WorldWideScience

Sample records for hicz graphing package

  1. admixturegraph: an R package for admixture graph manipulation and fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppälä, Kalle; Nielsen, Svend V; Mailund, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Admixture graphs generalize phylogenetic trees by allowing genetic lineages to merge as well as split. In this paper we present the R package admixturegraph containing tools for building and visualizing admixture graphs, for fitting graph parameters to genetic data, for visualizing goodness of fit and for evaluating the relative goodness of fit between different graphs. GitHub: https://github.com/mailund/admixture_graph and CRAN: https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/admixturegraph . mailund@birc.au.dk .

  2. smwrGraphs—An R package for graphing hydrologic data, version 1.1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, David L.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.

    2017-01-31

    This report describes an R package called smwrGraphs, which consists of a collection of graphing functions for hydrologic data within R, a programming language and software environment for statistical computing. The functions in the package have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey to create high-quality graphs for publication or presentation of hydrologic data that meet U.S. Geological Survey graphics guidelines.

  3. The huge Package for High-dimensional Undirected Graph Estimation in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tuo; Liu, Han; Roeder, Kathryn; Lafferty, John; Wasserman, Larry

    2015-01-01

    We describe an R package named huge which provides easy-to-use functions for estimating high dimensional undirected graphs from data. This package implements recent results in the literature, including Friedman et al. (2007), Liu et al. (2009, 2012) and Liu et al. (2010). Compared with the existing graph estimation package glasso, the huge package provides extra features: (1) instead of using Fortan, it is written in C, which makes the code more portable and easier to modify; (2) besides fitting Gaussian graphical models, it also provides functions for fitting high dimensional semiparametric Gaussian copula models; (3) more functions like data-dependent model selection, data generation and graph visualization; (4) a minor convergence problem of the graphical lasso algorithm is corrected; (5) the package allows the user to apply both lossless and lossy screening rules to scale up large-scale problems, making a tradeoff between computational and statistical efficiency. PMID:26834510

  4. Robust causal inference using directed acyclic graphs: the R package 'dagitty'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, Johannes; van der Zander, Benito; Gilthorpe, Mark S; Liśkiewicz, Maciej; Ellison, George T H

    2017-01-15

    Directed acyclic graphs (DAGs), which offer systematic representations of causal relationships, have become an established framework for the analysis of causal inference in epidemiology, often being used to determine covariate adjustment sets for minimizing confounding bias. DAGitty is a popular web application for drawing and analysing DAGs. Here we introduce the R package 'dagitty', which provides access to all of the capabilities of the DAGitty web application within the R platform for statistical computing, and also offers several new functions. We describe how the R package 'dagitty' can be used to: evaluate whether a DAG is consistent with the dataset it is intended to represent; enumerate 'statistically equivalent' but causally different DAGs; and identify exposure-outcome adjustment sets that are valid for causally different but statistically equivalent DAGs. This functionality enables epidemiologists to detect causal misspecifications in DAGs and make robust inferences that remain valid for a range of different DAGs. The R package 'dagitty' is available through the comprehensive R archive network (CRAN) at [https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/dagitty/]. The source code is available on github at [https://github.com/jtextor/dagitty]. The web application 'DAGitty' is free software, licensed under the GNU general public licence (GPL) version 2 and is available at [http://dagitty.net/].

  5. GraphXML: an XML based graph interchange format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Herman (Ivan); M.S. Marshall (Scott)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractGraphXML is a graph description language in XML that can be used as an interchange format for graph drawing and visualization packages. The generality and rich features of XML make it possible to define an interchange format that not only supports the pure, mathematical description of a

  6. Reaction Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅育熙

    1998-01-01

    The paper proposes reaction graphs as graphical representations of computational objects.A reaction graph is a directed graph with all its arrows and some of its nodes labeled.Computations are modled by graph rewriting of a simple nature.The basic rewriting rules embody the essence of both the communications among processes and cut-eliminations in proofs.Calculi of graphs are ideentified to give a formal and algebraic account of reaction graphs in the spirit of process algebra.With the help of the calculi,it is demonstrated that reaction graphs capture many interesting aspects of computations.

  7. Sharing Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Sahasranand, K R

    2010-01-01

    Almost all known secret sharing schemes work on numbers. Such methods will have difficulty in sharing graphs since the number of graphs increases exponentially with the number of nodes. We propose a secret sharing scheme for graphs where we use graph intersection for reconstructing the secret which is hidden as a sub graph in the shares. Our method does not rely on heavy computational operations such as modular arithmetic or polynomial interpolation but makes use of very basic operations like assignment and checking for equality, and graph intersection can also be performed visually. In certain cases, the secret could be reconstructed using just pencil and paper by authorised parties but cannot be broken by an adversary even with unbounded computational power. The method achieves perfect secrecy for (2, n) scheme and requires far fewer operations compared to Shamir's algorithm. The proposed method could be used to share objects such as matrices, sets, plain text and even a heterogeneous collection of these. S...

  8. Graph Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xueliang; Gutman, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This book is about graph energy. The authors have included many of the important results on graph energy, such as the complete solution to the conjecture on maximal energy of unicyclic graphs, the Wagner-Heuberger's result on the energy of trees, the energy of random graphs or the approach to energy using singular values. It contains an extensive coverage of recent results and a gradual development of topics and the inclusion of complete proofs from most of the important recent results in the area. The latter fact makes it a valuable reference for researchers looking to get into the field of g

  9. XML Graphs in Program Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    XML graphs have shown to be a simple and effective formalism for representing sets of XML documents in program analysis. It has evolved through a six year period with variants tailored for a range of applications. We present a unified definition, outline the key properties including validation...... of XML graphs against different XML schema languages, and provide a software package that enables others to make use of these ideas. We also survey the use of XML graphs for program analysis with four very different languages: XACT (XML in Java), Java Servlets (Web application programming), XSugar...

  10. Equipackable graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Preben Dahl; Hartnell, Bert L.

    2006-01-01

    There are many results dealing with the problem of decomposing a fixed graph into isomorphic subgraphs. There has also been work on characterizing graphs with the property that one can delete the edges of a number of edge disjoint copies of the subgraph and, regardless of how that is done, the gr...

  11. Introduction to graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Trudeau, Richard J

    1994-01-01

    Preface1. Pure Mathematics Introduction; Euclidean Geometry as Pure Mathematics; Games; Why Study Pure Mathematics?; What's Coming; Suggested Reading2. Graphs Introduction; Sets; Paradox; Graphs; Graph diagrams; Cautions; Common Graphs; Discovery; Complements and Subgraphs; Isomorphism; Recognizing Isomorphic Graphs; Semantics The Number of Graphs Having a Given nu; Exercises; Suggested Reading3. Planar Graphs Introduction; UG, K subscript 5, and the Jordan Curve Theorem; Are there More Nonplanar Graphs?; Expansions; Kuratowski's Theorem; Determining Whether a Graph is Planar or

  12. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  13. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2000-01-01

    This book is a concise, yet carefully written, introduction to modern graph theory, covering all its major recent developments. It can be used both as a reliable textbook for an introductory course and as a graduate text: on each topic it covers all the basic material in full detail, and adds one or two deeper results (again with detailed proofs) to illustrate the more advanced methods of that field. This second edition extends the first in two ways. It offers a thoroughly revised and updated chapter on graph minors, which now includes full new proofs of two of the central Robertson-Seymour theorems (as well as a detailed sketch of the entire proof of their celebrated Graph Minor Theorem). Second, there is now a section of hints for all the exercises, to enhance their value for both individual study and classroom use.

  14. Graphing Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  15. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    This standard textbook of modern graph theory, now in its fifth edition, combines the authority of a classic with the engaging freshness of style that is the hallmark of active mathematics. It covers the core material of the subject with concise yet reliably complete proofs, while offering glimpses of more advanced methods in each field by one or two deeper results, again with proofs given in full detail. The book can be used as a reliable text for an introductory course, as a graduate text, and for self-study. From the reviews: “This outstanding book cannot be substituted with any other book on the present textbook market. It has every chance of becoming the standard textbook for graph theory.”Acta Scientiarum Mathematiciarum “Deep, clear, wonderful. This is a serious book about the heart of graph theory. It has depth and integrity. ”Persi Diaconis & Ron Graham, SIAM Review “The book has received a very enthusiastic reception, which it amply deserves. A masterly elucidation of modern graph theo...

  16. Graphs in Practical Situations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓玫; 任心玥

    2008-01-01

    <正>Linear graphs are often used to depict conversion graphs and travel graphs. Example: The following graph shows the conversion between the Singapore dollar (S $) and the Malay- sian ringgit (RM) in 2000.

  17. GraphBench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-01

    GraphBench is a benchmark suite for graph pattern mining and graph analysis systems. The benchmark suite is a significant addition to conducting apples-apples comparison of graph analysis software (databases, in-memory tools, triple stores, etc.)

  18. Pattern polynomial graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, A Satyanarayana

    2011-01-01

    A graph $X$ is said to be a pattern polynomial graph if its adjacency algebra is a coherent algebra. In this study we will find a necessary and sufficient condition for a graph to be a pattern polynomial graph. Some of the properties of the graphs which are polynomials in the pattern polynomial graph have been studied. We also identify known graph classes which are pattern polynomial graphs.

  19. Line graphs for fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  20. Betweenness Centrality in Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such ...

  1. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  2. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This introduction to graph theory focuses on well-established topics, covering primary techniques and including both algorithmic and theoretical problems. The algorithms are presented with a minimum of advanced data structures and programming details. This thoroughly corrected 1988 edition provides insights to computer scientists as well as advanced undergraduates and graduate students of topology, algebra, and matrix theory. Fundamental concepts and notation and elementary properties and operations are the first subjects, followed by examinations of paths and searching, trees, and networks. S

  3. Feynman Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In these lectures I discuss Feynman graphs and the associated Feynman integrals. Of particular interest are the classes functions, which appear in the evaluation of Feynman integrals. The most prominent class of functions is given by multiple polylogarithms. The algebraic properties of multiple polylogarithms are reviewed in the second part of these lectures. The final part of these lectures is devoted to Feynman integrals, which cannot be expressed in terms of multiple polylogarithms. Methods from algebraic geometry provide tools to tackle these integrals.

  4. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Diestel, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    HauptbeschreibungThis standard textbook of modern graph theory, now in its fourth edition, combinesthe authority of a classic with the engaging freshness of style that is the hallmarkof active mathematics. It covers the core material of the subject with concise yetreliably complete proofs, while offering glimpses of more advanced methodsin each field by one or two deeper results, again with proofs given in full detail.The book can be used as a reliable text for an introductory course, as a graduatetext, and for self-study. Rezension"Deep, clear, wonderful. This is a serious book about the

  5. Graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Merris, Russell

    2001-01-01

    A lively invitation to the flavor, elegance, and power of graph theoryThis mathematically rigorous introduction is tempered and enlivened by numerous illustrations, revealing examples, seductive applications, and historical references. An award-winning teacher, Russ Merris has crafted a book designed to attract and engage through its spirited exposition, a rich assortment of well-chosen exercises, and a selection of topics that emphasizes the kinds of things that can be manipulated, counted, and pictured. Intended neither to be a comprehensive overview nor an encyclopedic reference, th

  6. Understanding Graphs & Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, John J.; Gravely, Mary Liles

    Developed by educators from the Emily Griffith Opportunity School, this teacher's guide was developed for a 4-hour workshop to teach employees how to read the charts and graphs they need in the workplace. The unit covers four types of graphs: pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs. The guide is divided into four sections: reading…

  7. Construct Graph Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, author uses set theory to construct a logic model of abstract figure from binary relation. Based on the uniform quantified structure, author gives two logic system for graph traversal and graph coloring respectively, moreover shows a new method of cutting graph. Around this model, there are six algorithms in this paper including exact graph traversal, Algebra calculation of natural number, graph partition and graph coloring.

  8. Graphing Polar Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  9. Linearized Wenger graphs

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Motivated by recent extensive studies on Wenger graphs, we introduce a new infinite class of bipartite graphs of a similar type, called linearized Wenger graphs. The spectrum, diameter and girth of these linearized Wenger graphs are determined.

  10. Packaging fluency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocanu, Ana; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Bogomolova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Research on packaging stresses the need for packaging design to read easily, presuming fast and accurate processing of product-related information. In this paper we define this property of packaging as “packaging fluency”. Based on the existing marketing and cognitive psychology literature...... on packaging design and processing fluency, our aim is to define and conceptualise packaging fluency. We stress the important role of packaging fluency since it is anticipated that a fluent package would influence the evaluative judgments for a product. We conclude this paper by setting the research agenda...

  11. Graphs and matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bapat, Ravindra B

    2014-01-01

    This new edition illustrates the power of linear algebra in the study of graphs. The emphasis on matrix techniques is greater than in other texts on algebraic graph theory. Important matrices associated with graphs (for example, incidence, adjacency and Laplacian matrices) are treated in detail. Presenting a useful overview of selected topics in algebraic graph theory, early chapters of the text focus on regular graphs, algebraic connectivity, the distance matrix of a tree, and its generalized version for arbitrary graphs, known as the resistance matrix. Coverage of later topics include Laplacian eigenvalues of threshold graphs, the positive definite completion problem and matrix games based on a graph. Such an extensive coverage of the subject area provides a welcome prompt for further exploration. The inclusion of exercises enables practical learning throughout the book. In the new edition, a new chapter is added on the line graph of a tree, while some results in Chapter 6 on Perron-Frobenius theory are reo...

  12. On middle cube graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dalfo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a family of graphs related to the $n$-cube. The middle cube graph of parameter k is the subgraph of $Q_{2k-1}$ induced by the set of vertices whose binary representation has either $k-1$ or $k$ number of ones. The middle cube graphs can be obtained from the well-known odd graphs by doubling their vertex set. Here we study some of the properties of the middle cube graphs in the light of the theory of distance-regular graphs. In particular, we completely determine their spectra (eigenvalues and their multiplicities, and associated eigenvectors.

  13. Spectral recognition of graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Dragoš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At some time, in the childhood of spectral graph theory, it was conjectured that non-isomorphic graphs have different spectra, i.e. that graphs are characterized by their spectra. Very quickly this conjecture was refuted and numerous examples and families of non-isomorphic graphs with the same spectrum (cospectral graphs were found. Still some graphs are characterized by their spectra and several mathematical papers are devoted to this topic. In applications to computer sciences, spectral graph theory is considered as very strong. The benefit of using graph spectra in treating graphs is that eigenvalues and eigenvectors of several graph matrices can be quickly computed. Spectral graph parameters contain a lot of information on the graph structure (both global and local including some information on graph parameters that, in general, are computed by exponential algorithms. Moreover, in some applications in data mining, graph spectra are used to encode graphs themselves. The Euclidean distance between the eigenvalue sequences of two graphs on the same number of vertices is called the spectral distance of graphs. Some other spectral distances (also based on various graph matrices have been considered as well. Two graphs are considered as similar if their spectral distance is small. If two graphs are at zero distance, they are cospectral. In this sense, cospectral graphs are similar. Other spectrally based measures of similarity between networks (not necessarily having the same number of vertices have been used in Internet topology analysis, and in other areas. The notion of spectral distance enables the design of various meta-heuristic (e.g., tabu search, variable neighbourhood search algorithms for constructing graphs with a given spectrum (spectral graph reconstruction. Several spectrally based pattern recognition problems appear in many areas (e.g., image segmentation in computer vision, alignment of protein-protein interaction networks in bio

  14. micromap: A Package for Linked Micromaps

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn C. Payton; Michael G. McManus; Weber, Marc H.; Anthony R. Olsen; Thomas M. Kincaid

    2015-01-01

    The R package micromap is used to create linked micromaps, which display statistical summaries associated with areal units, or polygons. Linked micromaps provide a means to simultaneously summarize and display both statistical and geographic distributions by linking statistical summaries to a series of small maps. The package contains functions dependent on the ggplot2 package to produce a row-oriented graph composed of different panels, or columns, of information. These panels at a minimum t...

  15. Pancyclic and bipancyclic graphs

    CERN Document Server

    George, John C; Wallis, W D

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on pancyclic and bipancyclic graphs and is geared toward researchers and graduate students in graph theory. Readers should be familiar with the basic concepts of graph theory, the definitions of a graph and of a cycle. Pancyclic graphs contain cycles of all possible lengths from three up to the number of vertices in the graph. Bipartite graphs contain only cycles of even lengths, a bipancyclic graph is defined to be a bipartite graph with cycles of every even size from 4 vertices up to the number of vertices in the graph. Cutting edge research and fundamental results on pancyclic and bipartite graphs from a wide range of journal articles and conference proceedings are composed in this book to create a standalone presentation. The following questions are highlighted through the book: - What is the smallest possible number of edges in a pancyclic graph with v vertices? - When do pancyclic graphs exist with exactly one cycle of every possible length? - What is the smallest possible number of...

  16. Packaging fluency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocanu, Ana; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Bogomolova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Research on packaging stresses the need for packaging design to read easily, presuming fast and accurate processing of product-related information. In this paper we define this property of packaging as “packaging fluency”. Based on the existing marketing and cognitive psychology literature on pac...

  17. Independencies Induced from a Graphical Markov Model After Marginalization and Conditioning: The R Package ggm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni M. Marchetti

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe some functions in the R package ggm to derive from a given Markov model, represented by a directed acyclic graph, different types of graphs induced after marginalizing over and conditioning on some of the variables. The package has a few basic functions that find the essential graph, the induced concentration and covariance graphs, and several types of chain graphs implied by the directed acyclic graph (DAG after grouping and reordering the variables. These functions can be useful to explore the impact of latent variables or of selection effects on a chosen data generating model.

  18. Girth of pancake graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Compeau, Phillip E.C

    2011-01-01

    We consider four families of pancake graphs, which are Cayley graphs, whose vertex sets are either the symmetric group on n objects or the hyperoctahedral group on n objects and whose generating sets...

  19. Improved graph clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    on Facebook , one would like to detect tightly connected communities, which is useful for subsequent tasks like customized recommendation and... advertisement . Graphs in modern applications have several characteristics that complicate graph clustering: • Small density gap: the edge density across

  20. Pattern Based Graph Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Shuai, Hong-Han; Yu, Philip S; Shen, Chih-Ya; Chen, Ming-Syan

    2013-01-01

    The importance of graph mining has been widely recognized thanks to a large variety of applications in many areas, while real datasets always play important roles to examine the solution quality and efficiency of a graph mining algorithm. Nevertheless, the size of a real dataset is usually fixed and constrained according to the available resources, such as the efforts to crawl an on-line social network. In this case, employing a synthetic graph generator is a possible way to generate a massive graph (e.g., billions nodes) for evaluating the scalability of an algorithm, and current popular statistical graph generators are properly designed to maintain statistical metrics such as total node degree, degree distribution, diameter, and clustering coefficient of the original social graphs. Nevertheless, in addition to the above metrics, recent studies on graph mining point out that graph frequent patterns are also important to provide useful implications for the corresponding social networking applications, but thi...

  1. Microelectronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, M; Schultze, J Walter

    2004-01-01

    Microelectronic Packaging analyzes the massive impact of electrochemical technologies on various levels of microelectronic packaging. Traditionally, interconnections within a chip were considered outside the realm of packaging technologies, but this book emphasizes the importance of chip wiring as a key aspect of microelectronic packaging, and focuses on electrochemical processing as an enabler of advanced chip metallization.Divided into five parts, the book begins by outlining the basics of electrochemical processing, defining the microelectronic packaging hierarchy, and emphasizing the impac

  2. Evolutionary Graph Drawing Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jing-wei; Wei Wen-fang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, graph drawing algorithms based on genetic algorithms are designed for general undirected graphs and directed graphs. As being shown, graph drawing algorithms designed by genetic algorithms have the following advantages: the frames of the algorithms are unified, the method is simple, different algorithms may be attained by designing different objective functions, therefore enhance the reuse of the algorithms. Also, aesthetics or constrains may be added to satisfy different requirements.

  3. On molecular graph comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  4. Integral trees and integral graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ligong

    2005-01-01

    This monograph deals with integral graphs, Laplacian integral regular graphs, cospectral graphs and cospectral integral graphs. The organization of this work, which consists of eight chapters, is as follows.

  5. Effective graph resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Spieksma, F.M.; Mieghem, P. van; Jamakovic, A.; Kooij, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies an interesting graph measure that we call the effective graph resistance. The notion of effective graph resistance is derived from the field of electric circuit analysis where it is defined as the accumulated effective resistance between all pairs of vertices. The objective of the

  6. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  7. Subsemi-Eulerian graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Suffel

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph is subeulerian if it is spanned by an eulerian supergraph. Boesch, Suffel and Tindell have characterized the class of subeulerian graphs and determined the minimum number of additional lines required to make a subeulerian graph eulerian.

  8. Distributed Graph Filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loukas, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently seen a surge of research focusing on the processing of graph data. The emerging field of signal processing on graphs focuses on the extension of classical discrete signal processing techniques to the graph setting. Arguably, the greatest breakthrough of the field has been the extens

  9. Graph representation of protein free energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghai; Duan, Mojie; Fan, Jue; Han, Li; Huo, Shuanghong

    2013-11-14

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding and protein conformational changes are governed by the underlying free energy landscape. However, the multidimensional nature of the free energy landscape makes it difficult to describe. We propose to use a weighted-graph approach to depict the free energy landscape with the nodes on the graph representing the conformational states and the edge weights reflecting the free energy barriers between the states. Our graph is constructed from a molecular dynamics trajectory and does not involve projecting the multi-dimensional free energy landscape onto a low-dimensional space defined by a few order parameters. The calculation of free energy barriers was based on transition-path theory using the MSMBuilder2 package. We compare our graph with the widely used transition disconnectivity graph (TRDG) which is constructed from the same trajectory and show that our approach gives more accurate description of the free energy landscape than the TRDG approach even though the latter can be organized into a simple tree representation. The weighted-graph is a general approach and can be used on any complex system.

  10. Graphing with "LogoWriter."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Sharon K.

    This book discusses four kinds of graphs that are taught in mathematics at the middle school level: pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs. The chapters on each of these types of graphs contain information such as starting, scaling, drawing, labeling, and finishing the graphs using "LogoWriter." The final chapter of the book…

  11. Handbook of graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L

    2003-01-01

    The Handbook of Graph Theory is the most comprehensive single-source guide to graph theory ever published. Best-selling authors Jonathan Gross and Jay Yellen assembled an outstanding team of experts to contribute overviews of more than 50 of the most significant topics in graph theory-including those related to algorithmic and optimization approaches as well as ""pure"" graph theory. They then carefully edited the compilation to produce a unified, authoritative work ideal for ready reference.Designed and edited with non-experts in mind, the Handbook of Graph Theory makes information easy to fi

  12. Methods of visualizing graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  13. Learning Graph Matching

    CERN Document Server

    Caetano, Tiberio S; Cheng, Li; Le, Quoc V; Smola, Alex J

    2008-01-01

    As a fundamental problem in pattern recognition, graph matching has applications in a variety of fields, from computer vision to computational biology. In graph matching, patterns are modeled as graphs and pattern recognition amounts to finding a correspondence between the nodes of different graphs. Many formulations of this problem can be cast in general as a quadratic assignment problem, where a linear term in the objective function encodes node compatibility and a quadratic term encodes edge compatibility. The main research focus in this theme is about designing efficient algorithms for approximately solving the quadratic assignment problem, since it is NP-hard. In this paper we turn our attention to a different question: how to estimate compatibility functions such that the solution of the resulting graph matching problem best matches the expected solution that a human would manually provide. We present a method for learning graph matching: the training examples are pairs of graphs and the `labels' are ma...

  14. Quantum statistics on graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, JM; Robbins, JM; 10.1098/rspa.2010.0254

    2011-01-01

    Quantum graphs are commonly used as models of complex quantum systems, for example molecules, networks of wires, and states of condensed matter. We consider quantum statistics for indistinguishable spinless particles on a graph, concentrating on the simplest case of abelian statistics for two particles. In spite of the fact that graphs are locally one-dimensional, anyon statistics emerge in a generalized form. A given graph may support a family of independent anyon phases associated with topologically inequivalent exchange processes. In addition, for sufficiently complex graphs, there appear new discrete-valued phases. Our analysis is simplified by considering combinatorial rather than metric graphs -- equivalently, a many-particle tight-binding model. The results demonstrate that graphs provide an arena in which to study new manifestations of quantum statistics. Possible applications include topological quantum computing, topological insulators, the fractional quantum Hall effect, superconductivity and molec...

  15. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  16. MEMS packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu , Tai-Ran

    2004-01-01

    MEMS Packaging discusses the prevalent practices and enabling techniques in assembly, packaging and testing of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The entire spectrum of assembly, packaging and testing of MEMS and microsystems, from essential enabling technologies to applications in key industries of life sciences, telecommunications and aerospace engineering is covered. Other topics included are bonding and sealing of microcomponents, process flow of MEMS and microsystems packaging, automated microassembly, and testing and design for testing.The Institution of Engineering and Technology is

  17. Simultaneous Interval Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jampani, Krishnam Raju

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper, we introduced the simultaneous representation problem (defined for any graph class C) and studied the problem for chordal, comparability and permutation graphs. For interval graphs, the problem is defined as follows. Two interval graphs G_1 and G_2, sharing some vertices I (and the corresponding induced edges), are said to be `simultaneous interval graphs' if there exist interval representations R_1 and R_2 of G_1 and G_2, such that any vertex of I is mapped to the same interval in both R_1 and R_2. Equivalently, G_1 and G_2 are simultaneous interval graphs if there exist edges E' between G_1-I and G_2-I such that G_1 \\cup G_2 \\cup E' is an interval graph. Simultaneous representation problems are related to simultaneous planar embeddings, and have applications in any situation where it is desirable to consistently represent two related graphs, for example: interval graphs capturing overlaps of DNA fragments of two similar organisms; or graphs connected in time, where one is an updated versi...

  18. qwViz: Visualisation of quantum walks on graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott D.; Bourke, Paul; Wang, Jingbo B.

    2011-10-01

    qwViz is a software package for interactive visualisation of the time-evolution of quantum walks on arbitrarily complex graphs. The package is written in C and uses OpenGL to generate graphics in real-time. The qwViz package can be used to directly simulate discrete-time quantum walks on undirected graphs when provided with the adjacency matrix of the graph. For more detailed studies, qwViz can also be used to visualise externally generated quantum walk data written in an XML-based file format (QWML). Various aspects of the visualisation can be customised and manipulated in real-time, allowing quantum walk dynamics to be probed at various length and time scales.

  19. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  20. Graphs of Plural Cuts

    CERN Document Server

    Dosen, K

    2011-01-01

    Plural (or multiple-conclusion) cuts are inferences made by applying a structural rule introduced by Gentzen for his sequent formulation of classical logic. As singular (single-conclusion) cuts yield trees, which underlie ordinary natural deduction derivations, so plural cuts yield graphs of a more complicated kind, related to trees, which this paper defines. Besides the inductive definition of these oriented graphs, which is based on sequent systems, a non-inductive, graph-theoretical, combinatorial, definition is given, and to reach that other definition is the main goal of the paper. As trees underlie multicategories, so the graphs of plural cuts underlie polycategories. The graphs of plural cuts are interesting in particular when the plural cuts are appropriate for sequent systems without the structural rule of permutation, and the main body of the paper deals with that matter. It gives a combinatorial characterization of the planarity of the graphs involved.

  1. Matrix Graph Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco, Pedro Pablo Perez

    2008-01-01

    This book objective is to develop an algebraization of graph grammars. Equivalently, we study graph dynamics. From the point of view of a computer scientist, graph grammars are a natural generalization of Chomsky grammars for which a purely algebraic approach does not exist up to now. A Chomsky (or string) grammar is, roughly speaking, a precise description of a formal language (which in essence is a set of strings). On a more discrete mathematical style, it can be said that graph grammars -- Matrix Graph Grammars in particular -- study dynamics of graphs. Ideally, this algebraization would enforce our understanding of grammars in general, providing new analysis techniques and generalizations of concepts, problems and results known so far.

  2. Causal graph dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  3. Toric models of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Buczyńska, Weronika

    2010-01-01

    We define toric projective model of a trivalent graph as a generalization of a binary symmetric model of a trivalent phylogenetic tree. Generators of the projective coordinate ring of the models of graphs with one cycle are explicitly described. The models of graphs with the same topological invariants are deformation equivalent and share the same Hilbert function. We also provide an algorithm to compute the Hilbert function.

  4. Introductory graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chartrand, Gary

    1984-01-01

    Graph theory is used today in the physical sciences, social sciences, computer science, and other areas. Introductory Graph Theory presents a nontechnical introduction to this exciting field in a clear, lively, and informative style. Author Gary Chartrand covers the important elementary topics of graph theory and its applications. In addition, he presents a large variety of proofs designed to strengthen mathematical techniques and offers challenging opportunities to have fun with mathematics. Ten major topics - profusely illustrated - include: Mathematical Models, Elementary Concepts of Grap

  5. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  6. Graph Generator Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothian, Josh [ORNL; Powers, Sarah S [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Baker, Matthew B [ORNL; Schrock, Jonathan [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  7. Graph factors modulo k

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We prove a general result on graph factors modulo k . A special case says that, for each natural number k , every (12k−7)-edge-connected graph with an even number of vertices contains a spanning subgraph in which each vertex has degree congruent to k modulo 2k.......We prove a general result on graph factors modulo k . A special case says that, for each natural number k , every (12k−7)-edge-connected graph with an even number of vertices contains a spanning subgraph in which each vertex has degree congruent to k modulo 2k....

  8. Functions and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, I M; Shnol, E E

    2002-01-01

    The second in a series of systematic studies by a celebrated mathematician I. M. Gelfand and colleagues, this volume presents students with a well-illustrated sequence of problems and exercises designed to illuminate the properties of functions and graphs. Since readers do not have the benefit of a blackboard on which a teacher constructs a graph, the authors abandoned the customary use of diagrams in which only the final form of the graph appears; instead, the book's margins feature step-by-step diagrams for the complete construction of each graph. The first part of the book employs simple fu

  9. Arrow ribbon graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bradford, Robert; Chmutov, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an additional structure on ribbon graphs, arrow structure. We extend the Bollob\\'as-Riordan polynomial to ribbon graph with this structure. The extended polynomial satisfies the contraction-deletion relations and naturally behaves with respect to the partial duality of ribbon graphs. We construct an arrow ribbon graph from a virtual link whose extended Bollob\\'as-Riordan polynomial specializes to the arrow polynomial of the virtual link recently introduced by H.Dye and L.Kauffman. This result generalizes the classical Thistlethwaite theorem to the arrow polynomial of virtual links.

  10. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  11. On Compact Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jiong Sheng LI

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a finite simple graph with adjacency matrix A, and let P(A) be the convex closure of the set of all permutation matrices commuting with A. G is said to be compact if every doubly stochastic matrix which commutes with A is in P(A). In this paper, we characterize 3-regular compact graphs and prove that if G is a connected regular compact graph, G - v is also compact, and give a family of almost regular compact connected graphs.

  12. Framings for graph hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Francis

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for computing the framing on the cohomology of graph hypersurfaces defined by the Feynman differential form. This answers a question of Bloch, Esnault and Kreimer in the affirmative for an infinite class of graphs for which the framings are Tate motives. Applying this method to the modular graphs of Brown and Schnetz, we find that the Feynman differential form is not of Tate type in general. This finally disproves a folklore conjecture stating that the periods of Feynman integrals of primitive graphs in phi^4 theory factorise through a category of mixed Tate motives.

  13. Learning graph matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Tibério S; McAuley, Julian J; Cheng, Li; Le, Quoc V; Smola, Alex J

    2009-06-01

    As a fundamental problem in pattern recognition, graph matching has applications in a variety of fields, from computer vision to computational biology. In graph matching, patterns are modeled as graphs and pattern recognition amounts to finding a correspondence between the nodes of different graphs. Many formulations of this problem can be cast in general as a quadratic assignment problem, where a linear term in the objective function encodes node compatibility and a quadratic term encodes edge compatibility. The main research focus in this theme is about designing efficient algorithms for approximately solving the quadratic assignment problem, since it is NP-hard. In this paper we turn our attention to a different question: how to estimate compatibility functions such that the solution of the resulting graph matching problem best matches the expected solution that a human would manually provide. We present a method for learning graph matching: the training examples are pairs of graphs and the 'labels' are matches between them. Our experimental results reveal that learning can substantially improve the performance of standard graph matching algorithms. In particular, we find that simple linear assignment with such a learning scheme outperforms Graduated Assignment with bistochastic normalisation, a state-of-the-art quadratic assignment relaxation algorithm.

