmatory factor analysis: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eXiménez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article extends previous research on the recovery of weak factor loadings in confirmatory factor analysis by exploring the effects of adding the mean structure. This issue has not been examined in previous research. This study is based on the framework of Yung and Bentler (1999 and aims to examine the conditions that affect the recovery of weak factor loadings when the model includes the mean structure, compared to analyzing the covariance structure alone. A simulation study was conducted in which several constraints were defined for one-, two-, and three-factor models. Results show that adding the mean structure improves the recovery of weak factor loadings and reduces the asymptotic variances for the factor loadings, particularly for the models with a smaller number of factors and a small sample size. Therefore, under certain circumstances, modeling the means should be seriously considered for covariance models containing weak factor loadings.

  14. Critical parameters governing energy density of Li-storage cathode materials unraveled by confirmatory factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kee-Sun; Han, Su Cheol; Park, Woon Bae; Pyo, Myoungho

    2016-03-01

    Despite extensive effort during the past few decades, a comprehensive understanding of the key variables governing the electrochemical properties of cathode materials in Li-ion batteries is still far from complete. To elucidate the critical parameters affecting energy density (ED) and capacity (Q) retention in layer and spinel cathodes, we data-mine the existing experimental data via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) based on a structural equation model (SEM), which is a proven, versatile tool in understanding complex problems in the social science. The data sets are composed of 18 and 15 parameters extracted from 38 layer and 33 spinel compounds, respectively. CFA reveals the irrelevance of Q retention to all the parameters we adopt, but it also reveals the sensitive variations of ED with specific parameters. We validate the usefulness of CFA in material science and pinpointed critical parameters for high-ED cathodes, hoping to suggest a new insight in materials design.

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) and Its Relationship to Hopelessness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Caroline L.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Numerous existing measures assess attitudes toward suicide yet fail to account for contextual factors. The Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) is presented as an alternative, with implications for the development of prevention programs. Having previously reported exploratory analysis of the TIPS; confirmatory factor analysis and…

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Dutch Version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Z.; Hendriks, M.P.; Kerkmeer, M.C.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The latent factor structure of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) was examined with a series of confirmatory factor analyses. As part of the Dutch standardization, 1,188 healthy participants completed the WMS-IV-NL. Four models were tested for the Adult Battery

  17. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Z.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Kerkmeer, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The latent factor structure of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) was examined with a series of confirmatory factor analyses. As part of the Dutch standardization, 1,188 healthy participants completed the WMS-IV-NL. Four models were tested for the Adult Battery

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory and Development of an Abbreviated Version: The CFNI-45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Mike C.; Moradi, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    The present study undertakes the first factor analysis of the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory (CFNI) conducted since the instrument's development. Confirmatory factor analysis using data from 243 women offered mixed support for the original 84-item CFNI structure and pointed to ways to modify the structure and reduce the length of the…

  19. A cross-battery, reference variable, confirmatory factor analytic investigation of the CHC taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Keith, Timothy Z; Flanagan, Dawn P; Alfonso, Vincent C

    2013-08-01

    The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) taxonomy has been used to classify and describe human cognitive abilities. The ability factors derived from the CHC taxonomy are often assumed to be invariant across multiple populations and intelligence batteries, which is an important assumption for research and assessment. In this study, data from five different test batteries that were collected during separate Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004) concurrent validity studies were factor-analyzed jointly. Because the KABC-II was administered to everyone in the validity studies, it was used as a reference battery to link the separate test batteries in a "cross-battery" confirmatory factor analysis. Some findings from this analysis were that CHC-based test classifications based on theory and prior research were straightforward and accurate, a first-order Fluid/Novel Reasoning (Gf) factor was equivalent to a second-order g factor, and sample heterogeneity related to SES and sex influenced factor loadings. It was also shown that a reference variable approach, used in studies that incorporate planned missingness into data collection, may be used successfully to analyze data from several test batteries and studies. One implication from these findings is that CHC theory should continue to serve as a useful guide that can be used for intelligence research, assessment, and test development.

  20. Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in Brazilian Samples of Different Age Groups: Findings from Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Brietzke, Elisa; Viola, Thiago Wendt; Manfro, Gisele Gus; Kristensen, Christian Haag; Arteche, Adriane Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is internationally accepted as a key tool for the assessment of childhood abuse and neglect experiences. However, there are relative few psychometric studies available and some authors have proposed two different factor solutions. We examined the dimensional structure and internal consistency of the Brazilian version of the CTQ. A total of 1,925 participants from eight different clinical and non-clinical samples including adolescents, adults and elders were considered in this study. First, we performed Confirmatory Factor Analysis to investigate the goodness of fit of the two proposed competitive factor structure models for the CTQ. We also investigated the internal consistency of all factors. Second, multi-group analyses were used to investigate measurement invariance and population heterogeneity across age groups and sex. Our findings revealed that the alternative factor structure as opposed to the original factor structure was the most appropriate model within adolescents and adults Brazilian samples. We provide further evidence for the validity and reliability of the CTQ within the Brazilian samples and report that the alternative model showed an improvement in fit indexes and may be a better alternative over the original model. PMID:24475237

  1. Old and new ideas for data screening and assumption testing for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Flora

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We provide a basic review of the data screening and assumption testing issues relevant to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis along with practical advice for conducting analyses that are sensitive to these concerns. Historically, factor analysis was developed for explaining the relationships among many continuous test scores, which led to the expression of the common factor model as a multivariate linear regression model with observed, continuous variables serving as dependent variables and unobserved factors as the independent, explanatory variables. Thus, we begin our paper with a review of the assumptions for the common factor model and data screening issues as they pertain to the factor analysis of continuous observed variables. In particular, we describe how principles from regression diagnostics also apply to factor analysis. Next, because modern applications of factor analysis frequently involve the analysis of the individual items from a single test or questionnaire, an important focus of this paper is the factor analysis of items. Although the traditional linear factor model is well-suited to the analysis of continuously distributed variables, commonly used item types, including Likert-type items, almost always produce dichotomous or ordered categorical variables. We describe how relationships among such items are often not well described by product-moment correlations, which has clear ramifications for the traditional linear factor analysis. An alternative, non-linear factor analysis using polychoric correlations has become more readily available to applied researchers and thus more popular. Consequently, we also review the assumptions and data-screening issues involved in this method. Throughout the paper, we demonstrate these procedures using an historic data set of nine cognitive ability variables.

  2. Old and new ideas for data screening and assumption testing for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, David B; Labrish, Cathy; Chalmers, R Philip

    2012-01-01

    We provide a basic review of the data screening and assumption testing issues relevant to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis along with practical advice for conducting analyses that are sensitive to these concerns. Historically, factor analysis was developed for explaining the relationships among many continuous test scores, which led to the expression of the common factor model as a multivariate linear regression model with observed, continuous variables serving as dependent variables, and unobserved factors as the independent, explanatory variables. Thus, we begin our paper with a review of the assumptions for the common factor model and data screening issues as they pertain to the factor analysis of continuous observed variables. In particular, we describe how principles from regression diagnostics also apply to factor analysis. Next, because modern applications of factor analysis frequently involve the analysis of the individual items from a single test or questionnaire, an important focus of this paper is the factor analysis of items. Although the traditional linear factor model is well-suited to the analysis of continuously distributed variables, commonly used item types, including Likert-type items, almost always produce dichotomous or ordered categorical variables. We describe how relationships among such items are often not well described by product-moment correlations, which has clear ramifications for the traditional linear factor analysis. An alternative, non-linear factor analysis using polychoric correlations has become more readily available to applied researchers and thus more popular. Consequently, we also review the assumptions and data-screening issues involved in this method. Throughout the paper, we demonstrate these procedures using an historic data set of nine cognitive ability variables.

  3. Confirmatory factor analysis of the PedsQL among youth in a residential treatment setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steven; Lambert, Matthew C; Nelson, Timothy D; Trout, Alexandra L; Epstein, Michael H; Pick, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The Pediatric Quality of Life assessment (PedsQL™) is the most widely used measure for assessing adolescent health-related quality of life (HRQoL). While youth in residential treatment facilities face many physical and mental health, behavioral, education, and familial challenges that could impact their HRQoL, no research has sought to assess the factor structure of the PedsQL™ among youth receiving residential care. High school-aged youth (N = 229) attending a large residential treatment center in Omaha, NE were recruited to complete a data collection packet comprised of various health assessments including the PedsQL. Four competing confirmatory factor analysis models were used to test the hypothesized internal structure of the PedsQL™ 4.0 Teen Report. Models A, B, and C had acceptable CFI (≥.90), TLI (≥.90), and RMSEA (≤.08) fit indicators. However, factor loadings for items 5 and 6 were problematic. After removing the two problematic items, Model D was fit to the data and proved to be the superior of the four models. This model included two first-order factors (physical health problems; school attendance problems) and one second-order factor (psychological health problems). The findings suggest that researchers and practitioners studying youth in residential settings can reliably use the PedsQL™ to assess their HRQoL.

  4. The five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - I : Confirmatory factor analysis fails to confirm 25 published five-factor solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, Mark; Cuijpers, Anke; Hoffman, Tonko; Remijsen, Mila; Hijman, Ron; de Haan, Lieuwe; van Meijel, Berno; van Harten, Peter N.; Valmaggia, Lucia; de Hert, Marc; Wiersma, Durk

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test the goodness-of-fit of all previously published five-factor models of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Methods: We used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with a large data set (N = 5769). Results: The different subsamples were tested for

  5. Exploring self-criticism: confirmatory factor analysis of the FSCRS in clinical and nonclinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Paula; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Duarte, Joana

    2015-01-01

    The Forms of Self-criticizing/Attacking and Self-reassuring Scale (FSCRS) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses the forms of self-criticism and self-reassurance. The aim of this study was to explore the latent structure of the FSCRS in nonclinical and clinical samples. Data from 381 participants from the general population and from 304 participants from clinical settings were subjected to confirmatory factor analyses to explore several structural models reflecting alternative representations of the FSCRS dimensionality. Overall, the model with the best fit to the data, in both samples, was the three-factor model (inadequate self, hated self and reassured self subscales) replicating the FSCRS original structure. The scale showed good psychometric characteristics, and the three factors discriminated between the clinical and nonclinical samples. To our knowledge, this is the first study to confirm the factor structure of the FSCRS in a purely clinical sample, and to test alternative models. This study adds to the existent literature that has been supporting the conceptualization of self-criticism as a multidimensional construct. Given the good psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the FSCRS, its use is encouraged and recommended for the assessment of self-criticism in both clinical and research settings.

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Questionnaire Measure of Managerial Stigma Towards Employee Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Angela J; Giallo, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    Managers' attitudes play a key role in how organizations respond to employees with depression. We examine the measurement properties of a questionnaire designed to assess managerial stigma towards employees with depression. Using data from a sample of 469 Australian managers representing a wide range of industries and work settings, we conducted a confirmatory factor analysis to assess three proposed subscales representing affective, cognitive and behavioural forms of stigma. Results were equivocal indicating acceptable fit for two-factor (affective and cognitive + behavioural), three-factor (affective, cognitive and behavioural) and higher order models. Failure to demonstrate the discriminant validity of the cognitive and behavioural dimensions, even though they are theoretically distinct, suggests that further work on the scale is warranted. These results provide an extension to the psychometric profile of this measure (exploratory factor analysis; Martin, ). Development of strategies to operationalize this construct will benefit occupational health research and practice, particularly in interventions that aim to reduce the stigma of mental health issues in the workplace or where managers' attitudes are a key mechanism in intervention efficacy. We encourage future research on this measure pertaining in particular to further enhancing all aspects of its construct validity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Nursing students' attitudes towards information and communication technology: an exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jae; Clarke, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences. Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter statistically significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that influence nurses' attitudes towards technology, the validity is questionable and few studies have been developed to test the attitudes of nursing students, in particular. A cross-sectional survey design was performed. The Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health was used to collect data from October 2012-December 2012. A panel of experts reviewed the content of the instrument and a pilot study was conducted. Following this, a total of 508 nursing students, who were engaged in clinical placements, were recruited from six universities in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed and reliability and construct validity were assessed. The resulting instrument consisted of 19 items across four factors. Reliability of the four factors was acceptable and the validity was supported. The instrument was shown to be both valid and reliable for measuring nursing students' attitudes towards technology, thus aiding in the current understandings of this aspect. Through these measurements and understandings, nursing educators and students are able to be more reflexive of their attitudes and can thus seek to develop them positively. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Version of the Anticipatory and Consummatory Interpersonal Pleasure Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joséphine Chaix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Anticipatory and Consummatory Interpersonal Pleasure Scale (ACIPS, a measure specifically designed to assess hedonic capacity for social and interpersonal pleasure, was used to evaluate the presence of social anhedonia in patients as well as the general population. The first goal of this study was to validate the structure of the French version of the ACIPS. The second objective was to verify whether a one, two or three factor solution is most appropriate for the ACIPS scale. The French version of the ACIPS was tested on 263 French-speaking pre-graduate students or professional volunteers. For the confirmatory factor analysis, data were treated as categorical ordinal and all the models were estimated using a robust weighted least squares estimator with adjustments for the mean and variance. Three models were estimated. A one-factor model representing a general undifferentiated “pleasure” latent construct was first tested on the 17 ACIPS items. A two-factor model distinguishing anticipatory-pleasure and consummatory-pleasure was tested next. Finally, a three-factor model including subdomains of intimate social interactions, group social interactions, and social bonding was tested. The one and two-factor models showed a somewhat poor fit to the data. However, the goodness of fit of the three factor model was adequate. These results suggest that individuals who enjoyed interaction in one of these three subdomains were more likely to enjoy doing so in the two other domains. However, on the basis of the comparison between the one and three factor models, these three types of interactions may not be considered as indistinguishable. Rather, they represent distinct and theoretically meaningful dimensions. These results show the French version of the ACIPS is a useful and valid scale to measure the capacity of savoring different kinds of social relationships.

  9. Validation of the French sensory gating inventory: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Hetrick, William P; Boyer, Laurent; Bolbecker, Amanda; Aramaki, Mitsuko; Ystad, Sølvi; Richieri, Raphaëlle; El-Kaim, Alexandre; Faget, Catherine; Faugere, Mélanie; Cermolacce, Michel; Kronland-Martinet, Richard; Lancon, Christophe; Vion-Dury, Jean

    2014-12-30

    The Sensory Gating Inventory (SGI) is an instrument investigating daily experiences of sensory gating deficit developed for English speaking schizophrenia patients. The purpose of this study is to design and validate a French version of the SGI. A forward-backward translation of the SGI was performed. The psychometric properties of the French SGI version were analyzed. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out to determine whether factor structure of the French version is similar to the original English version. In a sample of 363 healthy subjects (mean age=31.8 years, S.D.=12.2 years) the validation process revealed satisfactory psychometric properties: the internal consistency reliability was confirmed for each dimension; each item achieved the 0.40 standard threshold for item-internal consistency; each item was more highly correlated with its contributive dimension than with the other dimensions; and based on a CFA, we found a 4-factor structure for the French version of the SGI similar to the original instrument. Test-retest reliability was not determined. The French version of the SGI is a psychometrically sound self-report for measuring phenomenological sensory gating experiences.

  10. Erroneous gambling-related beliefs as illusions of primary and secondary control: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejova, Anastasia; Delfabbro, Paul H; Navarro, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Different classification systems for erroneous beliefs about gambling have been proposed, consistently alluding to 'illusion of control' and 'gambler's fallacy' categories. None of these classification systems have, however, considered the how the illusion of control and the gambler's fallacy might be interrelated. In this paper, we report the findings of a confirmatory factor analysis that examines the proposal that most erroneous gambling-related beliefs can be defined in terms of Rothbaum et al.'s (J Pers Soc Psychol, doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.42.1.5 , 1982) distinction between 'primary' and 'secondary' illusory control, with the former being driven to a large extent by the well-known gambler's fallacy and the latter being driven by a complex of beliefs about supernatural forces such as God and luck. A survey consisting of 100 items derived from existing instruments was administered to 329 participants. The analysis confirmed the existence of two latent structures (beliefs in primary and secondary control), while also offering support to the idea that gambler's fallacy-style reasoning may underlie both perceived primary control and beliefs about the cyclical nature of luck, a form of perceived secondary control. The results suggest the need for a greater focus on the role of underlying processes or belief structures as factors that foster susceptibility to specific beliefs in gambling situations. Addressing and recognising the importance of these underlying factors may also have implications for cognitive therapy treatments for problem gambling.

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis of the German Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Cornelia; Giesler, Marianne; Stock, Christian; Krisam, Johannes; Karstens, Sven; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Krug, Katja

    2016-05-01

    Over the past five years, the development of interprofessional education programmes has been gaining momentum in Germany fostering the need to evaluate these with appropriate instruments. Instead of developing a new instrument for evaluation purposes, the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was chosen, as it is a widespread instrument that has been used in a variety of different educational settings and countries. The German version of the RIPLS was administered in two sites to health professional students in Heidelberg and Freiburg, Germany. Cronbach's alpha was used to examine internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed for confirmation of the underlying factor structure of the RIPLS-D. In total, 531 questionnaires were analysed. The instrument showed overall reliability (0.81) and low reliability (< 0.7) in the subscales. The underlying factor structure could not be confirmed. These results contribute further evidence on deficits with the RIPLS. Despite known issues, the RIPLS continues to be translated and applied. This paper highlights the problematic issues in the RIPLS-D and does not recommend its use.

  12. Using confirmatory factor analysis to manage discriminant validity issues in social pharmacy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen R

    2016-06-01

    Background Confirmatory factory analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) are increasingly used in social pharmacy research. One of the key benefits of CFA is that it allows researchers to provide evidence for the validity of internal factor structure of measurement scales. In particular, CFA can be used to provide evidence for the validity of the assertion that a hypothesized multi-dimensional scale discriminates between sub-scales. Aim This manuscript aims to provide guidance for researchers who wish to use CFA to provide evidence for the internal factor structure of measurement scales. Methods The manuscript places discriminant validity in the context of providing overall validity evidence for measurement scales. Four examples from the recent social pharmacy literature are used to critically examine the various methods which are used to establish discriminant validity. Using a hypothetical scenario, the manuscript demonstrates how commonly used output from CFA computer programs can be used to provide evidence for separateness of sub-scales within a multi-dimensional scale. Conclusion The manuscript concludes with recommendations for the conduct and reporting of studies which use CFA to provide evidence of internal factor structure of measurement scales.

  13. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Sport Emotion Questionnaire in organisational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rachel; Fletcher, David

    2015-01-01

    The Sport Emotion Questionnaire (SEQ) (Jones, M. V., Lane, A. M., Bray, S. R., Uphill, M., & Catlin, J. (2005). Development and validation of the SEQ. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 27, 407-431) was developed and initially validated to assess sport performers' pre-competitive emotions. The purpose of this study was to test the factor structure of the SEQ in a different environment (viz. organisational) and at a different time point (viz. the past month). A further aim was to examine if the SEQ was invariant across different groups of sport performers. A diverse sample of athletes (n = 1277) completed the questionnaire. Fit indices from confirmatory factor analyses provided partial support for the hypothesised measurement model, with equal or better fit demonstrated than evident in initial validation. The comparative fit index values were above acceptable guidelines for all factors at subscale level. Evidence was also found for the invariance of the SEQ across different groups. Overall, the findings support the reliability and validity of the SEQ as a measure of the emotions experienced by sport performers in an organisational environment during the past month.

  14. Measuring the intrapersonal component of psychological empowerment: confirmatory factor analysis of the sociopolitical control scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, N Andrew; Lowe, John B; Hughey, Joseph; Reid, Robert J; Zimmerman, Marc A; Speer, Paul W

    2006-12-01

    The Sociopolitical Control Scale (SPCS) is a widely used measure of the intrapersonal component of psychological empowerment. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were conducted with data from two samples to test the hypothesized structure of the SPCS, the potential effects of method bias on the measure's psychometric properties, and whether a revised version of the scale (SPCS-R) yielded improved model fit. Sample 1 included 316 randomly selected community residents of the Midwestern United States. Sample 2 included 750 community residents of the Northeastern U.S. Results indicated that method bias from the use of negatively worded items had a significant effect on the factor structure of the SPCS. CFA of the SPCS-R, in which negatively worded items were rephrased so that all statements were positively worded, supported the measure's hypothesized two-factor structure (i.e., leadership competence and policy control). Subscales of the SPCS-R were found reliable and related in expected ways with measures of community involvement. Implications of the study for empowerment-based research and practice are described, and strategies to further develop the SPCS are discussed.

  15. The Structure of Negative Self-Statements in Children and Adolescents: A Confirmatory Factor-Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniering, Carolyn A.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the nature and organization of a range of negative self-statements in children and adolescents, using a structural equations/confirmatory factor-analytic approach. A community sample of 978 children aged 7-16 years completed a questionnaire about the frequency with which they experienced a broad range of…

  16. Linear Confirmatory Factor Models To Evaluate Multitrait-Multimethod Matrices: The Effects of Number of Indicators and Correlation among Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Jose M.; Hontangas, Pedro M.; Oliver, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Assessed two models for confirmatory factor analysis of multitrait-multimethod data through Monte Carlo simulation. The correlated traits-correlated methods (CTCM) and the correlated traits-correlated uniqueness (CTCU) models were compared. Results suggest that CTCU is a good alternative to CTCM in the typical multitrait-multimethod matrix, but…

  17. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) in the Standardization Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Jacobus

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the latent structure of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II; Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000) at three different age levels, using the standardization sample. Maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analyses are performed to test four competing hypothetical models for fit and…

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis for Testing Validity and Reliability of Traditional Knowledge Scale to Measure University Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugulu, Ilker

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the confirmatory factor analysis for testing validity and reliability of Traditional Knowledge Attitude Scale (TKAS) to measure university students' attitudes. The items in the TKAS were developed initially from the responses to two open-ended items by 30 university students and literature review on traditional…

  19. Multiple-Group Confirmatory Factor Analysis in R--A Tutorial in Measurement Invariance with Continuous and Ordinal Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Gerrit; von Brachel, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis (MG-CFA) is among the most productive extensions of structural equation modeling. Many researchers conducting cross-cultural or longitudinal studies are interested in testing for measurement and structural invariance. The aim of the present paper is to provide a tutorial in MG-CFA using the freely…

  20. Choosing among Multiple Achievement Measures: Applying Multitrait--Multimethod Confirmatory Factor Analysis to State Assessment, ACT, and Student GPA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Emily R.; Adelson, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers interested in understanding student achievement, its predictors, and how it relates to other student outcomes are likely unaware of how the source information about achievement may offer subtly different pictures. This study applies multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) within a structural…

  1. Choosing among Multiple Achievement Measures: Applying Multitrait--Multimethod Confirmatory Factor Analysis to State Assessment, ACT, and Student GPA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Emily R.; Adelson, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers interested in understanding student achievement, its predictors, and how it relates to other student outcomes are likely unaware of how the source information about achievement may offer subtly different pictures. This study applies multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) within a structural…

  2. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) in the Standardization Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Jacobus

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the latent structure of the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II; Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000) at three different age levels, using the standardization sample. Maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analyses are performed to test four competing hypothetical models for fit and…

  3. A Computationally Efficient State Space Approach to Estimating Multilevel Regression Models and Multilevel Confirmatory Factor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fei; Preacher, Kristopher J; Wu, Wei; Yung, Yiu-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Although the state space approach for estimating multilevel regression models has been well established for decades in the time series literature, it does not receive much attention from educational and psychological researchers. In this article, we (a) introduce the state space approach for estimating multilevel regression models and (b) extend the state space approach for estimating multilevel factor models. A brief outline of the state space formulation is provided and then state space forms for univariate and multivariate multilevel regression models, and a multilevel confirmatory factor model, are illustrated. The utility of the state space approach is demonstrated with either a simulated or real example for each multilevel model. It is concluded that the results from the state space approach are essentially identical to those from specialized multilevel regression modeling and structural equation modeling software. More importantly, the state space approach offers researchers a computationally more efficient alternative to fit multilevel regression models with a large number of Level 1 units within each Level 2 unit or a large number of observations on each subject in a longitudinal study.

  4. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Malay version comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire tested among mothers of primary school children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohaimi, Shamarina; Wei, Wong Yoke; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire (CFPQ) is an instrument specifically developed to evaluate parental feeding practices. It has been confirmed among children in America and applied to populations in France, Norway, and New Zealand. In order to extend the application of CFPQ, we conducted a factor structure validation of the translated version of CFPQ (CFPQ-M) using confirmatory factor analysis among mothers of primary school children (N = 397) in Malaysia. Several items were modified for cultural adaptation. Of 49 items, 39 items with loading factors >0.40 were retained in the final model. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the final model (twelve-factor model with 39 items and 2 error covariances) displayed the best fit for our sample (Chi-square = 1147; df = 634; P practices and related problems such as childhood obesity.

  5. Concepts of Confidence in Tendency Survey Research: An Assessment with Multi-group Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białowolski, Piotr

    In this paper, we investigate the link between the formal definition of confidence in tendency surveys and its measurement. We advocate for the use of reflective measures in an assessment of the confidence level in both consumer and industrial indicators. Based on the data from Poland's tendency survey research, we use a multi-group confirmatory factor analytical approach to demonstrate that the set of indicators proposed by the European Commission methodology that is currently used might be not appropriate to measure the concept of confidence consistently, both within and between periods. The conclusion is true for the confidence indicator in the area of consumer tendency surveys and for the tendency survey in the manufacturing industry. We search for possible amendments that help either to find the sources of instability for the indicators proposed by the guidelines of the European Commission or to select a different set of indicators for the concept of confidence. However, we determine that the differences between the newly proposed indicator that describe industrial confidence and the indicators based on the European Commission methodology are small in terms of correlations and predictive validity.

  6. Rasch modeling and confirmatory factor analysis of the systemizing quotient-revised (SQ-R) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stone, Mark H; Muncer, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the dimensionality of the Systemizing Quotient-Revised (SQ-R), a measure of how strong a person's interest is in systems, using two statistical approaches: Rasch modeling and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Participants included N = 675 with an autism spectrum condition (ASC), N = 1369 family members of people with ASC, and N = 2014 typical controls. Data were applied to the Rasch model (Rating Scale) using WINSTEPS. The data fit the Rasch model quite well lending support to the idea that systemizing could be seen as unidimensional. Reliability estimates were .99 for items and .92 for persons. A CFA parceling approach confirmed that a unidimensional model fit the data. There was, however, differential functioning by sex in some of these items. An abbreviated 44-item version of the scale, consisting of items without differential item functioning by sex was developed. This shorter scale also was tested from a Rasch perspective and confirmed through CFA. All measures showed differences on total scale scores between those participants with and without ASC (d = 0.71, p < .005), and between sexes (d = 0.53, p < .005). We conclude that the SQ-R is an appropriate measure of systemizing which can be measured along a single dimension.

  7. Customers’ perceived value towards the service in Islamic banking: Confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryani Suryani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to analyze the dimensionality of the concept of perceived value in Islamic banking sector, adapting to six dimensions of the GLOVAL scale and one additional dimension that is spiritual as measurement of perceived value to Islamic banking service sector. Design, methodology or approach is the total of 106 customers of financial entities surveyed, and confirmatory factor analysis was used to verify the reliability and validity of the scale of perceived value. It was found that perceived value is a multidimensional construct, composed of seven dimensions such as functional value of the establishment, functional value of the personnel, functional value of the service, functional value price, emotional value, social value, and spiritual value. The scale of overall perceived value in financial services was obtained, which was composed of seven dimensions and represented by 26 items that are significant for their measurement. It was also found that there are emotional and professionalism as dominant indicators in overall perceived value. It implies that a scale of measurement of the value is perceived by consumers in Islamic banking sector which incorporates valuations of customer value. The proposed model and study findings can greatly help researchers and practitioners understand the perceived value in Islamic Banking sector.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the School-Based Assessment Evaluation Scale Among Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hasnida Che Md. Ghazali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The school-based assessment (SBA system is a holistic assessment system that is conducted in schools by subject teachers in assessing the students cognitive (intellect, affective (emotional and spiritual and psychomotor (physical aspects. It is in line with the National Philosophy of Education and the Standards-based School Curriculum in Malaysia. In order to evaluate the implementation of SBA, a measurement scale was validated. Questionnaire was used as an instrument for data collection. 776 primary and secondary school teachers were selected as respondents using stratified random sampling. The data was analyzed with SPSS and AMOS version 18. The aim of this paper was to explore different factor structures of the SBA evaluation scale by using the second-order Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Results indicated that the SBA evaluation model was a valid and reliable scale. The input measurement model was validated with two factors (personnel qualifications and physical infrastructure, process measurement model was validated with six factors (‘attitude’, ‘understanding’, ‘skills’, ‘challenges’, ‘moderation’ and ‘monitoring’ and product measurement model was validated with two factors (‘students’ attitude’ and ‘students’ motivation’. This study provides support for using a valid instrument in evaluating the implementation of SBA in schools. Furthermore, the CFA procedures used supported the conceptual framework set out earlier. Thus, it presents clearly the importance of the evaluation process of any education system to follow all the dimensions outlined in the evaluation model proposed by Daniel Stufflebeam.       Sistem Penilaian Berbasis Sekolah (SBA adalah sistem penilaian holistik yang dilakukan di sekolah-sekolah oleh guru mata pelajaran dalam menilai kognitif (kecerdasan, afektif (emosional dan spiritual dan psikomotorik (fisik siswa. Hal ini sejalan dengan Filsafat Pendidikan Nasional dan Kurikulum

  9. Emotional Intelligence and Nurse Recruitment: Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis of the trait emotional intelligence questionnaire short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Austyn; Watson, Roger; Stenhouse, Rosie; Hale, Claire

    2015-12-01

    To examine the construct validity of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short form. Emotional intelligence involves the identification and regulation of our own emotions and the emotions of others. It is therefore a potentially useful construct in the investigation of recruitment and retention in nursing and many questionnaires have been constructed to measure it. Secondary analysis of existing dataset of responses to Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short form using concurrent application of Rasch analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. First year undergraduate nursing and computing students completed Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form in September 2013. Responses were analysed by synthesising results of Rasch analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Participants (N = 938) completed Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short form. Rasch analysis showed the majority of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form items made a unique contribution to the latent trait of emotional intelligence. Five items did not fit the model and differential item functioning (gender) accounted for this misfit. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure consisting of: self-confidence, empathy, uncertainty and social connection. All five misfitting items from the Rasch analysis belonged to the 'social connection' factor. The concurrent use of Rasch and factor analysis allowed for novel interpretation of Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short form. Much of the response variation in Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Short form can be accounted for by the social connection factor. Implications for practice are discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Structural validity of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition: Confirmatory factor analyses with the 16 primary and secondary subtests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L; Watkins, Marley W; Dombrowski, Stefan C

    2017-04-01

    The factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V; Wechsler, 2014a) standardization sample (N = 2,200) was examined using confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) with maximum likelihood estimation for all reported models from the WISC-V Technical and Interpretation Manual (Wechsler, 2014b). Additionally, alternative bifactor models were examined and variance estimates and model-based reliability estimates (ω coefficients) were provided. Results from analyses of the 16 primary and secondary WISC-V subtests found that all higher-order CFA models with 5 group factors (VC, VS, FR, WM, and PS) produced model specification errors where the Fluid Reasoning factor produced negative variance and were thus judged inadequate. Of the 16 models tested, the bifactor model containing 4 group factors (VC, PR, WM, and PS) produced the best fit. Results from analyses of the 10 primary WISC-V subtests also found the bifactor model with 4 group factors (VC, PR, WM, and PS) produced the best fit. Variance estimates from both 16 and 10 subtest based bifactor models found dominance of general intelligence (g) in accounting for subtest variance (except for PS subtests) and large ω-hierarchical coefficients supporting general intelligence interpretation. The small portions of variance uniquely captured by the 4 group factors and low ω-hierarchical subscale coefficients likely render the group factors of questionable interpretive value independent of g (except perhaps for PS). Present CFA results confirm the EFA results reported by Canivez, Watkins, and Dombrowski (2015); Dombrowski, Canivez, Watkins, and Beaujean (2015); and Canivez, Dombrowski, and Watkins (2015). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Measuring child maltreatment using multi-informant survey data: a higher-order confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni A. Salum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the validity and reliability of a multi-informant approach to measuring child maltreatment (CM comprising seven questions assessing CM administered to children and their parents in a large community sample. Methods Our sample comprised 2,512 children aged 6 to 12 years and their parents. Child maltreatment (CM was assessed with three questions answered by the children and four answered by their parents, covering physical abuse, physical neglect, emotional abuse and sexual abuse. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare the fit indices of different models. Convergent and divergent validity were tested using parent-report and teacher-report scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Discriminant validity was investigated using the Development and Well-Being Assessment to divide subjects into five diagnostic groups: typically developing controls (n = 1,880, fear disorders (n = 108, distress disorders (n = 76, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 143 and oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder (n = 56. Results A higher-order model with one higher-order factor (child maltreatment encompassing two lower-order factors (child report and parent report exhibited the best fit to the data and this model's reliability results were acceptable. As expected, child maltreatment was positively associated with measures of psychopathology and negatively associated with prosocial measures. All diagnostic category groups had higher levels of overall child maltreatment than typically developing children. Conclusions We found evidence for the validity and reliability of this brief measure of child maltreatment using data from a large survey combining information from parents and their children.

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale - Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacciarini, Thaís Santos Guerra; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-01-30

    to analyze the factor structure of the Appraisal of Self-Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adapted for Brazil. methodological study conducted with 150 individuals with diabetes mellitus cared for by the Family Health Strategy, most of whom are elderly with low educational levels. The test of the hypothesis concerning the confirmatory factor composition of the ASAS-R was performed using latent variables structural equations. the model's goodness-of-fit indexes were satisfactory (χ2 = 259.19; χ2/g.l = 2.97, p pesquisas que trabalham com o construto de capacidade de autocuidado e no desenvolvimento da Escala ASAS-R. analizar la estructura factorial de la escala de evaluación de la capacidad de autocuidado, Appraisal of Self Care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R), adaptada en Brasil. estudio metodológico conducido en 150 usuarios con diabetes mellitus, mayoría de ancianos y con baja escolaridad, acompañados por la Estrategia Salud de la Familia. El test de hipótesis de la composición factorial confirmatoria de la escala ASAS-R fue realizado por medio del modelo de ecuaciones estructurales para variables latentes. los valores de los índices de ajuste del modelo fueron satisfactorios (χ2 de 259,19; χ2/g.l de 2,97, p < 0,001; GFI = 0,85; RMR = 0,07; RMSEA = 0,09), las cargas factoriales fueron superiores a 0,40, la mayoría de las correlaciones ítem y factor varió de moderada a fuerte magnitud (0,34 la 0,58); valores de alfa total de 0,74 y de los tres factores de 0,69, 0,38 y 0,69, respectivamente. la estructura factorial de la escala obtuvo resultados satisfactorios de validez y de confiabilidad, excepto uno de sus factores. Es deseable que esa escala sea aplicada en muestras de la población general, para fortalecer los análisis de consistencia interna y de dimensionalidad de la estructura factorial; y se espera que este estudio pueda contribuir para avanzar en nuevas investigaciones que vengan a trabajar con el constructo de capacidad de autocuidado y con

  13. Validation and cross-national comparison of the food neophobia scale (FNS) using confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Phillip N; Frank, Robert A; Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa; Tuorila, Hely

    2003-04-01

    The food neophobia scale [FNS; Appetite 19 (1992) 105] has been used to assess willingness to try new foods in studies conducted around the world. Although it is tempting to compare FNS scores across these studies, appropriate psychometric analyses are required to validate the scale and allow cross-cultural comparisons. These analyses were pursued in the current study using confirmatory factor analysis in conjunction with a data analysis strategy described by Steenkamp and Baumgartner [J. Consumer Res. 25 (1998) 78] and random, representative samples drawn from the United States, Sweden and Finland. A unidimensional scale was constructed using eight of the original 10 items from the FNS, and this model provided an excellent fit to the data from the US and Swedish samples. An acceptable fit was achieved for six items when data from the US, Sweden and Finland were used. Based on these analyses, we recommend that two items from the original FNS be dropped (items 5 and 9). Elimination of additional items may be premature given the potential contributions of difference in sampling and testing methodology associated with data collection from the three samples. Future efforts to develop a FNS for cross-national comparisons should target the development of a scale with 14-16 items so that dropping several items from a model (due to translation or other problems) allows retention of a sufficient number of items to insure a robust test. However, even with only six items, our results supported the conclusion that people from Sweden are generally more willing to try novel foods as compared to people from the US and Finland. Future studies should focus on the source of this enhanced willingness to try novel foods among the Swedes and the potential use of this information in the development of programs aimed at facilitating dietary change.

  14. A confirmatory factor analytical study of a servant leadership measure in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Mahembe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Servant leadership is a value-based leadership practice that plays a critical role in team effectiveness and organisational success.Research purpose: The goal of the study was to validate the Servant Leadership Questionnaire(SLQ, which Barbuto and Wheeler developed, on a South African sample.Motivation for the study: The literature is replete with evidence of the role of follower focused leadership practices in improving team effectiveness, employee engagement and organisational success. We need to complement these efforts with psychometrically sound measuring instruments.Research design, approach and method: The authors drew a convenience sample of 288 school teachers from schools in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. They used the SLQ that Barbuto and Wheeler developed to measure servant leadership.Main findings: The authors found high levels of reliability for the sub-scales of the latent variables. They found good fit with the data for the measurement model of the five latent servant leadership dimensions (altruistic calling, persuasive mapping, emotional healing, wisdom and organisational stewardship through confirmatory factor analyses (CFA. They obtained reasonable fit for the first- and second-order servant leadership CFA. The authors concluded that the SLQ shows reasonable fit.Practical/managerial implications: The SLQ showed evidence of reliability and construct validity. It can contribute to the scientific selection and development of education leaders in South African schools.Contribution/value add: Servant leadership incorporates a service ethic that fosters participatory management, teacher development and team building. The department of education should increase team effectiveness in schools by selecting and developing servant leadership.

  15. Cross-validation of the reduced form of the Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait using confirmatory factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Luca eIani

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait (FCQ-T) is commonly used to assess habitual food cravings among individuals. Previous studies have shown that a brief version of this instrument (FCQ-T-r) has good reliability and validity. This article is the first to use Confirmatory factor analysis to examine the psychometric properties of the FCQ-T-r in a cross-validation study. Method: Habitual food cravings, as well as emotion regulation strategies, affective states, and disordered eati...

  16. Factor Structure of Scores from the Maslach Burnout Inventory: A Review and Meta-Analysis of 45 Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor-Analytic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Jody A.; Vassar, Matt; Wheeler, Denna L.; Barnes, Laura L. B.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a summary of 45 exploratory and confirmatory factor-analytic studies that examined the internal structure of scores obtained from the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). It highlights characteristics of the studies that account for differences in reporting of the MBI factor structure. This approach includes an examination of the…

  17. The chronic pain coping inventory: Confirmatory factor analysis of the French version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Côté Denis

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coping strategies are among the psychosocial factors hypothesized to contribute to the development of chronic musculoskeletal disability. The Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI was developed to assess eight behavioral coping strategies targeted in multidisciplinary pain treatment (Guarding, Resting, Asking for Assistance, Task Persistence, Relaxation, Exercise/Stretch, Coping Self-Statements and Seeking Social Support. The present study had two objectives. First, it aimed at measuring the internal consistency and the construct validity of the French version of the CPCI. Second, it aimed to verify if, as suggested by the CPCI authors, the scales of this instrument can be grouped according to the following coping families: Illness-focused coping and Wellness-focused coping. Method The CPCI was translated into French with the forward and backward translation procedure. To evaluate internal consistency, Cronbach's alphas were computed. Construct validity of the inventory was estimated through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA in two samples: a group of 439 Quebecois workers on sick leave in the sub-acute stage of low back pain (less than 84 days after the work accident and a group of 388 French chronic pain patients seen in a pain clinic. A CFA was also performed to evaluate if the CPCI scales were grouped into two coping families (i.e. Wellness-focused and Illness-focused coping. Results The French version of the CPCI had adequate internal consistency in both samples. The CFA confirmed the eight-scale structure of the CPCI. A series of second-order CFA confirmed the composition of the Illness-focused family of coping (Guarding, Resting and Asking for Assistance. However, the composition of the Wellness-focused family of coping (Relaxation, Exercise/Stretch, Coping Self-Statements and Seeking Social Support was different than the one proposed by the authors of the CPCI. Also, a positive correlation was observed between Illness

  18. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Multi-dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale in the South African context

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    Chantal Olckers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Empathy is a core competency in aiding individuals to address the challenges of social living. An indicator of emotional intelligence, it is useful in a globalising and cosmopolitan world. Moreover, managing staff, stakeholders and conflict in many social settings relies on communicative skills, of which empathy forms a large part. Empathy plays a pivotal role in negotiating, persuading and influencing behaviour. The skill of being able to empathise thus enables the possessor to attune to the needs of clients and employees and provides opportunities to become responsive to these needs.Research purpose: This study attempted to determine the construct validity of the Multi-dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale within the South African context.Motivation for the study: In South Africa, a large number of psychometrical instruments have been adopted directly from abroad. Studies determining the construct validity of several of these imported instruments, however, have shown that these instruments are not suited for use in the South African context.Research design, approach and method: The study was based on a quantitative research method with a survey design. A convenience sample of 212 respondents completed the Multi-dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale. The constructs explored were Suffering, Positive Sharing, Responsive Crying, Emotional Attention, a Feel for Others and Emotional Contagion. The statistical procedure used was a confirmatory factor analysis.Main findings: The study showed that, from a South African perspective, the Multi-dimensional Emotional Empathy Scale lacks sufficient construct validity.Practical/managerial implications: Further refinement of the model would provide valuable information that would aid people to be more appreciative of individual contributions, to meet client needs and to understand the motivations of others.Contribution/value-add: From a South African perspective, the findings of this study are

  19. Development of a Body Image Concern Scale using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in Chinese university students

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    He W

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wenxin He, Qiming Zheng, Yutian Ji, Chanchan Shen, Qisha Zhu, Wei Wang Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: The body dysmorphic disorder is prevalent in general population and in psychiatric, dermatological, and plastic-surgery patients, but there lacks a structure-validated, comprehensive self-report measure of body image concerns, which is established through both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Methods: We have composed a 34-item matrix targeting the body image concerns and trialed it in 328 male and 365 female Chinese university students. Answers to the matrix dealt with treatments including exploratory factor analyses, reserve of qualified items, and confirmatory factor analyses of latent structures. Results: Six latent factors, namely the Social Avoidance, Appearance Dissatisfaction, Preoccupation with Reassurance, Perceived Distress/Discrimination, Defect Hiding, and Embarrassment in Public, were identified. The factors and their respective items have composed a 24-item questionnaire named as the Body Image Concern Scale. Each factor earned a satisfactory internal reliability, and the intercorrelations between these factors were in a median level. Women scored significantly higher than men did on the Appearance Dissatisfaction, Preoccupation with Reassurance, and Defect Hiding. Conclusion: The Body Image Concern Scale has displayed its structure validation and gender preponderance in Chinese university students. Keywords: body dysmorphic disorder, body image, factor analysis, questionnaire development

  20. Confirmatory factor analytic structure and measurement invariance of quantitative autistic traits measured by the social responsiveness scale-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Thomas W; Ratliff, Kristin R; Gruber, Chris; Zhang, Yi; Law, Paul A; Constantino, John N

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the factor structure of autistic symptomatology is critical to the discovery and interpretation of causal mechanisms in autism spectrum disorder. We applied confirmatory factor analysis and assessment of measurement invariance to a large (N = 9635) accumulated collection of reports on quantitative autistic traits using the Social Responsiveness Scale, representing a broad diversity of age, severity, and reporter type. A two-factor structure (corresponding to social communication impairment and restricted, repetitive behavior) as elaborated in the updated Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) criteria for autism spectrum disorder exhibited acceptable model fit in confirmatory factor analysis. Measurement invariance was appreciable across age, sex, and reporter (self vs other), but somewhat less apparent between clinical and nonclinical populations in this sample comprised of both familial and sporadic autism spectrum disorders. The statistical power afforded by this large sample allowed relative differentiation of three factors among items encompassing social communication impairment (emotion recognition, social avoidance, and interpersonal relatedness) and two factors among items encompassing restricted, repetitive behavior (insistence on sameness and repetitive mannerisms). Cross-trait correlations remained extremely high, that is, on the order of 0.66-0.92. These data clarify domains of statistically significant factoral separation that may relate to partially-but not completely-overlapping biological mechanisms, contributing to variation in human social competency. Given such robust intercorrelations among symptom domains, understanding their co-emergence remains a high priority in conceptualizing common neural mechanisms underlying autistic syndromes.

