WorldWideScience

Sample records for hibernation inducement trigger

  1. Hibernation induces pentobarbital insensitivity in medulla but not cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Keith B Hengen; Behan, Mary; Carey, Hannah V.; Jones, Mathew V.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), a hibernating species, is a natural model of physiological adaption to an extreme environment. During torpor, body temperature drops to 0–4°C, and the cortex is electrically silent, yet the brain stem continues to regulate cardiorespiratory function. The mechanisms underlying selective inhibition in the brain during torpor are not known. To test whether altered GABAergic function is involved in regional and seasonal differences in neu...

  2. Blood hibernation: a novel strategy to inhibit systemic inflammation and coagulation induced by cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jing; WU Xiao-dong; LIN Ke; Raphael C. Lui; AN Qi; TAO Kai-yu; DU Lei; LIU Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation and coagulation are two intimately cross-linked defense mechanisms of most, if not all organisms to injuries. During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), these two process-is are activated and interact with each other through several common pathways, which may result in subsequent organ dysfunction. In the present study, we hypothesized that the addition of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), and aprotinin to the systemic circulation, hereby referred to as blood hibernation, would attenuate the inflammation and coagulation induced by CPB. Methods Thirty adult mongrel dogs were equally divided into five groups, anesthetized and placed on hypothermic CPB (32 C). Each group received respectively the following treatments: (1) inhalation of 40 ppm nitric oxide; (2) intravenous infusion of 20 ng·kg-1·min-1 of PGE1; (3) 80 000 kallikrein inhibitor units (KIU)/kg of aprotinin; (4) the combination of all three agents (blood hibernation group); and (5) no treatment (control group) during CPB. Activation of leukocyte, platelet, endothelial cell, and formation of thrombin were assessed after CPB.Results As compared with the other four groups, leukocyte counts were higher, while plasma elastase, interleukin-8, CD11b mRNA expression, myeloperoxidase activities and lung tissue leukocyte counts were lower in the blood hibernation group (P<0.05 versus other four groups after CPB). Plasma prothrombin fragment (PTF)1+2, and platelet activation factors were lower, while platelet counts were higher in the blood hibernation group (P<0.05 versus other four groups at 6 and 12 hours after CPB). Electron microscopy showed endothelial pseudopods protrusion, with cell adherence in all four groups except the blood hibernation group where endothelial cells remained intact.Conclusion Blood hibernation, effected by the addition of nitric oxide, PGE1 and aprotinin to the circulating blood during extra-corporeal circulation, was observed to attenuate the inflammation and

  3. Beginning Hibernate

    CERN Document Server

    Minter, Dave; Ottinger, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Beginning Hibernate, Third Edition is ideal if you're experienced in Java with databases (the traditional, or "connected," approach), but new to open-source, lightweight Hibernate, a leading object-relational mapping and database-oriented application development framework.This book packs in information about the release of the Hibernate 4.x persistence layer and provides a clear introduction to the current standard for object-relational persistence in Java. And since the book keeps its focus on Hibernate without wasting time on nonessential third-party tools, you'll be able to immediately star

  4. Beginning Hibernate

    CERN Document Server

    Linwood, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Beginning Hibernate, Second Edition is ideal if you're experienced in Java with databases (the traditional, or "connected," approach), but new to open source, lightweight Hibernate-the de facto object-relational mapping and database-oriented application development framework. This book packs in brand-new information about the latest release of the Hibernate 3.5 persistence layer and provides a clear introduction to the current standard for object-relational persistence in Java. And since the book keeps its focus on Hibernate without wasting time on nonessential third-party tools, you

  5. Hibernation for space travel: Impact on radioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Matteo; Tinganelli, Walter; Negrini, Matteo; Helm, Alexander; Scifoni, Emanuele; Tommasino, Francesco; Sioli, Maximiliano; Zoccoli, Antonio; Durante, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity used by some animals to survive in harsh environmental conditions. The idea of exploiting hibernation for space exploration has been proposed many years ago, but in recent years it is becoming more realistic, thanks to the introduction of specific methods to induce hibernation-like conditions (synthetic torpor) in non-hibernating animals. In addition to the expected advantages in long-term exploratory-class missions in terms of resource consumptions, aging, and psychology, hibernation may provide protection from cosmic radiation damage to the crew. Data from over half century ago in animal models suggest indeed that radiation effects are reduced during hibernation. We will review the mechanisms of increased radioprotection in hibernation, and discuss possible impact on human space exploration.

  6. Hibernation for space travel: Impact on radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Matteo; Tinganelli, Walter; Negrini, Matteo; Helm, Alexander; Scifoni, Emanuele; Tommasino, Francesco; Sioli, Maximiliano; Zoccoli, Antonio; Durante, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Hibernation is a state of reduced metabolic activity used by some animals to survive in harsh environmental conditions. The idea of exploiting hibernation for space exploration has been proposed many years ago, but in recent years it is becoming more realistic, thanks to the introduction of specific methods to induce hibernation-like conditions (synthetic torpor) in non-hibernating animals. In addition to the expected advantages in long-term exploratory-class missions in terms of resource consumptions, aging, and psychology, hibernation may provide protection from cosmic radiation damage to the crew. Data from over half century ago in animal models suggest indeed that radiation effects are reduced during hibernation. We will review the mechanisms of increased radioprotection in hibernation, and discuss possible impact on human space exploration.

  7. Hibernation-like state induced by an opioid peptide protects against experimental stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Tsung-Ping

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delta opioid peptide [D-ala2,D-leU5]enkephalin (DADLE induces hibernation in summer ground squirrels, and enhances preservation and survival of isolated or transplanted lungs and hearts. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of DADLE in the central nervous system. Results Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with DADLE (4 mg/kg every 2 h × 4 injections, i.p. or saline prior to unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Daily behavioral tests revealed that ischemic animals treated with DADLE did not show any significant behavioral dysfunctions compared with saline-treated ischemic animals. Opioid antagonists only transiently inhibited the protective effect of DADLE, indicating the participation of non-opioid mechanisms in DADLE neuroprotection. Histological examination using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC revealed that brains from ischemic animals treated with DADLE, either alone or with adjuvant opioid blockers, exhibited almost completely intact striata. In contrast, brains from ischemic animals that received saline showed significant infarction in the lateral striatum. Analyses of apoptotic cell death revealed a significant increase in the p-53 mRNA expression in the striatum of ischemic animals that received saline, while those that received DADLE exhibited near normal striatal p-53 expression. This protective effect was accompanied by significant increments in protein levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the striatum of DADLE-treated ischemic animals. Conclusion These results indicate that DADLE protected against necrotic and apoptotic cell death processes associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury. The present study demonstrates that delta opioids are crucially involved in stroke, suggesting that the opioid system is important in the study of brain injury and protection.

  8. Metabolic hormone FGF21 is induced in ground squirrels during hibernation but its overexpression is not sufficient to cause torpor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany T Nelson

    Full Text Available Hibernation is a natural adaptation that allows certain mammals to survive physiological extremes that are lethal to humans. Near freezing body temperatures, heart rates of 3-10 beats per minute, absence of food consumption, and depressed metabolism are characteristic of hibernation torpor bouts that are periodically interrupted by brief interbout arousals (IBAs. The molecular basis of torpor induction is unknown, however starved mice overexpressing the metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 promote fat utilization, reduce body temperature, and readily enter torpor-all hallmarks of mammalian hibernation. In this study we cloned FGF21 from the naturally hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus and found that levels of FGF21 mRNA in liver and FGF21 protein in serum are elevated during hibernation torpor bouts and significantly elevated during IBAs compared to summer active animals. The effects of artificially elevating circulating FGF21 concentrations 50 to 100-fold via adenoviral-mediated overexpression were examined at three different times of the year. This is the first time that a transgenic approach has been used in a natural hibernator to examine mechanistic aspects of hibernation. Surgically implanted transmitters measured various metrics of the hibernation phenotype over a 7-day period including changes in motor activity, heart rate and core body temperature. In April fed-state animals, FGF21 overexpression decreased blood insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, effects similar to those seen in obese mice. However, elevated FGF21 concentrations did not cause torpor in these fed-state animals nor did they cause torpor or affect metabolic parameters in fasted-state animals in March/April, August or October. We conclude that FGF21 is strongly regulated during torpor and IBA but that its overexpression is not sufficient to cause torpor in naturally hibernating ground squirrels.

  9. Biochemical adaptations of mammalian hibernation: exploring squirrels as a perspective model for naturally induced reversible insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C-W.; Biggar, K.K.; Storey, K.B. [Carleton University, Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-28

    An important disease among human metabolic disorders is type 2 diabetes mellitus. This disorder involves multiple physiological defects that result from high blood glucose content and eventually lead to the onset of insulin resistance. The combination of insulin resistance, increased glucose production, and decreased insulin secretion creates a diabetic metabolic environment that leads to a lifetime of management. Appropriate models are critical for the success of research. As such, a unique model providing insight into the mechanisms of reversible insulin resistance is mammalian hibernation. Hibernators, such as ground squirrels and bats, are excellent examples of animals exhibiting reversible insulin resistance, for which a rapid increase in body weight is required prior to entry into dormancy. Hibernator studies have shown differential regulation of specific molecular pathways involved in reversible resistance to insulin. The present review focuses on this growing area of research and the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis, and explores the roles of the Akt signaling pathway during hibernation. Here, we propose a link between hibernation, a well-documented response to periods of environmental stress, and reversible insulin resistance, potentially facilitated by key alterations in the Akt signaling network, PPAR-γ/PGC-1α regulation, and non-coding RNA expression. Coincidentally, many of the same pathways are frequently found to be dysregulated during insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes. Hence, the molecular networks that may regulate reversible insulin resistance in hibernating mammals represent a novel approach by providing insight into medical treatment of insulin resistance in humans.

  10. Hibernate A Developer's Notebook

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, James

    2004-01-01

    Do you enjoy writing software, except for the database code? Hibernate:A Developer's Notebook is for you. Database experts may enjoy fiddling with SQL, but you don't have to--the rest of the application is the fun part. And even database experts dread the tedious plumbing and typographical spaghetti needed to put their SQL into a Java program. Hibernate: A Developers Notebook shows you how to use Hibernate to automate persistence: you write natural Java objects and some simple configuration files, and Hibernate automates all the interaction between your objects and the database. You don't

  11. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Ursodeoxycholic Acid Toxicity & Side Effects: Ursodeoxycholic Acid Freezes Regeneration & Induces Hibernation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magd A. Kotb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA is a steroid bile acid approved for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. UDCA is reported to have “hepato-protective properties”. Yet, UDCA has “unanticipated” toxicity, pronounced by more than double number of deaths, and eligibility for liver transplantation compared to the control group in 28 mg/kg/day in primary sclerosing cholangitis, necessitating trial halt in North America. UDCA is associated with increase in hepatocellular carcinoma in PBC especially when it fails to achieve biochemical response (10 and 15 years incidence of 9% and 20% respectively. “Unanticipated” UDCA toxicity includes hepatitis, pruritus, cholangitis, ascites, vanishing bile duct syndrome, liver cell failure, death, severe watery diarrhea, pneumonia, dysuria, immune-suppression, mutagenic effects and withdrawal syndrome upon sudden halt. UDCA inhibits DNA repair, co-enzyme A, cyclic AMP, p53, phagocytosis, and inhibits induction of nitric oxide synthatase. It is genotoxic, exerts aneugenic activity, and arrests apoptosis even after cellular phosphatidylserine externalization. UDCA toxicity is related to its interference with drug detoxification, being hydrophilic and anti-apoptotic, has a long half-life, has transcriptional mutational abilities, down-regulates cellular functions, has a very narrow difference between the recommended (13 mg/kg/day and toxic dose (28 mg/kg/day, and it typically transforms into lithocholic acid that induces DNA strand breakage, it is uniquely co-mutagenic, and promotes cell transformation. UDCA beyond PBC is unjustified.

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  20. Getting Started with Hibernate 3

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, James

    2008-01-01

    Hibernate has clearly arrived. Are you ready to benefit from its simple way of working with relational databases as Java objects? This PDF updates the introductory material from the award-winning Hibernate: A Developer's Notebook to teach you how to jump right in and get productive with the current release of Hibernate. You'll be walked through the ins and outs of setting up Hibernate and some related tools that make it easier to use--and that may give you new ideas about how to store information in your Java programs. In short, this PDF gives you exactly the information you need to start u

  1. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  7. Induced and triggered earthquakes at The Geysers geothermal reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lane R.; Majer, Ernest L.

    2017-05-01

    The Geysers geothermal reservoir in northern California is the site of numerous studies of both seismicity induced by injection of fluids and seismicity triggered by other earthquakes. Data from a controlled experiment in the northwest part of The Geysers in the time period 2011 to 2015 are used to study these induced and triggered earthquakes and possible differences between them. Causal solutions to the elastic equations for a porous medium show how fluid injection generates fast elastic and diffusion waves followed by a much slower diffusive wake. Calculations of fluid increment, fluid pressure and elastic stress are used to investigate both when and why seismic failure takes place. Taking into account stress concentrations caused by material heterogeneity leads to the conclusion that fluid injection by itself can cause seismic activity with no need for tectonic forces. Induced events that occur at early times are best explained by changes in stress rate, while those that occur at later times are best explained by changes in stress. While some of the seismic activity is clearly induced by injection of fluids, also present is triggered seismicity that includes aftershock sequences, swarms of seismicity triggered by other earthquakes at The Geysers and clusters of multiple earthquakes. No basic differences are found between the source mechanisms of these different types of earthquakes.

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  18. Response of gut microbiota to fasting and hibernation in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Kei; Fujiwara, Reiko; Takemura, Naoki; Ogasawara, Toru; Watanabe, Jun; Ito, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tatsuya

    2009-10-01

    Although hibernating mammals wake occasionally to eat during torpor, this period represents a state of fasting. Fasting is known to alter the gut microbiota in nonhibernating mammals; therefore, hibernation may also affect the gut microbiota. However, there are few reports of gut microbiota in hibernating mammals. The present study aimed to compare the gut microbiota in hibernating torpid Syrian hamsters with that in active counterparts by using culture-independent analyses. Hamsters were allocated to either torpid, fed active, or fasted active groups. Hibernation was successfully induced by maintaining darkness at 4 degrees C. Flow cytometry analysis of cecal bacteria showed that 96-h fasting reduced the total gut bacteria. This period of fasting also reduced the concentrations of short chain fatty acids in the cecal contents. In contrast, total bacterial numbers and concentrations of short chain fatty acids were unaffected by hibernation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments indicated that fasting and hibernation modulated the cecal microbiota. Analysis of 16S rRNA clone library and species-specific real-time quantitative PCR showed that the class Clostridia predominated in both active and torpid hamsters and that populations of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin degrader, were increased by fasting but not by hibernation. From these results, we conclude that the gut microbiota responds differently to fasting and hibernation in Syrian hamsters.

  19. Glutathione redox balance in hibernating Chinese soft-shelled turtle Pelodiscus sinensis hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; Niu, Cuijuan; Liu, Yukun; Chen, Bojian

    2017-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) system is a critical component of antioxidant defense, which is important for hibernating survive of turtle hatchlings. The present work measured changes at the mRNA level of genes involved in GSH synthesis, GSH reduction and GSH utilization, as well as enzyme activity, in Pelodiscus sinensis hatchlings during hibernation. Samples were taken in the field at pre-hibernation (17°C, Mud temperature (MT)), hibernation (5.8°C, MT) and arousal (20.1°C, MT). Cerebral total GSH content decreased during hibernation, recovered after arousal along with a stable ratio of GSH/GSSG. Hepatic total GSH increased after arousal and pushed the ratio of GSH/GSSG to a more reduced status. Cerebral glutathione reductase (GR) mRNA and activity were depressed during hibernation then recovered after arousal. However, hepatic GR mRNA elevated during hibernation but its activity did not change. Tissue-specific changes of GR activity and mRNA may promote these tissue-specific changes of GSH redox. Hibernation caused little effect on mRNA level of glutathione synthetase (GS) while arousal induced them in the brain and liver. Most Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) isoform mRNAs did not change in both brain and liver during hibernation, then induced after arousal. Cerebral and hepatic GST activities kept stable throughout the entire experiment. Our results showed that GSH system may play a more important role in antioxidant defense in the liver while mainly maintaining stable redox balance in the brain of hibernating P. sinensis hatchings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  1. Different Thermostability of Skeletal Muscle Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase from Hibernating and Euthermic Jerboa (Jaculus orientalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IDDAR Abdelghani; CAMPOS Luis A.; SANCHO Javier; SERRANO Aurelio; SOUKRI Abdelaziz

    2003-01-01

    In previous study, we demonstrated that the specific activity of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) in skeletal muscle of induced hibernating jerboa (hibernating GAPDH) was 3-4 folds lower than that of the one in the skeletal muscle of the euthermic jerboa (euthermic GAPDH). A significant decrease in both GAPDH protein and GapC mRNA levels occurs when hibernating, but the purified hibernating GAPDH is less active than the euthermic GAPDH. To investigate the physico-chemical basis of this lower activity, the behaviour during thermal inactivation of skeletal muscle GAPDH from hibernating and euthermic tissues was examined by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence emission, circular dichroism and ultraviolet absorption. A clear resistance to thermal denaturation was observed in the hibernating GAPDH compared with the euthermic GAPDH. The different temperature of denaturation found in these proteins by both fluorimetry and circular dichroism indicates that there might exist conformational changes of GAPDH upon hibernation that could affect the stability of this enzyme.

  2. Separating triggered and stress-change induced seismcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Once a major earthquake occurs, it usually not only triggers a sequence of many aftershock, but also changes the tectonic stress field in the regions nearby. According to the rate and state law (Dieterich, 1994), such stress changes result in a permanent change of the seismicity rate, increment or decrement. However, since aftershock sequence lasts quite a long time before it decays off, it is hard tell whether the high level of seismicity after a big earthquake is the continuation of the aftershock activity or caused by the changes of stress due this big earthquake. In this study, by making use of the space-time ETAS model (Ogata, 1998) and the stochastic declustering method (Zhuang et al., 2002, 2004), I developed a method to separate the seismicity induced by stress-change from the aftershock activity in a probability manner. For example, it is found that the probabilities that Lushan earthquakes belong the background seismcity, aftershock of the Wenchuan earthquake, are stress-change induced seismcity are, respectively, 38% and 12%, 50%. References Dieterich, J.H. (1994) A constitutive law for rate of earthquake production and its application to earthquake clustering, J. Geophys. Res. , 99 , 2601-2618. Ogata, Y. (1998. Space-time point-process models for earthquake occur- rences, Ann. Inst. Stat. Math., 50, 379-402. Zhuang J., Ogata Y. and Vere-Jones D. (2004). Analyzing earthquake clustering features by using stochastic reconstruction. Journal of Geophysical Research, 109, No. B5, B05301, doi:10.1029/2003JB002879. Zhuang J., Ogata Y. and Vere-Jones D. (2002). Stochastic declustering of space-time earthquake occurrences. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 97: 369-380.

  3. Hibernate Recipes A Problem-Solution Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Hibernate continues to be the most popular out-of-the-box framework solution for Java Persistence and data/database accessibility techniques and patterns. It is used for e-commerce-based web applications as well as heavy-duty transactional systems for the enterprise. Gary Mak, the author of the best-selling Spring Recipes, now brings you Hibernate Recipes. This book contains a collection of code recipes and templates for learning and building Hibernate solutions for you and your clients. This book is your pragmatic day-to-day reference and guide for doing all things involving Hibernate. There

  4. Life in the cold: links between mammalian hibernation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-02-01

    The biological process of aging is the primary determinant of lifespan, but the factors that influence the rate of aging are not yet clearly understood and remain a challenging question. Mammals are characterized by >100-fold differences in maximal lifespan, influenced by relative variances in body mass and metabolic rate. Recent discoveries have identified long-lived mammalian species that deviate from the expected longevity quotient. A commonality among many long-lived species is the capacity to undergo metabolic rate depression, effectively re-programming normal metabolism in response to extreme environmental stress and enter states of torpor or hibernation. This stress tolerant phenotype often involves a reduction in overall metabolic rate to just 1-5% of the normal basal rate as well as activation of cytoprotective responses. At the cellular level, major energy savings are achieved via coordinated suppression of many ATP-expensive cell functions; e.g. global rates of protein synthesis are strongly reduced via inhibition of the insulin signaling axis. At the same time, various studies have shown activation of stress survival signaling during hibernation including up-regulation of protein chaperones, increased antioxidant defenses, and transcriptional activation of pro-survival signaling such as the FOXO and p53 pathways. Many similarities and parallels exist between hibernation phenotypes and different long-lived models, e.g. signal transduction pathways found to be commonly regulated during hibernation are also known to induce lifespan extension in animals such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, we highlight some of the molecular mechanisms that promote longevity in classic aging models C. elegans, Drosophila, and mice, while providing a comparative analysis to how they are regulated during mammalian hibernation.

  5. Triggered Swarms and Induced Aftershock Sequences in Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural geothermal systems, which are used for energy generation, are usually associated with high seismic activity. This can be related to the large-scale injection and extraction of fluids to enhance geothermal recovery. This results in the changes of the pore pressure and pore-elastic stress field and can stimulate the occurrence of earthquakes. These systems are also prone to triggering of seismicity by the passage of seismic waves generated by large distant main shocks. In this study, we analyze clustering and triggering of seismicity at several geothermal fields in California. Particularly, we consider the seismicity at the Geysers, Coso, and Salton Sea geothermal fields. We analyze aftershock sequences generated by local large events with magnitudes greater than 4.0 and earthquake swarms generated by several significant long distant main shocks. We show that the rate of the aftershock sequences generated by the local large events in the two days before and two days after the reference event can be modelled reasonably well by the time dependent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. On the other hand, the swarms of activity triggered by large distant earthquakes cannot be described by the ETAS model. To model the increase in the rate of seismicity associated with triggering by large distant main shocks we introduce an additional time-dependent triggering mechanism into the ETAS model. In almost all cases the frequency-magnitude statistics of triggered sequences follow Gutenberg-Richter scaling to a good approximation. The analysis indicates that the seismicity triggered by relatively large local events can initiate sequences similar to regular aftershock sequences. In contrast, the distant main shocks trigger swarm like activity with faster decaying rates.

  6. Statistical Studies of Induced and Triggered Seismicity at The Geysers, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, A.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yıkılmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2017-06-01

    This study considers the statistics of fluid-induced and remotely triggered seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field, California. Little seismicity was reported before steam extraction began in 1960. Beginning in 1980 the residual water associated with power generation was re-injected, producing induced seismicity. Beginning in 1997 large-scale injections of cold water began to enhance the generation of steam. This led to an increase in M 1.25 events. The GR and decay statistics are given. However, to separate aftershocks from remotely triggered earthquakes, an additional triggered sequence is studied. The M = 7.2 4/4/10 Baja earthquake triggered some 34 M > 1.25 earthquakes at The Geysers in the first hour including an M = 3.37 event. We conclude that the remotely triggered seismicity is dominated by local aftershocks of the larger remotely triggered earthquakes.

  7. Good and bad in the hibernating brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkstra, AM

    2006-01-01

    Hibernators survive long periods of time without behavioural activity. To minimize energy expenditure, hibernators use the natural hypometabolic state of torpor. Deep torpor in ground squirrels is accompanied by reduction of brain activity, and is associated with changes in electrical activity patte

  8. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, David T.S.; Cryan, Paul; Fricker, Paul D.; Dannemiller, Nicholas G.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding natural behaviours is essential to determining how animals deal with new threats (e.g. emerging diseases). However, natural behaviours of animals with cryptic lifestyles, like hibernating bats, are often poorly characterized. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an unprecedented disease threatening multiple species of hibernating bats, and pathogen-induced changes to host behaviour may contribute to mortality. To better understand the behaviours of hibernating bats and how they might relate to WNS, we developed new ways of studying hibernation across entire seasons.We used thermal-imaging video surveillance cameras to observe little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) and Indiana bats (M. sodalis) in two caves over multiple winters. We developed new, sharable software to test for autocorrelation and periodicity of arousal signals in recorded video.We processed 740 days (17,760 hr) of video at a rate of >1,000 hr of video imagery in less than 1 hr using a desktop computer with sufficient resolution to detect increases in arousals during midwinter in both species and clear signals of daily arousal periodicity in infected M. sodalis.Our unexpected finding of periodic synchronous group arousals in hibernating bats demonstrate the potential for video methods and suggest some bats may have innate behavioural strategies for coping with WNS. Surveillance video and accessible analysis software make it now practical to investigate long-term behaviours of hibernating bats and other hard-to-study animals.

  9. Hormonal control of lipolysis from the white adipose tissue of hibernating jerboa (Jaculus orientalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau-Hamsany, C; Castex, C; Hoo-Paris, R; Kacemi, N; Sutter, B

    1988-01-01

    1. Plasma glucose, glycerol, free fatty acids and total lipid content of the white adipose tissue were measured in euthermic and hibernating jerboa. 2. During hibernation, plasma glucose and glycerol were low compared to the euthermic animals, whereas there was no obvious difference in plasma free fatty acids. The white adipose tissue lipid content was strongly reduced in the hibernating state. 3. The effect of lipolytic hormones (norepinephrine and glucagon) and antilipolytic hormone (insulin) on in vitro glycerol release by adipose tissue isolated from hibernating or euthermic jerboa has been studied. 4. The white adipose tissue from hibernating jerboa presented a higher sensitivity to norepinephrine and glucagon than that of euthermic jerboa; insulin did not modify either basal glycerol release or lipolysis induced by the two lipolytic hormones at low temperatures (7 degrees C) and during the rewarming (from 7 degrees C to 37 degrees C) of the tissue slices. 5. These results suggested that white adipose tissue constitutes an important source of substrates derived from lipolysis during hibernation.

  10. Glucagon secretion in the hibernating edible dormouse (Glis glis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo-Paris, R; Castex, C; Hamsany, M; Thari, A; Sutter, B

    1985-01-01

    Plasma glucose and glucagon concentrations were measured in edible dormice during the bout of hibernation, arousal and active periods. During lethargy, plasma glucose and glucagon were low, compared to active values and did not fluctuate throughout the phase. During rewarming, plasma glucose regularly increased from 17 degrees to 37 degrees C while plasma glucagon rose after the 17 degrees C stage and reached the higher values at 26 degrees C, then slightly decreased at 37 degrees C. During arousal, plasma levels of free amino acids progressively increased. The effect of temperature and secretagogue (glucose and arginine) on glucagon secretion was studied using perfused pancreas from hibernating edible dormouse. In vitro rewarming of pancreas induced an increase in glucagon secretion. Glucagon secretion was regulated by glucose (inhibitory effect) and by arginine (stimulating effect) up to 25 degrees C. The effect of temperature and glucagon on oxygen uptake of hibernating edible dormouse brown fat was studied using an in vitro technique. Rewarming strongly increased oxygen consumption from 10 to 37 degrees C. Glucagon enhanced oxygen consumption up to 20 degrees C.

  11. Statistical Studies of Induced and Triggered Seismicity at The Geysers, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Angela

    This study considers the statistics of induced and triggered seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field, California. Little seismicity was reported before steam extraction began in 1960. In 1980 the residual water associated with power generation was re-injected, producing induced seismicity. Beginning in 1997 large-scale injections of cold water began in order to enhance the generation of steam. This led to an increase in M 1.25 events. The GR and decay statistics will be given. However, in order to separate second-order aftershocks from triggered aftershocks, an additional triggered sequence is studied. The M = 7.2 4/4/10 Baja earthquake had some 34 M >1.25 triggered events in the first hour including a M = 3.37 event.

  12. Chlorella vulgaris triggers apoptosis in hepatocarcinogenesis-induced rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emey Suhana MOHD AZAMAI; Suhaniza SULAIMAN; Shafina Hanim MOHD HABIB; Mee Lee LOOI; Srijit DAS; Nor Aini ABDUL HAMID; Wan Zurinah WANG NGAH; Yasmin Anum MOHD YUSOF

    2009-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris (CV) has been reported to have antioxidant and anticancer properties. We evaluated the effect of CV on apoptotic regulator protein expression in liver cancer-induced rats. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into eight groups: control group (normal diet), CDE group (choline deficient diet supplemented with ethionine in drinking water to induce hepatocarcinogenesis), CV groups with three different doses of CV (50, 150, and 300 mg/kg body weight), and CDE groups treated with different doses of CV (50, 150, and 300 mg/kg body weight). Rats were sacrificed at various weeks and liver tissues were embedded in paraffin blocks for immunohistochemistry studies. CV, at increasing doses, decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, but increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein, caspase 8, in CDE rats, which was correlated with decreased hepatoctyes proliferation and increased apoptosis as determined by bromodeoxy-uridine (BrdU) labeling and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Our study shows that CV has definite chemopreventive effect by inducing apoptosis via decreasing the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing the expression of caspase 8 in hepatocarcinogenesis-induced rats.

  13. Technical advances in trigger-induced RNA interference gene silencing in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Foda, Bardees M; Suresh, Susmitha; Singh, Upinder

    2016-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has a robust endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. There are abundant 27 nucleotide (nt) anti-sense small RNAs (AS sRNAs) that target genes for silencing and the genome encodes many genes involved in the RNAi pathway such as Argonaute proteins. Importantly, an E. histolytica gene with numerous AS sRNAs can function as a "trigger" to induce silencing of a gene that is fused to the trigger. Thus, the amebic RNAi pathway regulates gene expression relevant to amebic biology and has additionally been harnessed as a tool for genetic manipulation. In this study we have further improved the trigger-induced gene silencing method. We demonstrate that rather than using the full-length gene, a short portion of the coding region fused to a trigger is sufficient to induce silencing; the first 537 bp of the E. histolytica rhomboid gene (EhROM1) fused in-frame to the trigger was sufficient to silence EhROM1. We also demonstrated that the trigger method could silence two amebic genes concomitantly; fusion of the coding regions of EhROM1 and transcription factor, EhMyb, in-frame to a trigger gene resulted in both genes being silenced. Alternatively, two genes can be silenced sequentially: EhROM1-silenced parasites with no drug selection plasmid were transfected with trigger-EhMyb, resulting in parasites with both EhROM1 and EhMyb silenced. With all approaches tested, the trigger-mediated silencing was substantive and silencing was maintained despite loss of the G418 selectable marker. All gene silencing was associated with generation of AS sRNAs to the silenced gene. We tested the reversibility of the trigger system using inhibitors of histone modifications but found that the silencing was highly stable. This work represents a technical advance in the trigger gene silencing method in E. histolytica. Approaches that readily silence multiple genes add significantly to the genetic toolkit available to the ameba research community. Copyright © 2016

  14. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.

  15. Cholinergic and noradrenergic triggers' in soman induced convulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, M.T.; Zimmer, L.; Ennis, M.; Etri, M.

    1993-05-13

    Considerable evidence suggests that soman induced seizure's are initiated in the piriform cortex (PC). Consistent with this, PC is the most frequent site of neuropathology in soman treated rats and other species. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that convulsive doses of soman cause the rapid induction of the immediate early gene protein product, Fos, in piriform cortex (PC). Fos is known to be expressed when neurons undergo sustained excitatory activity. Following soman, Fos is selectively expressed by neurons in layers II Ill of PC. These neurons are known to send excitatory projections to the hippocampus and to thalamus and neocortex. Thus, we have suggested that soman may initially cause seizure activity in layer II-III PC neurons; this seizure activity could then spread to the hippocampus and neocortex. Consistent with this hypothesis, we have observed that Fos is expressed in hippocampus, thalamus and neocortex subsequent to its expression in PC.

  16. Rhinovirus-induced calcium flux triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 activation in bronchial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafilou, Kathy; Kar, Satwik; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Triantafilou, Martha

    2013-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses have been linked with underlying lung disorders, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in children and adults. However, the mechanism of virus-induced airway inflammation is poorly understood. In this study, using virus deletion mutants and silencing for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), we show that the rhinovirus ion channel protein 2B triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in bronchial cells. 2B protein targets the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi and induces Ca(2+) reduction in these organelles, thereby disturbing the intracellular calcium homeostasis. NLRP3 and NLRC5 act in a cooperative manner during the inflammasome assembly by sensing intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes and trigger IL-1β secretion. These results reveal for the first time that human rhinovirus infection in primary bronchial cells triggers inflammasome activation.

  17. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wojda, Samantha J; Barlow, Lindsay N; Drummer, Thomas D; Castillo, Alesha B; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2009-12-01

    Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.

  18. Hibernation Control Mechanism and Possible Applications to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, N.

    Mammalian hibernation, characterized by the ability to survive temporarily at low body temperatures close to 0oC, has been reported to increase resistance to various lethal events such as low body temperature, severe ischemia, bacterial infection and irradiation, and to prolong the life span. The application of this physiological phenomenon to space life has been dreamed of. However, realization of this dream has been prevented by a poor understanding of the control mechanisms of hibernation. Recent findings of a novel and unique protein complex (HP) in the blood of chipmunks, a rodent hibernator, which is controlled by the endogenous circannual rhythm of hibernation, allowed new developments in understanding the molecular mechanism of hibernation and its physiological significance. From these studies, two hormones regulated by the brain were identified as promising candidate molecules controlling HP production in the liver, assuming that hibernation is controlled via the neuroendocrine system and regulated by the endogenous circannual rhythm in the brain. A circannual HP rhythm was observed in chipmunks maintaining euthermia under conditions of constant warmth, suggesting that the physiological control of hibernation progresses without a lowering of body temperature. Furthermore, the study of HP rhythm on longevity revealed that a circannual rhythm plays an essential role in the much longer life span of hibernators. The present progress in hibernation research may open a new pathway for manipulating a circannual rhythm controlling hibernation in humans. In the future, this will make it feasible to take advantage of hibernation in space life.

  19. Characterization of an Opioid-Like Hibernation Induction Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    species, our primate studies indicated that intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion in conscious chaired primates Wd the isolated HIT-containing...trauma to the organ, anaphylactic shock, peptone shock, or an injection ol histamine . This swelling is though to be due to an obstruction of the

  20. Acoustically induced slip in sheared granular layers: Application to dynamic earthquake triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdowsi, Behrooz; Griffa, Michele; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.; Marone, Chris; Carmeliet, Jan

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental mystery in earthquake physics is "how can an earthquake be triggered by distant seismic sources?" Here we use discrete element method simulations of a granular layer, during stick slip, that is subject to transient vibrational excitation to gain further insight into the physics of dynamic earthquake triggering. Using Coulomb friction law for grains interaction, we observe delayed triggering of slip in the granular gouge. We find that at a critical vibrational amplitude (strain) there is an abrupt transition from negligible time-advanced slip (clock advance) to full clock advance; i.e., transient vibration and triggered slip are simultaneous. The critical strain is of order 10-6, similar to observations in the laboratory and in Earth. The transition is related to frictional weakening of the granular layer due to a dramatic decrease in coordination number and the weakening of the contact force network. Associated with this frictional weakening is a pronounced decrease in the elastic modulus of the layer. The study has important implications for mechanisms of triggered earthquakes and induced seismic events and points out the underlying processes in response of the fault gouge to dynamic transient stresses.

  1. The dilp2/5 genes control diapause inducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Schiesari, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Many holometabolous insects hibernate by triggering diapause, an “actively-induced” dormancy that blocks developmental functions. Yet, the nature of signals enhancing the plasticity of developmental system and underlying diapause inducibility is still elusive. We show that the “Insulin/IGF” dilp2/5 genes, encoding for developmental hormones, antagonize diapause switch in D. melanogaster and their modulation is pivotal in sensitizing the developmental system to environmental perturbations. Fun...