  14. Abstract graph transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Distefano, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Graphs may be used as representations of system states in operational semantics and model checking; in the latter context, they are being investigated as an alternative to bit vectors. The corresponding transitions are obtained as derivations from graph production rules. In this paper we propose an

  15. Abstract Graph Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Distefano, Dino; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roychoudhury, A.; Yang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Graphs may be used as representations of system states in operational semantics and model checking; in the latter context, they are being investigated as an alternative to bit vectors. The corresponding transitions are obtained as derivations from graph production rules. In this paper we propose an

  16. Moment graphs and representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jens Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Moment graphs and sheaves on moment graphs are basically combinatorial objects that have be used to describe equivariant intersectiion cohomology. In these lectures we are going to show that they can be used to provide a direct link from this cohomology to the representation theory of simple Lie...

  17. Graph Colouring Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to graph colouring algorithms. The focus is on vertex-colouring algorithms that work for general classes of graphs with worst-case performance guarantees in a sequential model of computation. The presentation aims to demonstrate the breadth of available...

  18. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  19. Graph Transforming Java Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, de Maarten; Rensink, Arend; Hunt, James J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces an approach for adding graph transformation-based functionality to existing JAVA programs. The approach relies on a set of annotations to identify the intended graph structure, as well as on user methods to manipulate that structure, within the user’s own JAVA class declaration

  20. Graph colouring algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Husfeldt, Thore

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to graph colouring algorithms. The focus is on vertex-colouring algorithms that work for general classes of graphs with worst-case performance guarantees in a sequential model of computation. The presentation aims to demonstrate the breadth of available techniques and is organized by algorithmic paradigm.

  1. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems i

  2. Les graphes (-1)-critiques

    CERN Document Server

    Belkhechine, Houmem; Elayech, Mohamed Baka

    2010-01-01

    Given a (directed) graph G=(V,A), a subset X of V is an interval of G provided that for any a, b\\in X and x\\in V-X, (a,x)\\in A if and only if (b,x)\\in A and (x,a)\\in A if and only if (x,b)\\in A. For example, \\emptyset, \\{x\\} (x \\in V) and V are intervals of G, called trivial intervals. A graph, all the intervals of which are trivial, is indecomposable; otherwise, it is decomposable. A vertex x of an indecomposable graph is critical if G-x is decomposable. In 1993, J.H. Schmerl and W.T. Trotter characterized the indecomposable graphs, all the vertices of which are critical, called critical graphs. In this article, we characterize the indecomposable graphs which admit a single non critical vertex, that we call (-1)-critical graphs.} This gives an answer to a question asked by Y. Boudabbous and P. Ille in a recent article studying the critical vertices in an indecomposable graph.

  3. Graphs Generated by Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Assari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a graph is assigned to any probability measure on the σ-algebra of Borel sets of a topological space. Using this construction, it is proved that given any number n (finite or infinite there exists a nonregular graph such that its clique, chromatic, and dominating number equals n.

  4. Moment graphs and representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jens Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Moment graphs and sheaves on moment graphs are basically combinatorial objects that have be used to describe equivariant intersectiion cohomology. In these lectures we are going to show that they can be used to provide a direct link from this cohomology to the representation theory of simple Lie...... algebras and of simple algebraic groups. The first section contains some background on equivariant cohomology....

  5. Graphs: Associated Markov Chains

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this research paper, weighted / unweighted, directed / undirected graphs are associated with interesting Discrete Time Markov Chains (DTMCs) as well as Continuous Time Markov Chains (CTMCs). The equilibrium / transient behaviour of such Markov chains is studied. Also entropy dynamics (Shannon entropy) of certain structured Markov chains is investigated. Finally certain structured graphs and the associated Markov chains are studied.

  6. Competitively tight graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Suh-Ryung; Park, Boram; Sano, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The competition graph of a digraph $D$ is a (simple undirected) graph which has the same vertex set as $D$ and has an edge between $x$ and $y$ if and only if there exists a vertex $v$ in $D$ such that $(x,v)$ and $(y,v)$ are arcs of $D$. For any graph $G$, $G$ together with sufficiently many isolated vertices is the competition graph of some acyclic digraph. The competition number $k(G)$ of $G$ is the smallest number of such isolated vertices. In general, it is hard to compute the competition number $k(G)$ for a graph $G$ and it has been one of the important research problems in the study of competition graphs. Opsut~[1982] suggested that the edge clique cover number $\\theta_E(G)$ should be closely related to $k(G)$ by showing $\\theta_E(G)-|V(G)|+2 \\leq k(G) \\leq \\theta_E(G)$. In this note, we study on these inequalities. We first show that for any positive integer $m$ satisfying $2 \\leq m \\leq |V(G)|$, there is a graph $G$ satisfying $k(G)=\\theta_E(G)-|V(G)|+m$ and characterize a graph $G$ satisfying $k(G)=\\...

  7. Generalized connectivity of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Noteworthy results, proof techniques, open problems and conjectures in generalized (edge-) connectivity are discussed in this book. Both theoretical and practical analyses for generalized (edge-) connectivity of graphs are provided. Topics covered in this book include: generalized (edge-) connectivity of graph classes, algorithms, computational complexity, sharp bounds, Nordhaus-Gaddum-type results, maximum generalized local connectivity, extremal problems, random graphs, multigraphs, relations with the Steiner tree packing problem and generalizations of connectivity. This book enables graduate students to understand and master a segment of graph theory and combinatorial optimization. Researchers in graph theory, combinatorics, combinatorial optimization, probability, computer science, discrete algorithms, complexity analysis, network design, and the information transferring models will find this book useful in their studies.

  8. Subgraph detection using graph signals

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2017-03-06

    In this paper we develop statistical detection theory for graph signals. In particular, given two graphs, namely, a background graph that represents an usual activity and an alternative graph that represents some unusual activity, we are interested in answering the following question: To which of the two graphs does the observed graph signal fit the best? To begin with, we assume both the graphs are known, and derive an optimal Neyman-Pearson detector. Next, we derive a suboptimal detector for the case when the alternative graph is not known. The developed theory is illustrated with numerical experiments.

  9. Radio Graceful Hamming Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niedzialomski Amanda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For k ∈ ℤ+ and G a simple, connected graph, a k-radio labeling f : V (G → ℤ+ of G requires all pairs of distinct vertices u and v to satisfy |f(u − f(v| ≥ k + 1 − d(u, v. We consider k-radio labelings of G when k = diam(G. In this setting, f is injective; if f is also surjective onto {1, 2, . . . , |V (G|}, then f is a consecutive radio labeling. Graphs that can be labeled with such a labeling are called radio graceful. In this paper, we give two results on the existence of radio graceful Hamming graphs. The main result shows that the Cartesian product of t copies of a complete graph is radio graceful for certain t. Graphs of this form provide infinitely many examples of radio graceful graphs of arbitrary diameter. We also show that these graphs are not radio graceful for large t.

  10. Bidimensionality and Geometric Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Fedor V; Saurabh, Saket

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we use several of the key ideas from Bidimensionality to give a new generic approach to design EPTASs and subexponential time parameterized algorithms for problems on classes of graphs which are not minor closed, but instead exhibit a geometric structure. In particular we present EPTASs and subexponential time parameterized algorithms for Feedback Vertex Set, Vertex Cover, Connected Vertex Cover, Diamond Hitting Set, on map graphs and unit disk graphs, and for Cycle Packing and Minimum-Vertex Feedback Edge Set on unit disk graphs. Our results are based on the recent decomposition theorems proved by Fomin et al [SODA 2011], and our algorithms work directly on the input graph. Thus it is not necessary to compute the geometric representations of the input graph. To the best of our knowledge, these results are previously unknown, with the exception of the EPTAS and a subexponential time parameterized algorithm on unit disk graphs for Vertex Cover, which were obtained by Marx [ESA 2005] and Alber and...

  11. Chromatic functors of graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshinaga, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Finite graphs that have a common chromatic polynomial have the same number of regular $n$-colorings. A natural question is whether there exists a natural bijection between regular $n$-colorings. We address this question using a functorial formulation. Let $G$ be a simple graph. Then for each set $X$ we can associate a set of $X$-colorings. This defines a functor, "chromatic functor" from the category of sets with injections to itself. The first main result verifies that two finite graphs dete...

  12. Handbook of graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Jonathan L; Zhang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the ten years since the publication of the best-selling first edition, more than 1,000 graph theory papers have been published each year. Reflecting these advances, Handbook of Graph Theory, Second Edition provides comprehensive coverage of the main topics in pure and applied graph theory. This second edition-over 400 pages longer than its predecessor-incorporates 14 new sections. Each chapter includes lists of essential definitions and facts, accompanied by examples, tables, remarks, and, in some cases, conjectures and open problems. A bibliography at the end of each chapter provides an ex

  13. Extremal graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2004-01-01

    The ever-expanding field of extremal graph theory encompasses a diverse array of problem-solving methods, including applications to economics, computer science, and optimization theory. This volume, based on a series of lectures delivered to graduate students at the University of Cambridge, presents a concise yet comprehensive treatment of extremal graph theory.Unlike most graph theory treatises, this text features complete proofs for almost all of its results. Further insights into theory are provided by the numerous exercises of varying degrees of difficulty that accompany each chapter. A

  14. Asymptote Misconception on Graphing Functions: Does Graphing Software Resolve It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öçal, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Graphing function is an important issue in mathematics education due to its use in various areas of mathematics and its potential roles for students to enhance learning mathematics. The use of some graphing software assists students' learning during graphing functions. However, the display of graphs of functions that students sketched by hand may…

  15. The Interval Graph Completion Problem on Split Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-kun; YU Min

    2015-01-01

    The interval graph completion problem on a graph G is to find an added edge set F such that G+F is an interval supergraph with the smallest possible number of edges. The problem has important applications to numerical algebra, V LSI-layout and algorithm graph theory etc; And it has been known to be N P-complete on general graphs. Some classes of special graphs have been investigated in the literatures. In this paper the interval graph completion problem on split graphs is investigated.

  16. Graph Operations on Clique-Width Bounded Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Gurski, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Clique-width is a well-known graph parameter. Many NP-hard graph problems admit polynomial-time solutions when restricted to graphs of bounded clique-width. The same holds for NLC-width. In this paper we study the behavior of clique-width and NLC-width under various graph operations and graph transformations. We give upper and lower bounds for the clique-width and NLC-width of the modified graphs in terms of the clique-width and NLC-width of the involved graphs.

  17. GraphState - a tool for graph identification and labelling

    CERN Document Server

    Batkovich, D; Kompaniets, M; Novikov, S

    2014-01-01

    We present python libraries for Feynman graphs manipulation. The key feature of these libraries is usage of generalization of graph representation offered by B. G. Nickel et al. In this approach graph is represented in some unique 'canonical' form that depends only on its combinatorial type. The uniqueness of graph representation gives an efficient way for isomorphism finding, searching for subgraphs and other graph manipulation tasks. Though offered libraries were originally designed for Feynman graphs, they might be useful for more general graph problems.

  18. Learning Activity Package, Algebra-Trigonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Bill

    A series of ten teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, the units cover logic; absolute value, inequalities, exponents, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric function; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  19. Coordinates and intervals in graph-based reference genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Knut D; Grytten, Ivar; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Storvik, Geir O; Glad, Ingrid K; Sandve, Geir K

    2017-05-18

    It has been proposed that future reference genomes should be graph structures in order to better represent the sequence diversity present in a species. However, there is currently no standard method to represent genomic intervals, such as the positions of genes or transcription factor binding sites, on graph-based reference genomes. We formalize offset-based coordinate systems on graph-based reference genomes and introduce methods for representing intervals on these reference structures. We show the advantage of our methods by representing genes on a graph-based representation of the newest assembly of the human genome (GRCh38) and its alternative loci for regions that are highly variable. More complex reference genomes, containing alternative loci, require methods to represent genomic data on these structures. Our proposed notation for genomic intervals makes it possible to fully utilize the alternative loci of the GRCh38 assembly and potential future graph-based reference genomes. We have made a Python package for representing such intervals on offset-based coordinate systems, available at https://github.com/uio-cels/offsetbasedgraph . An interactive web-tool using this Python package to visualize genes on a graph created from GRCh38 is available at https://github.com/uio-cels/genomicgraphcoords .

  20. Integrated Network Decompositions and Dynamic Programming for Graph Optimization (INDDGO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-31

    The INDDGO software package offers a set of tools for finding exact solutions to graph optimization problems via tree decompositions and dynamic programming algorithms. Currently the framework offers serial and parallel (distributed memory) algorithms for finding tree decompositions and solving the maximum weighted independent set problem. The parallel dynamic programming algorithm is implemented on top of the MADNESS task-based runtime.

  1. Introduction to graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Robin J

    1985-01-01

    Graph Theory has recently emerged as a subject in its own right, as well as being an important mathematical tool in such diverse subjects as operational research, chemistry, sociology and genetics. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the subject.

  2. Cycles in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Alspach, BR

    1985-01-01

    This volume deals with a variety of problems involving cycles in graphs and circuits in digraphs. Leading researchers in this area present here 3 survey papers and 42 papers containing new results. There is also a collection of unsolved problems.

  3. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Teresa W.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1 in a graph G = (V,E is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi ≥ deg(vi+1, where deg(vi denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a graph is at most half its order, and that the downhill domination number of a tree is at most one third its order. We characterize the graphs obtaining each of these bounds

  4. Categorical constructions in graph theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Bumby

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some graph-theoretic questions from the viewpoint of the portion of category theory which has become common knowledge. In particular, the reader is encouraged to consider whether there is only one natural category of graphs and how theories of directed graphs and undirected graphs are related.

  5. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  6. Local Interaction on Random Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Haller

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyze dynamic local interaction in population games where the local interaction structure (modeled as a graph can change over time: A stochastic process generates a random sequence of graphs. This contrasts with models where the initial interaction structure (represented by a deterministic graph or the realization of a random graph cannot change over time.

  7. The Least Eigenvalue of Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guidong YU; Yizheng FAN; Yi WANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the least eigenvalue of a graph whose complement is connected,and present a lower bound for the least eigenvalue of such graph.We also characterize the unique graph whose least eigenvalue attains the second minimum among all graphs of fixed order.

  8. Solsolitons associated with graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Lafuente, Ramiro A

    2010-01-01

    We show how to associate with each graph with a certain property (positivity) a family of simply connected solvable Lie groups endowed with left-invariant Riemannian metrics that are Ricci solitons (called solsolitons). We classify them up to isometry, obtaining families depending on many parameters of explicit examples of Ricci solitons. A classification of graphs with up to 3 coherent components according to positivity is also given.

  9. Graph Embedding for Pattern Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yunqian

    2013-01-01

    Graph Embedding for Pattern Analysis covers theory methods, computation, and applications widely used in statistics, machine learning, image processing, and computer vision. This book presents the latest advances in graph embedding theories, such as nonlinear manifold graph, linearization method, graph based subspace analysis, L1 graph, hypergraph, undirected graph, and graph in vector spaces. Real-world applications of these theories are spanned broadly in dimensionality reduction, subspace learning, manifold learning, clustering, classification, and feature selection. A selective group of experts contribute to different chapters of this book which provides a comprehensive perspective of this field.

  10. Modern graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobás, Béla

    1998-01-01

    The time has now come when graph theory should be part of the education of every serious student of mathematics and computer science, both for its own sake and to enhance the appreciation of mathematics as a whole. This book is an in-depth account of graph theory, written with such a student in mind; it reflects the current state of the subject and emphasizes connections with other branches of pure mathematics. The volume grew out of the author's earlier book, Graph Theory -- An Introductory Course, but its length is well over twice that of its predecessor, allowing it to reveal many exciting new developments in the subject. Recognizing that graph theory is one of several courses competing for the attention of a student, the book contains extensive descriptive passages designed to convey the flavor of the subject and to arouse interest. In addition to a modern treatment of the classical areas of graph theory such as coloring, matching, extremal theory, and algebraic graph theory, the book presents a detailed ...

  11. Quantum Causal Graph Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consider a graph having quantum systems lying at each node. Suppose that the whole thing evolves in discrete time steps, according to a global, unitary causal operator. By causal we mean that information can only propagate at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. Suppose, moreover, that the graph itself is subject to the evolution, and may be driven to be in a quantum superposition of graphs---in accordance to the superposition principle. We show that these unitary causal operators must decompose as a finite-depth circuit of local unitary gates. This unifies a result on Quantum Cellular Automata with another on Reversible Causal Graph Dynamics. Along the way we formalize a notion of causality which is valid in the context of quantum superpositions of time-varying graphs, and has a number of good properties. Keywords: Quantum Lattice Gas Automata, Block-representation, Curtis-Hedlund-Lyndon, No-signalling, Localizability, Quantum Gravity, Quantum Graphity, Causal Dynamical Triangula...

  12. Commuting projections on graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Zikatanov, Ludmil T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  13. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  14. Higher-order graph wavelets and sparsity on circulant graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzagiannidis, Madeleine S.; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    The notion of a graph wavelet gives rise to more advanced processing of data on graphs due to its ability to operate in a localized manner, across newly arising data-dependency structures, with respect to the graph signal and underlying graph structure, thereby taking into consideration the inherent geometry of the data. In this work, we tackle the problem of creating graph wavelet filterbanks on circulant graphs for a sparse representation of certain classes of graph signals. The underlying graph can hereby be data-driven as well as fixed, for applications including image processing and social network theory, whereby clusters can be modelled as circulant graphs, respectively. We present a set of novel graph wavelet filter-bank constructions, which annihilate higher-order polynomial graph signals (up to a border effect) defined on the vertices of undirected, circulant graphs, and are localised in the vertex domain. We give preliminary results on their performance for non-linear graph signal approximation and denoising. Furthermore, we provide extensions to our previously developed segmentation-inspired graph wavelet framework for non-linear image approximation, by incorporating notions of smoothness and vanishing moments, which further improve performance compared to traditional methods.

  15. Regularity in Vague Intersection Graphs and Vague Line Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy graph theory is commonly used in computer science applications, particularly in database theory, data mining, neural networks, expert systems, cluster analysis, control theory, and image capturing. A vague graph is a generalized structure of a fuzzy graph that gives more precision, flexibility, and compatibility to a system when compared with systems that are designed using fuzzy graphs. In this paper, we introduce the notion of vague line graphs, and certain types of vague line graphs and present some of their properties. We also discuss an example application of vague digraphs.

  16. The STAPL Parallel Graph Library

    KAUST Repository

    Harshvardhan,

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the stapl Parallel Graph Library, a high-level framework that abstracts the user from data-distribution and parallelism details and allows them to concentrate on parallel graph algorithm development. It includes a customizable distributed graph container and a collection of commonly used parallel graph algorithms. The library introduces pGraph pViews that separate algorithm design from the container implementation. It supports three graph processing algorithmic paradigms, level-synchronous, asynchronous and coarse-grained, and provides common graph algorithms based on them. Experimental results demonstrate improved scalability in performance and data size over existing graph libraries on more than 16,000 cores and on internet-scale graphs containing over 16 billion vertices and 250 billion edges. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  17. Fundamentals of algebraic graph transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrig, Hartmut; Prange, Ulrike; Taentzer, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to represent structural information in the form of objects and connections between them. Graph transformation is the rule-based manipulation of graphs, an increasingly important concept in computer science and related fields. This is the first textbook treatment of the algebraic approach to graph transformation, based on algebraic structures and category theory. Part I is an introduction to the classical case of graph and typed graph transformation. In Part II basic and advanced results are first shown for an abstract form of replacement systems, so-called adhesive high-level replacement systems based on category theory, and are then instantiated to several forms of graph and Petri net transformation systems. Part III develops typed attributed graph transformation, a technique of key relevance in the modeling of visual languages and in model transformation. Part IV contains a practical case study on model transformation and a presentation of the AGG (attributed graph grammar) tool envir...

  18. On P 4-tidy graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Giakoumakis

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the P 4-tidy graphs, a new class defined by Rusu [30] in order to illustrate the notion of P 4-domination in perfect graphs. This class strictly contains the P 4-extendible graphs and the P 4-lite graphs defined by Jamison & Olariu in [19] and [23] and we show that the P 4-tidy graphs and P 4-lite graphs are closely related. Note that the class of P 4-lite graphs is a class of brittle graphs strictly containing the P 4-sparse graphs defined by Hoang in [14]. McConnel & Spinrad [2] and independently Cournier & Habib [5] have shown that the modular decomposition tree of any graph is computable in linear time. For recognizing in linear time P 4-tidy graphs, we apply a method introduced by Giakoumakis in [9] and Giakoumakis & Fouquet in [6] using modular decomposition of graphs and we propose linear algorithms for optimization problems on such graphs, as clique number, stability number, chromatic number and scattering number. We show that the Hamiltonian Path Problem is linear for this class of graphs. Our study unifies and generalizes previous results of Jamison & Olariu ([18], [21], [22], Hochstattler & Schindler[16], Jung [25] and Hochstattler & Tinhofer [15].

  19. Quantitative graph theory mathematical foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such as:Comparative approaches (graph similarity or distance)Graph measures to characterize graphs quantitat

  20. A Common Platform for Graphical Models in R: The gRbase Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Dethlefsen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The gRbase package is intended to set the framework for computer packages for data analysis using graphical models. The gRbase package is developed for the open source language, R, and is available for several platforms. The package is intended to be widely extendible and flexible so that package developers may implement further types of graphical models using the available methods. The gRbase package consists of a set of S version 3 classes and associated methods for representing data and models. The package is linked to the dynamicGraph package (Badsberg 2005, an interactive graphical user interface for manipulating graphs.In this paper, we show how these building blocks can be combined and integrated with inference engines in the special cases of hierarchical loglinear models. We also illustrate how to extend the package to deal with other types of graphical models, in this case the graphical Gaussian models.

  1. Optimized Graph Search Using Multi-Level Graph Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Rahul; Shukla, Anupam; Tiwari, Ritu

    Graphs find a variety of use in numerous domains especially because of their capability to model common problems. The social networking graphs that are used for social networking analysis, a feature given by various social networking sites are an example of this. Graphs can also be visualized in the search engines to carry search operations and provide results. Various searching algorithms have been developed for searching in graphs. In this paper we propose that the entire network graph be clustered. The larger graphs are clustered to make smaller graphs. These smaller graphs can again be clustered to further reduce the size of graph. The search is performed on the smallest graph to identify the general path, which may be further build up to actual nodes by working on the individual clusters involved. Since many searches are carried out on the same graph, clustering may be done once and the data may be used for multiple searches over the time. If the graph changes considerably, only then we may re-cluster the graph.

  2. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)→R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k≥2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  3. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  4. Matchings on infinite graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bordenave, Charles; Salez, Justin

    2011-01-01

    We prove that the local weak convergence of a sequence of graphs is enough to guarantee the convergence of their normalized matching numbers. The limiting quantity is described by a local recursion defined on the weak limit of the graph sequence. However, this recursion may admit several solutions, implying non-trivial long-range dependencies between the edges of a largest matching. We overcome this lack of correlation decay by introducing a perturbative parameter called the temperature, which we let progressively go to zero. When the local weak limit is a unimodular Galton-Watson tree, the recursion simplifies into a distributional equation, resulting into an explicit formula that considerably extends the well-known one by Karp and Sipser for Erd\\"os-R\\'enyi random graphs.

  5. Visibility graph motifs

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovacci, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of visibility graph motifs, smaller substructures that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated to general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable to distinguish among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification a...

  6. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  7. Hyperbolicity in Median Graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    José M Sigarreta

    2013-11-01

    If is a geodesic metric space and $x_1,x_2,x_3\\in X$, a geodesic triangle $T=\\{x_1,x_2,x_3\\}$ is the union of the three geodesics $[x_1 x_2],[x_2 x_3]$ and $[x_3 x_1]$ in . The space is -hyperbolic (in the Gromov sense) if any side of is contained in a -neighborhood of the union of the two other sides, for every geodesic triangle in . If is hyperbolic, we denote by () the sharp hyperbolicity constant of , i.e.,$(X)=\\inf\\{≥ 0: X \\quad\\text{is}\\quad -\\text{hyperbolic}\\}$. In this paper we study the hyperbolicity of median graphs and we also obtain some results about general hyperbolic graphs. In particular, we prove that a median graph is hyperbolic if and only if its bigons are thin.

  8. Nim on the Complete Graph

    CERN Document Server

    Erickson, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    The game of Nim as played on graphs was introduced in Nim on Graphs I and extended in Nim on Graphs II by Masahiko Fukuyama. His papers detail the calculation of Grundy numbers for graphs under specific circumstances. We extend these results and introduce the strategy for even cycles. This paper examines a more general class of graphs by restricting the edge weight to one. We provide structural conditions for which there exist a winning strategy. This yields the solution for the complete graph.

  9. Graph theory and interconnection networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Lih-Hsing

    2008-01-01

    The advancement of large scale integrated circuit technology has enabled the construction of complex interconnection networks. Graph theory provides a fundamental tool for designing and analyzing such networks. Graph Theory and Interconnection Networks provides a thorough understanding of these interrelated topics. After a brief introduction to graph terminology, the book presents well-known interconnection networks as examples of graphs, followed by in-depth coverage of Hamiltonian graphs. Different types of problems illustrate the wide range of available methods for solving such problems. The text also explores recent progress on the diagnosability of graphs under various models.

  10. All P3-equipackable graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randerath, Bert; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    2010-01-01

    A graph G is P3-equipackable if any sequence of successive removals of edge-disjoint copies of P3 from G always terminates with a graph having at most one edge. All P3-equipackable graphs are characterised. They belong to a small number of families listed here.......A graph G is P3-equipackable if any sequence of successive removals of edge-disjoint copies of P3 from G always terminates with a graph having at most one edge. All P3-equipackable graphs are characterised. They belong to a small number of families listed here....

  11. Feynman motives of banana graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Aluffi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    We consider the infinite family of Feynman graphs known as the ``banana graphs'' and compute explicitly the classes of the corresponding graph hypersurfaces in the Grothendieck ring of varieties as well as their Chern--Schwartz--MacPherson classes, using the classical Cremona transformation and the dual graph, and a blowup formula for characteristic classes. We outline the interesting similarities between these operations and we give formulae for cones obtained by simple operations on graphs. We formulate a positivity conjecture for characteristic classes of graph hypersurfaces and discuss briefly the effect of passing to noncommutative spacetime.

  12. Locally identifying coloring of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Esperet, Louis; Montassier, Mickael; Ochem, Pascal; Parreau, Aline

    2010-01-01

    A vertex-coloring of a graph G is said to be locally identifying if for any pair (u,v) of adjacent vertices of G, with distinct closed neighborhood, the set of colors that appears in the closed neighborhoods of u and v are distinct. In this paper, we give several bounds on the minimum number of colors needed in such a coloring for different families of graphs (planar graphs, some subclasses of perfect graphs, graphs with bounded maximum degree) and prove that deciding whether a subcubic bipartite graph with large girth has a locally identifying coloring with 3 colors is an NP-complete problem.

  13. Graph-based knowledge representation computational foundations of conceptual graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Chein, Michel; Chein, Michel

    2008-01-01

    In addressing the question of how far it is possible to go in knowledge representation and reasoning through graphs, the authors cover basic conceptual graphs, computational aspects, and kernel extensions. The basic mathematical notions are summarized.

  14. Algorithms for Planar Graphs and Graphs in Metric Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    Algorithms for network problems play an increasingly important role in modern society. The graph structure of a network is an abstract and very useful representation that allows classical graph algorithms, such as Dijkstra and Bellman-Ford, to be applied. Real-life networks often have additional...... preprocessing time, an O(n log n) time algorithm for the replacement paths problem, and a min st-cut oracle with nearlinear preprocessing time. We also give improved time bounds for computing various graph invariants such as diameter and girth. In the second part, we consider stretch factor problems...... for geometric graphs and graphs embedded in metric spaces. Roughly speaking, the stretch factor is a real value expressing how well a (geo-)metric graph approximates the underlying complete graph w.r.t. distances. We give improved algorithms for computing the stretch factor of a given graph and for augmenting...

  15. SOME RESULTS ON CIRCULAR PERFECT GRAPHS AND PERFECT GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Baogang

    2005-01-01

    An r-circular coloring of a graph G is a map f from V(G) to the set of open unit intervals of an Euclidean circle of length r,such that f(u) ∩ f(v) = φ whenever uv ∈ E(G).Circular perfect graphs are defined analogously to perfect graphs by means of two parameters,the circular chromatic number and the circular clique number.In this paper,we study the properties of circular perfect graphs.We give (1) a necessary condition for a graph to be circular perfect,(2) some circular critical imperfect graphs,and (3) a characterization of graphs with the property that each of their induced subgraphs has circular clique number the same as its clique number,and then the two conjectures that are equivalent to the perfect graph conjecture.

  16. Using Graph and Vertex Entropy to Compare Empirical Graphs with Theoretical Graph Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kajdanowicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, several theoretical graph generation models have been proposed. Among the most prominent are: the Erdős–Renyi random graph model, Watts–Strogatz small world model, Albert–Barabási preferential attachment model, Price citation model, and many more. Often, researchers working with real-world data are interested in understanding the generative phenomena underlying their empirical graphs. They want to know which of the theoretical graph generation models would most probably generate a particular empirical graph. In other words, they expect some similarity assessment between the empirical graph and graphs artificially created from theoretical graph generation models. Usually, in order to assess the similarity of two graphs, centrality measure distributions are compared. For a theoretical graph model this means comparing the empirical graph to a single realization of a theoretical graph model, where the realization is generated from the given model using an arbitrary set of parameters. The similarity between centrality measure distributions can be measured using standard statistical tests, e.g., the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test of distances between cumulative distributions. However, this approach is both error-prone and leads to incorrect conclusions, as we show in our experiments. Therefore, we propose a new method for graph comparison and type classification by comparing the entropies of centrality measure distributions (degree centrality, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality. We demonstrate that our approach can help assign the empirical graph to the most similar theoretical model using a simple unsupervised learning method.

  17. Domains via Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guoqiang; CHEN Yixiang

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides a concrete and simple introduction to two pillars of domain theory: (1) solving recursive domain equations, and (2) universal and saturated domains. Our exposition combines Larsen and Winskel's idea on solving domain equations using information systems with Girard's idea of stable domain theory in the form of coherence spaces, or graphs.Detailed constructions are given for universal and even homogeneous objects in two categories of graphs: one representing binary complete, prime algebraic domains with complete primes covering the bottom; the other representing ω-algebraic, prime algebraic lattices. The backand-forth argument in model theory helps to enlighten the constructions.

  18. Augmented marked graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, King Sing

    2014-01-01

    Petri nets are a formal and theoretically rich model for the modelling and analysis of systems. A subclass of Petri nets, augmented marked graphs possess a structure that is especially desirable for the modelling and analysis of systems with concurrent processes and shared resources.This monograph consists of three parts: Part I provides the conceptual background for readers who have no prior knowledge on Petri nets; Part II elaborates the theory of augmented marked graphs; finally, Part III discusses the application to system integration. The book is suitable as a first self-contained volume

  19. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes Teresa W.; Hedetniemi Stephen T.; Jamieson Jessie D.; Jamieson William B.

    2014-01-01

    A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1) in a graph G = (V,E) is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi) ≥ deg(vi+1), where deg(vi) denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a grap...

  20. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  1. Distributed Evolutionary Graph Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel distributed evolutionary algorithm, KaFFPaE, to solve the Graph Partitioning Problem, which makes use of KaFFPa (Karlsruhe Fast Flow Partitioner). The use of our multilevel graph partitioner KaFFPa provides new effective crossover and mutation operators. By combining these with a scalable communication protocol we obtain a system that is able to improve the best known partitioning results for many inputs in a very short amount of time. For example, in Walshaw's well known benchmark tables we are able to improve or recompute 76% of entries for the tables with 1%, 3% and 5% imbalance.