  1. A Multi-Sample Confirmatory Factor Analysis of PTSD Symptoms: What Exactly Is Wrong with the DSM-IV Structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Within the DSM-IV, PTSD symptoms are rationally classified as assessing one of three symptom domains: reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, or hyperarousal. However, two alternative four-factor models have been advocated as superior to the DSM-IV framework, based on confirmatory factor analysis. In the Numbing model, symptoms of emotional numbing are differentiated from avoidance. In the Dysphoria model, several symptoms of numbing and hyperarousal are combined to form a factor purported to assess general psychological distress. Examination of these models, within 29 separate data sets, supports two conclusions. First, contrary to its conceptual underpinnings, the Dysphoria model differs empirically from the Numbing model solely in the correlation predicted between two hyperarousal symptoms; all other predicted correlations made by the two models are substantively identical. Second, when the factor analytic presumption of simple structure is relaxed to allow for potential presentation order effects, other plausible symptom structures emerge. In particular, the fit of the DSM-IV model improved dramatically and was a better fit to the data than either four-factor model. The ostensible inferiority of the DSM-IV model may be due to a methodological artifact stemming from the order in which symptoms are typically assessed. The provisional decision to revise the structure of PTSD symptoms in the DSM-5 in light of confirmatory factor analytic results may be misguided. PMID:23128035

  2. A hierarchical model for ordinal matrix factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paquet, Ulrich; Thomson, Blaise; Winther, Ole

    2012-01-01

    their ratings for other movies. The Netflix data set is used for evaluation, which consists of around 100 million ratings. Using root mean-squared error (RMSE) as an evaluation metric, results show that the suggested model outperforms alternative factorization techniques. Results also show how Gibbs sampling...

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Malay Version Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire Tested among Mothers of Primary School Children in Malaysia

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    Shamarina Shohaimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire (CFPQ is an instrument specifically developed to evaluate parental feeding practices. It has been confirmed among children in America and applied to populations in France, Norway, and New Zealand. In order to extend the application of CFPQ, we conducted a factor structure validation of the translated version of CFPQ (CFPQ-M using confirmatory factor analysis among mothers of primary school children (N = 397 in Malaysia. Several items were modified for cultural adaptation. Of 49 items, 39 items with loading factors >0.40 were retained in the final model. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the final model (twelve-factor model with 39 items and 2 error covariances displayed the best fit for our sample (Chi-square = 1147; df = 634; P<0.05; CFI = 0.900; RMSEA = 0.045; SRMR = 0.0058. The instrument with some modifications was confirmed among mothers of school children in Malaysia. The present study extends the usability of the CFPQ and enables researchers and parents to better understand the relationships between parental feeding practices and related problems such as childhood obesity.

  4. Confirmatory factor analysis and reliability of the Chinese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among guidance teachers in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Mantak; Lau, Patrick S Y; Shek, Daniel T L; Lam, Man-Ping

    2002-12-01

    In 1995 Chan and Hui examined the responses of a sample of Chinese teachers on the Maslach Burnout Inventory and recommended a possible 2-factor rather than the original 3-factor model for the assessment of burnout among Chinese teachers. In the present study, the factor structure of responses to the Chinese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory in a sample of 1,398 Chinese secondary school guidance teachers was examined using the EQS approach to confirmatory factor analysis. The results showed that a 3-factor model (Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishment) provided the best fit, with the first two factors highly correlated (r = .80). Internal consistencies for the subscales ranged from .80 to .88.

  5. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Adult Asperger Assessment: the association of symptom domains within a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenssberg, Renate; McKenzie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined disorder characterised by impairments in three domains of social interaction, communication, and repetitive, stereotyped behaviours and activities. Proposed changes to diagnostic criteria suggest that the diagnostic triad may no longer fit as the best way to conceptualise ASD, and that social and communication impairments should be considered as a single domain. The aim of this study was to examine the structure of symptom domains within the Adult Asperger Assessment (AAA; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Robinson, & Woodbury-Smith, 2005), a diagnostic tool for high functioning adults. As theoretical models already exist, confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine data from a clinical population of adults (n = 153) diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and High Functioning Autism (HFA). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to fit different models based on the structure proposed by the authors of the AAA, the traditional triad and the newly proposed diagnostic dyad. Analysis suggested that none of the tested models were a good fit on the AAA dataset. However, it did highlight very high correlations between social and communication factors (r > 0.9) within unmodified models. The results of the analysis provide tentative support for the move towards considering ASD as a dyad of 'social-communication' impairments and repetitive/restricted interests behaviours and activities, rather than the traditional triad. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A confirmatory factor analysis of the "Autoconcepto Forma 5" questionnaire in young adults from Spain and Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Fernando; Musitu, Gonzalo; Riquelme, Enrique; Riquelme, Paula

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the pentafactorial validity of the AF5 Self-Concept Questionnaire in Spanish and Chilean young adults. From the responses of a total of 4,383 young adults aged 17 to 22 years (1,918 Spanish, 44%, and 2,465 Chilean, 56%) it was analyzed the reliability of the instrument, the compared validity of the 5 oblique factor model proposed by the authors versus the unifactorial and the orthogonal alternative models, and was studied the invariance of one Chilean sample. The results of confirmatory factor analyses supported the authors' pentafactorial model. The multi-group factorial invariance showed that Chilean sample of the AF5 does not change neither the Spanish factor weights, nor the variances and covariances of the factors, or the error variances of items. Finally, the internal consistency of the five scales was good in the samples of both countries.

  7. A Monte Carlo study comparing PIV, ULS and DWLS in the estimation of dichotomous confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Steffen

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a Monte Carlo study to investigate the performance of the polychoric instrumental variable estimator (PIV) in comparison to unweighted least squares (ULS) and diagonally weighted least squares (DWLS) in the estimation of a confirmatory factor analysis model with dichotomous indicators. The simulation involved 144 conditions (1,000 replications per condition) that were defined by a combination of (a) two types of latent factor models, (b) four sample sizes (100, 250, 500, 1,000), (c) three factor loadings (low, moderate, strong), (d) three levels of non-normality (normal, moderately, and extremely non-normal), and (e) whether the factor model was correctly specified or misspecified. The results showed that when the model was correctly specified, PIV produced estimates that were as accurate as ULS and DWLS. Furthermore, the simulation showed that PIV was more robust to structural misspecifications than ULS and DWLS.

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Dutch Version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Zita; Hendriks, Marc P H; Kerkmeer, Margreet C; Kessels, Roy P C; Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2015-05-01

    The latent factor structure of the Dutch version of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV-NL) was examined with a series of confirmatory factor analyses. As part of the Dutch standardization, 1,188 healthy participants completed the WMS-IV-NL. Four models were tested for the Adult Battery (16-69 years; N = 699), and two models were tested for the Older Adult Battery (65-90 years; N = 489). Results corroborated the presence of three WMS-IV-NL factors in the Adult Battery consisting of Auditory Memory, Visual Memory, and Visual Working Memory. A two-factor model (consisting of Auditory Memory and Visual Memory) provided the best fit for the data of the Older Adult Battery. These findings provide evidence for the structural validity of the WMS-IV-NL, and further support the psychometric integrity of the WMS-IV.

  9. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Questionnaire on the Health Staff's Perceptions Regarding Doutores da Alegria's Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masetti, Morgana; Caires, Susana; Brandão, Daniel; Vieira, Diana Aguiar

    2016-06-09

    A confirmatory analysis was performed to validate the Questionnaire on the Health Staff's Perceptions Regarding Doutores da Alegria's Intervention, a 40-item instrument designed to assess pediatric staff's perceptions regarding the effects of Doutores da Alegria, a Brazilian hospital clowning professional organization. Eight dimensions were evaluated: the permanence of Doutores da Alegria's interventions; Doutores da Alegria's intrapersonal and interpersonal effects on their relation to health staff; themselves; staff-children; and staff-family relationships; as well as their effect on staff's cultural development; children's relation to their own disease; and families' attitude regarding their child's condition. In all, 567 health professionals from 13 Brazilian hospitals participated. The instrument's good psychometric features are acknowledged.

  10. Cross-validation of the reduced form of the Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait using confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eIani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Food Craving Questionnaire-Trait (FCQ-T is commonly used to assess habitual food cravings among individuals. Previous studies have shown that a brief version of this instrument (FCQ-T-r has good reliability and validity. This article is the first to use Confirmatory factor analysis to examine the psychometric properties of the FCQ-T-r in a cross-validation study.Method: Habitual food cravings, as well as emotion regulation strategies, affective states and disordered eating behaviors, were investigated in two independent samples of non-clinical adult volunteers (Sample 1: N = 368; Sample 2: N = 246. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to simultaneously test model fit statistics and dimensionality of the instrument. FCQ-T-r reliability was assessed by computing the composite reliability coefficient. Results: Analysis supported the unidimensional structure of the scale and fit indices were acceptable for both samples. The FCQ-T-r showed excellent reliability and moderate to high correlations with negative affect and disordered eating. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the FCQ-T-r scores can be reliably used to assess habitual cravings in an Italian non-clinical sample of adults. The robustness of these results is tested by a cross-validation of the model using two independent samples. Further research is required to expand on these findings, particularly in children and adolescents.

  11. Dimensionality and reliability of the self-care of heart failure index scales: further evidence from confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaranelli, Claudio; Lee, Christopher S; Vellone, Ercole; Riegel, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    The Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) is used widely, but issues with reliability have been evident. Cronbach alpha coefficient is usually used to assess reliability, but this approach assumes a unidimensional scale. The purpose of this article is to address the dimensionality and internal consistency reliability of the SCHFI. This was a secondary analysis of data from 629 adults with heart failure enrolled in three separate studies conducted in the northeastern and northwestern United States. Following testing for scale dimensionality using confirmatory factor analysis, reliability was tested using coefficient alpha and alternative options. Confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated that: (a) the Self-Care Maintenance Scale has a multidimensional four-factor structure; (b) the Self-Care Management Scale has a two-factor structure, but the primary factors loaded on a common higher-order factor; and (c) the Self-Care Confidence Scale is unidimensional. Reliability estimates for the three scales, obtained with methods compatible with each scale's dimensionality, were adequate or high. The results of the analysis demonstrate that issues of dimensionality and reliability cannot be separated. Appropriate estimates of reliability that are consistent with the dimensionality of the scale must be used. In the case of the SCHFI, coefficient alpha should not be used to assess reliability of the self-care maintenance and the self-care management scales, due to their multidimensionality. When performing psychometric evaluations, we recommend testing dimensionality before assessing reliability, as well using multiple indices of reliability, such as model-based internal consistency, composite reliability, and omega and maximal reliability coefficients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Differences in the haematological profile of healthy 70 year old men and women: normal ranges with confirmatory factor analysis

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    Taylor Michelle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reference ranges are available for different blood cell counts. These ranges treat each cell type independently and do not consider possible correlations between cell types. Methods Participants were identified from the Community Health Index as survivors of the 1947 Scottish Mental Survey, all born in 1936, who were resident in Lothian (potential n = 3,810 and invited to participate in the study. Those who consented were invited to attend a Clinical Research Facility where, amongst other assessments, blood was taken for full blood count. First we described cell count data and bivariate correlations. Next we performed principal components analysis to identify common factors. Finally we performed confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate suitable models explaining relationships between cell counts in men and women. Results We examined blood cell counts in 1027 community-resident people with mean age 69.5 (range 67.6-71.3 years. We determined normal ranges for each cell type using Q-Q plots which showed that these ranges were significantly different between men and women for all cell types except basophils. We identified three principal components explaining around 60% of total variance of cell counts. Varimax rotation indicated that these could be considered as erythropoietic, leukopoietic and thrombopoietic factors. We showed that these factors were distinct for men and women by confirmatory factor analysis: in men neutrophil count was part of a 'thrombopoietic' trait whereas for women it was part of a 'leukopoietic' trait. Conclusions First, normal ranges for haematological indices should be sex-specific; at present this only pertains to those associated with erythrocytes. Second, differences between individuals across a range of blood cell counts can be explained to a considerable extent by three major components, but these components are not the same in men and women.

  13. The Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised: Confirmatory Factor Analyses, Structural Invariance in Caucasian and African American Samples, and Score Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Randolph C.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Green, Bradley A.; Berman, Mitchell E.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly used measure of anxiety sensitivity is the 36-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised (ASI-R). Exploratory factor analyses have produced several different factors structures for the ASI-R, but an acceptable fit using confirmatory factor analytic approaches has only been found for a 21-item version of the instrument. We evaluated…

  14. The Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised: Confirmatory Factor Analyses, Structural Invariance in Caucasian and African American Samples, and Score Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Randolph C.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.; Green, Bradley A.; Berman, Mitchell E.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly used measure of anxiety sensitivity is the 36-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised (ASI-R). Exploratory factor analyses have produced several different factors structures for the ASI-R, but an acceptable fit using confirmatory factor analytic approaches has only been found for a 21-item version of the instrument. We evaluated…

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF MEASUREMENT ITEMS OF DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR LEAN AND AGILE SUPPLY CHAIN-CONFIRMATORY FACTOR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Venkata Ramana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the consistency approaches by confirmatory factor analysis that determines the construct validity, convergent validity, construct reliability and internal consistency of the items of strategic design requirements. The design requirements includes use of information technology, sourcing procedures, new product development, flexible manufacturing functions and demand management supply chain net work design, management, commitment and inventory management policies among manufacturers of volatile and unforeseeable products in Andhraadesh, India. This study suggested that the seven factor model with 20 items of the leagile supply chain design requirements had a good fit. Further, the study showed a val id and reliable measurement to identify critical items among the design requirements of leagile supply chains.

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Child Feeding Questionnaire among low-income African American families of preschool children.

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    Boles, Richard E; Nelson, Timothy D; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Valenzuela, Jessica M; Sherman, Susan N; Johnson, Susan L; Powers, Scott W

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the factor structure for three of the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) subscales, a widely used measure of parental feeding practices, among 296 low-income parents of African American preschool children. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an overall poor fit among CFQ subscales; Restriction, Pressure to Eat, and Concern about Child Weight, (chi(2), (df=87=300.249, CFI=1.00, NNFI=1.07, RMSEA=.091). Additionally, Cronbach's Alpha coefficients for 2 of the three subscales were below acceptable recommendations (Restriction=0.69; Pressure to Eat=0.58). These results suggest further psychometric clarification is needed to understand commonly reported feeding practice constructs among low-income African American mothers of preschool aged children.

  17. A confirmatory factor analysis of the metabolic syndrome in adolescents: an examination of sex and racial/ethnic differences

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    Gurka Matthew J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of clinical indices that signals increased risk for cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. The diagnosis of MetS is typically based on cut-off points for various components, e.g. waist circumference and blood pressure. Because current MetS criteria result in racial/ethnic discrepancies, our goal was to use confirmatory factor analysis to delineate differential contributions to MetS by sub-group. Research Design and Methods Using 1999–2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis of a single MetS factor that allowed differential loadings across sex and race/ethnicity, resulting in a continuous MetS risk score that is sex and race/ethnicity-specific. Results Loadings to the MetS score differed by racial/ethnic and gender subgroup with respect to triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol. ROC-curve analysis revealed high area-under-the-curve concordance with MetS by traditional criteria (0.96, and with elevations in MetS-associated risk markers, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (0.71, uric acid (0.75 and fasting insulin (0.82. Using a cut off for this score derived from ROC-curve analysis, the MetS risk score exhibited increased sensitivity for predicting elevations in ≥2 of these risk markers as compared with traditional pediatric MetS criteria. Conclusions The equations from this sex- and race/ethnicity-specific analysis provide a clinically-accessible and interpretable continuous measure of MetS that can be used to identify children at higher risk for developing adult diseases related to MetS, who could then be targeted for intervention. These equations also provide a powerful new outcome for use in childhood obesity and MetS research.

  18. Confirmatory factor analyses of the full and short versions of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, R; Thorpe, K

    2000-10-01

    Over the years, researchers have developed various short versions of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (D. P. Crowne & D. Marlowe, 1960). The authors used confirmatory factor analyses (J. L. Arbuckle, 1997) as well as item and scale analyses to evaluate the adequacy of the full version and various short versions. Overall, the results from 232 Canadian undergraduates showed (a) that all the short versions in the present study are a significant improvement in fit over the 33-item full scale and (b) that W. M. Reynolds's (1982) Forms A and B are the best fitting short versions. No gender differences were found for the full scale or any of the short versions. The results show that the full scale could be improved psychometrically and that the psychometrically sound short versions should be available because they require less administration time than the full scale.

  19. Child behaviors associated with childhood obesity and parents' self-efficacy to handle them: confirmatory factor analysis of the Lifestyle Behavior Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Anna; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Nyman, Jonna; Marcus, Claude; Nowicka, Paulina

    2015-03-11

    The development of family-based programs for child weight management requires an understanding of parents' difficulties in managing children's eating and physical activity behaviors; however, knowledge about the specific behaviors that parents find most difficult to address is still limited. The Lifestyle Behavior Checklist (LBC) is an Australian instrument that assesses parents' perceptions of children's obesity-related behaviors (the Problem scale), and parents' self-efficacy in dealing with these behaviors (the Confidence scale). Our aims were 1) to examine the psychometric properties (the factor structure, internal reliability, construct and discriminative validity) of the LBC in parents of preschoolers in Sweden, using the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) as a criterion measure, 2) to study associations between the LBC and socio-demographic factors. The LBC and the CFQ (measuring parental feeding practices) were distributed to parents from 25 schools/preschools and to parents starting a childhood obesity intervention. To test the fit of the original four-factor model (misbehavior in relation to food, overeating, emotional correlates of being overweight, physical activity (24 items)) to the data, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed. Structural equation modelling was used to examine associations between the LBC and the CFQ and socio-demographic factors. In a sample of 478 parents, a five-factor structure proved best fit to data, after excluding 6 items and allowing two pairs of error terms to correlate (TLI = 0.899; CFI = 0.918; RMSEA = 0.042; SRMR = 0.055). The Confidence scale indicated unidimensionality, therefore a hierarchical CFA with 5 first order factors and one second order factor was tested showing good fit. The validity of the LBC was proven by relevant associations with the CFQ and child weight status; parental responses differed depending on child weight status. The Confidence scale was not associated with any child or

  20. A Confirmatory Analysis of the Factor Structure and Cross-Age Invariance of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Gordon E.; McGrew, Kevin S.; Witta, E. Lea

    2004-01-01

    In the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III; D. Wechsler, 1997), the manual reports several confirmatory factor analyses in support of the instrument's latent factor structure. In practice, examiners frequently compare an examinee's score from a current administration of the WAIS-III with the results from a previous test…

  1. Sixteen-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index - Confirmatory factor analytic evidence, internal consistency, and construct validity in a young adult sample from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujanovic, Anka A.; Arrindell, Willem A.; Bernstein, Amit; Norton, Peter J.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity of the 16-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; Reiss Peterson, Gursky, & McNally 1986) in a young adult sample (n = 420)from the Netherlands. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to comparatively e

  2. A confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-III in a clinical sample with crossvalidation in the standardization sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D Bradley; Ryan, Joseph J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Schellenberger, Tony

    2002-05-01

    A maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) was performed by applying LISREL 8 to a clinical sample (n=328). Analyses were designed to determine which of the nine hypothesized oblique factor solutions could best explain intelligence as measured by the WAIS-III in the general clinical sample. Competing latent variable models were identified in previous studies and a priori model modifications were made to test derivations of the nine base models. Results in the clinical sample were crossvalidated by testing all models in the normative sample used in the standardization of the scale. Findings in both the clinical and standardization samples supported a six-factor model including Semantic Memory, Verbal Reasoning, Constructional Praxis, Visual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed factors. Our analysis differed from that presented in the WAIS-III manual as we tested more complex models of intelligence in addition to the ones evaluated by the test publishers. As a result, a six-factor model that corresponded to an expanded version of a model based on Horn's Gf-Gc theory was empirically supported as having the best fit to the data. More complex derivations of this model failed to achieve sufficient goodness of fit.

  3. Using confirmatory factor analysis to validate the Chamberlin affective instrument for mathematical problem solving with academically advanced students.

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    Chamberlin, Scott A; Moore, Alan D; Parks, Kelly

    2017-09-01

    Student affect plays a considerable role in mathematical problem solving performance, yet is rarely formally assessed. In this manuscript, an instrument and its properties are discussed to enable educational psychologists the opportunity to assess student affect. The study was conducted to norm the CAIMPS (instrument) with gifted students. In so doing, educational psychologists are informed of the process and the instrument's properties. The sample was comprised of 160 middle-grade (7 and 8) students, identified as gifted, in the United States. After completing one of four model-eliciting activities (MEAs), all participants completed the CAIMPS (Chamberlin Affective Instrument for Mathematical Problem Solving). Data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis to ascertain the number of factors in the instrument. The normed fit index (0.6939), non-normed fit index (0.8072), and root mean square error approximation (.076) were at or near the acceptable levels. Alpha levels for factors were also robust (.637-.923). Data suggest that the instrument was a good fit for use with mathematics students in middle grades when solving problems. Perhaps the most impressive characteristic of the instrument was that the four factors (AVI: anxiety, value, and interest), SS (self-efficacy and self-esteem), ASP (aspiration), and ANX (anxiety) did not correlate highly with one another, which defies previous hypotheses in educational psychology. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  4. The Multidimensional Media Influence Scale: confirmatory factor structure and relationship with body dissatisfaction among African American and Anglo American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kristen

    2009-06-01

    The Multidimensional Media Influence Scale (MMIS; Cusumano & Thompson, 2001). Media influence and body image in 8-11-year-old boys and girls: A preliminary report on the multidimensional media influence scale. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 29, 37-44) is a child-appropriate, 3-factor scale designed to assess perceived media influence on body image. It has been used in studies exploring the relationship between the entire scale as well as its subscales (awareness, internalization, and pressure) and variables related to body image. However, the 3-factor structure of the scale has never been confirmed via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), nor has the scale been evaluated with a racially diverse sample of children. This paper reports the results of CFAs establishing the multidimensionality of the scale and the unidimensionality of its subscales among a sample of 661 girls and boys aged 7-12 years, primarily African American and Anglo American. The pressure factor of the MMIS predicted the idealization of a thinner current (child) and future (adult) body both cross-sectionally and one year later for girls and for Anglo American children.

  5. A Confirmatory Factor Analytic Study of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in an Elderly Norwegian Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnes, Ole; Troland, Kari; Torsheim, Torbjoern

    2016-02-01

    This study compared the factor structure of the translated Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III), which is the latest available version in Norway, with the original U.S. version. A sample of 122 healthy, elderly Norwegians (mean age: 74; standard deviation = 8.8) completed the WMS-III. The factor structure of the translated WMS-III was tested, using Confirmatory Factor Analysis, with comparison of model fit based on five a priori hypothesized models. Several model fit indices pointed to a three-factor model (working memory, visual memory, and auditory memory) providing the best fit to the data. Our study supports updated findings of the original WMS-III in nonclinical samples and suggests that the translated version is structurally equal to the original. The study supports the cross-cultural validity of the WMS-III. However, based on the present data, one might expect scores on the Family Pictures subtest to fall below scores on other WMS-III subtests in elderly Norwegians.

  6. A confirmatory factor analysis of the WMS-III in a clinical sample with crossvalidation in the standardization sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley Burton, D; Ryan, Joseph J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Schellenberger, Tony; Richards, Heather M

    2003-08-01

    A maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) was performed by applying LISREL 8 to a general clinical sample (n=281). Analyses were designed to determine which of seven hypothesized oblique factor solutions could best explain memory as measured by the WMS-III. Competing latent variable models were identified in previous studies. Results in the clinical sample were crossvalidated by testing all models in the WMS-III standardization samples (combined n=1,250). Findings in both the clinical and standardization samples supported a four-factor model containing auditory memory, visual memory, working memory, and learning factors. Our analysis differed from that presented in the WMS-III manual and by other authors. We tested our models in a clinical sample and included selected word list subtests in order to test the viability of a learning dimension. Consistent with prior research, we were also unable to empirically support the viability of the immediate and delayed memory indices, despite allowing the error terms between the immediate and delayed memory subtests to correlate.

  7. Validation of the Adolescent Concerns Measure (ACM): Evidence from Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Rebecca P.; Chong, Wan Har; Huan, Vivien S.; Yeo, Lay See

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the development and initial validation of scores obtained from the Adolescent Concerns Measure (ACM), a scale which assesses concerns of Asian adolescent students. In Study 1, findings from exploratory factor analysis using 619 adolescents suggested a 24-item scale with four correlated factors--Family Concerns (9 items), Peer…

  8. Development of Physical Activity-Related Parenting Practices Scales for Urban Chinese Parents of Preschoolers: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Yi-Nam; Cerin, Ester; Barnett, Anthony; Huang, Wendy Y J; Mellecker, Robin R

    2017-09-01

    Valid instruments of parenting practices related to children's physical activity (PA) are essential to understand how parents affect preschoolers' PA. This study developed and validated a questionnaire of PA-related parenting practices for Chinese-speaking parents of preschoolers in Hong Kong. Parents (n = 394) completed a questionnaire developed using findings from formative qualitative research and literature searches. Test-retest reliability was determined on a subsample (n = 61). Factorial validity was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis. Subscale internal consistency was determined. The scale of parenting practices encouraging PA comprised 2 latent factors: Modeling, structure and participatory engagement in PA (23 items), and Provision of appropriate places for child's PA (4 items). The scale of parenting practices discouraging PA scale encompassed 4 latent factors: Safety concern/overprotection (6 items), Psychological/behavioral control (5 items), Promoting inactivity (4 items), and Promoting screen time (2 items). Test-retest reliabilities were moderate to excellent (0.58 to 0.82), and internal subscale reliabilities were acceptable (0.63 to 0.89). We developed a theory-based questionnaire for assessing PA-related parenting practices among Chinese-speaking parents of Hong Kong preschoolers. While some items were context and culture specific, many were similar to those previously found in other populations, indicating a degree of construct generalizability across cultures.

  9. Portuguese version of the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M)-I: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Teresa; Cunha, Marina; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Duarte, Joana

    2015-03-30

    The PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M) is a brief self-report instrument widely used to assess Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in war Veterans, according to DSM-IV. This study sought out to explore the factor structure and reliability of the Portuguese version of the PCL-M. A sample of 660 Portuguese Colonial War Veterans completed the PCL-M. Several Confirmatory Factor Analyses were conducted to test different structures for PCL-M PTSD symptoms. Although the respecified first-order four-factor model based on King et al.'s model showed the best fit to the data, the respecified first and second-order models based on the DSM-IV symptom clusters also presented an acceptable fit. In addition, the PCL-M showed adequate reliability. The Portuguese version of the PCL-M is thus a valid and reliable measure to assess the severity of PTSD symptoms as described in DSM-IV. Its use with Portuguese Colonial War Veterans may ease screening of possible PTSD cases, promote more suitable treatment planning, and enable monitoring of therapeutic outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of IT-based Competency Questionnaire in Information Science & Knowledge Studies, Based on Job Market Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Shahbazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present research is to evaluate the validity of an IT-based competency questionnaire in Information Science & Knowledge Studies. The Survey method has been used in the present research. A data collection tool has been a researcher-made questionnaire. Statistic samples, which are 315 people, have been chosen purposefully from among Iranian faculty members, Ph.D. students, and information center employees. The findings showed that by eliminating 17 items from the whole questionnaire and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the rest and rotating findings using the Varimax method, 8 Factors were revealed. The resulting components and also the items which had a high load factor with these components were considerably consistent with the classifications in the questionnaire and partly consistent with the findings of other researchers. 76 competency indicators (knowledge, skills, and attitudes were validated and grouped under 8 main categories: 1. “Computer Basics” 2. “Database Operating, Collection Development of Digital Resources, & Digital Library Management” 3. “Basics of Computer Networking” 4. “Basics of Programming & Database Designing” 5. “Web Designing & Web Content Analysis” 6. “Library Software & Computerized Organizing” 7. Archive of Digital Resources and 8. Attitudes.

  11. Cultural adaptation and validation of the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ): robust nine-dimension Danish language confirmatory factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Kayser, Lars; Norgaard, Ole; Bo, Anne; Elsworth, Gerald R; Osborne, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is an important construct in population health and healthcare requiring rigorous measurement. The Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ), with nine scales, measures a broad perception of health literacy. This study aimed to adapt the HLQ to the Danish setting, and to examine the factor structure, homogeneity, reliability and discriminant validity. The HLQ was adapted using forward-backward translation, consensus conference and cognitive interviews (n = 15). Psychometric properties were examined based on data collected by face-to-face interview (n = 481). Tests included difficulty level, composite scale reliability and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Cognitive testing revealed that only minor re-wording was required. The easiest scale to respond to positively was 'Social support for health', and the hardest were 'Navigating the healthcare system' and 'Appraisal of health information'. CFA of the individual scales showed acceptably high loadings (range 0.49-0.93). CFA fit statistics after including correlated residuals were good for seven scales, acceptable for one. Composite reliability and Cronbach's α were >0.8 for all but one scale. A nine-factor CFA model was fitted to items with no cross-loadings or correlated residuals allowed. Given this restricted model, the fit was satisfactory. The HLQ appears robust for its intended application of assessing health literacy in a range of settings. Further work is required to demonstrate sensitivity to measure changes.

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan M.; Chan, Fong; Ferrin, James M.; Lin, Chen-Ping; Chan, Jacob Y. C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" in a community sample of Canadians with spinal cord injuries. A confirmatory factor analysis provides evidence that the instrument is a multidimensional measure of quality of life. Additionally, the questionnaire is…

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan M.; Chan, Fong; Ferrin, James M.; Lin, Chen-Ping; Chan, Jacob Y. C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the factorial structure of the "World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire--Brief Version" in a community sample of Canadians with spinal cord injuries. A confirmatory factor analysis provides evidence that the instrument is a multidimensional measure of quality of life. Additionally, the questionnaire is…

  14. Male Role Norms Inventory--Short Form (MRNI-SF): Development, Confirmatory Factor Analytic Investigation of Structure, and Measurement Invariance across Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Ronald F.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Rankin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The current study reports the development from the Male Role Norms Inventory-Revised (MRNI-R; Levant, Rankin, Williams, Hasan, & Smalley, 2010) of the 21-item MRNI-Short Form (MRNI-SF). Confirmatory factor analysis of MRNI-SF responses from a sample of 1,017 undergraduate participants (549 men, 468 women) indicated that the best fitting "bifactor"…

  15. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WMS-III in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Nancy J; Strauss, Esther; Chelune, Gordon J; Hermann, Bruce P; Hunter, Michael; Loring, David W; Martin, Roy C; Sherman, Elisabeth M S

    2003-03-01

    Five competing models specifying the factor structure underlying the Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition (D. Wechsler, 1997b) primary subtest scores were evaluated in a sample of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (N = 254). Models specifying separate immediate and delayed constructs resulted in inadmissible parameter estimates and model specification error. There were negligible goodness-of-fit differences between a 3-factor model of working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory and a nested--more parsimonious--2-factor model of working memory and general memory. The results suggest that specifying a separate visual memory factor provides little advantage for this sample--an unexpected finding in a population with lateralized dysfunction, for which one might have predicted separate auditory and visual memory dimensions.

  16. Best-fit model of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I clinical decision-making cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlain, André F De

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the fit of a number of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis models to the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE1) clinical decision-making (CDM) cases. The outcomes of this study have important implications for a range of domains, including scoring and test development. The examinees included all first-time Canadian medical graduates and international medical graduates who took the MCCQE1 in spring or fall 2010. The fit of one- to five-factor exploratory models was assessed for the item response matrix of the 2010 CDM cases. Five confirmatory factor analytic models were also examined with the same CDM response matrix. The structural equation modeling software program Mplus was used for all analyses. Out of the five exploratory factor analytic models that were evaluated, a three-factor model provided the best fit. Factor 1 loaded on three medicine cases, two obstetrics and gynecology cases, and two orthopedic surgery cases. Factor 2 corresponded to pediatrics, and the third factor loaded on psychiatry cases. Among the five confirmatory factor analysis models examined in this study, three- and four-factor lifespan period models and the five-factor discipline models provided the best fit. The results suggest that knowledge of broad disciplinary domains best account for performance on CDM cases. In test development, particular effort should be placed on developing CDM cases according to broad discipline and patient age domains; CDM testlets should be assembled largely using the criteria of discipline and age.

  17. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Differential Relationships of the Two Subdomains of Negative Symptoms in Chronically Ill Psychotic Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie P M Stiekema

    Full Text Available Research suggests a two factor structure for negative symptoms in patients with psychotic disorders: social amotivation (SA and expressive deficits (ED. Applying this two-factor structure in clinical settings may provide valuable information with regard to outcomes and to target treatments. We aimed to investigate 1 whether the factor structure is also supported in chronically ill patients with a psychotic disorder and 2 what the relationship is between these factors and functioning (overall functioning and living situation, depressive symptoms and quality of life. 1157 Patients with a psychotic disorder and a duration of illness of 5 years or more were included in the analysis (data selected from the Pharmacotherapy Monitoring Outcome Survey; PHAMOUS. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed using items of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale that were previously identified to reflect negative symptoms (N1-4, N6, G5, G7, G13, G16. Subsequently, regression analysis was performed on outcomes. The results confirmed the distinction between SA (N2, N4, G16 and ED (N1, N3, N6, G5, G7, G13 in chronically ill patients. Both factors were related to worse overall functioning as measured with the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales, ED was uniquely associated with residential living status. Higher scores for SA were associated with more depressive symptoms and worse quality of life. Thus, SA is most strongly related to level of social-emotional functioning, while ED are more related to living situation and thereby are indicative of level of everyday functioning. This subdivision may be useful for research purposes and be a valuable additional tool in clinical practice and treatment development.

  18. Validation of an instrument to measure tutor performance in promoting self-directed learning by using confirmatory factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genoveva Amador Fierros

    Full Text Available Objective.This work sought to validate and propose an instrument to measure the performance of tutors in promoting self-directed learning in students involved in processes of problem-based learning. Methods. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was applied to validate the instrument composed of 60 items and six factors (self-assessment of learning gaps within the United Nations specific context: self-assessment, reflexion, critical thinking, administration of information, group skills, using a sample of 207 students from a total of 279, which comprise the student population of the Faculty of Nursing at Universidad de Colima in Mexico. (2007. Results. The CFA results demonstrated that the instrument is acceptable to measure performance of tutors in promoting self-directed learning, given that all the indicators, variances, covariances, and thresholds are statistically significant. Conclusion. The instrument permits obtaining students' opinions on how much professors contribute for them to develop each of the 60 skills described in the scale. Lastly, the results could report if professors are placing more emphasis in some areas than in other areas they should address during the problem-based learning (PBL process, or if definitely their actions are removed from the premises of PBL, information that will be useful for school management in decision making on the direction of teaching as a whole.

  19. The Beliefs about Paranoia Scale: Confirmatory factor analysis and tests of a metacognitive model of paranoia in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth K; Tully, Sarah; Pyle, Melissa; Gumley, Andrew I; Kingdon, David; Schwannauer, Matthias; Turkington, Douglas; Morrison, Anthony P

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to confirm the factor structure of the Beliefs about Paranoia Scale (BaPS), a self-report measure to assess metacognitive beliefs about paranoia, and to test hypotheses of a metacognitive model. We hypothesised that positive and negative beliefs about paranoia would be associated with severity of suspiciousness, and that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs would be associated with increased suspiciousness. A total of 335 patients meeting criteria for a schizophrenia spectrum disorder completed the BaPS, the Positive and Negative Syndromes Scale (PANSS), and the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). Confirmatory factor analysis verified that the three BaPS subscales (negative beliefs about paranoia, paranoia as a survival strategy, and normalizing beliefs) were an adequate fit of the data. Ordinal regression showed that positive beliefs about paranoia as a survival strategy and negative beliefs were both associated with severity of suspiciousness. This was the first study to show that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs was associated with increased suspiciousness. All hypotheses were confirmed, suggesting that a metacognitive approach has utility for the conceptualization of paranoia. Clinical implications suggest a role for metacognitive therapy, including strategies such as detached mindfulness and worry postponement.

  20. Ideal, nonideal, and no-marker variables: The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) marker technique works when it matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Larry J; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2015-09-01

    A persistent concern in the management and applied psychology literature is the effect of common method variance on observed relations among variables. Recent work (i.e., Richardson, Simmering, & Sturman, 2009) evaluated 3 analytical approaches to controlling for common method variance, including the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) marker technique. Their findings indicated significant problems with this technique, especially with nonideal marker variables (those with theoretical relations with substantive variables). Based on their simulation results, Richardson et al. concluded that not correcting for method variance provides more accurate estimates than using the CFA marker technique. We reexamined the effects of using marker variables in a simulation study and found the degree of error in estimates of a substantive factor correlation was relatively small in most cases, and much smaller than error associated with making no correction. Further, in instances in which the error was large, the correlations between the marker and substantive scales were higher than that found in organizational research with marker variables. We conclude that in most practical settings, the CFA marker technique yields parameter estimates close to their true values, and the criticisms made by Richardson et al. are overstated. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. A Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 among English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Riley, Natasha; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a significant problem for ethnic minorities that remains understudied partly due to a lack of strong measures with established psychometric properties. One screening tool, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), which was developed for use in primary care has also gained popularity in research settings. The reliability and validity of the PHQ-9 has been well established among predominantly Caucasian samples, in addition to many minority groups. However, there is little evidence regarding its utility among Hispanic Americans, a large and growing cultural group in the United States. In this study, we investigated the reliability and structural validity of the PHQ-9 in Hispanic American women. A community sample of 479 Latina women from southern California completed the PHQ-9 in their preferred language of English or Spanish. Cronbach’s alphas suggested that there was good internal consistency for both the English- and Spanish-language versions. Structural validity was investigated using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results support a similar one-factor structure with equivalent response patterns and variances among English- and Spanish-speaking Latinas. These results suggest that the PHQ-9 can be used with confidence in both English and Spanish versions to screen Latinas for depression. PMID:21787063

  2. Validation of an instrument to measure tutor performance in promoting self-directed learning by using confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador Fierros, Genoveva; Montesinos-López, Osval Antonio; Alcaráz Moreno, Noemí

    2016-04-01

    This work sought to validate and propose an instrument to measure the performance of tutors in promoting self-directed learning in students involved in processes of problem-based learning. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was applied to validate the instrument composed of 60 items and six factors (self-assessment of learning gaps within the United Nations specific context: self-assessment, reflexion, critical thinking, administration of information, group skills), using a sample of 207 students from a total of 279, which comprise the student population of the Faculty of Nursing at Universidad de Colima in Mexico. (2007). The CFA results demonstrated that the instrument is acceptable to measure performance of tutors in promoting self-directed learning, given that all the indicators, variances, covariances, and thresholds are statistically significant. The instrument permits obtaining students' opinions on how much professors contribute for them to develop each of the 60 skills described in the scale. Lastly, the results could report if professors are placing more emphasis in some areas than in other areas they should address during the problem-based learning (PBL) process, or if definitely their actions are removed from the premises of PBL, information that will be useful for school management in decision making on the direction of teaching as a whole.

  3. A Confirmatory Approach to Examining the Factor Structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, Janni; Skovgaard, Anne Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2013-01-01

    four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models were examined: 1. a model with five first order factors (i.e., hyperactivity/inattention, conduct, emotional, peer problems and prosocial), 2. a model adding two internalising and externalising second order factors to model 1, and 3. a model adding...... fits. Best model fits were found when two positively worded items were allowed to cross load with the prosocial scale, and cross loadings were allowed for among three sets of indicators. The analyses also revealed that model fits were slightly better for teachers than for parents and better for older...... a total difficulties second order factor to model 1. Model fits were evaluated, multi-group analyses were carried out and average variance extracted (AVE) and composite reliability (CR) estimates were examined. In this general population sample, low risk sample models 1 and 2 showed similar good overall...

  4. Confirmatory Factor Analytical Study of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex W. K.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated psychometric properties of the Revised Developmental Work Personality Scale (RDWPS). Results yielded a 14-item three-factor model that aligns with the original DWPS and fits the data very well. RDWPS scores were useful in predicting the resolution of Erikson's fourth stage of development, indicating construct validity.…

  5. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Life Orientation Test-Revised with Competitive Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appaneal, Renee N.

    2012-01-01

    Current reviews outside of sport indicate that the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R) items load on two separate factors (optimism and pessimism) and, therefore, should be treated as independent constructs. However, researchers in the sport sciences continue to use the single composite score reflecting a unidimensional definition of optimism.…

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis and temporal invariance of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Costa Galinha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the structure and the temporal invariance of the Portuguese version of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Previous studies are not consensual whether PANAS measures two or three affect factors and whether such factors are independent or correlated. In order to fill in this gap, we compared the original PANAS, as an independent bi-dimensional structure, with several other alternative structures. Two hundred forty five university students and professional trainees answered the questionnaire in two distinct moments with a two month interval. The model of PANAS with a structure of two independent factors, Positive Affect (PA and Negative Affect (NA, as proposed by the authors of the scale, was tested. However, the best model consisted of two independent factors, PA and NA, with the cross-loading of the item "excited" between PA and NA, and specified error correlations between the same categories of emotions. Another gap in the literature is the temporal invariance analysis of the PANAS. This paper assesses the temporal invariance of the scale, using the structural equation modeling analysis. Although it was used in its state form version, the PANAS scale showed temporal stability in a two month interval.

  7. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  8. Physics Metacognition Inventory Part Ii: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Bailey, MarLynn; Farley, John

    2015-01-01

    The Physics Metacognition Inventory was developed to measure physics students' metacognition for problem solving. In one of our earlier studies, an exploratory factor analysis provided evidence of preliminary construct validity, revealing six components of students' metacognition when solving physics problems including knowledge of cognition,…

  9. Bayesian Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis: Perspectives on Constrained-Model Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, C.F.W.

    2012-01-01

    The dissertation revolves around three aims. The first aim is the construction of a conceptually and computationally simple Bayes factor for Type I constrained-model selection (dimensionality determination) that is determinate under usage of improper priors and the subsequent utilization of this

  10. Nursing students’ attitudes towards information communication technology:An exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J.J.; Clarke, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a shortened version of the Information Technology Attitude Scales for Health, in the investigation of nursing students with clinical placement experiences.Background: Nurses and nursing students need to develop high levels of competency in information and communication technology. However, they encounter significant barriers in the use of the technology. Although some instruments have been developed to measure factors that in...