  2. Antioxidant Defenses in the Brains of Bats during Hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiuyuan; Ge, Hanxiao; Liao, Chen-Chong; Liu, Di; Zhang, Shuyi; Pan, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is a strategy used by some mammals to survive a cold winter. Small hibernating mammals, such as squirrels and hamsters, use species- and tissue-specific antioxidant defenses to cope with oxidative insults during hibernation. Little is known about antioxidant responses and their regulatory mechanisms in hibernating bats. We found that the total level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the brain of each of the two distantly related hibernating bats M. ricketti and R. ferrumequinum at arousal was lower than that at torpid or active state. We also found that the levels of malondialdehyde (product of lipid peroxidation) of the two hibernating species of bats were significantly lower than those of non-hibernating bats R. leschenaultia and C. sphinx. This observation suggests that bats maintain a basal level of ROS/RNS that does no harm to the brain during hibernation. Results of Western blotting showed that hibernating bats expressed higher amounts of antioxidant proteins than non-hibernating bats and that M. ricketti bats upregulated the expression of some enzymes to overcome oxidative stresses, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. In contrast, R. ferrumequinum bats maintained a relatively high level of superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione reductase, and thioredoxin-2 throughout the three different states of hibernation cycles. The levels of glutathione (GSH) were higher in M. ricketti bats than in R. ferrumequinum bats and were significantly elevated in R. ferrumequinum bats after torpor. These data suggest that M. ricketti bats use mainly antioxidant enzymes and R. ferrumequinum bats rely on both enzymes and low molecular weight antioxidants (e.g., glutathione) to avoid oxidative stresses during arousal. Furthermore, Nrf2 and FOXOs play major roles in the regulation of antioxidant defenses in the brains of bats during hibernation. Our study revealed strategies used by bats against oxidative

  3. A Hibernation-Like State for Transplantable Organs: Is Hydrogen Sulfide Therapy the Future of Organ Preservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, George J; Bouma, Hjalmar R; Saha, Manujendra N; Lobb, Ian; Henning, Robert H; Sener, Alp

    2017-08-29

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, during which renal grafts from deceased donors are routinely cold stored to suppress metabolic demand and thereby limit ischemic injury. However, prolonged cold storage, followed by reperfusion, induces extensive tissue damage termed cold ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) and puts the graft at risk of both early and late rejection. Recent Advances: Deep hibernators constitute a natural model of coping with cold IRI as they regularly alternate between 4°C and 37°C. Recently, endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gas with a characteristic rotten egg smell, has been implicated in organ protection in hibernation. In renal transplantation, H2S also seems to confer cytoprotection by lowering metabolism, thereby creating a hibernation-like environment, and increasing preservation time while allowing cellular processes of preservation of homeostasis and tissue remodeling to take place, thus increasing renal graft survival. Although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of organ protection during hibernation have not been fully explored, mammalian hibernation may offer a great clinical promise to safely cold store and reperfuse donor organs. In this review, we first discuss mammalian hibernation as a natural model of cold organ preservation with reference to the kidney and highlight the involvement of H2S during hibernation. Next, we present recent developments on the protective effects and mechanisms of exogenous and endogenous H2S in preclinical models of transplant IRI and evaluate the potential of H2S therapy in organ preservation as great promise for renal transplant recipients in the future. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  4. DNA Lesions Induced by Replication Stress Trigger Mitotic Aberration and Tetraploidy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Yoshioka, Yoshiko; Shinohe, Keitaro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Unno, Junya; Takagi, Masatoshi; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Mizutani, Shuki; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2010-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress. PMID:20098673

  5. DNA lesions induced by replication stress trigger mitotic aberration and tetraploidy development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ichijima

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress.

  6. The Adaptive Response to Intestinal Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Hibernation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-23

    Balslev-Clausen, A., J. M. McCarthy and H. V. Carey. 2003. Hibernation reduces pancreatic amylase levels in ground squirrels. Comp. Biochem...pathogens, despite the long term absence of food intake during the winter months. The results shown below support the conclusion that hibernators do...proposal but related to overall objective: Effect of hibernation on pancreatic amylase levels: This award also supported a small study that examined

  7. Mechanisms responsible for decreased glomerular filtration in hibernation and hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G. E.; Musacchia, X. J.; Jones, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, red blood cell and plasma volumes, and relative distribution of cardiac output were made on hibernating and hypothermic adult male and female golden hamsters weighing 120-140 g to study the mechanisms underlying the elimination or marked depression of renal function in hibernation and hypothermia. The results suggest that the elimination or marked depression in renal function reported in hibernation and hypothermia may partly be explained by alterations in cardiovascular system function. Renal perfusion pressure which decreases nearly 60% in both hibernation and hypothermia and a decrease in plasma volume of roughly 35% in the hypothermic animal might both be expected to markedly alter glomerular function.

  8. Hibernal Emergence of Chironomidae in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Baranov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-seven species of Chironomidae were detected emerging in the Crimea during the period from December 2010 to March 2013. Twenty-three are Orthocladiinae and 4 are Chironominae (one Chironomini and three Tanytarsini species. Nine species are recorded for the first time in Crimea. At the genus-level the hibernal emergence in Crimea shows resemblance to the patterns reported for streams in Kansas.

  9. Unraveling a three-step spatiotemporal mechanism of triggering of receptor-induced Nipah virus fusion and cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion is essential for entry of the biomedically-important paramyxoviruses into their host cells (viral-cell fusion, and for syncytia formation (cell-cell fusion, often induced by paramyxoviral infections [e.g. those of the deadly Nipah virus (NiV]. For most paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion requires two viral glycoproteins. Upon receptor binding, the attachment glycoprotein (HN/H/G triggers the fusion glycoprotein (F to undergo conformational changes that merge viral and/or cell membranes. However, a significant knowledge gap remains on how HN/H/G couples cell receptor binding to F-triggering. Via interdisciplinary approaches we report the first comprehensive mechanism of NiV membrane fusion triggering, involving three spatiotemporally sequential cell receptor-induced conformational steps in NiV-G: two in the head and one in the stalk. Interestingly, a headless NiV-G mutant was able to trigger NiV-F, and the two head conformational steps were required for the exposure of the stalk domain. Moreover, the headless NiV-G prematurely triggered NiV-F on virions, indicating that the NiV-G head prevents premature triggering of NiV-F on virions by concealing a F-triggering stalk domain until the correct time and place: receptor-binding. Based on these and recent paramyxovirus findings, we present a comprehensive and fundamentally conserved mechanistic model of paramyxovirus membrane fusion triggering and cell entry.

  10. Cardiac function adaptations in hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T

    2010-03-01

    Research on the cardiovascular physiology of hibernating mammals may provide insight into evolutionary adaptations; however, anesthesia used to handle wild animals may affect the cardiovascular parameters of interest. To overcome these potential biases, we investigated the functional cardiac phenotype of the hibernating grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) during the active, transitional and hibernating phases over a 4 year period in conscious rather than anesthetized bears. The bears were captive born and serially studied from the age of 5 months to 4 years. Heart rate was significantly different from active (82.6 +/- 7.7 beats/min) to hibernating states (17.8 +/- 2.8 beats/min). There was no difference from the active to the hibernating state in diastolic and stroke volume parameters or in left atrial area. Left ventricular volume:mass was significantly increased during hibernation indicating decreased ventricular mass. Ejection fraction of the left ventricle was not different between active and hibernating states. In contrast, total left atrial emptying fraction was significantly reduced during hibernation (17.8 +/- 2.8%) as compared to the active state (40.8 +/- 1.9%). Reduced atrial chamber function was also supported by reduced atrial contraction blood flow velocities and atrial contraction ejection fraction during hibernation; 7.1 +/- 2.8% as compared to 20.7 +/- 3% during the active state. Changes in the diastolic cardiac filling cycle, especially atrial chamber contribution to ventricular filling, appear to be the most prominent macroscopic functional change during hibernation. Thus, we propose that these changes in atrial chamber function constitute a major adaptation during hibernation which allows the myocardium to conserve energy, avoid chamber dilation and remain healthy during a period of extremely low heart rates. These findings will aid in rational approaches to identifying underlying molecular mechanisms.

  11. Collectin-11 detects stress-induced L-fucose pattern to trigger renal epithelial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Conrad A; Tran, David; Li, Ke; Wu, Weiju; Peng, Qi; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Zhou, Wuding; Sacks, Steven H

    2016-05-01

    Physiochemical stress induces tissue injury as a result of the detection of abnormal molecular patterns by sensory molecules of the innate immune system. Here, we have described how the recently discovered C-type lectin collectin-11 (CL-11, also known as CL-K1 and encoded by COLEC11) recognizes an abnormal pattern of L-fucose on postischemic renal tubule cells and activates a destructive inflammatory response. We found that intrarenal expression of CL-11 rapidly increases in the postischemic period and colocalizes with complement deposited along the basolateral surface of the proximal renal tubule in association with L-fucose, the potential binding ligand for CL-11. Mice with either generalized or kidney-specific deficiency of CL-11 were strongly protected against loss of renal function and tubule injury due to reduced complement deposition. Ex vivo renal tubule cells showed a marked capacity for CL-11 binding that was induced by cell stress under hypoxic or hypothermic conditions and prevented by specific removal of L-fucose. Further analysis revealed that cell-bound CL-11 required the lectin complement pathway-associated protease MASP-2 to trigger complement deposition. Given these results, we conclude that lectin complement pathway activation triggered by ligand-CL-11 interaction in postischemic tissue is a potent source of acute kidney injury and is amenable to sugar-specific blockade.

  12. How hibernation and hypothermia help to improve anticoagulant control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrij, Edwin L; Henning, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Winter is coming. Some animals successfully cope with the hostility of this season by hibernating. But how do hibernators survive the procoagulant state of months of immobility at very low body temperatures, with strongly decreased blood flow and increased blood viscosity? Changing the coagulation s

  13. Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Dynamics in a Hibernating Mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P.; Sahoo, Daisy; Drover, Victor A.; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Carey, Hannah V.

    2011-01-01

    Hibernating mammals cease feeding during the winter and rely primarily on stored lipids to fuel alternating periods of torpor and arousal. How hibernators manage large fluxes of lipids and sterols over the annual hibernation cycle is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate lipid and cholesterol transport and storage in ground squirrels studied in spring, summer, and several hibernation states. Cholesterol levels in total plasma, HDL and LDL particles were elevated in hibernators compared with spring or summer squirrels. Hibernation increased plasma apolipoprotein A-I expression and HDL particle size. Expression of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase was 13-fold lower in hibernators than in active season squirrels. Plasma triglycerides were reduced by fasting in spring but not summer squirrels. In hibernators plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was elevated during torpor whereas triglycerides were low relative to normothermic states. We conclude that the switch to a lipid-based metabolism during winter, coupled with reduced capacity to excrete cholesterol creates a closed system in which efficient use of lipoproteins is essential for survival. PMID:22195001

  14. Photographic recording of natural activity in hibernating bats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge

    1970-01-01

    In the past decade there has been an increasing awareness that spontaneous activity in hibernating mammals is not a mere accidental imperfection in the mechanism of hibernation but, on the contrary, a regular and important feature of it. Several recent investigations (e.g. Kristofferson & Soivio, 19

  15. Enhanced oxidative capacity of ground squirrel brain mitochondria during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Mallory A; Schwartz, Christine; Andrews, Matthew T

    2017-03-01

    During hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) regularly cycle between bouts of torpor and interbout arousal (IBA). Most of the brain is electrically quiescent during torpor but regains activity quickly upon arousal to IBA, resulting in extreme oscillations in energy demand during hibernation. We predicted increased functional capacity of brain mitochondria during hibernation compared with spring to accommodate the variable energy demands of hibernation. To address this hypothesis, we examined mitochondrial bioenergetics in the ground squirrel brain across three time points: spring (SP), torpor (TOR), and IBA. Respiration rates of isolated brain mitochondria through complex I of the electron transport chain were more than twofold higher in TOR and IBA than in SP (P mitochondria compared with TOR and IBA (P mitochondria function more effectively during the hibernation season, allowing for rapid production of energy to meet demand when extreme physiological changes are occurring. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The November 2011 M5.7 Oklahoma Earthquake: Induced or Triggered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Cochran, E. S.; Aminzadeh, F.

    2013-12-01

    On 6 November 2011, a M5.7 right-lateral strike-slip earthquake ruptured a section of the Wilzetta fault that strikes approximately N55E in Prague, Oklahoma. This earthquake was preceded by a right-lateral strike-slip M5.0 foreshock that occurred on 5 November 2011 and followed by a left-lateral strike-slip M5.0 aftershock that occurred on 8 November 2011. Seismicity during the sequence delineates three distinct near-vertical fault planes. The M5.0 foreshock was within several hundred meters of two active, high-volume injection wells, and thus was interpreted as potentially induced by Keranen et al. [2013]. Immediately following the M5.0 foreshock, three temporary seismometers were installed, with additional 44 stations installed after the M5.7 mainshock. These 47 stations recorded thousands of foreshocks and aftershocks that surrounded the three M≥5.0 events. We hypothesize that while the M5.0 foreshock (Event A) is potentially induced by anthropogenic activities, the static stress change imparted by this event triggered the M5.7 mainshock (Event B). To investigate this hypothesis, we calculate the static Coulomb stress change on 110 focal mechanism solutions examined in this study. Many of the focal mechanisms are consistent with the rupture planes defined by the seismicity of Events A and B. However, several of the focal mechanism solutions exhibit dip-slip focal mechanisms and/or are more consistent with the M5.0 aftershock (Event C). Event C occurs on a previously unmapped, east-west striking left-lateral fault plane, which differs substantially from the orientation of Events A and B. The diverse range of focal mechanism solutions suggests complex fault interactions within the Wilzetta fault system. Based on these focal mechanism solutions, we investigate the static stress changes imparted on the aftershocks that result from each of the M≥5.0 earthquakes. We find that the stress change induced by the Event A increases the stress at the hypocentral location

  17. LPS-induced clustering of CD14 triggers generation of PI(4,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płóciennikowska, Agnieszka; Zdioruk, Mykola I; Traczyk, Gabriela; Świątkowska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-11-15

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces strong pro-inflammatory reactions after sequential binding to CD14 protein and TLR4 receptor. Here, we show that CD14 controls generation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] in response to LPS binding. In J774 cells and HEK293 cells expressing CD14 exposed to 10-100 ng/ml LPS, the level of PI(4,5)P2 rose in a biphasic manner with peaks at 5-10 min and 60 min. After 5-10 min of LPS stimulation, CD14 underwent prominent clustering in the plasma membrane, accompanied by accumulation of PI(4,5)P2 and type-I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K) isoforms Iα and Iγ (encoded by Pip5k1a and Pip5k1c, respectively) in the CD14 region. Clustering of CD14 with antibodies, without LPS and TLR4 participation, was sufficient to trigger PI(4,5)P2 elevation. The newly generated PI(4,5)P2 accumulated in rafts, which also accommodated CD14 and a large portion of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ. Silencing of PIP5K Iα and PIP5K Iγ, or application of drugs interfering with PI(4,5)P2 synthesis and availability, abolished the LPS-induced PI(4,5)P2 elevation and inhibited downstream pro-inflammatory reactions. Taken together, these data indicate that LPS induces clustering of CD14, which triggers PI(4,5)P2 generation in rafts that is required for maximal pro-inflammatory signaling of TLR4.

  18. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  19. Alternative Strategy for Alzheimer’s Disease: Stress Response Triggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Smith Sonneborn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress resistance capacity is a hallmark of longevity protection and survival throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Latent pathway activation of protective cascades, triggered by environmental challenges to tolerate heat, oxygen deprivation, reactive oxygen species (ROS, diet restriction, and exercise provides tolerance to these stresses. Age-related changes and disease vulnerability mark an increase in damage, like damage induced by environmental challenges. An alternative approach to immunotherapy intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease is the use of mimetics of stress to upregulate endogenous protective cascades to repair age damage, shift the balance of apoptosis to regeneration to promote delay of onset, and even progression of Alzheimer’s disease memory dysfunction. Mimetics of environmental stress, hormetic agents, and triggers, endogenous or engineered, can “trick” activation of expression patterns of repair and rejuvenation. Examples of known candidate triggers of heat response, endogenous antioxidants, DNA repair, exercise, hibernation, and telomeres are available for AD intervention trials. Telomeres and telomerase emerge as major regulators in crossroads of senescence, cancer, and rejuvenation responsive to mimetics of telomeres. Lessons emerge from transgenic rodent models, the long-lived mole rat, clinical studies, and conserved innate pathways of stress resistance. Cross-reaction of benefits of different triggers promises intervention into seemingly otherwise unrelated diseases.

  20. Laser-triggered intraocular implant to induce photodynamic therapy for posterior capsule opacification prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Wenyong; Lei, Ming; He, Yuanfeng; Yan, Mina; Zhang, Xuefei; Zhao, Chunshun

    2016-02-10

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is one of the main reasons for loss of vision again after cataract surgery. In this study, intraocular lenses were modified with indocyanine green (ICG) and sealed up with PLGA to form long-term intraocular implants (ICG-IOL). When triggered by laser, ICG-IOL would induce photodynamic therapy (PDT). In-vitro cell viability assay and scratch wound healing assay demonstrated that ICG-IOL could effectively inhibit HLEpiC proliferation and migration without causing damage to the cells far away from it. Laser attenuation test indicated that ICG-IOL could be applied in vivo. In-vivo pharmacodynamics and safety study showed that ICG-IOL could significantly prevent the occurrence of PCO and was safe for intraocular normal tissue. All these results suggested that ICG-IOL would be a very promising candidate for PCO prevention.

  1. Naturally occurring triggers that induce apoptosis-like programmed cell death in Plasmodium berghei ookinetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat Ali

    Full Text Available Several protozoan parasites have been shown to undergo a form of programmed cell death that exhibits morphological features associated with metazoan apoptosis. These include the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei. Malaria zygotes develop in the mosquito midgut lumen, forming motile ookinetes. Up to 50% of these exhibit phenotypic markers of apoptosis; as do those grown in culture. We hypothesised that naturally occurring signals induce many ookinetes to undergo apoptosis before midgut traversal. To determine whether nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species act as such triggers, ookinetes were cultured with donors of these molecules. Exposure to the nitric oxide donor SNP induced a significant increase in ookinetes with condensed nuclear chromatin, activated caspase-like molecules and translocation of phosphatidylserine that was dose and time related. Results from an assay that detects the potential-dependent accumulation of aggregates of JC-1 in mitochondria suggested that nitric oxide does not operate via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. L-DOPA (reactive oxygen species donor also caused apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. Removal of white blood cells significantly decreased ookinetes exhibiting a marker of apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of the activity of nitric oxide synthase in the mosquito midgut epithelium using L-NAME significantly decreased the proportion of apoptotic ookinetes and increased the number of oocysts that developed. Introduction of a nitric oxide donor into the blood meal had no effect on mosquito longevity but did reduce prevalence and intensity of infection. Thus, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are triggers of apoptosis in Plasmodium ookinetes. They occur naturally in the mosquito midgut lumen, sourced from infected blood and mosquito tissue. Up regulation of mosquito nitric oxide synthase activity has potential as a transmission blocking strategy.

  2. Decreases in body temperature and body mass constitute pre-hibernation remodelling in the Syrian golden hamster, a facultative mammalian hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayama, Yuichi; Ando, Lisa; Tamura, Yutaka; Miura, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi

    2016-04-01

    Hibernation is an adaptive strategy for surviving during periods with little or no food availability, by profoundly reducing the metabolic rate and the core body temperature (T b). Obligate hibernators (e.g. bears, ground squirrels, etc.) hibernate every winter under the strict regulation of endogenous circannual rhythms, and they are assumed to undergo adaptive remodelling in autumn, the pre-hibernation period, prior to hibernation. However, little is known about the nature of pre-hibernation remodelling. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) are facultative hibernators that can hibernate irrespective of seasons when exposed to prolonged short photoperiod and cold ambient temperature (SD-Cold) conditions. Their T b set point reduced by the first deep torpor (DT) and then increased gradually after repeated cycles of DT and periodic arousal (PA), and finally recovered to the level observed before the prolonged SD-Cold in the post-hibernation period. We also found that, before the initiation of hibernation, the body mass of animals decreased below a threshold, indicating that hibernation in this species depends on body condition. These observations suggest that Syrian hamsters undergo pre-hibernation remodelling and that T b and body mass can be useful physiological markers to monitor the remodelling process during the pre-hibernation period.

  3. Alloxan-induced diabetes triggers the development of periodontal disease in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Claudino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease in diabetic patients presents higher severity and prevalence; and increased severity of ligature-induced periodontal disease has been verified in diabetic rats. However, in absence of aggressive stimuli such as ligatures, the influence of diabetes on rat periodontal tissues is incompletely explored. The aim of this study was to evaluate the establishment and progression of periodontal diseases in rats only with diabetes induction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats (n = 25 by intravenous administration of alloxan (42 mg/kg and were analyzed at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after diabetes induction. The hemimandibles were removed and submitted to radiographical and histopathological procedures. A significant reduction was observed in height of bone crest in diabetic animals at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, which was associated with increased numbers of osteoclasts and inflammatory cells. The histopathological analyses of diabetic rats also showed a reduction in density of collagen fibers, fibroblasts and blood vessels. Severe caries were also detected in the diabetic group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that diabetes induction triggers, or even co-induces the onset of alterations which are typical of periodontal diseases even in the absence of aggressive factors such as ligatures. Therefore, diabetes induction renders a previously resistant host into a susceptible phenotype, and hence diabetes can be considered a very important risk factor to the development of periodontal disease.

  4. Energy homeostasis regulatory peptides in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardi, János; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Szentirmai, Eva; Kapás, Levente; Krueger, James M

    2011-05-15

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) are inactive for up to 6 months during hibernation. They undergo profound seasonal changes in food intake, body mass, and energy expenditure. The circa-annual regulation of metabolism is poorly understood. In this study, we measured plasma ghrelin, leptin, obestatin, and neuropeptide-Y (NPY) levels, hormones known to be involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, in ten grizzly bears. Blood samples were collected during the active summer period, early hibernation and late hibernation. Plasma levels of leptin, obestatin, and NPY did not change between the active and the hibernation periods. Plasma total ghrelin and desacyl-ghrelin concentrations significantly decreased during the inactive winter period compared to summer levels. The elevated ghrelin levels may help enhance body mass during pre-hibernation, while the low plasma ghrelin concentrations during hibernation season may contribute to the maintenance of hypophagia, low energy utilization and behavioral inactivity. Our results suggest that ghrelin plays a potential role in the regulation of metabolic changes and energy homeostasis during hibernation in grizzly bears.

  5. Glutathione Depletion Induced by c-Myc Downregulation Triggers Apoptosis on Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Biroccio

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the mechanism(s involved in the c-Myc-dependent drug response of melanoma cells. By using three M14-derived c-Myc low-expressing clones, we demonstrate that alkylating agents, cisplatin and melphalan, trigger apoptosis in the c-Myc antisense transfectants, but not in the parental line. On the contrary, topoisomerase inhibitors, adriamycin and camptothecin, induce apoptosis to the same extent regardless of c-Myc expression. Because we previously demonstrated that c-Myc downregulation decreases glutathione (GSH content, we evaluated the role of GSH in the apoptosis induced by the different drugs. In control cells treated with one of the alkylating agents or the others, GSH depletion achieved by L-buthionine-sulfoximine preincubation opens the apoptotic pathway. The apoptosis proceeded through early Bax relocalization, cytochrome c release, concomitant caspase-9 activation, whereas reactive oxygen species production and alteration of mitochondria membrane potential were late events. That GSH was determining in the c-Myc-dependent druginduced apoptosis was demonstrated by altering the intracellular GSH content of the c-Myc low-expressing cells up to the level of controls. Indeed, GSH ethyl ester-mediated increase of GSH abrogated apoptosis induced by cisplatin and melphalan by inhibition of Baxicytochrome c redistribution. The relationship among c-Myc, GSH content, the response to alkylating agent has been also evaluated in the M14 Myc overexpressing clones as well as in the melanoma JR8 c-Myc antisense transfectants. All together, these results demonstrate that GSH plays a key role in governing c-Myc-dependent drug-induced apoptosis.

  6. Plate tectonics on the Earth triggered by plume-induced subduction initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerya, T V; Stern, R J; Baes, M; Sobolev, S V; Whattam, S A

    2015-11-12

    Scientific theories of how subduction and plate tectonics began on Earth--and what the tectonic structure of Earth was before this--remain enigmatic and contentious. Understanding viable scenarios for the onset of subduction and plate tectonics is hampered by the fact that subduction initiation processes must have been markedly different before the onset of global plate tectonics because most present-day subduction initiation mechanisms require acting plate forces and existing zones of lithospheric weakness, which are both consequences of plate tectonics. However, plume-induced subduction initiation could have started the first subduction zone without the help of plate tectonics. Here, we test this mechanism using high-resolution three-dimensional numerical thermomechanical modelling. We demonstrate that three key physical factors combine to trigger self-sustained subduction: (1) a strong, negatively buoyant oceanic lithosphere; (2) focused magmatic weakening and thinning of lithosphere above the plume; and (3) lubrication of the slab interface by hydrated crust. We also show that plume-induced subduction could only have been feasible in the hotter early Earth for old oceanic plates. In contrast, younger plates favoured episodic lithospheric drips rather than self-sustained subduction and global plate tectonics.

  7. Aspirin-triggered lipoxin induces CB1-dependent catalepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Menezes-de-Lima, Octávio; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2010-02-05

    Evidence are that inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enhances endocannabinoid signaling, indicating a crosstalk between these two eicosanoid pathways. Aspirin, a non-selective COX inhibitor, acetylates COX-2 with generation of a lipoxygenase (LOX) substrate, whose end product is the 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) (15-epi-LXA(4)), an aspirin-triggered lipoxin. Our objective was to investigate whether 15-epi-LXA(4) would potentiate in vivo effects of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA). Catalepsy was selected as a behavioral parameter and tested 5 min after AEA injection in all experiments. AEA induced dose-dependent (200 pmol/2 microl, i.c.v.) catalepsy. A sub-dose of AEA (10 pmol/2 microl, i.c.v.) was potentiated by aspirin (300 mg/kg, p.o.) via a 5-LOX-dependent step. The cataleptic effect induced by the interaction between sub-doses of 15-epi-LXA(4) (0.01 pmol/2 microl, i.c.v.) and AEA (10 pmol/2 microl, i.c.v.) was prevented by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptors antagonist SR141716A (1mg/kg, i.p.), but not by the antagonist of lipoxin ALX receptors Boc-2 (10 microg/kg, i.p.). While previous studies have shown that COX inhibition itself may enhance endocannabinoid effects, here we add another piece of evidence revealing that a LOX-derivative produced in consequence of COX-2 acetylation participates in this process.

  8. Serum markers of bone metabolism show bone loss in hibernating bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, S.W.; Vaughan, M.R.; Demers, L.M.; Donahue, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia was studied in hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus) using serum markers of bone metabolism. Blood samples were collected from male and female, wild black bears during winter denning and active summer periods. Radioimmunoassays were done to determine serum concentrations of cortisol, the carboxy-terminal cross-linked telopeptide, and the carboxy-terminal propeptide of Type I procollagen, which are markers of hone resorption and formation, respectively. The bone resorption marker was significantly higher during winter hibernation than it was in the active summer months, but the bone formation marker was unchanged, suggesting an imbalance in bone remodeling and a net bone loss during disuse. Serum cortisol was significantly correlated with the bone resorption marker, but not with the bone formation marker. The bone formation marker was four- to fivefold higher in an adolescent and a 17-year-old bear early in the remobilization period compared with the later summer months. These findings raise the possibility that hibernating black bears may minimize bone loss during disuse by maintaining osteoblastic function and have a more efficient compensatory mechanism for recovering immobilization-induced bone loss than that of humans or other animals.

  9. Fructose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells by provoking oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Maurya, Chandan K; Arha, Deepti; Avisetti, Deepa R; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raj, Palayyan S; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that oxidative stress results from the increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, tissue damage, insulin resistance, and other complications observed in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that intake of high fructose contributes to insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances. However, there is limited information about the direct effect of fructose on the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle, the major metabolic determinant of whole body insulin activity. Here, we assessed the effect of fructose exposure on mitochondria-mediated mechanisms in skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of L6 myotubes to high fructose stimulated the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of inducible NO synthase. Fructose-induced oxidative stress was associated with increased translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 to the nucleus, decreases in mitochondrial DNA content and mitochondrial dysfunctions, as evidenced by decreased activities of citrate synthase and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased activity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. Furthermore, positive Annexin-propidium iodide staining and altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and caspases in L6 myotubes indicated that the cells progressively became apoptotic upon fructose exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that exposure of skeletal muscle cells to fructose induced oxidative stress that decreased mitochondrial DNA content and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, which caused apoptosis.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide triggers nuclear import of Lpcat1 to regulate inducible gene expression in lung epithelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bryon; Ellis; Leah; Kaercher; Courtney; Snavely

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To report that Lpcat1 plays an important role in regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inducible gene tran-scription. METHODS:Gene expression in Murine Lung Epithelial MLE-12 cells with LPS treatment or Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli infection was analyzed by employing quantitative Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques. Nucleofection was used to deliver Lenti-viral system to express or knock down Lpcat1 in MLE cells. Subcellular protein fractionation and Western blotting were utilized to study Lpcat1 nuclear relocation. RESULTS:Lpcat1 translocates into the nucleus from thecytoplasm in murine lung epithelia (MLE) after LPS treatment. Haemophilus influenza and Escherichia coli , two LPS-containing pathogens that cause pneumonia, triggered Lpcat1 nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm. The LPS inducible gene expression profile was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after silencing Lpcat1 or overexpression of the enzyme in MLE cells. We detected that 17 out of a total 38 screened genes were upregulated, 14 genes were suppressed, and 7 genes remained unchanged in LPS treated cells in comparison to controls. Knockdown of Lpcat1 by shRNA dramatically changed the spectrum of the LPS inducible gene transcription, as 18 genes out of 38 genes were upregulated, of which 20 genes were suppressed or unchanged. Notably, in Lpcat1 overex-pressed cells, 25 genes out of 38 genes were reduced in the setting of LPS treatment.CONCLUSION:These observations suggest that Lpcat1 relocates into the nucleus in response to bacterial infection to differentially regulate gene transcriptional repression.

  11. MYB72, a node of convergence in induced systemic resistance triggered by a fungal and a bacterial beneficial microbe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segarra, G.; Ent, S. van der; Trillas, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Colonisation of plant roots by selected beneficial Trichoderma fungi or Pseudomonas bacteria can result in the activation of a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of pathogens. In Arabidopsis thaliana, induced systemic resistance (ISR) triggered by the rhizobacterial

  12. MYB72, a node of convergence in induced systemic resistance triggered by a fungal and a bacterial beneficial microbe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segarra, G.; Ent, S. van der; Trillas, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Colonisation of plant roots by selected beneficial Trichoderma fungi or Pseudomonas bacteria can result in the activation of a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of pathogens. In Arabidopsis thaliana, induced systemic resistance (ISR) triggered by the rhizobacterial

  13. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Petr [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Westers, Paul [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Biostatistics, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Technology Eindhoven, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related to pulsating PHV. In a pulsatile in vitro model, a mono- and bileaflet PHV were imaged using 256 MDCT at 60, 75 and 90 beats per minute (BPM) with either retrospective gating (120 kV, 600 mAs, pitch 0.2, CTDI{sub vol} 39.8 mGy) or prospective triggering (120 kV, 200 mAs, CTDI{sub vol} 13.3 mGy). Two thresholds (>175 and <-45HU), derived from the density of surrounding structures, were used for quantification of hyper- and hypodense artefacts. Image noise and artefacts were compared between protocols. Prospective triggering reduced hyperdense artefacts for both valves at every BPM (P = 0.001 all comparisons). Hypodense artefacts were reduced for the monoleaflet valve at 60 (P = 0.009), 75 (P = 0.016) and 90 BPM (P = 0.001), and for the bileaflet valves at 60 (P = 0.001), 90 (P = 0.001) but not at 75 BPM (P = 0.6). Prospective triggering reduced image noise at 60 (P = 0.001) and 75 (P < 0.03) but not at 90 BPM. Compared with retrospective gating, prospective triggering reduced most artefacts related to pulsating PHV in vitro. circle Computed tomographic images are often degraded by prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts circle Prospective triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts in vitro circle Artefact reduction at 90 beats per minute occurs without image noise reduction circle Prospective triggering may improve CT image quality of moving hyperdense structures. (orig.)

  14. Coupling of rainfall-induced landslide triggering model with predictions of debris flow runout distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Peter; von Ruette, Jonas; Fan, Linfeng; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    Rapid debris flows initiated by rainfall induced shallow landslides present a highly destructive natural hazard in steep terrain. The impact and run-out paths of debris flows depend on the volume, composition and initiation zone of released material and are requirements to make accurate debris flow predictions and hazard maps. For that purpose we couple the mechanistic 'Catchment-scale Hydro-mechanical Landslide Triggering (CHLT)' model to compute timing, location, and landslide volume with simple approaches to estimate debris flow runout distances. The runout models were tested using two landslide inventories obtained in the Swiss Alps following prolonged rainfall events. The predicted runout distances were in good agreement with observations, confirming the utility of such simple models for landscape scale estimates. In a next step debris flow paths were computed for landslides predicted with the CHLT model for a certain range of soil properties to explore its effect on runout distances. This combined approach offers a more complete spatial picture of shallow landslide and subsequent debris flow hazards. The additional information provided by CHLT model concerning location, shape, soil type and water content of the released mass may also be incorporated into more advanced models of runout to improve predictability and impact of such abruptly-released mass.

  15. Maintenance of a fully functional digestive system during hibernation in the European hamster, a food-storing hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitten, Mathieu; Oudart, Hugues; Habold, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Some small mammals limit energy expenditure during winter conditions through torpor bouts, which are characterized by a decrease in body temperature and metabolic rate. Individuals arise periodically from torpor to restore critical functions requiring euthermia. Although most of the species involved do not feed during hibernation and rely on body reserves to fulfil energy requirements (fat-storing species), others hoard food in a burrow (food-storing species) and can feed during interbout euthermy. Whereas fat-storing species undergo a marked atrophy of the digestive tract, food-storing species have to maintain a functional digestive system during hibernation. Our study aimed to evaluate the absorption capacities of a food-storing species, the European hamster, throughout the annual cycle. In vivo intestinal perfusions were conducted in different groups of hamsters (n=5) during the different life periods, namely before hibernation, in torpor, during interbout euthermy, and during summer rest. The triglyceride, non-esterified free fatty acid, starch, glucose and protein composition of the perfusate was evaluated before and after the 1h perfusion of a closed intestinal loop. Triglyceride, starch and protein hydrolysis rates were similar in hibernating (torpid and euthermic) and non-hibernating hamsters. Intestinal absorption of free fatty acid was also similar in all groups. However, glucose uptake rate was higher during hibernation than during the summer. In contrast with fat-storing species, the intestinal absorption capacities of food-storing species are fully maintained during hibernation to optimize nutrient assimilation during short interbout euthermy. In particular, glucose uptake rate is increased during hibernation to restore glycaemia and ensure glucose-dependent pathways.

  16. Hibernation is associated with increased survival and the evolution of slow life histories among mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbill, Christopher; Bieber, Claudia; Ruf, Thomas

    2011-11-22

    Survival probability is predicted to underlie the evolution of life histories along a slow-fast continuum. Hibernation allows a diverse range of small mammals to exhibit seasonal dormancy, which might increase survival and consequently be associated with relatively slow life histories. We used phylogenetically informed GLS models to test for an effect of hibernation on seasonal and annual survival, and on key attributes of life histories among mammals. Monthly survival was in most cases higher during hibernation compared with the active season, probably because inactivity minimizes predation. Hibernators also have approximately 15 per cent higher annual survival than similar sized non-hibernating species. As predicted, we found an effect of hibernation on the relationships between life history attributes and body mass: small hibernating mammals generally have longer maximum life spans (50% greater for a 50 g species), reproduce at slower rates, mature at older ages and have longer generation times compared with similar-sized non-hibernators. In accordance with evolutionary theories, however, hibernating species do not have longer life spans than non-hibernators with similar survival rates, nor do they have lower reproductive rates than non-hibernators with similar maximum life spans. Thus, our combined results suggest that (i) hibernation is associated with high rates of overwinter and annual survival, and (ii) an increase in survival in hibernating species is linked with the coevolution of traits indicative of relatively slow life histories.