  2. Handbook of graph grammars and computing by graph transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, G; Kreowski, H J; Rozenberg, G

    1999-01-01

    Graph grammars originated in the late 60s, motivated by considerations about pattern recognition and compiler construction. Since then, the list of areas which have interacted with the development of graph grammars has grown quite impressively. Besides the aforementioned areas, it includes software specification and development, VLSI layout schemes, database design, modeling of concurrent systems, massively parallel computer architectures, logic programming, computer animation, developmental biology, music composition, visual languages, and many others.The area of graph grammars and graph tran

  3. Portobello Packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Grose

    2010-01-01

    ...-based foams. Bayer earned dual degrees in mechanical engineering and product design in 2007 and, with classmate Gavin Mclntyre, started the company Ecovative Design to market his creation. EcoCradle, the company's organic packaging material, was named one of the top inventions of 2009 by Popular Science. Its insulation material, Greensulate, got a ...

  4. Routing on Metacyclic Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenjun Xiao

    2002-01-01

    Wu, Lakshmivarahan and Dhall[5] recently described a deterministic, distributed routing scheme for some special classes of metacyclic graphs. However they have no proof of correctness that the scheme is a shortest path routing algorithm. In the note we give a suboptimal, deterministic routing algorithm.

  5. Body Motion and Graphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  6. Line Graph Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  7. Quorum Colorings of Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Heditniemi (Sandra); R.C. Laskar (R.C.); H.M. Mulder (Martyn)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLet $G = (V,E)$ be a graph. A partition $\\pi = \\{V_1, V_2, \\ldots, V_k \\}$ of the vertices $V$ of $G$ into $k$ {\\it color classes} $V_i$, with $1 \\leq i \\leq k$, is called a {\\it quorum coloring} if for every vertex $v \\in V$, at least half of the vertices in the closed neighborhood

  8. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  9. Neural networks and graph theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许进; 保铮

    2002-01-01

    The relationships between artificial neural networks and graph theory are considered in detail. The applications of artificial neural networks to many difficult problems of graph theory, especially NP-complete problems, and the applications of graph theory to artificial neural networks are discussed. For example graph theory is used to study the pattern classification problem on the discrete type feedforward neural networks, and the stability analysis of feedback artificial neural networks etc.

  10. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  11. A Problem of Tree Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李浩; 刘群

    1989-01-01

    Because of the widespread applications of tree and treee graph in computer science,we are interested in studying the reee graph.M.Farber,B.Richter and H.Shang in [1] showed that the graph τ2(G)is 2-edge-connected as |V(G))≥3,at the same time,we will show the best lower bounds about vertex number and minimum degree of graph τ2(G).

  12. A Clustering Graph Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winlaw, Manda [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); De Sterck, Hans [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanders, Geoffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  13. Asteroidal Quadruples in non Rooted Path Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutierrez Marisa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A directed path graph is the intersection graph of a family of directed subpaths of a directed tree. A rooted path graph is the intersection graph of a family of directed subpaths of a rooted tree. Rooted path graphs are directed path graphs. Several characterizations are known for directed path graphs: one by forbidden induced subgraphs and one by forbidden asteroids. It is an open problem to find such characterizations for rooted path graphs. For this purpose, we are studying in this paper directed path graphs that are non rooted path graphs. We prove that such graphs always contain an asteroidal quadruple.

  14. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  15. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  16. Text analysis for knowledge graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, Roel

    2007-01-01

    The concept of knowledge graphs is introduced as a method to represent the state of the art in a specific scientific discipline. Next the text analysis part in the construction of such graphs is considered. Here the 'translation' from text to graph takes place. The method that is used here is compar

  17. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  18. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  19. Submanifolds Weakly Associated with Graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Carriazo; L M Fernández; A Rodríguez-Hidalgo

    2009-06-01

    We establish an interesting link between differential geometry and graph theory by defining submanifolds weakly associated with graphs. We prove that, in a local sense, every submanifold satisfies such an association, and other general results. Finally, we study submanifolds associated with graphs either in low dimensions or belonging to some special families.

  20. Seafood Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center worked with a New Orleans seafood packaging company to develop a container to improve the shipping longevity of seafood, primarily frozen and fresh fish, while preserving the taste. A NASA engineer developed metalized heat resistant polybags with thermal foam liners using an enhanced version of the metalized mylar commonly known as 'space blanket material,' which was produced during the Apollo era.

  1. The khmer software package: enabling efficient nucleotide sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusoe, Michael R; Alameldin, Hussien F; Awad, Sherine; Boucher, Elmar; Caldwell, Adam; Cartwright, Reed; Charbonneau, Amanda; Constantinides, Bede; Edvenson, Greg; Fay, Scott; Fenton, Jacob; Fenzl, Thomas; Fish, Jordan; Garcia-Gutierrez, Leonor; Garland, Phillip; Gluck, Jonathan; González, Iván; Guermond, Sarah; Guo, Jiarong; Gupta, Aditi; Herr, Joshua R; Howe, Adina; Hyer, Alex; Härpfer, Andreas; Irber, Luiz; Kidd, Rhys; Lin, David; Lippi, Justin; Mansour, Tamer; McA'Nulty, Pamela; McDonald, Eric; Mizzi, Jessica; Murray, Kevin D; Nahum, Joshua R; Nanlohy, Kaben; Nederbragt, Alexander Johan; Ortiz-Zuazaga, Humberto; Ory, Jeramia; Pell, Jason; Pepe-Ranney, Charles; Russ, Zachary N; Schwarz, Erich; Scott, Camille; Seaman, Josiah; Sievert, Scott; Simpson, Jared; Skennerton, Connor T; Spencer, James; Srinivasan, Ramakrishnan; Standage, Daniel; Stapleton, James A; Steinman, Susan R; Stein, Joe; Taylor, Benjamin; Trimble, Will; Wiencko, Heather L; Wright, Michael; Wyss, Brian; Zhang, Qingpeng; Zyme, En; Brown, C Titus

    2015-01-01

    The khmer package is a freely available software library for working efficiently with fixed length DNA words, or k-mers. khmer provides implementations of a probabilistic k-mer counting data structure, a compressible De Bruijn graph representation, De Bruijn graph partitioning, and digital normalization. khmer is implemented in C++ and Python, and is freely available under the BSD license at  https://github.com/dib-lab/khmer/.

  2. A seminar on graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harary, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Presented in 1962-63 by experts at University College, London, these lectures offer a variety of perspectives on graph theory. Although the opening chapters form a coherent body of graph theoretic concepts, this volume is not a text on the subject but rather an introduction to the extensive literature of graph theory. The seminar's topics are geared toward advanced undergraduate students of mathematics.Lectures by this volume's editor, Frank Harary, include ""Some Theorems and Concepts of Graph Theory,"" ""Topological Concepts in Graph Theory,"" ""Graphical Reconstruction,"" and other introduc

  3. Dynamic Representations of Sparse Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf

    1999-01-01

    We present a linear space data structure for maintaining graphs with bounded arboricity—a large class of sparse graphs containing e.g. planar graphs and graphs of bounded treewidth—under edge insertions, edge deletions, and adjacency queries. The data structure supports adjacency queries in worst...... case O(c) time, and edge insertions and edge deletions in amortized O(1) and O(c+log n) time, respectively, where n is the number of nodes in the graph, and c is the bound on the arboricity....

  4. Managing and Mining Graph Data

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Charu C

    2010-01-01

    Managing and Mining Graph Data is a comprehensive survey book in graph management and mining. It contains extensive surveys on a variety of important graph topics such as graph languages, indexing, clustering, data generation, pattern mining, classification, keyword search, pattern matching, and privacy. It also studies a number of domain-specific scenarios such as stream mining, web graphs, social networks, chemical and biological data. The chapters are written by well known researchers in the field, and provide a broad perspective of the area. This is the first comprehensive survey book in t

  5. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluhař, Z. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Weidenmüller, H. A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  6. Boxicity of Circular Arc Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Diptendu; Chandran, L. Sunil

    2008-01-01

    A $k$-dimensional box is the cartesian product $R_1 \\times R_2 \\times ... \\times R_k$ where each $R_i$ is a closed interval on the real line. The {\\it boxicity} of a graph $G$, denoted as $box(G)$, is the minimum integer $k$ such that $G$ can be represented as the intersection graph of a collection of $k$-dimensional boxes: that is two vertices are adjacent if and only if their corresponding boxes intersect. A circular arc graph is a graph that can be represented as the intersection graph of ...

  7. Resolvability in Circulant Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad SALMAN; Imran JAVAID; Muhammad Anwar CHAUDHRY

    2012-01-01

    A set W of the vertices of a connected graph G is called a resolving set for G if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a vertex w ∈ W such that d(u,w) ≠ d(v,w).A resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a metric basis for G and the number of vertices in a metric basis is called the metric dimension of G,denoted by dim(G).For a vertex u of G and a subset S of V(G),the distance between u and S is the number mins∈s d(u,s).A k-partition H ={S1,S2,...,Sk} of V(G) is called a resolving partition if for every two distinct vertices u,v ∈ V(G) there is a set Si in Π such that d(u,Si) ≠ d(v,Si).The minimum k for which there is a resolving k-partition of V(G) is called the partition dimension of G,denoted by pd(G).The circulant graph is a graph with vertex set Zn,an additive group ofintegers modulo n,and two vertices labeled i and j adjacent if and only if i - j (mod n) ∈ C,where C C Zn has the property that C =-C and 0(∈) C.The circulant graph is denoted by Xn,△ where A =|C|.In this paper,we study the metric dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,3 with connection set C ={1,-n/2,n - 1} and prove that dim(Xn,3) is independent of choice of n by showing that 3 for all n =0 (mod 4),dim(X,n,3) ={ 4 for all n =2 (mod 4).We also study the partition dimension of a family of circulant graphs Xn,4 with connection set C ={±1,±2} and prove that pd(Xn,4) is independent of choice of n and show that pd(X5,4) =5 and 3 forall odd n≥9,pd(Xn,4) ={ 4 for all even n ≥ 6 and n =7.

  8. Conditional coloring of some parameterized graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Venkata Subba

    2010-01-01

    For integers k>0 and r>0, a conditional (k,r)-coloring of a graph G is a proper k-coloring of the vertices of G such that every vertex v of degree d(v) in G is adjacent to vertices with at least min{r,d(v)} different colors. The smallest integer k for which a graph G has a conditional (k,r)-coloring is called the rth order conditional chromatic number, denoted by $\\chi_r(G)$. For different values of r we obtain $\\chi_r(G)$ of certain parameterized graphs viz., Windmill graph, line graph of Windmill graph, middle graph of Friendship graph, middle graph of a cycle, line graph of Friendship graph, middle graph of complete k-partite graph and middle graph of a bipartite graph.

  9. Practical graph mining with R

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrix, William; Jenkins, John; Padmanabhan, Kanchana; Chakraborty, Arpan

    2014-01-01

    Practical Graph Mining with R presents a "do-it-yourself" approach to extracting interesting patterns from graph data. It covers many basic and advanced techniques for the identification of anomalous or frequently recurring patterns in a graph, the discovery of groups or clusters of nodes that share common patterns of attributes and relationships, the extraction of patterns that distinguish one category of graphs from another, and the use of those patterns to predict the category of new graphs. Hands-On Application of Graph Data Mining Each chapter in the book focuses on a graph mining task, such as link analysis, cluster analysis, and classification. Through applications using real data sets, the book demonstrates how computational techniques can help solve real-world problems. The applications covered include network intrusion detection, tumor cell diagnostics, face recognition, predictive toxicology, mining metabolic and protein-protein interaction networks, and community detection in social networks. De...

  10. Hierarchy of Modular Graph Identities

    CERN Document Server

    D'Hoker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The low energy expansion of Type II superstring amplitudes at genus one is organized in terms of modular graph functions associated with Feynman graphs of a conformal scalar field on the torus. In earlier work, surprising identities between two-loop graphs at all weights, and between higher-loop graphs of weights four and five were constructed. In the present paper, these results are generalized in two complementary directions. First, all identities at weight six and all dihedral identities at weight seven are obtained and proven. Whenever the Laurent polynomial at the cusp is available, the form of these identities confirms the pattern by which the vanishing of the Laurent polynomial governs the full modular identity. Second, the family of modular graph functions is extended to include all graphs with derivative couplings and worldsheet fermions. These extended families of modular graph functions are shown to obey a hierarchy of inhomogeneous Laplace eigenvalue equations. The eigenvalues are calculated analy...

  11. Valiant Transform of Forney Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Bashabsheh, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of Forney graphs, or normal graphs, and the duality result therein [1] is a landmark in the theory of codes on graphs and in graph-based iterative decoding. A generic modeling framework for codes and systems, Forney graphs have since found various applications. It is unfortunate however that the development of the theory and application of Forney graphs to date has been restricted to the context of linear (and group) codes and systems, and the primary tool of Forney graphs is the duality result introduced in [1]. In a rather distant area of computer science, Valiant has recently presented a powerful family of new algorithms, which he calls holographic algorithms [2]. Using holographic algorithms, Valiant provides polynomial-time solutions to families of problems previously unknown to be tractable. At the heart of Valiant's holographic algorithms is the notion of "holographic reduction", which is the engine used in holographic algorithms to reduce from one problem to another. Recognizing the c...

  12. Bond percolation on isoradial graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmett, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In an investigation of percolation on isoradial graphs, we prove the criticality of canonical bond percolation on isoradial embeddings of planar graphs, thus extending celebrated earlier results for homogeneous and inhomogeneous square, triangular, and other lattices. This is achieved via the star-triangle transformation, by transporting the box-crossing property across the family of isoradial graphs. As a consequence, we obtain the universality of these models at the critical point, in the sense that the one-arm and 2j-alternating-arm critical exponents (and therefore also the connectivity and volume exponents) are constant across the family of such percolation processes. The isoradial graphs in question are those that satisfy certain weak conditions on their embedding and on their track system. This class of graphs includes, for example, isoradial embeddings of periodic graphs, and graphs derived from rhombic Penrose tilings.

  13. Randomised reproducing graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a model for a growing random graph based on simultaneous reproduction of the vertices. The model can be thought of as a generalisation of the reproducing graphs of Southwell and Cannings and Bonato et al to allow for a random element, and there are three parameters, $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$, which are the probabilities of edges appearing between different types of vertices. We show that as the probabilities associated with the model vary there are a number of phase transitions, in particular concerning the degree sequence. If $(1+\\alpha)(1+\\gamma)1$ then the degree of a typical vertex grows to infinity, and the proportion of vertices having any fixed degree $d$ tends to zero. We also give some results on the number of edges and on the spectral gap.

  14. Normal Order: Combinatorial Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, A I; Blasiak, P; Horzela, A; Penson, K A; Solomon, Allan I.; Duchamp, Gerard; Blasiak, Pawel; Horzela, Andrzej; Penson, Karol A.

    2004-01-01

    A conventional context for supersymmetric problems arises when we consider systems containing both boson and fermion operators. In this note we consider the normal ordering problem for a string of such operators. In the general case, upon which we touch briefly, this problem leads to combinatorial numbers, the so-called Rook numbers. Since we assume that the two species, bosons and fermions, commute, we subsequently restrict ourselves to consideration of a single species, single-mode boson monomials. This problem leads to elegant generalisations of well-known combinatorial numbers, specifically Bell and Stirling numbers. We explicitly give the generating functions for some classes of these numbers. In this note we concentrate on the combinatorial graph approach, showing how some important classical results of graph theory lead to transparent representations of the combinatorial numbers associated with the boson normal ordering problem.

  15. Exponential random graph models

    CERN Document Server

    Fronczak, Agata

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, exponential random graphs (ERGs) are among the most widely-studied network models. Different analytical and numerical techniques for ERG have been developed that resulted in the well-established theory with true predictive power. An excellent basic discussion of exponential random graphs addressed to social science students and researchers is given in [Anderson et al., 1999][Robins et al., 2007]. This essay is intentionally designed to be more theoretical in comparison with the well-known primers just mentioned. Given the interdisciplinary character of the new emerging science of complex networks, the essay aims to give a contribution upon which network scientists and practitioners, who represent different research areas, could build a common area of understanding.

  16. Convex Graph Invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    evaluating the function ΘP (A) for any fixed A,P is equivalent to solving the so-called Quadratic Assignment Problem ( QAP ), and thus we can employ various...tractable linear programming, spectral, and SDP relaxations of QAP [40, 11, 33]. In particular we discuss recent work [14] on exploiting group...symmetry in SDP relaxations of QAP , which is useful for approximately computing elementary convex graph invariants in many interesting cases. Finally in

  17. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  18. Factorized Graph Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; de la Torre, Fernando

    2015-11-19

    Graph matching (GM) is a fundamental problem in computer science, and it plays a central role to solve correspondence problems in computer vision. GM problems that incorporate pairwise constraints can be formulated as a quadratic assignment problem (QAP). Although widely used, solving the correspondence problem through GM has two main limitations: (1) the QAP is NP-hard and difficult to approximate; (2) GM algorithms do not incorporate geometric constraints between nodes that are natural in computer vision problems. To address aforementioned problems, this paper proposes factorized graph matching (FGM). FGM factorizes the large pairwise affinity matrix into smaller matrices that encode the local structure of each graph and the pairwise affinity between edges. Four are the benefits that follow from this factorization: (1) There is no need to compute the costly (in space and time) pairwise affinity matrix; (2) The factorization allows the use of a path-following optimization algorithm, that leads to improved optimization strategies and matching performance; (3) Given the factorization, it becomes straight-forward to incorporate geometric transformations (rigid and non-rigid) to the GM problem. (4) Using a matrix formulation for the GM problem and the factorization, it is easy to reveal commonalities and differences between different GM methods. The factorization also provides a clean connection with other matching algorithms such as iterative closest point; Experimental results on synthetic and real databases illustrate how FGM outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for GM. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/fgm.

  19. Graphs of Hecke operators

    CERN Document Server

    Lorscheid, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Let $X$ be a curve over $\\F_q$ with function field $F$. In this paper, we define a graph for each Hecke operator with fixed ramification. A priori, these graphs can be seen as a convenient language to organize formulas for the action of Hecke operators on automorphic forms. However, they will prove to be a powerful tool for explicit calculations and proofs of finite dimensionality results. We develop a structure theory for certain graphs $G_x$ of unramified Hecke operators, which is of a similar vein to Serre's theory of quotients of Bruhat Tits trees. To be precise, $G_x$ is locally a quotient of a Bruhat Tits tree and has finitely many components. An interpretation of $G_x$ in terms of rank 2 bundles on $X$ and methods from reduction theory show that $G_x$ is the union of finitely many cusps, which are infinite subgraphs of a simple nature, and a nucleus, which is a finite subgraph that depends heavily on the arithmetics of $F$. We describe how one recovers unramified automorphic forms as functions on the g...

  20. Kinetic Stable Delaunay Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Pankaj K; Guibas, Leonidas J; Kaplan, Haim; Koltun, Vladlen; Rubin, Natan; Sharir, Micha

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of maintaining the Euclidean Delaunay triangulation $\\DT$ of a set $P$ of $n$ moving points in the plane, along algebraic trajectories of constant description complexity. Since the best known upper bound on the number of topological changes in the full $\\DT$ is nearly cubic, we seek to maintain a suitable portion of it that is less volatile yet retains many useful properties. We introduce the notion of a stable Delaunay graph, which is a dynamic subgraph of the Delaunay triangulation. The stable Delaunay graph (a) is easy to define, (b) experiences only a nearly quadratic number of discrete changes, (c) is robust under small changes of the norm, and (d) possesses certain useful properties. The stable Delaunay graph ($\\SDG$ in short) is defined in terms of a parameter $\\alpha>0$, and consists of Delaunay edges $pq$ for which the angles at which $p$ and $q$ see their Voronoi edge $e_{pq}$ are at least $\\alpha$. We show that (i) $\\SDG$ always contains at least roughly one third of the Del...

  1. The phylogeny graphs of doubly partial orders

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Boram

    2011-01-01

    The competition graph of a doubly partial order is known to be an interval graph. The CCE graph and the niche graph of a doubly partial order are also known to be interval graphs if the graphs do not contain a cycle of length four and three as an induced subgraph, respectively. Phylogeny graphs are variant of competition graphs. The phylogeny graph $P(D)$ of a digraph $D$ is the (simple undirected) graph defined by $V(P(D)):=V(D)$ and $E(P(D)):=\\{xy \\mid N^+_D(x) \\cap N^+_D(y) \

  2. New Developments in MadGraph/MadEvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwall, Johan; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Artoisenet, Pierre; de Visscher, Simon; Duhr, Claude; Frederix, Rikkert; Herquet, Michel; Mattelaer, Olivier; /IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve

    2011-11-08

    We here present some recent developments of MadGraph/MadEvent since the latest published version, 4.0. These developments include: Jet matching with Pythia parton showers for both Standard Model and Beyond the Standard Model processes, decay chain functionality, decay width calculation and decay simulation, process generation for the Grid, a package for calculation of quarkonium amplitudes, calculation of Matrix Element weights for experimental events, automatic dipole subtraction for next-to-leading order calculations, and an interface to FeynRules, a package for automatic calculation of Feynman rules and model files from the Lagrangian of any New Physics model.

  3. Duality in Geometric Graphs: Vector Graphs, Kirchhoff Graphs and Maxwell Reciprocal Figures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Reese

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We compare two mathematical theories that address duality between cycles and vertex-cuts of graphs in geometric settings. First, we propose a rigorous definition of a new type of graph, vector graphs. The special case of R2-vector graphs matches the intuitive notion of drawing graphs with edges taken as vectors. This leads to a discussion of Kirchhoff graphs, as originally presented by Fehribach, which can be defined independent of any matrix relations. In particular, we present simple cases in which vector graphs are guaranteed to be Kirchhoff or non-Kirchhoff. Next, we review Maxwell’s method of drawing reciprocal figures as he presented in 1864, using modern mathematical language. We then demonstrate cases in which R2-vector graphs defined from Maxwell reciprocals are “dual” Kirchhoff graphs. Given an example in which Maxwell’s theories are not sufficient to define vector graphs, we begin to explore other methods of developing dual Kirchhoff graphs.

  4. Graphs cospectral with a friendship graph or its complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdollahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $n$ be any positive integer and let $F_n$ be the friendship (or Dutch windmill graph with $2n+1$ vertices and $3n$ edges. Here we study graphs with the same adjacency spectrum as the $F_n$. Two graphs are called cospectral if the eigenvalues multiset of their adjacency matrices are the same. Let $G$ be a graph cospectral with $F_n$. Here we prove that if $G$ has no cycle of length $4$ or $5$, then $Gcong F_n$. Moreover if $G$ is connected and planar then $Gcong F_n$.All but one of connected components of $G$ are isomorphic to $K_2$.The complement $overline{F_n}$ of the friendship graph is determined by its adjacency eigenvalues, that is, if $overline{F_n}$ is cospectral with a graph $H$, then $Hcong overline{F_n}$.

  5. Evaluation of Graph Pattern Matching Workloads in Graph Analysis Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokyong [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh; Lee, Sangkeun (Matt) [ORNL; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh

    2016-01-01

    Graph analysis has emerged as a powerful method for data scientists to represent, integrate, query, and explore heterogeneous data sources. As a result, graph data management and mining became a popular area of research, and led to the development of plethora of systems in recent years. Unfortunately, the number of emerging graph analysis systems and the wide range of applications, coupled with a lack of apples-to-apples comparisons, make it difficult to understand the trade-offs between different systems and the graph operations for which they are designed. A fair comparison of these systems is a challenging task for the following reasons: multiple data models, non-standardized serialization formats, various query interfaces to users, and diverse environments they operate in. To address these key challenges, in this paper we present a new benchmark suite by extending the Lehigh University Benchmark (LUBM) to cover the most common capabilities of various graph analysis systems. We provide the design process of the benchmark, which generalizes the workflow for data scientists to conduct the desired graph analysis on different graph analysis systems. Equipped with this extended benchmark suite, we present performance comparison for nine subgraph pattern retrieval operations over six graph analysis systems, namely NetworkX, Neo4j, Jena, Titan, GraphX, and uRiKA. Through the proposed benchmark suite, this study reveals both quantitative and qualitative findings in (1) implications in loading data into each system; (2) challenges in describing graph patterns for each query interface; and (3) different sensitivity of each system to query selectivity. We envision that this study will pave the road for: (i) data scientists to select the suitable graph analysis systems, and (ii) data management system designers to advance graph analysis systems.

  6. An Algebraic Representation of Graphs and Applications to Graph Enumeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Mestre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a recursion formula to generate all the equivalence classes of connected graphs with coefficients given by the inverses of the orders of their groups of automorphisms. We use an algebraic graph representation to apply the result to the enumeration of connected graphs, all of whose biconnected components have the same number of vertices and edges. The proof uses Abel’s binomial theorem and generalizes Dziobek’s induction proof of Cayley’s formula.

  7. Decomposing Oriented Graphs into Six Locally Irregular Oriented Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien; Renault, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    An undirected graph G is locally irregular if every two of its adjacent vertices have distinct degrees. We say that G is decomposable into k locally irregular graphs if there exists a partition E1∪E2∪⋯∪Ek of the edge set E(G) such that each Ei induces a locally irregular graph. It was recently co...

  8. Spectral Radius of Hamiltonian Planar Graphs and Outerplanar Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建; 林翠琴; 胡冠章

    2001-01-01

    The spectral radius is an important parameter of a graph related to networks. A method forestimating the spectral radius of each spanning subgraph is used to prove that the spectral radius of aHamiltonian planar graph of order n ≥ 4 is less than or equal toand the spectral radius of theouterplanar graph of order n ≥ 6 is less than or equal to, which are improvements overprevious results. A direction for further study is then suggested.``

  9. Studying the corona product of graphs under some graph invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tavakoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The corona product $Gcirc H$ of two graphs $G$ and $H$ is obtained by taking one copy of $G$ and $|V(G|$ copies of $H$; and by joining each vertex of the $i$-th copy of $H$ to the $i$-th vertex of $G$, where $1 leq i leq |V(G|$. In this paper, exact formulas for the eccentric distance sum and the edge revised Szeged indices of the corona product of graphs are presented. We also study the conditions under which the corona product of graphs produces a median graph.

  10. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  11. ATLAS software packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Rybkin, G

    2012-01-01

    Software packaging is indispensable part of build and prerequisite for deployment processes. Full ATLAS software stack consists of TDAQ, HLT, and Offline software. These software groups depend on some 80 external software packages. We present tools, package PackDist, developed and used to package all this software except for TDAQ project. PackDist is based on and driven by CMT, ATLAS software configuration and build tool, and consists of shell and Python scripts. The packaging unit used is CMT project. Each CMT project is packaged as several packages - platform dependent (one per platform available), source code excluding header files, other platform independent files, documentation, and debug information packages (the last two being built optionally). Packaging can be done recursively to package all the dependencies. The whole set of packages for one software release, distribution kit, also includes configuration packages and contains some 120 packages for one platform. Also packaged are physics analysis pro...

  12. Statistical mechanics on isoradial graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Boutillier, Cédric

    2010-01-01

    Isoradial graphs are a natural generalization of regular graphs which give, for many models of statistical mechanics, the right framework for studying models at criticality. In this survey paper, we first explain how isoradial graphs naturally arise in two approaches used by physicists: transfer matrices and conformal field theory. This leads us to the fact that isoradial graphs provide a natural setting for discrete complex analysis, to which we dedicate one section. Then, we give an overview of explicit results obtained for different models of statistical mechanics defined on such graphs: the critical dimer model when the underlying graph is bipartite, the 2-dimensional critical Ising model, random walk and spanning trees and the q-state Potts model.

  13. Amplified graph C*-algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Eilers, Søren; Sørensen, Adam P W

    2011-01-01

    We provide a complete invariant for graph C*-algebras which are amplified in the sense that whenever there is an edge between two vertices, there are infinitely many. The invariant used is the standard primitive ideal space adorned with a map into {-1,0,1,2,...}, and we prove that the classification result is strong in the sense that isomorphisms at the level of the invariant always lift. We extend the classification result to cover more graphs, and give a range result for the invariant (in the vein of Effros-Handelman-Shen) which is further used to prove that extensions of graph C*-algebras associated to amplified graphs are again graph C*-algebras of amplified graphs.

  14. Bondage number of grid graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Dettlaff, Magda; Yero, Ismael G

    2012-01-01

    The bondage number $b(G)$ of a nonempty graph $G$ is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from $G$ results in a graph with domination number greater than the domination number of $G$. Here we study the bondage number of some grid-like graphs. In this sense, we obtain some bounds or exact values of the bondage number of some Cartesian product, strong product or direct product of two paths.

  15. Bondage number of grid graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Dettlaff, Magda; Lemanska, Magdalena; Yero, Ismael G.

    2012-01-01

    The bondage number $b(G)$ of a nonempty graph $G$ is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from $G$ results in a graph with domination number greater than the domination number of $G$. Here we study the bondage number of some grid-like graphs. In this sense, we obtain some bounds or exact values of the bondage number of some strong product and direct product of two paths.

  16. Graphs Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fournier, Jean-Claude

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a pedagogical and comprehensive introduction to graph theory and its applications. It contains all the standard basic material and develops significant topics and applications, such as: colorings and the timetabling problem, matchings and the optimal assignment problem, and Hamiltonian cycles and the traveling salesman problem, to name but a few. Exercises at various levels are given at the end of each chapter, and a final chapter presents a few general problems with hints for solutions, thus providing the reader with the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge on the

  17. Contact Graph Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  18. Total colourings of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Yap, Hian-Poh

    1996-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date and rapid introduction to an important and currently active topic in graph theory. The author leads the reader to the forefront of research in this area. Complete and easily readable proofs of all the main theorems, together with numerous examples, exercises and open problems are given. The book is suitable for use as a textbook or as seminar material for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. The references are comprehensive and so it will also be useful for researchers as a handbook.

  19. Basin Hopping Graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharik, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo; Stadler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Motivation RNA folding is a complicated kinetic process. The minimum free energy structure provides only a static view of the most stable conformational state of the system. It is insufficient to give detailed insights into the dynamic behavior of RNAs. A sufficiently sophisticated analysis...... of the folding free energy landscape, however, can provide the relevant information. Results We introduce the basin hopping graph (BHG) as a novel coarse-grained model of folding landscapes. Each vertex of the BHG is a local minimum, which represents the corresponding basin in the landscape. Its edges connect...

  20. Graphs as rotations

    CERN Document Server

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    Using a notation of corner between edges when graph has a fixed rotation, i.e. cyclical order of edges around vertices, we define combinatorial objects - combinatorial maps as pairs of permutations, one for vertices and one for faces. Further, we define multiplication of these objects, that coincides with the multiplication of permutations. We consider closed under multiplication classes of combinatorial maps that consist of closed classes of combinatorial maps with fixed edges where each such class is defined by a knot. One class among them is special, containing selfconjugate maps.

  1. Learning Probabilistic Decision Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred; Dalgaard, Jens; Silander, Tomi

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic decision graphs (PDGs) are a representation language for probability distributions based on binary decision diagrams. PDGs can encode (context-specific) independence relations that cannot be captured in a Bayesian network structure, and can sometimes provide computationally more...... efficient representations than Bayesian networks. In this paper we present an algorithm for learning PDGs from data. First experiments show that the algorithm is capable of learning optimal PDG representations in some cases, and that the computational efficiency of PDG models learned from real-life data...

  2. Endomorphisms of graph algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Roberto; Hong, Jeong Hee; Szymanski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    We initiate a systematic investigation of endomorphisms of graph C*-algebras C*(E), extending several known results on endomorphisms of the Cuntz algebras O_n. Most but not all of this study is focused on endomorphisms which permute the vertex projections and globally preserve the diagonal MASA D...... that the restriction to the diagonal MASA of an automorphism which globally preserves both D_E and the core AF-subalgebra eventually commutes with the corresponding one-sided shift. Secondly, we exhibit several properties of proper endomorphisms, investigate invertibility of localized endomorphisms both on C...

  3. Partitions of generalized split graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Shklarsky, Oren

    2012-01-01

    We discuss matrix partition problems for graphs that admit a partition into k independent sets and ` cliques. We show that when k + ` 6 2, any matrix M has finitely many (k; `) minimal obstructions and hence all of these problems are polynomial time solvable. We provide upper bounds for the size of any (k; `) minimal obstruction when k = ` = 1 (split graphs), when k = 2; ` = 0 (bipartite graphs), and when k = 0; ` = 2 (co-bipartite graphs). When k = ` = 1, we construct an exponential size spl...

  4. Nested Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2012-01-01

    We present an extension of the recently introduced declarative process model Dynamic Condition Response Graphs ( DCR Graphs) to allow nested subgraphs and a new milestone relation between events. The extension was developed during a case study carried out jointly with our industrial partner...... Exformatics, a danish provider of case and workflow management systems. We formalize the semantics by giving first a map from Nested to (flat) DCR Graphs with milestones, and then extending the previously given mapping from DCR Graphs to Buchi-automata to include the milestone relation....