  11. Confirmatory factor analysis, latent profile analysis, and factor mixture modeling of the syndromes of the Child Behavior Checklist and Teacher Report Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2014-12-01

    The current study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), latent profile analysis (LPA), and factor mixture modeling (FMM) to examine the co-occurrence of the childhood syndromes using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teacher Report Form (TRF). Parents and teachers completed the CBCL and TRF, respectively, for a clinic-referred sample of 720 children, ages 7-12 years. For the CBCL, the analyses indicated most support a 2-class 2-factor FMM, and for the TRF, there was most support for a 2-class 3-factor model. The classes were all syndromes at average levels and all syndromes at high levels. The findings indicate high syndrome co-occurrence. The implications of the findings for understanding syndrome co-occurrence in the CBCL and TRF, theories of syndrome co-occurrence, and the clinical use of the CBCL and TRF are discussed. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Loneliness and solitude in adolescence: A confirmatory factor analysis of alternative models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goossens, Luc; Lasgaard, Mathias; Luyckx, Koen

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested a four-factor model of adolescent loneliness and solitude that comprises peer-related loneliness, family loneliness, negative attitude toward solitude, and positive attitude toward solitude. Nine different instruments for a total of 14 scales and derivative subscales were...... of the Loneliness and Aloneness Scale for Children and Adolescents (LACA) is recommended, because the instrument measures all four aspects of the model. Implications for current theories on adolescent loneliness and associated phenomena, such as adolescents' attitude toward being on their own, are briefly discussed....

  13. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the Adolescent Motivation to Cook Questionnaire: A Self-Determination Theory instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miketinas, Derek; Cater, Melissa; Bailey, Ariana; Craft, Brittany; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing adolescents' motivation and competence to cook may improve diet quality and reduce the risk for obesity and chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adolescents' intrinsic motivation to prepare healthy foods and the four psychological needs that facilitate motivation identified by the Self Determination Theory (SDT). Five hundred ninety-three high school students (62.7% female) were recruited to complete the survey. Participants indicated to what extent they agreed or disagreed with 25 statements pertaining to intrinsic motivation and perceived competence to cook, and their perceived autonomy support, autonomy, and relatedness to teachers and classmates. Data were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and internal consistency reliability. EFA returned a five-factor structure explaining 65.3% of the variance; and CFA revealed that the best model fit was a five-factor structure (χ2 = 524.97 (265); Comparative Fit Index = 0.93; RMSEA = 0.056; and SRMR = 0.04). The sub-scales showed good internal consistency (Intrinsic Motivation: α = 0.94; Perceived Competence: α = 0.92; Autonomy Support: α = 0.94; Relatedness: α = 0.90; and Autonomy: α = 0.85). These results support the application of the Adolescent Motivation to Cook Questionnaire to measure adolescents' motivation and perceived competence to cook, autonomy support by their instructor, autonomy in the classroom, and relatedness to peers. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this instrument can measure change in cooking intervention programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Edinburgh Handedness Inventory - Short Form: a revised version based on confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Jaimie F

    2014-01-01

    While the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory has been widely used, there have been few studies assessing its factorial validity. There is evidence that the original instructions and response options are difficult to understand. Using simplified instructions and response options, the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory was administered on a sample of 1514 participants using an online questionnaire. In accordance with previous research, a model of the 10-item inventory had poor fit for the data. This study also detected model misspecification in the previously-proposed 7-item modification. A 4-item Edinburgh Handedness Inventory - Short Form had good model fit with items modelled as both continuous and ordinal. Despite its brevity, it showed very good reliability, factor score determinacy, and correlation with scores on the 10-item inventory. By eliminating items that were modelled with considerable measurement error, the short form alleviates the concern of the 10-item inventory over-categorising mixed handers. Evidence was found for factorial invariance across level of education, age groups, and regions (USA and Australia/New Zealand). There generally appeared to be invariance across genders for the 4-item inventory. The proposed Edinburgh Handedness Inventory - Short Form measures a single handedness factor with an inventory that has brief and simple instructions and a small number of items.

  15. Measuring implementation behaviour of menu guidelines in the childcare setting: confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical domains framework questionnaire (TDFQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Kirsty; Wolfenden, Luke; Wiggers, John; Finch, Meghan; Wyse, Rebecca; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Presseau, Justin; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Yoong, Sze Lin

    2017-04-04

    While there are number of frameworks which focus on supporting the implementation of evidence based approaches, few psychometrically valid measures exist to assess constructs within these frameworks. This study aimed to develop and psychometrically assess a scale measuring each domain of the Theoretical Domains Framework for use in assessing the implementation of dietary guidelines within a non-health care setting (childcare services). A 75 item 14-domain Theoretical Domains Framework Questionnaire (TDFQ) was developed and administered via telephone interview to 202 centre based childcare service cooks who had a role in planning the service menu. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was undertaken to assess the reliability, discriminant validity and goodness of fit of the 14-domain theoretical domain framework measure. For the CFA, five iterative processes of adjustment were undertaken where 14 items were removed, resulting in a final measure consisting of 14 domains and 61 items. For the final measure: the Chi-Square goodness of fit statistic was 3447.19; the Standardized Root Mean Square Residual (SRMR) was 0.070; the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) was 0.072; and the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) had a value of 0.78. While only one of the three indices support goodness of fit of the measurement model tested, a 14-domain model with 61 items showed good discriminant validity and internally consistent items. Future research should aim to assess the psychometric properties of the developed TDFQ in other community-based settings.

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD-B) among Italian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leombruni, Paolo; Loera, Barbara; Miniotti, Marco; Zizzi, Francesca; Castelli, Lorys; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-10-01

    A steady increase in the number of patients requiring end-of-life care has been observed during the last decades. The assessment of healthcare students' attitudes toward end-of-life care is an important step in their curriculum, as it provides information about their disposition to practice palliative medicine. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD-B) was developed to detect such a disposition, but its psychometric properties are yet to be clearly defined. A convenience sample of 608 second-year medical students participated in our study in the 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 academic years. All participants completed the FATCOD-B. The sample was randomly divided in two subsamples. In the item analysis, reliability (Cronbach's α), internal consistency (item-total correlations), and an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were conducted using the first subsample (n = 300). Using the second subsample (n = 308), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed using the robust ML method in the Lisrel program. Reliability for all items was 0.699. Item-total correlations, ranging from 0.03 to 0.39, were weak. EFA identified a two-dimensional orthogonal solution, explaining 20% of total variance. CFA upheld the two-dimensional model, but the loadings on the dimensions and their respective indicators were weak and equal to zero for certain items. The findings of the present study suggest that the FATCOD-B measures a two-dimensional construct and that several items seem in need of revision. Future research oriented toward building a revised version of the scale should pay attention to item ambiguity and take particular care to distinguish among items that concern emotions and beliefs related to end-of-life care, as well as their subjects (e.g., the healthcare provider, the patient, his family).

  17. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Feeding Emotions Scale. A measure of parent emotions in the context of feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Leslie; Fisher, Jennifer O; Power, Thomas G; Chen, Tzu-An; Cross, Matthew B; Hughes, Sheryl O

    2015-08-01

    Assessing parent affect is important because studies examining the parent-child dyad have shown that parent affect has a profound impact on parent-child interactions and related outcomes. Although some measures that assess general affect during daily lives exist, to date there are only few tools that assess parent affect in the context of feeding. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure parent affect specific to the feeding context and determine its validity and reliability. A brief instrument consisting of 20 items was developed that specifically asks how parents feel during the feeding process. This brief instrument draws on the structure of a well-validated general affect measure. A total of 296 Hispanic and Black Head Start parents of preschoolers completed the Feeding Emotions Scale along with other parent-report measures as part of a larger study designed to better understand feeding interactions during the dinner meal. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a two-factor model with independent subscales of positive affect and negative affect (Cronbach's alphas of 0.85 and 0.84, respectively). Concurrent and convergent construct validity was evaluated by correlating the subscales of the Feeding Emotions Scale with positive emotionality and negative emotionality from the Differential Emotions Scale - a measure of general adult emotions. Concurrent and convergent criterion validity was evaluated by testing mean differences in affect across parent feeding styles using ANOVA. A significant difference was found across maternal weight status for positive feeding affect. The resulting validated measure can be used to assess parent affect in studies of feeding to better understand how interactions during feeding may impact the development of child eating behaviors and possibly weight status.

  18. Comparing different versions of the Rahim EI questionnaire in a South African context: A confirmatory factor analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Nel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Given the interest in the importance of emotional intelligence in employees and leaders with regard to performance of their jobs, it is imperative to use reliable and validinstruments to operationalise emotional intelligence.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess the psychometric properties of three different versions of the Rahim emotional intelligence index (EQI, specifically withregard to its factor structure and reliability, using two different samples.otivation for the study: No previous study has investigated which version of the Rahim EQI is the most appropriate for conducting research within South African organisations. Inaddition, the question of whether the Rahim EQI measures a strong general factor has notbeen answered.Research approach, design, and method: A cross-sectional quantitative research design wasused. Two samples were used (n = 470 and n = 308. The first sample completed the 40-itemversion of the Rahim EQI, whilst the second sample completed the 30-item version of the Rahim EQI. The measurement model, representing the 22-item version of the Rahim EQI, was also fitted to both these samples. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to compare thedifferent versions, as well as conceptualisations, of the Rahim EQI.Main findings: The 22-item version of the Rahim EQI exhibited better model fit than the 40-item and 30-item versions. In addition, the bifactor model suggested that the Rahim EQIseems to measure a strong general factor (emotional intelligence with very little evidence ofthe presence of unique group factors (self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills.Practical/managerial implications: Both the reliability and factor structure of the 22-item version of the Rahim EQI have been confirmed. The bifactor structure should inform researchers and practitioners that, in order to understand emotional intelligence, it is better to conceptualise it as a unidimensional

  19. Positive and negative affectivity in children: confirmatory factor analysis of a two-factor model and its relation to symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonigan, C J; Hooe, E S; David, C F; Kistner, J A

    1999-06-01

    The positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) framework that is embodied in the tripartite model of anxiety and depression has proved useful with adult populations; however, there is as yet little investigation with children concerning either the measurement of PA and NA or the relation between PA and NA and levels of adjustment. A confirmatory factor analysis was used in this study to examine the structure of self-reported affect and its relation to depressive and anxious symptoms in school children (4th to 11th grade). Results supported a 2-factor orthogonal model that was invariant across age and sex. Support for the expected pattern of relations between NA and PA with symptoms of depression and anxiety was strong for the older sample (M = 14.2 years) but weaker for the younger sample (M = 10.3 years). Results also provide preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule for children.

  20. Psychometric properties of the Dresden Body Image Questionnaire: A multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis across sex and age in a Dutch non-clinical sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffers, Mia; van Duijn, Marijtje A. J.; Bosscher, Ruud J.; Wiersma, Durk; Schoevers, Robert A.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Body image has implications for psychosocial functioning and quality of life and its disturbance is reported in a broad range of psychiatric disorders. In view of the lack of instruments in Dutch measuring body image as a broad concept, we set out to make an instrument available that reflects the multidimensional character of this construct by including more dimensions than physical appearance. The Dresden Körperbildfragebogen (DBIQ, Dresden Body Image Questionnaire) particularly served this purpose. The DBIQ consists of 35 items and five subscales: body acceptance, sexual fulfillment, physical contact, vitality, and self-aggrandizement. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the Dresden Body Image Questionnaire (DBIQ-NL) in a non-clinical sample. Methods The psychometric properties of the DBIQ-NL were examined in a non-clinical sample of 988 respondents aged between 18 and 65. We investigated the subscales' internal consistency and test-retest reliability. In order to establish construct validity we evaluated the association with a related construct, body cathexis, and with indices of self-esteem and psychological wellbeing. The factor structure of the DBIQ-NL was examined via confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The equivalence of the measurement model across sex and age was evaluated by multiplegroup confirmatory factor analyses. Results Confirmatory factor analyses showed a structure in accordance with the original scale, where model fit was improved significantly by moving one item to another subscale. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis across sex and age demonstrated partial strong invariance. Internal consistency was good with little overlap between the subscales. Temporal reliability and construct validity were satisfactory. Conclusion Results indicate that the DBIQ-NL is a reliable and valid instrument for non-clinical subjects. This provides a sound basis for

  1. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WHO Violence Against Women instrument in pregnant women: results from the BRISA prenatal cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marizélia Rodrigues Costa; de Britto e Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra Soares; Batista, Rosângela Fernandes Lucena; Ribeiro, Cecília Cláudia Costa; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Barbieri, Marco Antônio; Bettiol, Heloisa; da Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura

    2014-01-01

    Screening for violence during pregnancy is one of the strategies for the prevention of abuse against women. Since violence is difficult to measure, it is necessary to validate questionnaires that can provide a good measure of the phenomenon. The present study analyzed the psychometric properties of the World Health Organization Violence Against Women (WHO VAW) instrument for the measurement of violence against pregnant women. Data from the Brazilian Ribeirão Preto and São Luís birth cohort studies (BRISA) were used. The sample consisted of 1,446 pregnant women from São Luís and 1,378 from Ribeirão Preto, interviewed in 2010 and 2011. Thirteen variables were selected from a self-applied questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to investigate whether violence is a uni-or-multidimensional construct consisting of psychological, physical and sexual dimensions. The mean-and-variance-adjusted weighted least squares estimator was used. Models were fitted separately for each city and a third model combining data from the two settings was also tested. Models suggested from modification indices were tested to determine whether changes in the WHO VAW model would produce a better fit. The unidimensional model did not show good fit (Root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]  = 0.060, p violence showed a significantly better fit compared to the original WHO model (p Violence is a multidimensional second-order construct consisting of psychological, physical and sexual dimensions. The WHO VAW model and the modified models are suitable for measuring violence against pregnant women.

  2. Using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on patients with epilepsy: Confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Pakpour, Amir H

    2017-02-01

    The problems of mood disorders are critical in people with epilepsy. Therefore, there is a need to validate a useful tool for the population. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) has been used on the population, and showed that it is a satisfactory screening tool. However, more evidence on its construct validity is needed. A total of 1041 people with epilepsy were recruited in this study, and each completed the HADS. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were used to understand the construct validity of the HADS. In addition, internal consistency was tested using Cronbachs' α, person separation reliability, and item separation reliability. Ordering of the response descriptors and the differential item functioning (DIF) were examined using the Rasch models. The HADS showed that 55.3% of our participants had anxiety; 56.0% had depression based on its cutoffs. CFA and Rasch analyses both showed the satisfactory construct validity of the HADS; the internal consistency was also acceptable (α=0.82 in anxiety and 0.79 in depression; person separation reliability=0.82 in anxiety and 0.73 in depression; item separation reliability=0.98 in anxiety and 0.91 in depression). The difficulties of the four-point Likert scale used in the HADS were monotonically increased, which indicates no disordering response categories. No DIF items across male and female patients and across types of epilepsy were displayed in the HADS. The HADS has promising psychometric properties on construct validity in people with epilepsy. Moreover, the additive item score is supported for calculating the cutoff. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Could the Food Neophobia Scale be adapted to pregnant women? A confirmatory factor analysis in a Portuguese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paupério, Ana; Severo, Milton; Lopes, Carla; Moreira, Pedro; Cooke, Lucy; Oliveira, Andreia

    2014-04-01

    The Food Neophobia Scale (FNS) is widely used in different countries, however appropriate psychometric analyses are required to allow cross-cultural comparisons. To our knowledge, most studies have been conducted among children and adult populations, with no reference to pregnant women. The objective of this study was to translate and test the psychometric properties of a Portuguese version of the FNS, and to identify clusters of food neophobia during pregnancy. The FNS was translated into Portuguese by three health researchers, and back-translated into English by an independent native English speaker and professional translator. The scale was self-administered in a sample of 219 women from the baseline evaluation of the Taste intervention study (HabEat project: http://www.habeat.eu/), who attended medical visits in two hospitals from Porto, Portugal, reporting food neophobia during the last trimester of pregnancy. The FNS consists of 10 items with a 7-point rating scale. An exploratory analysis was performed to evaluate the scale's dimensionality, followed by a confirmatory factor analysis to test the fit of the previous model by using different indexes. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to evaluate the internal reliability of the scale. The construct validity was assessed by comparing the FNS scores by categories of education, age and fruit and vegetables intake by ANOVA. A Model-based clustering was used to identify patterns of food neophobia; the number of latent classes was defined according to the Bayesian information criterion. A two-factor model solution was obtained (after excluding item 8 with a factor loading foods; less neophobic traits) and items 2, 3, 5 and 7 loaded into a second factor (i.e. more neophobic traits). A good global of fitness of the model was confirmed by fit indexes: TLI=0.876, CFI=0.911, RMSEA=0.088 and SRMR=0.051. The higher the education, age, and fruit and vegetables intake the lower the neophobic tendency, measured by

  4. Measuring disability experienced by adults living with HIV: assessing construct validity of the HIV Disability Questionnaire using confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Solomon, Patricia; Bayoumi, Ahmed M

    2014-09-01

    To assess the construct validity of the HIV Disability Questionnaire (HDQ), a self-administered questionnaire that describes the presence, severity and episodic nature of disability experienced by people living with HIV. We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis. We hypothesised that domains in the HDQ characterised six dimensions of disability, each represented by HDQ items: physical symptoms and impairments (20 items); cognitive symptoms and impairments (3 items); mental and emotional health symptoms and impairments (11 items); uncertainty (14 items); difficulties with day-to-day activities (9 items) and challenges to social inclusion (12 items). We developed a measurement model to test these hypotheses. We used maximum likelihood methods of estimation to determine model fit. We considered a threshold for the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) of model fit. We considered variables with factor loadings of >0.30 as representing a given domain of disability. We recruited adults with HIV from hospital clinics, AIDS service organisations and a specialty hospital in Ontario. Of the 361 adults with HIV who completed the HDQ, 80% were men, 36% were 50 or older and 77% reported living with at least two concurrent health conditions in addition to HIV. We administered the HDQ followed by a demographic questionnaire. The model achieved good overall fit as indicated by a RMSEA of 0.030 (90% CI 0.028 to 0.033). All HDQ items represented our hypothesised dimensions of disability (factor loadings >0.30). Factor loadings ranged from 0.34 to 0.90. Domains of disability correlated with each other ranging from r=0.47 (between difficulties with day-to-day activities and uncertainty) to r=0.88 (between mental-emotional health challenges and challenges to social inclusion). The six domain structure of the HDQ demonstrated construct validity when administered to adults living with HIV. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  5. Best-fit model of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I clinical decision-making cases

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    André F. De Champlain

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to assess the fit of a number of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis models to the 2010 Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE1 clinical decision-making (CDM cases. The outcomes of this study have important implications for a range of domains, including scoring and test development. Methods: The examinees included all first-time Canadian medical graduates and international medical graduates who took the MCCQE1 in spring or fall 2010. The fit of one- to five-factor exploratory models was assessed for the item response matrix of the 2010 CDM cases. Five confirmatory factor analytic models were also examined with the same CDM response matrix. The structural equation modeling software program Mplus was used for all analyses. Results: Out of the five exploratory factor analytic models that were evaluated, a three-factor model provided the best fit. Factor 1 loaded on three medicine cases, two obstetrics and gynecology cases, and two orthopedic surgery cases. Factor 2 corresponded to pediatrics, and the third factor loaded on psychiatry cases. Among the five confirmatory factor analysis models examined in this study, three- and four-factor lifespan period models and the five-factor discipline models provided the best fit. Conclusion: The results suggest that knowledge of broad disciplinary domains best account for performance on CDM cases. In test development, particular effort should be placed on developing CDM cases according to broad discipline and patient age domains; CDM testlets should be assembled largely using the criteria of discipline and age.

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of WAIS-IV in a Clinical Sample: Examining a Bi-Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Collinson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been a number of studies that have examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale IV (WAIS-IV using the standardization sample. In this study, we investigate its factor structure on a clinical neuropsychology sample of mixed aetiology. Correlated factor, higher-order and bi-factor models are all tested. Overall, the results suggest that the WAIS-IV will be suitable for use with this population.

  7. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of WAIS-IV in a Clinical Sample: Examining a Bi-Factor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel Collinson; Stephen Evans; Miranda Wheeler; Don Brechin; Jenna Moffitt; Geoff Hill; Steven Muncer

    2016-01-01

    There have been a number of studies that have examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale IV (WAIS-IV) using the standardization sample. In this study, we investigate its factor structure on a clinical neuropsychology sample of mixed aetiology. Correlated factor, higher-order and bi-factor models are all tested. Overall, the results suggest that the WAIS-IV will be suitable for use with this population.

  8. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WHO Violence Against Women instrument in pregnant women: results from the BRISA prenatal cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marizélia Rodrigues Costa Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Screening for violence during pregnancy is one of the strategies for the prevention of abuse against women. Since violence is difficult to measure, it is necessary to validate questionnaires that can provide a good measure of the phenomenon. The present study analyzed the psychometric properties of the World Health Organization Violence Against Women (WHO VAW instrument for the measurement of violence against pregnant women. METHODS: Data from the Brazilian Ribeirão Preto and São Luís birth cohort studies (BRISA were used. The sample consisted of 1,446 pregnant women from São Luís and 1,378 from Ribeirão Preto, interviewed in 2010 and 2011. Thirteen variables were selected from a self-applied questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to investigate whether violence is a uni-or-multidimensional construct consisting of psychological, physical and sexual dimensions. The mean-and-variance-adjusted weighted least squares estimator was used. Models were fitted separately for each city and a third model combining data from the two settings was also tested. Models suggested from modification indices were tested to determine whether changes in the WHO VAW model would produce a better fit. RESULTS: The unidimensional model did not show good fit (Root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]  = 0.060, p < 0.001 for the combined model. The multidimensional WHO VAW model showed good fit (RMSEA = 0.036, p = 0.999 for the combined model and standardized factor loadings higher than 0.70, except for the sexual dimension for SL (0.65. The models suggested by the modification indices with cross loadings measuring simultaneously physical and psychological violence showed a significantly better fit compared to the original WHO model (p < 0.001 for the difference between the model chi-squares. CONCLUSIONS: Violence is a multidimensional second-order construct consisting of psychological, physical and sexual dimensions. The WHO VAW

  9. Problem behaviours and symptom dimensions of psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disabilities: An exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Craig A; Johnson, Paul C D; Smiley, Elita; Simpson, Neill; Purves, David; McConnachie, Alex; Cooper, Sally-Ann

    2016-08-01

    The limited evidence on the relationship between problem behaviours and symptoms of psychiatric disorders experienced by adults with intellectual disabilities leads to conflict about diagnostic criteria and confused treatment. This study examined the relationship between problem behaviours and other psychopathology, and compared the predictive validity of dimensional and categorical models experienced by adults with intellectual disabilities. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses appropriate for non-continuous data were used to derive, and validate, symptom dimensions using two clinical datasets (n=457; n=274). Categorical diagnoses were derived using DC-LD. Severity and 5-year longitudinal outcome was measured using a battery of instruments. Five factors/dimensions were identified and confirmed. Problem behaviours were included in an emotion dysregulation-problem behaviour dimension that was distinct from the depressive, anxiety, organic and psychosis dimensions. The dimensional model had better predictive validity than categorical diagnosis. International classification systems should not include problem behaviours as behavioural equivalents in diagnostic criteria for depression or other psychiatric disorders. Investigating the relevance of emotional regulation to psychopathology may provide an important pathway for development of improved interventions. There is uncertainty whether new onset problem behaviours or a change in longstanding problem behaviours should be considered as symptoms of depression or other types of psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disabilities. The validity of previous studies was limited by the use of pre-defined, categorical diagnoses or unreliable statistical methods. This study used robust statistical modelling to examine problem behaviours within a dimensional model of symptoms. We found that problem behaviours were included in an emotional dysregulation dimension and not in the dimension that included symptoms

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Spanish Version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale : A Rasch Rating Scale Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pilatti, Angela; Lozano Rojas, Oscar Martín; Cyders, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in a sample of college students. Participants were 318 college students (36.2% men; mean age = 20.9 years, SD = 6.4 years). The psychometric properties of this Spanish version were analyzed using the Rasch model, and the factor structure was examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The verification of the global fit of the data showed adequate indexes for pe...

  11. Validating the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire in people with type 2 diabetes: Latent trait analyses applying multidimensional Rasch modelling and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finbråten, Hanne Søberg; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Nordström, Gun; Trollvik, Anne; Guttersrud, Øystein

    2017-11-01

    To validate the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q47) in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The HLS-EU-Q47 latent variable is outlined in a framework with four cognitive domains integrated in three health domains, implying 12 theoretically defined subscales. Valid and reliable health literacy measurers are crucial to effectively adapt health communication and education to individuals and groups of patients. Cross-sectional study applying confirmatory latent trait analyses. Using a paper-and-pencil self-administered approach, 388 adults responded in March 2015. The data were analysed using the Rasch methodology and confirmatory factor analysis. Response violation (response dependency) and trait violation (multidimensionality) of local independence were identified. Fitting the "multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit" model, 1-, 3- and 12-dimensional Rasch models were applied and compared. Poor model fit and differential item functioning were present in some items, and several subscales suffered from poor targeting and low reliability. Despite multidimensional data, we did not observe any unordered response categories. Interpreting the domains as distinct but related latent dimensions, the data fit a 12-dimensional Rasch model and a 12-factor confirmatory factor model best. Therefore, the analyses did not support the estimation of one overall "health literacy score." To support the plausibility of claims based on the HLS-EU score(s), we suggest: removing the health care aspect to reduce the magnitude of multidimensionality; rejecting redundant items to avoid response dependency; adding "harder" items and applying a six-point rating scale to improve subscale targeting and reliability; and revising items to improve model fit and avoid bias owing to person factors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Functional Independence Measure in Iran: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Evaluation of Ceiling and Floor Effects in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

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    Rezaei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The functional independence measure (FIM is one of the most important assessment instruments for motor and cognitive dependence in rehabilitation medicine; however, there is little data about its confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and ceiling/floor effects from other countries and also in Iranian patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate a two-factor model (motor and cognitive independence as latent variables and ceiling/floor effects for FIM in Iranian patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 185 subacute TBI patients were selected from emergency and neurosurgery departments of Poursina Hospital (the largest trauma hospital in northern Iran, Rasht using the consecutive sampling method and were assessed for functional independence. Results The results of this study showed that the floor effect was not observed; however, ceiling effects were observed for the FIM total score and its subscales. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that the chi-square/df ratio was 2.8 for the two-factor structure and the fit indices for this structural model including root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA = 0.099, normed fit index (NFI = 0.96, tucker lewis index (TLI = 0.97, comparative fit index (CFI = 0.97 were close to standard indices. Conclusions Although ceiling effects should be considered for rehabilitation targets, the two-factor model of FIM (motor and cognitive independence has an eligible fitness for Iranian patients with TBI.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version in Healthy Adults and Application to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert M.; Lance, Charles E.; Isquith, Peter K.; Fischer, Adina S.; Giancola, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A) is a questionnaire measure designed to assess executive functioning in everyday life. Analysis of data from the BRIEF-A standardization sample yielded a two-factor solution (labeled Behavioral Regulation and Metacognition). The present investigation employed confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to evaluate four alternative models of the factor structure of the BRIEF-A self-report form in a sample of 524 healthy young adults. Results indicated that a three-factor model best fits the data: a Metacognition factor, a Behavioral Regulation factor consisting of the Inhibit and Self-Monitor scales, and an Emotional Regulation factor composed of the Emotional Control and Shift scales. The three factors contributed 14%, 19%, and 24% of unique variance to the model, respectively, and a second-order general factor accounted for 41% of variance overall. This three-factor solution is consistent with recent CFAs of the Parent report form of the BRIEF. Furthermore, although the Behavioral Regulation factor score in the two-factor model did not differ between adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and a matched healthy comparison group, greater impairment on the Behavioral Regulation factor but not the Emotional Regulation factor was found using the three-factor model. Together, these findings support the multidimensional nature of executive function and the clinical relevance of a three-factor model of the BRIEF-A. PMID:23676185

  14. Examining the Factor Structure and Hierarchical Nature of the Quality of Life Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel A.; Jenaro, Christina

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable debate in the area of individual quality of life research regarding the factor structure and hierarchical nature of the quality of life construct. Our purpose in this study was to test via structural equation modeling an a priori quality of life model consisting of eight first-order factors and one second-order factor. Data…

  15. Higher-order models versus direct hierarchical models: g as superordinate or breadth factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILLES E. GIGNAC

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Intelligence research appears to have overwhelmingly endorsed a superordinate (higher-order model conceptualization of g, in comparison to the relatively less well-known breadth conceptualization of g, as represented by the direct hierarchical model. In this paper, several similarities and distinctions between the indirect and direct hierarchical models are delineated. Based on the re-analysis of five correlation matrices, it was demonstrated via CFA that the conventional conception of g as a higher-order superordinate factor was likely not as plausible as a first-order breadth factor. The results are discussed in light of theoretical advantages of conceptualizing g as a first-order factor. Further, because the associations between group-factors and g are constrained to zero within a direct hierarchical model, previous observations of isomorphic associations between a lower-order group factor and g are questioned.

  16. Is the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale valid for use in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards the mentally ill? A confirmatory factor analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Roisin; Scott, Philomena Anne; Cocoman, Angela; Chambers, Mary; Guise, Veslemøy; Välimäki, Maritta; Clinton, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the construct validity of the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards mental illness and mental health patients. The harbouring of negative attitudes by nurses towards any patient can have implications for recovery. To gather robust evidence upon which to base information and education aimed at fostering acceptance, support and general positivity towards people with mental health illness, a valid and reliable system of data collection is required. A confirmatory factor analysis of both the original Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale and two modified versions of the scale were carried out during May - June 2007 using a data set representing the responses of 858 European nurses to the scale. Data were subjected to three different confirmatory factor analyses using Maximum Likelihood estimation in the software package, Analysis of Moment Structures 7. A number of absolute, relative and incremental fit statistics were used to assess the fit of the original Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale and two modified versions to the European nursing data. A modification of the scale was found to be most suitable for use in the investigation of European nurses' attitudes towards mental illness and people with mental illness. Further research is recommended to develop a valid and reliable research tool to specifically measure the attitudes of 'nurses' working across different mental healthcare facilities towards this vulnerable patient group. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The Hierarchical Factor Model of ADHD: Invariant across Age and National Groupings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplak, Maggie E.; Sorge, Geoff B.; Flora, David B.; Chen, Wai; Banaschewski, Tobias; Buitelaar, Jan; Ebstein, Richard; Eisenberg, Jacques; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Thompson, Margaret; Tannock, Rosemary; Asherson, Philip; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factor structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a clinical sample of 1,373 children and adolescents with ADHD and their 1,772 unselected siblings recruited from different countries across a large age range. Hierarchical and correlated factor analytic models were compared separately in the ADHD and…

  18. Confirmatory factor analysis and measurement invariance of the Child Feeding Questionnaire in low-income Hispanic and African-American mothers with preschool-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Angela; Vijayasiri, Ganga; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Schiffer, Linda A; Campbell, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    Validation work of the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) in low-income minority samples suggests a need for further conceptual refinement of this instrument. Using confirmatory factor analysis, this study evaluated 5- and 6-factor models on a large sample of African-American and Hispanic mothers with preschool-age children (n = 962). The 5-factor model included: 'perceived responsibility', 'concern about child's weight', 'restriction', 'pressure to eat', and 'monitoring' and the 6-factor model also tested 'food as a reward'. Multi-group analysis assessed measurement invariance by race/ethnicity. In the 5-factor model, two low-loading items from 'restriction' and one low-variance item from 'perceived responsibility' were dropped to achieve fit. Only removal of the low-variance item was needed to achieve fit in the 6-factor model. Invariance analyses demonstrated differences in factor loadings. This finding suggests African-American and Hispanic mothers may vary in their interpretation of some CFQ items and use of cognitive interviews could enhance item interpretation. Our results also demonstrated that 'food as a reward' is a plausible construct among a low-income minority sample and adds to the evidence that this factor resonates conceptually with parents of preschoolers; however, further testing is needed to determine the validity of this factor with older age groups.

  19. Assessing public speaking fear with the short form of the Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker scale: confirmatory factor analyses among a French-speaking community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeren A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Heeren,1,2 Grazia Ceschi,3 David P Valentiner,4 Vincent Dethier,1 Pierre Philippot11Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; 2National Fund for Scientific Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; 4Department of Psychology, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USABackground: The main aim of this study was to assess the reliability and structural validity of the French version of the 12-item version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker (PRCS, one of the most promising measurements of public speaking fear.Methods: A total of 611 French-speaking volunteers were administered the French versions of the short PRCS, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, as well as the Trait version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, which assess the level of anxious and depressive symptoms, respectively.Results: Regarding its structural validity, confirmatory factor analyses indicated a single-factor solution, as implied by the original version. Good scale reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.86 was observed. The item discrimination analysis suggested that all the items contribute to the overall scale score reliability. The French version of the short PRCS showed significant correlations with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r = 0.522, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (r = 0.414, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.516, and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (r = 0.361.Conclusion: The French version of the short PRCS is a reliable and valid measure for the evaluation of the fear of public speaking among a French-speaking sample. These findings have critical consequences for the measurement of psychological and pharmacological treatment effectiveness in public speaking fear among a French-speaking sample.Keywords: social phobia, public speaking, confirmatory

  20. Confirmatory factor analytic investigation of variance composition, gender invariance, and validity of the Male Role Norms Inventory-Adolescent-revised (MRNI-A-r).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Ronald F; McDermott, Ryon C; Hewitt, Amber A; Alto, Kathleen M; Harris, Kyle T

    2016-10-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis of responses to the Male Role Norms Inventory-Adolescent-revised (MRNI-A-r) from 384 middle school students (163 boys, 221 girls) indicated that the best fit to the data was a bifactor model incorporating the hypothesized 3-factor structure while explicitly modeling an additional, general factor. Specifically, each item-level indicator loaded simultaneously on 2 factors: a general traditional masculinity ideology factor and a specific factor corresponding to 1 of the 3 hypothesized masculine norms for adolescents: Emotionally Detached Dominance, Toughness, and Avoidance of Femininity. Invariance testing across gender supported metric invariance for the general factor only. Although item loadings on the general factor were similar across boys and girls, the specific factor loadings varied substantially, with many becoming nonsignificant in the presence of the general factor for girls. A structural regression analysis predicting latent variables of the Meanings of Adolescent Masculinity Scale (MAMS), the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and the Discipline, School Difficulties, and Positive Behavior Scale (DSDPBS) indicated that the general factor was a strong predictor of MAMS for both genders and DSDPBS for girls. Findings indicate that the MRNI-A-r general factor is a valid and reliable indicator of overall internalization of traditional masculinity ideology in adolescents; however, the specific factors may have different meanings for boys as compared with girls and lack validity in the presence of the general factor. These findings are consistent with a developmental perspective of gender ideology that views adolescence as a time when a differentiated cognitive schema of masculine norms is beginning to develop. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy: making sense of the total score through a second order confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Valente, Alexandra; Costa, Patrício; Elorduy, Marta; Virumbrales, Montserrat; Costa, Manuel J; Palés, Jorge

    2016-09-19

    Empathy is a key aspect of the physician-patient interactions. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) is one of the most used empathy measures of medical students. The development of cross-cultural empathy studies depends on valid and reliable translations of the JSE. This study sought to: (1) adapt and assess the psychometric properties in Spanish students of the Spanish JSE validated in Mexican students; (2) test a second order latent factor model. The Spanish JSE was adapted from the Spanish JSE-S, resulting in a final version of the measure. A non-probabilistic sample of 1104 medical students of two Spanish medical schools completed a socio-demographic and the Spanish JSE-S. Descriptive statistics, along with a confirmatory factor analysis, the average variance extracted (AVE), Cronbach's alphas and composite reliability (CR) coefficients were computed. An independent samples t-test was performed to access sex differences. The Spanish JSE-S demonstrated acceptable to good sensitivity (individual items - except for item 2 - and JSE-S total score: -2.72 factor analysis supported the three-factor solution and the second order latent factor model. The findings provide support for the sensitivity, construct validity and reliability of the adapted Spanish JSE-S with Spanish medical students. Data confirm the hypothesized second order latent factor model. This version may be useful in future research examining empathy in Spanish medical students, as well as in cross-cultural studies.

  2. A Hierarchical Linear Model with Factor Analysis Structure at Level 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuo; Frank, Kenneth A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article the authors develop a model that employs a factor analysis structure at Level 2 of a two-level hierarchical linear model (HLM). The model (HLM2F) imposes a structure on a deficient rank Level 2 covariance matrix [tau], and facilitates estimation of a relatively large [tau] matrix. Maximum likelihood estimators are derived via the…

  3. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-01-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science…

  4. Exploratory structural equation modeling, bifactor models, and standard confirmatory factor analysis models: application to the BASC-2 Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Teacher Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Margit; Schanding, G Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Several psychological assessment instruments are based on the assumption of a general construct that is composed of multiple interrelated domains. Standard confirmatory factor analysis is often not well suited for examining the factor structure of such scales. This study used data from 1885 elementary school students (mean age=8.77 years, SD=1.47 years) to examine the factor structure of the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, Second Edition (BASC-2) Behavioral and Emotional Screening System (BESS) Teacher Form that was designed to assess general risk for emotional/behavioral difficulty among children. The modeling sequence included the relatively new exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) approach and bifactor models in addition to more standard techniques. Findings revealed that the factor structure of the BASC-2 BESS Teacher Form is multidimensional. Both ESEM and bifactor models showed good fit to the data. Bifactor models were preferred on conceptual grounds. Findings illuminate the hypothesis-generating power of ESEM and suggest that it might not be optimal for instruments designed to assess a predominant general factor underlying the data.

  5. Emotional intelligence is a second-stratum factor of intelligence: evidence from hierarchical and bifactor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Carolyn; Joseph, Dana L; Newman, Daniel A; Roberts, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    This article examines the status of emotional intelligence (EI) within the structure of human cognitive abilities. To evaluate whether EI is a 2nd-stratum factor of intelligence, data were fit to a series of structural models involving 3 indicators each for fluid intelligence, crystallized intelligence, quantitative reasoning, visual processing, and broad retrieval ability, as well as 2 indicators each for emotion perception, emotion understanding, and emotion management. Unidimensional, multidimensional, hierarchical, and bifactor solutions were estimated in a sample of 688 college and community college students. Results suggest adequate fit for 2 models: (a) an oblique 8-factor model (with 5 traditional cognitive ability factors and 3 EI factors) and (b) a hierarchical solution (with cognitive g at the highest level and EI representing a 2nd-stratum factor that loads onto g at λ = .80). The acceptable relative fit of the hierarchical model confirms the notion that EI is a group factor of cognitive ability, marking the expression of intelligence in the emotion domain. The discussion proposes a possible expansion of Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory to include EI as a 2nd-stratum factor of similar standing to factors such as fluid intelligence and visual processing.

  6. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the French Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Philippe; Lecerf, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    According to the most widely accepted Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement, each subtest score of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) should reflect both 1st- and 2nd-order factors (i.e., 4 or 5 broad abilities and 1 general factor). To disentangle the contribution of each factor, we applied a…

  7. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and the Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised: Are we measuring complicated grief or posttraumatic stress?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, Maja; Lasgaard, Mathias Kamp; Shevlin, Mark

    2010-01-01

      The Inventory of Complicated Grief Revised (ICG-R) assesses symptoms of complicated grief in bereaved individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the factorial structure of Complicated Grief (CG) and investigate the relationship between CG and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder through the asse......  The Inventory of Complicated Grief Revised (ICG-R) assesses symptoms of complicated grief in bereaved individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the factorial structure of Complicated Grief (CG) and investigate the relationship between CG and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder through...... the assessment of models which combine both constructs. A secondary aim was to test the construct validity of the Danish version of ICG-R. The questionnaire was completed by respondents who were elderly and married with a history of at least one significant, interpersonal loss (145 males and 147 females, 60......-81 years). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a two-factor model (separation distress and traumatic distress) of CG. To investigate the relationship between CG and PTSD three combined models were specified and estimated using CFA. A model where all five factors, the two factors of CG...

  8. Hierarchical subtask discovery with non-negative matrix factorization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Earle, AC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available . Donoho, D. and Stodden, V. When does non-negative matrix factorization give a correct decomposition into parts? Proc. Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 16, pp. 1141–1148, 2004. Hennequin, R., David, B., and Badeau, R. Beta-divergence as a... with Linearly Solvable Markov Decision Processes. arXiv, 2016. S¸ims¸ek, Ö. and Barto, A.S. Skill Characterization Based on Be- tweenness. Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, pp. 1497–1504, 2009. Solway, A., Diuk, C., Córdova, N., Yee, D., Barto...

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the M5-50: An Implementation of the International Personality Item Pool Item Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Alan; Cooper, Christopher A.; McCord, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Goldberg's International Personality Item Pool (IPIP; Goldberg, 1999) provides researchers with public-domain, free-access personality measurement scales that are proxies of well-established published scales. One of the more commonly used IPIP sets employs 50 items to measure the 5 broad domains of the 5-factor model, with 10 items per factor. The…

  10. What Does the Shipley-2 Measure for Children and Adolescents? Integrated and Conjoint Confirmatory Factor Analysis With the WISC-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Hajovsky, Daniel B; Pace, Jesse R; Niileksela, Christopher R

    2016-02-01

    We used integrated and conjoint confirmatory factor analysis of Shipley-2 and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) data to investigate constructs measured in the Shipley-2 for children and adolescents. We also estimated Shipley-2 composite reliability at the subtest level rather than the item level. The three Shipley-2 subtests for the most part measured what was described in the manual, although Block Patterns measured visual spatial ability in addition to fluid ability and Abstraction was best considered a measure of psychometric g. The g factors derived from the WISC-IV and Shipley-2 were similar but not identical. Internal reliability estimates for Shipley-2 composites that were based on correlations between the subtests were substantially lower than those based on the items. Last, based on WISC-IV derived g factors, 37% to 53% of the variance in Shipley-2 composites was explained by g. Some of the reliable variance in the Shipley-2 composites was due to something specific that the subtests had in common not explained by psychometric g. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Statistics Related Self-Efficacy A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Demonstrating a Significant Link to Prior Mathematics Experiences for Graduate Level Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Larwin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined students' statistics-related self-efficacy, as measured with the current statistics self-efficacy (CSSE inventory developed by Finney and Schraw (2003. Structural equation modeling was used to check the confirmatory factor analysis of the one-dimensional factor of CSSE. Once confirmed, this factor was used to test whether a significant link to prior mathematics experiences exists. Additionally a new post-structural equation modeling (SEM application was employed to compute error-free latent variable score for CSSE in an effort to examine the ancillary effects of gender, age, ethnicity, department, degree level, hours completed, expected course grade, number of college-level math classes, current GPA on students' CSSE scores. Results support the one-dimensional construct and as expected, the model demonstrated a significant link between CSSE scores and prior mathematics experiences to CSSE. Additionally the students' department, expected grade, and number of prior math classes were found to have a significant effect on student's CSSE scores.