  17. Experimental Study of Remotely Triggered Rockburst Induced by a Tunnel Axial Dynamic Disturbance Under True-Triaxial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guoshao; Feng, Xiating; Wang, Jinhuan; Jiang, Jianqing; Hu, Lihua

    2017-08-01

    During deep underground excavation, dynamic ejection failure of a highly stressed rock mass near an excavated boundary is easily triggered by a dynamic disturbance in the tunnel axial direction, induced by blasting on the tunnel face. Such a dynamic ejection failure is usually called remotely triggered rockburst, and it poses a threat to underground construction. To clarify the characteristics of remotely triggered rockburst, the development of remotely triggered rockbursts of granite rock specimens was investigated using an improved true-triaxial test system. Experimental results show that with increasing static Z-direction stress (i.e., in situ tangential stress on the cross section of the tunnel), rockburst is triggered more easily and the kinetic energy of ejected fragments increases. Under other constant static stresses and dynamic disturbance, with increasing horizontal stress including X-direction stress (i.e., in situ axial stress) or Y-direction stress (i.e., in situ radial stress on the cross section of the tunnel), rockburst is more difficult to trigger and the kinetic energy of the ejected fragments decreases. Under constant static stresses, once the amplitude and frequency of the dynamic loading exceed their thresholds, the rockburst intensity increases rapidly and the rockburst can be triggered much more easily with small increments of the amplitude and frequency. Furthermore, Z-direction strain increases during the dynamic disturbance process, indicating that the ultimate energy-storage capacity of the specimen decreases with increasing damage. When the elastic strain energy is greater than the ultimate energy-storage capacity of the damaged specimen, part of the residual elastic energy is converted into kinetic energy of the ejected fragments.

  18. A conserved peptide pattern from a widespread microbial virulence factor triggers pattern-induced immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Böhm

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbe- or host damage-derived patterns mediate activation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI in plants. Microbial virulence factor (effector-triggered immunity (ETI constitutes a second layer of plant protection against microbial attack. Various necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1-like proteins (NLPs produced by bacterial, oomycete and fungal microbes are phytotoxic virulence factors that exert immunogenic activities through phytotoxin-induced host cell damage. We here show that multiple cytotoxic NLPs also carry a pattern of 20 amino acid residues (nlp20 that triggers immunity-associated plant defenses and immunity to microbial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana and related plant species with similar characteristics as the prototype pattern, bacterial flagellin. Characteristic differences in flagellin and nlp20 plant responses exist however, as nlp20s fail to trigger extracellular alkalinization in Arabidopsis cell suspensions and seedling growth inhibition. Immunogenic nlp20 peptide motifs are frequently found in bacterial, oomycete and fungal NLPs. Such an unusually broad taxonomic distribution within three phylogenetic kingdoms is unprecedented among microbe-derived triggers of immune responses in either metazoans or plants. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic NLPs carrying immunogenic nlp20 motifs trigger PTI in two ways as typical patterns and by inflicting host cell damage. We further propose that conserved structures within a microbial virulence factor might have driven the emergence of a plant pattern recognition system mediating PTI. As this is reminiscent of the evolution of immune receptors mediating ETI, our findings support the idea that there is a continuum between PTI and ETI.

  19. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso mango by inducing germination?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seshadri Shivashankar; Manoharan Sumathi; Tapas Kumar Roy

    2015-06-01

    Spongy tissue is a physiological disorder in Alphonso mango caused by the inception of germination-associated events during fruit maturation on the tree, rendering the fruit inedible. Inter-fruit competition during active fruit growth is a major contributing factor for the disorder which leads to reduced fat content in spongy tissue affected fruits. This study was, therefore, carried out to determine the possible association between seed fats and ST formation. The study of the fat content during fruit growth showed that it increased gradually from 40% fruit maturity. At 70% maturity, however, there was a sudden increase of fat content of whole fruit, leading to acute competition and resulting in differential allocation of resources among developing fruits. As a result, the seed in spongy-tissue-affected mature ripe fruit showed a marked drop in the levels of fats and the two very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), tetracosanoic acid and hexacosanoic acid together with an increase of linolenic acid and a fall in oleic acid contents, which are known to be key determinants for the initiation of pre-germination events in seed. Subsequently, a rise in the level of cytokinin and gibberellins in ST seed associated with a fall in abscisic acid level clearly signalled the onset of germination. Concurrently, a significant reduction in the ratio of linolenic acid/linoleic acid in pulp led to the loss of membrane integrity, cell death and the eventual formation of spongy tissue. Based on the above, it is concluded that a significant reduction in the biosynthesis of VLCFAs in seeds during fruit growth might trigger pre-germination events followed by a cascade of biochemical changes in the pulp, leading to lipid peroxidation and membrane injury in pulp culminating in ST development. Thus, this study presents crucial experimental evidence to highlight the critical role played by VLCFAs in inducing ST formation in Alphonso mango during the pre-harvest phase of fruit growth.

  20. Mis-trafficking of endosomal urokinase proteins triggers drug-induced glioma nonapoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Grodzki, Ana Cristina; Gorin, Fredric

    2015-04-01

    5-Benzylglycinyl-amiloride (UCD38B) is the parent molecule of a class of anticancer small molecules that kill proliferative and nonproliferative high-grade glioma cells by programmed necrosis. UCD38B intracellularly triggers endocytosis, causing 40-50% of endosomes containing proteins of the urokinase plasminogen activator system (uPAS) to relocate to perinuclear mitochondrial regions. Endosomal "mis-trafficking" caused by UCD38B in human glioma cells corresponds to mitochondrial depolarization with the release and nuclear translocation of apoptotis-inducing factor (AIF) followed by irreversible caspase-independent cell demise. High-content quantification of immunocytochemical colocalization studies identified that UCD38B treatment increased endocytosis of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) into the early and late endosomes by 4- to 5-fold prior to AIF nuclear translocation and subsequent glioma demise. PAI-1 was found to comparably relocate with a subset of early and late endosomes in four different human glioma cell lines after UCD38B treatment, followed by caspase-independent, nonapoptotic cell death. Following UCD38B treatment, the receptor guidance protein LRP-1, which is required for endosomal recycling of the uPA receptor to the plasmalemma, remained abnormally associated with PAI-1 in early and late endosomes. The resultant aberrant endosomal recycling increased the total cellular content of the uPA-PAI-1 protein complex. Reversible inhibition of cellular endocytosis demonstrated that UCD38B bypasses the plasmalemmal uPAS complex and directly acts intracellularly to alter uPAS endocytotic trafficking. UCD38B represents a class of small molecules whose anticancer cytotoxicity is a consequence of causing the mis-trafficking of early and late endosomes containing uPAS cargo and leading to AIF-mediated necrotic cell death. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and

  1. Loss of Drosophila pseudouridine synthase triggers apoptosis-induced proliferation and promotes cell-nonautonomous EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicidomini, R; Di Giovanni, A; Petrizzo, A; Iannucci, L F; Benvenuto, G; Nagel, A C; Preiss, A; Furia, M

    2015-01-01

    Many developing tissues display regenerative capability that allows them to compensate cell loss and preserve tissue homeostasis. Because of their remarkable regenerative capability, Drosophila wing discs are extensively used for the study of regenerative phenomena. We thus used the developing wing to investigate the role played in tissue homeostasis by the evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic H/ACA small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein pseudouridine synthase. Here we show that localized depletion of this enzyme can act as an endogenous stimulus capable of triggering apoptosis-induced proliferation, and that context-dependent effects are elicited in different sub-populations of the silenced cells. In fact, some cells undergo apoptosis, whereas those surrounding the apoptotic foci, although identically depleted, overproliferate. This overproliferation correlates with ectopic induction of the Wg and JAK-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) mitogenic pathways. Expression of a p35 transgene, which blocks the complete execution of the death program and generates the so-called ‘undead cells', amplifies the proliferative response. Pseudouridine synthase depletion also causes loss of apicobasal polarity, disruption of adherens cell junctions and ectopic induction of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and Mmp1 (matrix metalloproteinase-1) activity, leading to a significant epithelial reorganization. Unexpectedly, cell-nonautonomous effects, such as epithelial mesenchymal transition in the contiguous unsilenced squamous epithelium, are also promoted. Collectively, these data point out that cell–cell communication and long-range signaling can take a relevant role in the response to pseudouridine synthase decline. Considering that all the affected pathways are highly conserved throughout evolution, it is plausible that the response to pseudouridine synthase depletion has been widely preserved. On this account, our results can add new light on the

  2. Do seed VLCFAs trigger spongy tissue formation in Alphonso mango by inducing germination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Seshadri; Sumathi, Manoharan

    2015-06-01

    Spongy tissue is a physiological disorder in Alphonso mango caused by the inception of germination-associated events during fruit maturation on the tree, rendering the fruit inedible. Inter-fruit competition during active fruit growth is a major contributing factor for the disorder which leads to reduced fat content in spongy tissue affected fruits. This study was, therefore, carried out to determine the possible association between seed fats and ST formation. The study of the fat content during fruit growth showed that it increased gradually from 40 percent fruit maturity. At 70 percent maturity, however, there was a sudden increase of fat content of whole fruit, leading to acute competition and resulting in differential allocation of resources among developing fruits. As a result, the seed in spongy-tissue-affected mature ripe fruit showed a marked drop in the levels of fats and the two very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), tetracosanoic acid and hexacosanoic acid together with an increase of linolenic acid and a fall in oleic acid contents, which are known to be key determinants for the initiation of pre-germination events in seed. Subsequently, a rise in the level of cytokinin and gibberellins in ST seed associated with a fall in abscisic acid level clearly signalled the onset of germination. Concurrently, a significant reduction in the ratio of linolenic acid/linoleic acid in pulp led to the loss of membrane integrity, cell death and the eventual formation of spongy tissue. Based on the above, it is concluded that a significant reduction in the biosynthesis of VLCFAs in seeds during fruit growth might trigger pre-germination events followed by a cascade of biochemical changes in the pulp, leading to lipid peroxidation and membrane injury in pulp culminating in ST development. Thus, this study presents crucial experimental evidence to highlight the critical role played by VLCFAs in inducing ST formation in Alphonso mango during the pre-harvest phase of fruit

  3. Ganglionated plexi stimulation induces pulmonary vein triggers and promotes atrial arrhythmogenecity: In silico modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Minki; Lim, Byounghyun; Song, Jun-Seop; Yu, Hee Tae; Ryu, Ah-Jin; Lee, Young-Seon; Joung, Boyoung; Shim, Eun Bo; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) on atrial fibrillation (AF) is difficult to demonstrate in the intact human left atrium (LA) due to technical limitations of the current electrophysiological mapping technique. We examined the effects of the ANS on the initiation and maintenance of AF by employing a realistic in silico human left atrium (LA) model integrated with a model of ganglionated plexi (GPs). Methods We incorporated the morphology of the GP and parasympathetic nerves in a three-dimensional (3D) realistic LA model. For the model of ionic currents, we used a human atrial model. GPs were stimulated by increasing the IK[ACh], and sympathetic nerve stimulation was conducted through a homogeneous increase in the ICa-L. ANS-induced wave-dynamics changes were evaluated in a model that integrated a patient’s LA geometry, and we repeated simulation studies using LA geometries from 10 different patients. Results The two-dimensional model of pulmonary vein (PV) cells exhibited late phase 3 early afterdepolarization-like activity under 0.05μM acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation. In the 3D simulation model, PV tachycardia was induced, which degenerated to AF via GP (0.05μM ACh) and sympathetic (7.0×ICa-L) stimulations. Under sustained AF, local reentries were observed at the LA-PV junction. We also observed that GP stimulation reduced the complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE)-cycle length (CL, p<0.01) and the life span of phase singularities (p<0.01). GP stimulation also increased the overlap area of the GP and CFAE areas (CFAE-CL≤120ms, p<0.01). When 3 patterns of virtual ablations were applied to the 3D AF models, circumferential PV isolation including the GP was the most effective in terminating AF. Conclusion Cardiac ANS stimulations demonstrated triggered activity, automaticity, and local reentries at the LA-PV junction, as well as co-localized GP and CFAE areas in the 3D in silico GP model of the LA. PMID:28245283

  4. Response of Gut Microbiota to Fasting and Hibernation in Syrian Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Sonoyama, Kei; Fujiwara, Reiko; Takemura, Naoki; Ogasawara, Toru; Watanabe, Jun; Ito, Hiroyuki; Morita, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Although hibernating mammals wake occasionally to eat during torpor, this period represents a state of fasting. Fasting is known to alter the gut microbiota in nonhibernating mammals; therefore, hibernation may also affect the gut microbiota. However, there are few reports of gut microbiota in hibernating mammals. The present study aimed to compare the gut microbiota in hibernating torpid Syrian hamsters with that in active counterparts by using culture-independent analyses. Hamsters were all...

  5. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-05

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  6. TCR triggering induces the formation of Lck-RACK1-actinin-1 multiprotein network affecting Lck redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Ondrej Ballek; Jan Valečka; Martina Dobešová; Adéla Broučková; Jasper Manning; Pavel Řehulka; Jiří Stulík; Dominik Filipp

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of T-cell signaling is critically dependent on the function of the member of Src family tyrosine kinases, Lck. Upon T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggering, Lck kinase activity induces the nucleation of signal-transducing hubs that regulate the formation of complex signaling network and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, the delivery of Lck function requires rapid and targeted membrane redistribution, but the mechanism underpinning this process is largely unknown. To gai...

  7. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity.

  8. Hibernating bears as a model for preventing disuse osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, S.W.; McGee, M.E.; Harvey, K.B.; Vaughan, M.R.; Robbins, C.T.

    2006-01-01

    The hibernating bear is an excellent model for disuse osteoporosis in humans because it is a naturally occurring large animal model. Furthermore, bears and humans have similar lower limb skeletal morphology, and bears walk plantigrade like humans. Black bears (Ursus americanus) may not develop disuse osteoporosis during long periods of disuse (i.e. hibernation) because they maintain osteoblastic bone formation during hibernation. As a consequence, bone volume, mineral content, porosity, and strength are not adversely affected by annual periods of disuse. In fact, cortical bone bending strength has been shown to increase with age in hibernating black bears without a significant change in porosity. Other animals require remobilization periods 2-3 times longer than the immobilization period to recover the bone lost during disuse. Our findings support the hypothesis that black bears, which hibernate for as long as 5-7 months annually, have evolved biological mechanisms to mitigate the adverse effects of disuse on bone porosity and strength. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Renal Sympathetic Denervation: Hibernation or Resurrection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Doumas, Michael; Tsioufis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    The most current versions of renal sympathetic denervation have been invented as minimally invasive approaches for the management of drug-resistant hypertension. The anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of renal sympathetic innervation provide a strong background supporting an important role of the renal nerves in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and volume. In addition, historical data with surgical sympathectomy and experimental data with surgical renal denervation indicate a beneficial effect on BP levels. Early clinical studies with transcatheter radiofrequency ablation demonstrated impressive BP reduction, accompanied by beneficial effects in target organ damage and other disease conditions characterized by sympathetic overactivity. However, the failure of the SYMPLICITY 3 trial to meet its primary efficacy end point raised a lot of concerns and put the field of renal denervation into hibernation. This review aims to translate basic research into clinical practice by presenting the anatomical and physiological basis for renal sympathetic denervation, critically discussing the past and present knowledge in this field, where we stand now, and also speculating about the future of the intervention and potential directions for research. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Metabolic Flexibility: Hibernation, Torpor, and Estivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, James F

    2016-03-15

    Many environmental conditions can constrain the ability of animals to obtain sufficient food energy, or transform that food energy into useful chemical forms. To survive extended periods under such conditions animals must suppress metabolic rate to conserve energy, water, or oxygen. Amongst small endotherms, this metabolic suppression is accompanied by and, in some cases, facilitated by a decrease in core body temperature-hibernation or daily torpor-though significant metabolic suppression can be achieved even with only modest cooling. Within some ectotherms, winter metabolic suppression exceeds the passive effects of cooling. During dry seasons, estivating ectotherms can reduce metabolism without changes in body temperature, conserving energy reserves, and reducing gas exchange and its inevitable loss of water vapor. This overview explores the similarities and differences of metabolic suppression among these states within adult animals (excluding developmental diapause), and integrates levels of organization from the whole animal to the genome, where possible. Several similarities among these states are highlighted, including patterns and regulation of metabolic balance, fuel use, and mitochondrial metabolism. Differences among models are also apparent, particularly in whether the metabolic suppression is intrinsic to the tissue or depends on the whole-animal response. While in these hypometabolic states, tissues from many animals are tolerant of hypoxia/anoxia, ischemia/reperfusion, and disuse. These natural models may, therefore, serve as valuable and instructive models for biomedical research.

  11. ZnO nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress triggers apoptosis by activating JNK signaling pathway in cultured primary astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jieting; Deng, Xiaobei; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Deliang; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-01-01

    It has been documented in in vitro studies that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are capable of inducing oxidative stress, which plays a crucial role in ZnO NP-mediated apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of apoptosis in neurocytes induced by ZnO NP exposure was not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms of apoptosis provoked by ZnO NPs in cultured primary astrocytes by exploring the molecular signaling pathways triggered after ZnO NP ex...

  12. Impact of triggering event in outcomes of stress-induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerasi, Charan; Koifman, Edward; Weissman, Gaby; Wang, Zuyue; Torguson, Rebecca; Gai, Jiaxiang; Lindsay, Joseph; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron; Ben-Dor, Itsik

    2017-04-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is also known as stress cardiomyopathy because of the regularity with which it has been associated with physical or emotional stress. Such stress may well be a "trigger" of the syndrome. This analysis was undertaken to describe our experience with this disorder and in particular to examine the effects of the underlying trigger on outcomes. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 345 consecutive patients treated at our institution from 2006 to 2014. All presented with acute cardiac symptoms, a characteristic left ventricular contraction pattern (typical, atypical), and no major obstructive coronary artery disease. Patients were grouped based on their triggering event: (a) medical illness; (b) post-operative period; (c) emotional distress; or (d) no identified trigger. Baseline demographic characteristics, death in hospital, length of stay in hospital, and cardiac complications were abstracted from the patients' medical records. The mean±SD age of the population was 72±12 years and 91% were women. No significant difference in baseline characteristics was noted between the groups except for a higher prevalence of African Americans in the group with a medical illness. ST elevation was noted in 13.3% of patients and the average peak troponin level was 5±12 ng/dl. An inotropic drug was required in 49 (14.2%) patients, an intra-aortic balloon pump in 37 (10.7%) patients, and mechanical ventilation in 54 (15.7%) patients; 43.5% required treatment in the intensive care unit. Overall, 12 (3.5%) patients died. In only two (16.7%) patients was a there a direct cardiac cause of death. In those patients in whom the cardiac manifestations seemed to be triggered by a medical illness, the death rate was 7.1% and this was significantly higher than in the other groups ( p=0.03). Medical illness (odds ratio=6.25, p=0.02) and ST elevation (odds ratio=5.71, p=0.04) were both significantly associated with death. Our study showed that different

  13. Cigarette smoke-induced necroptosis and DAMP release trigger neutrophilic airway inflammation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Simon D; van der Toorn, Marco; Hesse, Laura; Gras, Renee; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Krysko, Dmitri V; Vandenabeele, Peter; de Vries, Maaike; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Heijink, Irene H; Nawijn, Martijn C

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate a role for airway epithelial necroptosis, a regulated form of necrosis, and the associated release of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in the development of COPD. DAMPs can activate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), triggering innate immune responses. We hypothes

  14. Remote triggering of high voltage systems by laser-induced plasmas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    West, NJ

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the electrical performance of an orthogonally with a coaxially laser-triggered spark gap. Each of these two gaps has its own advantages and disadvantages. At the same time, a Rogowski profile spark gap...

  15. Triggering Mechanism for Neutron Induced Single-Event Burnout in Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Hamada, Kimimori

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic ray neutrons can trigger catastrophic failures in power devices. It has been reported that parasitic transistor action causes single-event burnout (SEB) in power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). However, power diodes do not have an inherent parasitic transistor. In this paper, we describe the mechanism triggering SEB in power diodes for the first time using transient device simulation. Initially, generated electron-hole pairs created by incident recoil ions generate transient current, which increases the electron density in the vicinity of the n-/n+ boundary. The space charge effect of the carriers leads to an increase in the strength of the electric field at the n-/n+ boundary. Finally, the onset of impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary can trigger SEB. Furthermore, this failure is closely related to diode secondary breakdown. It was clarified that the impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary is a key point of the mechanism triggering SEB in power devices.

  16. Licochalcone A-Induced Human Bladder Cancer T24 Cells Apoptosis Triggered by Mitochondria Dysfunction and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Licochalcone A (LCA, a licorice chalconoid, is considered to be a bioactive agent with chemopreventive potential. This study investigated the mechanisms involved in LCA-induced apoptosis in human bladder cancer T24 cells. LCA significantly inhibited cells proliferation, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and caused T24 cells apoptosis. Moreover, LCA induced mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase-3 activation, and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, which displayed features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals. Besides, exposure of T24 cells to LCA triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress; as indicated by the enhancement in 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153/C/EBP homology protein (GADD153/CHOP expression, ER stress-dependent apoptosis is caused by the activation of ER-specific caspase-12. All the findings from our study suggest that LCA initiates mitochondrial ROS generation and induces oxidative stress that consequently causes T24 cell apoptosis via the mitochondria-dependent and the ER stress-triggered signaling pathways.

  17. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  18. Spontaneous firing in olfactory bulb neurons of Bufo bufo gargarizans in and after hibernation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuancheng Liang; Shaokang Bian; Xia Peng; Liwen Wang

    2011-01-01

    Microelectrode technique was used to record the spontaneous electrical activities of the neurons in olfactory bulb of the Bufo bufo gargarizans, both in hibernation and after hibernation. This study investigated the electrophysiological characteristics of amphibian olfactory bulb in the period of hibernation and after hibernation and its effects on the start of hibernation and spontaneous awakening. The research showed four forms of spontaneous firings: single spontaneous firing, burst spontaneous firing, irregular spontaneous firing and consecutive single spontaneous firing. The single spontaneous firing includes slow depolarized spontaneous firing and fast depolarized spontaneous firing, and the slow depolarized spontaneous firing occurs only during the hibernation period. In hibernation, the low amplitude and low frequency firing with a longer duration may be relevant to maintaining the tonicity of the central nervous system in toads that are in hibernation, and this kind of firing may also provide an excited basis for their arousal from hibernation. After hibernation, the amplitude and frequency of firing increase, but the firing duration gets shorter. This form of short-term firing, which may be a phenomenon of sensory neurons fast adapting, is one of the neuronal mechanisms for the arousal of hibernating animals.

  19. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Pan

    Full Text Available Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD, fumarylacetoacetase (FAH, involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  20. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Yijian; Cui, Jie; Liu, Yang; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Liao, Chen-Chung; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), fumarylacetoacetase (FAH), involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  1. The impact of cold acclimation and hibernation on antioxidant defenses in the ground squirrel (Spermophilus citellus): an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucetic, Milica; Stancic, Ana; Otasevic, Vesna; Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Aleksandra; Markelic, Milica; Velickovic, Ksenija; Golic, Igor; Buzadzic, Biljana; Storey, Kenneth B; Korac, Bato

    2013-12-01

    Any alteration in oxidative metabolism is coupled with a corresponding response by an antioxidant defense (AD) in appropriate subcellular compartments. Seasonal hibernators pass through circannual metabolic adaptations that allow them to either maintain euthermy (cold acclimation) or enter winter torpor with body temperature falling to low values. The present study aimed to investigate the corresponding pattern of AD enzyme protein expressions associated with these strategies in the main tissues involved in whole animal energy homeostasis: brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT, respectively), liver, and skeletal muscle. European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) were exposed to low temperature (4 ± 1 °C) and then divided into two groups: (1) animals fell into torpor (hibernating group) and (2) animals stayed active and euthermic for 1, 3, 7, 12, or 21 days (cold-exposed group). We examined the effects of cold acclimation and hibernation on the tissue-dependent protein expression of four enzymes which catalyze the two-step detoxification of superoxide to water: superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD 1 and 2), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). The results showed that hibernation induced an increase of AD enzyme protein expressions in BAT and skeletal muscle. However, AD enzyme contents in liver were largely unaffected during torpor. Under these conditions, different WAT depots responded by elevating the amounts of specific enzymes, as follows: SOD 1 in retroperitoneal WAT, GSH-Px in gonadal WAT, and CAT in subcutaneous WAT. Similar perturbations of AD enzymes contents were seen in all tissues during cold acclimation, often in a time-dependent manner. It can be concluded that BAT and muscle AD capacity undergo the most dramatic changes during both cold acclimation and hibernation, while liver is relatively unaffected by either condition. Additionally, this study provides a basis for further metabolic study that will illuminate the causes

  2. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-06-23

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites.

  3. Phosphorylation-triggered CUEDC2 degradation promotes UV-induced G1 arrest through APC/C(Cdh1) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Na; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Tao; Li, Ai-Ling; Wang, Na; Xu, Jin-Jing; Chang, Yan; Man, Jiang-Hong; Pan, Xin; Li, Tao; Li, Wei-Hua; Mu, Rui; Liang, Bing; Chen, Liang; Jin, Bao-Feng; Xia, Qing; Gong, Wei-Li; Zhang, Xue-Min; Wang, Li; Li, Hui-Yan

    2013-07-02

    DNA damage triggers cell cycle arrest to provide a time window for DNA repair. Failure of arrest could lead to genomic instability and tumorigenesis. DNA damage-induced G1 arrest is generally achieved by the accumulation of Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21). However, p21 is degraded and does not play a role in UV-induced G1 arrest. The mechanism of UV-induced G1 arrest thus remains elusive. Here, we have identified a critical role for CUE domain-containing protein 2 (CUEDC2) in this process. CUEDC2 binds to and inhibits anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/C(Cdh1)), a critical ubiquitin ligase in G1 phase, thereby stabilizing Cyclin A and promoting G1-S transition. In response to UV irradiation, CUEDC2 undergoes ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation and ubiquitin-dependent degradation, leading to APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated Cyclin A destruction, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inactivation, and G1 arrest. A nonphosphorylatable CUEDC2 mutant is resistant to UV-induced degradation. Expression of this stable mutant effectively overrides UV-induced G1-S block. These results establish CUEDC2 as an APC/C(Cdh1) inhibitor and indicate that regulated CUEDC2 degradation is critical for UV-induced G1 arrest.

  4. Nuclear DNA damage-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation promotes UVB-induced inflammatory responses in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuya, E-mail: tatsuya.hasegawa@to.shiseido.co.jp; Nakashima, Masaya; Suzuki, Yoshiharu

    2016-08-26

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight can result in DNA damage and an inflammatory reaction of the skin commonly known as sunburn, which in turn can lead to cutaneous tissue disorders. However, little has been known about how UV-induced DNA damage mediates the release of inflammatory mediators from keratinocytes. Here, we show that UVB radiation intensity-dependently increases NLRP3 gene expression and IL-1β production in human keratinocytes. Knockdown of NLRP3 with siRNA suppresses UVB-induced production of not only IL-1β, but also other inflammatory mediators, including IL-1α, IL-6, TNF-α, and PGE{sub 2}. In addition, inhibition of DNA damage repair by knockdown of XPA, which is a major component of the nucleotide excision repair system, causes accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. In vivo immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that NLRP3 expression is also elevated in UV-irradiated human epidermis. Overall, our findings indicate that UVB-induced DNA damage initiates NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to release of various inflammatory mediators from human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • UVB radiation induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation in human keratinocytes. • NLRP3 knockdown suppresses production of UVB-induced inflammatory mediators. • UVB-induced DNA damage triggers NLRP3 inflammasome activation. • NLRP3 expression in human epidermis is elevated in response to UV radiation.

  5. Data logging of body temperatures provides precise information on phenology of reproductive events in a free-living arctic hibernator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.T.; Sheriff, M.J.; Schmutz, J.A.; Kohl, F.; Toien, O.; Buck, C.L.; Barnes, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Precise measures of phenology are critical to understanding how animals organize their annual cycles and how individuals and populations respond to climate-induced changes in physical and ecological stressors. We show that patterns of core body temperature (T b) can be used to precisely determine the timing of key seasonal events including hibernation, mating and parturition, and immergence and emergence from the hibernacula in free-living arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii). Using temperature loggers that recorded T b every 20 min for up to 18 months, we monitored core T b from three females that subsequently gave birth in captivity and from 66 female and 57 male ground squirrels free-living in the northern foothills of the Brooks Range Alaska. In addition, dates of emergence from hibernation were visually confirmed for four free-living male squirrels. Average T b in captive females decreased by 0.5–1.0°C during gestation and abruptly increased by 1–1.5°C on the day of parturition. In free-living females, similar shifts in T b were observed in 78% (n = 9) of yearlings and 94% (n = 31) of adults; females without the shift are assumed not to have given birth. Three of four ground squirrels for which dates of emergence from hibernation were visually confirmed did not exhibit obvious diurnal rhythms in T b until they first emerged onto the surface when T b patterns became diurnal. In free-living males undergoing reproductive maturation, this pre-emergence euthermic interval averaged 20.4 days (n = 56). T b-loggers represent a cost-effective and logistically feasible method to precisely investigate the phenology of reproduction and hibernation in ground squirrels.

  6. Frequent arousal from hibernation linked to severity of infection and mortality in bats with white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, DeeAnn M.; Frank, Craig L.; Turner, Gregory G.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Kurta, Allen; Britzke, Eric R.; Vodzak, Megan E.; Darling, Scott R.; Stihler, Craig W.; Hicks, Alan C.; Jacob, Roymon; Grieneisen, Laura E.; Brownlee, Sarah A.; Muller, Laura K.; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS), an emerging infectious disease that has killed over 5.5 million hibernating bats, is named for the causative agent, a white fungus (Geomyces destructans (Gd)) that invades the skin of torpid bats. During hibernation, arousals to warm (euthermic) body temperatures are normal but deplete fat stores. Temperature-sensitive dataloggers were attached to the backs of 504 free-ranging little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in hibernacula located throughout the northeastern USA. Dataloggers were retrieved at the end of the hibernation season and complete profiles of skin temperature data were available from 83 bats, which were categorized as: (1) unaffected, (2) WNS-affected but alive at time of datalogger removal, or (3) WNS-affected but found dead at time of datalogger removal. Histological confirmation of WNS severity (as indexed by degree of fungal infection) as well as confirmation of presence/absence of DNA from Gd by PCR was determined for 26 animals. We demonstrated that WNS-affected bats aroused to euthermic body temperatures more frequently than unaffected bats, likely contributing to subsequent mortality. Within the subset of WNS-affected bats that were found dead at the time of datalogger removal, the number of arousal bouts since datalogger attachment significantly predicted date of death. Additionally, the severity of cutaneous Gd infection correlated with the number of arousal episodes from torpor during hibernation. Thus, increased frequency of arousal from torpor likely contributes to WNS-associated mortality, but the question of how Gd infection induces increased arousals remains unanswered.

  7. Measuring subcutaneous temperature and differential rates of rewarming from hibernation and daily torpor in two species of bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Shannon E; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2015-12-01

    Prolonged and remote measurement of body temperature (Tb) in undisturbed small hibernators was not possible in the past because of technological limitations. Although passive integrated transponders (PITs) have been used previously to measure subcutaneous temperature (Tsub) during daily torpor in a small marsupial, no study has attempted to use these devices at Tbs below 10°C. Therefore, we investigated whether subcutaneous interscapular PITs can be used as a viable tool for measuring Tb in a small hibernating bat (Nyctophilus gouldi; Ng) and compared it with measurements of Tb during daily torpor in a heterothermic bat (Syconycteris australis; Sa). The precision of transponders was investigated as a function of ambient temperature (Ta) and remote Tsub readings enabled us to quantify Tsub-Tb differentials during steady-state torpor and arousal. Transponders functioned well outside the manufacturer's recommended range, down to ~5°C. At rest, Tsub and rectal Tb (Trec) were strongly correlated for both bat species (Ng r(2)=0.88; Sa r(2)=0.95) and this was also true for N. gouldi in steady-state torpor (r(2)=0.93). During induced rewarming Tsub increased faster than Trec in both species. Our results demonstrate that transponders can be used to provide accurate remote measurement of Tb in two species of bats during different physiological states, both during steady-state conditions and throughout dynamic phases such as rewarming from torpor. We show that, at least during rewarming, regional heterothermy common to larger hibernators and other hibernating bats is also present in bats capable of daily torpor.

  8. ETIOLOGY, TRIGGERS AND NEUROCHEMICAL CIRCUITS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED, EXPECTED, AND LABORATORY-INDUCED PANIC ATTACKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L.; Federici, Lauren M.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe anxiety disorder that is characterized by recurrent panic attacks (PA), which can be unexpected (uPA, i.e., no clear identifiable trigger) or expected (ePA). Panic typically involves an abrupt feeling of catastrophic fear or distress accompanied by physiological symptoms such as palpitations, racing heart, thermal sensations, and sweating. Recurrent uPA and ePA can also lead to agoraphobia, where subjects with PD avoid situations that were associated with PA. Here we will review recent developments in our understanding of PD, which includes discussions on: symptoms and signs associated with uPA and ePAs; Diagnosis of PD and the new DSM-V; biological etiology such as heritability and gene x environment and gene x hormonal development interactions; comparisons between laboratory and naturally occurring uPAs and ePAs; neurochemical systems that are associated with clinical PAs (e.g. gene associations; targets for triggering or treating PAs), adaptive fear and panic response concepts in the context of new NIH RDoc approach; and finally strengths and weaknesses of translational animal models of adaptive and pathological panic states. PMID:25130976

  9. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  10. Metabolic Fingerprint of PS3-Induced Resistance of Grapevine Leaves against Plasmopara viticola Revealed Differences in Elicitor-Triggered Defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Marielle; Lucio, Marianna; Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Héloir, Marie-Claire; Trouvelot, Sophie; Daire, Xavier; Kanawati, Basem; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Poinssot, Benoît; Gougeon, Régis; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Induction of plant resistance against pathogens by defense elicitors constitutes an attractive strategy to reduce the use of fungicides in crop protection. However, all elicitors do not systematically confer protection against pathogens. Elicitor-induced resistance (IR) thus merits to be further characterized in order to understand what makes an elicitor efficient. In this study, the oligosaccharidic defense elicitors H13 and PS3, respectively, ineffective and effective to trigger resistance of grapevine leaves against downy mildew, were used to compare their effect on the global leaf metabolism. Ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) analysis allowed us to obtain and compare the specific metabolic fingerprint induced by each elicitor and to characterize the associated metabolic pathways. Moreover, erythritol phosphate was identified as a putative marker of elicitor-IR.

  11. Activation of JNK triggers release of Brd4 from mitotic chromosomes and mediates protection from drug-induced mitotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Dey, Anup; Tamura, Tomohiko; Ko, Minoru; Ozato, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Some anti-cancer drugs, including those that alter microtubule dynamics target mitotic cells and induce apoptosis in some cell types. However, such drugs elicit protective responses in other cell types allowing cells to escape from drug-induced mitotic inhibition. Cells with a faulty protective mechanism undergo defective mitosis, leading to genome instability. Brd4 is a double bromodomain protein that remains on chromosomes during mitosis. However, Brd4 is released from mitotic chromosomes when cells are exposed to anti-mitotic drugs including nocodazole. Neither the mechanisms, nor the biological significance of drug-induced Brd4 release has been fully understood. We found that deletion of the internal C-terminal region abolished nocodazole induced Brd4 release from mouse P19 cells. Furthermore, cells expressing truncated Brd4, unable to dissociate from chromosomes were blocked from mitotic progression and failed to complete cell division. We also found that pharmacological and peptide inhibitors of the c-jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) pathway, but not inhibitors of other MAP kinases, prevented release of Brd4 from chromosomes. The JNK inhibitor that blocked Brd4 release also blocked mitotic progression. Further supporting the role of JNK in Brd4 release, JNK2-/- embryonic fibroblasts were defective in Brd4 release and sustained greater inhibition of cell growth after nocodazole treatment. In sum, activation of JNK pathway triggers release of Brd4 from chromosomes upon nocodazole treatment, which mediates a protective response designed to minimize drug-induced mitotic stress.

  12. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 down-regulates inflammatory responses and protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiao [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shetty, Sreerama [Center for Biomedical Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Zhang, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Gao, Rong; Hu, Yuxin [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Shuxia [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Zhenyu [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Fu, Jian, E-mail: jian.fu@uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The presence of endotoxin in blood can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and septic shock. Resolvins, the endogenous lipid mediators derived from docosahexaenoic acid, have been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory action. Using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI, we investigated the effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) on inflammatory kidney injury. Administration of AT-RvD1 1 h after LPS challenge protected the mice from kidney injury as indicated by the measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and morphological alterations associated with tubular damage. The protective effects were evidenced by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the kidney indicating reduction in inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment restored kidney cell junction protein claudin-4 expression, which was otherwise reduced after LPS challenge. AT-RvD1 treatment inhibited endotoxin-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the kidney. Moreover, AT-RvD1 treatment markedly decreased LPS-induced IL-6 level in the kidney and blocked IL-6-mediated signaling including STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator in LPS-induced kidney injury, and AT-RvD1 has therapeutic potential against AKI during endotoxemia.