  5. Edge Ideals of Weighted Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Paulsen, Chelsey

    2012-01-01

    We study weighted graphs and their "edge ideals" which are ideals in polynomial rings that are defined in terms of the graphs. We provide combinatorial descriptions of m-irreducible decompositions for the edge ideal of a weighted graph in terms of the combinatorics of "weighted vertex covers". We use these, for instance, to say when these ideals are m-unmixed. We explicitly describe which weighted cycles and trees are unmixed and which ones are Cohen-Macaulay, and we prove that all weighted complete graphs are Cohen-Macaulay.

  6. Intuitionistic Fuzzy Graphs with Categorical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rashmanlou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to show the rationality of some operations, defined or to be defined, on intuitionistic fuzzy graphs. Firstly, three kinds of new product operations (called direct product, lexicographic product, and strong product are defined in intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, and some important notions on intuitionistic fuzzy graphs are demonstrated by characterizing these notions and their level counterparts graphs such as intuitionistic fuzzy complete graph, cartesian product of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, composition of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, union of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, and join of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs. As a result, a kind of representations of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs and intuitionistic fuzzy complete graphs are given. Next, categorical goodness of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs is illustrated by proving that the category of intuitionistic fuzzy graphs and homomorphisms between them is isomorphic-closed, complete, and co-complete.

  7. Cerebral: visualizing multiple experimental conditions on a graph with biological context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Aaron; Munzner, Tamara; Gardy, Jennifer; Kincaid, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Systems biologists use interaction graphs to model the behavior of biological systems at the molecular level. In an iterative process, such biologists observe the reactions of living cells under various experimental conditions, view the results in the context of the interaction graph, and then propose changes to the graph model. These graphs ser ve as a form of dynamic knowledge representation of the biological system being studied and evolve as new insight is gained from the experimental data. While numerous graph layout and drawing packages are available, these tools did not fully meet the needs of our immunologist collaborators. In this paper, we describe the data information display needs of these immunologists and translate them into design decisions. These decisions led us to create Cerebral, a system that uses a biologically guided graph layout and incorporates experimental data directly into the graph display. Small multiple views of different experimental conditions and a data-driven parallel coordinates view enable correlations between experimental conditions to be analyzed at the same time that the data is viewed in the graph context. This combination of coordinated views allows the biologist to view the data from many different perspectives simultaneously. To illustrate the typical analysis tasks performed, we analyze two datasets using Cerebral. Based on feedback from our collaborators we conclude that Cerebral is a valuable tool for analyzing experimental data in the context of an interaction graph model.

  8. ON BIPOLAR SINGLE VALUED NEUTROSOPHIC GRAPHS

    OpenAIRE

    Said Broumi; Mohamed Talea; Assia Bakali; Florentin Smarandache

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we combine the concept of bipolar neutrosophic set and graph theory. We introduce the notions of bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, strong bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, complete bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, regular bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs and investigate some of their related properties. 

  9. ON BIPOLAR SINGLE VALUED NEUTROSOPHIC GRAPHS

    OpenAIRE

    Said Broumi; Mohamed Talea; Assia Bakali; Florentin Smarandache

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we combine the concept of bipolar neutrosophic set and graph theory. We introduce the notions of bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, strong bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, complete bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, regular bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs and investigate some of their related properties. 

  10. On Bipolar Single Valued Neutrosophic Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    SAID BROUMI; MOHAMED TALEA; ASSIA BAKALI; FLORENTIN SMARANDACHE

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we combine the concept of bipolar neutrosophic set and graph theory. We introduce the notions of bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, strong bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, complete bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs, regular bipolar single valued neutrosophic graphs and investigate some of their related properties. 

  11. Double-Critical Graphs and Complete Minors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawarabayashi, Ken-ichi; Pedersen, Anders Sune; Toft, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

      A connected $k$-chromatic graph $G$ is double-critical if for all edges $uv$ of $G$ the graph $G - u - v$ is $(k-2)$-colourable. The only known double-critical $k$-chromatic graph is the complete $k$-graph $K_k$. The conjecture that there are no other double-critical graphs is a special case...

  12. Tutte Polynomial of Multi-Bridge Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Allagan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, using a well-known recursion for computing the Tutte polynomial of any graph, we found explicit formulae for the Tutte polynomials of any multi-bridge graph and some $2-$tree graphs. Further, several recursive formulae for other graphs such as the fan and the wheel graphs are also discussed.

  13. A Modal-Logic Based Graph Abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, J.; Boneva, I.B.; Kurban, M.E.; Rensink, A.; Ehrig, H.; Heckel, R.; Rozenberg, G.; Taentzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    Infinite or very large state spaces often prohibit the successful verification of graph transformation systems. Abstract graph transformation is an approach that tackles this problem by abstracting graphs to abstract graphs of bounded size and by lifting application of productions to abstract graphs

  14. Laplacian spectral characterization of products of complete graphs with trees, unicyclic graphs, and bicyclic graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Suijie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we give a Laplacian characterization of the product of the complete graphs $K_m$ with trees, unicyclic graphs, and bicyclic graphs. More precisely, let $G$ be a connected graph with at most two independent cycles. If $G$ is neither $C_{6}$ nor $\\Theta_{3,2,5}$ and determined by its Laplacain spectrum, then the product $G\\times K_{m}$ is also a graph determined by its Laplacian spectrum. In addition, we find the cosepctral graphs of $C_{6}\\times K_{m}$ and $\\Theta_{3,2,5}\\times K_{m}$, where the case $m=1$ is shown in Figure \\ref{F1} and \\ref{F2}.

  15. A Framework to Measure the Service Quality of Distributor with Fuzzy Graph Theoretic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of fuzzy logic and graph theoretic approach has been used to find the service quality of distributor in a manufacturing supply chain management. This combination is termed as the fuzzy graph theoretic (FGT approach. Initially the identified factors were grouped by SPSS (statistical package for social science software and then the digraph approach was applied. The interaction and inheritance values were calculated by fuzzy graph theory approach in terms of permanent function. Then a single numerical index was calculated by using permanent function which indicates the distributor service quality. This method can be used to compare the service quality of different distributors.

  16. GraphAlignment: Bayesian pairwise alignment of biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolář Michal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increased experimental availability and accuracy of bio-molecular networks, tools for their comparative and evolutionary analysis are needed. A key component for such studies is the alignment of networks. Results We introduce the Bioconductor package GraphAlignment for pairwise alignment of bio-molecular networks. The alignment incorporates information both from network vertices and network edges and is based on an explicit evolutionary model, allowing inference of all scoring parameters directly from empirical data. We compare the performance of our algorithm to an alternative algorithm, Græmlin 2.0. On simulated data, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 in several benchmarks except for computational complexity. When there is little or no noise in the data, GraphAlignment is slower than Græmlin 2.0. It is faster than Græmlin 2.0 when processing noisy data containing spurious vertex associations. Its typical case complexity grows approximately as O(N2.6. On empirical bacterial protein-protein interaction networks (PIN and gene co-expression networks, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 with respect to coverage and specificity, albeit by a small margin. On large eukaryotic PIN, Græmlin 2.0 outperforms GraphAlignment. Conclusions The GraphAlignment algorithm is robust to spurious vertex associations, correctly resolves paralogs, and shows very good performance in identification of homologous vertices defined by high vertex and/or interaction similarity. The simplicity and generality of GraphAlignment edge scoring makes the algorithm an appropriate choice for global alignment of networks.

  17. Detecting alternative graph clusterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Supreet; Kumara, Soundar; Yao, Tao

    2012-07-01

    The problem of graph clustering or community detection has enjoyed a lot of attention in complex networks literature. A quality function, modularity, quantifies the strength of clustering and on maximization yields sensible partitions. However, in most real world networks, there are an exponentially large number of near-optimal partitions with some being very different from each other. Therefore, picking an optimal clustering among the alternatives does not provide complete information about network topology. To tackle this problem, we propose a graph perturbation scheme which can be used to identify an ensemble of near-optimal and diverse clusterings. We establish analytical properties of modularity function under the perturbation which ensures diversity. Our approach is algorithm independent and therefore can leverage any of the existing modularity maximizing algorithms. We numerically show that our methodology can systematically identify very different partitions on several existing data sets. The knowledge of diverse partitions sheds more light into the topological organization and helps gain a more complete understanding of the underlying complex network.

  18. Random rectangular Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) model is proposed by considering a set of points uniformly and independently distributed on a rectangle of unit area instead of on a unit square \\left[0,1\\right]^{2}. The topological properties, such as connectivity, average degree, average path length and clustering, of the random rectangular graphs (RRGs) generated by this model are then studied as a function of the rectangle sides lengths a and b=1/a, and the radius r used to connect the nodes. When a=1 we recover the RGG, and when a\\rightarrow\\infty the very elongated rectangle generated resembles a one-dimensional RGG. We provided computational and analytical evidence that the topological properties of the RRG differ significantly from those of the RGG. The connectivity of the RRG depends not only on the number of nodes as in the case of the RGG, but also on the side length of the rectangle. As the rectangle is more elongated the critical radius for connectivity increases following first a power-law an...

  19. Quantum Graph Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sterk, Jonathan David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lobser, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parekh, Ojas D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced network analytics have become increasingly important to na- tional security with applications ranging from cyber security to detection and disruption of ter- rorist networks. While classical computing solutions have received considerable investment, the development of quantum algorithms to address problems, such as data mining of attributed relational graphs, is a largely unexplored space. Recent theoretical work has shown that quan- tum algorithms for graph analysis can be more efficient than their classical counterparts. Here, we have implemented a trapped-ion-based two-qubit quantum information proces- sor to address these goals. Building on Sandia's microfabricated silicon surface ion traps, we have designed, realized and characterized a quantum information processor using the hyperfine qubits encoded in two 171 Yb + ions. We have implemented single qubit gates using resonant microwave radiation and have employed Gate set tomography (GST) to characterize the quan- tum process. For the first time, we were able to prove that the quantum process surpasses the fault tolerance thresholds of some quantum codes by demonstrating a diamond norm distance of less than 1 . 9 x 10 [?] 4 . We used Raman transitions in order to manipulate the trapped ions' motion and realize two-qubit gates. We characterized the implemented motion sensitive and insensitive single qubit processes and achieved a maximal process infidelity of 6 . 5 x 10 [?] 5 . We implemented the two-qubit gate proposed by Molmer and Sorensen and achieved a fidelity of more than 97 . 7%.

  20. Comparing pedigree graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Reshef, Yakir; Finucane, Hilary; Jiang, Haitao; Zhu, Binhai; Karp, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Pedigree graphs, or family trees, are typically constructed by an expensive process of examining genealogical records to determine which pairs of individuals are parent and child. New methods to automate this process take as input genetic data from a set of extant individuals and reconstruct ancestral individuals. There is a great need to evaluate the quality of these methods by comparing the estimated pedigree to the true pedigree. In this article, we consider two main pedigree comparison problems. The first is the pedigree isomorphism problem, for which we present a linear-time algorithm for leaf-labeled pedigrees. The second is the pedigree edit distance problem, for which we present (1) several algorithms that are fast and exact in various special cases, and (2) a general, randomized heuristic algorithm. In the negative direction, we first prove that the pedigree isomorphism problem is as hard as the general graph isomorphism problem, and that the sub-pedigree isomorphism problem is NP-hard. We then show that the pedigree edit distance problem is APX-hard in general and NP-hard on leaf-labeled pedigrees. We use simulated pedigrees to compare our edit-distance algorithms to each other as well as to a branch-and-bound algorithm that always finds an optimal solution.

  1. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Sars, Matthias [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Suijlekom, Walter D. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  2. micromap: A Package for Linked Micromaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn C. Payton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The R package micromap is used to create linked micromaps, which display statistical summaries associated with areal units, or polygons. Linked micromaps provide a means to simultaneously summarize and display both statistical and geographic distributions by linking statistical summaries to a series of small maps. The package contains functions dependent on the ggplot2 package to produce a row-oriented graph composed of different panels, or columns, of information. These panels at a minimum typically contain maps, a legend, and statistical summaries, with the color-coded legend linking the maps and statistical summaries. We first describe the layout of linked micromaps and then the structure required for both the spatial and statistical datasets. The function create_map_table in the micromap package converts the input of an sp SpatialPolygonsDataFrame into a data frame that can be linked with the statistical dataset. Highly detailed polygons are not appropriate for display in linked micromaps so we describe how polygon boundaries can be simplified, decreasing the time required to draw the graphs, while retaining adequate detail for detection of spatial patterns. Our worked examples of linked micromaps use public health data as well as environmental data collected from spatially balanced probabilistic surveys.

  3. Tools for Large Graph Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    intuitive results on a variety of synthetic and real-world datasets. Here, we will verify their scalability. Figure 5.9 shows results on a “ caveman ...show timing results on a “ caveman ” graph with 3 caves. The plot shows wall-clock time vs. the number of edges E in the graph, for both SPLIT (dashed

  4. Subgraph Enumeration in Massive Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, Francesco

    bound also applies with high probability. Our algorithm is I/O optimal, in the worst-case, when the sample graph belongs to the Alon class, which includes cliques, cycles and every graph with a perfect matching: indeed, we show that any algorithm enumerating $T$ instances must always use $\\BOM...

  5. Open Graphs and Monoidal Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Lucas

    2010-01-01

    String diagrams are a powerful tool for reasoning about physical processes, logic circuits, tensor networks, and many other compositional structures. The distinguishing feature of these diagrams is that edges need not be connected to vertices at both ends, and these unconnected ends can be interpreted as the inputs and outputs of a diagram. In this paper, we give a concrete construction for string diagrams using a special kind of typed graph called an open-graph. While the category of open-graphs is not itself adhesive, we introduce the notion of a selective adhesive functor, and show that such a functor embeds the category of open-graphs into the ambient adhesive category of typed graphs. Using this functor, the category of open-graphs inherits "enough adhesivity" from the category of typed graphs to perform double-pushout (DPO) graph rewriting. A salient feature of our theory is that it ensures rewrite systems are "type-safe" in the sense that rewriting respects the inputs and outputs. This formalism lets u...

  6. Network reconstruction via graph blending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Rolando

    2016-05-01

    Graphs estimated from empirical data are often noisy and incomplete due to the difficulty of faithfully observing all the components (nodes and edges) of the true graph. This problem is particularly acute for large networks where the number of components may far exceed available surveillance capabilities. Errors in the observed graph can render subsequent analyses invalid, so it is vital to develop robust methods that can minimize these observational errors. Errors in the observed graph may include missing and spurious components, as well fused (multiple nodes are merged into one) and split (a single node is misinterpreted as many) nodes. Traditional graph reconstruction methods are only able to identify missing or spurious components (primarily edges, and to a lesser degree nodes), so we developed a novel graph blending framework that allows us to cast the full estimation problem as a simple edge addition/deletion problem. Armed with this framework, we systematically investigate the viability of various topological graph features, such as the degree distribution or the clustering coefficients, and existing graph reconstruction methods for tackling the full estimation problem. Our experimental results suggest that incorporating any topological feature as a source of information actually hinders reconstruction accuracy. We provide a theoretical analysis of this phenomenon and suggest several avenues for improving this estimation problem.

  7. Graph Transformation and AI Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelkamp, S.; Rensink, Arend; Edelkamp, S.; Frank, J.

    This document provides insight to the similarities and differences of Graph Transformation and AI Planning, two rising research fields with different publication organs and tools. While graph transformation systems can be used as a graphical knowledge engineering front-end for designing planning

  8. Graph Transformation and AI Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelkamp, S.; Rensink, A.; Edelkamp, S.; Frank, J.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides insight to the similarities and differences of Graph Transformation and AI Planning, two rising research fields with different publication organs and tools. While graph transformation systems can be used as a graphical knowledge engineering front-end for designing planning pr

  9. Quantum Markov fields on graphs

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We introduce generalized quantum Markov states and generalized d-Markov chains which extend the notion quantum Markov chains on spin systems to that on $C^*$-algebras defined by general graphs. As examples of generalized d-Markov chains, we construct the entangled Markov fields on tree graphs. The concrete examples of generalized d-Markov chains on Cayley trees are also investigated.

  10. Paley Graphs and Their Generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Elsawy, Ahmed Noubi

    2012-01-01

    To construct a Paley graph, we fix a finite field and consider its elements as vertices of the Paley graph. Two vertices are connected by an edge if their difference is a square in the field. We will study some important properties of the Paley graphs. In particular, we will show that the Paley graphs are connected, symmetric, and self-complementary. Also we will show that the Paley graph of order q is (q-1)/2 -regular, and every two adjacent vertices have (q-5)/4 common neighbors, and every two non-adjacent vertices have q-1/4 common neighbors, which means that the Paley graphs are strongly regular with parameters(q,q-1/2,q-5/4, q-1/4). Paley graphs are generalized by many mathematicians. In the first section of Chapter 3 we will see three examples of these generalizations and some of their basic properties. In the second section of Chapter 3 we will define a new generalization of the Paley graphs, in which pairs of elements of a finite field are connected by an edge if and only if there difference belongs t...

  11. Graph Representation of Projective Resolutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Bo SHI

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the concept - dimension tree and the related results for monomial algebras to a more general case - relations algebras Λ by bringing Gr(o)bner basis into play. More precisely,graph to be called the minimal resolution graph for M. Algorithms for computing such diagraphs and applications as well will be presented.

  12. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  13. Asymptotic aspects of Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Dejter, Italo J

    2011-01-01

    Arising from complete Cayley graphs $\\Gamma_n$ of odd cyclic groups $\\Z_n$, an asymptotic approach is presented on connected labeled graphs whose vertices are labeled via equally-multicolored copies of $K_4$ in $\\Gamma_n$ with adjacency of any two such vertices whenever they are represented by copies of $K_4$ in $\\Gamma_n$ sharing two equally-multicolored triangles. In fact, these connected labeled graphs are shown to form a family of graphs of largest degree 6 and diameter asymptotically of order $|V|^{1/3}$, properties shared by the initial member of a collection of families of Cayley graphs of degree $2m\\geq 6$ with diameter asymptotically of order $|V|^{1/m}$, where $3\\leq m\\in\\Z$.

  14. Renormalization algorithm with graph enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Hübener, R; Hartmann, L; Dür, W; Plenio, M B; Eisert, J

    2011-01-01

    We present applications of the renormalization algorithm with graph enhancement (RAGE). This analysis extends the algorithms and applications given for approaches based on matrix product states introduced in [Phys. Rev. A 79, 022317 (2009)] to other tensor-network states such as the tensor tree states (TTS) and projected entangled pair states (PEPS). We investigate the suitability of the bare TTS to describe ground states, showing that the description of certain graph states and condensed matter models improves. We investigate graph-enhanced tensor-network states, demonstrating that in some cases (disturbed graph states and for certain quantum circuits) the combination of weighted graph states with tensor tree states can greatly improve the accuracy of the description of ground states and time evolved states. We comment on delineating the boundary of the classically efficiently simulatable states of quantum many-body systems.

  15. Planar graphs theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizeki, T

    1988-01-01

    Collected in this volume are most of the important theorems and algorithms currently known for planar graphs, together with constructive proofs for the theorems. Many of the algorithms are written in Pidgin PASCAL, and are the best-known ones; the complexities are linear or 0(nlogn). The first two chapters provide the foundations of graph theoretic notions and algorithmic techniques. The remaining chapters discuss the topics of planarity testing, embedding, drawing, vertex- or edge-coloring, maximum independence set, subgraph listing, planar separator theorem, Hamiltonian cycles, and single- or multicommodity flows. Suitable for a course on algorithms, graph theory, or planar graphs, the volume will also be useful for computer scientists and graph theorists at the research level. An extensive reference section is included.

  16. Quantum walks on general graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kendon, V

    2003-01-01

    A scheme for a discrete time quantum walk on a general graph of N vertices with undirected edges is given, and compared with the continuous time quantum walk on a general graph introduced by Farhi and Gutmann [PRA 58 915 (1998)]. Both walks are contrasted with the examples of quantum walks in the literature treating graphs of fixed, small (< log N) degree. This illustrates the way in which extra information about the graph allows more efficient algorithms to be designed. To obtain a quantum speed up over classical for comparable resources it is necessary to code the position space of the quantum walk into a qubit register (or equivalent). The role of the oracle is also discussed and an efficient gate sequence is presented for implementing a discrete quantum walk given one copy of a quantum state encoding the adjacency matrix of the graph.

  17. Learning Activity Package, Algebra 124, LAPs 46-55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Bill

    A series of 10 teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in advanced algebra and trigonometry, these units cover absolute value, inequalities, exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; functions; higher degree equations and the derivative; the trigonometric functions; graphs and applications of the trigonometric functions; sequences and…

  18. Girth 5 graphs from relative difference sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Leif Kjær

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of construction of graphs with given degree $k$ and girth 5 and as few vertices as possible. We give a construction of a family of girth 5 graphs based on relative difference sets. This family contains the smallest known graph of degree 8 and girth 5 which was constructed ...... by Royle, four of the known cages including the Hoffman-Singleton graph, some graphs constructed by Exoo and some new smallest known graphs....

  19. Girth 5 graphs from relative difference sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Leif Kjær

    We consider the problem of construction of graphs with given degree and girth 5 and as few vertices as possible. We give a construction of a family of girth 5 graphs based on relative difference sets. This family contains the smallest known graph of degree 8 and girth 5 which was constructed by G....... Royle, four of the known cages including the Hoffman-Singleton graph, some graphs constructed by G. Exoo and some new smallest known graphs. k...

  20. Parallel Graph Transformation based on Merged Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Aouat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graph transformation is one of the key concepts in graph grammar. In order to accelerate the graph transformation, the concept of parallel graph transformation has been proposed by different tools such as AGG tool. The theory of parallel graph transformation used by AGG just allows clarifying the concepts of conflict and dependency between the transformation rules. This work proposes an approach of parallel graph transformations which enables dependent transformation rules to be executed in parallel.

  1. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  2. Periodic 2-graphs arising from subshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Pask, David; Weaver, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    Higher-rank graphs were introduced by Kumjian and Pask to provide models for higher-rank Cuntz-Krieger algebras. In a previous paper, we constructed 2-graphs whose path spaces are rank-two subshifts of finite type, and showed that this construction yields aperiodic 2-graphs whose $C^*$-algebras are simple and are not ordinary graph algebras. Here we show that the construction also gives a family of periodic 2-graphs which we call \\emph{domino graphs}. We investigate the combinatorial structure of domino graphs, finding interesting points of contact with the existing combinatorial literature, and prove a structure theorem for the $C^*$-algebras of domino graphs.

  3. Semantic graphs and associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomi, Andrés; Mizraji, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    Graphs have been increasingly utilized in the characterization of complex networks from diverse origins, including different kinds of semantic networks. Human memories are associative and are known to support complex semantic nets; these nets are represented by graphs. However, it is not known how the brain can sustain these semantic graphs. The vision of cognitive brain activities, shown by modern functional imaging techniques, assigns renewed value to classical distributed associative memory models. Here we show that these neural network models, also known as correlation matrix memories, naturally support a graph representation of the stored semantic structure. We demonstrate that the adjacency matrix of this graph of associations is just the memory coded with the standard basis of the concept vector space, and that the spectrum of the graph is a code invariant of the memory. As long as the assumptions of the model remain valid this result provides a practical method to predict and modify the evolution of the cognitive dynamics. Also, it could provide us with a way to comprehend how individual brains that map the external reality, almost surely with different particular vector representations, are nevertheless able to communicate and share a common knowledge of the world. We finish presenting adaptive association graphs, an extension of the model that makes use of the tensor product, which provides a solution to the known problem of branching in semantic nets.

  4. Hierarchy of modular graph identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Hoker, Eric; Kaidi, Justin [Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-11-09

    The low energy expansion of Type II superstring amplitudes at genus one is organized in terms of modular graph functions associated with Feynman graphs of a conformal scalar field on the torus. In earlier work, surprising identities between two-loop graphs at all weights, and between higher-loop graphs of weights four and five were constructed. In the present paper, these results are generalized in two complementary directions. First, all identities at weight six and all dihedral identities at weight seven are obtained and proven. Whenever the Laurent polynomial at the cusp is available, the form of these identities confirms the pattern by which the vanishing of the Laurent polynomial governs the full modular identity. Second, the family of modular graph functions is extended to include all graphs with derivative couplings and worldsheet fermions. These extended families of modular graph functions are shown to obey a hierarchy of inhomogeneous Laplace eigenvalue equations. The eigenvalues are calculated analytically for the simplest infinite sub-families and obtained by Maple for successively more complicated sub-families. The spectrum is shown to consist solely of eigenvalues s(s−1) for positive integers s bounded by the weight, with multiplicities which exhibit rich representation-theoretic patterns.

  5. Design Pattern Mining Using Graph Matching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-hua; ZHANG Zhi-xiang; BEN Ke-rong

    2004-01-01

    The identification of design pattern instances is important for program understanding and software maintenance. Aiming at the mining of design patterns in existing systems, this paper proposes a sub-graph isomorphism approach to discover several design patterns in a legacy system at a time. The attributed relational graph is used to describe design patterns and legacy systems. The sub-graph isomorphism approach consists of decomposition and composition process. During the decomposition process, graphs corresponding to the design patterns are decomposed into sub-graphs, some of which are graphs corresponding to the elemental design patterns. The composition process tries to get sub-graph isomorphism of the matched graph if sub-graph isomorphism of each sub-graph is obtained. Due to the common structures between design patterns, the proposed approach can reduce the matching times of entities and relations. Compared with the existing methods, the proposed algorithm is not linearly dependent on the number of design pattern graphs.

  6. Acyclic edge colorings of planar graphs and series parallel graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU JianFeng; WU JianLiang; LIU GuiZhen; LIU Bin

    2009-01-01

    A proper edge coloring of a graph G is called acyclic if there is no 2-colored cycle in G.The acyclic edge chromatic number of G,denoted by a'(G),is the least number of colors in an acyclic edge coloring of G.Alon et al.conjectured that a'(G) ≤△(G) +2 for any graphs.For planar graphs G with girth g(G),we prove that a'(G) ≤ max{2△(G)-2,△(G) +22} if g(G) ≥3,a'(G)≤△(G)+2if g(G) ≥ 5,a'(G) ≤△(G)+1 if g(G) ≥ 7,and a'(G)=△(G) if g(G) ≥ 16 and △(G) ≥ 3.For series-parallel graphs G,we have a'(G) ≤ △(G) +1.

  7. Graph Model Based Indoor Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Lu, Hua; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    infrastructure for different symbolic positioning technologies, e.g., Bluetooth and RFID. More specifically, the paper proposes a model of indoor space that comprises a base graph and mappings that represent the topology of indoor space at different levels. The resulting model can be used for one or several...... indoor positioning technologies. Focusing on RFID-based positioning, an RFID specific reader deployment graph model is built from the base graph model. This model is then used in several algorithms for constructing and refining trajectories from raw RFID readings. Empirical studies with implementations...

  8. Chordal Graphs are Fully Orientable

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Hsin-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Suppose that D is an acyclic orientation of a graph G. An arc of D is called dependent if its reversal creates a directed cycle. Let m and M denote the minimum and the maximum of the number of dependent arcs over all acyclic orientations of G. We call G fully orientable if G has an acyclic orientation with exactly d dependent arcs for every d satisfying m <= d <= M. A graph G is called chordal if every cycle in G of length at least four has a chord. We show that all chordal graphs are fully orientable.

  9. Symmetry properties of subdivision graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Daneshkhah, Ashraf; Devillers, Alice; Praeger, Cheryl E.

    2010-01-01

    The subdivision graph $S(\\Sigma)$ of a graph $\\Sigma$ is obtained from $\\Sigma$ by `adding a vertex' in the middle of every edge of $\\Si$. Various symmetry properties of $\\S(\\Sigma)$ are studied. We prove that, for a connected graph $\\Sigma$, $S(\\Sigma)$ is locally $s$-arc transitive if and only if $\\Sigma$ is $\\lceil\\frac{s+1}{2}\\rceil$-arc transitive. The diameter of $S(\\Sigma)$ is $2d+\\delta$, where $\\Sigma$ has diameter $d$ and $0\\leqslant \\delta\\leqslant 2$, and local $s$-distance transi...

  10. Recursive processing of cyclic graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Monica; Gori, Marco; Sarti, Lorenzo; Scarselli, Franco

    2006-01-01

    Recursive neural networks are a powerful tool for processing structured data. According to the recursive learning paradigm, the input information consists of directed positional acyclic graphs (DPAGs). In fact, recursive networks are fed following the partial order defined by the links of the graph. Unfortunately, the hypothesis of processing DPAGs is sometimes too restrictive, being the nature of some real-world problems intrinsically cyclic. In this paper, a methodology is proposed, which allows us to process any cyclic directed graph. Therefore, the computational power of recursive networks is definitely established, also clarifying the underlying limitations of the model.

  11. Cubature formulas on combinatorial graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Pesenson, Isaac Z

    2011-01-01

    Many contemporary applications, for example, cataloging of galaxies, document analysis, face recognition, learning theory, image processing, operate with a large amount of data which is often represented as a graph embedded into a high dimensional Euclidean space. The variety of problems arising in contemporary data processing requires development on graphs such topics of the classical harmonic analysis as Shannon sampling, splines, wavelets, cubature formulas. The goal of the paper is to establish cubature formulas on finite combinatorial graphs. The results have direct applications to problems that arise in connection with data filtering, data denoising and data dimension reduction.

  12. On Dominator Colorings in Graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Arumugam; Jay Bagga; K Raja Chandrasekar

    2012-11-01

    A dominator coloring of a graph is a proper coloring of in which every vertex dominates every vertex of at least one color class. The minimum number of colors required for a dominator coloring of is called the dominator chromatic number of and is denoted by $ d(G)$. In this paper we present several results on graphs with $ d(G)=(G)$ and $ d(G)=(G)$ where $(G)$ and $(G)$ denote respectively the chromatic number and the domination number of a graph . We also prove that if $(G)$ is the Mycielskian of , then $ d(G)+1≤ d((G))≤ d(G)+2$.

  13. Multigraph: Reusable Interactive Data Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    There are surprisingly few good software tools available for presenting time series data on the internet. The most common practice is to use a desktop program such as Excel or Matlab to save a graph as an image which can be included in a web page like any other image. This disconnects the graph from the data in a way that makes updating a graph with new data a cumbersome manual process, and it limits the user to one particular view of the data. The Multigraph project defines an XML format for describing interactive data graphs, and software tools for creating and rendering those graphs in web pages and other internet connected applications. Viewing a Multigraph graph is extremely simple and intuitive, and requires no instructions; the user can pan and zoom by clicking and dragging, in a familiar "Google Maps" kind of way. Creating a new graph for inclusion in a web page involves writing a simple XML configuration file. Multigraph can read data in a variety of formats, and can display data from a web service, allowing users to "surf" through large data sets, downloading only those the parts of the data that are needed for display. The Multigraph XML format, or "MUGL" for short, provides a concise description of the visual properties of a graph, such as axes, plot styles, data sources, labels, etc, as well as interactivity properties such as how and whether the user can pan or zoom along each axis. Multigraph reads a file in this format, draws the described graph, and allows the user to interact with it. Multigraph software currently includes a Flash application for embedding graphs in web pages, a Flex component for embedding graphs in larger Flex/Flash applications, and a plugin for creating graphs in the WordPress content management system. Plans for the future include a Java version for desktop viewing and editing, a command line version for batch and server side rendering, and possibly Android and iPhone versions. Multigraph is currently in use on several web

  14. spa: Semi-Supervised Semi-Parametric Graph-Based Estimation in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Culp

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an R package that combines feature-based (X data and graph-based (G data for prediction of the response Y . In this particular case, Y is observed for a subset of the observations (labeled and missing for the remainder (unlabeled. We examine an approach for fitting Y = Xβ + f(G where β is a coefficient vector and f is a function over the vertices of the graph. The procedure is semi-supervised in nature (trained on the labeled and unlabeled sets, requiring iterative algorithms for fitting this estimate. The package provides several key functions for fitting and evaluating an estimator of this type. The package is illustrated on a text analysis data set, where the observations are text documents (papers, the response is the category of paper (either applied or theoretical statistics, the X information is the name of the journal in which the paper resides, and the graph is a co-citation network, with each vertex an observation and each edge the number of times that the two papers cite a common paper. An application involving classification of protein location using a protein interaction graph and an application involving classification on a manifold with part of the feature data converted to a graph are also presented.