  12. A confirmatory factor analysis of the Resilience Scale adapted to chronic pain (RS-18): new empirical evidence of the protective role of resilience on pain adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Párraga, Gema T; López-Martínez, Alicia E; Esteve, Rosa; Ramírez-Maestre, Carmen; Wagnild, Gail

    2015-05-01

    Recent attention has focused on resilience as an important process in the experience and management of chronic pain. In this context, resilience is considered as a psychological factor that promotes adaptive responses to pain and pain-related life adversities. Current research suggests that it is a relevant variable in the prediction of pain adjustment among chronic pain patients. Recently, it was adapted the Resilience Scale to patients suffering chronic musculoskeletal pain (RS-18). The aims of this study were to confirm the internal structure of the RS-18 and to present new empirical evidence regarding its validity. A sample of 592 patients with chronic musculoskeletal back pain completed a battery of instruments to assess resilience, anxiety sensitivity, catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, hypervigilance, pain acceptance, and pain adjustment variables (pain intensity, emotional distress, functional impairment, and daily functioning). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the validity of the RS-18 and a single-factor solution. A series of moderated multiple regression analysis showed that resilience is a relevant psychological variable that not only independently predicts better pain adjustment, but also moderates the relationships between several psychological pain-related variables and pain adjustment variables. These findings give empirical support to the consideration of resilience as a protective variable in chronic pain adjustment and highlight the consideration that improving resilient behaviour could be an important target for the treatment of pain patients.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale: A Rasch rating scale analysis and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilatti, Angelina; Lozano, Oscar M; Cyders, Melissa A

    2015-12-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale in a sample of college students. Participants were 318 college students (36.2% men; mean age = 20.9 years, SD = 6.4 years). The psychometric properties of this Spanish version were analyzed using the Rasch model, and the factor structure was examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The verification of the global fit of the data showed adequate indexes for persons and items. The reliability estimates were high for both items and persons. Differential item functioning across gender was found for 23 items, which likely reflects known differences in impulsivity levels between men and women. The factor structure of the Spanish version of the UPPS-P replicates previous work with the original UPPS-P Scale. Overall, results suggest that test scores from the Spanish version of the UPPS-P show adequate psychometric properties to accurately assess the multidimensional model of impulsivity, which represents the most exhaustive measure of this construct.

  14. The structure of assertiveness : a confirmatory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARRINDELL, WA; SANDERMAN, R; VANDERMOLEN, H; VANDERENDE, J; MERSCH, PP

    1988-01-01

    By using confirmatory factor analysis, distress and performance factors of assertion identified previously in a sample of predomi- nantly agoraphobic club members (N = 703) employing the Scale for Interpersonal Behavior (SlB) - the factors being (I) Display of negative feelings; (II) Expression of a

  15. The structure of assertiveness : a confirmatory approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ARRINDELL, WA; SANDERMAN, R; VANDERMOLEN, H; VANDERENDE, J; MERSCH, PP

    1988-01-01

    By using confirmatory factor analysis, distress and performance factors of assertion identified previously in a sample of predomi- nantly agoraphobic club members (N = 703) employing the Scale for Interpersonal Behavior (SlB) - the factors being (I) Display of negative feelings; (II) Expression of

  16. Empirical evidence for a four factor framework of personality disorder organization: multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III personality disorder scales across Belgian and Danish data samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Gina; Elklit, Ask; Simonsen, Erik

    2010-02-01

    The factor structure of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (Millon, Millon, Davis, & Grossman, 2006) personality disorder scales was analyzed using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis on data obtained from a Danish (N = 2030) and a Belgian (N = 1210) sample. Two-, three-, and four factor models, a priori specified using structures found by Dyce, O'Connor, Parkins, and Janzen (1997), were fitted to the data. The best fitting model was a four factor structure (RMSEA = .066, GFI = .98, CFI = .93) with partially invariant factor loadings. The robustness of this four-factor model clearly supports the efforts to organize future personality disorder description in a four-factor framework by corroborating four domains that were predominant in dimensional models (Widiger & Simonsen, 2005): Factor 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively corresponded to emotional dysregulation versus stability, antagonism versus compliance, extraversion versus introversion, and constraint versus impulsivity.

  17. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Spanish Language Version of the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Eduardo Barrientos Delgado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to validate the Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (Herek, 1988. The starting point is the five dimensions reported in previous studies (Cárdenas & Barrientos, 2008. No research has confirmed the hypothesized ATLG factor structure with a Spanish-language sample. This study tested three factor structures, results indicating that the two- factor second-order model provides the best description of ATLG items. Additionally, psychometric properties were examined using a sample of 518 college students. ATLG proved reliable (α = 0.93 and valid for Chilean population.

  18. Evaluating WAIS-IV structure through a different psychometric lens: structural causal model discovery as an alternative to confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Marjolein J A M; Claassen, Tom; Suwartono, Christiany; van der Veld, William M; van der Heijden, Paul T; Hendriks, Marc P H

    2017-07-20

    Since the publication of the WAIS-IV in the U.S. in 2008, efforts have been made to explore the structural validity by applying factor analysis to various samples. This study aims to achieve a more fine-grained understanding of the structure of the Dutch language version of the WAIS-IV (WAIS-IV-NL) by applying an alternative analysis based on causal modeling in addition to confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The Bayesian Constraint-based Causal Discovery (BCCD) algorithm learns underlying network structures directly from data and assesses more complex structures than is possible with factor analysis. WAIS-IV-NL profiles of two clinical samples of 202 patients (i.e. patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a mixed psychiatric outpatient group) were analyzed and contrasted with a matched control group (N = 202) selected from the Dutch standardization sample of the WAIS-IV-NL to investigate internal structure by means of CFA and BCCD. With CFA, the four-factor structure as proposed by Wechsler demonstrates acceptable fit in all three subsamples. However, BCCD revealed three consistent clusters (verbal comprehension, visual processing, and processing speed) in all three subsamples. The combination of Arithmetic and Digit Span as a coherent working memory factor could not be verified, and Matrix Reasoning appeared to be isolated. With BCCD, some discrepancies from the proposed four-factor structure are exemplified. Furthermore, these results fit CHC theory of intelligence more clearly. Consistent clustering patterns indicate these results are robust. The structural causal discovery approach may be helpful in better interpreting existing tests, the development of new tests, and aid in diagnostic instruments.

  19. Mapping non suicidal self-injury in adolescence: Development and confirmatory factor analysis of the Impulse, Self-harm and Suicide Ideation Questionnaire for Adolescents (ISSIQ-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; Nunes, Carolina; Castilho, Paula; da Motta, Carolina; Caldeira, Suzana; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2015-06-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate, self-inflicted destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent and an important clinical phenomenon. Rates of NSSI appear to be disproportionately high in adolescents and young adults, and is a risk factor for suicidal ideation and behavior. The present study reports the psychometric properties of the Impulse, Self-harm and Suicide Ideation Questionnaire for Adolescents (ISSIQ-A), a measure designed to comprehensively assess the impulsivity, NSSI behaviors and suicide ideation. An additional module of this questionnaire assesses the functions of NSSI. Results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) of the scale on 1722 youths showed items' suitability and confirmed a model of four different dimensions (Impulse, Self-harm, Risk-behavior and Suicide ideation) with good fit and validity. Further analysis showed that youth׳s engagement in self-harm may exert two different functions: to create or alleviate emotional states, and to influence social relationships. Our findings contribute to research and assessment on non-suicidal self-injury, suggesting that the ISSIQ-A is a valid and reliable measure to assess impulse, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, in adolescence.

  20. Assessing public speaking fear with the short form of the Personal Report of Confidence as a Speaker scale: confirmatory factor analyses among a French-speaking community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, Alexandre; Ceschi, Grazia; Valentiner, David P; Dethier, Vincent; Philippot, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess the reliability and structural validity of the French version of the 12-item version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker (PRCS), one of the most promising measurements of public speaking fear. A total of 611 French-speaking volunteers were administered the French versions of the short PRCS, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale, as well as the Trait version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II, which assess the level of anxious and depressive symptoms, respectively. Regarding its structural validity, confirmatory factor analyses indicated a single-factor solution, as implied by the original version. Good scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86) was observed. The item discrimination analysis suggested that all the items contribute to the overall scale score reliability. The French version of the short PRCS showed significant correlations with the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r = 0.522), the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (r = 0.414), the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.516), and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (r = 0.361). The French version of the short PRCS is a reliable and valid measure for the evaluation of the fear of public speaking among a French-speaking sample. These findings have critical consequences for the measurement of psychological and pharmacological treatment effectiveness in public speaking fear among a French-speaking sample.

  1. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Home Environment and Home Social Behavior Data from the Elementary School Success Profile for Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Kate M.; Thompson, Aaron M.; Bowen, Natasha K.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to test the factor structure and scale quality of data provided by caregivers about the home environment and child behavior at home using the Elementary School Success Profile (ESSP) for Families. The ESSP for Families is one component of the ESSP, an online social-environmental assessment that also collects…

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Structure in Injured Children: Functional Impairment and Depression Symptoms in a Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Marsac, Meghan L.; Cirilli, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in children and adolescents who have experienced an acute single-incident trauma, associations between PTSD symptom clusters and functional impairment, and the specificity of PTSD symptoms in relation to depression and general distress. Method: Examined…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PKBS-2 Subscales for Assessing Social Skills and Behavioral Problems in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maria; Benitez, Juan L.; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Fernandez, Eduardo; Justicia, Fernando; Garcia, Trinidad; Garcia-Berben, Ana; Justicia, Ana; Alba, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Different research studies point out the importance of social competence as a protective factor against antisocial behavior. They likewise alert us of the importance of having valid, reliable instruments that measure these constructs in early childhood. Method: The objective of this research is to validate the subscales of the…

  4. Test anxiety and the validity of cognitive tests: A confirmatory factor analysis perspective and some empirical findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Zand Scholten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of cognitive ability tests is often interpreted solely as a function of the cognitive abilities that these tests are supposed to measure, but other factors may be at play. The effects of test anxiety on the criterion related validity (CRV) of tests was the topic of a recent study by Ree

  5. Test Anxiety and the Validity of Cognitive Tests: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Perspective and Some Empirical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Scholten, Annemarie Zand

    2010-01-01

    The validity of cognitive ability tests is often interpreted solely as a function of the cognitive abilities that these tests are supposed to measure, but other factors may be at play. The effects of test anxiety on the criterion related validity (CRV) of tests was the topic of a recent study by Reeve, Heggestad, and Lievens (2009) (Reeve, C. L.,…

  6. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the PKBS-2 Subscales for Assessing Social Skills and Behavioral Problems in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maria; Benitez, Juan L.; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Fernandez, Eduardo; Justicia, Fernando; Garcia, Trinidad; Garcia-Berben, Ana; Justicia, Ana; Alba, Guadalupe

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Different research studies point out the importance of social competence as a protective factor against antisocial behavior. They likewise alert us of the importance of having valid, reliable instruments that measure these constructs in early childhood. Method: The objective of this research is to validate the subscales of the…

  7. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the "Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale" (PreBERS) with Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Cynthia J.; Synhorst, Lori; Epstein, Michael H.; Allen, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The "Preschool Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale" (PreBERS) is a standardized, norm-referenced instrument that assesses emotional and behavioral strengths of preschool children. This study investigated whether the PreBERS four-factor structure (i.e., emotional regulation, school readiness, social confidence, and family involvement)…

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale-2 (BERS-2) Parent and Youth Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jacquelyn A.; Ryser, Gail; Reid, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.

    2006-01-01

    We confirmed the factor structure of the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale-2nd Edition (BERS-2) with a normative parent and youth sample. The BERS-2, based on the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale (BERS), is a standardized instrument that assesses children's emotional and behavioral strengths. The original BERS was renormed to create a…

  9. Attitude toward Science Teaching of Spanish and Turkish In-Service Elementary Teachers: Multi-Group Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korur, Fikret; Vargas, Rocío Vargas; Torres Serrano, Noemí

    2016-01-01

    Elementary school teachers' having a positive attitude toward science teaching might encourage students to develop positive attitudes toward science learning. This cross-cultural study aimed to validate the seven-factor structure of the Dimensions of Attitude toward Science (DAS) scale by applying it in two countries. Moreover, it aimed to…

  10. The Fear of Pain Questionnaire-III and the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-Short Form: a confirmatory factor analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vambheim, Sara M.; Lyby, Peter Solvoll; Aslaksen, Per M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Fear of Pain Questionnaire-III (FPQ-III) is a widely used instrument to assess the fear of pain (FOP) in clinical and nonclinical samples. The FPQ-III has 30 items and is divided into three subscales: Severe Pain, Minor Pain and Medical Pain. Due to findings of poor fit...... of the original three-factor FPQ-III model, the Fear of Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (FPQ-SF) four-factor model has been suggested as an alternative. The FPQ-SF is a revised version of the FPQ-III, reduced to 20 items and subdivided into four subscales: Severe Pain, Minor Pain, Injection Pain and Dental Pain...

  11. The Relationship between Self-Leadership and Personality: A Comparison of Hierarchical Factor Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery D. Houghton

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between self-leadership and personality through an analysis and comparison of hierarchical factor structures. More specifically, this study examined the relationships between the self-leadership dimensions of behavior-focused strategies, natural reward strategies, and constructive thought strategies, and the personality dimensions of extraversion, emotional stability, and conscientiousness. The results of the study provide evidence that the self-leadershi...

  12. The beliefs about paranoia scale: confirmatory factor analysis and tests of a metacognitive model of paranoia in a clinical sample

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Elizabeth K.; Tully, Sarah; Pyle, Melissa; Gumley, Andrew I.; Kingdon, David; Schwannauer, Matthias; Turkington, Douglas; Morrison, Anthony P.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to confirm the factor structure of the Beliefs about Paranoia Scale (BaPS), a self-report measure to assess metacognitive beliefs about paranoia, and to test hypotheses of a metacognitive model. We hypothesised that positive and negative beliefs about paranoia would be associated with severity of suspiciousness, and that the co-occurrence of positive and negative beliefs would be associated with increased suspiciousness. A total of 335 patients meeting criteria for a schizoph...

  13. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Patient Assessment of Constipation-Symptoms (PAC-SYM) among patients with chronic constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Luca; Conway, Paul Maurice; Basilisco, Guido

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: PAC-SYM is widely adopted to asses constipation severity. However, it has been validated in a small sample, few items have been included based on expert opinion and not on empirical grounds, and its factor structure has never been replicated. We aimed at evaluating the psychom......BACKGROUND AND AIM: PAC-SYM is widely adopted to asses constipation severity. However, it has been validated in a small sample, few items have been included based on expert opinion and not on empirical grounds, and its factor structure has never been replicated. We aimed at evaluating...... the psychometric properties of PAC-SYM in patients with chronic constipation. METHODS: We enrolled 2,203 outpatients with chronic constipation in two waves. We used wave I sample to test the psychometric properties of the PAC-SYM and wave II sample to cross-validate its factor structure, to assess criterion.......28-0.45), discrimination across Rome III criteria for functional constipation and abdominal pain, and responsiveness to clinical change (β = -0.49; ω (2) = 0.25). M:PAC-SYM minimal clinically important difference was 0.24. CONCLUSION: Our analysis shows that the rectal domain may not represent a relevant cluster...

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Spanish version of the Gamblers' Beliefs Questionnaire in a sample of Argentinean gamblers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Pilatti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cognitive distortions are related to gambling frequency and gambling severity. Having a culturally sensitive measure to assess cognitive distortions will facilitate the early detection of people who might be at risk of developing problematic gambling behaviors. The Gamblers' Beliefs Questionnaire was translated into Spanish (GBQ-S but no previous study explored the structure of the GBQ-S in a non-US sample with different levels of gambling involvement. Aim: The present study examined the factor structure of the GBQ-S in a community sample of gamblers from Argentina. It also analyzed the association between cognitive distortions and type of gambling activity and frequency of gambling behaviors and the predictive utility of the GBQ-S on gambling severity. Participants: 508 youth and adults completed the GBQ-S. Results: The CFA showed an overall acceptable fit to the data confirming the proposed two-factor model. Scores of the two GBQ sub-scales were positively and significantly correlated with scores on gambling severity. Cognitive distortions have a significant effect on gambling severity after controlling for frequency of engagement in gambling activities. Luck and perseverance, but not illusion of control, was positively related to gambling severity. Discussion: scores measured by the GBQ-S exhibit adequate psychometric properties for the accurate assessment of cognitive distortions across adults and youth from the general community of Argentina.

  15. Components of quality of life in a sample of patients with lupus: a confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch modeling of the LupusQoL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer-Henarejos, Ana-Belén; Gascón-Cánovas, Juan-José; López-Pina, José-Antonio

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test different exploratory solutions to the LupusQoL scale in a sample of Spanish patients with SLE using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch modeling, as well as to estimate the convergent validity. The χ (2) test, RMSEA, CFI, and TLI were used to test the fit of the different exploratory structures with CFA. To estimate the parameters in the dimensions found, a rating scale Rasch multidimensional random coefficient multinomial logit model was used. The reliability of the scores was obtained with coefficient alpha and coefficient omega. The convergent validity was calculated using Spearman's rho. Four hundred and fifty patients participated but complete data were available for 223 subjects. The original version (UK) and the French version obtained the best fit, showing that the proposed original structure was the best solution for the structure of the LupusQoL scale in the Spanish sample. The multidimensional solution of eight dimensions was adequate, but item 8 in physical health, item 16 in intimate relations, and items 29 and 30 obtained mean squares >1.6. Internal consistency and coefficient omega of the scores in the eight domains were higher. The Spanish version of LupusQoL correlated strongly with the corresponding SLAQ, EQ5D analogic scale, and EQ5D domain. This analysis confirmed the structure of eight dimensions of the original version in patients with SLE.

  16. Behavior Intention To Use Of Learning Management System Among Malaysian Pre-Service Teachers: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Baleghi-Zadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning Management system is a type of Information system that many universities invest on to be integrated with their curriculum. Therefore, factors which make students accept or reject Learning Management System is crucial for educational managers of universities. The main purpose of the present study is to modify and validate a measurement model based on two models of Technology Acceptance Model and Fit Model. The proposed measurement model included five constructs of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, behavior intention to use, technical support and task-technology fit. The sample size of the study was 300 pre-service teachers studying at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM and Universiti of Malaya (UM. The results of the study revealed that after deleting eleven items, the proposed measurement model was validated and fit. Therefore, the modified measurement model was able to present the theoretical patterns of the actual data.

  17. Dietary Patterns Derived Using Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis are Stable and Generalizable Across Race, Region, and Gender Subgroups in the REGARDS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E.; Letter, Abraham J.; Shikany, James M.; Roth, David L.; Newby, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Examining diet as a whole using dietary patterns as exposures is a complementary method to using single food or nutrients in studies of diet and disease, but the generalizability of intake patterns across race, region, and gender in the United States has not been established. Objective: To employ rigorous statistical analysis to empirically derive dietary patterns in a large bi-racial, geographically diverse population and examine whether results are stable across population subgroups. Design: The present analysis utilized data from 21,636 participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study who completed the Block 98 food frequency questionnaire. We employed exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analyses on 56 different food groups iteratively and examined differences by race, region, and sex to determine the optimal factor solution in our sample. Results: Five dietary patterns emerged: the “Convenience” pattern was characterized by mixed dishes; the “Plant-based” pattern by fruits, vegetables, and fish; the “Sweets/Fats” pattern by sweet snacks, desserts, and fats and oils; the “Southern” pattern by fried foods, organ meat, and sweetened beverages; and the “Alcohol/Salads” pattern by beer, wine, liquor, and salads. Differences were most pronounced in the Southern pattern with black participants, those residing in the Southeast, and participants not completing high school having the highest scores. Conclusion: Five meaningful dietary patterns emerged in the REGARDS study and showed strong congruence across race, sex, and region. Future research will examine associations between these patterns and health outcomes to better understand racial disparities in disease and inform prevention efforts. PMID:25988129

  18. Testing the measurement invariance of the EORTC QLQ-C30 across primary cancer sites using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D S J; Aaronson, N K; Fayers, P M; Pallant, J F; Velikova, G; King, M T

    2015-01-01

    The EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire is a widely used cancer-specific quality of life instrument comprising a core set of 30 items (QLQ-C30) supplemented by cancer site-specific modules. The purpose of this paper was to examine the extent to which the conventional multi-item domain structure of the QLQ-C30 holds across patients with seven different primary cancer sites. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to test whether a measurement model of the QLQ-C30 was invariant across cancer sites. Configural (same patterns of factor loadings), metric (equivalence of factor loadings) and scalar (equivalence of thresholds) invariance amongst the cancer site groups were assessed (N = 1,906) by comparing the fit of a model with these parameters freely estimated to a model where estimates were constrained to be equal for the corresponding items in each group. All groups exhibited good model fit except for the prostate group, which was excluded. Only 1 of 576 parameters was found to differ between primary sites: specifically, the first threshold of Item 1 in the breast cancer group exhibited non-invariance. In a post hoc analysis, several instances of non-invariance by treatment status (baseline, on-treatment, off-treatment) were observed. Given only one instance of non-invariance between cancer sites, there is a reason to be confident in the validity of conclusions drawn when comparing QLQ-C30 domain scores between different sites and when interpreting the scores of heterogeneous samples, although future research should assess the potential impact of confounding variables such as treatment and gender.

  19. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of U.S. and Italian children's performance on the PASS theory of intelligence as measured by the Cognitive Assessment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naglieri, Jack A; Taddei, Stefano; Williams, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    This study examined Italian and U.S. children's performance on the English and Italian versions, respectively, of the Cognitive Assessment System (CAS; Naglieri & Conway, 2009; Naglieri & Das, 1997), a test based on a neurocognitive theory of intelligence entitled PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive; Naglieri & Das, 1997; Naglieri & Otero, 2011). CAS subtest, PASS scales, and Full Scale scores for Italian (N=809) and U.S. (N=1,174) samples, matched by age and gender, were examined. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis results supported the configural invariance of the CAS factor structure between Italians and Americans for the 5- to 7-year-old (root-mean-square error of approximation [RMSEA]=.038; 90% confidence interval [CI]=.033, .043; comparative fit index [CFI]=.96) and 8- to 18-year-old (RMSEA=.036; 90% CI=.028, .043; CFI=.97) age groups. The Full Scale standard scores (using the U.S. norms) for the Italian (100.9) and U.S. (100.5) samples were nearly identical. The scores between the samples for the PASS scales were very similar, except for the Attention Scale (d=0.26), where the Italian sample's mean score was slightly higher. Negligible mean differences were found for 9 of the 13 subtest scores, 3 showed small d-ratios (2 in favor of the Italian sample), and 1 was large (in favor of the U.S. sample), but some differences in subtest variances were found. These findings suggest that the PASS theory, as measured by CAS, yields similar mean scores and showed factorial invariance for these samples of Italian and American children, who differ on cultural and linguistic characteristics. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. A multi-group confirmatory factor analyses of the LupusPRO between southern California and Filipino samples of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizoddin, D R; Olmstead, R; Cost, C; Jolly, M; Ayeroff, J; Racaza, G; Sumner, L A; Ormseth, S; Weisman, M; Nicassio, P M

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) leads to a range of biopsychosocial health outcomes through an unpredictable and complex disease path. The LupusPRO is a comprehensive, self-report measure developed specifically for populations with SLE, which assesses both health-related quality of life and non-health related quality of life. Given its increasingly widespread use, additional research is needed to evaluate the psychometric integrity of the LupusPRO across diverse populations. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of the LupusPRO in two divergent patient samples and the model fit between both samples. Methods Two diverse samples with SLE included 136 patients from an ethnically-diverse, urban region in southern California and 100 from an ethnically-homogenous, rural region in Manila, Philippines. All patients met the ACR classification criteria for SLE. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFAs) were conducted in each sample separately and combined to provide evidence of the factorial integrity of the 12 subscales in the LupusPRO. Results Demographic analyses indicated significant differences in age, disease activity and duration, education, income, insurance, and medication use between groups. Results of the separate CFAs indicated moderate fit to the data for the hypothesized 12-factor model for both the Manila and southern California groups, respectively [χ(2) (794) = 1283.32, p factor structures of the LupusPRO in the southern California and Manila groups were constrained to be equal between the two groups, findings revealed that the factor structures of measured variables fit the two groups reasonably well [χ(2 ) (1697) = 2950.413, df = 1697, p model fit improved significantly [χ(2) (15) = 147.165, p < 0.000]. Conclusions This research provides significant support for the subscale structure of the LupusPRO in two disparate cultural samples of SLE patients. Despite significant sociodemographic and

  1. Upscaling retardation factor in hierarchical porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hailin; Dai, Zhenxue; Wolfsberg, Andrew V; Ye, Ming; Stauffer, Philip H; Lu, Zhiming; Kwicklis, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity controls spatial and temporal variability of reactive transport parameters and has significant impacts on subsurface modeling of flow, transport, and remediation. Upscaling (or homogenization) is a process to replace a heterogeneous domain with a homogeneous one such that both reproduce the same response. To make reliable and accurate predictions of reactive transport for contaminant in chemically and physically heterogeneous porous media, subsurface reactive transport modeling needs upscaled parameters such as effective retardation factor to perform field-scale simulations. This paper develops a conceptual model of multimodal reactive mineral facies for upscaling reactive transport parameters of hierarchical heterogeneous porous media. Based on the conceptual model, covariance of hydraulic conductivity, sorption coefficient, flow velocity, retardation factor, and cross-covariance between flow velocity and retardation factor are derived from geostatistical characterizations of a three-dimensional unbounded aquifer system. Subsequently, using a Lagrangian approach the scale-dependent analytical expressions are derived to describe the scaling effect of effective retardation factors in temporal and spatial domains. When time and space scales become sufficiently large, the effective retardation factors approximate their composite arithmetic mean. Correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the sorption coefficient can significantly affect the values of the effective retardation factor in temporal and spatial domains. When the temporal and spatial scales are relatively small, scaling effect of the effective retardation factors is relatively large. This study provides a practical methodology to develop effective transport parameters for field-scale modeling at which remediation and risk assessment is actually conducted. It does not only bridge the gap between bench-scale measurements to field-scale modeling, but also provide new insights into

  2. Appraisal of a specific scale for quality of life (AlQoL-9) in Greek alcohol dependent individuals attending: A confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, A S; Ginieri-Coccossis, M; Richardson, C; Charalampi, A; Liappas, I A; Paparrigopoulos, Th

    2016-01-01

    Αlcohol abuse/dependence seriously affects quality of life (QoL). The AlQoL-9 scale, derived from the generic instrument SF-36, is the only instrument in the international literature which is specific as a measure of QoL for alcohol-dependent patients. It can provide health carers with valuable information regarding the needs of alcoholic individuals and the effects of therapeutic interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Greek version of AlQoL-9 taking as a basis the research on the original French and English versions. A sample of 170 participants (118 males, 52 females) aged 24-74 years (mean age=48.2 years, SD=9.6) recruited from inpatient and outpatient detoxification units in different regions of Greece completed the AlQoL-9 questionnaire and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment - short version (WHOQOL-BREF). The internal structure of the AlQoL-9 questionnaire was examined using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The associations of AlQoL-9 with sociodemographic and clinical variables were examined. The correlation coefficients between AlQoL-9 and scores on the domains of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire were computed as an indication of convergent validity. The average inter-item correlation between the AlQoL-9 items was 0.403. CFA supported a single factor underlying the AlQoL-9 items. Cronbach's alpha for the Greek version of the scale showed high internal consistency, 0.837, and could not be improved by omitting any item. The AlQoL-9 score showed significant associations with gender (mean 29.2, SD=6.2 for males; mean 26.1, SD=7.2 for females: p=0.004) and with comorbidity (mean 25.7, SD=7.8 with comorbidity, mean 29.5, SD=5.8 without: p=0.001). The AlQoL-9 score was significantly correlated (pGreek version of the AlQoL-9 constitutes a valid and reliable single-factor research instrument for evaluating quality of life among alcohol-dependent individuals. It is recommended to be used in

  3. [Confirmatory factor analysis of the short French version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression Scale (CES-D10) in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartierre, N; Coulon, N; Demerval, R

    2011-09-01

    Screening depressivity among adolescents is a key public health priority. In order to measure the severity of depressive symptomatology, a four-dimensional 20 items scale called "Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale" (CES-D) was developed. A shorter 10-item version was developed and validated (Andresen et al.). For this brief version, several authors supported a two-factor structure - Negative and Positive affect - but the relationship between the two reversed-worded items of the Positive affect factor could be better accounted for by correlated errors. The aim of this study is triple: firstly to test a French version of the CES-D10 among adolescents; secondly to test the relevance of a one-dimensional structure by considering error correlation for Positive affect items; finally to examine the extent to which this structural model is invariant across gender. The sample was composed of 269 French middle school adolescents (139 girls and 130 boys, mean age: 13.8, SD=0.65). Confirmatory Factorial Analyses (CFA) using the LISREL 8.52 were conducted in order to assess the adjustment to the data of three factor models: a one-factor model, a two-factor model (Positive and Negative affect) and a one-factor model with specification of correlated errors between the two reverse-worded items. Then, multigroup analysis was conducted to test the scale invariance for girls and boys. Internal consistency of the CES-D10 was satisfying for the adolescent sample (α=0.75). The best fitting model is the one-factor model with correlated errors between the two items of the previous Positive affect factor (χ(2)/dl=2.50; GFI=0.939; CFI=0.894; RMSEA=0.076). This model presented a better statistical fit to the data than the one-factor model without error correlation: χ(2)(diff) (1)=22.14, pfactor model with correlated errors was analyzed across separate samples of girls and boys. The model explains the data somewhat better for boys than for girls. The model's overall χ(2

  4. Trait anxiety, disgust sensitivity, and the hierarchic structure of fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Scott D; Hartman, Nathan S; Vrana, Scott R

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of Taylor's (1998) hierarchic model of fears and its relationship to trait anxiety and disgust sensitivity (DS). In Study 1 (N=420), a confirmatory factor analysis supported a hierarchic structure of fears. Next, an analysis using structural equation modeling indicated that trait anxiety is associated with claustrophobic and social fears, whereas DS is associated with all four fear subtypes examined (claustrophobic, social, blood-injection-injury and animal). However, trait anxiety and DS did not account for all variance shared by fear subtypes. The addition of a generalized "fear factor" accounted for significant residual shared variance between the four fear subtypes, beyond that accounted for by trait anxiety and DS. Study 2 (N=213) generally replicated these results. Findings suggest that the hierarchic structural model of fears would benefit from inclusion of trait anxiety and DS as higher-order contributors to fearfulness.

  5. A Hierarchical Three-Factor Model of Inattention-Hyperactivity-Impulsivity Derived from the Attention Problems Syndrome of the Teacher's Report Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumenci, Levent; McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Achenbach, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test three plausible conceptualizations of Inattention-Hyperactivity-Impulsivity (Ina-H-I) derived from the Attention Problems syndrome of the Teacher's Report Form (TRF): (a) a one factor model representing a general Ina-H-I factor; (b) a correlated two-factor model representing the Inattention (Ina) and…

  6. Psychometric properties of the SDM-Q-9 questionnaire for shared decision-making in multiple sclerosis: item response theory modelling and confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Javier; Moral, Ester; Brieva, Luis; Ruiz-Beato, Elena; Prefasi, Daniel; Maurino, Jorge

    2017-04-22

    Shared decision-making is a cornerstone of patient-centred care. The 9-item Shared Decision-Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) is a brief self-assessment tool for measuring patients' perceived level of involvement in decision-making related to their own treatment and care. Information related to the psychometric properties of the SDM-Q-9 for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the items composing the SDM-Q-9 and its dimensional structure in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. A non-interventional, cross-sectional study in adult patients with relapsing-remitting MS was conducted in 17 MS units throughout Spain. A nonparametric item response theory (IRT) analysis was used to assess the latent construct and dimensional structure underlying the observed responses. A parametric IRT model, General Partial Credit Model, was fitted to obtain estimates of the relationship between the latent construct and item characteristics. The unidimensionality of the SDM-Q-9 instrument was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis. A total of 221 patients were studied (mean age = 42.1 ± 9.9 years, 68.3% female). Median Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 2.5 ± 1.5. Most patients reported taking part in each step of the decision-making process. Internal reliability of the instrument was high (Cronbach's α = 0.91) and the overall scale scalability score was 0.57, indicative of a strong scale. All items, except for the item 1, showed scalability indices higher than 0.30. Four items (items 6 through to 9) conveyed more than half of the SDM-Q-9 overall information (67.3%). The SDM-Q-9 was a good fit for a unidimensional latent structure (comparative fit index = 0.98, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.07). All freely estimated parameters were statistically significant (P 0.40) with the exception of item 1 which presented the lowest loading (0.26). Items 6 through to 8 were the

  7. Hierarchical differentiation of myeloid progenitors is encoded in the transcription factor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumsiek, Jan; Marr, Carsten; Schroeder, Timm; Theis, Fabian J

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is an ideal model system for stem cell biology with advanced experimental access. A systems view on the interactions of core transcription factors is important for understanding differentiation mechanisms and dynamics. In this manuscript, we construct a Boolean network to model myeloid differentiation, specifically from common myeloid progenitors to megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, granulocytes and monocytes. By interpreting the hematopoietic literature and translating experimental evidence into Boolean rules, we implement binary dynamics on the resulting 11-factor regulatory network. Our network contains interesting functional modules and a concatenation of mutual antagonistic pairs. The state space of our model is a hierarchical, acyclic graph, typifying the principles of myeloid differentiation. We observe excellent agreement between the steady states of our model and microarray expression profiles of two different studies. Moreover, perturbations of the network topology correctly reproduce reported knockout phenotypes in silico. We predict previously uncharacterized regulatory interactions and alterations of the differentiation process, and line out reprogramming strategies.

  8. A note on upscaling retardation factor in hierarchical porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanian, Mohamad Reza; Huang, Chaocheng; Dai, Zhenxue; Deng, Hailin

    2014-01-01

    We present a model for upscaling the time-dependent effective retardation factor in hierarchical porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies. The model extends the approach by Deng et al. (2013) in which they expanded a Lagrangian-based stochastic theory presented by Rajaram (1997) in order to describe the scaling effect of retardation factor. They used a first-order linear approximation in deriving their model to make the derivation tractable. Importantly, the linear approximation is known to be valid only to variances of 0.2. In this article we show that the model can be derived with a higher-order approximation, which allows for representing variances from 0.2 to 1.0. We present the derivation, and use the resulting model to recalculate the time-dependent effective retardation for the scenario examined by Deng et al. (2013).

  9. Accelerated Multiplicative Updates and Hierarchical ALS Algorithms for Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Gillis, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is a data analysis technique used in a great variety of applications such as text mining, image processing, hyperspectral data analysis, computational biology, and clustering. In this paper, we consider two well-known algorithms designed to solve NMF problems, namely the multiplicative updates of Lee and Seung and the hierarchical alternating least squares of Cichocki et al. We propose a simple way to significantly accelerate their convergence, based on a careful analysis of the computational cost needed at each iteration. This acceleration technique can also be applied to other algorithms, which we illustrate on the projected gradient method of Lin. The efficiency of the accelerated algorithms is empirically demonstrated on image and text datasets, and compares favorably with a state-of-the-art alternating nonnegative least squares algorithm. Finally, we provide a theoretical argument based on the properties of NMF and its solutions that explains in particular the very ...

  10. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-10-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study; therefore, an exploration of the factors that affect science performances of Hong Kong students can give a lens to examine how science education can be improved in Hong Kong and other countries. The analyses reveal that student backgrounds as male, at higher grade levels, and born in mainland (when in the same grade) are associated with better science performance. Among the attitudinal factors, enjoyment of science and self-efficacy in science play important roles in scientific achievements. Most of the parental factors, on the other hand, are not having significant impacts on achievement after student attitudes are taken into account, with only parents' value of science having a small effect. School student intake is found to be a strong predictor of school average achievement, as well as a major mediator of the effects of school enrollment size and school socio-economic status. The findings differ from recently reported results, which suggested that school enrollment size was associated with achievement. This study also points out the problems of the use of science instruction time as a school-level variable to explain science achievement in Hong Kong.

  11. The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F): Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses at Item Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Cano, Francisco; Berben, A. B. G.; De la Fuente, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    The underlying structure of the Revised Two Factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F), a 20-item instrument for the evaluation of students' approaches to learning (SAL), was examined at item level using two independent groups of undergraduate students enrolled in the first (n = 314) and last (n = 522) years of their studies. The…

  12. The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F): Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses at Item Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Cano, Francisco; Berben, A. B. G.; De la Fuente, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    The underlying structure of the Revised Two Factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F), a 20-item instrument for the evaluation of students' approaches to learning (SAL), was examined at item level using two independent groups of undergraduate students enrolled in the first (n = 314) and last (n = 522) years of their studies. The…

  13. Hierarchical modeling of indoor radon concentration: how much do geology and building factors matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoni, Riccardo; De Francesco, Davide; De Bartolo, Daniela; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2014-12-01

    Radon is a natural gas known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure and only second to smoking as major leading cause of lung cancer. The main concern is in indoor environments where the gas tends to accumulate and can reach high concentrations. The primary contributor of this gas into the building is from the soil although architectonic characteristics, such as building materials, can largely affect concentration values. Understanding the factors affecting the concentration in dwellings and workplaces is important both in prevention, when the construction of a new building is being planned, and in mitigation when the amount of Radon detected inside a building is too high. In this paper we investigate how several factors, such as geologic typologies of the soil and a range of building characteristics, impact on indoor concentration focusing, in particular, on how concentration changes as a function of the floor level. Adopting a mixed effects model to account for the hierarchical nature of the data, we also quantify the extent to which such measurable factors manage to explain the variability of indoor radon concentration.

  14. Hierarchical Interactions of Homeodomain and Forkhead Transcription Factors in Regulating Odontogenic Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Shankar R.; Li, Xiao; Amen, Melanie A.; Florez, Sergio; Gutierrez, Diana; Cao, Huojun; Wang, Jianbo; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    FoxJ1 is a forkhead transcription factor expressed in multiple tissues during development and a major regulator of cilia development. FoxJ1−/− mice present with defects in odontogenesis, and we correlate these defects to hierarchical interactions between homeodomain factors Pitx2 and Dlx2 with FoxJ1 in regulating their expression through direct physical interactions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal endogenous Pitx2 and Dlx2 binding to the Dlx2 promoter and Dlx2 binding to the FoxJ1 promoter as well as Dlx2 and FoxJ1 binding to the amelogenin promoter. PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 promoter is attenuated by a direct Dlx2 physical interaction with PITX2. Dlx2 autoregulates its promoter, and Dlx2 transcriptionally activates the downstream gene FoxJ1. Dlx2 and FoxJ1 physically interact and synergistically regulate both Dlx2 and FoxJ1 promoters. Dlx2 and FoxJ1 also activate the amelogenin promoter, and amelogenin is required for enamel formation and late stage tooth development. FoxJ1−/− mice maxillary and mandibular incisors are reduced in length and width and have reduced amelogenin expression. FoxJ1−/− mice show a reduced and defective ameloblast layer, revealing a biological effect of these transcription factor hierarchies during tooth morphogenesis. These transcriptional mechanisms may contribute to other developmental processes such as neuronal, pituitary, and heart development. PMID:21504905

  15. Hierarchical Factor Structure of the Turkish Version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory in a Normal Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mucahit Kagan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Negative consequences of traumatic experiences, such as depression, anxiety, or dissociative symptoms, etc. have been reported by many researchers. However, it is proposed that stressful events not only lead to poor psychological outcomes but also may trigger positive changes. Several instruments gauging posttraumatic benefits have been developed to examine the effects of factors that may promote positive psychological outcomes in the aftermath of stressful events. The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI is one of the prominent instruments that assess posttraumatic positive changes. In this study we aimed to assess psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the PTGI. Method: This study differed to an extent from previous studies concerning the features of the PTGI. We used a dispositional form of the instrument in a sample recruited from high school and university students. Our data were collected from 723 volunteers. 367 subjects were males (50.76% and 356 subjects were females (49.24%. Also we did not specify any selection criteria in recruiting subjects owing to their adverse life experiences with a presumption that stressful life events are not uncommon in normal population. We administered to participants a dispositional form of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and the Personal View Survey-III. Item statistics for the measure were computed. We performed an explanatory factor analysis by using principal components with promax rotation and a confirmatory factor analysis by using structural equation modeling. Since the factor inter-correlations were higher than .40 we computed Schmid-Leiman transformation to obtain second-order general factor loadings. Inner consistencies and 15-day test-retest intracorrelations were calculated. Results: Item discrimination indexes ranged from .28 to .72. Promax rotated principal components analysis pointed out a three-factor structure. It was found in model testing with structural

  16. The role of self-perceived usefulness and competence in the self-esteem of elderly adults: confirmatory factor analyses of the Bachman revision of Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzijn, R; Keeves, J; Luszcz, M; Feather, N T

    1998-03-01

    This article reports on a confirmatory analytic study of the Bachman Revision (1970) of Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (1965) that was used in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ALSA). Participants comprised 1,087 elderly people aged between 70 and 103 years (mean 77 years). Five competing factor models were tested with LISREL8. The best-fitting model was a nested one, with a General Self-Esteem second-order factor and two first-order factors, Positive Self-regard and Usefulness/Competence. This model was validated with data from a later wave of ALSA. Usefulness and competence have received little attention in the gerontological literature to date. Preliminary results indicate that usefulness/competence may be an important predictor of well-being. Further work is required on the relationships among usefulness, competence, self-esteem, and well-being in elderly people.

  17. Asian mode of production as the factor of alternative modernization hierarchical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Medviedieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the interpretation of the Asiatic mode of production as a factor controlesysteem hierarchical confucian ethics. The authors concluded that confucianism as a type of social morality was formed in the conditions of the asiatic mode of production, which provides parallel processes of modernization façade Asian societies while maintaining the traditional Confucian framework and basic institutions of traditionalist society. Therefore, in the asiatic mode of production, there are only two social groups: the family and the state, or rather, family, existing outside the state (in the community, and the family that exists in the state as the ruling class. Therefore, gaining access to the state is important for the family, but because it is important to make sure that families were among those who fall into the state apparatus. Therefore, a society that offers an accelerated version of upward mobility remains virtually unshakable basis on the level and extremely mobile on the level of the superstructure. However, the general appearance is the impossibility of autonomous in relation to the state of the competitive environment, the emergence of the urban population as the local community, in an environment where emerging bourgeoisie as a social group.

  18. Analysis of acoustic cardiac signals for heart rate variability and murmur detection using nonnegative matrix factorization-based hierarchical decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Ghafoor; Koch, Peter; Papadias, Constantinos B.

    2014-01-01

    . A novel method based on hierarchical decomposition of the single channel mixture using various nonnegative matrix factorization techniques is proposed, which provides unsupervised clustering of the underlying component signals. HRV is determined over the recovered normal cardiac acoustic signals....... This novel decomposition technique is compared against the state-of-the-art techniques; experiments are performed using real-world clinical data, which show the potential significance of the proposed technique....

  19. Factorial invariance of child self-report across healthy and chronic health condition groups: a confirmatory factor analysis utilizing the PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbers, Christine A; Newman, Daniel A; Varni, James W

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the factorial invariance of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales for child self-report across 11,433 children ages 5-18 with chronic health conditions and healthy children. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis was performed specifying a five-factor model. Two multigroup structural equation models, one with constrained parameters and the other with unconstrained parameters, were proposed in order to compare the factor loadings across children with chronic health conditions and healthy children. Metric invariance (i.e., equal factor loadings) was demonstrated based on stability of the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) between the two models, and several additional indices of practical fit including the root mean squared error of approximation, the Non-normed Fit Index, and the Parsimony Normed Fit Index. The findings support an equivalent five-factor structure on the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales across healthy and chronic health condition groups. These findings suggest that when differences are found across chronic health condition and healthy groups when utilizing the PedsQL, these differences are more likely real differences in self-perceived health-related quality of life, rather than differences in interpretation of the PedsQL items as a function of health status.