  13. Acoustically-induced slip in sheared granular layers: application to dynamic earthquake triggering

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdowsi, Behrooz; Guyer, Robert A; Johnson, Paul A; Marone, Chris; Carmeliet, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental mystery in earthquake physics is "how can an earthquake be triggered by distant seismic sources?" A possible explanation is suggested by results found in discrete element method simulations of a granular layer, during stick-slip, that is subject to transient vibrational excitation. We find that at a critical vibrational amplitude (strain) there is an abrupt transition from negligible time-advanced slip (clock advance) to full clock advance, i.e., transient vibration and earthquake are simultaneous. The critical strain is of order 10^{-6}, similar to observations in the laboratory and in Earth. The transition is related to frictional weakening of the granular layer due to a dramatic increase in the number of slipping contacts and decrease in the coordination number. Associated with this frictional weakening is a pronounced decrease in the elastic moduli of the layer.

  14. Structural Transitions Induced by a Recombinant Methionine-Trigger in Silk Spidroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna; Winkler, Stefan; Valluzzi, Regina; Kaplan, David

    2000-03-01

    Control of beta sheet formation is an important factor in the understanding and prediction of structural transitions and protein folding. In genetically engineered silk proteins this control has been achieved using oxidative triggers. A genetically engineered variant of a spider silk protein, and a peptide analog, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk, were modified to include methionines flanking the beta sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively reduced and oxidized, altering the bulkiness and charge of the sulfhydryl group to control beta sheet formation by steric hindrance. Biophysical characterization and monitoring of structural transitions and intermediates were accomplished through attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) for solution state structures in both oxidized and reduced forms. For solid state structural characterization, IR microscopy and reflectance IR experiments were performed. Electron diffraction data as well as circular dichroism studies provide structural corroboration for all experiments in which reproducible sample preparation was achieved.

  15. Stable atrogin-1 (Fbxo32 and MuRF1 (Trim63 gene expression is involved in the protective mechanism in soleus muscle of hibernating Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that protect against or limit muscle atrophy in hibernators during prolonged inactivity has important implications for its treatment. We examined whether external factors influence the pathways regulating protein synthesis and degradation, leading to muscle atrophy prevention in Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus. We investigated the effects of 14-day hindlimb-unloading (HU in different seasons and two-month hibernation on the soleus (SOL muscle wet mass, muscle-to-body mass ratio, fiber cross sectional area (CSA, fiber distribution and muscle ultrastructure. We also measured changes in the protein expression and activation states of Akt, mTOR and FoxO1 and the mRNA expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1. Compared with the control groups, autumn and winter HU significantly lowered SOL muscle wet mass and muscle-to-body mass ratio, decreased type I and II fiber CSA and induced ultrastructural anomalies. However, these measured indices were unchanged between Pre-hibernation and Hibernation groups. Furthermore, phosphorylation levels of Akt and mTOR significantly decreased, while the phosphorylation level of FoxO1 and mRNA expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 increased after HU. During hibernation, the phosphorylation levels of Akt and mTOR significantly decreased, but the phosphorylation level of FoxO1 and mRNA expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 remained unchanged. Overall, our findings suggest that disuse and seasonality may not be sufficient to initiate the innate protective mechanism that prevents SOL atrophy during prolonged periods of hibernation inactivity. The stable expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 may facilitate to prevent SOL atrophy via controlling ubiquitination of muscle proteins during hibernation.

  16. Effects of Low-Load Exercise on Post-needling Induced Pain After Dry Needling of Active Trigger Point in Individuals with Subacromial Pain Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Salom Moreno, Jaime; Jiménez Gómez, Laura; Gómez Ahufinger, Victoria; Palacios Ceña, María; Arias Buría, José Luis; Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Fernández de las Peñas, César

    2017-01-01

    Background: Application of dry needling is usually associated to post-needling induced pain. Development of post-needling intervention targeting to reduce this adverse event is needed. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of low-load exercise on reducing post-needling induced-pain after dry needling of active trigger points (TrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle in subacromial pain syndrome.

  17. Combined gene expression and proteomic analysis of EGF induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggests multiple pathways trigger apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Ibrahim; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Hoffmann, Peter; Adelson, David L

    2013-11-01

    A431 cells, derived from epidermoid carcinoma, overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and when treated with a high dose of EGF will undergo apoptosis. We exploited microarray and proteomics techniques and network prediction to study the regulatory mechanisms of EGF-induced apoptosis in A431 cells. We observed significant changes in gene expression in 162 genes, approximately evenly split between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes and identified 30 proteins from the proteomic data that had either pro or anti-apoptotic annotation. Our correlation analysis of gene expression and proteome modeled a number of distinct sub-networks that are associated with the onset of apoptosis, allowing us to identify specific pathways and components. These include components of the interferon signalling pathway, and down stream components, including cytokines and suppressors of cytokine signalling. A central component of almost all gene expression sub-networks identified was TP53, which is mutated in A431 cells, and was down regulated. This down regulation of TP53 appeared to be correlated with proteomic sub-networks of cytoskeletal or cell adhesion components that might induce apoptosis by triggering cytochrome C release. Of the only three genes also differentially expressed as proteins, only serpinb1 had a known association with apoptosis. We confirmed that up regulation and cleavage of serpinb1 into L-DNAaseII was correlated with the induction of apoptosis. It is unlikely that a single pathway, but more likely a combination of pathways is needed to trigger EGF induced apoptosis in A431cells.

  18. Amphetamine-induced psychosis - a separate diagnostic entity or primary psychosis triggered in the vulnerable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramness Jørgen G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of amphetamine and methamphetamine is widespread in the general population and common among patients with psychiatric disorders. Amphetamines may induce symptoms of psychosis very similar to those of acute schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. This has been an argument for using amphetamine-induced psychosis as a model for primary psychotic disorders. To distinguish the two types of psychosis on the basis of acute symptoms is difficult. However, acute psychosis induced by amphetamines seems to have a faster recovery and appears to resolve more completely compared to schizophrenic psychosis. The increased vulnerability for acute amphetamine induced psychosis seen among those with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality and, to a certain degree other psychiatric disorders, is also shared by non-psychiatric individuals who previously have experienced amphetamine-induced psychosis. Schizophrenia spectrum disorder and amphetamine-induced psychosis are further linked together by the finding of several susceptibility genes common to both conditions. These genes probably lower the threshold for becoming psychotic and increase the risk for a poorer clinical course of the disease. The complex relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis has received much attention but is still not adequately explored. Our paper reviews the literature in this field and proposes a stress-vulnerability model for understanding the relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis.

  19. Dengue virus induces mitochondrial elongation through impairment of Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Vincent; Lang, Diane; Valois, Sierra; Rothman, Alan L; Medin, Carey L

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fission and fusion to maintain essential cellular functions. An imbalance between these two processes can result in many pathophysiological outcomes. Dengue virus (DENV) interacts with cellular organelles, including mitochondria, to successfully replicate in cells. This study used live-cell imaging and found an increase in mitochondrial length and respiration during DENV infection. The level of mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), was decreased on mitochondria during DENV infection, as well as Drp1 phosphorylated on serine 616, which is important for mitochondrial fission. DENV proteins NS4b and NS3 were also associated with subcellular fractions of mitochondria. Induction of fission through uncoupling of mitochondria or overexpression of Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 with a phosphomimetic mutation (S616D) significantly reduced viral replication. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics by inhibiting Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission, which promotes viral replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Apoptosis induced by piroxicam plus cisplatin combined treatment is triggered by p21 in mesothelioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Baldi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma (MM is a rare, highly aggressive tumor, associated to asbestos exposure. To date no chemotherapy regimen for MM has proven to be definitively curative, and new therapies for MM treatment need to be developed. We have previously shown in vivo that piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment in MM, specifically acts on cell cycle regulation triggering apoptosis, with survival increase. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed, at molecular level, the apoptotic increase caused by piroxicam/cisplatin treatment in MM cell lines. By means of genome wide analyses, we analyzed transcriptional gene deregulation both after the single piroxicam or cisplatin and the combined treatment. Here we show that apoptotic increase following combined treatment is mediated by p21, since apoptotic increase in piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment is abolished upon p21 silencing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment determines an apoptosis increase in MM cells, which is dependent on the p21 expression. The results provided suggest that piroxicam/cisplatin combination might be tested in clinical settings in tumor specimens that express p21.

  1. Changes during hibernation in different phospholipid and free and esterified cholesterol serum levels in black bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, V.; Sheikh, A.; Chauhan, A.; Tsiouris, J.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, fat is known to be the preferred source of energy. A detailed analysis of different phospholipids, as well as free and esterified cholesterol, was conducted to investigate lipid abnormalities during hibernation. The levels of total phospholipids and total cholesterol in the serum of black bears were found to increase significantly in hibernation as compared with the active state. Both free and esterified cholesterol were increased in the hibernating state in comparison with the active state (P biochimie et biologie mole??culaire. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation. PMID:27229882

  3. Experimental evidence for beneficial effects of projected climate change on hibernating amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üveges, Bálint; Mahr, Katharina; Szederkényi, Márk; Bókony, Veronika; Hoi, Herbert; Hettyey, Attila

    2016-05-27

    Amphibians are the most threatened vertebrates today, experiencing worldwide declines. In recent years considerable effort was invested in exposing the causes of these declines. Climate change has been identified as such a cause; however, the expectable effects of predicted milder, shorter winters on hibernation success of temperate-zone Amphibians have remained controversial, mainly due to a lack of controlled experimental studies. Here we present a laboratory experiment, testing the effects of simulated climate change on hibernating juvenile common toads (Bufo bufo). We simulated hibernation conditions by exposing toadlets to current (1.5 °C) or elevated (4.5 °C) hibernation temperatures in combination with current (91 days) or shortened (61 days) hibernation length. We found that a shorter winter and milder hibernation temperature increased survival of toads during hibernation. Furthermore, the increase in temperature and shortening of the cold period had a synergistic positive effect on body mass change during hibernation. Consequently, while climate change may pose severe challenges for amphibians of the temperate zone during their activity period, the negative effects may be dampened by shorter and milder winters experienced during hibernation.

  4. Bone formation is not impaired by hibernation (disuse) in black bears Ursus americanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, S.W.; Vaughan, M.R.; Demers, L.M.; Donahue, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Disuse by bed rest, limb immobilization or space flight causes rapid bone loss by arresting bone formation and accelerating bone resorption. This net bone loss increases the risk of fracture upon remobilization. Bone loss also occurs in hibernating ground squirrels, golden hamsters, and little brown bats by arresting bone formation and accelerating bone resorption. There is some histological evidence to suggest that black bears Ursus americanus do not lose bone mass during hibernation (i.e. disuse). There is also evidence suggesting that muscle mass and strength are preserved in black bears during hibernation. The question of whether bears can prevent bone loss during hibernation has not been conclusively answered. The goal of the current study was to further assess bone metabolism in hibernating black bears. Using the same serum markers of bone remodeling used to evaluate human patients with osteoporosis, we assayed serum from five black bears, collected every 10 days over a 196-day period, for bone resorption and formation markers. Here we show that bone resorption remains elevated over the entire hibernation period compared to the pre-hibernation period, but osteoblastic bone formation is not impaired by hibernation and is rapidly accelerated during remobilization following hibernation.

  5. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  6. A Near-Infrared Triggered Nanophotosensitizer Inducing Domino Effect on Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Burst for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengze; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Pan, Wei; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2015-11-24

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well-established modality for cancer therapy, which locally kills cancer cells when light irradiates a photosensitizer. However, conventional PDT is often limited by the extremely short lifespan and severely limited diffusion distance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosensitizer, as well as the penetration depth of visible light activation. Here, we develop a near-infrared (NIR) triggered nanophotosensitizer based on mitochondria targeted titanium dioxide-coated upconversion nanoparticles for PDT against cancer. When irradiated by NIR laser, the nanophotosensitizer could produce ROS in mitochondria, which induced the domino effect on ROS burst. The overproduced ROS accumulated in mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial collapse and irreversible cell apoptosis. Confocal fluorescence imaging indicated that the mitochondrial targeting and real-time imaging of ROS burst could be achieved in living cells. The complete removal of tumor in vivo confirmed the excellent therapeutic effect of the nanophotosensitizer.

  7. The Adaptive Response to Intestinal Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Hibernation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Hibernation reduces pancreatic amylase levels in ground squirrels. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A 134:573 – 578. Carey, H.V., C.A. Rhoads and T.Y. Aw. 2003...expression in rodents and humans is associated with microbial susceptibility. A wide variety of stimuli that activate pro-apopotic signaling pathways are... amylase levels in ground squirrels. (see Balslev- Clausen, et al., 2003, in list of published papers). Exocrine pancreatic activity is critical to GI

  8. Neural Signaling Metabolites May Modulate Energy Use in Hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Kelly L; Frare, Carla; Rice, Sarah A

    2017-01-01

    Despite an epidemic in obesity and metabolic syndrome limited means exist to effect adiposity or metabolic rate other than life style changes. Here we review evidence that neural signaling metabolites may modulate thermoregulatory pathways and offer novel means to fine tune energy use. We extend prior reviews on mechanisms that regulate thermogenesis and energy use in hibernation by focusing primarily on the neural signaling metabolites adenosine, AMP and glutamate.

  9. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1 and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR, ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  10. Laser phototherapy triggers the production of reactive oxygen species in oral epithelial cells without inducing DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburg, Caroline Siviero; Almeida, Luciana Oliveira; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Squarize, Cristiane Helena; Castilho, Rogerio Moraes

    2014-04-01

    Laser phototherapy (LPT) is widely used in clinical practice to accelerate healing. Although the use of LPT has advantages, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of accelerated healing and the safety concerns associated with LPT are still poorly understood. We investigated the physiological effects of LPT irradiation on the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), genomic instability, and deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) damage in human epithelial cells. In contrast to a high energy density (20  J/cm²), laser administered at a low energy density (4  J/cm²) resulted in the accumulation of ROS. Interestingly, 4  J/cm² of LPT did not induce DNA damage, genomic instability, or nuclear influx of the BRCA1 DNA damage repair protein, a known genome protective molecule that actively participates in DNA repair. Our results suggest that administration of low energy densities of LPT induces the accumulation of safe levels of ROS, which may explain the accelerated healing results observed in patients. These findings indicate that epithelial cells have an endowed molecular circuitry that responds to LPT by physiologically inducing accumulation of ROS, which triggers accelerated healing. Importantly, our results suggest that low energy densities of LPT can serve as a safe therapy to accelerate epithelial healing.

  11. Inactivation of Sag/Rbx2/Roc2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Triggers Senescence and Inhibits Kras-Induced Immortalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recent study showed that SAG/RBX2 E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates apoptosis and vasculogenesis by promoting degradation of NOXA and NF1, and co-operates with Kras to promote lung tumorigenesis by activating NFκB and mTOR pathways via targeted degradation of tumor suppressive substrates including IκB, DEPTOR, p21 and p27. Here we investigated the role of Sag/Rbx2 E3 ligase in cellular senescence and immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs and report that Sag is required for proper cell proliferation and KrasG12D-induced immortalization. Sag inactivation by genetic deletion remarkably suppresses cell proliferation by inducing senescence, which is associated with accumulation of p16, but not p53. Mechanistically, Sag deletion caused accumulation of Jun-B, a substrate of Sag-Fbxw7 E3 ligase and a transcription factor that drives p16 transcription. Importantly, senescence triggered by Sag deletion can be largely rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a, the p16 encoding gene, indicating its causal role. Furthermore, KrasG12D-induced immortalization can also be abrogated by Sag deletion via senescence induction, which is again rescued by simultaneous deletion of Cdkn2a. Finally, we found that Sag deletion inactivates KrasG12D activity and block the MAPK signaling pathway, together with accumulated p16, to induce senescence. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Sag is a KrasG12D-cooperating oncogene required for KrasG12D-induced immortalization and transformation, and targeting SAG-SCF E3 ligase may, therefore, have therapeutic value for senescence-based cancer treatment.

  12. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan, E-mail: falawi@upenn.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening.

  13. Neuronal plasticity in hibernation and the proposed role of the microtubule-associated protein tau as a "master switch" regulating synaptic gain in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Thomas; Bullmann, Torsten

    2013-09-01

    The present paper provides an overview of adaptive changes in brain structure and learning abilities during hibernation as a behavioral strategy used by several mammalian species to minimize energy expenditure under current or anticipated inhospitable environmental conditions. One cellular mechanism that contributes to the regulated suppression of metabolism and thermogenesis during hibernation is reversible phosphorylation of enzymes and proteins, which limits rates of flux through metabolic pathways. Reversible phosphorylation during hibernation also affects synaptic membrane proteins, a process known to be involved in synaptic plasticity. This mechanism of reversible protein phosphorylation also affects the microtubule-associated protein tau, thereby generating a condition that in the adult human brain is associated with aggregation of tau protein to paired helical filaments (PHFs), as observed in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we put forward the concept that phosphorylation of tau is a neuroprotective mechanism to escape NMDA-mediated hyperexcitability of neurons that would otherwise occur during slow gradual cooling of the brain. Phosphorylation of tau and its subsequent targeting to subsynaptic sites might, thus, work as a kind of "master switch," regulating NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic gain in a wide array of neuronal networks, thereby enabling entry into torpor. If this condition lasts too long, however, it may eventually turn into a pathological trigger, driving a cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, as in Alzheimer's disease or other "tauopathies".

  14. Immunological Demyelination Triggers Macrophage/Microglial Cells Activation without Inducing Astrogliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Cloutier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial scar formed by reactive astrocytes and axon growth inhibitors associated with myelin play important roles in the failure of axonal regeneration following central nervous system (CNS injury. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that immunological demyelination of the CNS facilitates regeneration of severed axons following spinal cord injury. In the present study, we evaluate whether immunological demyelination is accompanied with astrogliosis. We compared the astrogliosis and macrophage/microglial cell responses 7 days after either immunological demyelination or a stab injury to the dorsal funiculus. Both lesions induced a strong activated macrophage/microglial cells response which was significantly higher within regions of immunological demyelination. However, immunological demyelination regions were not accompanied by astrogliosis compared to stab injury that induced astrogliosis which extended several millimeters above and below the lesions, evidenced by astroglial hypertrophy, formation of a glial scar, and upregulation of intermediate filaments glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Moreover, a stab or a hemisection lesion directly within immunological demyelination regions did not induced astrogliosis within the immunological demyelination region. These results suggest that immunological demyelination creates a unique environment in which astrocytes do not form a glial scar and provides a unique model to understand the putative interaction between astrocytes and activated macrophage/microglial cells.

  15. Increased brain histamine H3 receptor expression during hibernation in golden-mantled ground squirrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anichtchik Oleg V

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is a state of extremely reduced physiological functions and a deep depression of CNS activity. We have previously shown that the histamine levels increase in the brain during hibernation, as does the ratio between histamine and its first metabolite, suggesting increased histamine turnover during this state. The inhibitory histamine H3 receptor has both auto- and heteroreceptor function, rendering it the most likely histamine receptor to be involved in regulating the activity of histamine as well as other neurotransmitters during hibernation. In view of accumulating evidence that there is a global depression of transcription and translation during hibernation, of all but a few proteins that are important for this physiological condition, we reasoned that an increase in histamine H3 receptor expression would clearly indicate an important hibernation-related function for the receptor. Results In this study we show, using in situ hybridization, that histamine H3 receptor mRNA increases in the cortex, caudate nucleus and putamen during hibernation, an increase that is accompanied by elevated receptor binding in the cerebral cortex, globus pallidus and substantia nigra. These results indicate that there is a hibernation-related increase in H3 receptor expression in cortical neurons and in striatopallidal and striatonigral GABAergic neurons. GTP-γ-S binding autoradiography shows that the H3 receptors in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra can be stimulated by histamine throughout the hibernation cycle, suggesting that they are functionally active during hibernation. Conclusions These results show that the histamine H3 receptor gene is one of the few with a transcript that increases during hibernation, indicating an important role for the receptor in regulating this state. Moreover, the receptor is functionally active in the basal ganglia, suggesting a function for it in regulating e.g. dopaminergic transmission

  16. Capsaicin triggers immunogenic PEL cell death, stimulates DCs and reverts PEL-induced immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Marisa; Gilardini Montani, Maria Saveria; Filardi, Mariarosari; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara

    2015-10-06

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of red pepper has been extensively studied for its many properties, especially the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant ones. It binds to vanilloid receptor 1, although it has been reported to be able to mediate some effects independently of its receptor. Another important property of Capsaicin is the anticancer activity against highly malignant tumors, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we found that Capsaicin induced an apoptotic cell death in PEL cells correlated with the inhibition of STAT3. STAT3 pathway, constitutively activated in PEL cells, is essential for their survival. By STAT3 de-phosphorylation, Capsaicin reduced the Mcl-1 expression level and this could represent one of the underlying mechanisms leading to the Capsaicin-mediated cell death and autophagy induction. Next, by pharmacological or genetic inhibition, we found that autophagy played a pro-survival role, suggesting that its inhibition could be exploited to increase the Capsaicin cytotoxic effect against PEL cells. Finally, we show that Capsaicin induced DAMP exposure, as for an immunogenic cell death, directly promoted DC activation and, more importantly, that it counteracted the immune-suppression, in terms of DC differentiation, mediated by the PEL released factors.

  17. Evidence for a trigger function of valproic acid in xenobiotic-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, S; Johanssen, S; Ungemach, F R

    2000-08-01

    The influence of the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (2-n-propylpentanoic acid), on the hepatocellular capacity, to cope with an extrinsic oxidative stress was investigated. Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to therapeutic concentrations of valproic acid (0.25-1.0 mmol/l) were less resistant than controls, as evidenced by a significant cytotoxic response after challenge of the cells with a non-toxic dose of allyl alcohol (2-propen-1-ol). Valproic acid alone was not toxic to hepatocytes even at ten times higher concentrations (10 mmol/l), suggesting that cell damage was not a mere additive effect. Incubation with valproic acid plus allyl alcohol induced an irreversible depletion of hepatocellular glutathione, in contrast to allyl alcohol alone which induced a transient loss. Hepatocytes treated with valproic acid plus allyl alcohol were protected by N-acetylcysteine, a precursor of glutathione. These findings indicate that valproic acid affects hepatocellular defence mechanisms and suggest that a predisposition of hepatocytes to oxidative stress may play a role in the fatal hepatotoxicity of valproic acid in epileptic patients.

  18. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles trigger sporulation in entomopathogenic fungi: the case of Neozygites tanajoae infecting the cassava green mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Fabien C C; Sabelis, Maurice W; Hanna, Rachid; Janssen, Arne

    2005-05-01

    A large body of evidence shows that plants release volatile chemicals upon attack by herbivores. These volatiles influence the performance of natural enemies. Nearly all the evidence on the effect of plant volatiles on natural enemies of herbivores concerns predators, parasitoids, and entomophagous nematodes. However, other entomopathogens, such as fungi, have not been studied yet for the way they exploit the chemical information that the plant conveys on the presence of herbivores. We tested the hypothesis that volatiles emanating from cassava plants infested by green mites (Mononychellus tanajoa) trigger sporulation in three isolates of the acaropathogenic fungus Neozygites tanajoae. Tests were conducted under climatic conditions optimal to fungal conidiation, such that the influence of the plant volatiles could only alter the quantity of conidia produced. For two isolates (Altal.brz and Colal.brz), it was found that, compared with clean air, the presence of volatiles from clean, excised leaf discs suppressed conidia production. This suppressive effect disappeared in the presence of herbivore-damaged leaves for the isolate Colal.brz. For the third isolate, no significant effects were observed. Another experiment differing mainly in the amount of volatiles showed that two isolates produced more conidia when exposed to herbivore-damaged leaves compared with clean air. Taken together, the results show that volatiles from clean plants suppress conidiation, whereas herbivore-induced plant volatiles promote conidiation of N. tanajoae. These opposing effects suggest that the entomopathogenic fungus tunes the release of spores to herbivore-induced plant signals indicating the presence of hosts.

  19. Noise-induced interspike interval correlations and spike train regularization in spike-triggered adapting neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation in neurons produces a temporal point process, whose statistics is governed by intrinsic phenomena and the external incoming inputs to be coded. In particular, spike-evoked adaptation currents support a slow temporal process that conditions spiking probability at the present time according to past activity. In this work, we study the statistics of interspike interval correlations arising in such non-renewal spike trains, for a neuron model that reproduces different spike modes in a small adaptation scenario. We found that correlations are stronger as the neuron fires at a particular firing rate, which is defined by the adaptation process. When set in a subthreshold regime, the neuron may sustain this particular firing rate, and thus induce correlations, by noise. Given that, in this regime, interspike intervals are negatively correlated at any lag, this effect surprisingly implies a reduction in the variability of the spike count statistics at a finite noise intensity.

  20. Noise-induced interspike interval correlations and spike train regularization in spike-triggered adapting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2016-09-01

    Spike generation in neurons produces a temporal point process, whose statistics is governed by intrinsic phenomena and the external incoming inputs to be coded. In particular, spike-evoked adaptation currents support a slow temporal process that conditions spiking probability at the present time according to past activity. In this work, we study the statistics of interspike interval correlations arising in such non-renewal spike trains, for a neuron model that reproduces different spike modes in a small adaptation scenario. We found that correlations are stronger as the neuron fires at a particular firing rate, which is defined by the adaptation process. When set in a subthreshold regime, the neuron may sustain this particular firing rate, and thus induce correlations, by noise. Given that, in this regime, interspike intervals are negatively correlated at any lag, this effect surprisingly implies a reduction in the variability of the spike count statistics at a finite noise intensity.

  1. Increases in myocardial workload induced by rapid atrial pacing trigger alterations in global metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan T Turer

    Full Text Available To determine whether increases in cardiac work lead to alterations in the plasma metabolome and whether such changes arise from the heart or peripheral organs.There is growing evidence that the heart influences systemic metabolism through endocrine effects and affecting pathways involved in energy homeostasis.Nineteen patients referred for cardiac catheterization were enrolled. Peripheral and selective coronary sinus (CS blood sampling was performed at serial timepoints following the initiation of pacing, and metabolite profiling was performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS.Pacing-stress resulted in a 225% increase in the median rate·pressure product from baseline. Increased myocardial work induced significant changes in the peripheral concentration of 43 of 125 metabolites assayed, including large changes in purine [adenosine (+99%, p = 0.006, ADP (+42%, p = 0.01, AMP (+79%, p = 0.004, GDP (+69%, p = 0.003, GMP (+58%, p = 0.01, IMP (+50%, p = 0.03, xanthine (+61%, p = 0.0006], and several bile acid metabolites. The CS changes in metabolites qualitatively mirrored those in the peripheral blood in both timing and magnitude, suggesting the heart was not the major source of the metabolite release.Isolated increases in myocardial work can induce changes in the plasma metabolome, but these changes do not appear to be directly cardiac in origin. A number of these dynamic metabolites have known signaling functions. Our study provides additional evidence to a growing body of literature on metabolic 'cross-talk' between the heart and other organs.

  2. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Wing So

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative effect on the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells, but had minimal cytotoxicity on the normal or non-tumorigenic cells, as measured by MTT reduction assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that DHA and EPA triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in LA-N-1 cells, as detected by flow cytometry, which was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of CDK2 and cyclin E proteins. Moreover, DHA and EPA could also induce apoptosis in LA-N-1 cells as revealed by an increase in DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Up-regulation of Bax, activated caspase-3 and caspase-9 proteins, and down-regulation of Bcl-XL protein, might account for the occurrence of apoptotic events. Collectively, our results suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of DHA and EPA on LA-N-1 cells might be mediated, at least in part, via triggering of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, DHA and EPA are potential anti-cancer agents which might be used for the adjuvant therapy or combination therapy with the conventional anti-cancer drugs for the treatment of some forms of human neuroblastoma with minimal toxicity.

  3. Studies of the Machine Induced Background, simulations for the design of the Beam Condition Monitor and implementation of the Inclusive $\\phi$ Trigger at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lieng, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments of the LHC at CERN, built to perform precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays. In order to protect the sensitive elements of the experiment from adverse beam conditions the Beam Condition Monitor has been created. Such conditions increase the particle flux arriving from the LHC, known as Machine Induced Background. These particles interfere with the experiment, for example through the physics trigger. In this thesis software development and simulations for the design and validation of the Beam Condition Monitor is shown, ranging from LHCb-specific algorithm implementation to beam dump threshold determination. Furthermore, software development in order to attain a complete simulation chain of machine induced background is shown. The results of these simulations are compared to early data collected at LHCb. Lastly, the development and implementation of the Inclusive $\\phi$ trigger line for the High Level Trigger is presented. This line aims to reconstruct ...

  4. Reduction of body temperature governs neutrophil retention in hibernating and nonhibernating animals by margination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Dugbartey, George J.; Boerema, Ate S.; Talaei, Fatemeh; Herwig, Annika; Goris, Maaike; van Buiten, Azuwerus; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Carey, Hannah V.; Henning, Robert H.; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Low body temperature leads to decrease of circulating neutrophils due to margination in hibernating and nonhibernating animals. Hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism, called torpor, interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. During deep and daily (shallow) torpor, the number of circulati

  5. Impaired skeletal muscle regeneration in the absence of fibrosis during hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Andres-Mateos

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy can occur as a consequence of immobilization and/or starvation in the majority of vertebrates studied. In contrast, hibernating mammals are protected against the loss of muscle mass despite long periods of inactivity and lack of food intake. Resident muscle-specific stem cells (satellite cells are known to be activated by muscle injury and their activation contributes to the regeneration of muscle, but whether satellite cells play a role in hibernation is unknown. In the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel we show that muscles ablated of satellite cells were still protected against atrophy, demonstrating that satellite cells are not involved in the maintenance of skeletal muscle during hibernation. Additionally, hibernating skeletal muscle showed extremely slow regeneration in response to injury, due to repression of satellite cell activation and myoblast differentiation caused by a fine-tuned interplay of p21, myostatin, MAPK, and Wnt signaling pathways. Interestingly, despite long periods of inflammation and lack of efficient regeneration, injured skeletal muscle from hibernating animals did not develop fibrosis and was capable of complete recovery when animals emerged naturally from hibernation. We propose that hibernating squirrels represent a new model system that permits evaluation of impaired skeletal muscle remodeling in the absence of formation of tissue fibrosis.

  6. Serum immune-related proteins are differentially expressed during hibernation in the American black bear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A Chow

    Full Text Available Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears.

  7. Temporal organisation of hibernation in wild-type and tau mutant Syrian hamsters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, M; Daan, S; Strijkstra, AM; Heldmaier, G.

    2001-01-01

    The temporal pattern of hibernation was studied in three genotypes of Syrian hamsters with different circadian periodicity to assess a potential circadian control of alternating torpor and euthermy. We recorded the pattern of hibernation by measuring activity in continuous dim light and constant env

  8. Skeletal muscle NADPH oxidase is increased and triggers stretch-induced damage in the mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P; Yeung, Ella W; Froehner, Stanley C; Allen, David G

    2010-12-20

    Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of muscle damage in dystrophic (mdx) mice. In this study we have investigated the role of NADPH oxidase as a source of the oxidative stress in these mice. The NADPH oxidase subunits gp91(phox), p67(phox) and rac 1 were increased 2-3 fold in tibilais anterior muscles from mdx mice compared to wild type. Importantly, this increase occurred in 19 day old mice, before the onset of muscle necrosis and inflammation, suggesting that NADPH oxidase is an important source of oxidative stress in mdx muscle. In muscles from 9 week old mdx mice, gp91(phox) and p67(phox) were increased 3-4 fold and NADPH oxidase superoxide production was 2 times greater than wild type. In single fibers from mdx muscle NADPH oxidase subunits were all located on or near the sarcolemma, except for p67(phox),which was expressed in the cytosol. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase significantly reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) rise following stretched contractions in mdx single fibers, and also attenuated the loss of muscle force. These results suggest that NADPH oxidase is a major source of reactive oxygen species in dystrophic muscle and its enhanced activity has a stimulatory effect on stretch-induced Ca(2+) entry, a key mechanism for muscle damage and functional impairment.

  9. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V; Upton, Kyle R; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-08

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs.

  10. Peri-nuclear clustering of mitochondria is triggered during aluminum maltolate induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, David A; Hurd, Jennifer A; Fox, Nena; Townsend, Brigitte E; Griffioen, Kathleen J S; Ghribi, Othman; Savory, John

    2006-07-01

    Synapse loss and neuronal death are key features of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Disrupted axonal transport of mitochondria is a potential mechanism that could contribute to both. As the major producer of ATP in the cell, transport of mitochondria to the synapse is required for synapse maintenance. However, mitochondria also play an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. Investigation of aluminum (Al) maltolate induced apoptosis in human NT2 cells led us to explore the relationship between apoptosis related changes and the disruption of mitochondrial transport. Similar to that observed with tau over expression, NT2 cells exhibit peri-nuclear clustering of mitochondria following treatment with Al maltolate. Neuritic processes largely lacked mitochondria, except in axonal swellings. Similar, but more rapid results were observed following staurosporine administration, indicating that the clustering effect was not specific to Al maltolate. Organelle clustering and transport disruption preceded apoptosis. Incubation with the caspase inhibitor zVAD-FMK effectively blocked apoptosis, however failed to prevent organelle clustering. Thus, transport disruption is associated with the initiation, but not necessarily the completion of apoptosis. These results, together with observed transport defects and apoptosis related changes in Alzheimer disease brain suggest that mitochondrial transport disruption may play a significant role in synapse loss and thus the pathogenesis or Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Incorporation of iron into chloroplasts triggers the restoration of cadmium induced inhibition of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Ádám; Sárvári, Éva; Tóth, Brigitta; Mészáros, Ilona; Fodor, Ferenc

    2016-09-01

    Photosynthetic symptoms of acute Cd stress can be remedied by elevated Fe supply. To shed more light on the most important aspects of this recovery, the detailed Fe trafficking and accumulation processes as well as the changes in the status of the photosynthetic apparatus were investigated in recovering poplar plants. The Cd-free, Fe-enriched nutrient solution induced an immediate intensive Fe uptake. The increased Fe/Cd ratio in the roots initiated the translocation of Fe to the leaf with a short delay that ultimately led to the accumulation of Fe in the chloroplasts. The chloroplast Fe uptake was directly proportional to the Fe translocation to leaves. The accumulation of PSI reaction centers and the recovery of PSII function studied by Blue-Native PAGE and chlorophyll a fluorescence induction measurements, respectively, began in parallel to the increase in the Fe content of chloroplasts. The initial reorganization of PSII was accompanied by a peak in the antennae-based non-photochemical quenching. In conclusion, Fe accumulation of the chloroplasts is a process of prime importance in the recovery of photosynthesis from acute Cd stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating the properties of AGN feedback in hot atmospheres triggered by cooling-induced gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Edward C D; Shabala, Stanislav S

    2011-01-01

    Radiative cooling may plausibly cause hot gas in the centre of a massive galaxy, or galaxy cluster, to become gravitationally unstable. The subsequent collapse of this gas on a dynamical timescale can provide an abundant source of fuel for AGN heating and star formation. Thus, this mechanism provides a way to link the AGN accretion rate to the global properties of an ambient cooling flow, but without the implicit assumption that the accreted material must have flowed onto the black hole from 10s of kiloparsecs away. It is shown that a fuelling mechanism of this sort naturally leads to a close balance between AGN heating and the radiative cooling rate of the hot, X-ray emitting halo. Furthermore, AGN powered by cooling-induced gravitational instability would exhibit characteristic duty cycles (delta) which are redolent of recent observational findings: delta is proportional to L_X/sigma_{*}^{3}, where L_X is the X-ray luminosity of the hot atmosphere, and sigma_{*} is the central stellar velocity dispersion of...

  13. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology.