  15. The gRbase package for graphical modelling in R

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsgaard, Søren; Dethlefsen, Claus

    We have developed a package, called , consisting of a number of classes and associated methods to support the analysis of data using graphical models. It is developed for the open source language, R, and is available for several platforms. The package is intended to be widely extendible and flexi...... these building blocks can be combined and integrated with inference engines in the special cases of hierarchical log-linear models (undirected models). gRbase gRbase dynamicGraph...... and flexible so that package developers may implement further types of graphical models using the available methods. contains methods for representing data, specification of models using a formal language, and is linked to , an interactive graphical user interface for manipulating graphs. We show how...

  16. Application of Computer Graphics to Graphing in Algebra and Trigonometry. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. Richard

    This project was designed to improve the graphing competency of students in elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, and trigonometry courses at Virginia Commonwealth University. Computer graphics programs were designed using an Apple II Plus computer and implemented using Pascal. The software package is interactive and gives students control…

  17. Total Restrained Bondage in Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nader JAFARI RAD; Roslan HASNI; Joanna RACZEK; Lutz VOLKMANN

    2013-01-01

    A subset S of vertices of a graph G with no isolated vertex is a total restrained dominating set if every vertex is adjacent to a vertex in S and every vertex in V(G)-S is also adjacent to a vertex in V(G)-S.The total restrained domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a total restrained dominating set of G.In this paper we initiate the study of total restrained bondage in graphs.The total restrained bondage number in a graph G with no isolated vertex,is the minimum cardinality of a subset of edges E such that G-E has no isolated vertex and the total restrained domination number of G-E is greater than the total restrained domination number of G.We obtain several properties,exact values and bounds for the total restrained bondage number of a graph.

  18. Digital Line Graph - Large Scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital line graph (DLG) data are digital representations of cartographic information. DLGs of map features are converted to digital form from maps and related...

  19. Digital Line Graph - Large Scale

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Digital line graph (DLG) data are digital representations of cartographic information. DLGs of map features are converted to digital form from maps and related...

  20. Hierarchical clustering for graph visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Clémençon, Stéphan; Rossi, Fabrice; Tran, Viet Chi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a graph visualization methodology based on hierarchical maximal modularity clustering, with interactive and significant coarsening and refining possibilities. An application of this method to HIV epidemic analysis in Cuba is outlined.

  1. Chordal Graphs and Semidefinite Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Lieven; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard

    2015-01-01

    in combinatorial optimization, linear algebra, statistics, signal processing, machine learning, and nonlinear optimization. This survey covers the theory and applications of chordal graphs, with an emphasis on algorithms developed in the literature on sparse Cholesky factorization. These algorithms are formulated......Chordal graphs play a central role in techniques for exploiting sparsity in large semidefinite optimization problems and in related con-vex optimization problems involving sparse positive semidefinite matrices. Chordal graph properties are also fundamental to several classical results...... as recursions on elimination trees, supernodal elimination trees, or clique trees associated with the graph. The best known example is the multifrontal Cholesky factorization algorithm, but similar algorithms can be formulated for a variety of related problems, including the computation of the partial inverse...

  2. Ising spins on thin graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, C F; Kownacki, J P

    1994-01-01

    The Ising model on ``thin'' graphs (standard Feynman diagrams) displays several interesting properties. For ferromagnetic couplings there is a mean field phase transition at the corresponding Bethe lattice transition point. For antiferromagnetic couplings the replica trick gives some evidence for a spin glass phase. In this paper we investigate both the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic models with the aid of simulations. We confirm the Bethe lattice values of the critical points for the ferromagnetic model on \\phi^3 and \\phi^4 graphs and examine the putative spin glass phase in the antiferromagnetic model by looking at the overlap between replicas in a quenched ensemble of graphs. We also compare the Ising results with those for higher state Potts models and Ising models on ``fat'' graphs, such as those used in 2D gravity simulations.

  3. Open Graphs and Computational Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Dixon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a form of algebraic reasoning for computational objects which are expressed as graphs. Edges describe the flow of data between primitive operations which are represented by vertices. These graphs have an interface made of half-edges (edges which are drawn with an unconnected end and enjoy rich compositional principles by connecting graphs along these half-edges. In particular, this allows equations and rewrite rules to be specified between graphs. Particular computational models can then be encoded as an axiomatic set of such rules. Further rules can be derived graphically and rewriting can be used to simulate the dynamics of a computational system, e.g. evaluating a program on an input. Examples of models which can be formalised in this way include traditional electronic circuits as well as recent categorical accounts of quantum information.

  4. Tree decompositions and social graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Adcock, Aaron B; Mahoney, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has established that large informatics graphs such as social and information networks have non-trivial tree-like structure when viewed at moderate size scales. Here, we present results from the first detailed empirical evaluation of the use of tree decomposition (TD) heuristics for structure identification and extraction in social graphs. Although TDs have historically been used in structural graph theory and scientific computing, we show that---even with existing TD heuristics developed for those very different areas---TD methods can identify interesting structure in a wide range of realistic informatics graphs. Among other things, we show that TD methods can identify structures that correlate strongly with the core-periphery structure of realistic networks, even when using simple greedy heuristics; we show that the peripheral bags of these TDs correlate well with low-conductance communities (when they exist) found using local spectral computations; and we show that several types of large-scale "...

  5. Generating random networks and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Coolen, Ton; Roberts, Ekaterina

    2017-01-01

    This book supports researchers who need to generate random networks, or who are interested in the theoretical study of random graphs. The coverage includes exponential random graphs (where the targeted probability of each network appearing in the ensemble is specified), growth algorithms (i.e. preferential attachment and the stub-joining configuration model), special constructions (e.g. geometric graphs and Watts Strogatz models) and graphs on structured spaces (e.g. multiplex networks). The presentation aims to be a complete starting point, including details of both theory and implementation, as well as discussions of the main strengths and weaknesses of each approach. It includes extensive references for readers wishing to go further. The material is carefully structured to be accessible to researchers from all disciplines while also containing rigorous mathematical analysis (largely based on the techniques of statistical mechanics) to support those wishing to further develop or implement the theory of rand...

  6. Exploration of Periodically Varying Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Flocchini, Paola; Santoro, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    We study the computability and complexity of the exploration problem in a class of highly dynamic graphs: periodically varying (PV) graphs, where the edges exist only at some (unknown) times defined by the periodic movements of carriers. These graphs naturally model highly dynamic infrastructure-less networks such as public transports with fixed timetables, low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite systems, security guards' tours, etc. We establish necessary conditions for the problem to be solved. We also derive lower bounds on the amount of time required in general, as well as for the PV graphs defined by restricted classes of carriers movements: simple routes, and circular routes. We then prove that the limitations on computability and complexity we have established are indeed tight. In fact we prove that all necessary conditions are also sufficient and all lower bounds on costs are tight. We do so constructively presenting two worst case optimal solution algorithms, one for anonymous systems, and one for those w...

  7. Connectivity threshold for Bluetooth graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Broutin, Nicolas; Fraiman, Nicolas; Lugosi, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    We study the connectivity properties of random Bluetooth graphs that model certain "ad hoc" wireless networks. The graphs are obtained as "irrigation subgraphs" of the well-known random geometric graph model. There are two parameters that control the model: the radius $r$ that determines the "visible neighbors" of each node and the number of edges $c$ that each node is allowed to send to these. The randomness comes from the underlying distribution of data points in space and from the choices of each vertex. We prove that no connectivity can take place with high probability for a range of parameters $r, c$ and completely characterize the connectivity threshold (in $c$) for values of $r$ close the critical value for connectivity in the underlying random geometric graph.

  8. Rank of Stably Dissipative Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    For the class of stably dissipative Lotka-Volterra systems we prove that the rank of its defining matrix, which is the dimension of the associated invariant foliation, is completely determined by the system's graph.

  9. Special Issue on Graph Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of Algorithms is devoted to the design and analysis of algorithms for solving combinatorial problems of a theoretical or practical nature involving graphs, with a focus on computational complexity.

  10. Graph Model Based Indoor Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Lu, Hua; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    The tracking of the locations of moving objects in large indoor spaces is important, as it enables a range of applications related to, e.g., security and indoor navigation and guidance. This paper presents a graph model based approach to indoor tracking that offers a uniform data management...... infrastructure for different symbolic positioning technologies, e.g., Bluetooth and RFID. More specifically, the paper proposes a model of indoor space that comprises a base graph and mappings that represent the topology of indoor space at different levels. The resulting model can be used for one or several...... indoor positioning technologies. Focusing on RFID-based positioning, an RFID specific reader deployment graph model is built from the base graph model. This model is then used in several algorithms for constructing and refining trajectories from raw RFID readings. Empirical studies with implementations...

  11. Algorithms for Comparing Pedigree Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Finucane, Hilary; Jiang, Haitao; Zhu, Binhai; Karp, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Pedigree graphs, which represent family relationships, are often constructed by collecting data from genealogical records to determine which pairs of people are parent and child. This process is expensive, and small mistakes in data collection--for example, one missing parent-child relationship--can cause large differences in the pedigree graphs created. In this paper, we introduce a simple pedigree definition based on a different type of data which is potentially easier to collect. This alternative characterization of a pedigree that describes a pedigree as a list of the descendants of each individual, rather than a list of parent-child relationships. We then introduce an algorithm that generates the pedigree graph from this list of descendants. We also consider the problem of comparing two pedigree graphs, which could be useful to evaluate the differences between pedigrees constructed via different methods. Specifically, this could be useful to evaluate pedigree reconstruction methods. We define the edit di...

  12. Some Graphs Containing Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, two classes of graphs of arbitrary order are described which contain unique Hamiltonian cycles. All the graphs have mean vertex degree greater than one quarter the order of the graph. The Hamiltonian cycles are detailed, their uniqueness proved and simple rules for the construction of the adjacency matrix of the graphs are given.…

  13. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  14. Hard graphs for the maximum clique problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, Cornelis

    1988-01-01

    The maximum clique problem is one of the NP-complete problems. There are graphs for which a reduction technique exists that transforms the problem for these graphs into one for graphs with specific properties in polynomial time. The resulting graphs do not grow exponentially in order and number. Gra

  15. Generalized wreath products of graphs and groups

    OpenAIRE

    Donno, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by the definition of generalized wreath product of permutation groups, we define the generalized wreath product of graphs, containing the classical Cartesian and wreath product of graphs as particular cases. We prove that the generalized wreath product of Cayley graphs of finite groups is the Cayley graph of the generalized wreath product of the corresponding groups.

  16. Graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanic, M.; Pedersen, Anders Sune; Pellicer, D.;

    2014-01-01

    We study square-complementary graphs, that is, graphs whose complement and square are isomorphic. We prove several necessary conditions for a graph to be square-complementary, describe ways of building new square-complementary graphs from existing ones, construct infinite families of square...

  17. Subgraph conditions for Hamiltonian properties of graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Binlong; Li, Binlong

    2012-01-01

    The research that forms the basis of this thesis addresses the following general structural questions in graph theory: which fixed graph of pair of graphs do we have to forbid as an induced subgraph of an arbitrary graph G to guarantee that G has a nice structure? In this thesis the nice structural

  18. Chain graph models and their causal interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Richardson, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    Chain graphs are a natural generalization of directed acyclic graphs and undirected graphs. However, the apparent simplicity of chain graphs belies the subtlety of the conditional independence hypotheses that they represent. There are many simple and apparently plausible, but ultimately fallaciou...

  19. Localized endomorphisms of graph algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Roberto; Szymanski, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Endomorphisms of graph C*-algebras are investigated. A combinatorial approach to analysis of permutative endomorphisms is developed. Then invertibility criteria for localized endomorphisms are given. Furthermore, proper endomorphisms which restrict to automorphisms of the canonical diagonal MASA are analyzed. The Weyl group and the restricted Weyl group of a graph C*-algebra are introduced and investigated. Criteria of outerness for automorphisms in the restricted Weyl group are found.

  20. Fundamental cycles and graph embeddings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate fundamental cycles in a graph G and their relations with graph embeddings. We show that a graph G may be embedded in an orientable surface with genus at least g if and only if for any spanning tree T , there exists a sequence of fundamental cycles C1, C2, . . . , C2g with C2i-1 ∩ C2i≠ф for 1≤ i ≤g. In particular, among β(G) fundamental cycles of any spanning tree T of a graph G, there are exactly 2γM (G) cycles C1, C2, . . . , C2γM (G) such that C2i-1 ∩ C2i≠ф for 1 ≤i≤γM (G), where β(G) and γM (G) are the Betti number and the maximum genus of G, respectively. This implies that it is possible to construct an orientable embedding with large genus of a graph G from an arbitrary spanning tree T (which may have very large number of odd components in G\\E(T )). This is different from the earlier work of Xuong and Liu, where spanning trees with small odd components are needed. In fact, this makes a common generalization of Xuong, Liu and Fu et al. Furthermore, we show that (1) this result is useful for locating the maximum genus of a graph having a specific edge-cut. Some known results for embedded graphs are also concluded; (2) the maximum genus problem may be reduced to the maximum matching problem. Based on this result and the algorithm of Micali-Vazirani, we present a new efficient algorithm to determine the maximum genus of a graph in O((β(G)) 25 ) steps. Our method is straight and quite different from the algorithm of Furst, Gross and McGeoch which depends on a result of Giles where matroid parity method is needed.

  1. Cycle-maximal triangle-free graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durocher, Stephane; Gunderson, David S.; Li, Pak Ching

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conjecture that the balanced complete bipartite graph K ⌊ n / 2 ⌋ , ⌈ n / 2 ⌉ contains more cycles than any other n -vertex triangle-free graph, and we make some progress toward proving this. We give equivalent conditions for cycle-maximal triangle-free graphs; show bounds...... on the numbers of cycles in graphs depending on numbers of vertices and edges, girth, and homomorphisms to small fixed graphs; and use the bounds to show that among regular graphs, the conjecture holds. We also consider graphs that are close to being regular, with the minimum and maximum degrees differing...

  2. The Rank of Integral Circulant Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hou-qing

    2014-01-01

    A graph is called an integral graph if it has an integral spectrum i.e., all eigen-values are integers. A graph is called circulant graph if it is Cayley graph on the circulant group, i.e., its adjacency matrix is circulant. The rank of a graph is defined to be the rank of its adjacency matrix. This importance of the rank, due to applications in physics, chemistry and combinatorics. In this paper, using Ramanujan sums, we study the rank of integral circulant graphs and gave some simple computational formulas for the rank and provide an example which shows the formula is sharp.

  3. Color Energy Of A Unitary Cayley Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiga Chandrashekar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Let G be a vertex colored graph. The minimum number χ(G of colors needed for coloring of a graph G is called the chromatic number. Recently, Adiga et al. [1] have introduced the concept of color energy of a graph Ec(G and computed the color energy of few families of graphs with χ(G colors. In this paper we derive explicit formulas for the color energies of the unitary Cayley graph Xn, the complement of the colored unitary Cayley graph (Xnc and some gcd-graphs.

  4. Weak Total Resolvability In Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casel Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A vertex v ∈ V (G is said to distinguish two vertices x, y ∈ V (G of a graph G if the distance from v to x is di erent from the distance from v to y. A set W ⊆ V (G is a total resolving set for a graph G if for every pair of vertices x, y ∈ V (G, there exists some vertex w ∈ W − {x, y} which distinguishes x and y, while W is a weak total resolving set if for every x ∈ V (G−W and y ∈ W, there exists some w ∈ W −{y} which distinguishes x and y. A weak total resolving set of minimum cardinality is called a weak total metric basis of G and its cardinality the weak total metric dimension of G. Our main contributions are the following ones: (a Graphs with small and large weak total metric bases are characterised. (b We explore the (tight relation to independent 2-domination. (c We introduce a new graph parameter, called weak total adjacency dimension and present results that are analogous to those presented for weak total dimension. (d For trees, we derive a characterisation of the weak total (adjacency metric dimension. Also, exact figures for our parameters are presented for (generalised fans and wheels. (e We show that for Cartesian product graphs, the weak total (adjacency metric dimension is usually pretty small. (f The weak total (adjacency dimension is studied for lexicographic products of graphs.

  5. Graph Signatures for Visual Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.; Foote, Harlan P.; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.

    2006-11-17

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain datasets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  6. Information Spreading in Dynamic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Clementi, Andrea; Trevisan, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We present a general approach to study the flooding time (a measure of how fast information spreads) in dynamic graphs (graphs whose topology changes with time according to a random process). We consider arbitrary converging Markovian dynamic graph process, that is, processes in which the topology of the graph at time $t$ depends only on its topology at time $t-1$ and which have a unique stationary distribution. The most well studied models of dynamic graphs are all Markovian and converging. Under general conditions, we bound the flooding time in terms of the mixing time of the dynamic graph process. We recover, as special cases of our result, bounds on the flooding time for the \\emph{random trip} model and the \\emph{random path} models; previous analysis techniques provided bounds only in restricted settings for such models. Our result also provides the first bound for the \\emph{random waypoint} model (which is tight for certain ranges of parameters) whose analysis had been an important open question.

  7. Chromatic polynomials of random graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bussel, Frank; Ehrlich, Christoph; Fliegner, Denny; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Timme, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Chromatic polynomials and related graph invariants are central objects in both graph theory and statistical physics. Computational difficulties, however, have so far restricted studies of such polynomials to graphs that were either very small, very sparse or highly structured. Recent algorithmic advances (Timme et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 023001) now make it possible to compute chromatic polynomials for moderately sized graphs of arbitrary structure and number of edges. Here we present chromatic polynomials of ensembles of random graphs with up to 30 vertices, over the entire range of edge density. We specifically focus on the locations of the zeros of the polynomial in the complex plane. The results indicate that the chromatic zeros of random graphs have a very consistent layout. In particular, the crossing point, the point at which the chromatic zeros with non-zero imaginary part approach the real axis, scales linearly with the average degree over most of the density range. While the scaling laws obtained are purely empirical, if they continue to hold in general there are significant implications: the crossing points of chromatic zeros in the thermodynamic limit separate systems with zero ground state entropy from systems with positive ground state entropy, the latter an exception to the third law of thermodynamics.

  8. On Some Bounds and Exact Formulae for Connective Eccentric Indices of Graphs under Some Graph Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan De

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The connective eccentric index of a graph is a topological index involving degrees and eccentricities of vertices of the graph. In this paper, we have studied the connective eccentric index for double graph and double cover. Also we give the connective eccentric index for some graph operations such as joins, symmetric difference, disjunction, and splice of graphs.

  9. On P-transitive graphs and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Lenzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new class of graphs which we call P-transitive graphs, lying between transitive and 3-transitive graphs. First we show that the analogue of de Jongh-Sambin Theorem is false for wellfounded P-transitive graphs; then we show that the mu-calculus fixpoint hierarchy is infinite for P-transitive graphs. Both results contrast with the case of transitive graphs. We give also an undecidability result for an enriched mu-calculus on P-transitive graphs. Finally, we consider a polynomial time reduction from the model checking problem on arbitrary graphs to the model checking problem on P-transitive graphs. All these results carry over to 3-transitive graphs.

  10. More on set-magic graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullas Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains certain properties of set-magic graphs and obtained the set-magic number of certain classes of graphs. All spanning super graphs of a set-magic graph always set-magic and all cycles and Hamiltonian graphs are set-magic. Also set-magic number of any cycle of size 2n is always greater than n.

  11. The Clique Problem in Ray Intersection Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Sergio; Langerman, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Ray intersection graphs are intersection graphs of rays, or halflines, in the plane. We show that any planar graph has an even subdivision whose complement is a ray intersection graph. The construction can be done in polynomial time and implies that finding a maximum clique in a segment intersection graph is NP-hard. This solves a 21-year old open problem posed by Kratochv\\'il and Ne\\v{s}et\\v{r}il.

  12. The IRAF/STSDAS Synthetic Photometry Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushouse, H.; Simon, B.

    The Space Telescope Science Data Analysis System (STSDAS) Synthetic Photometry (Synphot) package is an IRAF-based suite of tasks designed to simulate photometric data and spectra as observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Tasks in the Synphot package can be used to make plots of HST instrument sensitivity curves and calibration target spectra, to predict count rates for observations in any available mode of the HST science instruments, and to examine photometric transformation relationships among the various HST observing modes as well as conventional photometric systems such as Johnson UBV and Stromgren uvby. The availability of on-line spectral atlases also provides for the capability of simulating HST observations of real astrophysical targets. Synphot is available to assist Guest Observers in preparing observing proposals and has proven useful in planning and optimizing HST observing programs due to its cross-instrument simulation capability. Passbands for all of the HST instrument components, as well as those of other conventional photometric systems, are stored in data tables and are referenced via a master component graph table. The component graph table essentially provides a map of all of the HST instruments and describes all allowed combinations of the various instrument components. The Synphot passband calculator utilizes user-supplied keywords to trace a path through the component graph table and multiply together the individual component throughputs to return the composite passband. A powerful spectrum calculator is used to create complicated composite spectra from various parameterized spectrum models, grids of model atmosphere spectra, and atlases of stellar spectrophotometry. Because the Synphot tasks are completely data driven, instrument observing modes can be changed and even entirely new instruments added without any modifications to the software. Therefore Synphot can be applied to any other telescopes and instruments simply by

  13. PRIVATE GRAPHS – ACCESS RIGHTS ON GRAPHS FOR SEAMLESS NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Dorner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS – Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites, but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  14. Private Graphs - Access Rights on Graphs for Seamless Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, W.; Hau, F.; Pagany, R.

    2016-06-01

    After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems) and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS - Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI) and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites), but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  15. Complexity of Cocktail Party Graph and Crown Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Daoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The number of spanning trees τ(G in graphs (networks was an important invariant. Approach: Using the properties of the Chebyshev polynomials of the second kind and the linear algebra techniques to evaluate the associated determinants. Results: The complexity, number of spanning trees, of the cocktail party graph on 2n vertices, given in detail in the text was proved. Also the complexity of the crown graph on 2n vertices was shown to had the value nn-2 (n-1 (n-2n-1. Conclusion: The number of spanning trees τ(G in graphs (networks is an important invariant. The evaluation of this number and analyzing its behavior is not only interesting from a mathematical (computational perspective, but also, it is an important measure of reliability of a network and designing electrical circuits. Some computationally hard problems such as the travelling salesman problem can be solved approximately by using spanning trees. Due to the high dependence of the network design and reliability on the graph theory we introduced the above important theorems and lemmas and their proofs.

  16. From the Coxeter graph to the Klein graph

    CERN Document Server

    Dejter, Italo J

    2010-01-01

    We show that the 56-vertex Klein cubic graph $\\G'=F_{056}B$ (so denoted in the Foster census) can be obtained from the 28-vertex Coxeter graph $\\G=F_{028}A$ by 'zipping' adequately the squares of the 24 7-cycles of $\\G$ endowed with an orientation obtained by considering $\\G$ as a $\\mathcal C$-ultrahomogeneous digraph, where $\\mathcal C$ is the set of oriented 7-cycles $\\vec{C}_7$ and $2$-paths $\\vec{P}_3$, that tightly fasten those $\\vec{C}_7$ in $\\G$. In the process, it is seen that $\\G'$ is a ${\\mathcal C}'$-ultrahomogeneous graph, where ${\\mathcal C}'$ is the set of 7-cycles $C_7$ and $1$-paths $P_2$, that tightly fasten those $C_7$ in $\\G'$; this yields an embedding of $\\G'$ into a 3-torus $T_3$, which forms the Klein map of Coxeter notation $(7,3)_8$. The dual graph of $\\G'$ in $T_3$ is the distance regular Klein quartic graph, with corresponding dual map of Coxeter notation $(3,7)_8$.

  17. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  18. Subvoxel accurate graph search using non-Euclidean graph space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Abràmoff

    Full Text Available Graph search is attractive for the quantitative analysis of volumetric medical images, and especially for layered tissues, because it allows globally optimal solutions in low-order polynomial time. However, because nodes of graphs typically encode evenly distributed voxels of the volume with arcs connecting orthogonally sampled voxels in Euclidean space, segmentation cannot achieve greater precision than a single unit, i.e. the distance between two adjoining nodes, and partial volume effects are ignored. We generalize the graph to non-Euclidean space by allowing non-equidistant spacing between nodes, so that subvoxel accurate segmentation is achievable. Because the number of nodes and edges in the graph remains the same, running time and memory use are similar, while all the advantages of graph search, including global optimality and computational efficiency, are retained. A deformation field calculated from the volume data adaptively changes regional node density so that node density varies with the inverse of the expected cost. We validated our approach using optical coherence tomography (OCT images of the retina and 3-D MR of the arterial wall, and achieved statistically significant increased accuracy. Our approach allows improved accuracy in volume data acquired with the same hardware, and also, preserved accuracy with lower resolution, more cost-effective, image acquisition equipment. The method is not limited to any specific imaging modality and readily extensible to higher dimensions.

  19. Roman domination in Cartesian product graphs and strong product graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Yero, Ismael G

    2011-01-01

    A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ is a dominating set for $G$ if every vertex outside of $S$ is adjacent to at least one vertex belonging to $S$. The minimum cardinality of a dominating set for $G$ is called the domination number of $G$. A map $f : V \\rightarrow \\{0, 1, 2\\}$ is a Roman dominating function on a graph $G$ if for every vertex $v$ with $f(v) = 0$, there exists a vertex $u$, adjacent to $v$, such that $f(u) = 2$. The weight of a Roman dominating function is given by $f(V) =\\sum_{u\\in V}f(u)$. The minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on $G$ is called the Roman domination number of $G$. In this article we study the Roman domination number of Cartesian product graphs and strong product graphs. More precisely, we study the relationships between the Roman domination number of product graphs and the (Roman) domination number of the factors.

  20. Kirchoff Index of Graphs and some Graph Operations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nikseresht; Z Sepasdar; M H Shirdareh-Haghighi

    2014-08-01

    Let be a rooted tree, a connected graph, $x,y\\in V(G)$ be fixed and $G_i$’s be $|V(T)|$ disjoint copies of with $x_i$ and $y_i$ denoting the corresponding copies of and in $G_i$, respectively. We define the -repetition of to be the graph obtained by joining $y_i$ to $x_j$ for each $i\\in V(T)$ and each child of . In this paper, we compute the Kirchhoff index of the -repetition of in terms of parameters of and . Also we study how $Kf(G)$ behaves under some graph operations such as joining vertices or subdividing edges.

  1. The monadic second-order logic of graphs XVI : Canonical graph
    decompositions

    OpenAIRE

    Courcelle, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    This article establishes that the split decomposition of graphs introduced by Cunnigham, is definable in Monadic Second-Order Logic.This result is actually an instance of a more general result covering canonical graph decompositions like the modular decomposition and the Tutte decomposition of 2-connected graphs into 3-connected components. As an application, we prove that the set of graphs having the same cycle matroid as a given 2-connected graph can be defined from this graph by Monadic Se...

  2. The competition numbers of ternary Hamming graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Boram

    2010-01-01

    The competition graph of a digraph D is a graph which has the same vertex set as D and has an edge between x and y if and only if there exists a vertex v in D such that (x,v) and (y,v) are arcs of D. For any graph G, G together with sufficiently many isolated vertices is the competition graph of some acyclic digraph. The competition number k(G) of a graph G is defined to be the smallest number of such isolated vertices. In general, it is hard to compute the competition number k(G) for a graph G and it has been one of important research problems in the study of competition graphs to characterize a graph by its competition number. In this paper, we give the exact values of the competition numbers of ternary Hamming graphs.

  3. Box graphs and resolutions I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas P. Braun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU(5 by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  4. Box graphs and resolutions I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2016-04-01

    Box graphs succinctly and comprehensively characterize singular fibers of elliptic fibrations in codimension two and three, as well as flop transitions connecting these, in terms of representation theoretic data. We develop a framework that provides a systematic map between a box graph and a crepant algebraic resolution of the singular elliptic fibration, thus allowing an explicit construction of the fibers from a singular Weierstrass or Tate model. The key tool is what we call a fiber face diagram, which shows the relevant information of a (partial) toric triangulation and allows the inclusion of more general algebraic blowups. We shown that each such diagram defines a sequence of weighted algebraic blowups, thus providing a realization of the fiber defined by the box graph in terms of an explicit resolution. We show this correspondence explicitly for the case of SU (5) by providing a map between box graphs and fiber faces, and thereby a sequence of algebraic resolutions of the Tate model, which realizes each of the box graphs.

  5. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  6. Dual Use Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA seeks down-weighted packaging compatible with microwave preparation and perhaps high hydrostatic pressure processing. New packaging must satisfy NASA's 3-year...

  7. Merganser Download Package

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data download package contains an Esri 10.0 MXD, file geodatabase and copy of this FGDC metadata record. The data in this package are used in support of the...

  8. Comparative Packaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele; Antonini, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a comparative packaging study for use on long duration space missions. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Deliverables; 3) Food Sample Selection; 4) Experimental Design Matrix; 5) Permeation Rate Comparison; and 6) Packaging Material Information.

  9. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2008-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in advanced packaging in recent years. Several new packaging techniques have been developed and new packaging materials have been introduced. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the recent developments in this industry, particularly in the areas of microelectronics, optoelectronics, digital health, and bio-medical applications. The book discusses established techniques, as well as emerging technologies, in order to provide readers with the most up-to-date developments in advanced packaging.

  10. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Bolanča, Stanislav; Majnarić, Igor; Golubović, Kristijan

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid print...

  11. ATLAS software packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, Grigory

    2012-12-01

    Software packaging is indispensable part of build and prerequisite for deployment processes. Full ATLAS software stack consists of TDAQ, HLT, and Offline software. These software groups depend on some 80 external software packages. We present tools, package PackDist, developed and used to package all this software except for TDAQ project. PackDist is based on and driven by CMT, ATLAS software configuration and build tool, and consists of shell and Python scripts. The packaging unit used is CMT project. Each CMT project is packaged as several packages—platform dependent (one per platform available), source code excluding header files, other platform independent files, documentation, and debug information packages (the last two being built optionally). Packaging can be done recursively to package all the dependencies. The whole set of packages for one software release, distribution kit, also includes configuration packages and contains some 120 packages for one platform. Also packaged are physics analysis projects (currently 6) used by particular physics groups on top of the full release. The tools provide an installation test for the full distribution kit. Packaging is done in two formats for use with the Pacman and RPM package managers. The tools are functional on the platforms supported by ATLAS—GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. The packaged software is used for software deployment on all ATLAS computing resources from the detector and trigger computing farms, collaboration laboratories computing centres, grid sites, to physicist laptops, and CERN VMFS and covers the use cases of running all applications as well as of software development.

  12. Central heating: package boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahan, E.

    1977-05-01

    Performance and cost data for electrical and fossil-fired package boilers currently available from manufacturers are provided. Performance characteristics investigated include: unit efficiency, rated capacity, and average expected lifetime of units. Costs are tabulated for equipment and installation of various package boilers. The information supplied in this report will simplify the process of selecting package boilers required for industrial, commercial, and residential applications.

  13. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T. (University of New Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  14. Negation switching invariant signed graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Sinha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A signed graph (or, $sigraph$ in short is a graph G in which each edge x carries a value $\\sigma(x \\in \\{-, +\\}$ called its sign. Given a sigraph S, the negation $\\eta(S$ of the sigraph S is a sigraph obtained from S by reversing the sign of every edge of S. Two sigraphs $S_{1}$ and $S_{2}$ on the same underlying graph are switching equivalent if it is possible to assign signs `+' (`plus' or `-' (`minus' to vertices of $S_{1}$ such that by reversing the sign of each of its edges that has received opposite signs at its ends, one obtains $S_{2}$. In this paper, we characterize sigraphs which are negation switching invariant and also see for what sigraphs, S and $\\eta (S$ are signed isomorphic.

  15. On the graph turnpike problem

    KAUST Repository

    Feder, Tomás

    2009-06-01

    Results on graph turnpike problem without distinctness, including its NP-completeness, and an O(m+n log n) algorithm, is presented. The usual turnpike problem has all pairwise distances given, but does not specify which pair of vertices w e corresponds to. There are two other problems that can be viewed as special cases of the graph turnpike problem, including the bandwidth problem and the low-distortion graph embedding problem. The aim for the turnpike problem in the NP-complete is to orient the edges with weights w i in either direction so that when the whole cycle is transversed in the real line, it returns to a chosen starting point for the cycle. An instance of the turnpike problem with or without distinctness is uniquely mappable if there exists at most one solution up to translation and choice of orientation.