  20. Anxiety Sensitivity in School Attending Youth: Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the 18-Item CASI in a Multicultural South African Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lindi; Kidd, Martin; Seedat, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders in youth. To date, the applicability of the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (CASI) in youth from a low or middle income country (LMIC) setting on the African continent has not been assessed. A representative sample of 1149 secondary school learners from 29 schools in Cape Town, South Africa, participated in the study. Participants completed the CASI on a single occasion. One-, two-, and four-factor models of the CASI were assessed. A one-factor solution that comprised items predominantly represented by physical concerns appeared to provide the best fit to our data, however, relatively low variance (26%) was explained. Subsequent item deletion resulted in a 9-item 'physical concerns' factor that showed good construct reliability (0.83) but also explained a low amount of variance (35%). In terms of gender, a one-factor model provided the best fit, however, low variance was explained (i.e., 25%). Configural, metric and scalar invariance of the CASI by gender was determined. Our results suggest that the 18-item CASI is not applicable to our target population and may require adaptation in this population; however, replication of this study in other multicultural adolescent samples in South Africa is first needed to further assess the validity of the AS construct as measured by the CASI.

  1. Evaluation of B2C website based on the usability factors by using fuzzy AHP & hierarchical fuzzy TOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masudin, I.; Saputro, T. E.

    2016-02-01

    In today's technology, electronic trading transaction via internet has been utilized properly with rapid growth. This paper intends to evaluate related to B2C e-commerce website in order to find out the one which meets the usability factors better than another. The influential factors to B2C e-commerce website are determined for two big retailer websites. The factors are investigated based on the consideration of several studies and conformed to the website characteristics. The evaluation is conducted by using different methods namely fuzzy AHP and hierarchical fuzzy TOPSIS so that the final evaluation can be compared. Fuzzy triangular number is adopted to deal with imprecise judgment under fuzzy environment.

  2. Inference of Environmental Factor-Microbe and Microbe-Microbe Associations from Metagenomic Data Using a Hierarchical Bayesian Statistical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuqing; Chen, Ning; Chen, Ting

    2017-01-25

    The inference of associations between environmental factors and microbes and among microbes is critical to interpreting metagenomic data, but compositional bias, indirect associations resulting from common factors, and variance within metagenomic sequencing data limit the discovery of associations. To account for these problems, we propose metagenomic Lognormal-Dirichlet-Multinomial (mLDM), a hierarchical Bayesian model with sparsity constraints, to estimate absolute microbial abundance and simultaneously infer both conditionally dependent associations among microbes and direct associations between microbes and environmental factors. We empirically show the effectiveness of the mLDM model using synthetic data, data from the TARA Oceans project, and a colorectal cancer dataset. Finally, we apply mLDM to 16S sequencing data from the western English Channel and report several associations. Our model can be used on both natural environmental and human metagenomic datasets, promoting the understanding of associations in the microbial community.

  3. Investigating the Hierarchical Factor Structure of the Fifth Edition of the 16PF: An Application of the Schmid-Leiman Orthogonalization Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshenko, Oleksandr S.; Stark, Stephen; Chan, Kim Yin

    2001-01-01

    Studied the unidimensionality of the 16 noncognitive scales of the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) and the hierarchical factor structure of the inventory. Results using the Schmid Leiman orthogonalization procedure (J. Schmid and J. Leiman, 1957) showed that the noncognitive multi-item composites could be factored into 16…

  4. The structure of post-traumatic stress symptoms in survivors of war: confirmatory factor analyses of the Impact of Event Scale—Revised

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Böhme, H.F.; Ajdukovic, D.; Bogic, M.; Franciskovic, T.; Galeazzi, G.M.; Kucukalic, A.; Lecic-Tosevski, D.; Popovski, M.; Schützwohl, M.; Stangier, U.; Priebe, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at establishing the factor structure of the Impact of Event Scale—Revised (IES-R) in survivors of war. A total sample of 4167 participants with potentially traumatic experiences during the war in Ex-Yugoslavia was split into three samples: two independent samples of people who stayed

  5. The structure of post-traumatic stress symptoms in survivors of war: confirmatory factor analyses of the Impact of Event Scale—Revised

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Morina; H.F. Böhme; D. Ajdukovic; M. Bogic; T. Franciskovic; G.M. Galeazzi; A. Kucukalic; D. Lecic-Tosevski; M. Popovski; M. Schützwohl; U. Stangier; S. Priebe

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed at establishing the factor structure of the Impact of Event Scale—Revised (IES-R) in survivors of war. A total sample of 4167 participants with potentially traumatic experiences during the war in Ex-Yugoslavia was split into three samples: two independent samples of people who stayed

  6. Psychometric properties and confirmatory factor analysis of the CASP-19, a measure of quality of life in early old age: the HAPIEE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Kim (Gyu Ri); G. Netuveli (Gopalakrishnan); D. Blane (David); A. Peasey (Anne); S. Malyutina; G. Simonova (Galina); R. Kubinova; A. Pajak (Andrzej); S. Croezen (Simone); M. Bobak (Martin); H. Pikhart (Hynek)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The aim was to assess the reliability and validity of the quality of life (QoL) instrument CASP-19, and three shorter versions of CASP-12 in large population sample of older adults from the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol, and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe) study.Methods: Fr

  7. Factorial invariance of child self-report across age subgroups: a confirmatory factor analysis of ages 5 to 16 years utilizing the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbers, Christine A; Newman, Daniel A; Varni, James W

    2008-01-01

    The utilization of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measurement in an effort to improve pediatric health and well-being and determine the value of health care services has grown dramatically over the past decade. The paradigm shift toward patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials has provided the opportunity to emphasize the value and essential need for pediatric patient self-report. In order for HRQOL/PRO comparisons to be meaningful for subgroup analyses, it is essential to demonstrate factorial invariance. This study examined age subgroup factorial invariance of child self-report for ages 5 to 16 years on more than 8,500 children utilizing the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis (MGCFA) was performed specifying a five-factor model. Two multigroup structural equation models, one with constrained parameters and the other with unconstrained parameters, were proposed to compare the factor loadings across the age subgroups. Metric invariance (i.e., equal factor loadings) across the age subgroups was demonstrated based on stability of the Comparative Fit Index between the two models, and several additional indices of practical fit including the Root Mean Squared Error of Approximation, the Non-Normed Fit Index, and the Parsimony Normed Fit Index. The findings support an equivalent five-factor structure across the age subgroups. Based on these data, it can be concluded that children across the age subgroups in this study interpreted items on the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales in a similar manner regardless of their age.

  8. Universal-diverse orientation in Asian international students: confirmatory factor analysis of the Miville-Guzman universality-diversity scale, short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Karen; DeBlaere, Cirleen

    2014-07-01

    Despite apparent relevance to Asian international students, universal-diverse orientation (UDO) has not been psychometrically validated with this population. The current study investigated the most researched UDO measure, the Miville-Guzman Universality-Diversity Scale, Short Form (M-GUDS-S; Fuertes, Miville, Mohr, Sedlacek, & Gretchen, 2000), with 333 Asian international college students. The M-GUDS-S evidenced good reliability and convergent validity, and analyses confirmed a three-factor structure, supporting expanded use of the scale.

  9. An independent confirmatory factor analysis of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-fourth Edition (WISC-IV) integrated: what do the process approach subtests measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Nicholas; Hulac, David M; Bernstein, Joshua D

    2013-09-01

    The Wechsler intelligence scale for children--fourth edition (WISC-IV) Integrated contains the WISC-IV core and supplemental subtests along with process approach subtests designed to facilitate a process-oriented approach to score interpretation. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which WISC-IV Integrated subtests measure the constructs they are purported to measure. In addition to examining the measurement and scoring model provided in the manual, this study also tested hypotheses regarding Cattell-Horn-Carroll abilities that might be measured along with other substantive questions regarding the factor structure of the WISC-IV Integrated and the nature of abilities measured by process approach subtests. Results provide insight regarding the constructs measured by these subtests. Many subtests appear to be good to excellent measures of psychometric g (i.e., the general factor presumed to cause the positive correlation of mental tasks). Other abilities measured by subtests are described. For some subtests, the majority of variance is not accounted for by theoretical constructs included in the scoring model. Modifications made to remove demands such as memory recall and verbal expression were found to reduce construct-irrelevant variance. The WISC-IV Integrated subtests appear to measure similar constructs across ages 6-16, although strict factorial invariance was not supported.

  10. Pre-drinking motives in Canadian undergraduate students: Confirmatory factor analysis of the Prepartying Motivations Inventory and examination of new themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Ashlyne I; Lafreniere, Kathryn D; Jackson, Dennis L

    2016-09-01

    Pre-drinking is a risky, yet common activity among college students whereby they consume alcohol prior to going to an event where more alcohol may be consumed (LaBrie, Hummer, Pederson, Lac, & Chithambo, 2012). While general drinking motives have been studied extensively, attention to pre-drinking is recent, and deserves more attention. This study assessed the reliability, validity, and factor structure of the Prepartying Motivations Inventory (PMI), and identified novel motivations through a thematic analysis. A sample of 276 Canadian undergraduate students completed an online survey consisting of open-ended questions, drinking and pre-drinking questions, the PMI, and a brief demographic questionnaire. It was demonstrated that a four-factor model, similar to that of the initial PMI, fits well, but that improvements are made by eliminating an item related to being under the legal drinking age. Further, five new themes emerged that warrant further investigation, and possible inclusion in the current PMI. Findings suggest that the PMI could be refined to further understand students' motivations for pre-drinking, and might inform alcohol intervention programs on post-secondary campuses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An exploratory analysis of treatment completion and client and organizational factors using hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Albert; Das, Abhik; Raskin, Ira E; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A

    2006-11-01

    Data from the Alcohol and Drug Services Study (ADSS) are used to analyze the structure and operation of the substance abuse treatment industry in the United States. Published literature contains little systematic empirical analysis of the interaction between organizational characteristics and treatment outcomes. This paper addresses that deficit. It develops and tests a hierarchical linear model (HLM) to address questions about the empirical relationship between treatment inputs (industry costs, types and use of counseling and medical personnel, diagnosis mix, patient demographics, and the nature and level of services used in substance abuse treatment), and patient outcomes (retention and treatment completion rates). The paper adds to the literature by demonstrating a direct and statistically significant link between treatment completion and the organizational and staffing structure of the treatment setting. Related reimbursement issues, questions for future analysis, and limitations of the ADSS for this analysis are discussed.

  12. Development of the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire in patients with chronic low back pain: cross-cultural adaptation, confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Ferrari, Silvano; Mugnai, Raffaele; Pillastrini, Paolo; Rocca, Barbara; Vanti, Carla; Foti, Calogero

    2014-09-01

    Translating, culturally adapting and validating the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ-I) to allow its use with Italian-speaking patients with low back pain. The PSOCQ-I was developed by forward-backward translation, a final review by an expert committee and a test of the prefinal version to establish its correspondence with the original English version. Psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation), and construct validity by comparing PSOCQ-I with the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS), the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Roland Morris Disability Scale (RMDQ), a pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Pearson's correlation). The questionnaire was administered to 308 patients with chronic low back pain. Factor analysis confirmed a four-factor solution (namely, Precontemplation, Contemplation, Action, and Maintenance), achieving an acceptable data-model fit. Internal consistency (α=0.91-93) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation=0.74-0.81) were satisfactory. Construct validity showed moderate correlations between Precontemplation and PCS (r=0.318), TSK (r=0.385), RMDQ (r=0.320) and NRS (r=0.335); low correlations were found between the other PSOCQ subscales and PCS (r=-0.062; 0.039), TSK (r=-0.164; 0.024), RMDQ (r=-0.073; 0.004) and NRS (r=-0.170; 0.020). Low correlations were found between the PSOCQ-I subscales and anxiety (r=-0.132; 0.150) and depression (r=-0.113; 0.186). The PSOCQ was translated successfully into Italian, and proved to have a good factorial structure and psychometric properties that replicated the results of other versions. Its use is recommended for research purposes.

  13. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 Análisis factorial confirmatoria de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 Análise fatorial confirmatória da versão portuguesa da Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21

    OpenAIRE

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo; Barry Allen Tanner; Cynthia Lee Arfken

    2012-01-01

    To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years) comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The co...

  14. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Patient Safety Culture in an Iranian Hospital: A Case Study of Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Najafabad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transformation of patient safety culture towards developing an open culture can be the greatest challenge for achieving a safe healthcare system. This study aimed to carry out a structural analysis of the Persian translation version of a questionnaire assessing patient safety culture. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted to evaluate the Persian translation of patient safety culture questionnaire, developed by the National Patient Safety Agency. The questionnaire includes seven sections and 43 items investigating 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. The reliability of this questionnaire was confirmed with Cronbach's alpha (α>0.8. The questionnaire was distributed among employees of the Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Najafabad, Iran, 2015. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18 and Amos 18. Results: Sufficiency of the sample size, as determined by Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure, was 0.809, which was significantly associated with zero; therefore, performing factor analysis was acceptable and justifiable. The value of Bartlett's test was 696, P-value was less than 0.001, and degree of freedom was equal to 91. In the final model, the relative Chi-square was equal to 1.75 and P-value was less than 0.001. Also, parsimony normed fit index, parsimony-adjusted comparative fit index, and root mean square error of approximation were equal to 0.571, 0.621, and 0.065, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results of fitting indices for the model and the questionnaire used in the present study for assessing patient safety culture, it can be stated that the Persian translation of this instrument is valid and hospitals can use it to monitor patient safety culture improvement.

  15. Clarifying the effect of behavioral and clinical factors on traumatic dental injuries in childhood: a hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Feldens, Eliane Gerson; Bruch, Cristina Montini; Ferreira, Simone Helena; Feldens, Carlos Alberto

    2015-06-01

    To explore associations between traumatic dental injuries (TDI) in Brazilian preschool children and clinical, behavioral, and socio-demographic factors using a hierarchical approach. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 1316 children aged 0-5 years at public preschools in the city of Canoas (southern Brazil). Demographic (sex and age), socioeconomic (mother's schooling, income and family structure) and behavioral (use of pacifier, breastfeeding duration and bottle use at 12 months) factors were collected through a questionnaire. TDI (Andreasen criteria) and malocclusion (overjet and anterior open bite) were recorded by trained and calibrated examiners. Poisson regression was employed to determine factors associated with TDI using a hierarchical approach. The prevalence of TDI was 13.3%. In the final model, the probability of TDI was 50% higher in children who used a pacifier (PR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.08-2.10), 77% higher in children with overjet between 3 and 5 mm (PR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.22-2.57) and nearly threefold higher in children with overjet > 5 mm (PR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.77-4.20) compared with children with overjet ≤ 2 mm. Additional analysis demonstrated that overjet represented the pathway by which pacifier use was associated with TDI. Pacifier use is strongly associated with the occurrence of TDI in the primary dentition, and accentuated overjet represents a pathway to this association. These findings suggest the need for prevention strategies that address early counseling on pacifier use to reduce the occurrence of TDI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hierarchical Specification of Pruriceptors by Runt-Domain Transcription Factor Runx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Huang, Chengcheng; Wu, Xiaohua; Tao, Yeqi; Yan, Jingjing; Shi, Tianyong; Cao, Cheng; Han, Lu; Qiu, Mengsheng; Ma, Qiufu; Liu, Zijing; Liu, Yang

    2017-05-31

    The somatic sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) detect and transmit a diverse array of sensory modalities, such as pain, itch, cold, warm, touch, and others. Recent genetic and single-cell RNA sequencing studies have revealed a group of DRG neurons that could be particularly relevant for acute and chronic itch information transmission. They express the natriuretic peptide type B (NPPB), as well as a cohort of receptors and neuropeptides that have been implicated in chronic itch manifestation, including the interleukin-31 receptor A (IL-31ra) and its coreceptor oncostatin M receptor (Osmr), the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (Cysltr2), somatostatin, and neurotensin. However, how these neurons are generated during development remains unclear. Here we report that Runx1 is required to establish all these molecular features of NPPB(+) neurons. We further show that while early embryonic Runx1 activity is required for the formation of NPPB(+) cells, at later stages Runx1 switches to a genetic repressor and thus its downregulation becomes a prerequisite for the proper development of these pruriceptors. This mode by Runx1 is analogous to that in controlling another group of pruriceptors that specifically express the chloroquine receptor MrgprA3. Finally, behavioral studies using both sexes of mice revealed marked deficits in processing acute and chronic itch in Runx1 conditional knock-out mice, possibly attributable to impaired development of various pruriceptors.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our studies reveal a generalized control mode by Runx1 for pruriceptor development and consolidate a hierarchical control mechanism for the formation of sensory neurons transmitting distinct modalities. Among dorsal root ganglion neurons that initially express the neurotrophin receptor TrkA, Runx1 is necessary for the proper development of those neurons that innervate tissues derived from the ectoderm such as skin epidermis and hair follicles. These Runx1-dependent cutaneous

  17. Análise confirmatória do Questionário de Satisfação do Atleta: versão Portuguesa Confirmatory factor analysis of the Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire (ASQ: Portuguese version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. Chicau Borrego

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O objectivo do estudo foi examinar as propriedades psicométrica da versão Portuguesa do Questionário de Satisfação do Atleta ([QSA/Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire - ASQ], Riemer & Chelladurai, 1998, através da análise factorial confirmatória, uma vez que as características culturais e de idioma podem afectar a aplicação e interpretação do questionário. O QSA possui 14 dimensões, com 54 itens e visa avaliar a satisfação do atleta com a sua experiência desportiva. O modelo foi testado com uma amostra de 527 atletas de diferentes modalidades: basquetebol, andebol, futebol e voleibol, dos campeonatos nacionais e regionais de Portugal. Todos os factores apresentam elevados coeficientes de consistência interna, com valores de alpha de Cronbach entre a=0,70 e a =0,94. De uma forma geral os valores dos indicadores globais de ajustamento do modelo observado, resultantes da análise factorial confirmatória (robustos TLI/NNFI=0,93, CFI=0,93 e do IFI=0,93, RMSEA=0,042 (0,039 - 0,044 e o índice SRMR=0,05 expressam a sua qualidade. Assim, os resultados sugerem que a avaliação da satisfação do atleta nas diversas facetas consideradas relevantes para a sua experiencia desportiva, parece poder ser realizada em futuras pesquisas, através da utilização do ASQ versão portuguesaThe purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire (ASQ, developed by Riemer and Chelladurai (1998, through confirmatory factor analysis since cultural and language characteristics can affect the applicability and the interpretation of the multidimensional Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire. The ASQ has 14 dimensions, with 54 items to evaluate the athletes' satisfaction with their sports experience. The model was tested with a sample of 527 athletes (basketball, handball, soccer and volleyball players from national and regional championships in Portugal. All factors have good

  18. Replication and extension of a hierarchical model of social anxiety and depression: fear of positive evaluation as a key unique factor in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Wang, Hsu, Chiu, and Liang (2012, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26, 215-224) recently proposed a hierarchical model of social interaction anxiety and depression to account for both the commonalities and distinctions between these conditions. In the present paper, this model was extended to more broadly encompass the symptoms of social anxiety disorder, and replicated in a large unselected, undergraduate sample (n = 585). Structural equation modeling (SEM) and hierarchical regression analyses were employed. Negative affect and positive affect were conceptualized as general factors shared by social anxiety and depression; fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and disqualification of positive social outcomes were operationalized as specific factors, and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) was operationalized as a factor unique to social anxiety. This extended hierarchical model explicates structural relationships among these factors, in which the higher-level, general factors (i.e., high negative affect and low positive affect) represent vulnerability markers of both social anxiety and depression, and the lower-level factors (i.e., FNE, disqualification of positive social outcomes, and FPE) are the dimensions of specific cognitive features. Results from SEM and hierarchical regression analyses converged in support of the extended model. FPE is further supported as a key symptom that differentiates social anxiety from depression.

  19. Student Academic Optimism: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan; Bankole, Regina A.; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Moore, Dennis M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to add to the literature on Academic Optimism, a composite measure composed of teacher perceptions of trust in students, academic press, and collective efficacy by exploring a similar set of constructs from the student perceptive. The relationships between student trust in teachers, student perceptions of academic…

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Transfer Student Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob T. N.; Litzler, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Transfer students' adjustment to college has received substantial attention by researchers. This focus has predominately investigated the observation of "transfer shock": a decrease in grade point average (GPA) experienced after transferring. In response to the persistent focus on transfer shock, growing attention has been directed…

  1. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure of the WISC-IV Spanish Using Hierarchical Exploratory Factor Analytic Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    As recommended by Carroll, the present study examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish (WISC-IV Spanish) normative sample using higher order exploratory factor analytic techniques not included in the WISC-IV Spanish Technical Manual. Results indicated that the WISC-IV Spanish subtests were…

  2. Orthogonal Higher Order Structure of the WISC-IV Spanish Using Hierarchical Exploratory Factor Analytic Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    As recommended by Carroll, the present study examined the factor structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish (WISC-IV Spanish) normative sample using higher order exploratory factor analytic techniques not included in the WISC-IV Spanish Technical Manual. Results indicated that the WISC-IV Spanish subtests were…

  3. A CONFIRMATORY APPROACH TO MEASURING RISKS IN SUPPLY CHAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constangioara Alexandru

    2014-07-01

    Our proposed research methodology reveals the advantages of a confirmatory factor analysis over an exploratory principal component analysis in the context of risks management in supply chains. Moreover, as Sodhi and Tang (2012 reveals, more than half of papers in existing SCRM literature are either conceptual or qualitative empirical (case studies. Our proposed quantitative methodology contributes to reducing the above mentioned gap, providing results that can be used for statistical inferences and for enhancing the efficiency of the managerial decisional process.

  4. Factors Associated With Rehabilitation Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparing Functional Outcomes Between TBIMS Centers Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdah, Marie N; Hofmann, Melissa; Pretz, Christopher; An, Viktoriya; Barnes, Sunni A; Bennett, Monica; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas; Shafi, Shahid

    To examine differences in patient outcomes across Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) rehabilitation centers and factors that influence these differences using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Sixteen TBIMS centers. A total of 2056 individuals 16 years or older with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received inpatient rehabilitation. Multicenter observational cohort study using HLM to analyze prospectively collected data. Functional Independence Measure and Disability Rating Scale total scores at discharge and 1 year post-TBI. Duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) demonstrated a significant inverse relationship with functional outcomes. However, the magnitude of this relationship (change in functional status for each additional day in PTA) varied among centers. Functional status at discharge from rehabilitation and at 1 year post-TBI could be predicted using the slope and intercept of each TBIMS center for the duration of PTA, by comparing it against the average slope and intercept. HLM demonstrated center effect due to variability in the relationship between PTA and functional outcomes of patients. This variability is not accounted for in traditional linear regression modeling. Future studies examining variations in patient outcomes between centers should utilize HLM to measure the impact of additional factors that influence patient rehabilitation functional outcomes.

  5. Hierarchical classification strategy for Phenotype extraction from epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Cao (Lu); M. Graauw (Marjo de); K. Yan (Kuan); L.C.J. Winkel (Leah C.J.); F.J. Verbeek (Fons)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Endocytosis is regarded as a mechanism of attenuating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and of receptor degradation. There is increasing evidence becoming available showing that breast cancer progression is associated with a defect in EGFR endocytosis. In

  6. [Tooth decay and associated factors among adolescents in the north of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil: a hierarchical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Freire, Rafael Silveira; Nepomuceno, Marcela Oliveira; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Marcopito, Luiz Francisco

    2015-11-01

    This is a cross-sectional population-based study (n = 763) conducted in the north of the State of Minas Gerais, which aimed to investigate the prevalence of tooth decay among adolescents and to identify the potential determinants of same. Probability sampling by conglomerates in multiple stages was used. Trained and calibrated professionals performed the data collection by means of intraoral examination and interviews in the previously selected households. In the analysis of the determinant factor for the presence of tooth decay, hierarchical binary logistic regression models were used. The prevalence of tooth decay, decayed, missing and filled teeth were 71.3%, 36.5%, 55.6% and 16%, respectively. The following averages were observed: DMFT (3.4 teeth), number of decayed (0.8 teeth), restored (2.4 teeth) and missing (0.2 teeth). The incidence of tooth decay was higher among adolescents who stated they were black/indigenous/brown (OR = 1.76), lived in crowded households (OR = 2.4), did not regularly visit or had never been to a dentist (OR = 1.9), used public or philanthropic services (OR = 1,8), had smoking habits (OR = 4.1), consumed alcohol (OR = 1.8), perceived their oral health negatively (OR = 5.9 and OR = 1.9) and had toothac in the last six months (OR = 2.0).

  7. 公立医疗机构医生工作满意度结构的验证性因素分析%Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Job Satisfaction Structure of Physicians from Public Medical Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宜民; 冯学山

    2011-01-01

    目的 通过探讨公立医疗机构医生工作满意度的潜在因素结构,评价测量工具的结构效度.方法 自编医生工作满意度问卷(PJSQ-PMI),根据预调查探索性因素分析(EFA)结果提出假设模型,利用正式调查数据(N=1 451)进行多样本、多阶层验证性因素分析(CFA).结果 由58个原始指标组成的五因素模型Model A、A′的拟合效果不佳,而经项目组合后的简化修饰模型Model B′(含13个指标)与实际数据的拟合状态理想(GFI、NFI、CFI、IFI>0.9,RMSEA=0.075,RMR=0.024),在不同地区的样本中都获得支持;进一步构建的二阶模型Model C同样达到拟合要求(RMSEA=0.086,RMR=0.025,γ≥0.64),与Model B′的拟合卡方值之差CMIN=10.163,DF=5,P>0.05,根据简效法则接受Model C为较佳模型.结论 经EFA 与CFA相结合的多样本交叉检验显示,公立医疗机构医生工作满意度的潜在结构为简化的五因素二阶模型,表明问卷总体上具有较好的结构效度和测量稳定性.%Objective To assess construct validity of measurement tool through a probe into latent factorial structure of physicians' job satisfaction from public medical institutions. Methods Multi-sample, multi-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used in inspection of hypothesis models constructed according to the result of exploratory factor analysis(EFA). Formal data of three cities were surveyed by self-compiled PJS-PMI questionnaire. Results Though the five-factor model A&A' made of fifty-eight original indicators wasn't fitted well, the simplified model B'( including thirteen indicators)through item parceling could be supported ideally by entire sample data( GFI 、NFI、 CFI、IFI > 0. 9 ,RMSEA = 0. 075, RMR = 0. 024), and the same as by three single samples. Moreover, the second-order model C, raised on the basis of model B', could also reach the goodness-of-fit standards ( RMSEA = 0. 086, RMR = 0. 025,γ ≥ 0.64,ΔCMIN=10. 163,ΔDF=5,P>0. 05) and be

  8. Hierarchical photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Jiaguo; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2016-05-01

    As a green and sustainable technology, semiconductor-based heterogeneous photocatalysis has received much attention in the last few decades because it has potential to solve both energy and environmental problems. To achieve efficient photocatalysts, various hierarchical semiconductors have been designed and fabricated at the micro/nanometer scale in recent years. This review presents a critical appraisal of fabrication methods, growth mechanisms and applications of advanced hierarchical photocatalysts. Especially, the different synthesis strategies such as two-step templating, in situ template-sacrificial dissolution, self-templating method, in situ template-free assembly, chemically induced self-transformation and post-synthesis treatment are highlighted. Finally, some important applications including photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic H2 production and photocatalytic CO2 reduction are reviewed. A thorough assessment of the progress made in photocatalysis may open new opportunities in designing highly effective hierarchical photocatalysts for advanced applications ranging from thermal catalysis, separation and purification processes to solar cells.

  9. Global trends and factors associated with the illegal killing of elephants: A hierarchical bayesian analysis of carcass encounter data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Robert W; Underwood, Fiona M; Blanc, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Elephant poaching and the ivory trade remain high on the agenda at meetings of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Well-informed debates require robust estimates of trends, the spatial distribution of poaching, and drivers of poaching. We present an analysis of trends and drivers of an indicator of elephant poaching of all elephant species. The site-based monitoring system known as Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE), set up by the 10(th) Conference of the Parties of CITES in 1997, produces carcass encounter data reported mainly by anti-poaching patrols. Data analyzed were site by year totals of 6,337 carcasses from 66 sites in Africa and Asia from 2002-2009. Analysis of these observational data is a serious challenge to traditional statistical methods because of the opportunistic and non-random nature of patrols, and the heterogeneity across sites. Adopting a bayesian hierarchical modeling approach, we used the proportion of carcasses that were illegally killed (PIKE) as a poaching index, to estimate the trend and the effects of site- and country-level factors associated with poaching. Important drivers of illegal killing that emerged at country level were poor governance and low levels of human development, and at site level, forest cover and area of the site in regions where human population density is low. After a drop from 2002, PIKE remained fairly constant from 2003 until 2006, after which it increased until 2008. The results for 2009 indicate a decline. Sites with PIKE ranging from the lowest to the highest were identified. The results of the analysis provide a sound information base for scientific evidence-based decision making in the CITES process.

  10. Global trends and factors associated with the illegal killing of elephants: A hierarchical bayesian analysis of carcass encounter data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Burn

    Full Text Available Elephant poaching and the ivory trade remain high on the agenda at meetings of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES. Well-informed debates require robust estimates of trends, the spatial distribution of poaching, and drivers of poaching. We present an analysis of trends and drivers of an indicator of elephant poaching of all elephant species. The site-based monitoring system known as Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE, set up by the 10(th Conference of the Parties of CITES in 1997, produces carcass encounter data reported mainly by anti-poaching patrols. Data analyzed were site by year totals of 6,337 carcasses from 66 sites in Africa and Asia from 2002-2009. Analysis of these observational data is a serious challenge to traditional statistical methods because of the opportunistic and non-random nature of patrols, and the heterogeneity across sites. Adopting a bayesian hierarchical modeling approach, we used the proportion of carcasses that were illegally killed (PIKE as a poaching index, to estimate the trend and the effects of site- and country-level factors associated with poaching. Important drivers of illegal killing that emerged at country level were poor governance and low levels of human development, and at site level, forest cover and area of the site in regions where human population density is low. After a drop from 2002, PIKE remained fairly constant from 2003 until 2006, after which it increased until 2008. The results for 2009 indicate a decline. Sites with PIKE ranging from the lowest to the highest were identified. The results of the analysis provide a sound information base for scientific evidence-based decision making in the CITES process.

  11. Hierarchical and Multidimensional Academic Self-Concept of Commercial Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung; Chui; Lau

    1999-10-01

    Adapting the Marsh (1990) Academic Self-Description Questionnaire (ASDQ), this study examined the academic self-concept of students in a school of commerce in Hong Kong (N = 212). Confirmatory factor analysis found that students clearly distinguished among self-concept constructs in English, Chinese, Math and Statistics, Economics, and Principles of Accounting, and each of these constructs was highly associated with a global Academic self-concept construct, reflecting the validity of each construct in measuring an academic component of self-concept. Domain-specific self-concepts were more highly related with students' intention of course selection in corresponding areas than in nonmatching areas, further supporting the multidimensionality of the students' academic self-concept. Students' self-concepts in the five curriculum domains can be represented by the global Academic self-concept, supporting the hierarchical structure of students' academic self-concept in an educational institution with a specific focus, such as commercial studies. The academic self-concepts of the commercial students are both multidimensional and hierarchical. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Factors Influencing Self-Regulation in E-learning 2.0: Confirmatory Factor Model | Facteurs qui influencent la maîtrise de soi en cyberapprentissage 2.0 : modèle de facteur confirmative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The importance of self-regulation in e-learning has been well noted in research. Relevant studies have shown a consistent positive correlation between learners’ self-regulation and their success rate in e-learning. Increasing attention has been paid to developing learners’ self-regulated abilities in e-learning. For students, what and how to learn are largely predetermined by the learning environment provided by their institutions. Environmental determinants play a key role in shaping self-regulation in the learning process. This paper reports a study on the influences of the e-learning 2.0 environment on self-regulation. The study identified the factors that influence self-regulation in such an environment and determine the relationships between the factors and self-regulation. A theoretical model to categorize the success factors for self-regulated learning was proposed for this kind of environment. Based on the model, a questionnaire was designed and administered to more than two hundred and fifty distance learning students in Beijing and Hong Kong. Through structural equation modeling (SEM technique, relationships between environmental factors and self-regulation were analyzed. Statistical results showed that several factors affect self-regulation in the e-learning 2.0 environment. They include system quality, information quality, service quality, and user satisfaction. L’importance de la maîtrise de soi en cyberapprentissage a été bien étudiée. Les études pertinentes ont démontré une corrélation positive uniforme entre la maîtrise de soi des apprenants et leurs taux de réussite en apprentissage en ligne. Une attention croissante a été portée au développement des aptitudes de maîtrise de soi des élèves en cyberapprentissage. Pour les élèves, quoi apprendre et comment sont des questions principalement prédéterminées par l’environnement d’apprentissage qu’offrent leurs établissements. Les d

  13. Modeling hierarchical structures - Hierarchical Linear Modeling using MPlus

    CERN Document Server

    Jelonek, M

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the technique (and its linkage with physics) of overcoming problems connected to modeling social structures, which are typically hierarchical. Hierarchical Linear Models provide a conceptual and statistical mechanism for drawing conclusions regarding the influence of phenomena at different levels of analysis. In the social sciences it is used to analyze many problems such as educational, organizational or market dilemma. This paper introduces the logic of modeling hierarchical linear equations and estimation based on MPlus software. I present my own model to illustrate the impact of different factors on school acceptation level.

  14. Hierarchical structure of maladaptive personality traits in older adults: joint factor analysis of the PID-5 and the DAPP-BQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Joke; Bastiaansen, Leen; Rossi, Gina; Dierckx, Eva; De Clercq, Barbara; Hofmans, Joeri

    2014-04-01

    In DSM-5, the categorical model and criteria for the 10 personality disorders included in DSM-IV will be reprinted in Section II. Moreover, an alternative dimensional classification model will appear in Section III. This alternative DSM-5 proposal for the diagnosis of a personality disorder is based on two fundamental criteria: impairments in personality functioning (Criterion A) and the presence of pathological personality traits (Criterion B). In the maladaptive trait model that has been developed to operationalize Criterion B, 25 pathological traits are organized according to five higher order dimensions. The current study focuses on the convergence of the proposed DSM-5 trait model (as measured by the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 [PID-5]) with the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology (DAPP) model (as measured by the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Basic Questionnaire [DAPP-BQ]) in a sample of older people. A joint hierarchical factor analysis showed clear convergence between four PID-5 dimensions (Negative Affect, Detachment, Antagonism, Disinhibition) and conceptually similar DAPP-BQ components. Moreover, the PID-5 and the DAPP-BQ showed meaningful associations on different levels of their joint hierarchical factor structure. Methodological and theoretical implications of these initial results for the conceptualization of personality pathology are discussed.

  15. A Butterfly-Based Direct Integral-Equation Solver Using Hierarchical LU Factorization for Analyzing Scattering From Electrically Large Conducting Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han; Liu, Yang; Hu, Jun; Michielssen, Eric

    2017-09-01

    A butterfly-based direct combined-field integral equation (CFIE) solver for analyzing scattering from electrically large, perfect electrically conducting objects is presented. The proposed solver leverages the butterfly scheme to compress blocks of the hierarchical LU-factorized discretized CFIE operator and uses randomized butterfly reconstruction schemes to expedite the factorization. The memory requirements and computational cost of the direct butterfly-CFIE solver scale as $O(N\\mathrm{log}^2N)$ and $O(N^{1.5}\\mathrm{log}N)$, respectively. These scaling estimates permit significant memory and CPU savings when compared to those realized by low-rank (LR) decomposition-based solvers. The efficacy and accuracy of the proposed solver are demonstrated through its application to the analysis of scattering from canonical and realistic objects involving up to 14 million unknowns.

  16. Development and Confirmatory Factory Analysis of the Achievement Task Value Scale for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yu-Chiung; Lin, Hsiao-Fang; Lin, Chin-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the study were (a) to develop a scale to measure university students' task value and (b) to use confirmatory factor analytic techniques to investigate the construct validity of the scale. The questionnaire items were developed based on theoretical considerations and the final version contained 38 items divided into 4 subscales.…

  17. Next-generation confirmatory disease diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert; Gerver, Rachel; Karns, Kelly; Apori, Akwasi A.; Denisin, Aleksandra K.; Herr, Amy E.

    2014-06-01

    Microfluidic tools are advancing capabilities in screening diagnostics for use in near-patient settings. Here, we review three case studies to illustrate the flexibility and analytical power offered by microanalytical tools. We first overview a near-patient tool for detection of protein markers found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as a means to identify the presence of cerebrospinal fluid in nasal mucous - an indication that CSF is leaking into the nasal cavity. Microfluidic design allowed integration of several up-stream preparatory steps and rapid, specific completion of the human CSF protein assay. Second, we overview a tear fluid based assay for lactoferrin, a protein produced in the lacrimal gland, then secreted into tear fluid. Tear Lf is a putative biomarker for primary SS. A critical contribution of this and related work being measurement of Lf, even in light of well-known and significant matrix interactions and losses during the tear fluid collection and preparation. Lastly, we review a microfluidic barcode platform that enables rapid measurement of multiple infectious disease biomarkers in human sera. The assay presents a new approach to multiplexed biomarker detection, yet in a simple straight microchannel - thus providing a streamlined, simplified microanalytical platform, as is relevant to robust operation in diagnostic settings. We view microfluidic design and analytical chemistry as the basis for emerging, sophisticated assays that will advance not just screening diagnostic technology, but confirmatory assays, sample preparation and handling, and thus introduction and utilization of new biomarkers and assay formats.

  18. Hierarchical Fabrication of Engineered Vascularized Bone Biphasic Constructs via Dual 3D Bioprinting: Integrating Regional Bioactive Factors into Architectural Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haitao; Zhu, Wei; Nowicki, Margaret; Zhou, Xuan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-01

    A biphasic artificial vascularized bone construct with regional bioactive factors is presented using dual 3D bioprinting platform technique, thereby forming a large functional bone grafts with organized vascular networks. Biocompatible mussel-inspired chemistry and "thiol-ene" click reaction are used to regionally immobilize bioactive factors during construct fabrication for modulating or improving cellular events. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hierarchical Network Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    of different types of hierarchical networks. This is supplemented by a review of ring network design problems and a presentation of a model allowing for modeling most hierarchical networks. We use methods based on linear programming to design the hierarchical networks. Thus, a brief introduction to the various....... The thesis investigates models for hierarchical network design and methods used to design such networks. In addition, ring network design is considered, since ring networks commonly appear in the design of hierarchical networks. The thesis introduces hierarchical networks, including a classification scheme...... linear programming based methods is included. The thesis is thus suitable as a foundation for study of design of hierarchical networks. The major contribution of the thesis consists of seven papers which are included in the appendix. The papers address hierarchical network design and/or ring network...

  20. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2015-06-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (Appl Psychol Meas 8:453-461, 1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined on a grid formed by direct products of quadrature points. However, the increase in computational burden remains exponential in the number of dimensions, making the implementation of the recursive algorithm cumbersome for truly high-dimensional models. In this paper, a dimension reduction method that is specific to the Lord-Wingersky recursions is developed. This method can take advantage of the restrictions implied by hierarchical item factor models, e.g., the bifactor model, the testlet model, or the two-tier model, such that a version of the Lord-Wingersky recursive algorithm can operate on a dramatically reduced set of quadrature points. For instance, in a bifactor model, the dimension of integration is always equal to 2, regardless of the number of factors. The new algorithm not only provides an effective mechanism to produce summed score to IRT scaled score translation tables properly adjusted for residual dependence, but leads to new applications in test scoring, linking, and model fit checking as well. Simulated and empirical examples are used to illustrate the new applications.

  1. Principal factor and hierarchical cluster analyses for the performance assessment of an urban wastewater treatment plant in the Southeast of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayo, Javier; López-Castellanos, Joaquín

    2016-07-01

    Process performance and operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are carried out to ensure their compliance with legislative requirements imposed by European Union. Because a high amount of variables are daily measured, a coherent and structured approach of such a system is required to understand its inherent behavior and performance efficiency. In this sense, both principal factor analysis (PFA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) are multivariate techniques that have been widely applied to extract and structure information for different purposes. In this paper, both statistical tools are applied in an urban WWTP situated in the Southeast of Spain, a zone with special characteristics related to the geochemical background composition of water and an important use of fertilizers. Four main factors were extracted in association with nutrients, the ionic component, the organic load to the WWTP, and the efficiency of the whole process. HCA allowed distinguish between influent and effluent parameters, although a deeper examination resulted in a dendrogram with groupings similar to those previously reported for PFA.

  2. Hierarchical Multiagent Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-25

    In this paper, we investigate the use of hierarchical reinforcement learning (HRL) to speed up the acquisition of cooperative multiagent tasks. We...introduce a hierarchical multiagent reinforcement learning (RL) framework and propose a hierarchical multiagent RL algorithm called Cooperative HRL. In

  3. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  4. Hierarchical Network Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Communication networks are immensely important today, since both companies and individuals use numerous services that rely on them. This thesis considers the design of hierarchical (communication) networks. Hierarchical networks consist of layers of networks and are well-suited for coping...... the clusters. The design of hierarchical networks involves clustering of nodes, hub selection, and network design, i.e. selection of links and routing of ows. Hierarchical networks have been in use for decades, but integrated design of these networks has only been considered for very special types of networks....... The thesis investigates models for hierarchical network design and methods used to design such networks. In addition, ring network design is considered, since ring networks commonly appear in the design of hierarchical networks. The thesis introduces hierarchical networks, including a classification scheme...

  5. Hierarchical representations of the five-factor model of personality in predicting job performance: integrating three organizing frameworks with two theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Rodell, Jessica B; Klinger, Ryan L; Simon, Lauren S; Crawford, Eean R

    2013-11-01

    Integrating 2 theoretical perspectives on predictor-criterion relationships, the present study developed and tested a hierarchical framework in which each five-factor model (FFM) personality trait comprises 2 DeYoung, Quilty, and Peterson (2007) facets, which in turn comprise 6 Costa and McCrae (1992) NEO facets. Both theoretical perspectives-the bandwidth-fidelity dilemma and construct correspondence-suggest that lower order traits would better predict facets of job performance (task performance and contextual performance). They differ, however, as to the relative merits of broad and narrow traits in predicting a broad criterion (overall job performance). We first meta-analyzed the relationship of the 30 NEO facets to overall job performance and its facets. Overall, 1,176 correlations from 410 independent samples (combined N = 406,029) were coded and meta-analyzed. We then formed the 10 DeYoung et al. facets from the NEO facets, and 5 broad traits from those facets. Overall, results provided support for the 6-2-1 framework in general and the importance of the NEO facets in particular. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. An introduction to hierarchical linear modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woltman, Heather; Feldstain, Andrea; MacKay, J. Christine; Rocchi, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    This tutorial aims to introduce Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM). A simple explanation of HLM is provided that describes when to use this statistical technique and identifies key factors to consider before conducting this analysis...