  14. Purification and characterization of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing elicitor from Magnaporthe oryzae that triggers defense response in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnaporthe oryzae, the rice blast fungus, might secrete certain proteins related to plant-fungal pathogen interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report the purification, characterization, and gene cloning of a novel hypersensitive response-inducing protein elicitor (MoHrip1 secreted by M. oryzae. The protein fraction was purified and identified by de novo sequencing, and the sequence matched the genomic sequence of a putative protein from M. oryzae strain 70-15 (GenBank accession No. XP_366602.1. The elicitor-encoding gene mohrip1 was isolated; it consisted of a 429 bp cDNA, which encodes a polypeptide of 142 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.322 kDa and a pI of 4.53. The deduced protein, MoHrip1, was expressed in E. coli. And the expression protein collected from bacterium also forms necrotic lesions in tobacco. MoHrip1 could induce the early events of the defense response, including hydrogen peroxide production, callose deposition, and alkalization of the extracellular medium, in tobacco. Moreover, MoHrip1-treated rice seedlings possessed significantly enhanced systemic resistance to M. oryzae compared to the control seedlings. The real-time PCR results indicated that the expression of some pathogenesis-related genes and genes involved in signal transduction could also be induced by MoHrip1. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that MoHrip1 triggers defense responses in rice and could be used for controlling rice blast disease.

  15. Effects of age, weight, hormones, and hibernation on breeding success in boreal toads (Bufo boreas boreas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, T L; Szymanski, D C; Keyster, E D

    2010-03-01

    The goals of this study were to test the effects of exogenous hormones and hibernation on breeding behavior and gamete release by boreal toads (Bufo boreas boreas). Each year, a subset of 77 toads was hibernated and then paired with hibernated or nonhibernated mates and treated with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), or left untreated. Amplexus and egg and sperm production were recorded. At 1 yr of age, only 19% of pairs exhibited amplexus, and no sperm or eggs were produced. At 2 and 3 yr of age, most male toads treated with LHRHa exhibited amplexus (56.9% and 100%, respectively). Among 2-yr-old males, amplexus was more prevalent (Pbreeding success, males should be hibernated and treated with LHRHa. In contrast, female productivity was enhanced by improving their body condition instead of subjecting them to hibernation prior to LHRHa treatment.

  16. The Gut Microbiota Modulates Energy Metabolism in the Hibernating Brown Bear Ursus arctos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Felix; Ståhlman, Marcus; Ilkayeva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation that helps many animals to conserve energy during food shortage in winter. Brown bears double their fat depots during summer and use these stored lipids during hibernation. Although bears seasonally become obese, they remain metabolically healthy. We analyzed...... the microbiota of free-ranging brown bears during their active phase and hibernation. Compared to the active phase, hibernation microbiota had reduced diversity, reduced levels of Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and increased levels of Bacteroidetes. Several metabolites involved in lipid metabolism, including...... triglycerides, cholesterol, and bile acids, were also affected by hibernation. Transplantation of the bear microbiota from summer and winter to germ-free mice transferred some of the seasonal metabolic features and demonstrated that the summer microbiota promoted adiposity without impairing glucose tolerance...

  17. Telomere-mediated chromosomal instability triggers TLR4 induced inflammation and death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindra N Bhattacharjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres are essential to maintain chromosomal stability. Cells derived from mice lacking telomerase RNA component (mTERC-/- mice display elevated telomere-mediated chromosome instability. Age-dependent telomere shortening and associated chromosome instability reduce the capacity to respond to cellular stress occurring during inflammation and cancer. Inflammation is one of the important risk factors in cancer progression. Controlled innate immune responses mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR are required for host defense against infection. Our aim was to understand the role of chromosome/genome instability in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of TLR4 in telomerase deficient mTERC-/- mice harbouring chromosome instability which did not develop any overt immunological disorder in pathogen-free condition or any form of cancers at this stage. Chromosome instability was measured in metaphase spreads prepared from wildtype (mTERC+/+, mTERC+/- and mTERC-/- mouse splenocytes. Peritoneal and/or bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to examine the responses of TLR4 by their ability to produce inflammatory mediators TNFalpha and IL6. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 is highly up-regulated in the immune cells derived from telomerase-null (mTERC-/- mice and lipopolysaccharide, a natural ligand for TLR4 stabilises NF-kappaB binding to its promoter by down-regulating ATF-3 in mTERC-/- macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implied that background chromosome instability in the cellular level stabilises the action of TLR4-induced NF-kappaB action and sensitises cells to produce excess pro-inflammatory mediators. Chromosome/genomic instability data raises optimism for controlling inflammation by non-toxic TLR antagonists among high-risk groups.

  18. Ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 triggers internalization and signaling in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Parhamifar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukotriene D(4 (LTD(4 belongs to the bioactive lipid group known as eicosanoids and has implications in pathological processes such as inflammation and cancer. Leukotriene D(4 exerts its effects mainly through two different G-protein-coupled receptors, CysLT(1 and CysLT(2. The high affinity LTD(4 receptor CysLT(1R exhibits tumor-promoting properties by triggering cell proliferation, survival, and migration in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, increased expression and nuclear localization of CysLT(1R correlates with a poorer prognosis for patients with colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a proximity ligation assay and immunoprecipitation, this study showed that endogenous CysLT(1R formed heterodimers with its counter-receptor CysLT(2R under basal conditions and that LTD(4 triggers reduced dimerization of CysLTRs in intestinal epithelial cells. This effect was dependent upon a parallel LTD(4-induced increase in CysLT(1R tyrosine phosphorylation. Leukotriene D(4 also led to elevated internalization of CysLT(1Rs from the plasma membrane and a simultaneous increase at the nucleus. Using sucrose, a clathrin endocytic inhibitor, dominant-negative constructs, and siRNA against arrestin-3, we suggest that a clathrin-, arrestin-3, and Rab-5-dependent process mediated the internalization of CysLT(1R. Altering the CysLT(1R internalization process at either the clathrin or the arrestin-3 stage led to disruption of LTD(4-induced Erk1/2 activation and up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggests that upon ligand activation, CysLT(1R is tyrosine-phosphorylated and released from heterodimers with CysLT(2R and, subsequently, internalizes from the plasma membrane to the nuclear membrane in a clathrin-, arrestin-3-, and Rab-5-dependent manner, thus, enabling Erk1/2 signaling and downstream transcription of the COX-2 gene.

  19. Titin isoform switching is a major cardiac adaptive response in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Wu, Yiming; Granzier, Henk

    2008-07-01

    The hibernation phenomenon captures biological as well as clinical interests to understand how organs adapt. Here we studied how hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extremely low heart rates without developing cardiac chamber dilation. We evaluated cardiac filling function in unanesthetized grizzly bears by echocardiography during the active and hibernating period. Because both collagen and titin are involved in altering diastolic function, we investigated both in the myocardium of active and hibernating grizzly bears. Heart rates were reduced from 84 beats/min in active bears to 19 beats/min in hibernating bears. Diastolic volume, stroke volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were not different. However, left ventricular muscle mass was significantly lower (300 +/- 12 compared with 402 +/- 14 g; P = 0.003) in the hibernating bears, and as a result the diastolic volume-to-left ventricular muscle mass ratio was significantly greater. Early ventricular filling deceleration times (106.4 +/- 14 compared with 143.2 +/- 20 ms; P = 0.002) were shorter during hibernation, suggesting increased ventricular stiffness. Restrictive pulmonary venous flow patterns supported this conclusion. Collagen type I and III comparisons did not reveal differences between the two groups of bears. In contrast, the expression of titin was altered by a significant upregulation of the stiffer N2B isoform at the expense of the more compliant N2BA isoform. The mean ratio of N2BA to N2B titin was 0.73 +/- 0.07 in the active bears and decreased to 0.42 +/- 0.03 (P = 0.006) in the hibernating bears. The upregulation of stiff N2B cardiac titin is a likely explanation for the increased ventricular stiffness that was revealed by echocardiography, and we propose that it plays a role in preventing chamber dilation in hibernating grizzly bears. Thus our work identified changes in the alternative splicing of cardiac titin as a major adaptive response in hibernating grizzly

  20. 1H-NMR metabolomic biomarkers of poor outcome after hemorrhagic shock are absent in hibernators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori K Bogren

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock (HS following trauma is a leading cause of death among persons under the age of 40. During HS the body undergoes systemic warm ischemia followed by reperfusion during medical intervention. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R results in a disruption of cellular metabolic processes that ultimately lead to tissue and organ dysfunction or failure. Resistance to I/R injury is a characteristic of hibernating mammals. The present study sought to identify circulating metabolites in the rat as biomarkers for metabolic alterations associated with poor outcome after HS. Arctic ground squirrels (AGS, a hibernating species that resists I/R injury independent of decreased body temperature (warm I/R, was used as a negative control.Male Sprague-Dawley rats and AGS were subject to HS by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg and maintaining the low MAP for 20 min before reperfusing with Ringers. The animals' temperature was maintained at 37 ± 0.5 °C for the duration of the experiment. Plasma samples were taken immediately before hemorrhage and three hours after reperfusion. Hydrophilic and lipid metabolites from plasma were then analyzed via 1H-NMR from unprocessed plasma and lipid extracts, respectively. Rats, susceptible to I/R injury, had a qualitative shift in their hydrophilic metabolic fingerprint including differential activation of glucose and anaerobic metabolism and had alterations in several metabolites during I/R indicative of metabolic adjustments and organ damage. In contrast, I/R injury resistant AGS, regardless of season or body temperature, maintained a stable metabolic homeostasis revealed by a qualitative 1H-NMR metabolic profile with few changes in quantified metabolites during HS-induced global I/R.An increase in circulating metabolites indicative of anaerobic metabolism and activation of glycolytic pathways is associated with poor prognosis after HS in rats. These same biomarkers are absent in AGS after HS

  1. Cellulase from Trichoderma harzianum interacts with roots and triggers induced systemic resistance to foliar disease in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Fan, Lili; Fu, Kehe; Yu, Chuanjin; Wang, Meng; Xia, Hai; Sun, Jianan; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2016-11-10

    Trichoderma harzianum is well known to exhibit induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Curvularia leaf spot. We previously reported that a C6 zinc finger protein (Thc6) is responsible for a major contribution to the ISR to the leaf disease, but the types of effectors and the signals mediated by Thc6 from Trichoderma are unclear. In this work, we demonstrated that two hydrolases, Thph1 and Thph2, from T. harzianum were regulated by Thc6. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) study revealed that Thc6 regulated mRNA expression by binding to GGCTAA and GGCTAAA in the promoters of the Thph1 and Thph2 genes, respectively. Moreover, the Thph1 and Thph2 proteins triggered the transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated the free cytosolic calcium levels in maize leaf. Furthermore, the genes related to the jasmonate/ethylene signaling pathway were up-regulated in the wild-type maize strain. However, the ΔThph1- or ΔThph2-deletion mutants could not activate the immune defense-related genes in maize to protect against leaf disease. Therefore, we conclude that functional Thph1 and Thph2 may be required in T. harzianum to activate ISR in maize.

  2. HIV-1-triggered release of type I IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells induces BAFF production in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alejandro M; Ouellet, Michel; Tremblay, Michel J

    2015-03-01

    HIV-1 infection leads to numerous B cell abnormalities, including hypergammaglobulinemia, nonspecific B cell activation, nonspecific class switching, increased cell turnover, breakage of tolerance, increased immature/transitional B cells, B cell malignancies, as well as a loss of capacity to generate and maintain memory, all of which contribute to a global impairment of the immune humoral compartment. Several cytokines and soluble factors, which are increased in sera of HIV-1-infected individuals, have been suggested to directly or indirectly contribute to these B cell dysfunctions, and one of these is the B cell-activating factor (BAFF). We report in this study that HIV-1 (X4- and R5-tropic) upregulates BAFF expression and secretion by human monocytes. Moreover, we show that the virus-mediated production of BAFF by monocytes relies on a type I IFN response by a small percentage of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) present in the monocyte cultures. HIV-1-induced type I IFN by pDCs triggers BAFF production in both classical and intermediate monocytes, but not in nonclassical monocytes, which nonetheless display a very strong basal BAFF production. We report also that basal BAFF secretion was higher in monocytes obtained from females compared with those from male donors. This study provides a novel mechanistic explanation for the increased BAFF levels observed during HIV-1 infection and highlights the importance of pDC/monocyte crosstalk to drive BAFF secretion. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  4. CXCL1-Triggered Interaction of LFA1 and ICAM1 Control Glucose-Induced Leukocyte Recruitment during Inflammation In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Buschmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well acknowledged that proinflammatory stimulation during acute hyperglycemia is able to aggravate inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms of proinflammatory effects of glucose are controversially discussed. We investigated leukocyte recruitment after intravenous injection of glucose in different inflammatory models using intravital microscopy. Flow chamber experiments, expression analysis, functional depletion, and knockout of key adhesion molecules gave mechanistic insight in involved pathways. We demonstrated that a single injection of glucose rapidly increased blood glucose levels in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, during tumor necrosis factor (TNF α-induced inflammation leukocyte recruitment was not further enhanced by glucose administration, whereas glucose injection profoundly augmented leukocyte adhesion and transmigration into inflamed tissue in the trauma model, indicating that proinflammatory properties of glucose are stimulus dependent. Experiments with functional or genetic inhibition of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1, and lymphocyte function antigen 1 (LFA1 suggest that keratino-derived-chemokine CXCL1-triggered interactions of ICAM1 and LFA1 are crucially involved in the trauma model of inflammation. The lacking effect of glucose on β2 integrin expression and on leukocyte adhesion in dynamic flow chamber experiments argues against leukocyte-driven underlying mechanisms and favours an endothelial pathway since endothelial ICAM1 expression was significantly upregulated in response to glucose.

  5. Pancreatic A and B cell stimulation in euthermic and hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris): effects of glucose and arginine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florant, G L; Hoo-Paris, R; Castex, C; Bauman, W A; Sutter, B C

    1986-01-01

    In euthermic and hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris), the pancreatic A and B cells respond in the appropriate secretory manner to glucose or arginine injection. Although reduced, this response, is clearly present in hibernating marmots. When glucose is administered to euthermic or hibernating marmots, plasma insulin concentrations rise and glucagon levels fall. While similar results are obtained in hibernation, the time period of the response is much longer due to the slowing of temperature dependent metabolic processes. Injection of L-arginine stimulates an increase in plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon as expected. Measurements of plasma glucose, insulin, and glucagon under basal conditions, suggest that there are no significant differences between any phase of hibernation (eg. entrance, deep hibernation, arousal) and euthermia. These results provide indirect evidence that the pancreatic A and B cells of hibernating marmots continue to function in order to help regulate plasma glucose concentration.

  6. Motivational Modulation of Self-Initiated and Externally Triggered Movement Speed Induced by Threat of Shock: Experimental Evidence for Paradoxical Kinesis in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise M McDonald

    Full Text Available Paradoxical kinesis has been observed in bradykinetic people with Parkinson's disease. Paradoxical kinesis occurs in situations where an individual is strongly motivated or influenced by relevant external cues. Our aim was to induce paradoxical kinesis in the laboratory. We tested whether the motivation of avoiding a mild electric shock was sufficient to induce paradoxical kinesis in externally-triggered and self-initiated conditions in people with Parkinson's disease tested on medication and in age-matched controls.Participants completed a shock avoidance behavioural paradigm in which half of the trials could result in a mild electric shock if the participant did not move fast enough. Half of the trials of each type were self-initiated and half were externally-triggered. The criterion for avoiding shock was a maximum movement time, adjusted according to each participant's performance on previous trials using a staircase tracking procedure.On trials with threat of shock, both patients with Parkinson's disease and controls had faster movement times compared to no potential shock trials, in both self-initiated and externally-triggered conditions. The magnitude of improvement of movement time from no potential shock to potential shock trials was positively correlated with anxiety ratings.When motivated to avoid mild electric shock, patients with Parkinson's disease, similar to healthy controls, showed significant speeding of movement execution. This was observed in both self-initiated and externally-triggered versions of the task. Nevertheless, in the ET condition the improvement of reaction times induced by motivation to avoid shocks was greater for the PD patients than controls, highlighting the value of external cues for movement initiation in PD patients. The magnitude of improvement from the no potential shock to the potential shock trials was associated with the threat-induced anxiety. This demonstration of paradoxical kinesis in the

  7. Variation of parasitism patterns in bats during hibernation: the effect of host species, resources, health status, and hibernation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postawa, Tomasz; Nagy, Zoltan

    2016-10-01

    During critical periods of food shortage or variable climatic conditions, the choice of an appropriate host can increase the survival and reproductive performance of parasites. In turn, one of the unique adaptations to periodical food shortages is hibernation, which is often found among insectivorous bat species in the temperate zone. While hibernating, bats are completely defenseless against both predators and ectoparasites, their immune and endocrine systems are diminished, and survival is dependent on the accumulated fat reserves. Differences in the health status or in the rate of consumption of the resources might also explain species-specific differences in ectoparasite abundance, especially between closely related host species, such as the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis) and the lesser mouse-eared bat (M. blythii) during hibernation. In the present study, the abundance of two ecologically distinct (summer and winter) types of ectoparasites was examined in terms of its influence on the body condition and hemoglobin content of the two host species. The effects of demographic factors, such as host sex and age, were also investigated. Despite a similar pattern of deteriorating body condition and hemoglobin concentration, M. myotis was more parasitized than was M. blythii. The marked decrease in hemoglobin content in first-year females of both host species correlated with the highest parasite load and indicated a risk of anemia. At the intraspecific level, ectoparasite abundance was not correlated with body condition (resources), but it negatively affected hemoglobin content; however, this mostly concerned M. blythii, which had a lower parasite load. Therefore, it can be concluded that interspecific differences in ectoparasite abundance may result from parasites selecting the host species that is less sensitive to their activity. In turn, in summer ectoparasites, the preference for female hosts is probably attributable to the likelihood of reinfection

  8. Differential expression analysis of Liprin-α2 in hibernating bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A PCR-based subtractive hybridization technique was used to identify genes up-regulated in the hibernating bat brain to explore the molecular mechanism of hibernation. Three genes, Liprin-α2, PTP4A2 and CAMKKβ were differentially expressed in hibernating bat brain tissue compared to active bat brain tissue. One of them, Liprin-α2, which has recently been shown to have the key function in the organization of presynaptic and postsynaptic multiprotein complexes was studied in detail. We demonstrated that the expression level of Liprin-α2 was up-regulated almost 4-fold in hibernating bat brains by RT-PCR compared to levels in active bats. The differential expression pattern of Liprin-α2 was also detected in muscle, fat, brain and heart tissue of hibernating bats by real-time quantitative PCR. The result indicated that Liprin-α2 was over-expressed in brain and heart tissue and down-regulated in muscle and fat. In brain tissue of hibernating bats, Liprin-α2 expression was statistically significantly higher than in brain tissue of active controls (P = 0.029).The precise control of transcriptional level and the distinctively differential expression pattern of Liprin-α2 in different organs during circannual hibernation may have important physiological significance, not only in maintaining normal function of many key organs but also in effectively conserving limited energy resources without physiological damage.

  9. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  10. The awakening of a classical nova from hibernation

    CERN Document Server

    Mroz, P; Pietrukowicz, P; Szymanski, M K; Soszynski, I; Wyrzykowski, L; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S; Skowron, J; Ulaczyk, K; Skowron, D; Pawlak, M

    2016-01-01

    Cataclysmic variable stars (CVs) are close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf (primary) that is accreting matter from a low-mass companion star (secondary). From time to time such systems undergo large-amplitude brightenings. The most spectacular eruptions, over $10^4$ times in brightness, occur in classical novae and are caused by a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf. Such eruptions are thought to recur on timescales of $10^4-10^6$. In between, the system's properties depend primarily on the mass-transfer rate: if it is lower than a $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}$/year, the accretion becomes unstable and the matter is dumped onto the white dwarf during quasi-periodic dwarf nova outbursts. The hibernation hypothesis predicts that nova eruptions strongly affect the mass-transfer rate, keeping it high for centuries after the event. Subsequently, the mass-transfer rate should significantly decrease for $10^3-10^6$ years, starting the hibernation phase. After that the nova awakes again - with acc...

  11. Down regulation of sodium channels in the central nervous system of hibernating snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; Battonyai, I; Pirger, Z

    2014-05-28

    Hibernation, as behavior, is an evolutionary mode of adaptation of animal species to unfavorable environmental conditions. It is generally characterized by suppressed metabolism, which also includes down regulation of the energy consuming ion-channel functioning. Experimental data regarding decreased ion-channel function are scarce. Therefore, our goal was to study the possible down regulation of voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) subtypes in the neurons of hibernating snails. Our immunohistochemical experiments revealed that the expression of NaV1.8-like channels in the central nervous system was substantially down regulated in hibernating animals. In contrast to NaV1.8-like, the NaV1.9-like channels were present in neurons independently from hibernating and non-hibernating states. Our western blot data supported the immunohistochemical results according to which the band of the NaV1.8-like channel protein was less intensively labeled in the homogenate of the hibernating snails. The NaV1.9-like immunoreactivity was equally present both in hibernating and active snails. Micro-electrophysiological experiments show that in hibernating snails both NaV1.8- and NaV1.9-like currents are substantially decreased compared to that of the active snails. The contradictory electrophysiological and immunohistochemical or western blot data suggest that the molecular mechanisms of the "channel arrest" could be different in diverse NaV channel subtypes. Climate changes will affect temperature extremes and a question is how different species beyond their physiological tolerance will or able to adapt to changing environment. Hibernation is an important mode of adaptation to extreme climatic variations, and pursuant to this the present results may contribute to the study of the behavioral ecology.

  12. Seasonal and regional differences in gene expression in the brain of a hibernating mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schwartz

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel

  13. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Habets, J.; Westers, P.; Mol, B.A. de; Prokop, M.; Budde, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related

  14. Exploring the Bone Proteome to Help Explain Altered Bone Remodeling and Preservation of Bone Architecture and Strength in Hibernating Marmots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Alison H; Roteliuk, Danielle M; Gookin, Sara E; McGrew, Ashley K; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Condon, Keith W; Prenni, Jessica E; Wojda, Samantha J; Florant, Gregory L; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Periods of physical inactivity increase bone resorption and cause bone loss and increased fracture risk. However, hibernating bears, marmots, and woodchucks maintain bone structure and strength, despite being physically inactive for prolonged periods annually. We tested the hypothesis that bone turnover rates would decrease and bone structural and mechanical properties would be preserved in hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris). Femurs and tibias were collected from marmots during hibernation and in the summer following hibernation. Bone remodeling was significantly altered in cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation with suppressed formation and no change in resorption, unlike the increased bone resorption that occurs during disuse in humans and other animals. Trabecular bone architecture and cortical bone geometrical and mechanical properties were not different between hibernating and active marmots, but bone marrow adiposity was significantly greater in hibernators. Of the 506 proteins identified in marmot bone, 40 were significantly different in abundance between active and hibernating marmots. Monoaglycerol lipase, which plays an important role in fatty acid metabolism and the endocannabinoid system, was 98-fold higher in hibernating marmots compared with summer marmots and may play a role in regulating the changes in bone and fat metabolism that occur during hibernation.

  15. The sulfated laminarin triggers a stress transcriptome before priming the SA- and ROS-dependent defenses during grapevine's induced resistance against Plasmopara viticola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Gauthier

    Full Text Available Grapevine (Vitis vinifera is susceptible to many pathogens which cause significant losses to viticulture worldwide. Chemical control is available, but agro-ecological concerns have raised interest in alternative methods, especially in triggering plant immunity by elicitor treatments. The β-glucan laminarin (Lam and its sulfated derivative (PS3 have been previously demonstrated to induce resistance in grapevine against downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola. However, if Lam elicits classical grapevine defenses such as oxidative burst, pathogenesis-related (PR-proteins and phytoalexin production, PS3 triggered grapevine resistance via a poorly understood priming phenomenon. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular mechanisms of the PS3-induced resistance. For this purpose we studied i the signaling events and transcriptome reprogramming triggered by PS3 treatment on uninfected grapevine, ii grapevine immune responses primed by PS3 during P. viticola infection. Our results showed that i PS3 was unable to elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS production, cytosolic Ca(2+ concentration variations, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation but triggered a long lasting plasma membrane depolarization in grapevine cells, ii PS3 and Lam shared a common stress-responsive transcriptome profile that partly overlapped the salicylate- (SA and jasmonate-(JA-dependent ones. After P. viticola inoculation, PS3 specifically primed the SA- and ROS-dependent defense pathways leading to grapevine induced resistance against this biotroph. Interestingly pharmacological approaches suggested that the plasma membrane depolarization and the downstream ROS production are key events of the PS3-induced resistance.

  16. The awakening of a classical nova from hibernation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Przemek; Udalski, Andrzej; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Szymański, Michał K.; Soszyński, Igor; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Poleski, Radosław; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, Jan; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Dorota; Pawlak, Michał

    2016-09-01

    Cataclysmic variable stars—novae, dwarf novae, and nova-likes—are close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf star (the primary) that is accreting matter from a low-mass companion star (the secondary). From time to time such systems undergo large-amplitude brightenings. The most spectacular eruptions, with a ten-thousandfold increase in brightness, occur in classical novae and are caused by a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf. Such eruptions are thought to recur on timescales of ten thousand to a million years. In between, the system’s properties depend primarily on the mass-transfer rate: if it is lower than a billionth of a solar mass per year, the accretion becomes unstable and the matter is dumped onto the white dwarf during quasi-periodic dwarf nova outbursts. The hibernation hypothesis predicts that nova eruptions strongly affect the mass-transfer rate in the binary, keeping it high for centuries after the event. Subsequently, the mass-transfer rate should significantly decrease for a thousand to a million years, starting the hibernation phase. After that the nova awakes again—with accretion returning to the pre-eruption level and leading to a new nova explosion. The hibernation model predicts cyclical evolution of cataclysmic variables through phases of high and low mass-transfer. The theory gained some support from the discovery of ancient nova shells around the dwarf novae Z Camelopardalis and AT Cancri, but direct evidence for considerable mass-transfer changes prior, during and after nova eruptions has not hitherto been found. Here we report long-term observations of the classical nova V1213 Cen (Nova Centauri 2009) covering its pre- and post-eruption phases and precisely documenting its evolution. Within the six years before the explosion, the system revealed dwarf nova outbursts indicative of a low mass-transfer rate. The post-nova is two orders of magnitude brighter than the pre-nova at minimum light with no trace of

  17. The awakening of a classical nova from hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Przemek; Udalski, Andrzej; Pietrukowicz, Paweł; Szymański, Michał K; Soszyński, Igor; Wyrzykowski, Łukasz; Poleski, Radosław; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, Jan; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Skowron, Dorota; Pawlak, Michał

    2016-09-29

    Cataclysmic variable stars-novae, dwarf novae, and nova-likes-are close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf star (the primary) that is accreting matter from a low-mass companion star (the secondary). From time to time such systems undergo large-amplitude brightenings. The most spectacular eruptions, with a ten-thousandfold increase in brightness, occur in classical novae and are caused by a thermonuclear runaway on the surface of the white dwarf. Such eruptions are thought to recur on timescales of ten thousand to a million years. In between, the system's properties depend primarily on the mass-transfer rate: if it is lower than a billionth of a solar mass per year, the accretion becomes unstable and the matter is dumped onto the white dwarf during quasi-periodic dwarf nova outbursts. The hibernation hypothesis predicts that nova eruptions strongly affect the mass-transfer rate in the binary, keeping it high for centuries after the event. Subsequently, the mass-transfer rate should significantly decrease for a thousand to a million years, starting the hibernation phase. After that the nova awakes again-with accretion returning to the pre-eruption level and leading to a new nova explosion. The hibernation model predicts cyclical evolution of cataclysmic variables through phases of high and low mass-transfer. The theory gained some support from the discovery of ancient nova shells around the dwarf novae Z Camelopardalis and AT Cancri, but direct evidence for considerable mass-transfer changes prior, during and after nova eruptions has not hitherto been found. Here we report long-term observations of the classical nova V1213 Cen (Nova Centauri 2009) covering its pre- and post-eruption phases and precisely documenting its evolution. Within the six years before the explosion, the system revealed dwarf nova outbursts indicative of a low mass-transfer rate. The post-nova is two orders of magnitude brighter than the pre-nova at minimum light with no trace of dwarf

  18. Triggering Klystrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  19. The relationship of sleep with temperature and metabolic rate in a hibernating primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Krystal

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: It has long been suspected that sleep is important for regulating body temperature and metabolic-rate. Hibernation, a state of acute hypothermia and reduced metabolic-rate, offers a promising system for investigating those relationships. Prior studies in hibernating ground squirrels report that, although sleep occurs during hibernation, it manifests only as non-REM sleep, and only at relatively high temperatures. In our study, we report data on sleep during hibernation in a lemuriform primate, Cheirogaleus medius. As the only primate known to experience prolonged periods of hibernation and as an inhabitant of more temperate climates than ground squirrels, this animal serves as an alternative model for exploring sleep temperature/metabolism relationships that may be uniquely relevant to understanding human physiology. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: We find that during hibernation, non-REM sleep is absent in Cheirogaleus. Rather, periods of REM sleep occur during periods of relatively high ambient temperature, a pattern opposite of that observed in ground squirrels. Like ground squirrels, however, EEG is marked by ultra-low voltage activity at relatively low metabolic-rates. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm a sleep-temperature/metabolism link, though they also suggest that the relationship of sleep stage with temperature/metabolism is flexible and may differ across species or mammalian orders. The absence of non-REM sleep suggests that during hibernation in Cheirogaleus, like in the ground squirrel, the otherwise universal non-REM sleep homeostatic response is greatly curtailed or absent. Lastly, ultra-low voltage EEG appears to be a cross-species marker for extremely low metabolic-rate, and, as such, may be an attractive target for research on hibernation induction.

  20. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Scott T.; Richters, Karl E.; Melin, Travis E.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hordyk, Peter J.; Benrud, Ryan R.; Geiser, Lauren R.; Cash, Steve E.; Simon Shelley, C.; Howard, David R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Sola-Visner, Martha C.

    2012-01-01

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4–8°C and 3–5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4–8°C wer...

  1. Metabolic changes in summer active and anuric hibernating free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Stenvinkel

    Full Text Available The brown bear (Ursus arctos hibernates for 5 to 6 months each winter and during this time ingests no food or water and remains anuric and inactive. Despite these extreme conditions, bears do not develop azotemia and preserve their muscle and bone strength. To date most renal studies have been limited to small numbers of bears, often in captive environments. Sixteen free-ranging bears were darted and had blood drawn both during hibernation in winter and summer. Samples were collected for measurement of creatinine and urea, markers of inflammation, the calcium-phosphate axis, and nutritional parameters including amino acids. In winter the bear serum creatinine increased 2.5 fold despite a 2-fold decrease in urea, indicating a remarkable ability to recycle urea nitrogen during hibernation. During hibernation serum calcium remained constant despite a decrease in serum phosphate and a rise in FGF23 levels. Despite prolonged inactivity and reduced renal function, inflammation does not ensue and bears seem to have enhanced antioxidant defense mechanisms during hibernation. Nutrition parameters showed high fat stores, preserved amino acids and mild hyperglycemia during hibernation. While total, essential, non-essential and branched chain amino acids concentrations do not change during hibernation anorexia, changes in individual amino acids ornithine, citrulline and arginine indicate an active, although reduced urea cycle and nitrogen recycling to proteins. Serum uric acid and serum fructose levels were elevated in summer and changes between seasons were positively correlated. Further studies to understand how bears can prevent the development of uremia despite minimal renal function during hibernation could provide new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of human kidney disease.

  2. Great tits search for, capture, kill and eat hibernating bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estók, Péter; Zsebok, Sándor; Siemers, Björn M

    2010-02-23

    Ecological pressure paired with opportunism can lead to surprising innovations in animal behaviour. Here, we report predation of great tits (Parus major) on hibernating pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) at a Hungarian cave. Over two winters, we directly observed 18 predation events. The tits specifically and systematically searched for and killed bats for food. A substantial decrease in predation on bats after experimental provisioning of food to the tits further supports the hypothesis that bat-killing serves a foraging purpose in times of food scarcity. We finally conducted a playback experiment to test whether tits would eavesdrop on calls of awakening bats to find them in rock crevices. The tits could clearly hear the calls and were attracted to the loudspeaker. Records for tit predation on bats at this cave now span more than ten years and thus raise the question of whether cultural transmission plays a role for the spread of this foraging innovation.

  3. Distinct dictation of Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality via triggering TLR3 and TLR4 signal pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woo Han

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is major emerging neurologic disease caused by JE virus. To date, the impact of TLR molecules on JE progression has not been addressed. Here, we determined whether each TLR modulates JE, using several TLR-deficient mouse strains (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9. Surprisingly, among the tested TLR-deficient mice there were contrasting results in TLR3(-/- and TLR4(-/- mice, i.e. TLR3(-/- mice were highly susceptible to JE, whereas TLR4(-/- mice showed enhanced resistance to JE. TLR3 ablation induced severe CNS inflammation characterized by early infiltration of inflammatory CD11b(+Ly-6Chigh monocytes along with profoundly increased viral burden, proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression as well as BBB permeability. In contrast, TLR4(-/- mice showed mild CNS inflammation manifested by reduced viral burden, leukocyte infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Interestingly, TLR4 ablation provided potent in vivo systemic type I IFN innate response, as well as ex vivo type I IFN production associated with strong induction of antiviral PRRs (RIG-I, MDA5, transcription factors (IRF-3, IRF-7, and IFN-dependent (PKR, Oas1, Mx and independent ISGs (ISG49, ISG54, ISG56 by alternative activation of IRF3 and NF-κB in myeloid-derived DCs and macrophages, as compared to TLR3(-/- myeloid-derived cells which were more permissive to viral replication through impaired type I IFN innate response. TLR4 ablation also appeared to mount an enhanced type I IFN innate and humoral, CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses, which were mediated by altered immune cell populations (increased number of plasmacytoid DCs and NK cells, reduced CD11b(+Ly-6C(high monocytes and CD4(+Foxp3(+ Treg number in lymphoid tissue. Thus, potent type I IFN innate and adaptive immune responses in the absence of TLR4 were closely coupled with reduced JE lethality. Collectively, these results suggest that a balanced triggering of TLR signal array by viral components

  4. Rice Hypersensitive Induced Reaction Protein 1 (OsHIR1 associates with plasma membrane and triggers hypersensitive cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Sai-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, HIR (Hypersensitive Induced Reaction proteins, members of the PID (Proliferation, Ion and Death superfamily, have been shown to play a part in the development of spontaneous hypersensitive response lesions in leaves, in reaction to pathogen attacks. The levels of HIR proteins were shown to correlate with localized host cell deaths and defense responses in maize and barley. However, not much was known about the HIR proteins in rice. Since rice is an important cereal crop consumed by more than 50% of the populations in Asia and Africa, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms of disease responses in this plant. We previously identified the rice HIR1 (OsHIR1 as an interacting partner of the OsLRR1 (rice Leucine-Rich Repeat protein 1. Here we show that OsHIR1 triggers hypersensitive cell death and its localization to the plasma membrane is enhanced by OsLRR1. Result Through electron microscopy studies using wild type rice plants, OsHIR1 was found to mainly localize to the plasma membrane, with a minor portion localized to the tonoplast. Moreover, the plasma membrane localization of OsHIR1 was enhanced in transgenic rice plants overexpressing its interacting protein partner, OsLRR1. Co-localization of OsHIR1 and OsLRR1 to the plasma membrane was confirmed by double-labeling electron microscopy. Pathogen inoculation studies using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana expressing either OsHIR1 or OsLRR1 showed that both transgenic lines exhibited increased resistance toward the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. However, OsHIR1 transgenic plants produced more extensive spontaneous hypersensitive response lesions and contained lower titers of the invading pathogen, when compared to OsLRR1 transgenic plants. Conclusion The OsHIR1 protein is mainly localized to the plasma membrane, and its subcellular localization in that compartment is enhanced by OsLRR1. The expression of OsHIR1 may sensitize the plant

  5. Hibernation in an antarctic fish: on ice for winter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish A Campbell

    Full Text Available Active metabolic suppression in anticipation of winter conditions has been demonstrated in species of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians, but not fish. This is because the reduction in metabolic rate in fish is directly proportional to the decrease in water temperature and they appear to be incapable of further suppressing their metabolic rate independently of temperature. However, the Antarctic fish (Notothenia coriiceps is unusual because it undergoes winter metabolic suppression irrespective of water temperature. We assessed the seasonal ecological strategy by monitoring swimming activity, growth, feeding and heart rate (f(H in N. coriiceps as they free-ranged within sub-zero waters. The metabolic rate of wild fish was extrapolated from f(H recordings, from oxygen consumption calibrations established in the laboratory prior to fish release. Throughout the summer months N. coriiceps spent a considerable proportion of its time foraging, resulting in a growth rate (G(w of 0.18 +/- 0.2% day(-1. In contrast, during winter much of the time was spent sedentary within a refuge and fish showed a net loss in G(w (-0.05 +/- 0.05% day(-1. Whilst inactive during winter, N. coriiceps displayed a very low f(H, reduced sensory and motor capabilities, and standard metabolic rate was one third lower than in summer. In a similar manner to other hibernating species, dormancy was interrupted with periodic arousals. These arousals, which lasted a few hours, occurred every 4-12 days. During arousal activity, f(H and metabolism increased to summer levels. This endogenous suppression and activation of metabolic processes, independent of body temperature, demonstrates that N. coriiceps were effectively 'putting themselves on ice' during winter months until food resources improved. This study demonstrates that at least some fish species can enter a dormant state similar to hibernation that is not temperature driven and presumably provides seasonal energetic

  6. Bacillus cereus AR156 activates PAMP-triggered immunity and induces a systemic acquired resistance through a NPR1-and SA-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Yanru; Song, Xiaoou; Wang, Jiansheng; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Induced resistance responses play a potent role in plant defense system against pathogen attack. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that installs induced systemic resistance (ISR) to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that AR156 leaf infiltration enhances disease resistance in Arabidopsis through the activation of a systemic acquired resistance (SAR). PR1 protein expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst are strongly induced in plants treated with AR156 and inoculated with Pst than that in plants inoculated with Pst only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger SAR in jar1 or ein2 mutants, but not in the NahG transgenic and NPR1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced SAR depends on SA-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not JA and ET. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1 gene expression, which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). Altogether, our results indicate that AR156 can induce SAR by the SA-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components.