  16. Quantum Snake Walk on Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2010-01-01

    I introduce a new type of continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states which most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. No efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  17. Optimal preparation of graph states

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J; Portillo, Jose R

    2010-01-01

    We show how to prepare any graph state of up to 12 qubits with: (a) the minimum number of controlled-Z gates, and (b) the minimum preparation depth. We assume only one-qubit and controlled-Z gates. The method exploits the fact that any graph state belongs to an equivalence class under local Clifford operations. We extend up to 12 qubits the classification of graph states according to their entanglement properties, and identify each class using only a reduced set of invariants. For any state, we provide a circuit with both properties (a) and (b), if it does exist, or, if it does not, one circuit with property (a) and one with property (b), including the explicit one-qubit gates needed.

  18. Significance evaluation in factor graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Tobias; Hobolth, Asger; Jensen, Jens Ledet

    2017-01-01

    Background Factor graphs provide a flexible and general framework for specifying probability distributions. They can capture a range of popular and recent models for analysis of both genomics data as well as data from other scientific fields. Owing to the ever larger data sets encountered...... in genomics and the multiple-testing issues accompanying them, accurate significance evaluation is of great importance. We here address the problem of evaluating statistical significance of observations from factor graph models. Results Two novel numerical approximations for evaluation of statistical....... Conclusions The applicability of saddlepoint approximation and importance sampling is demonstrated on known models in the factor graph framework. Using the two methods we can substantially improve computational cost without compromising accuracy. This contribution allows analyses of large datasets...

  19. Graph measures and network robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Ellens, W

    2013-01-01

    Network robustness research aims at finding a measure to quantify network robustness. Once such a measure has been established, we will be able to compare networks, to improve existing networks and to design new networks that are able to continue to perform well when it is subject to failures or attacks. In this paper we survey a large amount of robustness measures on simple, undirected and unweighted graphs, in order to offer a tool for network administrators to evaluate and improve the robustness of their network. The measures discussed in this paper are based on the concepts of connectivity (including reliability polynomials), distance, betweenness and clustering. Some other measures are notions from spectral graph theory, more precisely, they are functions of the Laplacian eigenvalues. In addition to surveying these graph measures, the paper also contains a discussion of their functionality as a measure for topological network robustness.

  20. The fascinating world of graph theory

    CERN Document Server

    Benjamin, Arthur; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory goes back several centuries and revolves around the study of graphs-mathematical structures showing relations between objects. With applications in biology, computer science, transportation science, and other areas, graph theory encompasses some of the most beautiful formulas in mathematics-and some of its most famous problems. The Fascinating World of Graph Theory explores the questions and puzzles that have been studied, and often solved, through graph theory. This book looks at graph theory's development and the vibrant individuals responsible for the field's growth. Introducin

  1. Recognition of Unipolar and Generalised Split Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin McDiarmid

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A graph is unipolar if it can be partitioned into a clique and a disjoint union of cliques, and a graph is a generalised split graph if it or its complement is unipolar. A unipolar partition of a graph can be used to find efficiently the clique number, the stability number, the chromatic number, and to solve other problems that are hard for general graphs. We present an O(n2-time algorithm for recognition of n-vertex generalised split graphs, improving on previous O(n3-time algorithms.

  2. Graph-based modelling in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rysiński, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    This book presents versatile, modern and creative applications of graph theory in mechanical engineering, robotics and computer networks. Topics related to mechanical engineering include e.g. machine and mechanism science, mechatronics, robotics, gearing and transmissions, design theory and production processes. The graphs treated are simple graphs, weighted and mixed graphs, bond graphs, Petri nets, logical trees etc. The authors represent several countries in Europe and America, and their contributions show how different, elegant, useful and fruitful the utilization of graphs in modelling of engineering systems can be. .

  3. Some Invariants of Jahangir Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobeen Munir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we compute closed forms of M-polynomial, first and second Zagreb polynomials and forgotten polynomial for Jahangir graphs Jn,m for all values of m and n. From the M-polynomial, we recover many degree-based topological indices such as first and second Zagreb indices, modified Zagreb index, Symmetric division index, etc. We also compute harmonic index, first and second multiple Zagreb indices and forgotten index of Jahangir graphs. Our results are extensions of many existing results.

  4. Completely Described Undirected Graph Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objects of research are undirected graphs. The paper considers a problem of their isomorphism. A literature analysis of its solution, has shown that there is no way to define a complete graph invariant in the form of unique structural characteristics of each its vertex, which has a computational complexity of definition better than О (n 4 .The work objective is to provide the characteristics of the graph structure, which could be used to solve the problem of their isomorphism for a time better than О (n 4 . As such characteristics, the paper proposes to use the set of codes of tree roots of all the shortest - in terms of the number of edges - paths from each vertex to the others, uniquely defining the structure of each tree. It proves the theorem that it is possible to reduce the problem of isomorphism of the undirected graphs to the isomorphism problem of their splitting into the trees of all the shortest - in terms of the number of edges - paths of each vertex to the others. An algorithm to construct the shortest paths from each vertex to all others and to compute codes of their vertices has been developed. As the latter, are used Aho-codes, which find application in recognising the isomorphism of trees. The computational complexity to obtain structural characteristics of vertices has been estimated to be about О (n 3 .The pilot studies involved the full-scale experiment using the developed complex programmes to generate raw data, i.e. analytic representation of the graph with the number of vertices equal to 1200, and a programme to provide codes of the tree roots. To have an estimate of - "the worst" in terms of time - complexity of expansion algorithm of graphs into trees of the shortest paths and define the codes of their roots has been an experimentally studied how the number of tree vertices depends on the graph density. For the worst case was obtained a dependence of the number of tree vertices on the number of graph vertices

  5. Scattering from isospectral quantum graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, R; Sawicki, A; Smilansky, U, E-mail: rami.band@weizmann.ac.i, E-mail: assawi@cft.edu.p, E-mail: uzy.smilansky@weizmann.ac.i [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-10-15

    Quantum graphs can be extended to scattering systems when they are connected by leads to infinity. It is shown that for certain extensions, the scattering matrices of isospectral graphs are conjugate to each other and their poles distributions are therefore identical. The scattering matrices are studied using a recently developed isospectral theory (Band et al 2009 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 175202 and Parzanchevski and Band 2010 J. Geom. Anal. 20 439-71). At the same time, the scattering approach offers a new insight on the mentioned isospectral construction.

  6. Turing Automata and Graph Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Bartha

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Indexed monoidal algebras are introduced as an equivalent structure for self-dual compact closed categories, and a coherence theorem is proved for the category of such algebras. Turing automata and Turing graph machines are defined by generalizing the classical Turing machine concept, so that the collection of such machines becomes an indexed monoidal algebra. On the analogy of the von Neumann data-flow computer architecture, Turing graph machines are proposed as potentially reversible low-level universal computational devices, and a truly reversible molecular size hardware model is presented as an example.

  7. Topological Minors in Bipartite Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Camino BALBUENA; Martín CER.A; Pedro GARC(I)A-V(A)ZQUEZ; Juan Carlos VALENZUELA

    2011-01-01

    For a bipartite graph G on m and n vertices,respectively,in its vertices classes,and for integers s and t such that 2 ≤ s ≤ t,0≤ m-s≤ n-t,andm,+n≤ 2s+t-1,we prove that if G has at least mn- (2(m - s) + n - t) edges then it contains a subdivision of the complete bipartite K(s,t) with s vertices in the m-class and t vertices in the n-class.Furthermore,we characterize the corresponding extremal bipartite graphs with mn- (2(m - s) + n - t + 1) edges for this topological Turan type problem.

  8. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Acevedo, O [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Institut fuer Mathematik und Informatik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn Str.15a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Gobron, T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2006-01-20

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We completely characterize quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Some examples are given including a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford algebra.

  9. Computing Graph Roots Without Short Cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Farzad, Babak; Le, Van Bang; Tuy, Nguyen Ngoc

    2009-01-01

    Graph G is the square of graph H if two vertices x, y have an edge in G if and only if x, y are of distance at most two in H. Given H it is easy to compute its square H2, however Motwani and Sudan proved that it is NP-complete to determine if a given graph G is the square of some graph H (of girth 3). In this paper we consider the characterization and recognition problems of graphs that are squares of graphs of small girth, i.e. to determine if G = H2 for some graph H of small girth. The main results are the following. - There is a graph theoretical characterization for graphs that are squares of some graph of girth at least 7. A corollary is that if a graph G has a square root H of girth at least 7 then H is unique up to isomorphism. - There is a polynomial time algorithm to recognize if G = H2 for some graph H of girth at least 6. - It is NP-complete to recognize if G = H2 for some graph H of girth 4. These results almost provide a dichotomy theorem for the complexity of the recognition problem in terms of ...

  10. Approximate Graph Edit Distance in Quadratic Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Kaspar; Ferrer, Miquel; Bunke, Horst

    2015-09-14

    Graph edit distance is one of the most flexible and general graph matching models available. The major drawback of graph edit distance, however, is its computational complexity that restricts its applicability to graphs of rather small size. Recently the authors of the present paper introduced a general approximation framework for the graph edit distance problem. The basic idea of this specific algorithm is to first compute an optimal assignment of independent local graph structures (including substitutions, deletions, and insertions of nodes and edges). This optimal assignment is complete and consistent with respect to the involved nodes of both graphs and can thus be used to instantly derive an admissible (yet suboptimal) solution for the original graph edit distance problem in O(n3) time. For large scale graphs or graph sets, however, the cubic time complexity may still be too high. Therefore, we propose to use suboptimal algorithms with quadratic rather than cubic time for solving the basic assignment problem. In particular, the present paper introduces five different greedy assignment algorithms in the context of graph edit distance approximation. In an experimental evaluation we show that these methods have great potential for further speeding up the computation of graph edit distance while the approximated distances remain sufficiently accurate for graph based pattern classification.

  11. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-11-19

    Background: Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods.Results: To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods.Conclusion: The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. 2012 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Active Packaging Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Bastarrachea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by the application of coatings with the corresponding functionality through surface modification. The latter option offers the advantage of preserving the packaging materials’ bulk properties nearly intact. Herein, different coating technologies like embedding for controlled release, immobilization, layer-by-layer deposition, and photografting are explained and their potential application for active food packaging is explored and discussed.

  13. Edible packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Krochta, John M

    2010-01-01

    Research groups and the food and pharmaceutical industries recognize edible packaging as a useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving product stability, quality, safety, variety, and convenience for consumers. Recent studies have explored the ability of biopolymer-based food packaging materials to carry and control-release active compounds. As diverse edible packaging materials derived from various by-products or waste from food industry are being developed, the dry thermoplastic process is advancing rapidly as a feasible commercial edible packaging manufacturing process. The employment of nanocomposite concepts to edible packaging materials promises to improve barrier and mechanical properties and facilitate effective incorporation of bioactive ingredients and other designed functions. In addition to the need for a more fundamental understanding to enable design to desired specifications, edible packaging has to overcome challenges such as regulatory requirements, consumer acceptance, and scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications.

  14. Chain graph models and their causal interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Richardson, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    the equilibrium distributions of dynamic models with feed-back. These dynamic interpretations lead to a simple theory of intervention, extending the theory developed for directed acyclic graphs. Finally, we contrast chain graph models under this interpretation with simultaneous equation models which have......Chain graphs are a natural generalization of directed acyclic graphs and undirected graphs. However, the apparent simplicity of chain graphs belies the subtlety of the conditional independence hypotheses that they represent. There are many simple and apparently plausible, but ultimately fallacious......, interpretations of chain graphs that are often invoked, implicitly or explicitly. These interpretations also lead to flawed methods for applying background knowledge to model selection. We present a valid interpretation by showing how the distribution corresponding to a chain graph may be generated from...

  15. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  16. The thickness of amalgamations of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The thickness $\\theta(G)$ of a graph $G$ is the minimum number of planar spanning subgraphs into which the graph $G$ can be decomposed. As a topological invariant of a graph, it is a measurement of the closeness to planarity of a graph, and it also has important applications to VLSI design. In this paper, the thickness of graphs that are obtained by vertex-amalgamation and bar-amalgamation of any two graphs whose thicknesses are known are obtained, respectively. And the lower and upper bounds for the thickness of graphs that are obtained by edge-amalgamation and 2-vertex-amalgamation of any two graphs whose thicknesses are known are also derived, respectively.

  17. The Laplacian eigenvalues of graphs: a survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The Laplacian matrix of a simple graph is the difference of the diagonal matrix of vertex degree and the (0,1) adjacency matrix. In the past decades, the Laplacian spectrum has received much more and more attention, since it has been applied to several fields, such as randomized algorithms, combinatorial optimization problems and machine learning. This paper is primarily a survey of various aspects of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix of a graph for the past teens. In addition, some new unpublished results and questions are concluded. Emphasis is given on classifications of the upper and lower bounds for the Laplacian eigenvalues of graphs (including some special graphs, such as trees, bipartite graphs, triangular-free graphs, cubic graphs, etc.) as a function of other graph invariants, such as degree sequence, the average 2-degree, diameter, the maximal independence number, the maximal matching number, vertex connectivity, the domination number, the number of the spanning trees, etc.

  18. Measuring extremal dependencies in web graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkovich, Y.; Litvak, Nelli; Zwart, B.

    We analyze dependencies in power law graph data (Web sample, Wikipedia sample and a preferential attachment graph) using statistical inference for multivariate regular variation. The well developed theory of regular variation is widely applied in extreme value theory, telecommunications and

  19. Two-Player Graph Pebbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudente, Matthew James

    Given a graph G with pebbles on the vertices, we define a pebbling move as removing two pebbles from a vertex u, placing one pebble on a neighbor v, and discarding the other pebble, like a toll. The pebbling number pi( G) is the least number of pebbles needed so that every arrangement of pi(G) pebbles can place a pebble on any vertex through a sequence of pebbling moves. We introduce a new variation on graph pebbling called two-player pebbling. In this, players called the mover and the defender alternate moves, with the stipulation that the defender cannot reverse the previous move. The mover wins only if they can place a pebble on a specified vertex and the defender wins if the mover cannot. We define η(G), analogously, as the minimum number of pebbles such that given every configuration of the η( G) pebbles and every specified vertex r, the mover has a winning strategy. First, we will investigate upper bounds for η( G) on various classes of graphs and find a certain structure for which the defender has a winning strategy, no matter how many pebbles are in a configuration. Then, we characterize winning configurations for both players on a special class of diameter 2 graphs. Finally, we show winning configurations for the mover on paths using a recursive argument.

  20. XML Graphs in Program Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2007-01-01

    XML graphs have shown to be a simple and effective formalism for representing sets of XML documents in program analysis. It has evolved through a six year period with variants tailored for a range of applications. We present a unified definition, outline the key properties including validation...

  1. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  2. Standards for Graph Algorithm Primitives

    OpenAIRE

    Mattson, Tim; Bader, David; Berry, Jon; Buluc, Aydin; Dongarra, Jack; Faloutsos, Christos; Feo, John; Gilbert, John; Gonzalez, Joseph; Hendrickson, Bruce; Kepner, Jeremy; Leiserson, Charles; Lumsdaine, Andrew; Padua, David; Poole, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    It is our view that the state of the art in constructing a large collection of graph algorithms in terms of linear algebraic operations is mature enough to support the emergence of a standard set of primitive building blocks. This paper is a position paper defining the problem and announcing our intention to launch an open effort to define this standard.

  3. Memory Hierarchy Sensitive Graph Layout

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Amitabha

    2012-01-01

    Mining large graphs for information is becoming an increasingly important workload due to the plethora of graph structured data becoming available. An aspect of graph algorithms that has hitherto not received much interest is the effect of memory hierarchy on accesses. A typical system today has multiple levels in the memory hierarchy with differing units of locality; ranging across cache lines, TLB entries and DRAM pages. We postulate that it is possible to allocate graph structured data in main memory in a way as to improve the spatial locality of the data. Previous approaches to improving cache locality have focused only on a single unit of locality, either the cache line or virtual memory page. On the other hand cache oblivious algorithms can optimise layout for all levels of the memory hierarchy but unfortunately need to be specially designed for individual data structures. In this paper we explore hierarchical blocking as a technique for closing this gap. We require as input a specification of the units...

  4. Seidel Switching and Graph Energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haemers, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The energy of a graph Γ is the sum of the absolute values of the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of Γ. Seidel switching is an operation on the edge set of Γ. In some special cases Seidel switching does not change the spectrum, and therefore the energy. Here we investigate when Seidel s

  5. Index theorems for quantum graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fulling, S A; Wilson, J H

    2007-01-01

    In geometric analysis, an index theorem relates the difference of the numbers of solutions of two differential equations to the topological structure of the manifold or bundle concerned, sometimes using the heat kernels of two higher-order differential operators as an intermediary. In this paper, the case of quantum graphs is addressed. A quantum graph is a graph considered as a (singular) one-dimensional variety and equipped with a second-order differential Hamiltonian H (a "Laplacian") with suitable conditions at vertices. For the case of scale-invariant vertex conditions (i.e., conditions that do not mix the values of functions and of their derivatives), the constant term of the heat-kernel expansion is shown to be proportional to the trace of the internal scattering matrix of the graph. This observation is placed into the index-theory context by factoring the Laplacian into two first-order operators, H =A*A, and relating the constant term to the index of A. An independent consideration provides an index f...

  6. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  7. Junction trees of general graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofei WANG; Jianhua GUO

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we study the maximal prime subgraphs and their corresponding structure for any undirected graph.We introduce the notion of junction trees and investigate their structural characteristics,including junction properties,induced-subtree properties,running-intersection properties and maximum-weight spanning tree properties.Furthermore,the characters of leaves and edges on junction trees are discussed.

  8. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  9. A Graph Calculus for Predicate Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A. S. Veloso

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a refutation graph calculus for classical first-order predicate logic, which is an extension of previous ones for binary relations. One reduces logical consequence to establishing that a constructed graph has empty extension, i. e. it represents bottom. Our calculus establishes that a graph has empty extension by converting it to a normal form, which is expanded to other graphs until we can recognize conflicting situations (equivalent to a formula and its negation.

  10. An interactive system for drawing graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Joe; Shieber, Stuart; Ryall, Kathy

    1996-01-01

    Abstract: In spite of great advances in the automatic drawing of medium and large graphs, the tools available for drawing small graphs exquisitely (that is, with the aesthetics commonly found in professional publications and presentations) are still very primitive. Commercial tools, e.g., Claris Draw, provide minimal support for aesthetic graph layout. At the other extreme, research prototypes based on constraint methods are overly general for graph drawing. Our system improves on general con...

  11. Cut Size Statistics of Graph Bisection Heuristics

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiber, G. R.; Martin, O. C.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of cut sizes generated by heuristic algorithms which solve approximately the graph bisection problem. On an ensemble of sparse random graphs, we find empirically that the distribution of the cut sizes found by ``local'' algorithms becomes peaked as the number of vertices in the graphs becomes large. Evidence is given that this distribution tends towards a Gaussian whose mean and variance scales linearly with the number of vertices of the graphs. Given...

  12. Operations on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Graph Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akram

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An intuitionistic fuzzy graph structure (IFGS is a generalization of an intuitionistic fuzzy graph. The concept of intuitionistic fuzzy graph structure is introduced and investigated in this paper. Some operations including union, join, Cartesian product, cross product, lexicographic product, strong product and composition on intuitionistic fuzzy graph structures are defined and elaborated with a number of examples. Some basic properties of these operations are also presented.

  13. Minimum Dominating Tree Problem for Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hao; LIN Lan

    2014-01-01

    A dominating tree T of a graph G is a subtree of G which contains at least one neighbor of each vertex of G. The minimum dominating tree problem is to find a dominating tree of G with minimum number of vertices, which is an NP-hard problem. This paper studies some polynomially solvable cases, including interval graphs, Halin graphs, special outer-planar graphs and others.

  14. Noncommutative Manifolds from Graph and k-Graph C*-Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, David; Rennie, Adam; Sims, Aidan

    2009-12-01

    In [PRen] we constructed smooth (1, ∞)-summable semifinite spectral triples for graph algebras with a faithful trace, and in [PRS] we constructed ( k, ∞)-summable semifinite spectral triples for k-graph algebras. In this paper we identify classes of graphs and k-graphs which satisfy a version of Connes’ conditions for noncommutative manifolds.

  15. Implicit Hamiltonian formulation of bond graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golo, G.; Schaft, A.J. van der; Breedveld, P.C.; Maschke, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with mathematical formulation of bond graphs. It is proven that the power continuous part of bond graphs, the junction structure, can be associated with a Dirac structure and that equations describing a bond graph model correspond to an implicit port-controlled Hamiltonian system wi

  16. Cycle-maximal triangle-free graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durocher, Stephane; Gunderson, David S.; Li, Pak Ching;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conjecture that the balanced complete bipartite graph K ⌊ n / 2 ⌋ , ⌈ n / 2 ⌉ contains more cycles than any other n -vertex triangle-free graph, and we make some progress toward proving this. We give equivalent conditions for cycle-maximal triangle-free graphs; show bounds...

  17. Around the Sun in a Graphing Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of graphing calculators for polar and parametric equations. Presents eight lines of the program for the graph of a parametric equation and 11 lines of the program for a graph of a polar equation. Illustrates the application of the programs for planetary motion and free-fall motion. (YP)

  18. Convergence of zeta functions of graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Clair, Bryan; Mokhtari-Sharghi, Shahriar

    2000-01-01

    The $L^2$-zeta function of an infinite graph Y (defined previously in a ball around zero) has an analytic extension. For a tower of finite graphs covered by Y, the normalized zeta functions of the finite graphs converge to the $L^2$-zeta function of Y.

  19. Strongly 2-connected orientations of graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We prove that a graph admits a strongly 2-connected orientation if and only if it is 4-edge-connected, and every vertex-deleted subgraph is 2-edge-connected. In particular, every 4-connected graph has such an orientation while no cubic 3-connected graph has such an orientation....

  20. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    In this report we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java

  1. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo; Lee, D.; Lopes, A.; Poetzsch-Heffter, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java syntax

  2. Mathematical Foundations of the GraphBLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluc, Aydın; Franchetti, Franz; Gilbert, John; Hutchison, Dylan; Kumar, Manoj; Lumsdaine, Andrew; Meyerhenke, Henning; McMillan, Scott; Moreira, Jose; Owens, John D; Yang, Carl; Zalewski, Marcin; Mattson, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The GraphBLAS standard (GraphBlas.org) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. Mathematically the Graph- BLAS defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the mathematics of the GraphBLAS. Graphs represent connections between vertices with edges. Matrices can represent a wide range of graphs using adjacency matrices or incidence matrices. Adjacency matrices are often easier to analyze while incidence matrices are often better for representing data. Fortunately, the two are easily connected by matrix mul- tiplication. A key feature of matrix mathematics is that a very small number of matrix operations can be used to manipulate a very wide range of graphs. This composability of small number of operations is the foundation of the GraphBLAS. A standard such as the GraphBLAS can only be effecti...

  3. Well-covered graphs and factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randerath, Bert; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    2006-01-01

    A maximum independent set of vertices in a graph is a set of pairwise nonadjacent vertices of largest cardinality α. Plummer defined a graph to be well-covered, if every independent set is contained in a maximum independent set of G. Every well-covered graph G without isolated vertices has a perf...

  4. Extremal norms of graphs and matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years, the trace norm of graphs has been extensively studied under the name of graph energy. In this paper some of this research is extended to more general matrix norms, like the Schatten p-norms and the Ky Fan k-norms. Whenever possible the results are given both for graphs and general matrices.

  5. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  6. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo; Lee, D.; Lopes, A.; Poetzsch-Heffter, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java syntax

  7. A Type Graph Model for Java Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Zambon, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    In this report we present a type graph that models all executable constructs of the Java programming language. Such a model is useful for any graph-based technique that relies on a representation of Java programs as graphs. The model can be regarded as a common representation to which all Java synta

  8. Destroying longest cycles in graphs and digraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Aardt, Susan A.; Burger, Alewyn P.; Dunbar, Jean E.;

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, C. Thomassen proved that in any graph one can destroy all the longest cycles by deleting at most one third of the vertices. We show that for graphs with circumference k≤8 it suffices to remove at most 1/k of the vertices. The Petersen graph demonstrates that this result cannot be extende...

  9. On chromatic and flow polynomial unique graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duan, Yinghua; Wu, Haidong; Yu, Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    ... research on graphs uniquely determined by their chromatic polynomials and more recently on their Tutte polynomials, but rather spotty research on graphs uniquely determined by their flow polynomials or the combination of both chromatic and flow polynomials. This article is an initiation of investigation on graphs uniquely determin...

  10. LARGEST EIGENVALUE OF A UNICYCLIC MIXED GRAPH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FanYizheng

    2004-01-01

    The graphs which maximize and minimize respectively the largest eigenvalue over all unicyclic mixed graphs U on n vertices are determined. The unicyclic mixed graphs U with the largest eigenvalue λ1 (U)=n or λ1 (U)∈ (n ,n+1] are characterized.

  11. Genesis 1:1-3 in Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    Automatically transforming text to conceptual graphs has long been a goal of the Conceptual Graphs community, starting with Sowa and Way’s seminal paper in 1986. We have developed a method for transforming Old Testament texts in Hebrew into English-based conceptual graphs, and in this paper, we r...

  12. The Cyclic Graph of a Finite Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Long Ma

    2013-01-01

    and characterize certain finite groups whose cyclic graphs have some properties. Then, we present some properties of the cyclic graphs of the dihedral groups D2n and the generalized quaternion groups Q4n for some n. Finally, we present some parameters about the cyclic graphs of finite noncyclic groups of order up to 14.

  13. A new characterization of trivially perfect graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rubio Montiel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A graph $G$ is \\emph{trivially perfect} if for every induced subgraph the cardinality of the largest set of pairwise nonadjacent vertices (the stability number $\\alpha(G$ equals the number of (maximal cliques $m(G$. We characterize the trivially perfect graphs in terms of vertex-coloring and we extend some definitions to infinite graphs.

  14. Structural intervention distance for evaluating causal graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Jonas; Bühlmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Causal inference relies on the structure of a graph, often a directed acyclic graph (DAG). Different graphs may result in different causal inference statements and different intervention distributions. To quantify such differences, we propose a (pre-)metric between DAGs, the structural interventi...... implementation with software code available on the first author's home page....

  15. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  16. Integral complete r-partite graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Ligong; Li, Xueliang; Hoede, C.

    2004-01-01

    A graph is called integral if all the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix are integers. In this paper, we give a useful sufficient and necessary condition for complete r-partite graphs to be integral, from which we can construct infinite many new classes of such integral graphs. It is proved that

  17. A new cluster algorithm for graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, S. van

    1998-01-01

    A new cluster algorithm for graphs called the emph{Markov Cluster algorithm ($MCL$ algorithm) is introduced. The graphs may be both weighted (with nonnegative weight) and directed. Let~$G$~be such a graph. The $MCL$ algorithm simulates flow in $G$ by first identifying $G$ in a canonical way with

  18. Centrosymmetric Graphs And A Lower Bound For Graph Energy Of Fullerenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katona Gyula Y.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The energy of a molecular graph G is defined as the summation of the absolute values of the eigenvalues of adjacency matrix of a graph G. In this paper, an infinite class of fullerene graphs with 10n vertices, n ≥ 2, is considered. By proving centrosymmetricity of the adjacency matrix of these fullerene graphs, a lower bound for its energy is given. Our method is general and can be extended to other class of fullerene graphs.

  19. On a conjecture concerning helly circle graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durán Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We say that G is an e-circle graph if there is a bijection between its vertices and straight lines on the cartesian plane such that two vertices are adjacent in G if and only if the corresponding lines intersect inside the circle of radius one. This definition suggests a method for deciding whether a given graph G is an e-circle graph, by constructing a convenient system S of equations and inequations which represents the structure of G, in such a way that G is an e-circle graph if and only if S has a solution. In fact, e-circle graphs are exactly the circle graphs (intersection graphs of chords in a circle, and thus this method provides an analytic way for recognizing circle graphs. A graph G is a Helly circle graph if G is a circle graph and there exists a model of G by chords such that every three pairwise intersecting chords intersect at the same point. A conjecture by Durán (2000 states that G is a Helly circle graph if and only if G is a circle graph and contains no induced diamonds (a diamond is a graph formed by four vertices and five edges. Many unsuccessful efforts - mainly based on combinatorial and geometrical approaches - have been done in order to validate this conjecture. In this work, we utilize the ideas behind the definition of e-circle graphs and restate this conjecture in terms of an equivalence between two systems of equations and inequations, providing a new, analytic tool to deal with it.

  20. Packaging for Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Helen; Fitzpatrick, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    The packaging industry is under pressure from regulators, customers and other stakeholders to improve packaging’s sustainability by reducing its environmental and societal impacts. This is a considerable challenge because of the complex interactions between products and their packaging, and the many roles that packaging plays in the supply chain. Packaging for Sustainability is a concise and readable handbook for practitioners who are trying to implement sustainability strategies for packaging. Industry case studies are used throughout the book to illustrate possible applications and scenarios. Packaging for Sustainability draws on the expertise of researchers and industry practitioners to provide information on business benefits, environmental issues and priorities, environmental evaluation tools, design for environment, marketing strategies, and challenges for the future.

  1. A new construction for vertex decomposable graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Hajisharifi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Let G be a finite simple graph on the vertex set V(G and let S⊆V(G. Adding a whisker to G at x means adding a new vertex y and edge xy to G where x∈V(G. The graph G∪W(S is obtained from G by adding a whisker to every vertex of S. We prove that if G∖S is either a graph with no chordless cycle of length other than 3 or 5, chordal graph or C5, then G∪W(S is a vertex decomposable graph.

  2. Graph inverse semigroups: their characterization and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David G

    2011-01-01

    Graph inverse semigroups generalize the polycyclic inverse monoids and play an important role in the theory of C*-algebras. This paper has two main goals: first, to provide an abstract characterization of graph inverse semigroups; and second, to show how they may be completed, under suitable conditions, to form what we call the Cuntz-Krieger semigroup of the graph. This semigroup is the ample semigroup of a topological groupoid associated with the graph, and the semigroup analogue of the Leavitt path algebra of the graph.

  3. Line graphs and $2$-geodesic transitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Devillers, Alice; Jin, Wei; Li, Cai Heng; Praeger, Cheryl E.

    2012-01-01

    For a graph $\\Gamma$, a positive integer $s$ and a subgroup $G\\leq \\Aut(\\Gamma)$, we prove that $G$ is transitive on the set of $s$-arcs of $\\Gamma$ if and only if $\\Gamma$ has girth at least $2(s-1)$ and $G$ is transitive on the set of $(s-1)$-geodesics of its line graph. As applications, we first prove that the only non-complete locally cyclic $2$-geodesic transitive graphs are the complete multipartite graph $K_{3[2]}$ and the icosahedron. Secondly we classify 2-geodesic transitive graphs ...

  4. The clique problem in ray intersection graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Langerman, Stefan; Cardinal, Jean; Cabello, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Ray intersection graphs are intersection graphs of rays, or halflines, in the plane. We show that any planar graph has an even subdivision whose complement is a ray intersection graph. The construction can be done in polynomial time and implies that finding a maximum clique in a segment intersection graph is NP-hard. This solves a 21-year old open problem posed by Kratochvíl and Nešetřil (Comment Math Univ Carolinae 31(1):85-93, 1990).

  5. The Bipartite Swapping Trick on Graph Homomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yufei

    2011-01-01

    We provide an upper bound to the number of graph homomorphisms from $G$ to $H$, where $H$ is a fixed graph with certain properties, and $G$ varies over all $N$-vertex, $d$-regular graphs. This result generalizes a recently resolved conjecture of Alon and Kahn on the number of independent sets. We build on the work of Galvin and Tetali, who studied the number of graph homomorphisms from $G$ to $H$ when $H$ is bipartite. We also apply our techniques to graph colorings and stable set polytopes.

  6. Proving relations between modular graph functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban

    2016-12-01

    We consider modular graph functions that arise in the low energy expansion of the four graviton amplitude in type II string theory. The vertices of these graphs are the positions of insertions of vertex operators on the toroidal worldsheet, while the links are the scalar Green functions connecting the vertices. Graphs with four and five links satisfy several non-trivial relations, which have been proved recently. We prove these relations by using elementary properties of Green functions and the details of the graphs. We also prove a relation between modular graph functions with six links.