  7. Hierarchical active factors to band gap and nonlinear optical response in Ag-containing quaternary-chalcogenide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jun-ben [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Material and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); Mamat, Mamatrishat, E-mail: mmtrxt@xju.edu.cn [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Pan, Shilie [Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Material and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yang, Zhihua, E-mail: zhyang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Electronic Information Material and Devices, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 40-1 South Beijing Road, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2016-07-15

    In this research work, Ag-containing quaternary-chalcogenide compounds KAg{sub 2}TS{sub 4} (T=P, Sb) (I-II) and RbAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} (III) have been studied by means of Density Functional Theory as potential IR nonlinear optical materials. The origin of wide band gap, different optical anisotropy and large SHG response is explained via a combination of density of states, electronic density difference and bond population analysis. It is indicated that the different covalent interaction behavior of P-S and Sb-S bonds dominates the band gap and birefringence. Specifically, the Ag-containing chalcogenide compound KAg{sub 2}PS{sub 4} possesses wide band gap and SHG response comparable with that of AgGaS{sub 2}. By exploring the origin of the band gap and NLO response for compounds KAg{sub 2}TS{sub 4} (T=P, Sb), we found the determination factor to the properties is different, especially the roles of Ag-d orbitals and bonding behavior of P-S or Sb-S. Thus, the compounds KAg{sub 2}TS{sub 4} (T=P, Sb) and RbAg{sub 2}SbS{sub 4} can be used in infrared (IR) region. - Graphical abstract: Metal thiophosphates RbPbPS{sub 4} and KSbP{sub 2}S{sub 6} have a similar band gap with KAg{sub 2}PS{sub 4}. However, based on first principles calculated results it shown that KAg{sub 2}PS{sub 4} possesses wide band gap (3.02 eV) and relatively large SHG response. Display Omitted.

  8. Motivational factors in multilevel marketing business: A confirmatory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Jain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present scenario of high unemployment; Multilevel Marketing (MLM generates employment for people who have no permanent source of earning. MLM system has emerged as one of the prime alternatives in the current marketing system. India has become a very popular destination of doing MLM business with high potential of growth. MLM system provides lucrative compensation that works as motivation for people to join this business. Motivation for executives of any firm plays a major role in its success. It also leads commitment of employees towards work and responsibilities. An attempt has been made to identify the motivational variables that have the highest level of contribution for joining the MLM system. Most of the MLM companies focus on compensation plan or reward system but apart from that a number of variables have been found which motivate the distributors to engage in MLM business. Further, the distributors play a vital role in the growth of the business. In this study, we also propose a motivational model to help MLM companies formulate better strategies in making a large network of people for growth of business.

  9. (IEQ) Assessment in Hospital Buildings: A Confirmatory Factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    Performance Indicators of Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ). Assessment in ... Keywords: Building performance, hospital buildings, indicators, indoor environment quality. ATBU Journal of ...... Management of Environmental. Quality: An ...

  10. A Confirmatory Factoring of the Self-Consciousness Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Ira H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A three subscale inventory designed by Fenigstein, Scheier, and Buss to measure self-consciousness was administered to 297 college students. Fenigstein et al.'s representation was found to fit the data in its original form. Items on the subscales differ nearly as much statistically as they do substantively. (Author/LMO)

  11. Distinguishing between exploratory and confirmatory preclinical research will improve translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmelman, Jonathan; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Preclinical researchers confront two overarching agendas related to drug development: selecting interventions amid a vast field of candidates, and producing rigorous evidence of clinical promise for a small number of interventions. We suggest that each challenge is best met by two different, complementary modes of investigation. In the first (exploratory investigation), researchers should aim at generating robust pathophysiological theories of disease. In the second (confirmatory investigation), researchers should aim at demonstrating strong and reproducible treatment effects in relevant animal models. Each mode entails different study designs, confronts different validity threats, and supports different kinds of inferences. Research policies should seek to disentangle the two modes and leverage their complementarity. In particular, policies should discourage the common use of exploratory studies to support confirmatory inferences, promote a greater volume of confirmatory investigation, and customize design and reporting guidelines for each mode.

  12. Diagnosis of brain death: confirmatory tests after clinical test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Yingying; Yang Qinglin; Liu Gang; Zhang Yan; Ye Hong; Gao Daiquan; Zhang Yunzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain death confirmation tests occupy a different position in each country's diagnostic criteria (or guideline); the choices of tests are also different.China brain death criteria include clinical judgment and confirmation tests.This study aimed to confirm the preferred confirmatory test and complementary confirmatory tests.Methods We did a clinical brain death determination on deep coma patients,and then divided them into brain death group and non-brain death group.According to the Chinese standards for determining brain death,both the groups accepted confirmatory tests including electroencephalograph (EEG),somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP),and transcranial Doppler (TCD).The sensitivity,specificity,false positive rate,and false negative rate were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the confirmatory tests.Results Among the 131 cases of patients,103 patients met the clinical criteria of brain death.Respiratory arrest provocation test was performed on 44 cases and 32 cases (73%) successfully completed and confirmed that they have no spontaneous breathing.Of the three confirmation tests,EEG had the highest completion rate (98%) and good sensitivity (83%) and specificity (97%); TCD had followed completion rate (54%) and not good sensitivity (73%) and specificity (75%); SEP had the lowest completion rate (49%),good sensitivity (100%),and not good specificity (78%).After the combination of SEP or TCD with EEG,the specificity can increase to 100%.Conclusions The completion rate of respiratory arrest provocation test remains a problem in the clinical diagnosis of brain death.If the test cannot be completed,whether to increase a confirmatory test is debatable.SEP had an ideal sensitivity,and the specificity will reach 100% after combining with TCD or EEG.When a confirmed test was uncertain,we suggest increasing another confirmatory test.

  13. Generation of hierarchically correlated multivariate symbolic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tumminello, Mi; Mantegna, R N

    2008-01-01

    We introduce an algorithm to generate multivariate series of symbols from a finite alphabet with a given hierarchical structure of similarities. The target hierarchical structure of similarities is arbitrary, for instance the one obtained by some hierarchical clustering procedure as applied to an empirical matrix of Hamming distances. The algorithm can be interpreted as the finite alphabet equivalent of the recently introduced hierarchically nested factor model (M. Tumminello et al. EPL 78 (3) 30006 (2007)). The algorithm is based on a generating mechanism that is different from the one used in the mutation rate approach. We apply the proposed methodology for investigating the relationship between the bootstrap value associated with a node of a phylogeny and the probability of finding that node in the true phylogeny.

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis of the portuguese Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 Análisis factorial confirmatoria de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 Análise fatorial confirmatória da versão portuguesa da Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís Alves Apóstolo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine which of three published models best characterizes the factor structure of the Portuguese version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and to assess its validity and reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis of Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 for 1,297 adult, primary care outpatients (66.7% female, Mage = 48.57 years comparing 3 models. The relationship between the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was analyzed. The correlated 3-factor model fit the data best. The scale demonstrated good internal consistency, with alpha scores of the subscales ranging from 0.836 to 0.897. Correlation with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was positive and moderate with the negative affect scale; it was negative and limited with the positive affect. These findings support the correlated 3-factor structure. The test demonstrated adequate reliability and construct validity, which supports its use for screening in primary care settings with Portuguese speakers.El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar cual de los tres modelos publicados mejor caracteriza la estructura factorial de la versión portuguesa de la Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21 y evaluar su validez y confiabilidad. Se compararon los tres modelos a través de análisis factorial confirmatoria de la DASS-21, aplicada el 1.297 pacientes adultos, del servicio de atención básica (66,7% mujeres; edad Media=48,57 años. La relación entre la DASS-21 y la Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS también fue analizada. El modelo de tres factores correlacionados se ajusta mejor a los datos. La escala presentó buena consistencia interna con valores alfa observados en las subescalas, variando de 0,836 a 0,897. La correlación con la PANAS fue positiva y comedida con la escala de afecto negativa, y negativa y limitada con la escala de afecto positivo. Esos resultados corroboran la estructura de tres factores. La

  15. Micromechanics of hierarchical materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A short overview of micromechanical models of hierarchical materials (hybrid composites, biomaterials, fractal materials, etc.) is given. Several examples of the modeling of strength and damage in hierarchical materials are summarized, among them, 3D FE model of hybrid composites...... with nanoengineered matrix, fiber bundle model of UD composites with hierarchically clustered fibers and 3D multilevel model of wood considered as a gradient, cellular material with layered composite cell walls. The main areas of research in micromechanics of hierarchical materials are identified, among them......, the investigations of the effects of load redistribution between reinforcing elements at different scale levels, of the possibilities to control different material properties and to ensure synergy of strengthening effects at different scale levels and using the nanoreinforcement effects. The main future directions...

  16. Hierarchical auxetic mechanical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Ruben; Mizzi, Luke; Azzopardi, Joseph I; Azzopardi, Keith M; Attard, Daphne; Casha, Aaron; Briffa, Joseph; Grima, Joseph N

    2015-02-11

    Auxetic mechanical metamaterials are engineered systems that exhibit the unusual macroscopic property of a negative Poisson's ratio due to sub-unit structure rather than chemical composition. Although their unique behaviour makes them superior to conventional materials in many practical applications, they are limited in availability. Here, we propose a new class of hierarchical auxetics based on the rotating rigid units mechanism. These systems retain the enhanced properties from having a negative Poisson's ratio with the added benefits of being a hierarchical system. Using simulations on typical hierarchical multi-level rotating squares, we show that, through design, one can control the extent of auxeticity, degree of aperture and size of the different pores in the system. This makes the system more versatile than similar non-hierarchical ones, making them promising candidates for industrial and biomedical applications, such as stents and skin grafts.

  17. Introduction into Hierarchical Matrices

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Hierarchical matrices allow us to reduce computational storage and cost from cubic to almost linear. This technique can be applied for solving PDEs, integral equations, matrix equations and approximation of large covariance and precision matrices.

  18. Hierarchical Auxetic Mechanical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Ruben; Mizzi, Luke; Azzopardi, Joseph I.; Azzopardi, Keith M.; Attard, Daphne; Casha, Aaron; Briffa, Joseph; Grima, Joseph N.

    2015-02-01

    Auxetic mechanical metamaterials are engineered systems that exhibit the unusual macroscopic property of a negative Poisson's ratio due to sub-unit structure rather than chemical composition. Although their unique behaviour makes them superior to conventional materials in many practical applications, they are limited in availability. Here, we propose a new class of hierarchical auxetics based on the rotating rigid units mechanism. These systems retain the enhanced properties from having a negative Poisson's ratio with the added benefits of being a hierarchical system. Using simulations on typical hierarchical multi-level rotating squares, we show that, through design, one can control the extent of auxeticity, degree of aperture and size of the different pores in the system. This makes the system more versatile than similar non-hierarchical ones, making them promising candidates for industrial and biomedical applications, such as stents and skin grafts.

  19. Applied Bayesian Hierarchical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Congdon, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Bayesian methods facilitate the analysis of complex models and data structures. Emphasizing data applications, alternative modeling specifications, and computer implementation, this book provides a practical overview of methods for Bayesian analysis of hierarchical models.

  20. Programming with Hierarchical Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Peter

    This report desribes the hierarchical maps used as a central data structure in the Corundum framework. We describe its most prominent features, ague for its usefulness and briefly describe some of the software prototypes implemented using the technology....

  1. Catalysis with hierarchical zeolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Martin Spangsberg; Taarning, Esben; Egeblad, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical (or mesoporous) zeolites have attracted significant attention during the first decade of the 21st century, and so far this interest continues to increase. There have already been several reviews giving detailed accounts of the developments emphasizing different aspects of this research...... topic. Until now, the main reason for developing hierarchical zeolites has been to achieve heterogeneous catalysts with improved performance but this particular facet has not yet been reviewed in detail. Thus, the present paper summaries and categorizes the catalytic studies utilizing hierarchical...... zeolites that have been reported hitherto. Prototypical examples from some of the different categories of catalytic reactions that have been studied using hierarchical zeolite catalysts are highlighted. This clearly illustrates the different ways that improved performance can be achieved with this family...

  2. Goleman's Leadership styles at different hierarchical levels in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anurag; Desanghere, Loni; Stobart, Kent; Walker, Keith

    2017-09-19

    With current emphasis on leadership in medicine, this study explores Goleman's leadership styles of medical education leaders at different hierarchical levels and gain insight into factors that contribute to the appropriateness of practices. Forty two leaders (28 first-level with limited formal authority, eight middle-level with wider program responsibility and six senior- level with higher organizational authority) rank ordered their preferred Goleman's styles and provided comments. Eight additional senior leaders were interviewed in-depth. Differences in ranked styles within groups were determined by Friedman tests and Wilcoxon tests. Based upon style descriptions, confirmatory template analysis was used to identify Goleman's styles for each interviewed participant. Content analysis was used to identify themes that affected leadership styles. There were differences in the repertoire and preferred styles at different leadership levels. As a group, first-level leaders preferred democratic, middle-level used coaching while the senior leaders did not have one preferred style and used multiple styles. Women and men preferred democratic and coaching styles respectively. The varied use of styles reflected leadership conceptualizations, leader accountabilities, contextual adaptations, the situation and its evolution, leaders' awareness of how they themselves were situated, and personal preferences and discomfort with styles. The not uncommon use of pace-setting and commanding styles by senior leaders, who were interviewed, was linked to working with physicians and delivering quickly on outcomes. Leaders at different levels in medical education draw from a repertoire of styles. Leadership development should incorporate learning of different leadership styles, especially at first- and mid-level positions.

  3. Medindo consumo de álcool: análise fatorial confirmatória do Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT Midiendo consumo de alcohol: análisis factorial confirmatorio del Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT Measuring alcohol consumption: confirmatory factor analysis of The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walberto Silva dos Santos

    2013-04-01

    to AUDIT , the participants responded to two others correlated instruments - CAGE and EAFUA - and to biosocialdemographic questions. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated the adequacy of the model of three factors, with goodness of fit indexes (χ²/gl=63,29, CFI=0,98, AGFI=0,98 e RMSEA=0,05 statistically higher than the structure of one and two factors. Finally, resorting to Pearson's r correlations and the comparison of means, both convergent and criterion validity of AUDIT were confirmed, attesting its proposal of measuring alcohol consumption and demonstrating its applicability in the screening of problem drinkers.

  4. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol. 26.101 Section... Testing § 26.101 Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol. (a) The confirmatory test must begin as soon... that meets the requirements of § 26.91(b) and (c) was used for the initial alcohol test, the same...

  5. Construct validity of the WISC-IV with a referred sample: direct versus indirect hierarchical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canivez, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is one of the most frequently used intelligence tests in clinical assessments of children with learning difficulties. Construct validity studies of the WISC-IV have generally supported the higher order structure with four correlated first-order factors and one higher-order general intelligence factor, but recent studies have supported an alternate model in which general intelligence is conceptualized as a breadth factor rather than a superordinate factor (M. W. Watkins, 2010, Structure of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition among a national sample of referred students, Psychological Assessment, Vol. 22, pp. 782-787; M. W. Watkins, G. L. Canivez, T. James, K. & R. Good, in press, Construct validity of the WISC-IVUK with a large referred Irish sample, International Journal of School and Educational Psychology). WISC-IV core subtest data obtained from evaluations to assess learning difficulties in 345 children (224 boys, 121 girls) were examined. One through four, first order factor models and indirect versus direct hierarchical models were compared using confirmatory factor analyses. The correlated four-factor Wechsler model provided good fit to these data, but the direct hierarchical model showed statistically significant improvement over the indirect hierarchical model and correlated four-factor model. The direct hierarchical model was judged the best explanation of the WISC-IV factor structure, with the general factor accounting for 71.6% of the common variance while the first order factors accounted for 2.4-10.3% of the common variance. Thus, the results with the present sample of referred children were similar to those from other investigations (G. E. Gignac, 2005, Revisiting the factor structure of the WAIS-R: Insights through nested factor modeling, Assessment, Vol. 12, pp. 320-329; G. E. Gignac, 2006, The WAIS-III as a nested factors model: A useful alternative to

  6. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  7. Neutrosophic Hierarchical Clustering Algoritms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıdvan Şahin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interval neutrosophic set (INS is a generalization of interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy set (IVIFS, whose the membership and non-membership values of elements consist of fuzzy range, while single valued neutrosophic set (SVNS is regarded as extension of intuitionistic fuzzy set (IFS. In this paper, we extend the hierarchical clustering techniques proposed for IFSs and IVIFSs to SVNSs and INSs respectively. Based on the traditional hierarchical clustering procedure, the single valued neutrosophic aggregation operator, and the basic distance measures between SVNSs, we define a single valued neutrosophic hierarchical clustering algorithm for clustering SVNSs. Then we extend the algorithm to classify an interval neutrosophic data. Finally, we present some numerical examples in order to show the effectiveness and availability of the developed clustering algorithms.

  8. Bias factors associated with assessing the validity of university teaching: a hierarchical linear model Factores de sesgo asociados a la validez de la evaluación docente universitaria: un modelo jerárquico lineal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raciel Acevedo Alvarez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzes the variables that are intrinsically linked with the student, professor and class environment in relation to the university educational evaluation questionnaires. The participants in the study were 374 students with an age mean of 19.9 and 29 professors with an age mean of 36 from 3 different departments at the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR at the city of Guanacaste. The hierarchical lineal models were used for the data analysis, a quantitative methodology which facilitates the evaluation of the determinants which affect the results of the study. However, only four of these determinants were associated with the evaluation concerned, class size, enrolment year, department type and forecasted achievement levels. The results obtained from the study demonstrate that these kinds of evaluation are valid despite the results being slightly affected by a range of factors from externalities to teacher competence. El presente estudio analiza las variables del estudiante, la clase y el profesor asociadas con el sesgo en los cuestionarios aplicados a los estudiantes en la evaluación docente universitaria. En la propuesta han participado 374 estudiantes y 29 profesores de tres departamentos de la Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR, sede de Guanacaste, con una media de edad de 19.9 para los estudiantes y de 36 años los profesores. Para el análisis de los datos se utilizaron los modelos jerárquicos lineales, una metodología cuantitativa, cuyas estimaciones permitieron comprobar que de todos los determinantes incluidos en el estudio, solamente, cuatro de ellos (número de estudiantes en el curso, cantidad de años en la institución, tipo de departamento al que pertenece el estudiante y expectativa de nota estaban ligeramente asociados a este tipo de evaluación. Los resultados demuestran que estas evaluaciones son válidas y se ven poco afectadas por los elementos externos a la competencia docente.

  9. Hierarchical Porous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grote, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Materials Design is often at the forefront of technological innovation. While there has always been a push to generate increasingly low density materials, such as aero or hydrogels, more recently the idea of bicontinuous structures has gone more into play. This review will cover some of the methods and applications for generating both porous, and hierarchically porous structures.

  10. Structured multiplicity and confirmatory statistical analyses in pharmacodynamic studies using the quantitative electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, Georg; Staner, Luc; Boeijinga, Peter

    2011-09-30

    Pharmacodynamic (PD) clinical studies are characterised by a high degree of multiplicity. This multiplicity is the result of the design of these studies that typically investigate effects of a number of biomarkers at various doses and multiple time points. Measurements are taken at many or all points of a "hyper-grid" that can be understood as the cross-product of a number of dimensions each of which has typically 3-30 discrete values. This exploratory design helps understanding the phenomena under investigation, but has made a confirmatory statistical analysis of these studies difficult, so that such an analysis is often missing in this type of studies. In this contribution we show that the cross-product structure of PD studies allows to combine several well-known techniques to address multiplicity in an effective way, so that a confirmatory analysis of these studies becomes feasible without unrealistic loss of power. We demonstrate the application of this technique in two studies that use the quantitative EEG (qEEG) as biomarker for drug activity at the GABA-A receptor. QEEG studies suffer particularly from the curse of multiplicity, since, in addition to the common dimensions like dose and time, the qEEG is measured at many locations over the scalp and in a number of frequency bands which inflate the multiplicity by a factor of about 250.

  11. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meifeng Dai; Jie Liu; Feng Zhu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present trapping issues of weight-dependent walks on weighted hierarchical networks which are based on the classic scale-free hierarchical networks. Assuming that edge’s weight is used as local information by a random walker, we introduce a biased walk. The biased walk is that a walker, at each step, chooses one of its neighbours with a probability proportional to the weight of the edge. We focus on a particular case with the immobile trap positioned at the hub node which has the largest degree in the weighted hierarchical networks. Using a method based on generating functions, we determine explicitly the mean first-passage time (MFPT) for the trapping issue. Let parameter (0 < < 1) be the weight factor. We show that the efficiency of the trapping process depends on the parameter a; the smaller the value of a, the more efficient is the trapping process.

  12. Group sequential and confirmatory adaptive designs in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Wassmer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of the general principles of and techniques for confirmatory adaptive designs. Confirmatory adaptive designs are a generalization of group sequential designs. With these designs, interim analyses are performed in order to stop the trial prematurely under control of the Type I error rate. In adaptive designs, it is also permissible to perform a data-driven change of relevant aspects of the study design at interim stages. This includes, for example, a sample-size reassessment, a treatment-arm selection or a selection of a pre-specified sub-population. Essentially, this adaptive methodology was introduced in the 1990s. Since then, it has become popular and the object of intense discussion and still represents a rapidly growing field of statistical research. This book describes adaptive design methodology at an elementary level, while also considering designing and planning issues as well as methods for analyzing an adaptively planned trial. This includes estimation methods...

  13. Collaborative Hierarchical Sparse Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sprechmann, Pablo; Sapiro, Guillermo; Eldar, Yonina C

    2010-01-01

    Sparse modeling is a powerful framework for data analysis and processing. Traditionally, encoding in this framework is done by solving an l_1-regularized linear regression problem, usually called Lasso. In this work we first combine the sparsity-inducing property of the Lasso model, at the individual feature level, with the block-sparsity property of the group Lasso model, where sparse groups of features are jointly encoded, obtaining a sparsity pattern hierarchically structured. This results in the hierarchical Lasso, which shows important practical modeling advantages. We then extend this approach to the collaborative case, where a set of simultaneously coded signals share the same sparsity pattern at the higher (group) level but not necessarily at the lower one. Signals then share the same active groups, or classes, but not necessarily the same active set. This is very well suited for applications such as source separation. An efficient optimization procedure, which guarantees convergence to the global opt...

  14. Perturbation Detection Through Modeling of Gene Expression on a Latent Biological Pathway Network: A Bayesian hierarchical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Lisa M; Carvalho, Luis; Schaus, Scott; Kolaczyk, Eric D

    Cellular response to a perturbation is the result of a dynamic system of biological variables linked in a complex network. A major challenge in drug and disease studies is identifying the key factors of a biological network that are essential in determining the cell's fate. Here our goal is the identification of perturbed pathways from high-throughput gene expression data. We develop a three-level hierarchical model, where (i) the first level captures the relationship between gene expression and biological pathways using confirmatory factor analysis, (ii) the second level models the behavior within an underlying network of pathways induced by an unknown perturbation using a conditional autoregressive model, and (iii) the third level is a spike-and-slab prior on the perturbations. We then identify perturbations through posterior-based variable selection. We illustrate our approach using gene transcription drug perturbation profiles from the DREAM7 drug sensitivity predication challenge data set. Our proposed method identified regulatory pathways that are known to play a causative role and that were not readily resolved using gene set enrichment analysis or exploratory factor models. Simulation results are presented assessing the performance of this model relative to a network-free variant and its robustness to inaccuracies in biological databases.

  15. Hierarchical manifold learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kanwal K; Rao, Anil; Price, Anthony N; Wolz, Robin; Hajnal, Jo; Rueckert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method of hierarchical manifold learning which aims to automatically discover regional variations within images. This involves constructing manifolds in a hierarchy of image patches of increasing granularity, while ensuring consistency between hierarchy levels. We demonstrate its utility in two very different settings: (1) to learn the regional correlations in motion within a sequence of time-resolved images of the thoracic cavity; (2) to find discriminative regions of 3D brain images in the classification of neurodegenerative disease,

  16. Dimensional and hierarchical models of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in an Arab college student sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohaeri Jude U

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of depressive symptomatology from the perspective of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA could facilitate valid and interpretable comparisons across cultures. The objectives of the study were: (i using the responses of a sample of Arab college students to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in CFA, to compare the "goodness of fit" indices of the original dimensional three-and two-factor first-order models, and their modifications, with the corresponding hierarchical models (i.e., higher - order and bifactor models; (ii to assess the psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II, including convergent/discriminant validity with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25. Method Participants (N = 624 were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the questionnaires in class. CFA was done by AMOS, version 16. Eleven models were compared using eight "fit" indices. Results In CFA, all the models met most "fit" criteria. While the higher-order model did not provide improved fit over the dimensional first - order factor models, the bifactor model (BFM had the best fit indices (CMNI/DF = 1.73; GFI = 0.96; RMSEA = 0.034. All regression weights of the dimensional models were significantly different from zero (P Conclusion The broadly adequate fit of the various models indicates that they have some merit and implies that the relationship between the domains of depression probably contains hierarchical and dimensional elements. The bifactor model is emerging as the best way to account for the clinical heterogeneity of depression. The psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II lend support to our CFA results.

  17. Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E. Zander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional electrospun nanofibers have a myriad of applications ranging from scaffolds for tissue engineering to components of biosensors and energy harvesting devices. The generally smooth one-dimensional structure of the fibers has stood as a limitation to several interesting novel applications. Control of fiber diameter, porosity and collector geometry will be briefly discussed, as will more traditional methods for controlling fiber morphology and fiber mat architecture. The remainder of the review will focus on new techniques to prepare hierarchically structured fibers. Fibers with hierarchical primary structures—including helical, buckled, and beads-on-a-string fibers, as well as fibers with secondary structures, such as nanopores, nanopillars, nanorods, and internally structured fibers and their applications—will be discussed. These new materials with helical/buckled morphology are expected to possess unique optical and mechanical properties with possible applications for negative refractive index materials, highly stretchable/high-tensile-strength materials, and components in microelectromechanical devices. Core-shell type fibers enable a much wider variety of materials to be electrospun and are expected to be widely applied in the sensing, drug delivery/controlled release fields, and in the encapsulation of live cells for biological applications. Materials with a hierarchical secondary structure are expected to provide new superhydrophobic and self-cleaning materials.

  18. HDS: Hierarchical Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Dave; Walter, Anton; Lupton, W. F.; Warren-Smith, Rodney F.; Lawden, Mike; McIlwrath, Brian; Peden, J. C. M.; Jenness, Tim; Draper, Peter W.

    2015-02-01

    The Hierarchical Data System (HDS) is a file-based hierarchical data system designed for the storage of a wide variety of information. It is particularly suited to the storage of large multi-dimensional arrays (with their ancillary data) where efficient access is needed. It is a key component of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012) and is used by the Starlink N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) library (ascl:1411.023). HDS organizes data into hierarchies, broadly similar to the directory structure of a hierarchical filing system, but contained within a single HDS container file. The structures stored in these files are self-describing and flexible; HDS supports modification and extension of structures previously created, as well as functions such as deletion, copying, and renaming. All information stored in HDS files is portable between the machines on which HDS is implemented. Thus, there are no format conversion problems when moving between machines. HDS can write files in a private binary format (version 4), or be layered on top of HDF5 (version 5).

  19. Hierarchical video summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratakonda, Krishna; Sezan, M. Ibrahim; Crinon, Regis J.

    1998-12-01

    We address the problem of key-frame summarization of vide in the absence of any a priori information about its content. This is a common problem that is encountered in home videos. We propose a hierarchical key-frame summarization algorithm where a coarse-to-fine key-frame summary is generated. A hierarchical key-frame summary facilitates multi-level browsing where the user can quickly discover the content of the video by accessing its coarsest but most compact summary and then view a desired segment of the video with increasingly more detail. At the finest level, the summary is generated on the basis of color features of video frames, using an extension of a recently proposed key-frame extraction algorithm. The finest level key-frames are recursively clustered using a novel pairwise K-means clustering approach with temporal consecutiveness constraint. We also address summarization of MPEG-2 compressed video without fully decoding the bitstream. We also propose efficient mechanisms that facilitate decoding the video when the hierarchical summary is utilized in browsing and playback of video segments starting at selected key-frames.

  20. Examining the factor structures of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire and the self-compassion scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew J; Dalgleish, Tim; Karl, Anke; Kuyken, Willem

    2014-06-01

    The five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and the self-compassion scale (SCS; Neff, 2003) are widely used measures of mindfulness and self-compassion in mindfulness-based intervention research. The psychometric properties of the FFMQ and the SCS need to be independently replicated in community samples and relevant clinical samples to support their use. Our primary aim was to establish the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in individuals with recurrent depression in remission, since mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was developed as a treatment for preventing depressive relapse. In order to determine the consistency across populations, we examined the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in 3 samples: (1) a convenience sample of adults, (2) a sample of adults who practice meditation, and (3) a sample of adults who suffer from recurrent depression and were recruited to take part in a trial of MBCT. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) showed that a 4-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the community sample and the clinical sample but that a 5-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the meditator sample. CFA did not endorse the SCS 6-factor hierarchical structure in any of the 3 samples. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of the psychometric properties of the FFMQ to measure mindfulness when comparing meditators and nonmeditators. Further research is needed to develop a more psychometrically robust measure of self-compassion.

  1. Impact of communities, health, and emotional-related factors on smoking use: comparison of joint modeling of mean and dispersion and Bayes' hierarchical models on add health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jie; Fang, Di; Wilson, Jeffrey R

    2017-02-03

    The analysis of correlated binary data is commonly addressed through the use of conditional models with random effects included in the systematic component as opposed to generalized estimating equations (GEE) models that addressed the random component. Since the joint distribution of the observations is usually unknown, the conditional distribution is a natural approach. Our objective was to compare the fit of different binary models for correlated data in Tabaco use. We advocate that the joint modeling of the mean and dispersion may be at times just as adequate. We assessed the ability of these models to account for the intraclass correlation. In so doing, we concentrated on fitting logistic regression models to address smoking behaviors. Frequentist and Bayes' hierarchical models were used to predict conditional probabilities, and the joint modeling (GLM and GAM) models were used to predict marginal probabilities. These models were fitted to National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) data for Tabaco use. We found that people were less likely to smoke if they had higher income, high school or higher education and religious. Individuals were more likely to smoke if they had abused drug or alcohol, spent more time on TV and video games, and been arrested. Moreover, individuals who drank alcohol early in life were more likely to be a regular smoker. Children who experienced mistreatment from their parents were more likely to use Tabaco regularly. The joint modeling of the mean and dispersion models offered a flexible and meaningful method of addressing the intraclass correlation. They do not require one to identify random effects nor distinguish from one level of the hierarchy to the other. Moreover, once one can identify the significant random effects, one can obtain similar results to the random coefficient models. We found that the set of marginal models accounting for extravariation through the additional dispersion submodel produced

  2. Hierarchical networks of scientific journals

    CERN Document Server

    Palla, Gergely; Mones, Enys; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Scientific journals are the repositories of the gradually accumulating knowledge of mankind about the world surrounding us. Just as our knowledge is organised into classes ranging from major disciplines, subjects and fields to increasingly specific topics, journals can also be categorised into groups using various metrics. In addition to the set of topics characteristic for a journal, they can also be ranked regarding their relevance from the point of overall influence. One widespread measure is impact factor, but in the present paper we intend to reconstruct a much more detailed description by studying the hierarchical relations between the journals based on citation data. We use a measure related to the notion of m-reaching centrality and find a network which shows the level of influence of a journal from the point of the direction and efficiency with which information spreads through the network. We can also obtain an alternative network using a suitably modified nested hierarchy extraction method applied ...

  3. Further insights on the French WISC-IV factor structure through Bayesian structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, Philippe; Reverte, Isabelle; Rossier, Jérôme; Favez, Nicolas; Lecerf, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    The interpretation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is based on a 4-factor model, which is only partially compatible with the mainstream Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) model of intelligence measurement. The structure of cognitive batteries is frequently analyzed via exploratory factor analysis and/or confirmatory factor analysis. With classical confirmatory factor analysis, almost all cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are fixed to zero in order to allow the model to be identified. However, inappropriate zero cross-loadings can contribute to poor model fit, distorted factors, and biased factor correlations; most important, they do not necessarily faithfully reflect theory. To deal with these methodological and theoretical limitations, we used a new statistical approach, Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM), among a sample of 249 French-speaking Swiss children (8-12 years). With BSEM, zero-fixed cross-loadings between latent variables and measures are replaced by approximate zeros, based on informative, small-variance priors. Results indicated that a direct hierarchical CHC-based model with 5 factors plus a general intelligence factor better represented the structure of the WISC-IV than did the 4-factor structure and the higher order models. Because a direct hierarchical CHC model was more adequate, it was concluded that the general factor should be considered as a breadth rather than a superordinate factor. Because it was possible for us to estimate the influence of each of the latent variables on the 15 subtest scores, BSEM allowed improvement of the understanding of the structure of intelligence tests and the clinical interpretation of the subtest scores. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Detecting Hierarchical Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    a generative Bayesian model that is able to infer whether hierarchies are present or not from a hypothesis space encompassing all types of hierarchical tree structures. For efficient inference we propose a collapsed Gibbs sampling procedure that jointly infers a partition and its hierarchical structure......Many real-world networks exhibit hierarchical organization. Previous models of hierarchies within relational data has focused on binary trees; however, for many networks it is unknown whether there is hierarchical structure, and if there is, a binary tree might not account well for it. We propose....... On synthetic and real data we demonstrate that our model can detect hierarchical structure leading to better link-prediction than competing models. Our model can be used to detect if a network exhibits hierarchical structure, thereby leading to a better comprehension and statistical account the network....

  5. Context updates are hierarchical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Karl Ingason

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This squib studies the order in which elements are added to the shared context of interlocutors in a conversation. It focuses on context updates within one hierarchical structure and argues that structurally higher elements are entered into the context before lower elements, even if the structurally higher elements are pronounced after the lower elements. The crucial data are drawn from a comparison of relative clauses in two head-initial languages, English and Icelandic, and two head-final languages, Korean and Japanese. The findings have consequences for any theory of a dynamic semantics.

  6. Testing the Hierarchical Structure of the Children's Depression Inventory: A Multigroup Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Luis F.; Aluja, Anton; del Barrio, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the aims were (a) to obtain, describe, and compare different solutions of three, five, and six first-order factors raised in the previous literature about the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI); (b) analyze the number and nature of the second-order factors; (c) test which model best reproduces…

  7. Non-homogeneous fractal hierarchical weighted networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yujuan; Dai, Meifeng; Ye, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    A model of fractal hierarchical structures that share the property of non-homogeneous weighted networks is introduced. These networks can be completely and analytically characterized in terms of the involved parameters, i.e., the size of the original graph Nk and the non-homogeneous weight scaling factors r1, r2, · · · rM. We also study the average weighted shortest path (AWSP), the average degree and the average node strength, taking place on the non-homogeneous hierarchical weighted networks. Moreover the AWSP is scrupulously calculated. We show that the AWSP depends on the number of copies and the sum of all non-homogeneous weight scaling factors in the infinite network order limit.

  8. Hierarchical model of vulnerabilities for emotional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Peter J; Mehta, Paras D

    2007-01-01

    Clark and Watson's (1991) tripartite model of anxiety and depression has had a dramatic impact on our understanding of the dispositional variables underlying emotional disorders. More recently, calls have been made to examine not simply the influence of negative affectivity (NA) but also mediating factors that might better explain how NA influences anxious and depressive syndromes (e.g. Taylor, 1998; Watson, 2005). Extending preliminary projects, this study evaluated two hierarchical models of NA, mediating factors of anxiety sensitivity and intolerance of uncertainty, and specific emotional manifestations. Data provided a very good fit to a model elaborated from preliminary studies, lending further support to hierarchical models of emotional vulnerabilities. Implications for classification and diagnosis are discussed.

  9. Trees and Hierarchical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Arndt

    1990-01-01

    The "raison d'etre" of hierarchical dustering theory stems from one basic phe­ nomenon: This is the notorious non-transitivity of similarity relations. In spite of the fact that very often two objects may be quite similar to a third without being that similar to each other, one still wants to dassify objects according to their similarity. This should be achieved by grouping them into a hierarchy of non-overlapping dusters such that any two objects in ~ne duster appear to be more related to each other than they are to objects outside this duster. In everyday life, as well as in essentially every field of scientific investigation, there is an urge to reduce complexity by recognizing and establishing reasonable das­ sification schemes. Unfortunately, this is counterbalanced by the experience of seemingly unavoidable deadlocks caused by the existence of sequences of objects, each comparatively similar to the next, but the last rather different from the first.

  10. Hierarchical Affinity Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Inmar; Frey, Brendan J

    2012-01-01

    Affinity propagation is an exemplar-based clustering algorithm that finds a set of data-points that best exemplify the data, and associates each datapoint with one exemplar. We extend affinity propagation in a principled way to solve the hierarchical clustering problem, which arises in a variety of domains including biology, sensor networks and decision making in operational research. We derive an inference algorithm that operates by propagating information up and down the hierarchy, and is efficient despite the high-order potentials required for the graphical model formulation. We demonstrate that our method outperforms greedy techniques that cluster one layer at a time. We show that on an artificial dataset designed to mimic the HIV-strain mutation dynamics, our method outperforms related methods. For real HIV sequences, where the ground truth is not available, we show our method achieves better results, in terms of the underlying objective function, and show the results correspond meaningfully to geographi...

  11. Optimisation by hierarchical search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zintchenko, Ilia; Hastings, Matthew; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Finding optimal values for a set of variables relative to a cost function gives rise to some of the hardest problems in physics, computer science and applied mathematics. Although often very simple in their formulation, these problems have a complex cost function landscape which prevents currently known algorithms from efficiently finding the global optimum. Countless techniques have been proposed to partially circumvent this problem, but an efficient method is yet to be found. We present a heuristic, general purpose approach to potentially improve the performance of conventional algorithms or special purpose hardware devices by optimising groups of variables in a hierarchical way. We apply this approach to problems in combinatorial optimisation, machine learning and other fields.

  12. How hierarchical is language use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan L.; Bod, Rens; Christiansen, Morten H.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally assumed that hierarchical phrase structure plays a central role in human language. However, considerations of simplicity and evolutionary continuity suggest that hierarchical structure should not be invoked too hastily. Indeed, recent neurophysiological, behavioural and computational studies show that sequential sentence structure has considerable explanatory power and that hierarchical processing is often not involved. In this paper, we review evidence from the recent literature supporting the hypothesis that sequential structure may be fundamental to the comprehension, production and acquisition of human language. Moreover, we provide a preliminary sketch outlining a non-hierarchical model of language use and discuss its implications and testable predictions. If linguistic phenomena can be explained by sequential rather than hierarchical structure, this will have considerable impact in a wide range of fields, such as linguistics, ethology, cognitive neuroscience, psychology and computer science. PMID:22977157

  13. How hierarchical is language use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan L; Bod, Rens; Christiansen, Morten H

    2012-11-22

    It is generally assumed that hierarchical phrase structure plays a central role in human language. However, considerations of simplicity and evolutionary continuity suggest that hierarchical structure should not be invoked too hastily. Indeed, recent neurophysiological, behavioural and computational studies show that sequential sentence structure has considerable explanatory power and that hierarchical processing is often not involved. In this paper, we review evidence from the recent literature supporting the hypothesis that sequential structure may be fundamental to the comprehension, production and acquisition of human language. Moreover, we provide a preliminary sketch outlining a non-hierarchical model of language use and discuss its implications and testable predictions. If linguistic phenomena can be explained by sequential rather than hierarchical structure, this will have considerable impact in a wide range of fields, such as linguistics, ethology, cognitive neuroscience, psychology and computer science.

  14. Associative Hierarchical Random Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladický, L'ubor; Russell, Chris; Kohli, Pushmeet; Torr, Philip H S

    2014-06-01

    This paper makes two contributions: the first is the proposal of a new model-The associative hierarchical random field (AHRF), and a novel algorithm for its optimization; the second is the application of this model to the problem of semantic segmentation. Most methods for semantic segmentation are formulated as a labeling problem for variables that might correspond to either pixels or segments such as super-pixels. It is well known that the generation of super pixel segmentations is not unique. This has motivated many researchers to use multiple super pixel segmentations for problems such as semantic segmentation or single view reconstruction. These super-pixels have not yet been combined in a principled manner, this is a difficult problem, as they may overlap, or be nested in such a way that the segmentations form a segmentation tree. Our new hierarchical random field model allows information from all of the multiple segmentations to contribute to a global energy. MAP inference in this model can be performed efficiently using powerful graph cut based move making algorithms. Our framework generalizes much of the previous work based on pixels or segments, and the resulting labelings can be viewed both as a detailed segmentation at the pixel level, or at the other extreme, as a segment selector that pieces together a solution like a jigsaw, selecting the best segments from different segmentations as pieces. We evaluate its performance on some of the most challenging data sets for object class segmentation, and show that this ability to perform inference using multiple overlapping segmentations leads to state-of-the-art results.

  15. Improving Measurement Precision of Hierarchical Latent Traits Using Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Many latent traits in social sciences display a hierarchical structure, such as intelligence, cognitive ability, or personality. Usually a second-order factor is linearly related to a group of first-order factors (also called domain abilities in cognitive ability measures), and the first-order factors directly govern the actual item responses.…

  16. SORM applied to hierarchical parallel system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2006-01-01

    The old hierarchical stochastic load combination model of Ferry Borges and Castanheta and the corresponding problem of determining the distribution of the extreme random load effect is the inspiration to this paper. The evaluation of the distribution function of the extreme value by use of a part......The old hierarchical stochastic load combination model of Ferry Borges and Castanheta and the corresponding problem of determining the distribution of the extreme random load effect is the inspiration to this paper. The evaluation of the distribution function of the extreme value by use...... of a particular first order reliability method (FORM) was first described in a celebrated paper by Rackwitz and Fiessler more than a quarter of a century ago. The method has become known as the Rackwitz-Fiessler algorithm. The original RF-algorithm as applied to a hierarchical random variable model...... is recapitulated so that a simple but quite effective accuracy improving calculation can be explained. A limit state curvature correction factor on the probability approximation is obtained from the final stop results of the RF-algorithm. This correction factor is based on Breitung’s asymptotic formula for second...

  17. Noise enhances information transfer in hierarchical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A; Sloot, Peter M A

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of noise on information transmission in the form of packages shipped between nodes of hierarchical networks. Numerical simulations are performed for artificial tree networks, scale-free Ravasz-Barabási networks as well for a real network formed by email addresses of former Enron employees. Two types of noise are considered. One is related to packet dynamics and is responsible for a random part of packets paths. The second one originates from random changes in initial network topology. We find that the information transfer can be enhanced by the noise. The system possesses optimal performance when both kinds of noise are tuned to specific values, this corresponds to the Stochastic Resonance phenomenon. There is a non-trivial synergy present for both noisy components. We found also that hierarchical networks built of nodes of various degrees are more efficient in information transfer than trees with a fixed branching factor.

  18. Bayesian hierarchical modeling of drug stability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhong, Jinglin; Nie, Lei

    2008-06-15

    Stability data are commonly analyzed using linear fixed or random effect model. The linear fixed effect model does not take into account the batch-to-batch variation, whereas the random effect model may suffer from the unreliable shelf-life estimates due to small sample size. Moreover, both methods do not utilize any prior information that might have been available. In this article, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical approach to modeling drug stability data. Under this hierarchical structure, we first use Bayes factor to test the poolability of batches. Given the decision on poolability of batches, we then estimate the shelf-life that applies to all batches. The approach is illustrated with two example data sets and its performance is compared in simulation studies with that of the commonly used frequentist methods. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Modeling hierarchical structures - Hierarchical Linear Modeling using MPlus

    OpenAIRE

    Jelonek, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the technique (and its linkage with physics) of overcoming problems connected to modeling social structures, which are typically hierarchical. Hierarchical Linear Models provide a conceptual and statistical mechanism for drawing conclusions regarding the influence of phenomena at different levels of analysis. In the social sciences it is used to analyze many problems such as educational, organizational or market dilemma. This paper introduces the logic of m...