  7. Changes in calpains and calpastatin in the soleus muscle of Daurian ground squirrels during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Xi; He, Yue; Gao, Yun-Fang; Wang, Hui-Ping; Goswami, Nandu

    2014-10-01

    We investigated changes in muscle mass, calpains, calpastatin and Z-disk ultrastructure in the soleus muscle (SOL) of Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus) after hibernation or hindlimb suspension to determine possible mechanisms by which muscle atrophy is prevented in hibernators. Squirrels (n=30) were divided into five groups: no hibernation group (PRE, n=6); hindlimb suspension group (HLS, n=6); two month hibernation group (HIB, n=6); two day group after 90±12 days of hibernation (POST, n=6); and forced exercise group (one time forced, moderate-intensity treadmill exercise) after arousal (FE, n=6). Activity and protein expression of calpains were determined by casein zymography and western blotting, and Z-disk ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The following results were found. Lower body mass and higher SOL muscle mass (mg) to total body mass (g) ratio were observed in HIB and POST; calpain-1 activity increased significantly by 176% (P=0.034) in HLS compared to the PRE group; no significant changes were observed in calpain-2 activity. Protein expression of calpain-1 and calpain-2 increased by 83% (P=0.041) and 208% (P=0.029) in HLS compared to the PRE group, respectively; calpastatin expression increased significantly by 180% (Pcalpain activity and consequently calpain-mediated protein degradation by highly elevated calpastatin protein expression levels may be an important mechanism for preventing muscle protein loss during hibernation and ensuring that Z-lines remained ultrastructurally intact.

  8. Motivational Modulation of Self-Initiated and Externally Triggered Movement Speed Induced by Threat of Shock: Experimental Evidence for Paradoxical Kinesis in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Louise M.; Griffin, Harry J.; Angeli, Aikaterini; Torkamani, Mariam; Georgiev, Dejan; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Paradoxical kinesis has been observed in bradykinetic people with Parkinson’s disease. Paradoxical kinesis occurs in situations where an individual is strongly motivated or influenced by relevant external cues. Our aim was to induce paradoxical kinesis in the laboratory. We tested whether the motivation of avoiding a mild electric shock was sufficient to induce paradoxical kinesis in externally-triggered and self-initiated conditions in people with Parkinson’s disease tested on medication and in age-matched controls. Methods Participants completed a shock avoidance behavioural paradigm in which half of the trials could result in a mild electric shock if the participant did not move fast enough. Half of the trials of each type were self-initiated and half were externally-triggered. The criterion for avoiding shock was a maximum movement time, adjusted according to each participant’s performance on previous trials using a staircase tracking procedure. Results On trials with threat of shock, both patients with Parkinson’s disease and controls had faster movement times compared to no potential shock trials, in both self-initiated and externally-triggered conditions. The magnitude of improvement of movement time from no potential shock to potential shock trials was positively correlated with anxiety ratings. Conclusions When motivated to avoid mild electric shock, patients with Parkinson’s disease, similar to healthy controls, showed significant speeding of movement execution. This was observed in both self-initiated and externally-triggered versions of the task. Nevertheless, in the ET condition the improvement of reaction times induced by motivation to avoid shocks was greater for the PD patients than controls, highlighting the value of external cues for movement initiation in PD patients. The magnitude of improvement from the no potential shock to the potential shock trials was associated with the threat-induced anxiety. This demonstration of

  9. Norfloxacin-Induced Electroencephalogram Alteration and Seizures in Rats Are Not Triggered by Enhanced Levels of Intracerebral Glutamate†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenel, Marylore; Limosin, Anne; Marchand, Sandrine; Paquereau, Joël; Mimoz, Olivier; Couet, William

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the electroencephalogram (EEG) effect was combined with intracerebral glutamate determinations using microdialysis for rats receiving norfloxacin intravenously (150 mg/kg of body weight). The EEG effect (accompanied by tremors and seizures) was consistently observed without glutamate level modifications. Therefore, norfloxacin-inducted seizures are not triggered by intracerebral glutamate level enhancement. PMID:14576142

  10. Complete Coulomb stress changes induced by the Ms7.6 earthquake in Lancang-Gengma, Yunnan and triggering of aftershocks by dynamic and static stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The spatiotemporal evolution patterns of complete Coulomb stress changes caused by 1988 Ms7.6 earthquake in Lancang-Gengma,Yunnan,are calculated and studied.And the triggering problems of Ms7.2 Gengma shock occurring 13 minutes after the main shock and of Ms5.0―6.9 aftershocks within 24 days after the main shock are discussed.The results show that the spatial distribution patterns of complete Coulomb stress changes of the Ms7.6 main shock are strongly asymmetric.The areas of positive dynamic and static Coulomb stress are both coincident well with the strong aftershocks' locations.The Ms7.2 Gengma shock and most of strong aftershocks are subjected to the triggering effect of dynamic and static Coulomb stresses induced by the Ms7.6 Lancang earthquake.

  11. The physiological link between metabolic rate depression and tau phosphorylation in mammalian hibernation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens T Stieler

    Full Text Available Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein are hallmarks of a variety of neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Increased tau phosphorylation is assumed to represent an early event in pathogenesis and a pivotal aspect for aggregation and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. However, the regulation of tau phosphorylation in vivo and the causes for its increased stage of phosphorylation in AD are still not well understood, a fact that is primarily based on the lack of adequate animal models. Recently we described the reversible formation of highly phosphorylated tau protein in hibernating European ground squirrels. Hence, mammalian hibernation represents a model system very well suited to study molecular mechanisms of both tau phosphorylation and dephosphorylation under in vivo physiological conditions. Here, we analysed the extent and kinetics of hibernation-state dependent tau phosphorylation in various brain regions of three species of hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels, Syrian hamsters and black bears. Overall, tau protein was highly phosphorylated in torpor states and phosphorylation levels decreased after arousal in all species. Differences between brain regions, hibernation-states and phosphosites were observed with respect to degree and kinetics of tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, we tested the phosphate net turnover of tau protein to analyse potential alterations in kinase and/or phosphatase activities during hibernation. Our results demonstrate that the hibernation-state dependent phosphorylation of tau protein is specifically regulated but involves, in addition, passive, temperature driven regulatory mechanisms. By determining the activity-state profile for key enzymes of tau phosphorylation we could identify kinases potentially involved in the differentially regulated, reversible tau phosphorylation that occurs during hibernation. We show that in black bears hibernation is associated with

  12. Resuscitation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from dormancy requires hibernation promoting factor (PA4463) for ribosome preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Tatsuya; Williamson, Kerry S; Schaefer, Robert; Pratt, Shawna; Chang, Connie B; Franklin, Michael J

    2017-03-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections are difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy in part because the biofilms contain subpopulations of dormant antibiotic-tolerant cells. The dormant cells can repopulate the biofilms following alleviation of antibiotic treatments. While dormant, the bacteria must maintain cellular integrity, including ribosome abundance, to reinitiate the de novo protein synthesis required for resuscitation. Here, we demonstrate that the P. aeruginosa gene PA4463 [hibernation promoting factor (HPF)], but not the ribosome modulation factor (PA3049), is required for ribosomal RNA preservation during prolonged nutrient starvation conditions. Single-cell-level studies using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and growth in microfluidic drops demonstrate that, in the absence of hpf, the rRNA abundances of starved cells decrease to levels that cause them to lose their ability to resuscitate from starvation, leaving intact nondividing cells. P. aeruginosa defective in the stringent response also had reduced ability to resuscitate from dormancy. However, FISH analysis of the starved stringent response mutant showed a bimodal response where the individual cells contained either abundant or low ribosome content, compared with the wild-type strain. The results indicate that ribosome maintenance is key for maintaining the ability of P. aeruginosa to resuscitate from starvation-induced dormancy and that HPF is the major factor associated with P. aeruginosa ribosome preservation.

  13. Hibernal habitat selection by Wood Frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in a northern New England montane landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Luke A.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Loftin, Cynthia S.

    2016-01-01

    Poikilothermic species, such as amphibians, endure harsh winter conditions via freeze-tolerance or freeze-avoidance strategies. Freeze-tolerance requires a suite of complex, physiological mechanisms (e.g., cryoprotectant synthesis); however, behavioral strategies (e.g., hibernal habitat selection) may be used to regulate hibernaculum temperatures and promote overwintering survival. We investigated the hibernal ecology of the freeze-tolerant Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) in north-central Maine. Our objectives were to characterize the species hibernaculum microclimate (temperature, relative humidity), evaluate hibernal habitat selection, and describe the spatial arrangement of breeding, post-breeding, and hibernal habitats. We monitored 15 frogs during two winters (2011/12: N = 10; 2012/13: N = 5), measured hibernal habitat features at micro (2 m) and macro (10 m) spatial scales, and recorded microclimate hourly in three strata (hibernaculum, leaf litter, ambient air). We compared these data to that of 57 random locations with logistic regression models, Akaike Information Criterion, and Kolmogorov–Smirnov tests. Hibernaculum microclimate was significantly different and less variable than leaf litter, ambient air, and random location microclimate. Model averaging indicated that canopy cover (−), leaf litter depth (+), and number of logs and stumps (+; microhabitat only) were important predictors of Wood Frog hibernal habitat. These habitat features likely act to insulate hibernating frogs from extreme and variable air temperatures. For example, decreased canopy cover facilitates increased snowpack depth and earlier snowpack accumulation and melt. Altered winter temperature and precipitation patterns attributable to climate change may reduce snowpack insulation, facilitate greater temperature variation in the underlying hibernacula, and potentially compromise Wood Frog winter survival.

  14. Modulation of gene expression in heart and liver of hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibernation is an adaptive strategy to survive in highly seasonal or unpredictable environments. The molecular and genetic basis of hibernation physiology in mammals has only recently been studied using large scale genomic approaches. We analyzed gene expression in the American black bear, Ursus americanus, using a custom 12,800 cDNA probe microarray to detect differences in expression that occur in heart and liver during winter hibernation in comparison to summer active animals. Results We identified 245 genes in heart and 319 genes in liver that were differentially expressed between winter and summer. The expression of 24 genes was significantly elevated during hibernation in both heart and liver. These genes are mostly involved in lipid catabolism and protein biosynthesis and include RNA binding protein motif 3 (Rbm3, which enhances protein synthesis at mildly hypothermic temperatures. Elevated expression of protein biosynthesis genes suggests induction of translation that may be related to adaptive mechanisms reducing cardiac and muscle atrophies over extended periods of low metabolism and immobility during hibernation in bears. Coordinated reduction of transcription of genes involved in amino acid catabolism suggests redirection of amino acids from catabolic pathways to protein biosynthesis. We identify common for black bears and small mammalian hibernators transcriptional changes in the liver that include induction of genes responsible for fatty acid β oxidation and carbohydrate synthesis and depression of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbohydrate catabolism, cellular respiration and detoxification pathways. Conclusions Our findings show that modulation of gene expression during winter hibernation represents molecular mechanism of adaptation to extreme environments.

  15. Comparison of sestamibi, thallium, echocardiography and PET for the detection of hibernating myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, S.F.; Hallett, W.A.; O' Doherty, M.J.; Nunan, T.O. [Clinical PET Centre, Guys and St Thomas' s Hospitals, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Chambers, J.; Roxburgh, J.C. [Cardiothoracic Centre, Guys and St Thomas' s Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-03-01

    The detection of hibernating myocardium is important because revascularisation results in improved function and prognosis in patients with hibernation but not in those with non-viable myocardium. The primary aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of four techniques with respect to hibernation in the same study population with 6-12 months of follow-up. Twenty-five males underwent rest-stress sestamibi and delayed (>18 h) thallium scintigraphy, high-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography and nitrogen-13 ammonia/fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (NH{sub 3}/FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). The pre-operative ejection fraction was 36.2% ({+-}7.3%). Follow-up was 8.1 ({+-}2.8) months. Using postoperative improvement in wall motion on echocardiography as the gold standard, 6/34 dysfunctional vascular territories were hibernating. The mean uptake of all tracers was significantly higher in hibernating than in non-viable territories (P<0.05). Normal perfusion or mismatch on PET (FDG>NH{sub 3} uptake) and the pattern of response to dobutamine on echocardiography were also predictive of recovery (P<0.001 and P=0.02 respectively). Univariate logistic regression identified sestamibi, ammonia and FDG as independent predictors of hibernation. FDG-PET was, however, the only independent predictor using multivariate analysis. The nuclear techniques had high negative predictive values (NPV) of {>=}95% but lower positive predictive values (PPV) of 45%-75% as compared with echocardiography, which had an NPV of 87% and a PPV of 100%. PET was the most powerful predictor of hibernation although the combination of a technique with a high PPV (echocardiography) and a high NPV (PET or sestamibi) may represent the optimal clinical choice. (orig.)

  16. Amygdalar glutamatergic neuronal systems play a key role on the hibernating state of hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facciolo Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitatory transmitting mechanisms are proving to play a critical role on neuronal homeostasis conditions of facultative hibernators such as the Syrian golden hamster. Indeed works have shown that the glutamatergic system of the main olfactory brain station (amygdala is capable of controlling thermoregulatory responses, which are considered vital for the different hibernating states. In the present study the role of amygdalar glutamatergic circuits on non-hibernating (NHIB and hibernating (HIB hamsters were assessed on drinking stimuli and subsequently compared to expression variations of some glutamatergic subtype mRNA levels in limbic areas. For this study the two major glutamatergic antagonists and namely that of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, 3-(+-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonate (CPP plus that of the acid α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-metil-4-isoxazol-propionic receptor (AMPAR site, cyano-7-nitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX were infused into the basolateral amygdala nucleus. Attempts were made to establish the type of effects evoked by amygdalar glutamatergic cross-talking processes during drinking stimuli, a response that may corroborate their major role at least during some stages of this physiological activity in hibernators. Results From the behavioral results it appears that the two glutamatergic compounds exerted distinct effects. In the first case local infusion of basolateral complexes (BLA with NMDAR antagonist caused very great (p Conclusion We conclude that predominant drinking events evoked by glutamatergic mechanisms, in the presence of prevalently down regulated levels of NR1/2A of some telencephalic and hypothalamic areas appear to constitute an important neuronal switch at least during arousal stage of hibernation. The establishment of the type of glutamatergic subtypes that are linked to successful hibernating states, via drinking stimuli, may have useful bearings toward sleeping disorders.

  17. Seasonal restructuring of the ground squirrel gut microbiota over the annual hibernation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Hannah V; Walters, William A; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Many hibernating mammals suspend food intake during winter, relying solely on stored lipids to fuel metabolism. Winter fasting in these species eliminates a major source of degradable substrates to support growth of gut microbes, which may affect microbial community structure and host-microbial interactions. We explored the effect of the annual hibernation cycle on gut microbiotas using deep sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from ground squirrel cecal contents. Squirrel microbiotas were dominated by members of the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Verrucomicrobia. UniFrac analysis showed that microbiotas clustered strongly by season, and maternal influences, diet history, host age, and host body temperature had minimal effects. Phylogenetic diversity and numbers of operational taxonomic units were lowest in late winter and highest in the spring after a 2-wk period of refeeding. Hibernation increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia, phyla that contain species capable of surviving on host-derived substrates such as mucins, and reduced relative abundance of Firmicutes, many of which prefer dietary polysaccharides. Hibernation reduced cecal short-chain fatty acid and ammonia concentrations, and increased and decreased concentrations of acetate and butyrate, respectively. These results indicate that the ground squirrel microbiota is restructured each year in a manner that reflects differences in microbial preferences for dietary vs. host-derived substrates, and thus the competitive abilities of different taxa to survive in the altered environment in the hibernator gut.

  18. The role of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate in metabolic suppression during hibernation and arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher; Staples, James F

    2010-06-01

    Hibernation elicits a major reduction in whole-animal O(2) consumption that corresponds with active suppression of liver mitochondrial electron transport capacity at, or downstream of, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). During arousal from the torpor phase of hibernation this suppression is reversed and metabolic rates rise dramatically. In this study, we used the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) to assess isolated liver mitochondrial respiration during the torpor phase of hibernation and various stages of arousal to elucidate a potential role of SDH in metabolic suppression. State 3 and state 4 respiration rates were seven- and threefold lower in torpor compared with the summer-active and interbout euthermic states. Respiration rates increased during arousal so that when body temperature reached 30 degrees C in late arousal, state 3 and state 4 respiration were 3.3- and 1.8-fold greater than during torpor, respectively. SDH activity was 72% higher in interbout euthermia than in torpor. Pre-incubating with isocitrate [to alleviate oxaloacetate (OAA) inhibition] increased state 3 respiration rate during torpor by 91%, but this rate was still fourfold lower than that measured in interbout euthermia. Isocitrate pre-incubation also eliminated differences in SDH activity among hibernation bout stages. OAA concentration correlated negatively with both respiration rates and SDH activity. These data suggest that OAA reversibly inhibits SDH in torpor, but cannot fully account for the drastic metabolic suppression observed during this hibernation phase.

  19. Changes in the Golgi apparatus of neocortical and hippocampal neurons in the hibernating hamster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eAntón

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hibernating animals have been used as models to study several aspects of the plastic changes that occur in the metabolism and physiology of neurons. These models are also of interest in the study of Alzheimer’s disease because the microtubule-associated protein tau is hyperphosphorylated during the hibernation state known as torpor, similar to the pretangle stage of Alzheimer’s disease. Hibernating animals undergo torpor periods with drops in body temperature and metabolic rate, and a virtual cessation of neural activity. These processes are accompanied by morphological and neurochemical changes in neurons, which reverse a few hours after coming out of the torpor state. Since tau has been implicated in the structural regulation of the neuronal Golgi apparatus (GA we have used Western Blot and immunocytochemistry to analyze whether the GA is modified in cortical neurons of the Syrian hamster at different hibernation stages. The results show that, during the hibernation cycle, the GA undergo important structural changes along with differential modifications in expression levels and distribution patterns of Golgi structural proteins. These changes were accompanied by significant transitory reductions in the volume and surface area of the GA elements during torpor and arousal stages as compared with euthermic animals

  20. Distribution of endocrine cells in the digestive tract of Alligator sinensis during the active and hibernating period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Shengzhou; Zhou, Naizhen; Wang, Chaolin; Wu, Xiaobing

    2014-10-01

    The digestive tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body; the distribution pattern of endocrine cells varies with different pathological and physiological states. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distributed density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), gastrin (GAS), somatostatin (SS) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunoreactive (IR) cells in the digestive tract of Alligator sinensis during the active and hibernating period by immunohistochemical (IHC) method. The results indicated that 5-HT-IR cells were distributed throughout the entire digestive tract, which were most predominant in duodenum and jejunum. The density increased significantly in stomach and duodenum during hibernation. GAS-IR cells were limited in small stomach and small intestine. The density decreased significantly in small stomach during hibernation, while increased in duodenum. What's more, most of the endocrine cells in duodenum were generally spindle shaped with long cytoplasmic processes ending in the lumen during hibernation. SS-IR cells were limited in stomach and small stomach. The density increased in stomach while decreased in small stomach during hibernation, meanwhile, fewer IR cells occurred in small intestine. VIP-IR cells occurred in stomach and small stomach. The density decreased in small stomach, while increased in stomach during hibernation. These results indicated that the endocrine cells in different parts of digestive tract varied differently during hibernation, their changes were adaptive response to the hibernation.

  1. Hibernation is associated with depression of T-cell independent humoral immune responses in the 13-lined ground squirrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Carey, Hannah V.

    Mammalian hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism and body temperature (torpor), interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. The function of both the innate and adaptive immune system is suppressed during hibernation. In this study, we analyzed the humoral adaptive immune response to a

  2. A Site Characterization Protocol for Evaluating the Potential for Triggered or Induced Seismicity Resulting from Wastewater Injection and Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R. J.; Zoback, M. D.; Gupta, A.; Baker, J.; Beroza, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory and governmental agencies, individual companies and industry groups and others have recently proposed, or are developing, guidelines aimed at reducing the risk associated with earthquakes triggered by waste water injection or hydraulic fracturing. While there are a number of elements common to the guidelines proposed, not surprisingly, there are also some significant differences among them and, in a number of cases, important considerations that are not addressed. The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive protocol for site characterization based on a rigorous scientific understanding of the responsible processes. Topics addressed will include the geologic setting (emphasizing faults that might be affected), historical seismicity, hydraulic characterization of injection and adjacent intervals, geomechanical characterization to identify potentially active faults, plans for seismic monitoring and reporting, plans for monitoring and reporting injection (pressure, volumes, and rates), other factors contributing to risk (potentially affected population centers, structures, and facilities), and implementing a modified Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The guidelines will be risk based and adaptable, rather than prescriptive, for a proposed activity and region of interest. They will be goal oriented and will rely, to the degree possible, on established best practice procedures, referring to existing procedures and recommendations. By developing a risk-based site characterization protocol, we hope to contribute to the development of rational and effective measures for reducing the risk posed by activities that potentially trigger earthquakes.

  3. A gain-of-function mutation in Msl10 triggers cell death and wound-induced hyperaccumulation of jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zou; Jian-Min Zhou; Satya Chintamanani; Ping He; Hirotada Fukushige; Liping Yu; Meiyu Shao; Lihuang Zhu; David F Hildebrand; Xiaoyan Tang

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are rapidly induced after wound-ing and act as key regulators for wound induced signaling pathway. However, what perceives the wound signal and how that triggers JA biosynthesis remains poorly understood. To identify components involved in Arabidopsis wound and JA signaling pathway, we screened for mutants with abnormal expression of a luciferase reporter, which is under the control of a wound-responsive promoter of an ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factor gene, RAP2.6 (Related to APetala 2.6). The rea1 (RAP2.6 expresser in shoot apex) mutant constitutively expressed the RAP2.6-LUC reporter gene in young leaves. Along with the typical JA phenotypes including shorter petioles, loss of apical dominance, accumulation of anthocyanin pig-ments and constitutive expression of JA response gene, rea1 plants also displayed cell death and accumulated high levels of JA in response to wounding. The phenotype of rea1 mutant is caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the C-terminus of a mechanosensitive ion channel MscS-like 10 (MSL10). MSL10 is localized in the plasma membrane and is expressed predom-inantly in root tip, shoot apex and vascular tissues. These results suggest that MSL10 is involved in the wound-triggered early signal transduction pathway and possibly in regulating the positive feedback synthesis of JA.

  4. The poplar Rust-Induced Secreted Protein (RISP inhibits the growth of the leaf rust pathogen Melampsora larici-populina and triggers cell culture alkalinisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin ePetre

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells secrete a wide range of proteins in extracellular spaces in response to pathogen attack. The poplar Rust-Induced Secreted Protein (RISP is a small cationic protein of unknown function that was identified as the most induced gene in poplar leaves during immune responses to the leaf rust pathogen Melampsora larici-populina, an obligate biotrophic parasite. Here, we combined in planta and in vitro molecular biology approaches to tackle the function of RISP. Using a RISP-mCherry fusion transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we demonstrated that RISP is secreted into the apoplast. A recombinant RISP specifically binds to M. larici-populina urediniospores and inhibits their germination. It also arrests the growth of the fungus in vitro and on poplar leaves. Interestingly, RISP also triggers poplar cell culture alkalinisation and is cleaved at the C-terminus by a plant-encoded mechanism. Altogether our results indicate that RISP is an antifungal protein that has the ability to trigger cellular responses.

  5. The Poplar Rust-Induced Secreted Protein (RISP) Inhibits the Growth of the Leaf Rust Pathogen Melampsora larici-populina and Triggers Cell Culture Alkalinisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Hecker, Arnaud; Germain, Hugo; Tsan, Pascale; Sklenar, Jan; Pelletier, Gervais; Séguin, Armand; Duplessis, Sébastien; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Plant cells secrete a wide range of proteins in extracellular spaces in response to pathogen attack. The poplar rust-induced secreted protein (RISP) is a small cationic protein of unknown function that was identified as the most induced gene in poplar leaves during immune responses to the leaf rust pathogen Melampsora larici-populina, an obligate biotrophic parasite. Here, we combined in planta and in vitro molecular biology approaches to tackle the function of RISP. Using a RISP-mCherry fusion transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we demonstrated that RISP is secreted into the apoplast. A recombinant RISP specifically binds to M. larici-populina urediniospores and inhibits their germination. It also arrests the growth of the fungus in vitro and on poplar leaves. Interestingly, RISP also triggers poplar cell culture alkalinisation and is cleaved at the C-terminus by a plant-encoded mechanism. Altogether our results indicate that RISP is an antifungal protein that has the ability to trigger cellular responses.

  6. Biochemical Foundations of Health and Energy Conservation in Hibernating Free-Ranging Subadult Brown Bear Ursus arctos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Karen Gjesing; Hansen, Rasmus; Overgaard, Michael Toft;

    2016-01-01

    hibernation physiology. We propose that energy for the costly protein synthesis is reduced by three mechanisms, (i) dehydration, which increases protein concentration without de novo synthesis; (ii) reduced protein degradation rates due to a 6 °C reduction in body temperature, and decreased protease activity......Brown bears (Ursus arctos) hibernate for 5-7 months without eating, drinking, urinating and defecating at a metabolic rate of only 25% of the summer activity rate. Nonetheless, they emerge healthy and alert in spring. We quantified the biochemical adaptations for hibernation by comparing...... the proteome, metabolome, and hematologic features of blood from hibernating and active free-ranging subadult brown bears with a focus on conservation of health and energy. We found that total plasma protein concentration increased during hibernation, even though the concentrations of most individual plasma...

  7. Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Jansen, Heiko T; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Morgenstern, Kurt; Gehring, Jamie Lauren; Rigano, Kimberly Scott; Lee, Jae; Gong, Jianhua; Shaywitz, Adam J; Vella, Chantal A; Robbins, Charles T; Corbit, Kevin C

    2014-08-01

    The confluence of obesity and diabetes as a worldwide epidemic necessitates the discovery of new therapies. Success in this endeavor requires translatable preclinical studies, which traditionally employ rodent models. As an alternative approach, we explored hibernation where obesity is a natural adaptation to survive months of fasting. Here we report that grizzly bears exhibit seasonal tripartite insulin responsiveness such that obese animals augment insulin sensitivity but only weeks later enter hibernation-specific insulin resistance (IR) and subsequently reinitiate responsiveness upon awakening. Preparation for hibernation is characterized by adiposity coupled to increased insulin sensitivity via modified PTEN/AKT signaling specifically in adipose tissue, suggesting a state of "healthy" obesity analogous to humans with PTEN haploinsufficiency. Collectively, we show that bears reversibly cope with homeostatic perturbations considered detrimental to humans and describe a mechanism whereby IR functions not as a late-stage metabolic adaptation to obesity, but rather a gatekeeper of the fed-fasting transition.

  8. The hibernating mobile phone: Dead storage as a barrier to efficient electronic waste recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Garrath T; Smalley, Grace; Suckling, James R; Lilley, Debra; Lee, Jacquetta; Mawle, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Hibernation, the dead storage period when a mobile phone is still retained by the user at its end-of-life, is both a common and a significant barrier to the effective flow of time-sensitive stock value within a circular economic model. In this paper we present the findings of a survey of 181 mobile phone owners, aged between 18-25years old, living and studying in the UK, which explored mobile phone ownership, reasons for hibernation, and replacement motives. This paper also outlines and implements a novel mechanism for quantifying the mean hibernation period based on the survey findings. The results show that only 33.70% of previously owned mobile phones were returned back into the system. The average duration of ownership of mobile phones kept and still in hibernation was 4years 11months, with average use and hibernation durations of 1year 11months, and 3years respectively; on average, mobile phones that are kept by the user are hibernated for longer than they are ever actually used as primary devices. The results also indicate that mobile phone replacement is driven primarily by physical (technological, functional and absolute) obsolescence, with economic obsolescence, partly in response to the notion of being 'due an upgrade', also featuring significantly. We also identify in this paper the concept of a secondary phone, a recently replaced phone that holds a different function for the user than their primary phone but is still valued and intentionally retained by the user, and which, we conclude, should be accounted for in any reverse logistics strategy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Winter hibernation and UCHL1-p34cdc2 association in toad oocyte maturation competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Kuang

    Full Text Available Currently, it is believed that toad oocyte maturation is dependent on the physiological conditions of winter hibernation. Previous antibody-blocking experiments have demonstrated that toad ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (tUCHL1 is necessary for germinal vesicle breakdown during toad oocyte maturation. In this paper, we first supply evidence that tUCHL1 is highly evolutionarily conserved. Then, we exclude protein availability and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase enzyme activity as factors in the response of oocytes to winter hibernation. In the context of MPF (maturation promoting factor controlling oocyte maturation and to further understand the role of UCHL1 in oocyte maturation, we performed adsorption and co-immunoprecipitation experiments using toad oocyte protein extracts and determined that tUCHL1 is associated with MPF in toad oocytes. Recombinant tUCHL1 absorbed p34(cdc2, a component of MPF, in obviously larger quantities from mature oocytes than from immature oocytes, and p13(suc1 was isolated from tUCHL1 with a dependence on the ATP regeneration system, suggesting that still other functions may be involved in their association that require phosphorylation. In oocytes from hibernation-interrupted toads, the p34(cdc2 protein level was significantly lower than in oocytes from toads in artificial hibernation, providing an explanation for the different quantities isolated by recombinant tUCHL1 pull-down and, more importantly, identifying a mechanism involved in the toad oocyte's dependence on a low environmental temperature during winter hibernation. Therefore, in toads, tUCHL1 binds p34(cdc2 and plays a role in oocyte maturation. However, neither tUCHL1 nor cyclin B1 respond to low temperatures to facilitate oocyte maturation competence during winter hibernation.

  10. Bid and calpains cooperate to trigger oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguissola, Sergio; Köhler, Barbara; O'Byrne, Robert; Düssmann, Heiko; Cannon, Mary D; Murray, Frank E; Concannon, Caoimhin G; Rehm, Markus; Kögel, Donat; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2009-11-01

    The Bcl-2 homology 3-only protein Bid is an important mediator of death receptor-induced apoptosis. Recent reports and this study suggest that Bid may also mediate genotoxic drug-induced apoptosis of various human cancer cells. Here, we characterized the role of Bid and the mechanism of Bid activation during oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of HeLa cervical cancer cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of Bid protected HeLa cells against both death receptor- and oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Expression of a Bid mutant in which caspase-8 cleavage site was mutated (D59A) reactivated oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis in Bid-deficient cells but failed to reactivate death receptor-induced apoptosis, suggesting that caspase-8-mediated Bid cleavage did not contribute to oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of bcl-2 or treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-dl-Asp-fluoromethylketone abolished caspase-2, -8, -9, and -3 activation as well as Bid cleavage in response to oxaliplatin, suggesting that Bid cleavage occurred downstream of mitochondrial permeabilization and was predominantly mediated by caspases. We also detected an early activation of calpains in response to oxaliplatin. Calpain inhibition reduced Bid cleavage, mitochondrial depolarization, and activation of caspase-9, -3, -2, and -8 in response to oxaliplatin. Further experiments, however, suggested that Bid cleavage by calpains was not a prerequisite for oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis: single-cell imaging experiments using a yellow fluorescent protein-Bid-cyan fluorescent protein probe demonstrated translocation of full-length Bid to mitochondria that was insensitive to calpain or caspase inhibition. Moreover, calpain inhibition showed a potent protective effect in Bid-silenced cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that calpains and Bid act in a cooperative, but mutually independent, manner to mediate oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells.

  11. Seasonal abundance and mortality of Oebalus poecilus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in a hibernation refuge

    OpenAIRE

    R. S. S. Santos; L. R. Redaelli; DIEFENBACH L. M. G.; ROMANOWSKI,H. P.; Prando,H. F.; R. C. Antochevis

    2006-01-01

    Oebalus poecilus (Dallas) is an important pest affecting irrigated rice in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It hibernates during the coldest months of the year in refuges such as bamboo litter. This study examined O. poecilus hibernation to determine the causes of mortality during this period. The study was conducted in a 140 m² bamboo plantation located in a rice-growing area in Eldorado do Sul County (30° 02’ S and 51° 23’ W), RS. During June 2000 to April 2002, 63 samples of litter were taken in...

  12. Smac Mimetic-Induced Upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1 Triggers Migration and Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells and Influences the Tumor Microenvironment in a Paracrine Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Lindemann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac mimetics are considered as promising anticancer therapeutics that are currently under investigation in early clinical trials. They induce apoptosis by antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, which are frequently overexpressed in cancer. We previously reported that Smac mimetics, such as BV6, additionally exert non-apoptotic functions in glioblastoma (GBM cells by stimulating migration and invasion in a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-dependent manner. Because NF-κB target genes mediating these effects are largely unknown, we performed whole-genome expression analyses. Here, we identify chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 as the top-listed NF-κB-regulated gene being upregulated upon BV6 treatment in GBM cells. BV6-induced upregulation and secretion of CCL2 are required for migration and invasion of GBM cells because knockdown of CCL2 in GBM cells abolishes these effects. Co-culture experiments of GBM cells with non-malignant astroglial cells reveal that BV6-stimulated secretion of CCL2 by GBM cells into the supernatant triggers migration of astroglial cells toward GBM cells because CCL2 knockdown in BV6-treated GBM cells impedes BV6-stimulated migration of astroglial cells. In conclusion, we identify CCL2 as a BV6-induced NF-κB target gene that triggers migration and invasion of GBM cells and exerts paracrine effects on the GBM's microenvironment by stimulating migration of astroglial cells. These findings provide novel insights into the biological functions of Smac mimetics with important implications for the development of Smac mimetics as cancer therapeutics.

  13. GnRH agonist triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Al Humaidan, Peter Samir Heskjær

    2013-01-01

    The concept that a bolus of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) can replace human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) as a trigger of final oocyte maturation was introduced several years ago. Recent developments in the area strengthen this premise. GnRHa trigger offers important advantages...... triggering concept should be challenged and that the GnRHa trigger is the way to move forward with thoughtful consideration of the needs, safety and comfort of our patients. Routinely, human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is used to induce ovulation in fertility treatments. This approach deviates...... significantly from physiology and often results in insufficient hormonal support in early pregnancy and in ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). An alternative approach is to use a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist which allows a more physiological trigger of ovulation and, most importantly...

  14. Facilitated Anion Transport Induces Hyperpolarization of the Cell Membrane That Triggers Differentiation and Cell Death in Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Hernando, Elsa; Calabuig-Fariñas, Silvia; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Sahlholm, Kristoffer; Knöpfel, Thomas; García-Valverde, María; Rodilla, Ananda M; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Farràs, Rosa; Ciruela, Francisco; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2015-12-23

    Facilitated anion transport potentially represents a powerful tool to modulate various cellular functions. However, research into the biological effects of small molecule anionophores is still at an early stage. Here we have used two potent anionophore molecules inspired in the structure of marine metabolites tambjamines to gain insight into the effect induced by these compounds at the cellular level. We show how active anionophores, capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of chloride and bicarbonate in model phospholipid liposomes, induce acidification of the cytosol and hyperpolarization of plasma cell membranes. We demonstrate how this combined effect can be used against cancer stem cells (CSCs). Hyperpolarization of cell membrane induces cell differentiation and loss of stemness of CSCs leading to effective elimination of this cancer cell subpopulation.