  7. On Wiener index of graph complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaisankar Senbagamalar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Let $G$ be an $(n,m$-graph. We say that $G$ has property $(ast$ if for every pair of its adjacent vertices $x$ and $y$, there exists a vertex $z$, such that $z$ is not adjacent to either $x$ or $y$. If the graph $G$ has property $(ast$, then its complement $overline G$ is connected, has diameter 2, and its Wiener index is equal to $binom{n}{2}+m$, i.e., the Wiener index is insensitive of any other structural details of the graph $G$. We characterize numerous classes of graphs possessing property $(ast$, among which are trees, regular, and unicyclic graphs.

  8. Subsampling for graph power spectrum estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Chepuri, Sundeep Prabhakar

    2016-10-06

    In this paper we focus on subsampling stationary random signals that reside on the vertices of undirected graphs. Second-order stationary graph signals are obtained by filtering white noise and they admit a well-defined power spectrum. Estimating the graph power spectrum forms a central component of stationary graph signal processing and related inference tasks. We show that by sampling a significantly smaller subset of vertices and using simple least squares, we can reconstruct the power spectrum of the graph signal from the subsampled observations, without any spectral priors. In addition, a near-optimal greedy algorithm is developed to design the subsampling scheme.

  9. No finite $5$-regular matchstick graph exists

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A graph $G=(V,E)$ is called a unit-distance graph in the plane if there is an injective embedding of $V$ in the plane such that every pair of adjacent vertices are at unit distance apart. If additionally the corresponding edges are non-crossing and all vertices have the same degree $r$ we talk of a regular matchstick graph. Due to Euler's polyhedron formula we have $r\\le 5$. The smallest known $4$-regular matchstick graph is the so called Harborth graph consisting of $52$ vertices. In this ar...

  10. The genus of a type of graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the joint tree model introduced by Liu, the genera of further types of graphs not necessary to have certain symmetry can be obtained. In this paper, we obtain the genus of a new type of graph with weak symmetry. As a corollary, the genus of complete tripartite graph K n,n,l (l≥n≥2) is also derived. The method used here is more direct than those methods, such as current graph, used to calculate the genus of a graph and can be realized in polynomial time.

  11. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, Aaron V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  12. Generalized graph states based on Hadamard matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Shawn X. [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Yu, Nengkun [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); UTS-AMSS Joint Research Laboratory for Quantum Computation and Quantum Information Processing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zeng, Bei [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z8 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Graph states are widely used in quantum information theory, including entanglement theory, quantum error correction, and one-way quantum computing. Graph states have a nice structure related to a certain graph, which is given by either a stabilizer group or an encoding circuit, both can be directly given by the graph. To generalize graph states, whose stabilizer groups are abelian subgroups of the Pauli group, one approach taken is to study non-abelian stabilizers. In this work, we propose to generalize graph states based on the encoding circuit, which is completely determined by the graph and a Hadamard matrix. We study the entanglement structures of these generalized graph states and show that they are all maximally mixed locally. We also explore the relationship between the equivalence of Hadamard matrices and local equivalence of the corresponding generalized graph states. This leads to a natural generalization of the Pauli (X, Z) pairs, which characterizes the local symmetries of these generalized graph states. Our approach is also naturally generalized to construct graph quantum codes which are beyond stabilizer codes.

  13. MAP Estimation, Message Passing, and Perfect Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jebara, Tony S

    2012-01-01

    Efficiently finding the maximum a posteriori (MAP) configuration of a graphical model is an important problem which is often implemented using message passing algorithms. The optimality of such algorithms is only well established for singly-connected graphs and other limited settings. This article extends the set of graphs where MAP estimation is in P and where message passing recovers the exact solution to so-called perfect graphs. This result leverages recent progress in defining perfect graphs (the strong perfect graph theorem), linear programming relaxations of MAP estimation and recent convergent message passing schemes. The article converts graphical models into nand Markov random fields which are straightforward to relax into linear programs. Therein, integrality can be established in general by testing for graph perfection. This perfection test is performed efficiently using a polynomial time algorithm. Alternatively, known decomposition tools from perfect graph theory may be used to prove perfection ...

  14. Fast approximate quadratic programming for graph matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Vogelstein

    Full Text Available Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs, we find that it efficiently achieves performance.

  15. Fast approximate quadratic programming for graph matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelstein, Joshua T; Conroy, John M; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J; Kratzer, Steven G; Harley, Eric T; Fishkind, Donniell E; Vogelstein, R Jacob; Priebe, Carey E

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance.

  16. The Feynman Identity for Planar Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, G. A. T. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Feynman identity (FI) of a planar graph relates the Euler polynomial of the graph to an infinite product over the equivalence classes of closed nonperiodic signed cycles in the graph. The main objectives of this paper are to compute the number of equivalence classes of nonperiodic cycles of given length and sign in a planar graph and to interpret the data encoded by the FI in the context of free Lie superalgebras. This solves in the case of planar graphs a problem first raised by Sherman and sets the FI as the denominator identity of a free Lie superalgebra generated from a graph. Other results are obtained. For instance, in connection with zeta functions of graphs.

  17. An algebraic approach to graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinero, Fernando

    theory as evaluation codes. Chapter three consists of the introduction to graph based codes, such as Tanner codes and graph codes. In Chapter four, we compute the dimension of some graph based codes with a result combining graph based codes and subfield subcodes. Moreover, some codes in chapter four......This thesis consists of six chapters. The first chapter, contains a short introduction to coding theory in which we explain the coding theory concepts we use. In the second chapter, we present the required theory for evaluation codes and also give an example of some fundamental codes in coding...... are optimal or best known for their parameters. In chapter five we study some graph codes with Reed–Solomon component codes. The underlying graph is well known and widely used for its good characteristics. This helps us to compute the dimension of the graph codes. We also introduce a combinatorial concept...

  18. Minimal regular 2-graphs and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; Hongbing; LIU; Guizhen; LIU; Jiping

    2006-01-01

    A 2-graph is a hypergraph with edge sizes of at most two. A regular 2-graph is said to be minimal if it does not contain a proper regular factor. Let f2(n) be the maximum value of degrees over all minimal regular 2-graphs of n vertices. In this paper, we provide a structure property of minimal regular 2-graphs, and consequently, prove that f2(n) = n+3-i/3where 1 ≤i≤6, i=n (mod 6) andn≥ 7, which solves a conjecture posed by Fan, Liu, Wu and Wong. As applications in graph theory, we are able to characterize unfactorable regular graphs and provide the best possible factor existence theorem on degree conditions. Moreover, f2(n) and the minimal 2-graphs can be used in the universal switch box designs, which originally motivated this study.

  19. Triangle Counting in Dynamic Graph Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulteau, Laurent; Froese, Vincent; Pagh, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    , with a few exceptions, the algorithms have considered insert-only streams. We present a new algorithm estimating the number of triangles in dynamic graph streams where edges can be both inserted and deleted. We show that our algorithm achieves better time and space complexity than previous solutions......Estimating the number of triangles in graph streams using a limited amount of memory has become a popular topic in the last decade. Different variations of the problem have been studied, depending on whether the graph edges are provided in an arbitrary order or as incidence lists. However...... for various graph classes, for example sparse graphs with a relatively small number of triangles. Also, for graphs with constant transitivity coefficient, a common situation in real graphs, this is the first algorithm achieving constant processing time per edge. The result is achieved by a novel approach...

  20. A kaleidoscopic view of graph colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This book describes kaleidoscopic topics that have developed in the area of graph colorings. Unifying current material on graph coloring, this book describes current information on vertex and edge colorings in graph theory, including harmonious colorings, majestic colorings, kaleidoscopic colorings and binomial colorings. Recently there have been a number of breakthroughs in vertex colorings that give rise to other colorings in a graph, such as graceful labelings of graphs that have been reconsidered under the language of colorings. The topics presented in this book include sample detailed proofs and illustrations, which depicts elements that are often overlooked. This book is ideal for graduate students and researchers in graph theory, as it covers a broad range of topics and makes connections between recent developments and well-known areas in graph theory.

  1. On Second Order Degree of Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriela ARAUJO-PARDO; Camino BALBUENA; Mika OLSEN; Pilar VALENCIA

    2012-01-01

    Given a vertex v of a graph G the second order degree of v denoted as d2 (v) is defined as the number of vertices at distance 2 from v.In this paper we address the following question:What are the sufficient conditions for a graph to have a vertex v such that d2(v) ≥ d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of v? Among other results,every graph of minimum degree exactly 2,except four graphs,is shown to have a vertex of second order degree as large as its own degree.Moreover,every K-4-free graph or every maximal planar graph is shown to have a vertex v such that d2(v) ≥ d(v).Other sufficient conditions on graphs for guaranteeing this property are also proved.

  2. Fibonacci number of the tadpole graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe DeMaio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1982, Prodinger and Tichy defined the Fibonacci number of a graph G to be the number of independent sets of the graph G. They did so since the Fibonacci number of the path graph Pn is the Fibonacci number F(n+2 and the Fibonacci number of the cycle graph Cn is the Lucas number Ln. The tadpole graph Tn,k is the graph created by concatenating Cn and Pk with an edge from any vertex of Cn to a pendant of Pk for integers n=3 and k=0. This paper establishes formulae and identities for the Fibonacci number of the tadpole graph via algebraic and combinatorial methods.

  3. Line graphs as social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, M. J.; Muchnik, L.; Mańka-Krasoń, A.; Kułakowski, K.

    2011-07-01

    It was demonstrated recently that the line graphs are clustered and assortative. These topological features are known to characterize some social networks [M.E.J. Newman, Y. Park, Why social networks are different from other types of networks, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003) 036122]; it was argued that this similarity reveals their cliquey character. In the model proposed here, a social network is the line graph of an initial network of families, communities, interest groups, school classes and small companies. These groups play the role of nodes, and individuals are represented by links between these nodes. The picture is supported by the data on the LiveJournal network of about 8×10 6 people.

  4. Spin glasses on thin graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, C F; Johnston, D A; Plechác, P

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper we found strong evidence from simulations that the Ising antiferromagnet on ``thin'' random graphs - Feynman diagrams - displayed a mean-field spin glass transition. The intrinsic interest of considering such random graphs is that they give mean field results without long range interactions or the drawbacks, arising from boundary problems, of the Bethe lattice. In this paper we reprise the saddle point calculations for the Ising and Potts ferromagnet, antiferromagnet and spin glass on Feynman diagrams. We use standard results from bifurcation theory that enable us to treat an arbitrary number of replicas and any quenched bond distribution. We note the agreement between the ferromagnetic and spin glass transition temperatures thus calculated and those derived by analogy with the Bethe lattice, or in previous replica calculations. We then investigate numerically spin glasses with a plus or minus J bond distribution fo rthe Ising and Q=3,3,10,50 state Potts models, paying particular attention t...

  5. A Planarity Criterion for Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Dosen, Kosta

    2012-01-01

    It is proven that a connected graph is planar if and only if all its cocycles with at least four edges are "grounded" in the graph. The notion of grounding of this planarity criterion, which is purely combinatorial, stems from the intuitive idea that with planarity there should be a linear ordering of the edges of a cocycle such that in the two subgraphs remaining after the removal of these edges there can be no crossing of disjoint paths that join the vertices of these edges. The proof given in the paper of the right-to-left direction of the equivalence is based on Kuratowski's Theorem for planarity involving $K_{3,3}$ and $K_5$, but the criterion itself does not mention $K_{3,3}$ and $K_5$. Some other variants of the criterion are also shown necessary and sufficient for planarity.

  6. Color-induced graph colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of color-induced graph colorings is presented in this book, emphasizing vertex colorings induced by edge colorings. The coloring concepts described in this book depend not only on the property required of the initial edge coloring and the kind of objects serving as colors, but also on the property demanded of the vertex coloring produced. For each edge coloring introduced, background for the concept is provided, followed by a presentation of results and open questions dealing with this topic. While the edge colorings discussed can be either proper or unrestricted, the resulting vertex colorings are either proper colorings or rainbow colorings. This gives rise to a discussion of irregular colorings, strong colorings, modular colorings, edge-graceful colorings, twin edge colorings and binomial colorings. Since many of the concepts described in this book are relatively recent, the audience for this book is primarily mathematicians interested in learning some new areas of graph colorings...

  7. Line graphs as social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Malgorzata; Mańka-Krasoń, Anna; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The line graphs are clustered and assortative. They share these topological features with some social networks. We argue that this similarity reveals the cliquey character of the social networks. In the model proposed here, a social network is the line graph of an initial network of families, communities, interest groups, school classes and small companies. These groups play the role of nodes, and individuals are represented by links between these nodes. The picture is supported by the data on the LiveJournal network of about 8 x 10^6 people. In particular, sharp maxima of the observed data of the degree dependence of the clustering coefficient C(k) are associated with cliques in the social network.

  8. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  9. Graph distance for complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  10. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. Thus we consider quantum walks on a general basis and try to classify them as a preliminary step in the construction of new algorithms that could be devised in this way. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space, and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We characterize completely the quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Examples are given among which a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford Algebra.

  11. Multi-label literature classification based on the Gene Ontology graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xinghua

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gene Ontology is a controlled vocabulary for representing knowledge related to genes and proteins in a computable form. The current effort of manually annotating proteins with the Gene Ontology is outpaced by the rate of accumulation of biomedical knowledge in literature, which urges the development of text mining approaches to facilitate the process by automatically extracting the Gene Ontology annotation from literature. The task is usually cast as a text classification problem, and contemporary methods are confronted with unbalanced training data and the difficulties associated with multi-label classification. Results In this research, we investigated the methods of enhancing automatic multi-label classification of biomedical literature by utilizing the structure of the Gene Ontology graph. We have studied three graph-based multi-label classification algorithms, including a novel stochastic algorithm and two top-down hierarchical classification methods for multi-label literature classification. We systematically evaluated and compared these graph-based classification algorithms to a conventional flat multi-label algorithm. The results indicate that, through utilizing the information from the structure of the Gene Ontology graph, the graph-based multi-label classification methods can significantly improve predictions of the Gene Ontology terms implied by the analyzed text. Furthermore, the graph-based multi-label classifiers are capable of suggesting Gene Ontology annotations (to curators that are closely related to the true annotations even if they fail to predict the true ones directly. A software package implementing the studied algorithms is available for the research community. Conclusion Through utilizing the information from the structure of the Gene Ontology graph, the graph-based multi-label classification methods have better potential than the conventional flat multi-label classification approach to facilitate

  12. Decomposing a graph into bistars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Bárat and the present author conjectured that, for each tree T, there exists a natural number kT such that the following holds: If G is a kT-edge-connected graph such that |E(T)| divides |E(G)|, then G has a T-decomposition, that is, a decomposition of the edge set into trees each of which...

  13. The dynamic chain event graph

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a formal dynamic version of Chain Event Graphs (CEGs), a particularly expressive family of discrete graphical models. We demonstrate how this class links to semi-Markov models and provides a convenient generalization of the Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN). In particular we develop a repeating time-slice Dynamic CEG providing a useful and simpler model in this family. We demonstrate how the Dynamic CEG’s graphical formulation exhibits asymmetric conditional independence...

  14. Matrix Completions and Chordal Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth John HARRISON

    2003-01-01

    In a matrix-completion problem the aim is to specifiy the missing entries of a matrix inorder to produce a matrix with particular properties. In this paper we survey results concerning matrix-completion problems where we look for completions of various types for partial matrices supported ona given pattern. We see that thc existence of completions of the required type often depends on thechordal properties of graphs associated with the pattern.

  15. Parallel External Memory Graph Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, Lars Allan; Goodrich, Michael T.; Sitchinava, Nodari

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study parallel I/O efficient graph algorithms in the Parallel External Memory (PEM) model, one o f the private-cache chip multiprocessor (CMP) models. We study the fundamental problem of list ranking which leads to efficient solutions to problems on trees, such as computing lowest...... an optimal speedup of ¿(P) in parallel I/O complexity and parallel computation time, compared to the single-processor external memory counterparts....

  16. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. On Making Directed Graphs Eulerian

    CERN Document Server

    Sorge, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A directed graph is called Eulerian, if it contains a walk that traverses every arc in the graph exactly once. We study the problem of Eulerian Extension (EE) where a directed multigraph G and a weight function is given and it is asked whether G can be made Eulerian by adding arcs whose total weight does not exceed a given threshold. This problem is motivated through applications in vehicle routing and flowshop scheduling. However, EE is NP- hard and thus we use the parameterized complexity framework to analyze it. In parameterized complexity, the running time of algorithms is considered not only with respect to input length, but also with respect to other properties of the input-called "parameters". Dorn et al. proved that EE can be solved in O(4^k n^4) time, where k denotes the parameter "number of arcs that have to be added". In this thesis, we analyze EE with respect to the (smaller) parameters "number c of connected components in the input graph" and "sum b over indeg(v) - outdeg(v) for all vertices v in...

  18. Restrained roman domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roushini Leely Pushpam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A Roman dominating function (RDF on a graph G = (V,E is defined to be a function satisfying the condition that every vertex u for which f(u = 0 is adjacent to at least one vertex v for which f(v = 2. A set S V is a Restrained dominating set if every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex in S and to a vertex in . We define a Restrained Roman dominating function on a graph G = (V,E to be a function satisfying the condition that every vertex u for which f(u = 0 is adjacent to at least one vertex v for which f(v = 2 and at least one vertex w for which f(w = 0. The weight of a Restrained Roman dominating function is the value . The minimum weight of a Restrained Roman dominating function on a graph G is called the Restrained Roman domination number of G and denoted by . In this paper, we initiate a study of this parameter.

  19. Metabolic networks: beyond the graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Andrés; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Drugs are devised to enter into the metabolism of an organism in order to produce a desired effect. From the chemical point of view, cellular metabolism is constituted by a complex network of reactions transforming metabolites one in each other. Knowledge on the structure of this network could help to develop novel methods for drug design, and to comprehend the root of known unexpected side effects. Many large-scale studies on the structure of metabolic networks have been developed following models based on different kinds of graphs as the fundamental image of the reaction network. Graphs models, however, comport wrong assumptions regarding the structure of reaction networks that may lead into wrong conclusions if they are not taken into account. In this article we critically review some graph-theoretical approaches to the analysis of centrality, vulnerability and modularity of metabolic networks, analyzing their limitations in estimating these key network properties, consider some proposals explicit or implicitly based on directed hypergraphs regarding their ability to overcome these issues, and review some recent implementation improvements that make the application of these models in increasingly large networks a viable option.

  20. Sparse graphs are not flammable

    CERN Document Server

    Prałat, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the following \\emph{$k$-many firefighter problem} on a finite graph $G=(V,E)$. Suppose that a fire breaks out at a given vertex $v \\in V$. In each subsequent time unit, a firefighter protects $k$ vertices which are not yet on fire, and then the fire spreads to all unprotected neighbours of the vertices on fire. The objective of the firefighter is to save as many vertices as possible. The surviving rate $\\rho(G)$ of $G$ is defined as the expected percentage of vertices that can be saved when a fire breaks out at a random vertex of $G$. Let $\\tau_k = k+2-\\frac {1}{k+2}$. We show that for any $\\eps >0$ and $k \\ge 2$, each graph $G$ on $n$ vertices with at most $(\\tau_k-\\eps)n$ edges is not flammable; that is, $\\rho(G) > \\frac {2\\eps}{5\\tau_k} > 0$. Moreover, a construction of a family of flammable random graphs is proposed to show that the constant $\\tau_k$ cannot be improved.

  1. Topological structure of dictionary graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukś, Henryk; Krzemiński, Mark

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the topological structure of the subgraphs of dictionary graphs constructed from WordNet and Moby thesaurus data. In the process of learning a foreign language, the learner knows only a subset of all words of the language, corresponding to a subgraph of a dictionary graph. When this subgraph grows with time, its topological properties change. We introduce the notion of the pseudocore and argue that the growth of the vocabulary roughly follows decreasing pseudocore numbers—that is, one first learns words with a high pseudocore number followed by smaller pseudocores. We also propose an alternative strategy for vocabulary growth, involving decreasing core numbers as opposed to pseudocore numbers. We find that as the core or pseudocore grows in size, the clustering coefficient first decreases, then reaches a minimum and starts increasing again. The minimum occurs when the vocabulary reaches a size between 103 and 104. A simple model exhibiting similar behavior is proposed. The model is based on a generalized geometric random graph. Possible implications for language learning are discussed.

  2. Dynkin graphs and quadrilateral singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Urabe, Tohsuke

    1993-01-01

    The study of hypersurface quadrilateral singularities can be reduced to the study of elliptic K3 surfaces with a singular fiber of type I * 0 (superscript *, subscript 0), and therefore these notes consider, besides the topics of the title, such K3 surfaces too. The combinations of rational double points that can occur on fibers in the semi-universal deformations of quadrilateral singularities are examined, to show that the possible combinations can be described by a certain law from the viewpoint of Dynkin graphs. This is equivalent to saying that the possible combinations of singular fibers in elliptic K3 surfaces with a singular fiber of type I * 0 (superscript *, subscript 0) can be described by a certain law using classical Dynkin graphs appearing in the theory of semi-simple Lie groups. Further, a similar description for thecombination of singularities on plane sextic curves is given. Standard knowledge of algebraic geometry at the level of graduate students is expected. A new method based on graphs wil...

  3. On Self-Centeredness of Product of Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph G is said to be a self-centered graph if the eccentricity of every vertex of the graph is the same. In other words, a graph is a self-centered graph if radius and diameter of the graph are equal. In this paper, self-centeredness of strong product, co-normal product, and lexicographic product of graphs is studied in detail. The necessary and sufficient conditions for these products of graphs to be a self-centered graph are also discussed. The distance between any two vertices in the co-normal product of a finite number of graphs is also computed analytically.

  4. Degree Associated Edge Reconstruction Number of Graphs with Regular Pruned Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anusha Devi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An ecard of a graph $G$ is a subgraph formed by deleting an edge. A da-ecard specifies the degree of the deleted edge along with the ecard. The degree associated edge reconstruction number of a graph $G,~dern(G,$ is the minimum number of da-ecards that uniquely determines $G.$  The adversary degree associated edge reconstruction number of a graph $G, adern(G,$ is the minimum number $k$ such that every collection of $k$ da-ecards of $G$ uniquely determines $G.$ The maximal subgraph without end vertices of a graph $G$ which is not a tree is the pruned graph of $G.$ It is shown that $dern$ of complete multipartite graphs and some connected graphs with regular pruned graph is $1$ or $2.$ We also determine $dern$ and $adern$ of corona product of standard graphs.

  5. Analysis of three-dimensional image using Tutte polynomial for polyhedral graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez M., Alejandro

    2013-05-01

    All three-dimensional image, could be represented with a polyhedral graphs, where the number of edges and vertices is proportional to the quality of the image, and this image could be stored in an algebraic expression like a Tutte polynomial, allowing the reconstruction of any three-dimensional image. The Tutte polynomial is calculated using the package Graph Theory of Maple 16, which has been optimized for polyhedral graphs with a lot of edges and vertices, so this could be very useful with three-dimensional complex images or three-dimensional HD image. In this paper, I will present some examples of the useful Tutte polynomial, and for future work, I will investigate the use of Bollobás- Riordan polynomial.

  6. Grooming. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This learning activity package on grooming for health workers is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  7. Packaging issues: avoiding delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R

    2005-10-01

    Manufacturers can minimise delamination occurrence by applying the appropriate packaging design and process features. The end user can minimise the impact of fibre tear and reduce subsequent delamination by careful package opening. The occasional inconvenient delamination is a small price to pay for the high level of sterility assurance that comes with the use of Tyvek.

  8. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  9. CYPROS - Cybernetic Program Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tyssø

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available CYPROS is an interactive program system consisting of a number of special purpose packages for simulation, identification, parameter estimation and control system design. The programming language is standard FORTRAN IV and the system is implemented on a medium size computer system (Nord-10. The system is interactive and program control is obtained by the use of numeric terminals. Output is rapidly examined by extensive use of video colour graphics. The subroutines included in the packages are designed and documented according to standardization rules given by the SCL (Scandinavian Control Library organization. This simplifies the exchange of subroutines throughout the SCL system. Also, this makes the packages attractive for implementation by industrial users. In the simulation package, different integration methods are available and it can be easily used for off-line, as well as real time, simulation problems. The identification package consists of programs for single-input/single-output and multivariablc problems. Both transfer function models and state space models can be handled. Optimal test signals can be designed. The control package consists of programs based on multivariable time domain and frequency domain methods for analysis and design. In addition, there is a package for matrix and time series manipulation. CYPROS has been applied successfully to industrial problems of various kinds, and parts of the system have already been implemented on different computers in industry. This paper will, in some detail, describe the use and the contents of the packages and some examples of application will be discussed.

  10. User friendly packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Most consumers have experienced occasional problems with opening packaging. Tomato sauce from the tinned mackerel splattered all over the kitchen counter, the unrelenting pickle jar lid, and the package of sliced ham that cannot be opened without a knife or a pair of scissors. The research project...

  11. Advanced flip chip packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Yi-Shao; Wong, CP

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Flip Chip Packaging presents past, present and future advances and trends in areas such as substrate technology, material development, and assembly processes. Flip chip packaging is now in widespread use in computing, communications, consumer and automotive electronics, and the demand for flip chip technology is continuing to grow in order to meet the need for products that offer better performance, are smaller, and are environmentally sustainable. This book also: Offers broad-ranging chapters with a focus on IC-package-system integration Provides viewpoints from leading industry executives and experts Details state-of-the-art achievements in process technologies and scientific research Presents a clear development history and touches on trends in the industry while also discussing up-to-date technology information Advanced Flip Chip Packaging is an ideal book for engineers, researchers, and graduate students interested in the field of flip chip packaging.

  12. Finding Light Spanners in Bounded Pathwidth Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Grigni, Michelangelo

    2011-01-01

    Given an edge-weighted graph $G$ and $\\epsilon>0$, a $(1+\\epsilon)$-spanner is a spanning subgraph $G'$ whose shortest path distances approximate those of $G$ within a $(1+\\epsilon)$ factor. If $G$ is from certain minor-closed graph families (at least bounded genus graphs and apex graphs), then we know that light spanners exist. That is, we can compute a $(1+\\epsilon)$-spanner $G'$ with total edge weight at most a constant times the weight of a minimum spanning tree. This constant may depend on $\\epsilon$ and the graph family, but not on the particular graph $G$ nor on its edge weighting. For weighted graphs from several minor-closed graph families, the existence of light spanners has been essential in the design of approximation schemes for the metric TSP (the traveling salesman problem) and some similar problems. In this paper we make some progress towards the conjecture that light spanners exist for every minor-closed graph family. In particular, we show that they exist for graphs with bounded pathwidth. W...

  13. Minimum degree condition forcing complete graph immersion

    CERN Document Server

    DeVos, Matt; Fox, Jacob; McDonald, Jessica; Mohar, Bojan; Scheide, Diego

    2011-01-01

    An immersion of a graph $H$ into a graph $G$ is a one-to-one mapping $f:V(H) \\to V(G)$ and a collection of edge-disjoint paths in $G$, one for each edge of $H$, such that the path $P_{uv}$ corresponding to edge $uv$ has endpoints $f(u)$ and $f(v)$. The immersion is strong if the paths $P_{uv}$ are internally disjoint from $f(V(H))$. It is proved that for every positive integer $t$, every simple graph of minimum degree at least $200t$ contains a strong immersion of the complete graph $K_t$. For dense graphs one can say even more. If the graph has order $n$ and has $2cn^2$ edges, then there is a strong immersion of the complete graph on at least $c^2 n$ vertices in $G$ in which each path $P_{uv}$ is of length 2. As an application of these results, we resolve a problem raised by Paul Seymour by proving that the line graph of every simple graph with average degree $d$ has a clique minor of order at least $cd^{3/2}$, where $c>0$ is an absolute constant. For small values of $t$, $1\\le t\\le 7$, every simple graph of...

  14. Inferring Pedigree Graphs from Genetic Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takeyuki; Ito, Hiro

    In this paper, we study a problem of inferring blood relationships which satisfy a given matrix of genetic distances between all pairs of n nodes. Blood relationships are represented by our proposed graph class, which is called a pedigree graph. A pedigree graph is a directed acyclic graph in which the maximum indegree is at most two. We show that the number of pedigree graphs which satisfy the condition of given genetic distances may be exponential, but they can be represented by one directed acyclic graph with n nodes. Moreover, an O(n3) time algorithm which solves the problem is also given. Although phylogenetic trees and phylogenetic networks are similar data structures to pedigree graphs, it seems that inferring methods for phylogenetic trees and networks cannot be applied to infer pedigree graphs since nodes of phylogenetic trees and networks represent species whereas nodes of pedigree graphs represent individuals. We also show an O(n2) time algorithm which detects a contradiction between a given pedigreee graph and distance matrix of genetic distances.

  15. Planarity of 3,4-jump Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏二玲; 刘颜佩

    2004-01-01

    For a graph G of size ε≥1 and its edge-induced subgraphs H1 and H2 of size γ(1 < γ < ε), H1 is said to be obtained from H2 by an edge jump if there exist four distinct vertices u, v, ω and x in G such that (u,v)∈E(H2), (ω,x)∈E(G) - E(H2) and H1=H2 - (u, v) + (ω, x). In this article, the γ-jump graphs(r≥3) are discussed. A graph H is said to be an γ-jump graph of G if its vertices correspond to the edge induced graph of size γ in G and two vertices are adjacent if and only if one of the two corresponding subgraphs can be obtained from the other by an edge jump. For k≥2, the k-th iterated γ-jump graph Jrk(G) is defined as Jγ(Jγk-1 (G)), where Jγ1 (G) = Jγ(G). An infinite sequence {Gi} of graphs is planar if every graph Gi is planar. It is shown that there does not exist a graph G for which the sequence {J3k(G)} is planar, where k is any positive integer. Meanwhile, lim gen(J3k(G)) =∞, where gen(G) denotes the genus of a graph G, if the sequence k→∞J3k(G) is defined for every positive integer k. As for the 4-jump graph of a graph G,{J4k(G)} is planar if and only if G = C5. For γ≥5, whether the fix graph of the sequence {Jγk(G))exists is determined.

  16. Graphs whose Complement and Square are Isomorphic (extended version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Sune; Milanic, Martin; Verret, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We study square-complementary graphs, that is, graphs whose comple- ment and square are isomorphic. We prove several necessary conditions for a graph to be square-complementary, describe ways of building new square-complementary graphs from existing ones, construct innite families of square......-complementary graphs, and characterize square-complementary graphs within various graph classes. The bipartite case turns out to be of particular interest....

  17. Packaging Concerns/Techniques for Large Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews packaging challenges and options for electronic parts. The presentation includes information about non-hermetic packages, space challenges for packaging and complex package variations.

  18. PROSPECTS OF POLYMER PACKAGING MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sedykh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main types of materials used in the manufacture of packaging. Analyzed trends in further development of packaging materials. Shows how to improve the quality of plastic packaging materials in today's market.