  20. CT findings as confirmatory criteria of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiogai, Toshiyuki; Takeuchi, Kazuo (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    The absence of cerebral circulation and electrocerebral silence have served as an accurate index of irreversible brain death. It is proposed that computed tomography (CT) findings be evaluated as confirmatory criteria of brain death. To this end, CT evaluation of 14 patients satisfying the conventional criteria of brain death was performed. A CT finding of severe compression or dissappearance of the ventricular system, or so called ''brain tamponade'', was seen in 7 (50 %) of the 14 patients. Enhanced contrast CT, especially dynamic CT, usually distinctly reveals the cerebral vessels whenever the cerebral blood flow is preserved; conversely, the lack of enhanced brain structures, even comparing attenuation values, indicates the absence of cerebral blood flow. In 7 (70 %) of 10 patients, however, there was enhanced contrast of vascular brain structures, especially the circle of Willis, major cerebral arteries, choroid plexuses, and venous sinuses. It is suggested that this result is due to the improvement of demonstrability by CT. The usefulness of CT in the confirmation of brain death lies in visualization of the pathological changes associated with a dead brain, such as ''brain tamponade'', and the lack of enhanced contrast indicating the absence of cerebral blood flow. The latter point is still problematic as angiography revealed an extremely low cerebral blood flow in a few cases of ''dead brain'' patients. It is recommended that cerebral blood flow in brain death be evaluated by dynamic CT scanning and correlated with other methods of cerebral blood flow determination (e.g., intravenous digital subtraction angiography).

  1. Hierarchical Ag mesostructures for single particle SERS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minwei; Zhang, Yin

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with highly rough surface morphology have been synthesized at room temperature through a simple seed-mediated approach. Electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the obtained Ag mesostructures exhibit a textured surface morphology with the flower-like architecture. Moreover, the particle size can be tailored easily in the range of 250-500 nm. For the growth process of the hierarchical Ag mesostructures, it is believed that the self-assembly mechanism is more reasonable rather than the epitaxial overgrowth of Ag seed. The oriented attachment of nanoparticles is revealed during the formation of Ag mesostructures. Single particle surface enhanced Raman spectra (sp-SERS) of crystal violet adsorbed on the hierarchical Ag mesostructures were measured. Results reveal that the hierarchical Ag mesostructures can be highly sensitive sp-SERS substrates with good reproducibility. The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures are estimated to be about 106.

  2. Higher-order factor structures for the WISC-IV: implications for neuropsychological test interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott L; Englund, Julia A; Roberts, Alycia M

    2014-01-01

    Factor-analytic studies support a hierarchical four-factor model for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) with a prominent general, third-order factor. However, there is substantial disagreement on which type of higher-order model best fits the data and how different models should guide test interpretation in clinical practice, with many studies concluding interpretation should primarily be focused on general indicators of intelligence. We performed a series of confirmatory factor analyses with the WISC-IV standardization sample (N = 2,200, ages 6-16 years) to examine model fit and reexamined models used to support test interpretation at the general level. Consistent with previous research, bifactor models were difficult to identify; however, compared with bifactor and hierarchical models, the correlated factors model with no general higher-order factor provided the best fit to the data. Results from this study support the basic four-factor model specified in the WISC-IV technical manual, with test interpretation primarily focused at the factor level, rather than the general level suggested in previous studies.

  3. Hierarchical fringe tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Romain G; Boskri, Abdelkarim; Folcher, Jean-Pierre; Lagarde, Stephane; Bresson, Yves; Benkhaldoum, Zouhair; Lazrek, Mohamed; Rakshit, Suvendu

    2014-01-01

    The limiting magnitude is a key issue for optical interferometry. Pairwise fringe trackers based on the integrated optics concepts used for example in GRAVITY seem limited to about K=10.5 with the 8m Unit Telescopes of the VLTI, and there is a general "common sense" statement that the efficiency of fringe tracking, and hence the sensitivity of optical interferometry, must decrease as the number of apertures increases, at least in the near infrared where we are still limited by detector readout noise. Here we present a Hierarchical Fringe Tracking (HFT) concept with sensitivity at least equal to this of a two apertures fringe trackers. HFT is based of the combination of the apertures in pairs, then in pairs of pairs then in pairs of groups. The key HFT module is a device that behaves like a spatial filter for two telescopes (2TSF) and transmits all or most of the flux of a cophased pair in a single mode beam. We give an example of such an achromatic 2TSF, based on very broadband dispersed fringes analyzed by g...

  4. Onboard hierarchical network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunesi, Luca; Armbruster, Philippe

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a suitable hierarchical networking solution to improve capabilities and performances of space systems, with significant recurrent costs saving and more efficient design & manufacturing flows. Classically, a satellite can be split in two functional sub-systems: the platform and the payload complement. The platform is in charge of providing power, attitude & orbit control and up/down-link services, whereas the payload represents the scientific and/or operational instruments/transponders and embodies the objectives of the mission. One major possibility to improve the performance of payloads, by limiting the data return to pertinent information, is to process data on board thanks to a proper implementation of the payload data system. In this way, it is possible to share non-recurring development costs by exploiting a system that can be adopted by the majority of space missions. It is believed that the Modular and Scalable Payload Data System, under development by ESA, provides a suitable solution to fulfil a large range of future mission requirements. The backbone of the system is the standardised high data rate SpaceWire network http://www.ecss.nl/. As complement, a lower speed command and control bus connecting peripherals is required. For instance, at instrument level, there is a need for a "local" low complexity bus, which gives the possibility to command and control sensors and actuators. Moreover, most of the connections at sub-system level are related to discrete signals management or simple telemetry acquisitions, which can easily and efficiently be handled by a local bus. An on-board hierarchical network can therefore be defined by interconnecting high-speed links and local buses. Additionally, it is worth stressing another important aspect of the design process: Agencies and ESA in particular are frequently confronted with a big consortium of geographically spread companies located in different countries, each one

  5. Hierarchical Reverberation Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Brewer, Brendon J

    2013-01-01

    Reverberation mapping (RM) is an important technique in studies of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The key idea of RM is to measure the time lag $\\tau$ between variations in the continuum emission from the accretion disc and subsequent response of the broad line region (BLR). The measurement of $\\tau$ is typically used to estimate the physical size of the BLR and is combined with other measurements to estimate the black hole mass $M_{\\rm BH}$. A major difficulty with RM campaigns is the large amount of data needed to measure $\\tau$. Recently, Fine et al (2012) introduced a new approach to RM where the BLR light curve is sparsely sampled, but this is counteracted by observing a large sample of AGN, rather than a single system. The results are combined to infer properties of the sample of AGN. In this letter we implement this method using a hierarchical Bayesian model and contrast this with the results from the previous stacked cross-correlation technique. We find that our inferences are more precise and allow fo...

  6. Hierarchical materials: Background and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical design draws inspiration from analysis of biological materials and has opened new possibilities for enhancing performance and enabling new functionalities and extraordinary properties. With the development of nanotechnology, the necessary technological requirements for the manufactur...

  7. Hierarchical clustering for graph visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Clémençon, Stéphan; Rossi, Fabrice; Tran, Viet Chi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a graph visualization methodology based on hierarchical maximal modularity clustering, with interactive and significant coarsening and refining possibilities. An application of this method to HIV epidemic analysis in Cuba is outlined.

  8. Direct hierarchical assembly of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Yue; Thorkelsson, Kari

    2014-07-22

    The present invention provides hierarchical assemblies of a block copolymer, a bifunctional linking compound and a nanoparticle. The block copolymers form one micro-domain and the nanoparticles another micro-domain.

  9. Determining Motivators and Hygiene Factors among Excellent Teachers in Malaysia: An Experience of Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzat, Ismail Hussein; Don, Yahya; Fauzee, Sofian Omar; Hussin, Fauzi; Raman, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In a world in which successful learning is believed to rest on the methods of teaching and the performance of students is determined by teacher quality, it is clear that teachers are the backbone of student learning attainments. In such a scenario, teacher development, welfare, motivation, and satisfaction are crucial for better teaching…

  10. Factors Influencing Self-Regulation in E-Learning 2.0: Confirmatory Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The importance of self-regulation in e-learning has been well noted in research. Relevant studies have shown a consistent positive correlation between learners' self-regulation and their success rate in e-learning. Increasing attention has been paid to developing learners' self-regulated abilities in e-learning. For students, what and how to learn…

  11. 75 FR 4877 - In the Matter of Beta Gamma Nuclear Radiology; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Gamma Nuclear Radiology; Confirmatory Order Modifying License (Effective Immediately) I Beta Gamma Nuclear Radiology (BGNR) (Licensee) is the holder of medical License No. 52-25542-01, issued by the U.S...

  12. Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.N. Bailey

    2009-03-18

    The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensee’s procedures and survey results.

  13. Confirmatory Survey for the Partial Site Release at the ABB Inc. CE Winsor Site, Windsor, CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.C. Adams

    2008-06-27

    The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to confirm that remedial actions had been effective in meeting established release criteria and that documentation accurately and adequately describes the final radiological conditions of the PSR Impacted Areas.

  14. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 650 - Optional Format for Confirmatory License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOUNDATION PATENTS Pt. 650, App. A Appendix A to Part 650—Optional Format for Confirmatory License The... title) (inventor name ) (patent application number and filing date) (country, if other than...

  15. Functional annotation of hierarchical modularity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchana Padmanabhan

    Full Text Available In biological networks of molecular interactions in a cell, network motifs that are biologically relevant are also functionally coherent, or form functional modules. These functionally coherent modules combine in a hierarchical manner into larger, less cohesive subsystems, thus revealing one of the essential design principles of system-level cellular organization and function-hierarchical modularity. Arguably, hierarchical modularity has not been explicitly taken into consideration by most, if not all, functional annotation systems. As a result, the existing methods would often fail to assign a statistically significant functional coherence score to biologically relevant molecular machines. We developed a methodology for hierarchical functional annotation. Given the hierarchical taxonomy of functional concepts (e.g., Gene Ontology and the association of individual genes or proteins with these concepts (e.g., GO terms, our method will assign a Hierarchical Modularity Score (HMS to each node in the hierarchy of functional modules; the HMS score and its p-value measure functional coherence of each module in the hierarchy. While existing methods annotate each module with a set of "enriched" functional terms in a bag of genes, our complementary method provides the hierarchical functional annotation of the modules and their hierarchically organized components. A hierarchical organization of functional modules often comes as a bi-product of cluster analysis of gene expression data or protein interaction data. Otherwise, our method will automatically build such a hierarchy by directly incorporating the functional taxonomy information into the hierarchy search process and by allowing multi-functional genes to be part of more than one component in the hierarchy. In addition, its underlying HMS scoring metric ensures that functional specificity of the terms across different levels of the hierarchical taxonomy is properly treated. We have evaluated our

  16. Confirmatory analysis of acetylgestagens in plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sarah Kelly; Pedersen, Mikael

    2007-01-01

    A confirmatory method has been developed and validated for the determination of chlormadinone acetate (CMA), megestrol acetate (NIGA), melengestrol acetate (MLA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in bovine and porcine plasma. Analytes are extracted from plasma samples using matrix-assisted li......A confirmatory method has been developed and validated for the determination of chlormadinone acetate (CMA), megestrol acetate (NIGA), melengestrol acetate (MLA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in bovine and porcine plasma. Analytes are extracted from plasma samples using matrix...

  17. Hierarchical architecture of active knits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Julianna; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann

    2013-12-01

    Nature eloquently utilizes hierarchical structures to form the world around us. Applying the hierarchical architecture paradigm to smart materials can provide a basis for a new genre of actuators which produce complex actuation motions. One promising example of cellular architecture—active knits—provides complex three-dimensional distributed actuation motions with expanded operational performance through a hierarchically organized structure. The hierarchical structure arranges a single fiber of active material, such as shape memory alloys (SMAs), into a cellular network of interlacing adjacent loops according to a knitting grid. This paper defines a four-level hierarchical classification of knit structures: the basic knit loop, knit patterns, grid patterns, and restructured grids. Each level of the hierarchy provides increased architectural complexity, resulting in expanded kinematic actuation motions of active knits. The range of kinematic actuation motions are displayed through experimental examples of different SMA active knits. The results from this paper illustrate and classify the ways in which each level of the hierarchical knit architecture leverages the performance of the base smart material to generate unique actuation motions, providing necessary insight to best exploit this new actuation paradigm.

  18. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  19. 基于分层线性模型的流动人口社会融合影响因素研究%A Research on the Factors Affecting Social Integration of Floating Population Based on Hierarchical Linear Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛艳

    2016-01-01

    根据2012年全国流动人口动态监测结果和反映31个省市基本公共服务均等化的指标数据,建立分层线性模型从流动人口个体和省级层面考察影响流动人口社会融合的影响因素和作用程度的大小。研究发现,流动人口的社会融合不仅与个人因素有关,而且还受地区基本公共服务差异化的影响。个体层面从户口性质、就业状况、医疗保险、自我融入意愿、本地人接受程度、收入情况与住房条件解释流动人口社会融合差异的63�12%;省级层面从基础教育、医疗卫生、公共就业及基本社会保障解释流动人口社会融合的差异为36�83%。最后从政府、公民社会参与角度出发,提出促进流动人口社会融合的措施和建议。%Based on the dynamic monitoring of floating population in 2012 and the index data of 31 provinces and cities, this paper investigated the factors and their effect all the social integration of floating population using hierarchical linear model. It is found that the social integration of the floating population is not only related to individual factors, but also to the influence of regional basic public services. At individual level, a series of factors like nature of hukou, employment status, health insurance, self integration, local acceptance, income and housing conditions, are analyzed to explain the differences of 63�12% in social integration of migrant population; at the provincial level, factors like basic education, health care, public employment and basic social barriers are considered to explain the 36�83% of difference in social integration of the floating population. Finally, from the perspective of government and civil society participation, the measures and suggestions of promoting the social integration of floating population are proposed.

  20. Research on application of risk assessment approach for multi-factor hierarchical fuzzy comprehensive evaluation%多因素分层模糊综合风险评估方法的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪刚; 程杰仁

    2012-01-01

    According to the problem of redundant attributes for indicator system of information security based on electronic archive, an attributes detection method based on correlation analysis is presented. The proposed algorithm exploits the principles of the quantified indicators properties, and the correlation between the indicators properties according to mean and standard deviation of indicators properties is measured; aiming at the problem of the low accuracy on risk assessment of information security , multi-factor hierarchical fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model based on AHP and fuzzy mathematics is proposed. The practical application on a certain information system proves that it can assess the system directly and effectively, and the assessment result is to actual with higher degree ,and it can provide reliable basis for decision making of risk about information security.%针对电子档案信息安全指标体系中的指标属性冗余的问题,提出了基于相关分析的指标属性检测方法.该方法采用量化指标属性的原则,根据指标属性的平均值和标准差,度量指标属性间的相关性;针对信息安全风险评估准确度不高的问题,提出了多因素分层模糊综合评估模型,该算法采用了层次分析法和模糊数学理论.某单位的电子档案信息系统的实际应用结果表明,该方法能直观、有效地评估系统,评估结果与实际吻合程度较高,为信息安全风险决策提供可靠的依据.

  1. Micromechanical design of hierarchical composites using global load sharing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hierarchical composites, embodied by natural materials ranging from bone to bamboo, may offer combinations of material properties inaccessible to conventional composites. Using global load sharing (GLS) theory, a well-established micromechanics model for composites, we develop accurate numerical and analytical predictions for the strength and toughness of hierarchical composites with arbitrary fiber geometries, fiber strengths, interface properties, and number of hierarchical levels, N. The model demonstrates that two key material properties at each hierarchical level-a characteristic strength and a characteristic fiber length-control the scalings of composite properties. One crucial finding is that short- and long-fiber composites behave radically differently. Long-fiber composites are significantly stronger than short-fiber composites, by a factor of 2N or more; they are also significantly tougher because their fiber breaks are bridged by smaller-scale fibers that dissipate additional energy. Indeed, an "infinite" fiber length appears to be optimal in hierarchical composites. However, at the highest level of the composite, long fibers localize on planes of pre-existing damage, and thus short fibers must be employed instead to achieve notch sensitivity and damage tolerance. We conclude by providing simple guidelines for microstructural design of hierarchical composites, including the selection of N, the fiber lengths, the ratio of length scales at successive hierarchical levels, the fiber volume fractions, and the desired properties of the smallest-scale reinforcement. Our model enables superior hierarchical composites to be designed in a rational way, without resorting either to numerical simulation or trial-and-error-based experimentation.

  2. Hierarchical topic modeling with nested hierarchical Dirichlet process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-qun DING; Shan-ping LI; Zhen ZHANG; Bin SHEN

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the statistical modeling of latent topic hierarchies in text corpora. The height of the topic tree is assumed as fixed, while the number of topics on each level as unknown a priori and to be inferred from data. Taking a nonparametric Bayesian approach to this problem, we propose a new probabilistic generative model based on the nested hierarchical Dirichlet process (nHDP) and present a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm for the inference of the topic tree structure as welt as the word distribution of each topic and topic distribution of each document. Our theoretical analysis and experiment results show that this model can produce a more compact hierarchical topic structure and captures more free-grained topic relationships compared to the hierarchical latent Dirichlet allocation model.

  3. An introduction to hierarchical linear modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Woltman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This tutorial aims to introduce Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM. A simple explanation of HLM is provided that describes when to use this statistical technique and identifies key factors to consider before conducting this analysis. The first section of the tutorial defines HLM, clarifies its purpose, and states its advantages. The second section explains the mathematical theory, equations, and conditions underlying HLM. HLM hypothesis testing is performed in the third section. Finally, the fourth section provides a practical example of running HLM, with which readers can follow along. Throughout this tutorial, emphasis is placed on providing a straightforward overview of the basic principles of HLM.

  4. Social Competence in Preschool Children: Replication of Results and Clarification of a Hierarchical Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Antonio J.; Peceguina, Ines; Daniel, Joao R.; Shin, Nana; Vaughn, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested assumptions and conclusions reached in an earlier confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) study of the social competence (SC) construct for preschool children. Two samples (total N = 408; a new Portuguese sample and one from US samples that had participated in the original study) contributed data. Seven SC indicators were tested for…

  5. Deliberate change without hierarchical influence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Sladjana; Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to structure processes, overcome resistance and get things done. But is deliberate change also possible without formal...... reveals that deliberate change is indeed achievable in a non-hierarchical collaborative OSS community context. However, it presupposes the presence and active involvement of informal change agents. The paper identifies and specifies four key drivers for change agents’ influence. Originality....../value The findings contribute to organisational analysis by providing a deeper understanding of the importance of leadership in making deliberate change possible in non-hierarchical settings. It points to the importance of “change-by-conviction”, essentially based on voluntary behaviour. This can open the door...

  6. Static Correctness of Hierarchical Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    1990-01-01

    A system of hierarchical, fully recursive types in a truly imperative language allows program fragments written for small types to be reused for all larger types. To exploit this property to enable type-safe hierarchical procedures, it is necessary to impose a static requirement on procedure calls....... We introduce an example language and prove the existence of a sound requirement which preserves static correctness while allowing hierarchical procedures. This requirement is further shown to be optimal, in the sense that it imposes as few restrictions as possible. This establishes the theoretical...... basis for a general type hierarchy with static type checking, which enables first-order polymorphism combined with multiple inheritance and specialization in a language with assignments. We extend the results to include opaque types. An opaque version of a type is different from the original but has...

  7. The Effects of Temporal Distance on Confirmatory Information Processing%时间距离对于验证性信息加工的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌斌; 王重鸣

    2014-01-01

    研究基于解释水平理论考察时间距离对于验证性信息加工的影响,即在个体和组织决策情境中,人们倾向于偏好选择和高估与自身观点和决策相一致的信息,而不是非一致性信息。通过4个情境决策实验,研究结果一致表明近期决策会提高信息搜寻和评估中的验证偏差,而远期决策会降低它们的验证偏差,知觉到的决策确定性在其中起到部分中介作用(实验1b)。解释水平(实验2)和期许性/可行性表征(实验3)分别在时间距离对验证性信息加工的影响中起到调节作用,结果依次表明在低解释水平(高可行性-低期许性特征)条件下,时间距离与验证性信息加工的负相关关系会得到显著增强,而在高解释水平(高期许性-低可行性特征)条件下,时间距离与验证性信息加工的负相关关系会得到显著降低。%The present study investigates the influence of temporal distance on confirmatory information processing. Confirmatory information processing principally refers to a tendency of individuals to search and overestimate information that supports with their decision rather than looking for information conflicts (Fischer, Fischer, Englich, Aydin,&Frey, 2011;Fischer, 2011). According to the theoretical viewpoint of Construal Level Theory (CLT, see Trope & Liberman, 2010), temporal distance or perceived temporal proximity exerts an important discount effect on confirmatory information processing under individual and organizational decision making context. It is hypothesized that low temporal distance will increase confirmatory information processing and high temporal distance will decrease it. This discount effect is moderated by construal level mindset and decision’s desirable and feasible representation. We have conducted three studies and our results have found to support our prediction. In Study 1, we have conducted two one-factor between-subjects experiments in which

  8. Structural integrity of hierarchical composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paggi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interface mechanical problems are of paramount importance in engineering and materials science. Traditionally, due to the complexity of modelling their mechanical behaviour, interfaces are often treated as defects and their features are not explored. In this study, a different approach is illustrated, where the interfaces play an active role in the design of innovative hierarchical composites and are fundamental for their structural integrity. Numerical examples regarding cutting tools made of hierarchical cellular polycrystalline materials are proposed, showing that tailoring of interface properties at the different scales is the way to achieve superior mechanical responses that cannot be obtained using standard materials

  9. Effects of Informative and Confirmatory Feedback on Brain Activation During Negative Feedback Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Kyoung eWoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study compared the effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing. For confirmatory feedback trials, participants were informed that they had failed the task, whereas informative feedback trials presented task relevant information along with the notification of their failure. Fourteen male undergraduates performed a series of spatial-perceptual tasks and received feedback while their brain activity was recorded. During confirmatory feedback trials, greater activations in the amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the thalamus (including the habenular were observed in response to incorrect responses. These results suggest that confirmatory feedback induces negative emotional reactions to failure. In contrast, informative feedback trials elicited greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC when participants experienced failure. Further psychophysiological interaction (PPI analysis revealed a negative coupling between the DLPFC and the amygdala during informative feedback relative to confirmatory feedback trials. These findings suggest that providing task-relevant information could facilitate implicit down-regulation of negative emotions following failure.

  10. Evaluation of Risk Factors in Agriculture: An Application of the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP Methodology Evaluación de Factores de Riesgo en la Agricultura: Una Aplicación de la Metodología de Proceso Analítico Jerárquico (AHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Toledo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Risk in the agricultural sector has multiple dimensions or factors and prioritization of these can support decision making. On the other hand, knowing the importance of these risk factors for distinct agricultural activities and how they vary according to geographic zone constitutes relevant information for agricultural development. The objective of this study was to prioritize risk factors that are highly relevant for farmers in Central South Chile. The multi-criteria Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP methodology was used to define a decision structure with four risk factors or criteria: climate, price and direct cost variability, human factor, and commercialization. In general, results obtained showed that there are no important imbalances in the weightings of different risk factors. Price and cost variability was the most important factor (0.30 whereas climate was the least important (0.20. It also confirmed that there are spatial differences in the weightings obtained for the distinct risk factors which determine distinct risk levels for the respective agricultural activities according to geographic region.El riesgo en el sector agrícola tiene múltiples dimensiones o factores y la priorización de éstas puede apoyar la toma de decisiones. Por otra parte, resulta relevante conocer la importancia que tienen estos factores de riesgo para distintos rubros agrícolas y como varían según zona geográfica, pues es información valiosa para el diseño de políticas de desarrollo agrícola. El objetivo de este estudio fue priorizar factores de riesgo que son altamente relevantes para los agricultores del centro sur de Chile. Se utilizó la metodología multicriterio Proceso Analítico Jerárquico (AHP para definir la estructura de decisión con cuatro factores de riesgo o criterios: clima, variabilidad de precios y costos, factor humano y comercialización. En general, los resultados obtenidos muestran que no existen importantes

  11. Confirmatory Analyses of Perfectionism on High School Students in Taipei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yating; Ting, Yuanyu

    2008-01-01

    Perfectionism has been related to an individual's academic performance and mental health. Western research on perfectionism has shown inconsistent factor structures of the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS). This study recruited 283 high school students ranging from 15 to 18 years old from urban areas in Taipei to examine factors of…

  12. Efficient scalable algorithms for hierarchically semiseparable matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shen; Xia, Jianlin; Situ, Yingchong; Hoop, Maarten V. de

    2011-09-14

    Hierarchically semiseparable (HSS) matrix algorithms are emerging techniques in constructing the superfast direct solvers for both dense and sparse linear systems. Here, we develope a set of novel parallel algorithms for the key HSS operations that are used for solving large linear systems. These include the parallel rank-revealing QR factorization, the HSS constructions with hierarchical compression, the ULV HSS factorization, and the HSS solutions. The HSS tree based parallelism is fully exploited at the coarse level. The BLACS and ScaLAPACK libraries are used to facilitate the parallel dense kernel operations at the ne-grained level. We have appplied our new parallel HSS-embedded multifrontal solver to the anisotropic Helmholtz equations for seismic imaging, and were able to solve a linear system with 6.4 billion unknowns using 4096 processors, in about 20 minutes. The classical multifrontal solver simply failed due to high demand of memory. To our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of employing the HSS algorithms in solving the truly large-scale real-world problems. Our parallel strategies can be easily adapted to the parallelization of the other rank structured methods.

  13. 基于层次架构视角的产品族顾客满意驱动要素研究%The Driving Factors of Product Family Customer Satisfaction Based on Hierarchical Architecture Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    支华炜; 杜纲; 夏一

    2013-01-01

    To gain the competitive advantage,customer satisfaction has become the core target for product family architecture. A complete architecture needs to implement the planning of product line, product platform and product instance. Through the detailed decomposition to the content of hierarchical architecture,the key driven factors to customer satisfaction have been discussed using structural equation modeling and the mobile phone family is taken as an example. The results reveal that the excellent architecture has a positive influence to enhance customer satisfaction which would facilitate the ascension of customer loyalty. In particular, platform architecture has a main influence to customer satisfaction by the control of quality and cost The positive effect is obvious for product recommendation and attribute customized to satisfy customers, however, the option value and services customized restrict the consumption feeling of customer.%作为企业获取竞争优势的关键因素,顾客满意的提升成为产品族架构的核心目标.完整的产品族架构需要实现产品线、产品平台与产品特例的逐级规划.通过详细拆分产品族层次架构内容,以手机产品族为例,对产品族顾客满意的驱动要素进行了细致探讨.研究发现,卓越的产品族架构水平对于顾客满意具有积极影响,并有利于顾客忠诚度的提升.具体而言,依靠质量与成本控制,平台架构对于顾客满意的影响较大.在其他两个层面,产品特例属性与服务的定制化架构对于顾客满意的正向作用明显,而选择价值与产品推介是制约顾客消费体验的主要因素.

  14. Sensory Hierarchical Organization and Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skapof, Jerome

    The purpose of this study was to judge the viability of an operational approach aimed at assessing response styles in reading using the hypothesis of sensory hierarchical organization. A sample of 103 middle-class children from a New York City public school, between the ages of five and seven, took part in a three phase experiment. Phase one…

  15. Memory Stacking in Hierarchical Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westö, Johan; May, Patrick J C; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2016-02-01

    Robust representations of sounds with a complex spectrotemporal structure are thought to emerge in hierarchically organized auditory cortex, but the computational advantage of this hierarchy remains unknown. Here, we used computational models to study how such hierarchical structures affect temporal binding in neural networks. We equipped individual units in different types of feedforward networks with local memory mechanisms storing recent inputs and observed how this affected the ability of the networks to process stimuli context dependently. Our findings illustrate that these local memories stack up in hierarchical structures and hence allow network units to exhibit selectivity to spectral sequences longer than the time spans of the local memories. We also illustrate that short-term synaptic plasticity is a potential local memory mechanism within the auditory cortex, and we show that it can bring robustness to context dependence against variation in the temporal rate of stimuli, while introducing nonlinearities to response profiles that are not well captured by standard linear spectrotemporal receptive field models. The results therefore indicate that short-term synaptic plasticity might provide hierarchically structured auditory cortex with computational capabilities important for robust representations of spectrotemporal patterns.

  16. Effective thermal conductivity of complicated hierarchic multilayer fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm retention property of fabric is one of the most important factors for clothing comfortability. The worm retention efficiency of a multilayer fabric with hierarchic inner structure was investigated based on its geometric feature. The thermal resistance of the multilayer fabric increases as the layer of the fabric increases.

  17. Psychometric properties and Confirmatory structure of the Strengths and difficulties questionnaire in a sample of adolescents in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpa, Onoja M; Afolabi, Rotimi F; Fowobaje, Kayode R

    Though the SDQ has been used in selected studies in Nigeria, its theoretical structure has not been fully and appropriately investigated in the setting. The present study employs Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to investigate the theoretical structure of the self-reported version of the SDQ in a sample of adolescents in Benue state, Nigeria. A total of 1,244 adolescents from different categories of secondary schools in Makurdi and Vandekya Local government areas of Benue state participated in the study. Preliminary data analyses were performed using descriptive statistics while the theoretical structure of the SDQ was assessed using EFA and CFA. Model fits were assessed using Chi-square test and other fit indices at 5% significance level. Participants were 14.19±2.45 (Vandekya) and 14.19±2.45 (Makurdi) years old. Results of the EFA and CFA revealed a 3-factor oblique model as the best model for the sample of adolescents studied (χ(2)/df =2.20, p<0.001) with all fit indices yielding better results. A correlated 3-factor model fits the present data better than the 5-factor theoretical model of the SDQ. The use of the original 5-factor model of the SDQ in the present setting should be interpreted with caution.

  18. Hierarchical Prisoner's Dilemma in Hierarchical Public-Goods Game

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Yuma; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    The dilemma in cooperation is one of the major concerns in game theory. In a public-goods game, each individual pays a cost for cooperation, or to prevent defection, and receives a reward from the collected cost in a group. Thus, defection is beneficial for each individual, while cooperation is beneficial for the group. Now, groups (say, countries) consisting of individual players also play games. To study such a multi-level game, we introduce a hierarchical public-goods (HPG) game in which two groups compete for finite resources by utilizing costs collected from individuals in each group. Analyzing this HPG game, we found a hierarchical prisoner's dilemma, in which groups choose the defection policy (say, armaments) as a Nash strategy to optimize each group's benefit, while cooperation optimizes the total benefit. On the other hand, for each individual within a group, refusing to pay the cost (say, tax) is a Nash strategy, which turns to be a cooperation policy for the group, thus leading to a hierarchical d...

  19. Hierarchical structure of biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-Cuarón, Carlos; Rivera, Ana L; Castaño, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    A general theory of biological systems, based on few fundamental propositions, allows a generalization of both Wierner and Berthalanffy approaches to theoretical biology. Here, a biological system is defined as a set of self-organized, differentiated elements that interact pair-wise through various networks and media, isolated from other sets by boundaries. Their relation to other systems can be described as a closed loop in a steady-state, which leads to a hierarchical structure and functioning of the biological system. Our thermodynamical approach of hierarchical character can be applied to biological systems of varying sizes through some general principles, based on the exchange of energy information and/or mass from and within the systems. PMID:24145961

  20. Automatic Hierarchical Color Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizing images into semantic categories can be extremely useful for content-based image retrieval and image annotation. Grouping images into semantic classes is a difficult problem, however. Image classification attempts to solve this hard problem by using low-level image features. In this paper, we propose a method for hierarchical classification of images via supervised learning. This scheme relies on using a good low-level feature and subsequently performing feature-space reconfiguration using singular value decomposition to reduce noise and dimensionality. We use the training data to obtain a hierarchical classification tree that can be used to categorize new images. Our experimental results suggest that this scheme not only performs better than standard nearest-neighbor techniques, but also has both storage and computational advantages.

  1. Intuitionistic fuzzy hierarchical clustering algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zeshui

    2009-01-01

    Intuitionistic fuzzy set (IFS) is a set of 2-tuple arguments, each of which is characterized by a mem-bership degree and a nonmembership degree. The generalized form of IFS is interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy set (IVIFS), whose components are intervals rather than exact numbers. IFSs and IVIFSs have been found to be very useful to describe vagueness and uncertainty. However, it seems that little attention has been focused on the clus-tering analysis of IFSs and IVIFSs. An intuitionistic fuzzy hierarchical algorithm is introduced for clustering IFSs, which is based on the traditional hierarchical clustering procedure, the intuitionistic fuzzy aggregation operator, and the basic distance measures between IFSs: the Hamming distance, normalized Hamming, weighted Hamming, the Euclidean distance, the normalized Euclidean distance, and the weighted Euclidean distance. Subsequently, the algorithm is extended for clustering IVIFSs. Finally the algorithm and its extended form are applied to the classifications of building materials and enterprises respectively.

  2. Hierarchical Formation of Galactic Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, B G

    2006-01-01

    Young stellar groupings and clusters have hierarchical patterns ranging from flocculent spiral arms and star complexes on the largest scale to OB associations, OB subgroups, small loose groups, clusters and cluster subclumps on the smallest scales. There is no obvious transition in morphology at the cluster boundary, suggesting that clusters are only the inner parts of the hierarchy where stars have had enough time to mix. The power-law cluster mass function follows from this hierarchical structure: n(M_cl) M_cl^-b for b~2. This value of b is independently required by the observation that the summed IMFs from many clusters in a galaxy equals approximately the IMF of each cluster.

  3. Hierarchical matrices algorithms and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hackbusch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This self-contained monograph presents matrix algorithms and their analysis. The new technique enables not only the solution of linear systems but also the approximation of matrix functions, e.g., the matrix exponential. Other applications include the solution of matrix equations, e.g., the Lyapunov or Riccati equation. The required mathematical background can be found in the appendix. The numerical treatment of fully populated large-scale matrices is usually rather costly. However, the technique of hierarchical matrices makes it possible to store matrices and to perform matrix operations approximately with almost linear cost and a controllable degree of approximation error. For important classes of matrices, the computational cost increases only logarithmically with the approximation error. The operations provided include the matrix inversion and LU decomposition. Since large-scale linear algebra problems are standard in scientific computing, the subject of hierarchical matrices is of interest to scientists ...

  4. Hierarchical Cont-Bouchaud model

    CERN Document Server

    Paluch, Robert; Holyst, Janusz A

    2015-01-01

    We extend the well-known Cont-Bouchaud model to include a hierarchical topology of agent's interactions. The influence of hierarchy on system dynamics is investigated by two models. The first one is based on a multi-level, nested Erdos-Renyi random graph and individual decisions by agents according to Potts dynamics. This approach does not lead to a broad return distribution outside a parameter regime close to the original Cont-Bouchaud model. In the second model we introduce a limited hierarchical Erdos-Renyi graph, where merging of clusters at a level h+1 involves only clusters that have merged at the previous level h and we use the original Cont-Bouchaud agent dynamics on resulting clusters. The second model leads to a heavy-tail distribution of cluster sizes and relative price changes in a wide range of connection densities, not only close to the percolation threshold.

  5. 77 FR 24742 - In the Matter of ABSG Consulting Inc. Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of ABSG Consulting Inc. Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately) I ABSG Consulting Inc. (ABSG) is an independently owned and operated risk, safety, and integrity management company...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1846-01 - Manufacturer in-use confirmatory testing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturer in-use confirmatory...-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1846-01 Manufacturer.... (a) General requirements. (1) A manufacturer of LDVs, LDTs and/or MDPVs must test, or cause...

  7. 49 CFR 192.931 - How may Confirmatory Direct Assessment (CDA) be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may Confirmatory Direct Assessment (CDA) be used? 192.931 Section 192.931 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...

  8. 77 FR 31651 - Texas Gamma Ray, LLC, Pasadena, TX; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... culture, willfulness, security of licensed material, and ethics. Within 60 days of the date of the... material, and ethics. b. Within 60 days of the date of the Confirmatory Order, TGR will contract with an... Internet, or in some cases to mail copies on electronic storage media. Participants may not submit...

  9. 75 FR 33358 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; McGuire Nuclear Station; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Carolinas, LLC; McGuire Nuclear Station; Confirmatory Order (Effective Immediately) I Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC's (Duke Energy or Licensee) is the holder of License Nos. NPF-9 and NPF-17, issued by the Nuclear... Energy Nuclear Policy Manual, NSD 218.10.1, Revision 9, states in relevant part, that where unusual...

  10. 75 FR 69140 - NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the... Regulatory Commission has issued for public comment a document entitled: NUREG-1953, ``Confirmatory Thermal...-4209, 301-415-4737, or by e-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-1953 is available electronically...

  11. Threat and Selective Exposure: The Moderating Role of Threat and Decision Context on Confirmatory Information Search after Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmuller, Andreas; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Fischer, Julia; Frey, Dieter; Crelley, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies on the impact of perceived threat on confirmatory information search (selective exposure) in the context of decision making have yielded mixed results. Some studies have suggested that confirmatory information search is reduced, yet others have found contradictory effects. The present series of 5 studies consistently found that…

  12. Hierarchical Clustering and Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziminaoglou, E; Manrique, A

    2000-01-01

    The growth of Super Massive Black Holes and the parallel development of activity in galactic nuclei are implemented in an analytic code of hierarchical clustering. The evolution of the luminosity function of quasars and AGN will be computed with special attention paid to the connection between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. One of the major interests of the model is the parallel study of quasar formation and evolution and the History of Star Formation.

  13. Hybrid and hierarchical composite materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Sano, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses a broad spectrum of areas in both hybrid materials and hierarchical composites, including recent development of processing technologies, structural designs, modern computer simulation techniques, and the relationships between the processing-structure-property-performance. Each topic is introduced at length with numerous  and detailed examples and over 150 illustrations.   In addition, the authors present a method of categorizing these materials, so that representative examples of all material classes are discussed.

  14. Treatment Protocols as Hierarchical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Bassat, Moshe; Carlson, Richard W.; Puri, Vinod K.; Weil, Max Harry

    1978-01-01

    We view a treatment protocol as a hierarchical structure of therapeutic modules. The lowest level of this structure consists of individual therapeutic actions. Combinations of individual actions define higher level modules, which we call routines. Routines are designed to manage limited clinical problems, such as the routine for fluid loading to correct hypovolemia. Combinations of routines and additional actions, together with comments, questions, or precautions organized in a branching logic, in turn, define the treatment protocol for a given disorder. Adoption of this modular approach may facilitate the formulation of treatment protocols, since the physician is not required to prepare complex flowcharts. This hierarchical approach also allows protocols to be updated and modified in a flexible manner. By use of such a standard format, individual components may be fitted together to create protocols for multiple disorders. The technique is suited for computer implementation. We believe that this hierarchical approach may facilitate standarization of patient care as well as aid in clinical teaching. A protocol for acute pancreatitis is used to illustrate this technique.

  15. 运动员心智游移认知结构模型研究--基于探索性因素分析和验证性因素分析的方法%A Cognitive Structure Model Study on Mind Wandering of Athletes--Based on Exploratory as wel1 as Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙福成; 陈欣; 李波; 马玉芳

    2014-01-01

    采用自编的《运动员心智游移认知结构问卷》,运用问卷法、探索性因素分析和验证性因素分析等方法,构建并验证了三个初阶因子的运动员心智游移认知结构模型。研究表明:运动员心智游移因素具有可靠性和有效性,其基本结构由任务、环境和情绪等三个因子构成。研究为运动队评估运动员心智游移认知取向提供理论依据和实证工具。%Based on a questionnaire survey as wel1 as EFA and CFA,a cognitive structural model has been developed to investigate mind wandering of athletes.The mode1 reveals the typica1 phases and factors of mind wandering. The study shows that the effective and reliable cognitive structure of mind wandering consist of three dimensions,namely,task,environment and emotion.The mode1 may be used as a theoretical basis and empirical tool for sports teams to evaluate cognitive orientation of athletes.

  16. 基于分层回归的中国互联网保险驱动因素实证研究%Empirical Study on the Driving Factors of China’s Internet Insurance Based on Hierarchical Regression Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤英汉

    2015-01-01

    By analyzing the features and status quo of China’s internet insurance development, this paper found that the main reason causing the weak growth in the insurance industry is the conflict between people’s increasing needs for insurance and the relatively backward insurance management approaches. Internet insurance is a supplement to traditional insurance to a certain degree. By using the hierarchical regression method, this paper analyzes the insurance premium and its relative data from 2003 to 2013. The result shows that the driving factors of the internet insurance are: tax, population, internet, etc. The study also indicates that internet insurance is not a replacement or a threat to the traditional insurance business, but a new form of it instead. Internet insurance can satisfy people’s various needs for insurance. Finally, the author proposes that internet insurance, as a new insurance business, its development facilitates changes in the thoughts and ideas of the insurance industry as a whole. Internet technology has pushed it forward, especially, in such areas as insurance channels, product and service innovations. Therefore, internet insurance also injects fresh blood to China’s insurance industry.%通过分析我国互联网保险的特点和发展现状,发现快速变化的市场环境引致的社会日益增长的保险需求同相对落后的保险经营管理方式之间的矛盾日益突出,造成当前保险业增长乏力。互联网保险的出现弥补了传统保险的不足,成为保险业新的增长动力。本文运用分层回归分析方法,对我国2003-2013年网销保费及相关数据进行研究,验证了我国互联网保险驱动因素主要取决于税收、人口、互联网等方面,保险业自身因素对互联网保险影响不显著。研究发现,互联网保险的发展不是对传统保险的替代和竞争,而是保险新需求的发现,互联网保险满足多层次的保险需求。提出互联

  17. Hierarchical Structure of Abilities: Factorial Validation of Higher Order Constructs in Thurstone's Primary Mental Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Patricia

    1981-01-01

    Thurstone's primary mental abilities (1938/1968) involving 57 tests were factor analyzed to produce a comprehensive hierarchical model. Kaiser's varimax solution for primary mental abilities served as the raw data for this study. (Author/GK)

  18. Entrepreneurial intention modeling using hierarchical multiple regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Jeger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to identify the contribution of effectuation dimensions to the predictive power of the entrepreneurial intention model over and above that which can be accounted for by other predictors selected and confirmed in previous studies. As is often the case in social and behavioral studies, some variables are likely to be highly correlated with each other. Therefore, the relative amount of variance in the criterion variable explained by each of the predictors depends on several factors such as the order of variable entry and sample specifics. The results show the modest predictive power of two dimensions of effectuation prior to the introduction of the theory of planned behavior elements. The article highlights the main advantages of applying hierarchical regression in social sciences as well as in the specific context of entrepreneurial intention formation, and addresses some of the potential pitfalls that this type of analysis entails.

  19. Hierarchical Control for Smart Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbæk, K; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with hierarchical model predictive control (MPC) of smart grid systems. The design consists of a high level MPC controller, a second level of so-called aggregators, which reduces the computational and communication-related load on the high-level control, and a lower level...... of autonomous consumers. The control system is tasked with balancing electric power production and consumption within the smart grid, and makes active use of the flexibility of a large number of power producing and/or power consuming units. The objective is to accommodate the load variation on the grid, arising...