  15. Up-regulation of Long Non-coding RNA TUG1 in Hibernating Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques J. Frigault

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation is associated with multiple physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that allow animals to endure colder temperatures. We hypothesize that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, a group of non-coding transcripts with diverse functions, are differentially expressed during hibernation. In this study, expression levels of lncRNAs H19 and TUG1 were assessed via qRT-PCR in liver, heart, and skeletal muscle tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. TUG1 transcript levels were significantly elevated 1.94-fold in skeletal muscle of hibernating animals when compared with euthermic animals. Furthermore, transcript levels of HSF2 also increased 2.44-fold in the skeletal muscle in hibernating animals. HSF2 encodes a transcription factor that can be negatively regulated by TUG1 levels and that influences heat shock protein expression. Thus, these observations support the differential expression of the TUG1–HSF2 axis during hibernation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for differential expression of lncRNAs in torpid ground squirrels, adding lncRNAs as another group of transcripts modulated in this mammalian species during hibernation.

  16. Up-regulation of Long Non-coding RNA TUG1 in Hibernating Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacques J. Frigault; Daneck Lang-Ouellette; Pier Morin Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian hibernation is associated with multiple physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that allow animals to endure colder temperatures. We hypothesize that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a group of non-coding transcripts with diverse functions, are differ-entially expressed during hibernation. In this study, expression levels of lncRNAs H19 and TUG1 were assessed via qRT-PCR in liver, heart, and skeletal muscle tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus). TUG1 transcript levels were signifi-cantly elevated 1.94-fold in skeletal muscle of hibernating animals when compared with euthermic animals. Furthermore, transcript levels of HSF2 also increased 2.44-fold in the skeletal muscle in hibernating animals. HSF2 encodes a transcription factor that can be negatively regulated by TUG1 levels and that influences heat shock protein expression. Thus, these observations support the differential expression of the TUG1–HSF2 axis during hibernation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for differential expression of lncRNAs in torpid ground squirrels, adding lncRNAs as another group of transcripts modulated in this mammalian species during hibernation.

  17. Hibernation-associated changes in persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels and patterns in British Columbia grizzly bears (ursus arctos horribilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jennie R; MacDuffee, Misty; Yunker, Mark B; Ross, Peter S

    2007-03-15

    We hypothesized that depleted fat reserves in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) following annual hibernation would reveal increases in persistent organic pollutant (POP) concentrations compared to those present in the fall. We obtained fat and hair from British Columbia grizzly bears in early spring 2004 to compare with those collected in fall 2003, with the two tissue types providing contaminant and dietary information, respectively. By correcting for the individual feeding habits of grizzlies using a stable isotope-based approach, we found that polychlorinated biphenyls (sigmaPCBs) increased by 2.21x, polybrominated diphenylethers (sigmaPBDEs) increased by 1.58x, and chlordanes (sigmaCHL) by 1.49x in fat following hibernation. Interestingly, individual POPs elicited a wide range of hibernation-associated concentration effects (e.g., CB-153, 2.25x vs CB-169, 0.00x), resulting in POP pattern convergence in a PCA model of two distinct fall feeding groups (salmon-eating vs non-salmon-eating) into a single spring (post-hibernation) group. Our results suggest that diet dictates contaminant patterns during a feeding phase, while metabolism drives patterns during a fasting phase. This work suggests a duality of POP-associated health risks to hibernating grizzly bears: (1) increased concentrations of some POPs during hibernation; and (2) a potentially prolonged accumulation of water-soluble, highly reactive POP metabolites, since grizzly bears do not excrete during hibernation.

  18. Phosphate Starvation-Dependent Iron Mobilization Induces CLE14 Expression to Trigger Root Meristem Differentiation through CLV2/PEPR2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Alanís, Dolores; Yong-Villalobos, Lenin; Jiménez-Sandoval, Pedro; Alatorre-Cobos, Fulgencio; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Mora-Macías, Javier; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Federico; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2017-06-05

    Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) availability causes terminal differentiation of the root apical meristem (RAM), a phenomenon known as root meristem exhaustion or determined growth. Here, we report that the CLE14 peptide acts as a key player in this process. Low Pi stress induces iron mobilization in the RAM through the action of LPR1/LPR2, causing expression of CLE14 in the proximal meristem region. CLV2 and PEPR2 receptors perceive CLE14 and trigger RAM differentiation, with concomitant downregulation of SHR/SCR and PIN/AUXIN pathway. Our results reveal multiple steps of the molecular mechanism of one of the most physiologically important root nutrient responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome Sequence of Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens Strain 90-166, Which Triggers Induced Systemic Resistance and Plant Growth Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-06-18

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 elicits induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens and herbivores and promotes plant growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Strain 90-166 secretes volatile compounds, siderophores, salicylic acid, and quorum-sensing autoinducers as bacterial determinants toward plant health. Herein, we present its draft genome sequence.

  20. Chemotherapy triggers HIF-1–dependent glutathione synthesis and copper chelation that induces the breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiquan; Samanta, Debangshu; Xiang, Lisha; Zhang, Huimin; Hu, Hongxia; Chen, Ivan; Bullen, John W.; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10–15% of all breast cancer but is responsible for a disproportionate share of morbidity and mortality because of its aggressive characteristics and lack of targeted therapies. Chemotherapy induces enrichment of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which are responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy induces the expression of the cystine transporter xCT and the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLM) in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1–dependent manner, leading to increased intracellular glutathione levels, which inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) activity through copper chelation. Loss of MEK-ERK signaling causes FoxO3 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of the gene encoding the pluripotency factor Nanog, which is required for enrichment of BCSCs. Inhibition of xCT, GCLM, FoxO3, or Nanog blocks chemotherapy-induced enrichment of BCSCs and impairs tumor initiation. These results suggest that, in combination with chemotherapy, targeting BCSCs by inhibiting HIF-1–regulated glutathione synthesis may improve outcome in TNBC. PMID:26229077

  1. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  2. Chemotherapy triggers HIF-1-dependent glutathione synthesis and copper chelation that induces the breast cancer stem cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiquan; Samanta, Debangshu; Xiang, Lisha; Zhang, Huimin; Hu, Hongxia; Chen, Ivan; Bullen, John W; Semenza, Gregg L

    2015-08-18

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) accounts for 10-15% of all breast cancer but is responsible for a disproportionate share of morbidity and mortality because of its aggressive characteristics and lack of targeted therapies. Chemotherapy induces enrichment of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which are responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy induces the expression of the cystine transporter xCT and the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLM) in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1-dependent manner, leading to increased intracellular glutathione levels, which inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) activity through copper chelation. Loss of MEK-ERK signaling causes FoxO3 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of the gene encoding the pluripotency factor Nanog, which is required for enrichment of BCSCs. Inhibition of xCT, GCLM, FoxO3, or Nanog blocks chemotherapy-induced enrichment of BCSCs and impairs tumor initiation. These results suggest that, in combination with chemotherapy, targeting BCSCs by inhibiting HIF-1-regulated glutathione synthesis may improve outcome in TNBC.

  3. SnTox3 acts in effector triggered susceptibility to induce disease on wheat carrying the Snn3 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The necrotrophic fungus Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple proteinaceous host-selective toxins (HSTs which act in effector triggered susceptibility. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of the SnTox3-encoding gene, designated SnTox3, as well as the initial characterization of the SnTox3 protein. SnTox3 is a 693 bp intron-free gene with little obvious homology to other known genes. The predicted immature SnTox3 protein is 25.8 kDa in size. A 20 amino acid signal sequence as well as a possible pro sequence are predicted. Six cysteine residues are predicted to form disulfide bonds and are shown to be important for SnTox3 activity. Using heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris and transformation into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate, we show that SnTox3 encodes the SnTox3 protein and that SnTox3 interacts with the wheat susceptibility gene Snn3. In addition, the avirulent S. nodorum isolate transformed with SnTox3 was virulent on host lines expressing the Snn3 gene. SnTox3-disrupted mutants were deficient in the production of SnTox3 and avirulent on the Snn3 differential wheat line BG220. An analysis of genetic diversity revealed that SnTox3 is present in 60.1% of a worldwide collection of 923 isolates and occurs as eleven nucleotide haplotypes resulting in four amino acid haplotypes. The cloning of SnTox3 provides a fundamental tool for the investigation of the S. nodorum-wheat interaction, as well as vital information for the general characterization of necrotroph-plant interactions.

  4. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  5. Apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways triggered by different grape seed extracts on human colon cancer cell line Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinicola, Simona; Cucina, Alessandra; Pasqualato, Alessia; Proietti, Sara; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Pasqua, Gabriella; Santamaria, Anna Rita; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Laganà, Aldo; Antonacci, Donato; Giuliani, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2010-09-01

    Consumption of grape seed extract (GSE) is widely marketed as a dietary supplement and is considered safe for human health. Nevertheless, the analytical composition of GSE from different grape cultivars, growing in special agronomic constraints, differs greatly in flavan-3-ols content. The major concern with GSE studies is a lack of availability of uniformly standardised preparations, which raises an important question whether different GSE samples have comparable activity and trigger the same mechanisms of action on a given biological system. Therefore, it is tempting to speculate that GSE, obtained from different cultivars, could exert differentiated anticancer effects. The focus of the present study is to determine the selective biological efficacy of GSE obtained from three different sources on the human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. Irrespective of its source, high doses of GSE induced a significant inhibition on Caco-2 cell growth. Moreover, apoptosis was enhanced through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mechanisms, leading to an early apoptosis-inducing factor release and, further, to a dramatic increase in caspase 7 and 3 activity. However, a significant difference in apoptotic rates induced by the three grape sources clearly emerged when treating cancer cells with low and intermediate GSE concentrations (25 and 50 microg/ml).

  6. Up-regulation of c-Jun inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis via caspase-triggered c-Abl cleavage in human multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Raab, Marc S; Tonon, Giovanni; Sattler, Martin; Barilà, Daniela; Zhang, Jing; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Yasui, Hiroshi; Raje, Noopur; DePinho, Ronald A; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-02-15

    Here we show the antimyeloma cytotoxicity of adaphostin and carried out expression profiling of adaphostin-treated multiple myeloma (MM) cells to identify its molecular targets. Surprisingly, c-Jun was the most up-regulated gene even at the earliest point of analysis (2 h). We also observed adaphostin-induced c-Abl cleavage in immunoblot analysis. Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, but not melphalan or dexamethasone, induced similar effects, indicating unique agent-dependent mechanisms. Using caspase inhibitors, as well as caspase-resistant mutants of c-Abl (TM-c-Abl and D565A-Abl), we then showed that c-Abl cleavage in MM cells requires caspase activity. Importantly, both overexpression of the c-Abl fragment or c-Jun and knockdown of c-Abl and c-Jun expression by small interfering RNA confirmed that adaphostin-induced c-Jun up-regulation triggers downstream caspase-mediated c-Abl cleavage, inhibition of MM cell growth, and induction of apoptosis. Finally, our data suggest that this mechanism may not only be restricted to MM but may also be important in a broad range of malignancies including erythroleukemia and solid tumors.

  7. Warming up for sleep? - ground squirrels sleep during arousals from hibernation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Serge; Barnes, Brian M.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.

    1991-01-01

    Hypothermia during mammalian hibernation is periodically interrupted by arousals to euthermy, the function of which is unknown. We report that arctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus parryii) consistently sleep during these arousals, and that their EEG shows the decrease in slow wave activity (δ power

  8. WARMING UP FOR SLEEP - GROUND-SQUIRRELS SLEEP DURING AROUSALS FROM HIBERNATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAAN, S; BARNES, BM; STRIJKSTRA, AM

    1991-01-01

    Hypothermia during mammalian hibernation is periodically interrupted by arousals to euthermy, the function of which is unknown. We report that arctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus parryii) consistently sleep during these arousals, and that their EEG shows the decrease in slow wave activity (delta-p

  9. Ambient temperature during torpor affects NREM sleep EEG during arousal episodes in hibernating European ground squirrels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkstra, AM; Daan, S

    1997-01-01

    Ambient temperature (T-a) systematically affects the frequency of arousal episodes in mammalian hibernation. This variation might hypothetically be attributed to temperature effects on the rate of sleep debt increase in torpor. We studied this rate by recording sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in

  10. Dissimilarity of slow-wave activity enhancement by torpor and sleep deprivation in a hibernator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijkstra, AM; Daan, S

    1998-01-01

    Sleep regulation processes have been hypothesized to be involved in function and timing of arousal episodes in hibernating ground squirrels. We investigated the importance of sleep regulation during arousal episodes by sleep deprivation experiments. After sleep deprivation of 4, 12, and 24 h,

  11. Thermotelemetric study on the hibernation of a common hamster, Cricetus cricetus (Linnaeus, 1758), under natural circumstances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, R.E.M.B.; Gelder, van J.J.; Lenders, A.

    1989-01-01

    By means of radio-thermotelemetry a study was made of the thermoregulatory patterns during hibernation of a common hamster, Cricetus cricetus (L., 1758) under natural conditions. In the euthermic state, body temperature (Tb) fluctuated between 36.4 and 38.6°C with Tb higher than 37.0°C probably indi

  12. Alpha-tocopheryl succinate inhibits autophagic survival of prostate cancer cells induced by vitamin K3 and ascorbate to trigger cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tomasetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The redox-silent vitamin E analog α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS was found to synergistically cooperate with vitamin K3 (VK3 plus ascorbic acid (AA in the induction of cancer cell-selective apoptosis via a caspase-independent pathway. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism(s underlying cell death induced in prostate cancer cells by α-TOS, VK3 and AA, and the potential use of targeted drug combination in the treatment of prostate cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The generation of ROS, cellular response to oxidative stress, and autophagy were investigated in PC3 prostate cancer cells by using drugs at sub-toxic doses. We evaluated whether PARP1-mediated apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF release plays a role in apoptosis induced by the combination of the agents. Next, the effect of the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA on tumor growth was examined in nude mice. VK3 plus AA induced early ROS formation associated with induction of autophagy in response to oxidative stress, which was reduced by α-TOS, preventing the formation of autophagosomes. α-TOS induced mitochondrial destabilization leading to the release of AIF. Translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus, a result of the combinatorial treatment, was mediated by PARP1 activation. The inhibition of AIF as well as of PARP1 efficiently attenuated apoptosis triggered by the drug combination. Using a mouse model of prostate cancer, the combination of α-TOS, VK3 and AA was more efficient in tumor suppression than when the drugs were given separately, without deleterious side effects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: α-TOS, a mitochondria-targeting apoptotic agent, switches at sub-apoptotic doses from autophagy-dependent survival of cancer cells to their demise by promoting the induction of apoptosis. Given the grim prognosis for cancer patients, this finding is of potential clinical relevance.

  13. Involvement of P53 and Bax/Bad triggering apoptosis in thioacetamide-induced hepatic epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Hsuen Chen; Chia-Yu Hsu; Ching-Feng Weng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Thioacetamide (TAA) has been used in studying liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, however, the mechanisms of TAA-induced apoptosis in liver are still unclear. The hepatic epithelial cell line clone 9 was cultured and treated with TAA to investigate the causes of cell death. METHODS: The cell viability of TAA-induced clone 9 cells was determined using MTT assay. Total cellular GSH in TAA-induced clone 9 cells was measured using a slight modification of the Tietze assay. The activity of caspase 3 in TAA-induced clone 9 cells was monitored by the cleavage of DEVD-p-nitroanaline. TUNEL assay and flow cytometry were applied for the determination of DNA fragmentation and the proportion of apoptosis in TAAinduced clone 9 cells, respectively. The alterations of caspase 3, Bad, Bax and Phospho-P53 contents in TAAinduced clone 9 cells were measured by Western blot. RESULTS: The experimental data indicated that TAA caused rat hepatic epithelial cell line clone 9 cell death in a dose-and time-dependent manner; 60% of the cells died (MTT assay) within 24 h after 100 mg/L TAA was applied. Apoptotic cell percentage (TUNEL assay) and caspase 3 activities were highest after 100 mg/L TAA was added for 8 h. The release of GSH and the elevation in caspase content after TAA treatment resulted in clone 9 cell apoptosis via oxidative stress and a caspasedependent mechanism. The phospho-p53, Bax and Bad protein expressions in clone 9 cells were increased after TAA treatment.CONCLUSION: These results reveal that TAA activates p53, increases caspase 3, Bax and Bad protein contents,perhaps causing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the disintegration of membranes, leading to apoptosis of cells.

  14. Oxidative Stress Triggered by Apigenin Induces Apoptosis in a Comprehensive Panel of Human Cervical Cancer-Derived Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Raquel P; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patrícia de S; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Ratti, Bianca A; Kaplum, Vanessa; Bruschi, Marcos L; Nakamura, Celso V; Silva, Sueli O; Maria-Engler, Silvya S; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the cytotoxic effects of apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), particularly its marked inhibition of cancer cell viability both in vitro and in vivo, have attracted the attention of the anticancer drug discovery field. Despite this, there are few studies of apigenin in cervical cancer, and these studies have mostly been conducted using HeLa cells. To evaluate the possibility of apigenin as a new therapeutic candidate for cervical cancer, we evaluated its cytotoxic effects in a comprehensive panel of human cervical cancer-derived cell lines including HeLa (human papillomavirus/HPV 18-positive), SiHa (HPV 16-positive), CaSki (HPV 16 and HPV 18-positive), and C33A (HPV-negative) cells in comparison to a nontumorigenic spontaneously immortalized human epithelial cell line (HaCaT). Our results demonstrated that apigenin had a selective cytotoxic effect and could induce apoptosis in all cervical cancer cell lines which were positively marked with Annexin V, but not in HaCaT (control cells). Additionally, apigenin was able to induce mitochondrial redox impairment, once it increased ROS levels and H2O2, decreased the Δψm, and increased LPO. Still, apigenin was able to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. Thus, apigenin appears to be a promising new candidate as an anticancer drug for cervical cancer induced by different HPV genotypes.

  15. Oxidative Stress Triggered by Apigenin Induces Apoptosis in a Comprehensive Panel of Human Cervical Cancer-Derived Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel P. Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the cytotoxic effects of apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone, particularly its marked inhibition of cancer cell viability both in vitro and in vivo, have attracted the attention of the anticancer drug discovery field. Despite this, there are few studies of apigenin in cervical cancer, and these studies have mostly been conducted using HeLa cells. To evaluate the possibility of apigenin as a new therapeutic candidate for cervical cancer, we evaluated its cytotoxic effects in a comprehensive panel of human cervical cancer-derived cell lines including HeLa (human papillomavirus/HPV 18-positive, SiHa (HPV 16-positive, CaSki (HPV 16 and HPV 18-positive, and C33A (HPV-negative cells in comparison to a nontumorigenic spontaneously immortalized human epithelial cell line (HaCaT. Our results demonstrated that apigenin had a selective cytotoxic effect and could induce apoptosis in all cervical cancer cell lines which were positively marked with Annexin V, but not in HaCaT (control cells. Additionally, apigenin was able to induce mitochondrial redox impairment, once it increased ROS levels and H2O2, decreased the Δψm, and increased LPO. Still, apigenin was able to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. Thus, apigenin appears to be a promising new candidate as an anticancer drug for cervical cancer induced by different HPV genotypes.

  16. Oxidative Stress Triggered by Apigenin Induces Apoptosis in a Comprehensive Panel of Human Cervical Cancer-Derived Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Raquel P.; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Ratti, Bianca A.; Kaplum, Vanessa; Bruschi, Marcos L.; Nakamura, Celso V.; Maria-Engler, Silvya S.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the cytotoxic effects of apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), particularly its marked inhibition of cancer cell viability both in vitro and in vivo, have attracted the attention of the anticancer drug discovery field. Despite this, there are few studies of apigenin in cervical cancer, and these studies have mostly been conducted using HeLa cells. To evaluate the possibility of apigenin as a new therapeutic candidate for cervical cancer, we evaluated its cytotoxic effects in a comprehensive panel of human cervical cancer-derived cell lines including HeLa (human papillomavirus/HPV 18-positive), SiHa (HPV 16-positive), CaSki (HPV 16 and HPV 18-positive), and C33A (HPV-negative) cells in comparison to a nontumorigenic spontaneously immortalized human epithelial cell line (HaCaT). Our results demonstrated that apigenin had a selective cytotoxic effect and could induce apoptosis in all cervical cancer cell lines which were positively marked with Annexin V, but not in HaCaT (control cells). Additionally, apigenin was able to induce mitochondrial redox impairment, once it increased ROS levels and H2O2, decreased the Δψm, and increased LPO. Still, apigenin was able to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer cells. Thus, apigenin appears to be a promising new candidate as an anticancer drug for cervical cancer induced by different HPV genotypes. PMID:28191273

  17. Radioprotective effect of geraniin via the inhibition of apoptosis triggered by γ-radiation-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, In Kyung; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Sang Young; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-04-01

    The radioprotective effect of geraniin, a tannin compound isolated from Nymphaea tetragona Georgi var. (Nymphaeaceae), against γ-radiation-induced damage was investigated in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells. Geraniin recovered cell viability detected by MTT test and colony formation assay, which was compromised by γ-radiation, and reduced the γ-radiation-induced apoptosis by the inhibition of loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Geraniin protected cellular components (lipid membrane, cellular protein, and DNA) damaged by γ-radiation, which was detected by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl formation, and comet assay. Geraniin significantly reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species generated by γ-radiation, which was detected using spectrofluorometer, flow cytometer, and confocal microscope after 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. Geraniin normalized the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, which were decreased by γ-radiation. These results suggest that geraniin protects cells against radiation-induced oxidative stress via enhancing of antioxidant enzyme activities and attenuating of cellular damage.

  18. Caffeine-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO1 triggers Bim-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Han, Dong-Feng; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Dong, Nan; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly ingested neuroactive compounds and exhibits anticancer effects through induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of caffeine-induced apoptosis in U251 cells (human glioma cell line). We analyzed the inhibitory effects of caffeine on cell proliferation by performing WST-8 and colony formation assays; in addition, cell survival was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to investigate the role played by FoxO1 in the proapoptotic effects of caffeine on glioma cells. Results showed that caffeine inhibited proliferation and survival of human glioma cells, induced apoptosis, and increased the expression of FoxO1 and its proapoptotic target Bim. In addition, we found that FoxO1 enhanced the transcription of its proapoptotic target Bim. In summary, our data indicates that FoxO1-Bim mediates caffeine-induced regression of glioma growth by activating cell apoptosis, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the possible use of caffeine in treating human cancer.

  19. Cholecystokinin activation of central satiety centers changes seasonally in a mammalian hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P; Raybould, Helen E; Carey, Hannah V

    2011-05-01

    Hibernators that rely on lipids during winter exhibit profound changes in food intake over the annual cycle. The mechanisms that regulate appetite changes in seasonal hibernators remain unclear, but likely consist of complex interactions between gut hormones, adipokines, and central processing centers. We hypothesized that seasonal changes in the sensitivity of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) to the gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) may contribute to appetite regulation in ground squirrels. Spring (SPR), late summer (SUM), and winter euthermic hibernating (HIB) 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) were treated with intraperitoneal CCK (100 μg/kg) or vehicle (CON) for 3h and Fos expression in the NTS was quantified. In CON squirrels, numbers of Fos-positive neurons in HIB were low compared to SPR and SUM. CCK treatment increased Fos-positive neurons in the NTS at the levels of the area postrema (AP) and pre AP during all seasons and at the level of the rostral AP in HIB squirrels. The highest absolute levels of Fos-positive neurons were found in SPR CCK squirrels, but the highest relative increase from CON was found in HIB CCK squirrels. Fold-changes in Fos-positive neurons in SUM were intermediate between SPR and HIB. Thus, CCK sensitivity falls from SPR to SUM suggesting that seasonal changes in sensitivity of NTS neurons to vagally-derived CCK may influence appetite in the active phase of the annual cycle in hibernating squirrels. Enhanced sensitivity to CCK signaling in NTS neurons of hibernators indicates that changes in gut-brain signaling may contribute to seasonal changes in food intake during the annual cycle.

  20. NK-derived IFN-γ/IL-4 triggers the sexually disparate polarization of macrophages in CVB3-induced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Yue, Yan; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-11-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common etiology of myocarditis with an increased morbidity and mortality in males. We previously reported that differential polarization of macrophages contributed to sexually dimorphic susceptibility of mice to CVB3-induced myocarditis. However, the underlying kinetics, impetus as well as the molecular mechanism remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that myocardial macrophages started to polarize at as early as day 5 post CVB3 infection in both genders of BALB/c mice, with M1 phenotype detected in males and M2a phenotype in females, and this trend was further amplified at day 7 when myocarditis reached peak. In addition, we identified that prevailed IFN-γ in males and dominant IL-4 in females were critical myocardial cytokines for the disparate macrophage polarization, which respectively activated JAK1-STAT1 and JAK3-STAT6 pathways. Strikingly, we found that the main source of IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokines in both genders were myocardial infiltrating NK cells, which differentially secreted cytokines in various microenvironments manifested synergistically by sex hormones and CVB3 infection. Consistently, depletion of NK cells significantly impeded the myocardial macrophage polarization in both genders of CVB3-infected mice. Collectively, these data indicated that myocardial NK-derived IFN-γ/IL-4 was critical for the differential polarization of macrophages in CVB3-induced myocarditis via activating JAK1-STAT1 and JAK3-STAT6 pathways respectively. Our study may help understand the mechanism of sexually differential polarization of macrophages and provide clues for the gender bias in CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  1. E platinum, a newly synthesized platinum compound, induces apoptosis through ROS-triggered ER stress in gastric carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Guo, Qinglong; Tao, Lei; Zhao, Li; Chen, Yan; An, Teng; Chen, Zhen; Fu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still one of the leading causes of death in cancer-related diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effect of E Platinum, a newly platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent bearing the basic structure of Oxaliplatin, in a variety of gastric carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that E Platinum significantly induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a result of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that E Platinum enhanced Ca(2+) flux out from the endoplasmic reticulum by increasing the protein expression of IP3R type 1 (IP3R1) and decreasing the expression of ERp44. Dysfunction of Ca(2+) homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to accumulation of unfolded proteins and ER stress. Mechanically, E Platinum increased ER stress associated protein expression such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4, and CHOP. However, knocking down CHOP reversed E Platinum-induced apoptosis by blocking mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, 10 mg/kg of E Platinum significantly suppressed BGC-823 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, E Platinum inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis by ROS-mediated ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. Our study indicated that E Platinum may be a potential and effective treatment for gastric cancer in clinical. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Macrophage IL-12p70 Signaling Prevents HSV-1–Induced CNS Autoimmunity Triggered by Autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Zandian, Mandana; Allen, Sariah J.; Rajasagi, Naveen Kumar; van Rooijen, Nico; Chen, Shuang; Arditi, Moshe; Rouse, Barry T.; Flavell, Richard A.; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self-tolerance and function to suppress overly exuberant immune responses. However, it is unclear whether innate immune cells modulate Treg function. Here the authors examined the role of innate immunity in lymphomyeloid homeostasis. Methods. The involvement of B cells, dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, and T cells in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in different strains of mice infected ocularly with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was investigated. Results. The authors found that depletion of macrophages, but not DCs, B cells, NK cells, CD4+ T cells, or CD8+ T cells, induced CNS demyelination irrespective of virus or mouse strain. As with macrophage depletion, mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-12p35 or IL-12p40 showed CNS demyelination after HSV-1 infection, whereas demyelination was undetectable in HSV-1–infected, IL-23p19–deficient, or Epstein-Barr virus–induced gene 3-deficient mice. Demyelination could be rescued in macrophage-depleted mice after the injection of IL-12p70 DNA and in IL-12p35−/− or IL-12p40−/− mice after injection with IL-12p35 or IL-12p40 DNA or with recombinant viruses expressing IL-12p35 or IL-12p40. Using FoxP3-, CD4-, CD8-, or CD25-depletion and gene-deficient mouse approaches, the authors demonstrated that HSV-1–induced demyelination was blocked in the absence of CD4, CD25, or FoxP3 in macrophage-depleted mice. Flow cytometry showed an elevation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in the spleens of infected macrophage-depleted mice, and adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells to infected macrophage-depleted severe combined immunodeficient mice induced CNS demyelination. Conclusions. The authors demonstrated that macrophage IL-12p70 signaling plays an important role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the CNS by preventing the development of autoaggressive CD4+ Tregs. PMID:21220560

  3. Normoergic NO-dependent changes, triggered by a SAR inducer in potato, create more potent defense responses to Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, Łukasz; Milczarek, Grzegorz; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Abramowski, Dariusz; Billert, Hanna; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta

    2013-10-01

    In our experimental approach we examined how potato leaves exposed to a chemical agent might induce nitric oxide (NO) dependent biochemical modifications for future mobilization of an effective resistance to Phytophthora infestans. After potato leaf treatment with one of the following SAR inducers, i.e. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or Laminarin, we observed enhanced NO generation concomitant with biochemical changes related to a slight superoxide anion (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation dependent on minimal NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities, respectively. These rather normoergic changes, linked to the NO message, were mediated by the temporary down-regulation of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). In turn, after challenge inoculation signal amplification promoted potato resistance manifested in the up-regulation of GSNOR activity tuned with the depletion of the SNO pool, which was observed by our team earlier (Floryszak-Wieczorek et al., 2012). Moreover, hyperergic defense responses related to an early and rapid O2(-)and H2O2 overproduction together with a temporary increase in NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities were noted. BABA treatment was the most effective against P. infestans resulting in the enhanced activity of β-1,3-glucanase and callose deposition. Our results indicate that NO-mediated biochemical modifications might play an important role in creating more potent defense responses of potato to a subsequent P. infestans attack.

  4. Trichoderma-Induced Acidification Is an Early Trigger for Changes in Arabidopsis Root Growth and Determines Fungal Phytostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Esparza-Reynoso, Saraí; Garnica-Vergara, Amira; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are common rhizosphere inhabitants widely used as biological control agents and their role as plant growth promoting fungi has been established. Although soil pH influences several fungal and plant functional traits such as growth and nutrition, little is known about its influence in rhizospheric or mutualistic interactions. The role of pH in the Trichoderma–Arabidopsis interaction was studied by determining primary root growth and lateral root formation, root meristem status and cell viability, quiescent center (QC) integrity, and auxin inducible gene expression. Primary root growth phenotypes in wild type seedlings and STOP1 mutants allowed identification of a putative root pH sensing pathway likely operating in plant–fungus recognition. Acidification by Trichoderma induced auxin redistribution within Arabidopsis columella root cap cells, causing root tip bending and growth inhibition. Root growth stoppage correlated with decreased cell division and with the loss of QC integrity and cell viability, which were reversed by buffering the medium. In addition, stop1, an Arabidopsis mutant sensitive to low pH, was oversensitive to T. atroviride primary root growth repression, providing genetic evidence that a pH root sensing mechanism reprograms root architecture during the interaction. Our results indicate that root sensing of pH mediates the interaction of Trichoderma with plants. PMID:28567051

  5. 基于Hibernate JPA和JQuery框架的数据查询研究与实现%Research and Implementation of Data Query Based on Hibernate JPA and JQuery Framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭莹宇

    2012-01-01

    This article researches the base theory of Hibernate JPA query framework, and describes the method and process of data query designed and implemented by JPA and Jquery. In addition, the article summarizes the characteristics and advantages of data query based on Hibernate JPA query framework.%在研究Hibernate JPA查询技术理论的基础上,阐述JPA结合视图组件JQuery框架技术设计和实现数据查询的方法过程.着重总结Hibernate JPA结合JQuery框架实现数据查询的特点以及相对其它技术的优势.

  6. Western-type diet induces senescence, modifies vascular function in non-senescence mice and triggers adaptive mechanisms in senescent ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onetti, Yara; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Heras, Magda; Vila, Elisabet; Dantas, Ana Paula

    2013-12-01

    The effects of high-fat diet ingestion on senescence-induced modulation of contractile responses to phenylephrine (Phe) were determined in aortas of senescence-accelerated (SAMP8) and non-senescent (SAMR1) mice fed (8weeks) a Western-type high-fat diet (WD). Increased levels of senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining were found in aortas of SAMP8 and SAMR1 with WD. In SAMR1, WD did not modify Phe contraction in spite of inducing major changes in the mechanisms of regulation of contractile responses. Although WD increased NAD(P)H-oxidase-derived O2(-) and augmented peroxynitrite formation, we found an increase of inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO production which may contribute to maintain Phe contraction in SAMR1 WD. On SAMP8, WD significantly decreased Phe-induced contractions when compared with SAMP8 under normal chow. This response was not dependent on changes of NOS expression, but rather as consequence of increased antioxidant capacity by superoxide dismutase (SOD1). A similar constrictor influence from cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway on Phe responses was found in SAMR1 and SAMP8 ND. However, WD removed that influence on SAMR1, and produced a switch in the balance from a vasoconstrictor to a vasodilator component in SAMP8. These results were associated to the increased COX-2 expression, suggesting that a COX-2-derived vasodilator prostaglandin may contribute to the vascular adaptations after WD intake. Taken together, our data suggest that WD plays a detrimental role in the vasculature of non-senescent mice by increasing pro-inflammatory (iNOS) and pro-oxidative signaling pathways and may contribute to increase vascular senescence. In senescent vessels, however, WD triggers different intrinsic compensatory alterations which include increase of antioxidant activity by SOD1 and vasodilator prostaglandin production via COX-2. © 2013.

  7. Effects of Low-Load Exercise on Postneedling-Induced Pain After Dry Needling of Active Trigger Point in Individuals With Subacromial Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Jiménez-Gómez, Laura; Gómez-Ahufinger, Victoria; Palacios-Ceña, María; Arias-Buría, José L; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-05-05

    The application of dry needling usually is associated with postneedling-induced pain. A postneedling intervention reduce this adverse event is needed. To determine the effectiveness of low-load exercise on reducing postneedling-induced pain after dry needling of active trigger points (TrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle in subacromial pain syndrome. A 72-hour follow-up, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Urban hospitals. Individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (n = 90, 52% female, mean age: 35 ± 13 years) with active TrPs in the infraspinatus muscle. All individuals received dry needling into the infraspinatus active TrP. Then, they were divided randomly into an experimental group, which received a single bout of low-load exercise of shoulder muscles; a placebo group, which received inactive ultrasound for 10 minutes; and a control group, which did not receive any intervention. Numerical Pain Rating Scale (0-10 point) was administered postneedling, immediately postintervention (2 minutes), and 24, 48, and 72 hours after needling. Shoulder pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10) and disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand; Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) were assessed before and 72 hour after needling. The 5 × 3 analysis of covariance showed that the exercise group demonstrated a larger decrease in postneedling-induced pain immediately after (P = .001), 24 hours (P = .001), and 48 hours after (P = .006) than placebo or control groups. No differences were found at 72 hours (P = .03). Similar improvements in shoulder pain (P needling, irrespective of the treatment group. Low-load exercise was effective for reducing postneedling-induced pain on active TrPs in the infraspinatus muscle 24 and 48 hours after needling. The application of a postneedling intervention did not influence short-term pain and disability changes. To be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. Heme-induced ROS in Trypanosoma cruzi activates CaMKII-like that triggers epimastigote proliferation. One helpful effect of ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Pereira de Almeida Nogueira

    Full Text Available Heme is a ubiquitous molecule that has a number of physiological roles. The toxic effects of this molecule have been demonstrated in various models, based on both its pro-oxidant nature and through a detergent mechanism. It is estimated that about 10 mM of heme is released during blood digestion in the blood-sucking bug's midgut. The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, proliferates in the midgut of the insect vector; however, heme metabolism in trypanosomatids remains to be elucidated. Here we provide a mechanistic explanation for the proliferative effects of heme on trypanosomatids. Heme, but not other porphyrins, induced T. cruzi proliferation, and this phenomenon was accompanied by a marked increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation in epimastigotes when monitored by ROS-sensitive fluorescent probes. Heme-induced ROS production was time- and concentration-dependent. In addition, lipid peroxidation and the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE adducts with parasite proteins were increased in epimastigotes in the presence of heme. Conversely, the antioxidants urate and GSH reversed the heme-induced ROS. Urate also decreased parasite proliferation. Among several protein kinase inhibitors tested only specific inhibitors of CaMKII, KN93 and Myr-AIP, were able to abolish heme-induced ROS formation in epimastigotes leading to parasite growth impairment. Taken together, these data provide new insight into T. cruzi- insect vector interactions: heme, a molecule from the blood digestion, triggers epimastigote proliferation through a redox-sensitive signalling mechanism.