  19. Consumer response to packaging design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, Nigel D.; Herpen, van Erica; Lans, van der Ivo A.; Ligthart, Tom N.; Trijp, van Hans C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Building on theories of cue utilization, this paper investigates whether and how packaging sustainability influences consumer perceptions, inferences and attitudes towards packaged products. A framework is tested in an empirical study among 249 students using soup products varying in packaging

  20. Generalized Graphs, Methods for Obtaining Graph Spectra. Application of Graph Spectra in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mingzuo

    Various graphical methods in the literature for getting at some features of the MO energy level spectra of especially pi systems and some related three-dimensional molecules are studied in detail. These include the graphical methods of Sinanoglu (although its mathematical, quantum-physical foundations, e.g. Sinanoglu's structural-covariance theory, are not discussed in this thesis), the edge-deletion method of Jiang, the specialized method of Sheng for benzenoid graphs, pairing theorems, graph splitting methods of e.g. McClelland, and more general one of R. A. Davidson. Of these the Sinanoglu method is found to be the only one generally applicable to diverse types of molecules without the need to introduce additional and complicated rules for each new graph type. The Sinanoglu method however is intended to be only a qualitative tool (giving the number of bonding, nonbonding, and antibonding levels and their changes upon reaction or geometrical distortions, large or small, of the molecule). Thus the other methods, although highly specialized, could be of help in getting some further information on the spectra. In particular, the "negative graph" concept in Chapter 3 of this thesis would be found useful in ascertaining the energy gap between the lowest and highest MO levels. In case where the Sinanoglu method cannot distinguish between differing stabilities of two molecules with the same signature and number of elections, this energy gap will be particularly useful. In the thesis, many alternative and simpler derivations of the graph-theoretic methods of Jiang, Davidson and others mentioned above are given. Some methods are generalized further. In the last chapter of the thesis starting with S 5.3, the graphical method is applied extensively to various types of molecules thought to have through-space interactions. Especially the Sinanoglu method is used to obtain the signature (instead of using a computer) and qualitative stabilities of these molecules are discussed

  1. Roman Bondage Numbers of Some Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    A Roman dominating function on a graph $G=(V,E)$ is a function $f: V\\to \\{0,1,2\\}$ satisfying the condition that every vertex $u$ with $f(u)=0$ is adjacent to at least one vertex $v$ with $f(v)=2$. The weight of a Roman dominating function is the value $f(G)=\\sum_{u\\in V} f(u)$. The Roman domination number of $G$ is the minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on $G$. The Roman bondage number of a nonempty graph $G$ is the minimum number of edges whose removal results in a graph with the Roman domination number larger than that of $G$. This paper determines the exact value of the Roman bondage numbers of two classes of graphs, complete $t$-partite graphs and $(n-3)$-regular graphs with order $n$ for any $n\\ge 5$.

  2. Term Graph Rewriting and Parallel Term Rewriting

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Andrea; 10.4204/EPTCS.48.3

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between Term Graph Rewriting and Term Rewriting is well understood: a single term graph reduction may correspond to several term reductions, due to sharing. It is also known that if term graphs are allowed to contain cycles, then one term graph reduction may correspond to infinitely many term reductions. We stress that this fact can be interpreted in two ways. According to the "sequential interpretation", a term graph reduction corresponds to an infinite sequence of term reductions, as formalized by Kennaway et.al. using strongly converging derivations over the complete metric space of infinite terms. Instead according to the "parallel interpretation" a term graph reduction corresponds to the parallel reduction of an infinite set of redexes in a rational term. We formalize the latter notion by exploiting the complete partial order of infinite and possibly partial terms, and we stress that this interpretation allows to explain the result of reducing circular redexes in several approaches to te...

  3. Aspects of randomness in neural graph structures

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, significant advances have been made in understanding the structural and functional properties of biological networks, via graph-theoretic analysis. In general, most graph-theoretic studies are conducted in the presence of serious uncertainties, such as major undersampling of the experimental data. In the specific case of neural systems, however, a few moderately robust experimental reconstructions do exist, and these have long served as fundamental prototypes for studying connectivity patterns in the nervous system. In this paper, we provide a comparative analysis of these "historical" graphs, both in (unmodified) directed and (often symmetrized) undirected forms, and focus on simple structural characterizations of their connectivity. We find that in most measures the networks studied are captured by simple random graph models; in a few key measures, however, we observe a marked departure from the random graph prediction. Our results suggest that the mechanism of graph formation in th...

  4. Three Syntactic Theories for Combinatory Graph Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Zerny, Ian

    2011-01-01

    We present a purely syntactic theory of graph reduction for the canonical combinators S, K, and I, where graph vertices are represented with evaluation contexts and let expressions. We express this syntactic theory as a reduction semantics, which we refocus into the first storeless abstract machine...... for combinatory graph reduction, which we refunctionalize into the first storeless natural semantics for combinatory graph reduction.We then factor out the introduction of let expressions to denote as many graph vertices as possible upfront instead of on demand, resulting in a second syntactic theory, this one...... of term graphs in the sense of Barendregt et al. The corresponding storeless abstract machine and natural semantics follow mutatis mutandis. We then interpret let expressions as operations over a global store (thus shifting, in Strachey's words, from denotable entities to storable entities), resulting...

  5. Three Syntactic Theories for Combinatory Graph Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Zerny, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We present a purely syntactic theory of graph reduction for the canonical combinators S, K, and I, where graph vertices are represented with evaluation contexts and let expressions. We express this rst syntactic theory as a storeless reduction semantics of combinatory terms. We then factor out...... the introduction of let expressions to denote as many graph vertices as possible upfront instead of on demand . The factored terms can be interpreted as term graphs in the sense of Barendregt et al. We express this second syntactic theory, which we prove equivalent to the rst, as a storeless reduction semantics...... of combinatory term graphs. We then recast let bindings as bindings in a global store, thus shifting, in Strachey's words, from denotable entities to storable entities. The store-based terms can still be interpreted as term graphs. We express this third syntactic theory, which we prove equivalent to the second...

  6. Complexity Results on Graphs with Few Cliques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Rosgen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph class has few cliques if there is a polynomial bound on the number of maximal cliques contained in any member of the class. This restriction is equivalent to the requirement that any graph in the class has a polynomial sized intersection representation that satisfies the Helly property. On any such class of graphs, some problems that are NP-complete on general graphs, such as the maximum clique problem and the maximum weighted clique problem, admit polynomial time algorithms. Other problems, such as the vertex clique cover and edge clique cover problems remain NP-complete on these classes. Several classes of graphs which have few cliques are discussed, and the complexity of some partitioning and covering problems are determined for the class of all graphs which have fewer cliques than a given polynomial bound.

  7. Search Algorithms for Conceptual Graph Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurashid Mamadolimov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider a database composed of a set of conceptual graphs. Using conceptual graphs and graphhomomorphism it is possible to build a basic query-answering mechanism based on semantic search.Graph homomorphism defines a partial order over conceptual graphs. Since graph homomorphismchecking is an NP-Complete problem, the main requirement for database organizing and managingalgorithms is to reduce the number of homomorphism checks. Searching is a basic operation for databasemanipulating problems. We consider the problem of searching for an element in a partially ordered set.The goal is to minimize the number of queries required to find a target element in the worst case. First weanalyse conceptual graph database operations. Then we propose a new algorithm for a subclass of lattices.Finally, we suggest a parallel search algorithm for a general poset.

  8. Notes on large angle crossing graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Dujmovic, Vida; Morin, Pat; Wolle, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A graph G is an a-angle crossing (aAC) graph if every pair of crossing edges in G intersect at an angle of at least a. The concept of right angle crossing (RAC) graphs (a=Pi/2) was recently introduced by Didimo et. al. It was shown that any RAC graph with n vertices has at most 4n-10 edges and that there are infinitely many values of n for which there exists a RAC graph with n vertices and 4n-10 edges. In this paper, we give upper and lower bounds for the number of edges in aAC graphs for all 0 < a < Pi/2.

  9. Determinants of adjacency matrices of graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdollahi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the set of all determinants of adjacency matrices of graphs with a given number of vertices. Using Brendan McKay's data base of small graphs, determinants of graphs with at most $9$ vertices are computed so that the number of non-isomorphic graphs with given vertices whose determinants are all equal to a number is exhibited in a table. Using an idea of M. Newman, it is proved that if $G$ is a graph with $n$ vertices and ${d_1,dots,d_n}$ is the set of vertex degrees of $G$, then $gcd(2m,d^2$ divides the determinant of the adjacency matrix of $G$, where $d=gcd(d_1,dots,d_n$. Possible determinants of adjacency matrices of graphs with exactly two cycles are obtained.

  10. Malware Classification based on Call Graph Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Kinable, Joris

    2010-01-01

    Each day, anti-virus companies receive tens of thousands samples of potentially harmful executables. Many of the malicious samples are variations of previously encountered malware, created by their authors to evade pattern-based detection. Dealing with these large amounts of data requires robust, automatic detection approaches. This paper studies malware classification based on call graph clustering. By representing malware samples as call graphs, it is possible to abstract certain variations away, and enable the detection of structural similarities between samples. The ability to cluster similar samples together will make more generic detection techniques possible, thereby targeting the commonalities of the samples within a cluster. To compare call graphs mutually, we compute pairwise graph similarity scores via graph matchings which approximately minimize the graph edit distance. Next, to facilitate the discovery of similar malware samples, we employ several clustering algorithms, including k-medoids and DB...

  11. Graphs in machine learning: an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Latouche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are commonly used to characterise interactions between objects of interest. Because they are based on a straightforward formalism, they are used in many scientific fields from computer science to historical sciences. In this paper, we give an introduction to some methods relying on graphs for learning. This includes both unsupervised and supervised methods. Unsupervised learning algorithms usually aim at visualising graphs in latent spaces and/or clustering the nodes. Both focus on extracting knowledge from graph topologies. While most existing techniques are only applicable to static graphs, where edges do not evolve through time, recent developments have shown that they could be extended to deal with evolving networks. In a supervised context, one generally aims at inferring labels or numerical values attached to nodes using both the graph and, when they are available, node characteristics. Balancing the two sources of information can be challenging, especially as they can disagree locally or globall...

  12. LGM: Mining Frequent Subgraphs from Linear Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Tabei, Yasuo; Hirose, Shuichi; Tsuda, Koji

    2011-01-01

    A linear graph is a graph whose vertices are totally ordered. Biological and linguistic sequences with interactions among symbols are naturally represented as linear graphs. Examples include protein contact maps, RNA secondary structures and predicate-argument structures. Our algorithm, linear graph miner (LGM), leverages the vertex order for efficient enumeration of frequent subgraphs. Based on the reverse search principle, the pattern space is systematically traversed without expensive duplication checking. Disconnected subgraph patterns are particularly important in linear graphs due to their sequential nature. Unlike conventional graph mining algorithms detecting connected patterns only, LGM can detect disconnected patterns as well. The utility and efficiency of LGM are demonstrated in experiments on protein contact maps.

  13. Parallel Graph Partitioning for Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Meyerhenke, Henning; Schulz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Processing large complex networks like social networks or web graphs has recently attracted considerable interest. In order to do this in parallel, we need to partition them into pieces of about equal size. Unfortunately, previous parallel graph partitioners originally developed for more regular mesh-like networks do not work well for these networks. This paper addresses this problem by parallelizing and adapting the label propagation technique originally developed for graph clustering. By introducing size constraints, label propagation becomes applicable for both the coarsening and the refinement phase of multilevel graph partitioning. We obtain very high quality by applying a highly parallel evolutionary algorithm to the coarsened graph. The resulting system is both more scalable and achieves higher quality than state-of-the-art systems like ParMetis or PT-Scotch. For large complex networks the performance differences are very big. For example, our algorithm can partition a web graph with 3.3 billion edges ...

  14. Efficient Snapshot Retrieval over Historical Graph Data

    CERN Document Server

    Khurana, Udayan

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of managing historical data for large evolving information networks like social networks or citation networks, with the goal to enable temporal and evolutionary queries and analysis. We present the design and architecture of a distributed graph database system that stores the entire history of a network and provides support for efficient retrieval of multiple graphs from arbitrary time points in the past, in addition to maintaining the current state for ongoing updates. Our system exposes a general programmatic API to process and analyze the retrieved snapshots. We introduce DeltaGraph, a novel, extensible, highly tunable, and distributed hierarchical index structure that enables compactly recording the historical information, and that supports efficient retrieval of historical graph snapshots for single-site or parallel processing. Along with the original graph data, DeltaGraph can also maintain and index auxiliary information; this functionality can be used to extend the structure to ...

  15. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  16. The Dynamics of the Forest Graph Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Suresh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1966, Cummins introduced the “tree graph”: the tree graph T(G of a graph G (possibly infinite has all its spanning trees as vertices, and distinct such trees correspond to adjacent vertices if they differ in just one edge, i.e., two spanning trees T1 and T2 are adjacent if T2 = T1 − e + f for some edges e ∈ T1 and f ∉ T1. The tree graph of a connected graph need not be connected. To obviate this difficulty we define the “forest graph”: let G be a labeled graph of order α, finite or infinite, and let N(G be the set of all labeled maximal forests of G. The forest graph of G, denoted by F(G, is the graph with vertex set N(G in which two maximal forests F1, F2 of G form an edge if and only if they differ exactly by one edge, i.e., F2 = F1 − e + f for some edges e ∈ F1 and f ∉ F1. Using the theory of cardinal numbers, Zorn’s lemma, transfinite induction, the axiom of choice and the well-ordering principle, we determine the F-convergence, F-divergence, F-depth and F-stability of any graph G. In particular it is shown that a graph G (finite or infinite is F-convergent if and only if G has at most one cycle of length 3. The F-stable graphs are precisely K3 and K1. The F-depth of any graph G different from K3 and K1 is finite. We also determine various parameters of F(G for an infinite graph G, including the number, order, size, and degree of its components.

  17. Graph Zeta function and gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Along the recently trodden path of studying certain number theoretic properties of gauge theories, especially supersymmetric theories whose vacuum manifolds are non-trivial, we investigate Ihara's Graph Zeta Function for large classes of quiver theories and periodic tilings by bi-partite graphs. In particular, we examine issues such as the spectra of the adjacency and whether the gauge theory satisfies the strong and weak versions of the graph theoretical analogue of the Riemann Hypothesis.

  18. Recursively arbitrarily vertex-decomposable graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Baudon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph \\(G = (V;E\\ is arbitrarily vertex decomposable if for any sequence \\(\\tau\\ of positive integers adding up to \\(|V|\\, there is a sequence of vertex-disjoint subsets of \\(V\\ whose orders are given by \\(\\tau\\, and which induce connected graphs. The main aim of this paper is to study the recursive version of this problem. We present a solution for trees, suns, and partially for a class of 2-connected graphs called balloons.

  19. On invariant sets in Lagrangian graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this exposition, we show that the Hamiltonian is always constant on a compact invariant connected subset which lies in a Lagrangian graph provided that the Hamiltonian and the graph are sufficiently smooth. We also provide some counterexamples to show that if the Hamiltonian function is not smooth enough, then it may be non-constant on a compact invariant connected subset which lies in a Lagrangian graph.

  20. Eigenvalues and expansion of bipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Janwa, Heeralal

    2012-01-01

    We prove lower bounds on the largest and second largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix of bipartite graphs and give necessary and sufficient conditions for equality. We give several examples of classes that are optimal with respect to the bouns. We prove that BIBD-graphs are characterized by ...... by their eigenvalues. Finally we present a new bound on the expansion coefficient of (c,d)-regular bipartite graphs and compare that with aclassical bound....

  1. Maximum Estrada Index of Bicyclic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Long; Wang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Let $G$ be a simple graph of order $n$, let $\\lambda_1(G),\\lambda_2(G),...,\\lambda_n(G)$ be the eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of $G$. The Esrada index of $G$ is defined as $EE(G)=\\sum_{i=1}^{n}e^{\\lambda_i(G)}$. In this paper we determine the unique graph with maximum Estrada index among bicyclic graphs with fixed order.

  2. Semisymmetric Cubic Graphs of Order 162

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehdi Alaeiyan; Hamid A Tavallaee; B N Onagh

    2010-02-01

    An undirected graph without isolated vertices is said to be semisymmetric if its full automorphism group acts transitively on its edge set but not on its vertex set. In this paper, we inquire the existence of connected semisymmetric cubic graphs of order 162. It is shown that for every odd prime , there exists a semisymmetric cubic graph of order 162 and its structure is explicitly specified by giving the corresponding voltage rules generating the covering projections.

  3. Density conditions for triangles in multipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondy, Adrian; Shen, Jin; Thomassé, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    subgraphs in G. We investigate in particular the case where G is a complete multipartite graph. We prove that a finite tripartite graph with all edge densities greater than the golden ratio has a triangle and that this bound is best possible. Also we show that an infinite-partite graph with finite parts has...... a triangle, provided that the edge density between any two parts is greater than 1/2....

  4. Byzantine Vector Consensus in Complete Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    communication network is a complete graph. All the communication channels are reliable and FIFO (first-in-first-out). The problem of Byzantine vector...the communication network is a complete graph. All the communication channels are reliable and FIFO ( rst-in- rst-out). The problem of Byzantine...other directly on reliable FIFO (first-in first-out) channels. Thus, the communication network is a complete graph. The input vector at each process

  5. ANTIMAGIC LABELING OF GENERALIZED SAUSAGE GRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oudone Phanalasy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An antimagic labeling of a graph with q edges is a bijection from the set of edges to the set of positive integers {1,2,...,q} such that all vertex weights are pairwise distinct, where the vertex weight of a vertex is the sum of the labels of all the edges incident with that vertex. A graph is antimagic if it has an antimagic labeling. In this paper we construct antimagic labeling for the family of generalized sausage graphs.

  6. Counting Links and Knots in Complete Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Loren

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the minimal number of links and knots in complete partite graphs. We provide exact values or bounds on the minimal number of links for all complete partite graphs with all but 4 vertices in one partition, or with 9 vertices in total. In particular, we find that the minimal number of links for $K_{4,4,1}$ is 74. We also provide exact values or bounds on the minimal number of knots for all complete partite graphs with 8 vertices.

  7. Hermeticity of electronic packages

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhouse, Hal; Romenesco, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This is a book about the integrity of sealed packages to resist foreign gases and liquids penetrating the seal or an opening (crack) in the packageùespecially critical to the reliability and longevity of electronics. The author explains how to predict the reliability and the longevity of the packages based on leak rate measurements and the assumptions of impurities. Non-specialists in particular will benefit from the author's long involvement in the technology. Hermeticity is a subject that demands practical experience, and solving one problem does not necessarily give one the background to so

  8. Optoelectronic packaging: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, R.F.

    1993-09-01

    Optoelectronics and photonics hold great potential for high data-rate communication and computing. Wide using in computing applications was limited first by device technologies and now suffers due to the need for high-precision, mass-produced packaging. The use of phontons as a medium of communication and control implies a unique set of packaging constraints that was not present in traditional telecommunications applications. The state-of-the-art in optoelectronic packaging is now driven by microelectric techniques that have potential for low cost and high volume manufacturing.

  9. Hermeticity of electronic packages

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhouse, Hal

    2000-01-01

    This is a book about the integrity of sealed packages to resist foreign gases and liquids penetrating the seal or an opening (crack) in the package-especially critical to the reliability and longevity of electronics. The author explains how to predict the reliability and the longevity of the packages based on leak rate measurements and the assumptions of impurities. Non-specialists in particular will benefit from the author's long involvement in the technology. Hermeticity is a subject that demands practical experience, and solving one problem does not necessarily give one the background to so

  10. On the power graphs which are Cayley graphs of some groups

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, S.; Bhuniya, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, Jemal Abawajy, Andrei Kelarev and Morshed Chowdhury [1] proposed a problem to characterize the finite groups whose power graphs are Cayley graphs of some groups. Here we give a complete answer to this question.

  11. Stationary waves on nonlinear quantum graphs. II. Application of canonical perturbation theory in basic graph structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnutzmann, Sven; Waltner, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    We consider exact and asymptotic solutions of the stationary cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation on metric graphs. We focus on some basic example graphs. The asymptotic solutions are obtained using the canonical perturbation formalism developed in our earlier paper [S. Gnutzmann and D. Waltner, Phys. Rev. E 93, 032204 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.032204]. For closed example graphs (interval, ring, star graph, tadpole graph), we calculate spectral curves and show how the description of spectra reduces to known characteristic functions of linear quantum graphs in the low-intensity limit. Analogously for open examples, we show how nonlinear scattering of stationary waves arises and how it reduces to known linear scattering amplitudes at low intensities. In the short-wavelength asymptotics we discuss how genuine nonlinear effects may be described using the leading order of canonical perturbation theory: bifurcation of spectral curves (and the corresponding solutions) in closed graphs and multistability in open graphs.

  12. A definition of graph homology and graph K-theory of algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Movshev, M. V.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and study elementary properties of graph homology of algebras. This new homology theory shares many features of cyclic and Hochschild homology. We also define a graph K-theory together with an analog of Chern character.

  13. Connectivity graphs of uncertainty regions

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, Erin; Lenchner, Jonathan; Sember, Jeff; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Stege, Ulrike; Stolpner, Svetlana; Weibel, Christophe; Whitesides, Sue

    2010-01-01

    We study a generalization of the well known bottleneck spanning tree problem called "Best Case Connectivity with Uncertainty": Given a family of geometric regions, choose one point per region, such that the length of the longest edge in a spanning tree of a disc intersection graph is minimized. We show that this problem is NP-hard even for very simple scenarios such as line segments and squares. We also give exact and approximation algorithms for the case of line segments and unit discs respectively.

  14. Lattices, graphs, and Conway mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Joshua Evan

    2011-01-01

    The d-invariant of an integral, positive definite lattice L records the minimal norm of a characteristic covector in each equivalence class mod 2L. We prove that the 2-isomorphism type of a connected graph is determined by the d-invariant of its lattice of integral cuts (or flows). As an application, we prove that a reduced, alternating link diagram is determined up to mutation by the Heegaard Floer homology of the link's branched double-cover. Thus, alternating links with homeomorphic branched double-covers are mutants.

  15. Generalized connected domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kouider

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As a generalization of connected domination in a graph G we consider domination by sets having at most k components. The order γ c k (G of such a smallest set we relate to γ c (G, the order of a smallest connected dominating set. For a tree T we give bounds on γ c k (T in terms of minimum valency and diameter. For trees the inequality γ c k (T≤ n-k-1 is known to hold, we determine the class of trees, for which equality holds.

  16. LOCALIZATION THEOREM ON HAMILTONIAN GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Let G be a 2-connected graph of order n( 3).If I(u,v) S(u,v) or max {d(u),d(v)} n/2 for any two vertices u,v at distance two in an induced subgraph K1,3 or P3 of G,then G is hamiltonian.Here I(u,v) = |N(u)∩ N(v)|,S(u,v) denotes thenumber of edges of maximum star containing u,v as an induced subgraph in G.

  17. Givental graphs and inversion symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dunin-Barkowski, P; Spitz, L

    2012-01-01

    Inversion symmetry is a very non-trivial discrete symmetry of Frobenius manifolds. It was obtained by Dubrovin from one of the elementary Schlesinger transformations of a special ODE associated to Frobenius manifold. In this paper, we review the Givental group action on Frobenius manifolds in terms of Feynman graphs and then we obtain an interpretation of the inversion symmetry in terms of the action of the Givental group. We also consider the implication of this interpretation of the inversion symmetry for the Schlesinger transformations and for the Hamiltonians of the associated principle hierarchy.

  18. The alignment-distribution graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  19. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, Roberto B

    2011-01-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called "light-clock diamonds") represent units of measurement modeled on the ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra. We use the Doppler Effect, in the spirit of the Bondi k-calculus, to motivate the method.

  20. A Reduction of the Graph Reconstruction Conjecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monikandan S.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A graph is said to be reconstructible if it is determined up to isomor- phism from the collection of all its one-vertex deleted unlabeled subgraphs. Reconstruction Conjecture (RC asserts that all graphs on at least three vertices are reconstructible. In this paper, we prove that interval-regular graphs and some new classes of graphs are reconstructible and show that RC is true if and only if all non-geodetic and non-interval-regular blocks G with diam(G = 2 or diam(Ḡ = diam(G = 3 are reconstructible

  1. Graph-theoretical matrices in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Janezic, Dusanka; Nikolic, Sonja; Trinajstic, Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Graph-Theoretical Matrices in Chemistry presents a systematic survey of graph-theoretical matrices and highlights their potential uses. This comprehensive volume is an updated, extended version of a former bestseller featuring a series of mathematical chemistry monographs. In this edition, nearly 200 graph-theoretical matrices are included.This second edition is organized like the previous one-after an introduction, graph-theoretical matrices are presented in five chapters: The Adjacency Matrix and Related Matrices, Incidence Matrices, The Distance Matrix and Related Matrices, Special Matrices

  2. Sublinear distance labeling for sparse graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Dahlgaard, Søren; Knudsen, Mathias Bæk Tejs;

    2015-01-01

    between pairs of nodes that are at distance at least $D$ from each other. In this paper we consider distance labeling schemes for the classical case of unweighted and undirected graphs. We present the first distance labeling scheme of size $o(n)$ for sparse graphs (and hence bounded degree graphs......). This addresses an open problem by Gavoille et. al. [J. Algo. 2004], hereby separating the complexity from general graphs which require $\\Omega(n)$ size Moon [Proc. of Glasgow Math. Association 1965]. As an intermediate result we give a $O(\\frac{n}{D}\\log^2 D)$ $D$-preserving distance labeling scheme, improving...

  3. The color space of a graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.R.; Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    If k is a prime power, and G is a graph with n vertices, then a k-coloring of G may be considered as a vector in GF(k)(n). We prove that the subspace of GF(3)(n) spanned by all 3-colorings of a planar triangle-free graph with n vertices has dimension n. In particular, any such graph has at least n...... - 1 nonequivalent 3-colorings, and the addition of any edge or any vertex of degree 3 results in a 3-colorable graph. (C) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc....

  4. Interactive Graph Layout of a Million Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Mi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensemaking of large graphs, specifically those with millions of nodes, is a crucial task in many fields. Automatic graph layout algorithms, augmented with real-time human-in-the-loop interaction, can potentially support sensemaking of large graphs. However, designing interactive algorithms to achieve this is challenging. In this paper, we tackle the scalability problem of interactive layout of large graphs, and contribute a new GPU-based force-directed layout algorithm that exploits graph topology. This algorithm can interactively layout graphs with millions of nodes, and support real-time interaction to explore alternative graph layouts. Users can directly manipulate the layout of vertices in a force-directed fashion. The complexity of traditional repulsive force computation is reduced by approximating calculations based on the hierarchical structure of multi-level clustered graphs. We evaluate the algorithm performance, and demonstrate human-in-the-loop layout in two sensemaking case studies. Moreover, we summarize lessons learned for designing interactive large graph layout algorithms on the GPU.

  5. Graph algorithms in the titan toolkit.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, William Clarence, III; Wylie, Brian Neil

    2009-10-01

    Graph algorithms are a key component in a wide variety of intelligence analysis activities. The Graph-Based Informatics for Non-Proliferation and Counter-Terrorism project addresses the critical need of making these graph algorithms accessible to Sandia analysts in a manner that is both intuitive and effective. Specifically we describe the design and implementation of an open source toolkit for doing graph analysis, informatics, and visualization that provides Sandia with novel analysis capability for non-proliferation and counter-terrorism.

  6. Intrinsic Universality of Causal Graph Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Martiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Causal graph dynamics are transformations over graphs that capture two important symmetries of physics, namely causality and homogeneity. They can be equivalently defined as continuous and translation invariant transformations or functions induced by a local rule applied simultaneously on every vertex of the graph. Intrinsic universality is the ability of an instance of a model to simulate every other instance of the model while preserving the structure of the computation at every step of the simulation. In this work we present the construction of a family of intrinsically universal instances of causal graphs dynamics, each instance being able to simulate a subset of instances.

  7. Signed graphs with two negative edges

    OpenAIRE

    Rollová, Edita; Schubert, Michael; Steffen, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    The presented paper studies the flow number $F(G,\\sigma)$ of flow-admissible signed graphs $(G,\\sigma)$ with two negative edges. We restrict our study to cubic graphs, because for each non-cubic signed graph $(G,\\sigma)$ there is a set ${\\cal G}(G,\\sigma)$ of cubic graphs such that $F(G, \\sigma) \\leq \\min \\{F(H,\\sigma_H) : (H,\\sigma_H) \\in {\\cal G}(G)\\}$. We prove that $F(G,\\sigma) \\leq 6$ if $(G,\\sigma)$ contains a bridge and $F(G,\\sigma) \\leq 7$ in general. We prove better bounds, if there ...

  8. Total dominator chromatic number of a graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel P. Kazemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a graph $G$, the total dominator coloring problem seeks a proper coloring of $G$ with the additional property that every vertex in the graph is adjacent to all vertices of a color class. We seek to minimize the number of color classes. We initiate to study this problem on several classes of graphs, as well as finding general bounds and characterizations. We also compare the total dominator chromatic number of a graph with the chromatic number and the total domination number of it.

  9. Triangle Counting in Dynamic Graph Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulteau, Laurent; Froese, Vincent; Pagh, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the number of triangles in graph streams using a limited amount of memory has become a popular topic in the last decade. Different variations of the problem have been studied, depending on whether the graph edges are provided in an arbitrary order or as incidence lists. However...... combining sampling of vertex triples and sparsification of the input graph. In the course of the analysis of the algorithm we present a lower bound on the number of pairwise independent 2-paths in general graphs which might be of independent interest. At the end of the paper we discuss lower bounds...

  10. Advanced Coarsening Schemes for Graph Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Safro, Ilya; Schulz, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The graph partitioning problem is widely used and studied in many practical and theoretical applications. The multilevel strategies represent today one of the most effective and efficient generic frameworks for solving this problem on large-scale graphs. Most of the attention in designing the multilevel partitioning frameworks has been on the refinement phase. In this work we focus on the coarsening phase, which is responsible for creating structurally similar to the original but smaller graphs. We compare different matching- and AMG-based coarsening schemes, experiment with the algebraic distance between nodes, and demonstrate computational results on several classes of graphs that emphasize the running time and quality advantages of different coarsenings.

  11. Volume growth and stochastic completeness of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Folz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Given the variable-speed random walk on a weighted graph and a metric adapted to the structure of the random walk, we construct a Brownian motion on a closely related metric graph which behaves similarly to the VSRW and for which the associated intrinsic metric has certain desirable properties. Jump probabilities and moments of jump times for Brownian motion on metric graphs with varying edge lengths, jump conductances, and edge densities are computed. We use these results together with a theorem of Sturm for stochastic completeness, or non-explosiveness, on local Dirichlet spaces to prove sharp volume growth criteria in adapted metrics for stochastic completeness of graphs.

  12. Decomposing a planar graph into an independent set and a 3-degenerate graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2001-01-01

    We prove the conjecture made by O. V. Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and a set inducing a 3-degenerate graph. (C) 2001 Academic Press.......We prove the conjecture made by O. V. Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and a set inducing a 3-degenerate graph. (C) 2001 Academic Press....

  13. The khmer software package: enabling efficient nucleotide sequence analysis [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Crusoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The khmer package is a freely available software library for working efficiently with fixed length DNA words, or k-mers. khmer provides implementations of a probabilistic k-mer counting data structure, a compressible De Bruijn graph representation, De Bruijn graph partitioning, and digital normalization. khmer is implemented in C++ and Python, and is freely available under the BSD license at https://github.com/dib-lab/khmer/.

  14. Exact Exponential-Time Algorithms for Domination Problems in Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, J.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis studies exact exponential-time algorithms for domination problems in graphs. Domination problems in graphs are a special kind of subset problems in graphs. A subset problem in a graph is a problem where one is given a graph G=(V,E), and one is asked whether there exist some subset S

  15. Universality for the Distance in Finite Variance Random Graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Esker, H.; Van der Hofstad, R.; Hooghiemstra, G.

    2008-01-01

    We generalize the asymptotic behavior of the graph distance between two uniformly chosen nodes in the configuration model to a wide class of random graphs. Among others, this class contains the Poissonian random graph, the expected degree random graph and the generalized random graph (including the

  16. Dual Use Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA calculation that over a kg of packaging waste are generated per day for a 6 member crew. This represents over 1.5 metric tons of waste during a Mars mission....

  17. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2017-01-01

    This second edition continues to be the most comprehensive review on the developments in advanced electronic packaging technologies, with a focus on materials and processing. Recognized experts in the field contribute to 22 updated and new chapters that provide comprehensive coverage on various 3D package architectures, novel bonding and joining techniques, wire bonding, wafer thinning techniques, organic substrates, and novel approaches to make electrical interconnects between integrated circuit and substrates. Various chapters also address advances in several key packaging materials, including: Lead-free solders Flip chip underfills Epoxy molding compounds Conductive adhesives Die attach adhesives/films Thermal interface materials (TIMS) Materials for fabricating embedded passives including capacitors, inductors, and resistors Materials and processing aspects on wafer-level chip scale package (CSP) and MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) Contributors also review new and emerging technologies such as Light ...

  18. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  19. London 2012 packaging guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines are intended to provide supplemental advice to suppliers and licensees regarding the provisions of the LOCOG Sustainable Sourcing Code that relate to packaging design and materials selection.

  20. On cyclic orthogonal double covers of circulant graphs by special infinite graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. El-Shanawany

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a technique to construct cyclic orthogonal double covers (CODCs of regular circulant graphs by certain infinite graph classes such as complete bipartite and tripartite graphs and disjoint union of butterfly and K1,2n−10 is introduced.