  20. Hierarchical Structures in Hypertext Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezdan, Eniko; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Bezdan, E., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 9 September). Hierarchical Structures in Hypertext Learning Environments. Presentation for the visit of KU Leuven, Open University, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  1. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Scales for Diagnosing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (SCALES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, Gail R.; Campbell, Hilary L.; Miller, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have evolved over time with current versions of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual", (4th edition), text revision, ("DSM-IV-TR") suggesting that two constellations of symptoms may be present alone or in combination. The SCALES instrument for diagnosing attention deficit…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  4. Validation of the Olympic Games Attitude Scale (OGAS): Evidence from Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Jennifer Y.; Cheung, Siu-Yin; King, Carina C.; Lam, Eddie T. C.

    2016-01-01

    There have been extensive studies of local residents' perception and reaction to the impacts of mega events. However, there is limited empirical research on the social impacts that shape foreign attitudes toward the host country. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Olympic Games Attitude Scale (OGAS) to examine viewers'…

  5. IQs Are Very Strong but Imperfect Indicators of Psychometric "g": Results from Joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Ryan L.; Floyd, Randy G.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Kranzler, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The most global score yielded by intelligence tests, IQs, are supported by substantial validity evidence and have historically been central to the identification of intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, and giftedness. This study examined the extent to which IQs measure the ability they target, psychometric "g." Data from…

  6. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Motivated Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahi, Mohammad Ali; Rasekh, Abbas Eslami; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) is an instrument for measuring motivation and learning strategies in general education. This instrument is modular, consisting of motivation and learning strategies modules. This study sought to see whether the learning strategies module of this instrument can be applied to the context of…

  7. A Note on Sample Size and Solution Propriety for Confirmatory Factor Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dennis L.; Voth, Jennifer; Frey, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    Determining an appropriate sample size for use in latent variable modeling techniques has presented ongoing challenges to researchers. In particular, small sample sizes are known to present concerns over sampling error for the variances and covariances on which model estimation is based, as well as for fit indexes and convergence failures. The…

  8. Dimensionality of the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale: Findings Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia Man-Sze

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale (CPCPS) was constructed to assess Chinese people's beliefs about poverty. Four categories of explanations of poverty are covered in this scale: personal problems of poor people, lack of opportunities to escape from poverty, exploitation of poor people, and bad fate. Based on the responses of 1,519…

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Scales for Diagnosing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (SCALES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, Gail R.; Campbell, Hilary L.; Miller, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have evolved over time with current versions of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual", (4th edition), text revision, ("DSM-IV-TR") suggesting that two constellations of symptoms may be present alone or in combination. The SCALES instrument for diagnosing attention deficit…

  10. Adaptation, data quality and confirmatory factor analysis of the Danish version of the PACIC questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sokolowski, Ineta; Vedsted, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Internationalt bruges PACIC-spørgeskemaet til at måle patienter med kronisk sygdom til evaluering af sundhedsvæsenets indsats. Vi lavede en videnskabelig og standardiseret oversættelse af den engelske version. Vi genfandt de fem skalaer, som endvidere viste gode egenskaber for et spørgeskema. Der...

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzine, Gypsy M.; Cooney, John B.; McKenzie, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research on teacher self-efficacy has revealed substantive problems concerning the validity of instruments used to measure teacher self-efficacy beliefs. Although claims about the influence of teachers' self-efficacy beliefs on student achievement, success with curriculum innovation, and so on, may be true statements, one cannot make…

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis of the thyroid-related quality of life questionnaire ThyPRO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Deng, N; Gandek, B;

    2014-01-01

    .ResultsEach ThyPRO scale was adequately represented by a unidimensional model after minor revisions. Eleven items were identified in the unidimensional models as potentially misfitting and were investigated further by multidimensional modeling.ConclusionElaborate psychometric modeling supported the construct...

  13. Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis to Understand Executive Control in Preschool Children: I. Latent Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Charak, David

    2008-01-01

    Although many tasks have been developed recently to study executive control in the preschool years, the constructs that underlie performance on these tasks are poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether executive control is composed of multiple, separable cognitive abilities (e.g., inhibition and working memory) or whether it is…

  14. Convergence, Admissibility, and Fit of Alternative Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models for MTMM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Charles E.; Fan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We compared six different analytic models for multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) data in terms of convergence, admissibility, and model fit to 258 samples of previously reported data. Two well-known models, the correlated trait-correlated method (CTCM) and the correlated trait-correlated uniqueness (CTCU) models, were fit for reference purposes in…

  15. Identification of Effective Leadership Indicators in Ghanaian Retail Banks Using AMOS-Based Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanda, Aminu; Kuada, John

    2013-01-01

    In the light of the importance of banks to the economic growth process in Ghana, this study sought to identify the determinants of effective leadership style that is appreciated by employees in retail banking firms in Ghana, towards providing practitioners with crucial information that could enable...... them make informed decisions towards improving the workplace. Using data collected from employees in eleven firms which were analyzed using the AMOS programme, minimum was achieved for the leadership measurement model and the goodness of fit statistics showed that the overall model fit quite well...... and taking care of their complaints as well as putting in place systems for enhancing employees’ career advancement into specialist departments or management positions are also perceived as good determinant of leadership. It is therefore hypothesized that managers of retail banks in Ghana could be perceived...

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  17. The development and validation of the organisational innovativeness construct using confirmatory factor analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Catherine; Ahmed, Pervaiz

    2004-01-01

    The role of organisational innovativeness, or innovative capability, in attaining competitive advantage has been widely discussed. Most research examines innovation activities and their associations to organisational characteristics, or investigates certain perspectives of innovative capability, such as product innovation. Much less attention, however, has been paid to develop and validate measurement constructs of organisational innovativeness. Through extensive literature review, we identif...

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  19. Dimensionality of the Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale: Findings Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Ma, Cecilia Man-Sze

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese Perceived Causes of Poverty Scale (CPCPS) was constructed to assess Chinese people's beliefs about poverty. Four categories of explanations of poverty are covered in this scale: personal problems of poor people, lack of opportunities to escape from poverty, exploitation of poor people, and bad fate. Based on the responses of 1,519…

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  1. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Test of Gross Motor Development-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka Yee Allison; Cheung, Siu Yin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the underlying structure of the second edition of the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 (Ulrich, 2000) as applied to Chinese children. The Test of Gross Motor Development-2 was administered to 626 Hong Kong Chinese children. The outlier test with standard scoring was utilized. After data screening, a total…

  2. Convergence, Admissibility, and Fit of Alternative Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models for MTMM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Charles E.; Fan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We compared six different analytic models for multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) data in terms of convergence, admissibility, and model fit to 258 samples of previously reported data. Two well-known models, the correlated trait-correlated method (CTCM) and the correlated trait-correlated uniqueness (CTCU) models, were fit for reference purposes in…

  3. Dynamic Organization of Hierarchical Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    In the brain, external objects are categorized in a hierarchical way. Although it is widely accepted that objects are represented as static attractors in neural state space, this view does not take account interaction between intrinsic neural dynamics and external input, which is essential to understand how neural system responds to inputs. Indeed, structured spontaneous neural activity without external inputs is known to exist, and its relationship with evoked activities is discussed. Then, how categorical representation is embedded into the spontaneous and evoked activities has to be uncovered. To address this question, we studied bifurcation process with increasing input after hierarchically clustered associative memories are learned. We found a "dynamic categorization"; neural activity without input wanders globally over the state space including all memories. Then with the increase of input strength, diffuse representation of higher category exhibits transitions to focused ones specific to each object. The hierarchy of memories is embedded in the transition probability from one memory to another during the spontaneous dynamics. With increased input strength, neural activity wanders over a narrower state space including a smaller set of memories, showing more specific category or memory corresponding to the applied input. Moreover, such coarse-to-fine transitions are also observed temporally during transient process under constant input, which agrees with experimental findings in the temporal cortex. These results suggest the hierarchy emerging through interaction with an external input underlies hierarchy during transient process, as well as in the spontaneous activity.

  4. Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burnup Confirmatory Data Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Christine T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alsaed, Halim A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Marschman, Steven C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations.

  5. Unidimensionality of life satisfaction and its relation to social desirability: a confirmatory study of a short form of the Life Satisfaction Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laicardi, C; Baldassarri, F; Artistico, D

    2001-02-01

    This study investigated construct validity of a short version of the Life Satisfaction in the Elderly Scale developed from an exploratory factor analysis in 1990 of the original version of Salamon and Conte's Life Satisfaction scale. First, a confirmatory factor analysis (maximum likelihood method) was conducted on 149 adult and elderly Italians to assess whether the latent variable of the Life Satisfaction Short Form scale was adequately represented by one factor. Analysis showed a good fit for the proposed unidimensional model, the items achieved good internal consistency on the scale, and no age differences arose in the score for the Life Satisfaction factor. Second, the correlations between the items measuring Life Satisfaction and the Eysenck 1985 Lie scale indicated that the items on the Life Satisfaction Short Form are largely independent of social desirability for younger and older adults.

  6. Clinical utility of arterial spin-labeling as a confirmatory test for suspected brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, K M; Yun, T J; Yoon, B-W; Jeon, B S; Choi, S H; Kim, J-H; Kim, J E; Sohn, C-H; Han, M H

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosis of brain death is made on the basis of 3 essential findings: coma, absence of brain stem reflexes, and apnea. Although confirmatory tests are not mandatory in most situations, additional testing may be necessary to declare brain death in patients in whom results of specific components of clinical testing cannot be reliably evaluated. Recently, arterial spin-labeling has been incorporated as part of MR imaging to evaluate cerebral perfusion. Advantages of arterial spin-labeling include being completely noninvasive and providing information about absolute CBF. We retrospectively reviewed arterial spin-labeling findings according to the following modified criteria based on previously established confirmatory tests to determine brain death: 1) extremely decreased perfusion in the whole brain, 2) bright vessel signal intensity around the entry of the carotid artery to the skull, 3) patent external carotid circulation, and 4) "hollow skull sign" in a series of 5 patients. Arterial spin-labeling findings satisfied the criteria for brain death in all patients. Arterial spin-labeling imaging has the potential to be a completely noninvasive confirmatory test to provide additional information to assist in the diagnosis of brain death.

  7. Research design considerations for confirmatory chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Baron, Ralf; Bellamy, Nicholas; Burke, Laurie B; Chappell, Amy; Chartier, Kevin; Cleeland, Charles S; Costello, Ann; Cowan, Penney; Dimitrova, Rozalina; Ellenberg, Susan; Farrar, John T; French, Jacqueline A; Gilron, Ian; Hertz, Sharon; Jadad, Alejandro R; Jay, Gary W; Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kerns, Robert D; Manning, Donald C; McDermott, Michael P; McGrath, Patrick J; Narayana, Arvind; Porter, Linda; Quessy, Steve; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Reeve, Bryce B; Rhodes, Thomas; Sampaio, Cristina; Simpson, David M; Stauffer, Joseph W; Stucki, Gerold; Tobias, Jeffrey; White, Richard E; Witter, James

    2010-05-01

    There has been an increase in the number of chronic pain clinical trials in which the treatments being evaluated did not differ significantly from placebo in the primary efficacy analyses despite previous research suggesting that efficacy could be expected. These findings could reflect a true lack of efficacy or methodological and other aspects of these trials that compromise the demonstration of efficacy. There is substantial variability among chronic pain clinical trials with respect to important research design considerations, and identifying and addressing any methodological weaknesses would enhance the likelihood of demonstrating the analgesic effects of new interventions. An IMMPACT consensus meeting was therefore convened to identify the critical research design considerations for confirmatory chronic pain trials and to make recommendations for their conduct. We present recommendations for the major components of confirmatory chronic pain clinical trials, including participant selection, trial phases and duration, treatment groups and dosing regimens, and types of trials. Increased attention to and research on the methodological aspects of confirmatory chronic pain clinical trials has the potential to enhance their assay sensitivity and ultimately provide more meaningful evaluations of treatments for chronic pain.

  8. Self-organized Criticality in Hierarchical Brain Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qiu-Ying; ZHANG Ying-Yue; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the cortical brain network of the macaque displays a hierarchically clustered organization and the neuron network shows small-world properties. Now the two factors will be considered in our model and the dynamical behavior of the model will be studied. We study the characters of the model and find that the distribution of avalanche size of the model follows power-law behavior.

  9. Hierarchical Bulk Synchronous Parallel Model and Performance Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Linpeng; SUNYongqiang; YUAN Wei

    1999-01-01

    Based on the framework of BSP, aHierarchical Bulk Synchronous Parallel (HBSP) performance model isintroduced in this paper to capture the performance optimizationproblem for various stages in parallel program development and toaccurately predict the performance of a parallel program byconsidering factors causing variance at local computation and globalcommunication. The related methodology has been applied to several realapplications and the results show that HBSP is a suitable model foroptimizing parallel programs.

  10. Posttraumatic growth inventory: factor structure in Spanish-speaking people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Hernansaiz, Helena; Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús

    2017-10-01

    This cross-sectional study analyzed the factorial structure of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) in a sample of 304 Spanish-speaking HIV-positive adults. Participants completed the PTGI and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out through structural equations modeling, with a Varimax rotation. Factors with eigenvalues greater than 1 were extracted, and items with loadings higher than .5 on a factor and lower than .4 on the rest were retained. Two confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were performed to test a hierarchical model and a bifactor model. Reliability analyses were conducted. EFA suggested a three-factor model keeping 11 of the original 21 items. The three factors that emerged were changes in philosophy of life, in the self and in interpersonal relationships. CFAs suggested that only the bifactor model fitted the data. The three factors as well as the global scale showed good reliability. The factor structure of PTGI's scores in our data is consistent with the three dimensions theorized by Tedeschi and Calhoun, which speaks in favor of the construct validity of this measure.

  11. Decomposing Person and Occasion-Specific Effects: An Extension of Latent State-Trait (LSI) Theory to Hierarchical LST Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermelleh-Engel, Karin; Keith, Nina; Moosbrugger, Helfried; Hodapp, Volker

    2004-01-01

    An extension of latent state-trait (LST) theory to hierarchical LST models is presented. In hierarchical LST models, the covariances between 2 or more latent traits are explained by a general 3rd-order factor, and the covariances between latent state residuals pertaining to different traits measured on the same measurement occasion are explained…

  12. On the Hierarchical Preconditioning of the PMCHWT Integral Equation on Simply and Multiply Connected Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Guzman, J E Ortiz; Mitharwal, R; Beghein, Y; Eibert, T F; Cools, K; Andriulli, F P

    2016-01-01

    We present a hierarchical basis preconditioning strategy for the Poggio-Miller-Chang-Harrington-Wu-Tsai (PMCHWT) integral equation considering both simply and multiply connected geometries.To this end, we first consider the direct application of hierarchical basis preconditioners, developed for the Electric Field Integral Equation (EFIE), to the PMCHWT. It is notably found that, whereas for the EFIE a diagonal preconditioner can be used for obtaining the hierarchical basis scaling factors, this strategy is catastrophic in the case of the PMCHWT since it leads to a severly ill-conditioned PMCHWT system in the case of multiply connected geometries. We then proceed to a theoretical analysis of the effect of hierarchical bases on the PMCHWT operator for which we obtain the correct scaling factors and a provably effective preconditioner for both low frequencies and mesh refinements. Numerical results will corroborate the theory and show the effectiveness of our approach.

  13. Discovering hierarchical structure in normal relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering is a widely used tool for structuring and visualizing complex data using similarity. Traditionally, hierarchical clustering is based on local heuristics that do not explicitly provide assessment of the statistical saliency of the extracted hierarchy. We propose a non-param...

  14. Discursive Hierarchical Patterning in Economics Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to apply Lung's (2008) model of the discursive hierarchical patterning of cases to a closer and more specific study of Economics cases and proposes a model of the distinct discursive hierarchical patterning of the same. It examines a corpus of 150 Economics cases with a view to uncovering the patterns of discourse construction.…

  15. A Model of Hierarchical Key Assignment Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhigang; ZHAO Jing; XU Maozhi

    2006-01-01

    A model of the hierarchical key assignment scheme is approached in this paper, which can be used with any cryptography algorithm. Besides, the optimal dynamic control property of a hierarchical key assignment scheme will be defined in this paper. Also, our scheme model will meet this property.

  16. A Brief History of the Philosophical Foundations of Exploratory Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaik, Stanley A.

    1987-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis derives its key ideas from many sources, including Aristotle, Francis Bacon, Descartes, Pearson and Yule, and Kant. The conclusions of exploratory factor analysis are never complete without subsequent confirmatory factor analysis. (Author/GDC)

  17. Galaxy formation through hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic methods for studying the formation of galaxies by gas condensation within massive dark halos are presented. The present scheme applies to cosmogonies where structure grows through hierarchical clustering of a mixture of gas and dissipationless dark matter. The simplest models consistent with the current understanding of N-body work on dissipationless clustering, and that of numerical and analytic work on gas evolution and cooling are adopted. Standard models for the evolution of the stellar population are also employed, and new models for the way star formation heats and enriches the surrounding gas are constructed. Detailed results are presented for a cold dark matter universe with Omega = 1 and H(0) = 50 km/s/Mpc, but the present methods are applicable to other models. The present luminosity functions contain significantly more faint galaxies than are observed.

  18. Groups possessing extensive hierarchical decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Januszkiewicz, T; Leary, I J

    2009-01-01

    Kropholler's class of groups is the smallest class of groups which contains all finite groups and is closed under the following operator: whenever $G$ admits a finite-dimensional contractible $G$-CW-complex in which all stabilizer groups are in the class, then $G$ is itself in the class. Kropholler's class admits a hierarchical structure, i.e., a natural filtration indexed by the ordinals. For example, stage 0 of the hierarchy is the class of all finite groups, and stage 1 contains all groups of finite virtual cohomological dimension. We show that for each countable ordinal $\\alpha$, there is a countable group that is in Kropholler's class which does not appear until the $\\alpha+1$st stage of the hierarchy. Previously this was known only for $\\alpha= 0$, 1 and 2. The groups that we construct contain torsion. We also review the construction of a torsion-free group that lies in the third stage of the hierarchy.

  19. Quantum transport through hierarchical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, S; Varghese, C; Novotny, M A

    2011-04-01

    The transport of quantum electrons through hierarchical lattices is of interest because such lattices have some properties of both regular lattices and random systems. We calculate the electron transmission as a function of energy in the tight-binding approximation for two related Hanoi networks. HN3 is a Hanoi network with every site having three bonds. HN5 has additional bonds added to HN3 to make the average number of bonds per site equal to five. We present a renormalization group approach to solve the matrix equation involved in this quantum transport calculation. We observe band gaps in HN3, while no such band gaps are observed in linear networks or in HN5. We provide a detailed scaling analysis near the edges of these band gaps.

  20. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  1. Multicollinearity in hierarchical linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Jiang, Shanhe; Land, Kenneth C

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates an ill-posed problem (multicollinearity) in Hierarchical Linear Models from both the data and the model perspectives. We propose an intuitive, effective approach to diagnosing the presence of multicollinearity and its remedies in this class of models. A simulation study demonstrates the impacts of multicollinearity on coefficient estimates, associated standard errors, and variance components at various levels of multicollinearity for finite sample sizes typical in social science studies. We further investigate the role multicollinearity plays at each level for estimation of coefficient parameters in terms of shrinkage. Based on these analyses, we recommend a top-down method for assessing multicollinearity in HLMs that first examines the contextual predictors (Level-2 in a two-level model) and then the individual predictors (Level-1) and uses the results for data collection, research problem redefinition, model re-specification, variable selection and estimation of a final model.

  2. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  3. A neural signature of hierarchical reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Fernandes, José J F; Solway, Alec; Diuk, Carlos; McGuire, Joseph T; Barto, Andrew G; Niv, Yael; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2011-07-28

    Human behavior displays hierarchical structure: simple actions cohere into subtask sequences, which work together to accomplish overall task goals. Although the neural substrates of such hierarchy have been the target of increasing research, they remain poorly understood. We propose that the computations supporting hierarchical behavior may relate to those in hierarchical reinforcement learning (HRL), a machine-learning framework that extends reinforcement-learning mechanisms into hierarchical domains. To test this, we leveraged a distinctive prediction arising from HRL. In ordinary reinforcement learning, reward prediction errors are computed when there is an unanticipated change in the prospects for accomplishing overall task goals. HRL entails that prediction errors should also occur in relation to task subgoals. In three neuroimaging studies we observed neural responses consistent with such subgoal-related reward prediction errors, within structures previously implicated in reinforcement learning. The results reported support the relevance of HRL to the neural processes underlying hierarchical behavior.

  4. Hierarchical Identity-Based Lossy Trapdoor Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Escala, Alex; Libert, Benoit; Rafols, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Lossy trapdoor functions, introduced by Peikert and Waters (STOC'08), have received a lot of attention in the last years, because of their wide range of applications in theoretical cryptography. The notion has been recently extended to the identity-based scenario by Bellare et al. (Eurocrypt'12). We provide one more step in this direction, by considering the notion of hierarchical identity-based lossy trapdoor functions (HIB-LTDFs). Hierarchical identity-based cryptography generalizes identitybased cryptography in the sense that identities are organized in a hierarchical way; a parent identity has more power than its descendants, because it can generate valid secret keys for them. Hierarchical identity-based cryptography has been proved very useful both for practical applications and to establish theoretical relations with other cryptographic primitives. In order to realize HIB-LTDFs, we first build a weakly secure hierarchical predicate encryption scheme. This scheme, which may be of independent interest, is...

  5. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  6. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  7. Hierarchically Nanoporous Bioactive Glasses for High Efficiency Immobilization of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, W.; Min, D.D.; Zhang, X.D.

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glasses with hierarchical nanoporosity and structures have been heavily involved in immobilization of enzymes. Because of meticulous design and ingenious hierarchical nanostructuration of porosities from yeast cell biotemplates, hierarchically nanostructured porous bioactive glasses can...

  8. Hierarchical mutual information for the comparison of hierarchical community structures in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Juan Ignacio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The quest for a quantitative characterization of community and modular structure of complex networks produced a variety of methods and algorithms to classify different networks. However, it is not clear if such methods provide consistent, robust and meaningful results when considering hierarchies as a whole. Part of the problem is the lack of a similarity measure for the comparison of hierarchical community structures. In this work we give a contribution by introducing the {\\it hierarchical mutual information}, which is a generalization of the traditional mutual information, and allows to compare hierarchical partitions and hierarchical community structures. The {\\it normalized} version of the hierarchical mutual information should behave analogously to the traditional normalized mutual information. Here, the correct behavior of the hierarchical mutual information is corroborated on an extensive battery of numerical experiments. The experiments are performed on artificial hierarchies, and on the hierarchical ...

  9. A Factor Analytic Approach to Distinguish Pure and Co-Occurring Dimensions of Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Colder, Craig R.; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study used a confirmatory factor model to distinguish pure and co-occurring dimensions of proactive and reactive aggression, and examined the relation between parenting variables and these dimensions of aggression in a sample of 100 children (9 to 12 years of age; 69 boys). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported 3 dimensions of…

  10. A Route Confidence Evaluation Method for Reliable Hierarchical Text Categorization

    CERN Document Server

    Hatami, Nima; Armano, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical Text Categorization (HTC) is becoming increasingly important with the rapidly growing amount of text data available in the World Wide Web. Among the different strategies proposed to cope with HTC, the Local Classifier per Node (LCN) approach attains good performance by mirroring the underlying class hierarchy while enforcing a top-down strategy in the testing step. However, the problem of embedding hierarchical information (parent-child relationship) to improve the performance of HTC systems still remains open. A confidence evaluation method for a selected route in the hierarchy is proposed to evaluate the reliability of the final candidate labels in an HTC system. In order to take into account the information embedded in the hierarchy, weight factors are used to take into account the importance of each level. An acceptance/rejection strategy in the top-down decision making process is proposed, which improves the overall categorization accuracy by rejecting a few percentage of samples, i.e., thos...

  11. Hierarchical neutrino masses and mixing in flipped-SU(5)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizos, J. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Tamvakis, K., E-mail: tamvakis@uoi.g [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-02-22

    We consider the problem of neutrino masses and mixing in the framework of flipped SU(5). The right-handed neutrino mass, generated through the operation of a seesaw mechanism by a sector of gauge singlets, leads naturally, at a subsequent level, to the standard seesaw mechanism resulting into three light neutrino states with masses of the desired phenomenological order of magnitude. In this framework we study simple Ansaetze for the singlet couplings for which hierarchical neutrino masses emerge naturally as lambda{sup n}:lambda:1 or lambda{sup n}:lambda{sup 2}:1, parametrized in terms of the Cabbibo parameter. The resulting neutrino mixing matrices are characterized by a hierarchical structure, in which theta{sub 13} is always predicted to be the smallest. Finally, we discuss a possible factorized parametrization of the neutrino mass that, in addition to Cabbibo mixing, encodes also mixing due to the singlet sector.

  12. The structure of dust aggregates in hierarchical coagulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dominik, Carsten; Borel, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Dust coagulation in interstellar space and protoplanetary disks is usually treated as one of 2 extreme cases: Particle-Cluster Aggregation and Cluster-Cluster Aggregation. In this paper we study the process of hierarchical growth, where aggregates are built from significantly smaller aggregates (but not monomers). We show that this process can be understood as a modified, PCA-like process that produces porous, but non-fractal particles whose filling factor is chiefly determined by the porosity of the building blocks. We also show that in a coagulation environment where relative velocities are driven by turbulence, a logarithmically flat mass distribution (equal mass per mass decade) as it is typically found in environments where fragmentation replenishes small grains, leads to a situation where small particles and aggregates dominate the growth of large ones. Therefore, in such environments, hierarchical growth should be seen as the norm. Consequently, we predict that the aggregates in such environments are n...

  13. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  14. A Model for Slicing JAVA Programs Hierarchically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-Xin Li; Xiao-Cong Fan; Jun Pang; Jian-Jun Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Program slicing can be effectively used to debug, test, analyze, understand and maintain objectoriented software. In this paper, a new slicing model is proposed to slice Java programs based on their inherent hierarchical feature. The main idea of hierarchical slicing is to slice programs in a stepwise way, from package level, to class level, method level, and finally up to statement level. The stepwise slicing algorithm and the related graph reachability algorithms are presented, the architecture of the Java program Analyzing Tool (JATO) based on hierarchical slicing model is provided, the applications and a small case study are also discussed.

  15. Hierarchical analysis of acceptable use policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Laughton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acceptable use policies (AUPs are vital tools for organizations to protect themselves and their employees from misuse of computer facilities provided. A well structured, thorough AUP is essential for any organization. It is impossible for an effective AUP to deal with every clause and remain readable. For this reason, some sections of an AUP carry more weight than others, denoting importance. The methodology used to develop the hierarchical analysis is a literature review, where various sources were consulted. This hierarchical approach to AUP analysis attempts to highlight important sections and clauses dealt with in an AUP. The emphasis of the hierarchal analysis is to prioritize the objectives of an AUP.

  16. Hierarchical modeling and analysis for spatial data

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sudipto; Gelfand, Alan E

    2003-01-01

    Among the many uses of hierarchical modeling, their application to the statistical analysis of spatial and spatio-temporal data from areas such as epidemiology And environmental science has proven particularly fruitful. Yet to date, the few books that address the subject have been either too narrowly focused on specific aspects of spatial analysis, or written at a level often inaccessible to those lacking a strong background in mathematical statistics.Hierarchical Modeling and Analysis for Spatial Data is the first accessible, self-contained treatment of hierarchical methods, modeling, and dat

  17. Different meaning of the p-value in exploratory and confirmatory hypothesis testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Vach, Werner

    2011-01-01

    The outcome of clinical studies is often reduced to the statistical significance of results by indicating a p-value below the 5% significance level. Hypothesis testing and, through that, the p-value is commonly used, but their meaning is frequently misinterpreted in clinical research. The concept...... of hypothesis testing is explained and some pitfalls including those of multiple testing are given. The conceptual difference between exploratory and confirmatory hypothesis testing is discussed, and a better use of p-values, which includes presenting p-values with two or three decimals, is suggested....

  18. Screening and confirmatory methods for determining lincomycin residues in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiers, A R; Neff, A W

    1976-07-01

    Methods for screening and for confirming residues of lincomycin in animal tissues, both sensitive to 0.1 ppm, are described. In the screening technique, residues are extracted, cleaned up by solvent partition, and detected by microbiological plate assay. In the confirmatory technique, residues are cleaned up on an unfunctionalized macroreticular-type resin column, concentrated, chromatographed on thin layer plates, and detected by bioautography. This system was effective in identifying lincomycin in the presence of 20 other antibiotics and chemicals used in the animal health industry.

  19. Image meshing via hierarchical optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao XIE; Ruo-feng TONG‡

    2016-01-01

    Vector graphic, as a kind of geometric representation of raster images, has many advantages, e.g., defi nition independence and editing facility. A popular way to convert raster images into vector graphics is image meshing, the aim of which is to fi nd a mesh to represent an image as faithfully as possible. For traditional meshing algorithms, the crux of the problem resides mainly in the high non-linearity and non-smoothness of the objective, which makes it difficult to fi nd a desirable optimal solution. To ameliorate this situation, we present a hierarchical optimization algorithm solving the problem from coarser levels to fi ner ones, providing initialization for each level with its coarser ascent. To further simplify the problem, the original non-convex problem is converted to a linear least squares one, and thus becomes convex, which makes the problem much easier to solve. A dictionary learning framework is used to combine geometry and topology elegantly. Then an alternating scheme is employed to solve both parts. Experiments show that our algorithm runs fast and achieves better results than existing ones for most images.

  20. Image meshing via hierarchical optimization*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao XIE; Ruo-feng TONGS

    2016-01-01

    Vector graphic, as a kind of geometric representation of raster images, has many advantages, e.g., definition independence and editing facility. A popular way to convert raster images into vector graphics is image meshing, the aim of which is to find a mesh to represent an image as faithfully as possible. For traditional meshing algorithms, the crux of the problem resides mainly in the high non-linearity and non-smoothness of the objective, which makes it difficult to find a desirable optimal solution. To ameliorate this situation, we present a hierarchical optimization algorithm solving the problem from coarser levels to finer ones, providing initialization for each level with its coarser ascent. To further simplify the problem, the original non-convex problem is converted to a linear least squares one, and thus becomes convex, which makes the problem much easier to solve. A dictionary learning framework is used to combine geometry and topology elegantly. Then an alternating scheme is employed to solve both parts. Experiments show that our algorithm runs fast and achieves better results than existing ones for most images.

  1. Hierarchical Bayes Ensemble Kalman Filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyrulnikov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF), when applied to high-dimensional systems, suffers from an inevitably small affordable ensemble size, which results in poor estimates of the background error covariance matrix ${\\bf B}$. The common remedy is a kind of regularization, usually an ad-hoc spatial covariance localization (tapering) combined with artificial covariance inflation. Instead of using an ad-hoc regularization, we adopt the idea by Myrseth and Omre (2010) and explicitly admit that the ${\\bf B}$ matrix is unknown and random and estimate it along with the state (${\\bf x}$) in an optimal hierarchical Bayes analysis scheme. We separate forecast errors into predictability errors (i.e. forecast errors due to uncertainties in the initial data) and model errors (forecast errors due to imperfections in the forecast model) and include the two respective components ${\\bf P}$ and ${\\bf Q}$ of the ${\\bf B}$ matrix into the extended control vector $({\\bf x},{\\bf P},{\\bf Q})$. Similarly, we break the traditional backgrou...

  2. Assessing Cognitive and Affective Empathy Through the Interpersonal Reactivity Index: An Argument Against a Two-Factor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikou, Evangelia G; Thompson, W Jake

    2016-12-01

    One aspect of higher order social cognition is empathy, a psychological construct comprising a cognitive (recognizing emotions) and an affective (responding to emotions) component. The complex nature of empathy complicates the accurate measurement of these components. The most widely used measure of empathy is the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). However, the factor structure of the IRI as it is predominantly used in the psychological literature differs from Davis's original four-factor model in that it arbitrarily combines the subscales to form two factors: cognitive and affective empathy. This two-factor model of the IRI, although popular, has yet to be examined for psychometric support. In the current study, we examine, for the first time, the validity of this alternative model. A confirmatory factor analysis showed poor model fit for this two-factor structure. Additional analyses offered support for the original four-factor model, as well as a hierarchical model for the scale. In line with previous findings, females scored higher on the IRI than males. Our findings indicate that the IRI, as it is currently used in the literature, does not accurately measure cognitive and affective empathy and highlight the advantages of using the original four-factor structure of the scale for empathy assessments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. HIDEN: Hierarchical decomposition of regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsoy Günhan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors regulate numerous cellular processes by controlling the rate of production of each gene. The regulatory relations are modeled using transcriptional regulatory networks. Recent studies have shown that such networks have an underlying hierarchical organization. We consider the problem of discovering the underlying hierarchy in transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We first transform this problem to a mixed integer programming problem. We then use existing tools to solve the resulting problem. For larger networks this strategy does not work due to rapid increase in running time and space usage. We use divide and conquer strategy for such networks. We use our method to analyze the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli, H. sapiens and S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Our experiments demonstrate that: (i Our method gives statistically better results than three existing state of the art methods; (ii Our method is robust against errors in the data and (iii Our method’s performance is not affected by the different topologies in the data.

  4. CODE-CROSSING: HIERARCHICAL POLITENESS IN JAVANESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Wajdi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Javanese is a well known for its speech levels called ngoko ‘low’ and krama ‘high’ which enable its speakers to show intimacy, deference, and hierarchy among the society members. This research applied critically Brown and Gilman (1960’s theory of terms of address to analyze the asymmetrical, factors which influence, and politeness of the use of speech levels in Javanese.                                                                                                   Method of observation, in depth interview, and document study were applied to collect the data. Recorded conversation was then transcribed into written form, classified and codified according to the speech levels, and analyzed using politeness system (Scollon and Scollon, 2001 and status scale (Homes, 2001.                                                                       The use of speech levels shows asymmetric communication: two speakers use two different codes, i.e. ngoko and krama because of power (+P and with/without distance (+/-D, and it is the reflection of hierarchical politeness. The asymmetrical use of ngoko and krama by God and His Angel, God and human beings strongly explicated the asymmetrical communication between superiors and inferiors. The finding of the research shows that the use of ngoko and krama could present the phenomena of code-switching, code-mixing, and the fundamental phenomenon is ‘code-crossing’. It is concluded that hierarchical politeness in Javanese is ‘social contract’ i.e. the acknowledgment of the existence of high class (superior and low class (inferior  implemented in ‘communications contract’  using speech levels of the Javanese language  in line with status scale. Asymmetrical use of ngoko and krama indexed inequality, hierarchy, and harmony

  5. Revisiting the Leadership Scale for Sport: Examining Factor Structure Through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weisheng; Rodriguez, Fernando M; Won, Doyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the shortened version of the Leadership Scale for Sport, through a survey of 201 collegiate swimmers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II and III institutions, using both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis. Both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five-factor solution fit the data adequately. The sizes of factor loadings on target factors substantially differed between the confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling solutions. In addition, the inter-correlations between factors of the Leadership Scale for Sport and the correlations with athletes' satisfaction were found to be inflated in the confirmatory factor analysis solution. Overall, the findings provide evidence of the factorial validity of the shortened Leadership Scale for Sport.

  6. An Automatic Hierarchical Delay Analysis Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FaridMheir-El-Saadi; BozenaKaminska

    1994-01-01

    The performance analysis of VLSI integrated circuits(ICs) with flat tools is slow and even sometimes impossible to complete.Some hierarchical tools have been developed to speed up the analysis of these large ICs.However,these hierarchical tools suffer from a poor interaction with the CAD database and poorly automatized operations.We introduce a general hierarchical framework for performance analysis to solve these problems.The circuit analysis is automatic under the proposed framework.Information that has been automatically abstracted in the hierarchy is kept in database properties along with the topological information.A limited software implementation of the framework,PREDICT,has also been developed to analyze the delay performance.Experimental results show that hierarchical analysis CPU time and memory requirements are low if heuristics are used during the abstraction process.

  7. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  8. Hierarchical modularity in human brain functional networks

    CERN Document Server

    Meunier, D; Fornito, A; Ersche, K D; Bullmore, E T; 10.3389/neuro.11.037.2009

    2010-01-01

    The idea that complex systems have a hierarchical modular organization originates in the early 1960s and has recently attracted fresh support from quantitative studies of large scale, real-life networks. Here we investigate the hierarchical modular (or "modules-within-modules") decomposition of human brain functional networks, measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 18 healthy volunteers under no-task or resting conditions. We used a customized template to extract networks with more than 1800 regional nodes, and we applied a fast algorithm to identify nested modular structure at several hierarchical levels. We used mutual information, 0 < I < 1, to estimate the similarity of community structure of networks in different subjects, and to identify the individual network that is most representative of the group. Results show that human brain functional networks have a hierarchical modular organization with a fair degree of similarity between subjects, I=0.63. The largest 5 modules at ...

  9. HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION, IN RELATIONAL DATABASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Horia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will present different types of representation, of hierarchical information inside a relational database. I also will compare them to find the best organization for specific scenarios.

  10. Hierarchical Network Design Using Simulated Annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomadsen, Tommy; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    The hierarchical network problem is the problem of finding the least cost network, with nodes divided into groups, edges connecting nodes in each groups and groups ordered in a hierarchy. The idea of hierarchical networks comes from telecommunication networks where hierarchies exist. Hierarchical...... networks are described and a mathematical model is proposed for a two level version of the hierarchical network problem. The problem is to determine which edges should connect nodes, and how demand is routed in the network. The problem is solved heuristically using simulated annealing which as a sub......-algorithm uses a construction algorithm to determine edges and route the demand. Performance for different versions of the algorithm are reported in terms of runtime and quality of the solutions. The algorithm is able to find solutions of reasonable quality in approximately 1 hour for networks with 100 nodes....

  11. When to Use Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Veronika Huta

    2014-01-01

    Previous publications on hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) have provided guidance on how to perform the analysis, yet there is relatively little information on two questions that arise even before analysis...

  12. Conservation Laws in the Hierarchical Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijeren, H. van; Gallavotti, G.; Knops, H.

    1974-01-01

    An exposition of the renormalization-group equations for the hierarchical model is given. Attention is drawn to some properties of the spin distribution functions which are conserved under the action of the renormalization group.

  13. Hierarchical DSE for multi-ASIP platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micconi, Laura; Corvino, Rosilde; Gangadharan, Deepak;

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a hierarchical Design Space Exploration (DSE) for the design of multi-processor platforms targeted to specific applications with strict timing and area constraints. In particular, it considers platforms integrating multiple Application Specific Instruction Set Processors (ASIPs...

  14. A factor analytic study of the Italian National Institute of Health Quality of Life – Core Evaluation Form (ISSQoL-CEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lauriola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available M Lauriola1, R Murri3, M Massella4, M Mirra4, S Donnini4, V Fragola4, J Ivanovic5, M Pavoni6, G Mancini2, R Bucciardini41Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, 2Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Catholic University of “Sacro Cuore”, Rome, Italy; 4Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani, Rome, Italy; 6Ospedale Civile Santa Maria delle Croci, Ravenna, ItalyObjectives: The Italian National Institute of Health Quality of Life – Core Evaluation Form (ISSQoL-CEF is a specific questionnaire measuring health-related quality of life for human immunodeficiency virus-infected people in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The main goal of this study was to examine the construct validity of this questionnaire by confirmation of its hypothesized dimensional structure.Methods: Baseline quality of life data from four clinical studies were collected and a confirmatory factor analysis of the ISSQoL-CEF items was carried out. Both first-order and secondorder factor models were tested: Model 1 with nine correlated first-order factors; Model 2 with three correlated second-order factors (Physical, Mental, and Social Health; Model 3 with two correlated second-order factors (Physical and Mental/Social Health; Model 4 with only one second-order factor (General Health.Results: A total of 261 patients were surveyed. Model 1 had a good fit to the data. Model 2 had an acceptable fit to the data and it was the best of all hierarchical models. However, Model 2 fitted the data worse than Model 1.Conclusions: The findings of in this study, consistent with the results of previous study, pointed out the construct validity of the ISSQoL-CEF.Keywords: confirmatory factor analysis, HRQoL, patient-reported outcomes

  15. Hierarchical organization versus self-organization

    OpenAIRE

    Busseniers, Evo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we try to define the difference between hierarchical organization and self-organization. Organization is defined as a structure with a function. So we can define the difference between hierarchical organization and self-organization both on the structure as on the function. In the next two chapters these two definitions are given. For the structure we will use some existing definitions in graph theory, for the function we will use existing theory on (self-)organization. In the t...

  16. Hierarchical decision making for flood risk reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custer, Rocco; Nishijima, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    . In current practice, structures are often optimized individually without considering benefits of having a hierarchy of protection structures. It is here argued, that the joint consideration of hierarchically integrated protection structures is beneficial. A hierarchical decision model is utilized to analyze...... and compare the benefit of large upstream protection structures and local downstream protection structures in regard to epistemic uncertainty parameters. Results suggest that epistemic uncertainty influences the outcome of the decision model and that, depending on the magnitude of epistemic uncertainty...

  17. Hierarchical self-organization of tectonic plates

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The Earth's surface is subdivided into eight large tectonic plates and many smaller ones. We reconstruct the plate tessellation history and demonstrate that both large and small plates display two distinct hierarchical patterns, described by different power-law size-relationships. While small plates display little organisational change through time, the structure of the large plates oscillate between minimum and maximum hierarchical tessellations. The organization of large plates rapidly chan...

  18. Angelic Hierarchical Planning: Optimal and Online Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-06

    restrict our attention to plans in I∗(Act, s0). Definition 2. ( Parr and Russell , 1998) A plan ah∗ is hierarchically optimal iff ah∗ = argmina∈I∗(Act,s0):T...Murdock, Dan Wu, and Fusun Yaman. SHOP2: An HTN planning system. JAIR, 20:379–404, 2003. Ronald Parr and Stuart Russell . Reinforcement Learning with...Angelic Hierarchical Planning: Optimal and Online Algorithms Bhaskara Marthi Stuart J. Russell Jason Wolfe Electrical Engineering and Computer

  19. Hierarchical Needs, Income Comparisons and Happiness Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Drakopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    The cornerstone of the hierarchical approach is that there are some basic human needs which must be satisfied before non-basic needs come into the picture. The hierarchical structure of needs implies that the satisfaction of primary needs provides substantial increases to individual happiness compared to the subsequent satisfaction of secondary needs. This idea can be combined with the concept of comparison income which means that individuals compare rewards with individuals with similar char...

  20. Prevalence of hemoglobinopathies in school children: the importance of using confirmatory methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fernandes de Freitas Tavares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemoglobinopathies are included among the most common genetic diseases in the world. In Brazil, hemoglobinopathies are related to the diversity of racial backgrounds and the degree of interbreeding. The study focused on the prevalence of hemoglobinopathies using conventional and confirmatory laboratory tests in children from public schools in Ribeirão Preto-SP. The study involved the participation of 427 children between six and nine years of age. Hematologic evaluation, hemoglobin electrophoresis on cellulose acetate at alkaline pH, quantification of hemoglobin fractions by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and detection of -α3.7 deletion for α thalassemia by polymerase chain reaction were performed. The results of hemoglobin electrophoresis on cellulose acetate and HPLC of the children studied showed the presence of 30 children (7% with hemoglobinopathies. Eleven children presented results indicating suspicion of S/β-thalassemia; their parents and/or siblings were evaluated and confirmed the presence of only Hb S. The analysis of deletion -α3.7to characterize α-thalassemias sampling performed on 207 participants identified 26 children (12.6% with deletion -α3.7. Thus, 54 (12.6% of the children studied present this genetic alteration. For the detection of α-thalassemias it is necessary to use confirmatory methods such as molecular analysis and evaluation of family members in doubtful cases to facilitate genetic counseling in families, in which deletion -α3.7 is more frequent in Brazil.