  9. Sialyl-glycoconjugates in cholesterol-rich microdomains of P388 cells are the triggers for apoptosis induced by Rana catesbeiana oocyte ribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y; Sugawara, S; Tatsuta, T; Hosono, M; Nitta, K; Fujii, Y; Kobayashi, H; Fujimura, T; Taka, H; Koide, Y; Hasan, I; Matsumoto, R; Yasumitsu, H; Kanaly, R A; Kawsar, S M A; Ozeki, Y

    2014-02-01

    SBL/RC-RNase was originally isolated from frog (Rana catesbeiana) oocytes and purified as a novel sialic acid-binding lectin (SBL) that displayed strong anti-cancer activity. SBL was later shown to be identical to a ribonuclease (RC-RNase) from oocytes of the same species. The administration of SBL/RC-RNase induced apoptosis (with nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation) in mouse leukemia P388 cells but did not kill umbilical vein endothelial or fibroblast cells derived from normal tissues. The cytotoxic activity of SBL/RC-RNase was inhibited by desialylation of P388 cells and/or the co-presence of free bovine submaxillary mucin. FACS analysis showed that SBL/RC-RNase was incorporated into cells after attachment to cholesterol-rich microdomains. Addition of the cholesterol remover methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced SBL/RC-RNase-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis occurred through the caspase-3 pathway following activation of caspase-8 by SBL/RC-RNase. A heat shock cognate protein (Hsc70) and a heat shock protein (Hsp70) (each 70 kDa) on the cell membrane were shown to bind to SBL/RC-RNase by mass spectrometric and flow cytometric analyses. Quercetin, an inhibitor of Hsc70 and Hsp70, significantly reduced SBL/RC-RNase-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that sialyl-glycoconjugates present in cholesterol-rich microdomains form complexes with Hsc70 or Hsp70 that act as triggers for SBL/RC-RNase to induce apoptosis through a pathway involving the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8.

  10. Pronounced expression of the lipolytic inhibitor G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2) in adipose tissue from brown bears (Ursus arctos) prior to hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Niels; Nielsen, Thomas S; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Viggers, Rikke; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Evans, Alina; Frøbert, Ole

    2016-04-01

    Prior to hibernation, the brown bear (Ursus arctos) exhibits unparalleled weight gain. Unlike humans, weight gain in bears is associated with lower levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFA) and increased insulin sensitivity. Understanding how free-ranging brown bears suppress lipolysis when gaining weight may therefore provide novel insight toward the development of human therapies. Blood and subcutaneous adipose tissue were collected from immobilized free-ranging brown bears (fitted with GPS-collars) during hibernation in winter and from the same bears during the active period in summer in Dalarna, Sweden. The expression of lipid droplet-associated proteins in adipose tissue was examined under the hypothesis that bears suppress lipolysis during summer while gaining weight by increased expression of negative regulators of lipolysis. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) expression did not differ between seasons, but in contrast, the expression of ATGL coactivator Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) was lower in summer. In addition, the expression of the negative regulators of lipolysis, G0S2 and cell-death inducing DNA fragmentation factor-a-like effector (CIDE)C markedly increased during summer. Free-ranging brown bears display potent upregulation of inhibitors of lipolysis in adipose tissue during summer. This is a potential mechanism for increased insulin sensitivity during weight gain and G0S2 may serve as a target to modulate insulin sensitivity.

  11. SGS3 Cooperates with RDR6 in Triggering Geminivirus-Induced Gene Silencing and in Suppressing Geminivirus Infection in Nicotiana Benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing has an important role in defending against virus infection in plants. Plants with the deficiency of RNA silencing components often show enhanced susceptibility to viral infections. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRs mediated-antiviral defense has a pivotal role in resistance to many plant viruses. In RDR6-mediated defense against viral infection, a plant-specific RNA binding protein, Suppressor of Gene Silencing 3 (SGS3, was also found to fight against some viruses in Arabidopsis. In this study, we showed that SGS3 from Nicotiana benthamiana (NbSGS3 is required for sense-RNA induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (S-PTGS and initiating sense-RNA-triggered systemic silencing. Further, the deficiency of NbSGS3 inhibited geminivirus-induced endogenous gene silencing (GIEGS and promoted geminivirus infection. During TRV-mediated NbSGS3 or N. benthamiana RDR6 (NbRDR6 silencing process, we found that their expression can be effectively fine-tuned. Plants with the knock-down of both NbSGS3 and NbRDR6 almost totally blocked GIEGS, and were more susceptible to geminivirus infection. These data suggest that NbSGS3 cooperates with NbRDR6 against GIEGS and geminivirus infection in N. benthamiana, which provides valuable information for breeding geminivirus-resistant plants.

  12. Bozepinib, a novel small antitumor agent, induces PKR-mediated apoptosis and synergizes with IFNα triggering apoptosis, autophagy and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchal JA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Juan Antonio Marchal,1,2 Esther Carrasco,1 Alberto Ramirez,1,3 Gema Jiménez,1,2 Carmen Olmedo,4 Macarena Peran,1,3 Ahmad Agil,5 Ana Conejo-García,6 Olga Cruz-López,6 Joaquin María Campos,6 María Ángel García4,7 1Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine Institute, Centre for Biomedical Research, 2Department of Human Anatomy and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, 3Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaén, Jaén, 4Experimental Surgery Research Unit, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada, 5Department of Pharmacology and Neurosciences Institute, Faculty of Medicine, 6Department of Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Granada, 7Department of Oncology, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, Granada, Spain Abstract: Bozepinib [(RS-2,6-dichloro-9-[1-(p-nitrobenzenesulfonyl-1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1- benzoxazepin-3-yl]-9H-purine] is a potent antitumor compound that is able to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we show that bozepinib also has antitumor activity in colon cancer cells, showing 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values lower than those described for breast cancer cells and suggesting great potential of this synthetic drug in the treatment of cancer. We identified that the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR is a target of bozepinib, being upregulated and activated by the drug. However, p53 was not affected by bozepinib, and was not necessary for induction of apoptosis in either breast or colon cancer cells. In addition, the efficacy of bozepinib was improved when combined with the interferon-alpha (IFNα cytokine, which enhanced bozepinib-induced apoptosis with involvement of protein kinase PKR. Moreover, we report here, for the first time, that in combined therapy, IFNα induces a clear process of autophagosome formation, and prior treatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, is able to

  13. Common Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Common Asthma Triggers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... t avoid the triggers. Some of the most common triggers are: Tobacco Smoke Tobacco smoke is unhealthy ...

  14. The role of endogenous H2S formation in reversible remodeling of lung tissue during hibernation in the Syrian hamster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talaei, Fatemeh; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Boerema, Ate S.; Schmidt, Martina; Henning, Rob H.

    During hibernation, small mammals alternate between periods of metabolic suppression and low body temperature ('torpor') and periods of full metabolic recovery with euthermic temperatures ('arousal'). Previously, we demonstrated marked structural remodeling of the lung during torpor, which is

  15. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rL-RVG) triggers autophagy and apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells by inducing ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xuefeng; Zhao, Yinghai; Zhang, Zhijian; Wang, Mubin; Li, Mi; Yan, Yulan

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that the recombinant avirulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota strain expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (rL-RVG) could induce autophagy and apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells. In the present study, we explored the upstream regulators, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that induce autophagy and apoptosis and the relationships among them. For this purpose, SGC-7901 and HGC cells were infected with rL-RVG. NDV LaSota strain and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were treated as the control groups. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to detect the expression of the ER stress-related proteins glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and the transcription factor GADD153 (CHOP), among others. The expression of beclin-1 and the conversion of light chain (LC) 3-I were used to determine the occurrence of autophagy, and flow cytometry (FCM) and western blotting were used to examine apoptosis-related protein expression. Transmission electron microscopy was also performed to monitor the ultrastructure of the cells. Moreover, small interfering (si) RNA was used to knock down CHOP expression. rL-RVG treatment increased the expression of ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78, CHOP, activating transcriptional factor 6 (ATF6), X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP-1), and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (p-eIF2α), in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and knockdown of CHOP reduced LC3-II conversion and beclin-1 expression. When ER stress was inhibited with 4-PBA, the expression of both autophagy-related proteins and apoptosis-related proteins markedly decreased. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3MA) decreased not only apoptosis-related protein expression but also ER stress-related protein expression. Moreover, we found that downregulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway by SP600125 reduced LC3-II conversion, beclin-1 expression and caspase-3 activation. Collectively, the

  16. Pilocarpine-induced seizures trigger differential regulation of microRNA-stability related genes in rat hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Erika R.; Higa, Guilherme S. V.; Santos, Bianca A.; de Sousa, Erica; Damico, Marcio V.; Walter, Lais T.; Morya, Edgard; Valle, Angela C.; Britto, Luiz R. G.; Kihara, Alexandre H.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptogenesis in the temporal lobe elicits regulation of gene expression and protein translation, leading to reorganization of neuronal networks. In this process, miRNAs were described as being regulated in a cell-specific manner, although mechanistics of miRNAs activity are poorly understood. The specificity of miRNAs on their target genes depends on their intracellular concentration, reflecting the balance of biosynthesis and degradation. Herein, we confirmed that pilocarpine application promptly (<30 min) induces status epilepticus (SE) as revealed by changes in rat electrocorticogram particularly in fast-beta range (21–30 Hz). SE simultaneously upregulated XRN2 and downregulated PAPD4 gene expression in the hippocampus, two genes related to miRNA degradation and stability, respectively. Moreover, SE decreased the number of XRN2-positive cells in the hilus, while reduced the number of PAPD4-positive cells in CA1. XRN2 and PAPD4 levels did not change in calretinin- and CamKII-positive cells, although it was possible to determine that PAPD4, but not XRN2, was upregulated in parvalbumin-positive cells, revealing that SE induction unbalances the accumulation of these functional-opposed proteins in inhibitory interneurons that directly innervate distinct domains of pyramidal cells. Therefore, we were able to disclose a possible mechanism underlying the differential regulation of miRNAs in specific neurons during epileptogenesis. PMID:26869208

  17. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Maestraggi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called “cytopathic hypoxia,” perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system (“immunoparalysis” translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  18. Skeletal Muscle and Lymphocyte Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Septic Shock Trigger ICU-Acquired Weakness and Sepsis-Induced Immunoparalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestraggi, Quentin; Lebas, Benjamin; Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Ludes, Pierre-Olivier; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Schneider, Francis; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard; Pottecher, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental events driving the pathological processes of septic shock-induced multiorgan failure (MOF) at the cellular and subcellular levels remain debated. Emerging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction as a critical factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated MOF. If macrocirculatory and microcirculatory dysfunctions undoubtedly participate in organ dysfunction at the early stage of septic shock, an intrinsic bioenergetic failure, sometimes called "cytopathic hypoxia," perpetuates cellular dysfunction. Short-term failure of vital organs immediately threatens patient survival but long-term recovery is also severely hindered by persistent dysfunction of organs traditionally described as nonvital, such as skeletal muscle and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In this review, we will stress how and why a persistent mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscles and PBMC could impair survival in patients who overcome the first acute phase of their septic episode. First, muscle wasting protracts weaning from mechanical ventilation, increases the risk of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and creates a state of ICU-acquired muscle weakness, compelling the patient to bed. Second, failure of the immune system ("immunoparalysis") translates into its inability to clear infectious foci and predisposes the patient to recurrent nosocomial infections. We will finally emphasize how mitochondrial-targeted therapies could represent a realistic strategy to promote long-term recovery after sepsis.

  19. Biochemical Foundations of Health and Energy Conservation in Hibernating Free-ranging Subadult Brown Bear Ursus arctos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welinder, Karen Gjesing; Hansen, Rasmus; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Brohus, Malene; Sønderkær, Mads; von Bergen, Martin; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Otto, Wolfgang; Lindahl, Tomas L; Arinell, Karin; Evans, Alina L; Swenson, Jon E; Revsbech, Inge G; Frøbert, Ole

    2016-10-21

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) hibernate for 5-7 months without eating, drinking, urinating, and defecating at a metabolic rate of only 25% of the summer activity rate. Nonetheless, they emerge healthy and alert in spring. We quantified the biochemical adaptations for hibernation by comparing the proteome, metabolome, and hematological features of blood from hibernating and active free-ranging subadult brown bears with a focus on conservation of health and energy. We found that total plasma protein concentration increased during hibernation, even though the concentrations of most individual plasma proteins decreased, as did the white blood cell types. Strikingly, antimicrobial defense proteins increased in concentration. Central functions in hibernation involving the coagulation response and protease inhibition, as well as lipid transport and metabolism, were upheld by increased levels of very few key or broad specificity proteins. The changes in coagulation factor levels matched the changes in activity measurements. A dramatic 45-fold increase in sex hormone-binding globulin levels during hibernation draws, for the first time, attention to its significant but unknown role in maintaining hibernation physiology. We propose that energy for the costly protein synthesis is reduced by three mechanisms as follows: (i) dehydration, which increases protein concentration without de novo synthesis; (ii) reduced protein degradation rates due to a 6 °C reduction in body temperature and decreased protease activity; and (iii) a marked redistribution of energy resources only increasing de novo synthesis of a few key proteins. The comprehensive global data identified novel biochemical strategies for bear adaptations to the extreme condition of hibernation and have implications for our understanding of physiology in general.

  20. ATLa, an aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 synthetic analog, prevents the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Vanessa; Valença, Samuel S; Farias-Filho, Francisco A; Molinaro, Raphael; Simões, Rafael L; Ferreira, Tatiana P T; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Hogaboam, Cory M; Kunkel, Steven L; Fierro, Iolanda M; Canetti, Claudio; Benjamim, Claudia F

    2009-05-01

    Despite an increase in the knowledge of mechanisms and mediators involved in pulmonary fibrosis, there are no successful therapeutics available. Lipoxins (LX) and their 15-epimers, aspirin-triggered LX (ATL), are endogenously produced eicosanoids with potent anti-inflammatory and proresolution effects. To date, few studies have been performed regarding their effect on pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, using C57BL/6 mice, we report that bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung fibrosis was prevented by the concomitant treatment with an ATL synthetic analog, ATLa, which reduced inflammation and matrix deposition. ATLa inhibited BLM-induced leukocyte accumulation and alveolar collapse as evaluated by histology and morphometrical analysis. Moreover, Sirius red staining and lung hydroxyproline content showed an increased collagen deposition in mice receiving BLM alone that was decreased upon treatment with the analog. These effects resulted in benefits to pulmonary mechanics, as ATLa brought to normal levels both lung resistance and compliance. Furthermore, the analog improved mouse survival, suggesting an important role for the LX pathway in the control of disease establishment and progression. One possible mechanism by which ATLa restrained fibrosis was suggested by the finding that BLM-induced myofibroblast accumulation/differentiation in the lung parenchyma was also reduced by both simultaneous and posttreatment with the analog (alpha-actin immunohistochemistry). Interestingly, ATLa posttreatment (4 days after BLM) showed similar inhibitory effects on inflammation and matrix deposition, besides the TGF-beta level reduction in the lung, reinforcing an antifibrotic effect. In conclusion, our findings show that LX and ATL can be considered as promising therapeutic approaches to lung fibrotic diseases.

  1. Triggering of the dsRNA sensors TLR3, MDA5, and RIG-I induces CD55 expression in synovial fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga N Karpus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD55 (decay-accelerating factor is a complement-regulatory protein highly expressed on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS. CD55 is also a ligand for CD97, an adhesion-type G protein-coupled receptor abundantly present on leukocytes. Little is known regarding the regulation of CD55 expression in FLS. METHODS: FLS isolated from arthritis patients were stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands. Transfection with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C and 5'-triphosphate RNA were used to activate the cytoplasmic double-stranded (dsRNA sensors melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I. CD55 expression, cell viability, and binding of CD97-loaded beads were quantified by flow cytometry. RESULTS: CD55 was expressed at equal levels on FLS isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis. CD55 expression in RA FLS was significantly induced by IL-1β and especially by the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C. Activation of MDA5 and RIG-I also enhanced CD55 expression. Notably, activation of MDA5 dose-dependently induced cell death, while triggering of TLR3 or RIG-I had a minor effect on viability. Upregulation of CD55 enhanced the binding capacity of FLS to CD97-loaded beads, which could be blocked by antibodies against CD55. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of dsRNA sensors enhances the expression of CD55 in cultured FLS, which increases the binding to CD97. Our findings suggest that dsRNA promotes the interaction between FLS and CD97-expressing leukocytes.

  2. Triptan-induced enhancement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion dural afferents underlies increased responsiveness to potential migraine triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Milena; Ossipov, Michael H; Wang, Ruizhong; Dussor, Gregory; Lai, Josephine; Meng, Ian D; Chichorro, Juliana; Andrews, John S; Rakhit, Suman; Maddaford, Shawn; Dodick, David; Porreca, Frank

    2010-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder often treated with triptans. Triptan overuse can lead to increased frequency of headache in some patients, a phenomenon termed medication overuse headache. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated or sustained triptan administration for several days can elicit persistent neural adaptations in trigeminal ganglion cells innervating the dura, prominently characterized by increased labelling of neuronal profiles for calcitonin gene related peptide. Additionally, triptan administration elicited a behavioural syndrome of enhanced sensitivity to surrogate triggers of migraine that was maintained for weeks following discontinuation of drug, a phenomenon termed 'triptan-induced latent sensitization'. Here, we demonstrate that triptan administration elicits a long-lasting increase in identified rat trigeminal dural afferents labelled for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the trigeminal ganglion. Cutaneous allodynia observed during the period of triptan administration was reversed by NXN-323, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Additionally, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition prevented environmental stress-induced hypersensitivity in the post-triptan administration period. Co-administration of NXN-323 with sumatriptan over several days prevented the expression of allodynia and enhanced sensitivity to stress observed following latent sensitization, but not the triptan-induced increased labelling of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in dural afferents. Triptan administration thus promotes increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in dural afferents, which is critical for enhanced sensitivity to environmental stress. These data provide a biological basis for increased frequency of headache following triptans and highlight the potential clinical utility of neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition in preventing or treating medication overuse headache.

  3. The limits of drought-induced rapid cold-hardening: extremely brief, mild desiccation triggers enhanced freeze-tolerance in Eurosta solidaginis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, J D; Lee, Richard E

    2015-02-01

    Rapid cold-hardening (RCH) is a highly conserved response in insects that induces physiological changes within minutes to hours of exposure to low temperature and provides protection from chilling injury. Recently, a similar response, termed drought-induced RCH, was described following as little as 6h of desiccation, producing a loss of less than 10% of fresh mass. In this study, we investigated the limits and mechanisms of this response in larvae of the goldenrod gall fly Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera, Tephritidae). The cold-hardiness of larvae increased markedly after as few as 2h of desiccation and a loss of less than 1% fresh mass, as organismal survival increased from 8% to 41% following exposure to -18 °C. Tissue-level effects of desiccation were observed within 1h, as 87% of midgut cells from desiccated larvae remained viable following freezing compared to 57% of controls. We also demonstrated that drought-induced RCH occurs independently of neuroendocrine input, as midgut tissue desiccated ex vivo displayed improved freeze-tolerance relative to control tissue (78-11% survival, respectively). Finally, though there was an increase in hemolymph osmolality beyond the expected effects of the osmo-concentration of solutes during dehydration, we determined that this increase was not due to the synthesis of glycerol, glucose, sorbitol, or trehalose. Our results indicate that E. solidaginis larvae are extremely sensitive to desiccation, which is a triggering mechanism for one or more physiological pathways that confer enhanced freeze-tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rhodocetin-αβ-induced neuropilin-1-cMet association triggers restructuring of matrix contacts in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Stephan; Ditkowski, Bartosz; Parrandier, Désirée; Roth, Lise; Augustin, Hellmut; Eble, Johannes A

    2013-03-01

    The snake venom component rhodocetin-αβ (RCαβ) stimulates endothelial cell motility in an α2β1 integrin-independent manner. We aimed to elucidate its cellular and molecular mechanisms. We identified neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) as a novel target of RCαβ by protein-chemical methods. RCαβ and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A avidly bind to Nrp1. Instead of acting as VEGF receptor 2 coreceptor, Nrp1 associates upon RCαβ treatment with cMet. Furthermore, cell-based ELISAs and kinase inhibitor studies showed that RCαβ induces phosphorylation of tyrosines 1234/1235 [corrected] and thus activation of cMet. Consequently, paxillin is phosphorylated at Y31, which is redistributed from streak-like focal adhesions to spot-like focal contacts at the cell perimeter, along with α2β1 integrin, thereby regulating cell-matrix interactions. Cortactin is abundant in the cell perimeter, where it is involved in the branching of the cortical actin network of lamellipodia, whereas tensile force-bearing actin stress fibers radiating from focal adhesions disappear together with zyxin, a focal adhesion marker, on RCαβ treatment. Our data demonstrate that (1) Nrp1 is a novel target for venom components, such as RCαβ; (2) Nrp1 coupled to cMet regulates the type of cell-matrix interactions in a manner involving paxillin phosphorylation; and (3) altered cell-matrix interactions determine endothelial cell migration and cellular force management.

  5. Increased oxidative stress and decreased activities of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase in the red blood cells of the hibernating black bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, A.; Sheikh, A.M.; Brown, W. Ted; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, animals undergo metabolic changes that result in reduced utilization of glucose and oxygen. Fat is known to be the preferential source of energy for hibernating animals. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) is an end product of fatty acid oxidation, and is generally used as an index of lipid peroxidation. We report here that peroxidation of lipids is increased in the plasma and in the membranes of red blood cells in black bears during hibernation. The plasma MDA content was about four fold higher during hibernation as compared to that during the active, non-hibernating state (P increased during hibernation (P increased oxidative stress, and have reduced activities of membrane-bound enzymes such as Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase. These changes can be considered part of the adaptive for survival process of metabolic depression. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Zinc(II) complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives as a new class of apoptosis inducers that trigger DNA damage-mediated p53 phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shenggui; Cao, Wenqiang; Yu, Lianling; Zheng, Wenjie; Li, Linlin; Fan, Cundong; Chen, Tianfeng

    2013-04-28

    In the present study, two zinc(II) complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives, Zn(bpbp)Cl2 (1) and [Zn(bpbp)2](ClO4)2·CH3CH2OH·H2O (2) (bpbp = 2,6-bis(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)pyridine), have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activities. The underlying molecular mechanisms through which they caused the cancer cell death were also elucidated. The complexes were identified as potent antiproliferative agents against a panel of five human cancer cell lines by comparing with cisplatin. Complex 2 demonstrated dose-dependent growth inhibition on MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells with IC50 at 2.9 μM. Despite this potency, the complexes possessed great selectivity between human cancer cells and normal cells. Induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 cells by complex 2 was evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 cell population, DNA fragmentation and nuclear condensation. Further investigation on intracellular mechanisms revealed that complex 2 was able to induce p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells by triggering DNA damage. On the basis of this evidence, we suggest that Zn(II) complexes containing bis-benzimidazole derivatives may be candidates for further evaluation as chemotherapeutic agents for human cancers.

  7. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  8. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    condensation induces mechanical stress and triggers shattering and chromothripsis in chromosomes or chromosome arms still undergoing DNA replication or repair in micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells, when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

  9. Identifying asthma triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  10. [Ornithine decarboxylase in mammalian organs and tissues at hibernation and artificial hypobiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinovich, O S; Aksenova, G E

    2013-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, EC 4.1.1.17.) is a short-lived and dynamically regulated enzyme of polyamines biosynthesis. Regulation of functional, metabolic and proliferative state of organs and tissues involves the modifications of the ODC enzymatic activity. The organ-specific changes in ODC activity were revealed in organs and tissues (liver, spleen, bone marrow, kidney, and intestinal mucosa) of hibernating mammals - squirrels Spermophilus undulates - during the hibernating season. At that, a positive correlation was detected between the decline and recovery of the specialized functions of organs and tissues and the respective modifications of ODC activity during hibernation bouts. Investigation of changes in ODC activity in organs and tissues of non-hibernating mammals under artificial hypobiosis showed that in Wistar rats immediately after exposure to hypothermia-hypoxia-hypercapnia (hypobiosis) the level of ODC activity was low in thymus, spleen, small intestine mucosa, neocortex, and liver. The most marked reduction in enzyme activity was observed in actively proliferating tissues: thymus, spleen, small intestine mucosa. In bone marrow of squirrels, while in a state of torpor, as well as in thymus of rats after exposure to hypothermia-hypoxia-hypercapnia, changes in the ODC activity correlated with changes in the rate of cell proliferation (by the criterion of cells distribution over cell cycle). The results obtained, along with the critical analysis of published data, indicate that the ODC enzyme is involved in biochemical adaptation of mammals to natural and artificial hypobiosis. A decline in the ODC enzymatic activity indicates a decline in proliferative, functional, and metabolic activity of organs and tissues of mammals (bone marrow, mucosa of small intestine, thymus, spleen, neocortex, liver, kidneys) when entering the state of hypobiosis.

  11. Insights into the regulation of muscle metabolism and growth in mice and hibernating grizzly bears

    OpenAIRE

    Mugahid (Megahed), Douaa (Doaa)

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays an important role in the regulation of muscle growth and metabolic signalling in striated muscle. Muscle disuse reduces mechanical input to the muscle, which results in a loss of muscle mass. Here I describe how titin's mechanically activated kinase domain affects muscle growth and metabolism via p62 and Akt signalling. I also demonstrate how changes in metabolic and growth signalling in hibernating grizzly bear help maintain muscle mass under conditio...

  12. Hibernation Site Philopatry in Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) in New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Zappalorti, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) are one of the few snakes that spend the winter in underground hibernacula that they excavate. We report the use of hibernacula by Pine Snakes from 1986 to 2012 in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. We determined whether philopatry to a specific hibernaculum varied as a function of age, sex, and location of the hibernaculum. Three hibernacula were occupied nearly continuously for 27 yr by 1 to 27 snakes each year. With known-age snakes (N = 120), captured mainly as hatchlings and 2-yr-olds, we found that 23% were always philopatric. Philopatry was related to age of last capture, sex, and capture location. Philopatry was higher for 1) females compared with males, 2) snakes at two solitary hibernacula compared with a hibernaculum complex, and 3) snakes 6 yr old or younger, compared with older snakes. Of hatchlings found hibernating, 24% used the same hibernation site the next year, and 38% were located at year 4 or later. The number of snakes that always used the same hibernation site declined with the age of last capture. Snakes that entered hibernacula as hatchlings were found more often than those that entered as 2-yr-olds. For the seven snakes that were 14 yr or older, females were found 64- 86 % of the time, whereas males were found 15 to 50% of the time. Understanding the behavior and habitat requirements of snakes during different seasons is central to life-history analysis and for conserving viable populations.

  13. Homocysteine homeostasis and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase expression in the brain of hibernating bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijian Zhang

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine is an important risk factor that increases cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease morbidity. In mammals, B vitamin supplementation can reduce homocysteine levels. Whether, and how, hibernating mammals, that essentially stop ingesting B vitamins, maintain homocysteine metabolism and avoid cerebrovascular impacts and neurodegeneration remain unclear. Here, we compare homocysteine levels in the brains of torpid bats, active bats and rats to identify the molecules involved in homocysteine homeostasis. We found that homocysteine does not elevate in torpid brains, despite declining vitamin B levels. At low levels of vitamin B6 and B12, we found no change in total expression level of the two main enzymes involved in homocysteine metabolism (methionine synthase and cystathionine β-synthase, but a 1.85-fold increase in the expression of the coenzyme-independent betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT. BHMT expression was observed in the amygdala of basal ganglia and the cerebral cortex where BHMT levels were clearly elevated during torpor. This is the first report of BHMT protein expression in the brain and suggests that BHMT modulates homocysteine in the brains of hibernating bats. BHMT may have a neuroprotective role in the brains of hibernating mammals and further research on this system could expand our biomedical understanding of certain cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disease processes.

  14. Hibernation Site Philopatry in Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) in New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Zappalorti, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) are one of the few snakes that spend the winter in underground hibernacula that they excavate. We report the use of hibernacula by Pine Snakes from 1986 to 2012 in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. We determined whether philopatry to a specific hibernaculum varied as a function of age, sex, and location of the hibernaculum. Three hibernacula were occupied nearly continuously for 27 yr by 1 to 27 snakes each year. With known-age snakes (N = 120), captured mainly as hatchlings and 2-yr-olds, we found that 23% were always philopatric. Philopatry was related to age of last capture, sex, and capture location. Philopatry was higher for 1) females compared with males, 2) snakes at two solitary hibernacula compared with a hibernaculum complex, and 3) snakes 6 yr old or younger, compared with older snakes. Of hatchlings found hibernating, 24% used the same hibernation site the next year, and 38% were located at year 4 or later. The number of snakes that always used the same hibernation site declined with the age of last capture. Snakes that entered hibernacula as hatchlings were found more often than those that entered as 2-yr-olds. For the seven snakes that were 14 yr or older, females were found 64– 86 % of the time, whereas males were found 15 to 50% of the time. Understanding the behavior and habitat requirements of snakes during different seasons is central to life-history analysis and for conserving viable populations. PMID:27011392

  15. Subtropical mouse-tailed bats use geothermally heated caves for winter hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Eran; Plotnik, Brit; Amichai, Eran; Braulke, Luzie J; Landau, Shmulik; Yom-Tov, Yoram; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2015-04-07

    We report that two species of mouse-tailed bats (Rhinopoma microphyllum and R. cystops) hibernate for five months during winter in geothermally heated caves with stable high temperature (20°C). While hibernating, these bats do not feed or drink, even on warm nights when other bat species are active. We used thermo-sensitive transmitters to measure the bats' skin temperature in the natural hibernacula and open flow respirometry to measure torpid metabolic rate at different ambient temperatures (Ta, 16-35°C) and evaporative water loss (EWL) in the laboratory. Bats average skin temperature at the natural hibernacula was 21.7 ± 0.8°C, and no arousals were recorded. Both species reached the lowest metabolic rates around natural hibernacula temperatures (20°C, average of 0.14 ± 0.01 and 0.16 ± 0.04 ml O2 g(-1) h(-1) for R. microphyllum and R. cystops, respectively) and aroused from torpor when Ta fell below 16°C. During torpor the bats performed long apnoeas (14 ± 1.6 and 16 ± 1.5 min, respectively) and had a very low EWL. We hypothesize that the particular diet of these bats is an adaptation to hibernation at high temperatures and that caves featuring high temperature and humidity during winter enable these species to survive this season on the northern edge of their world distribution.

  16. Insulin secretion in the hibernating edible dormouse (Glis glis): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex, C; Tahri, A; Hoo-Paris, R; Sutter, B C

    1984-01-01

    Plasma glucose and insulin have been studied during lethargy and spontaneous arousal of hibernating edible dormouse. During lethargy blood glucose was low while plasma insulin remained at the same level as in other seasons. Plasma glucose and insulin did not fluctuate along the phase of lethargy. During spontaneous arousal plasma insulin rose strongly from the 17 degrees C stage, reaching the higher values at 26 degrees C while blood glucose was only 85 mg/100 ml, then decreased at 37 degrees C. The effect of glucose and temperature on insulin secretion was studied using perfused pancreas preparation from hibernating edible dormice. During the rewarming of the edible dormouse pancreas the insulin release did not occur in response to the absolute extracellular glucose level but occurred in response to a B cell membrane phenomenon which was dependent on the changing rate of glucose level. The effect of glucose and temperature on insulin secretion from perfused pancreas was compared between edible dormouse and homeotherm permanent, the rat. The B cell response to glucose of the dormouse pancreas increased up to 15 degrees C whereas that of the rat only from 25 degrees C. The dormouse insulin secretion reached a peak value at the 30 degrees C of temperature, whereas that of the rat progressively increased until 37 degrees C. These results showed that some biochemical adjustment or process of acclimatization took place in the B cells of the hibernators.

  17. Chilled frogs are hot: hibernation and reproduction of the Endangered mountain yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Frank E.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Lemm, Jeffrey M.; Fisher, Robert N.; Clark, Rulon W.

    2015-01-01

    In the face of the sixth great extinction crisis, it is imperative to establish effective breeding protocols for amphibian conservation breeding programs. Captive efforts should not proceed by trial and error, nor should they jump prematurely to assisted reproduction techniques, which can be invasive, difficult, costly, and, at times, counterproductive. Instead, conservation practitioners should first look to nature for guidance, and replicate key conditions found in nature in the captive environment, according to the ecological and behavioral requirements of the species. We tested the effect of a natural hibernation regime on reproductive behaviors and body condition in the Endangered mountain yellow-legged frog Rana muscosa. Hibernation had a clear positive effect on reproductive behavior, manifesting in vocal advertisement signaling, female receptivity, amplexus, and oviposition. These behaviors are critical components of courtship that lead to successful reproduction. Our main finding was that captive R. muscosa require a hibernation period for successful reproduction, as only hibernated females produced eggs and only hibernated males successfully fertilized eggs. Although hibernation also resulted in a reduced body condition, the reduction appeared to be minimal with no associated mortality. The importance of hibernation for reproduction is not surprising, since it is a major component of the conditions that R. muscosa experiences in the wild. Other amphibian conservation breeding programs can also benefit from a scientific approach that tests the effect of natural ecological conditions on reproduction. This will ensure that captive colonies maximize their role in providing genetic reservoirs for assurance and reintroduction efforts.

  18. Telomere dynamics in free-living edible dormice (Glis glis): the impact of hibernation and food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelzl, Franz; Cornils, Jessica S; Smith, Steve; Moodley, Yoshan; Ruf, Thomas

    2016-08-15

    We studied the impact of hibernation and food supply on relative telomere length (RTL), an indicator for aging and somatic maintenance, in free-living edible dormice. Small hibernators such as dormice have ∼50% higher maximum longevity than non-hibernators. Increased longevity could theoretically be due to prolonged torpor directly slowing cellular damage and RTL shortening. However, although mitosis is arrested in mammals at low body temperatures, recent evidence points to accelerated RTL shortening during periodic re-warming (arousal) from torpor. Therefore, we hypothesized that these arousals during hibernation should have a negative effect on RTL. Here, we show that RTL was shortened in all animals over the course of ∼1 year, during which dormice hibernated for 7.5-11.4 months. The rate of periodic arousals, rather than the time spent euthermic during the hibernation season, was the best predictor of RTL shortening. This finding points to negative effects on RTL of the transition from low torpor to high euthermic body temperature and metabolic rate during arousals, possibly because of increased oxidative stress. The animals were, however, able to elongate their telomeres during the active season, when food availability was increased by supplemental feeding in a year of low natural food abundance. We conclude that in addition to their energetic costs, periodic arousals also lead to accelerated cellular damage in terms of RTL shortening. Although dormice are able to counteract and even over-compensate for the negative effects of hibernation, restoration of RTL appears to be energetically costly.

  19. Aconitine-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload causes arrhythmia and triggers apoptosis through p38 MAPK signaling pathway in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Hong; Meng, Xiang-bao [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Hu, Jin; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Bo [Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences of Jilin Province, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Wang, Min [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Xu, Hui-bo, E-mail: xhb_6505@163.com [Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences of Jilin Province, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Sun, Xiao-bo, E-mail: sun_xiaobo163@163.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)

    2014-08-15

    {sup 2+} overload causes arrhythmia in rats. • Aconitine induces Ca{sup 2+} overload through the activation of L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels. • Aconitine-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload triggers apoptotic responses in vitro and in vivo. • Aconitine promotes apoptotic development via activation of P38 MAPK.

  20. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  1. It takes two to tango: Phagocyte and lymphocyte numbers in a small mammalian hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenstein, Nadine; Langer, Franz; Stefanski, Volker; Fietz, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Immunity is energetically costly and competes for resources with other physiological body functions, which may result in trade-offs that impair fitness during demanding situations. Endocrine mediators, particularly stress hormones, play a central role in these relationships and directly impact leukocyte differentials. To determine the effects of external stressors, energetic restraints and competing physiological functions on immune parameters and their relevance for fitness, we investigated leukocyte profiles during the active season of a small obligate hibernator, the edible dormouse (Glis glis), in five different study sites in south-western Germany. The highly synchronized yearly cycle of this species and the close adaptation of its life history to the irregular abundance of food resources provide a natural experiment to elucidate mechanisms underlying variations in fitness parameters. In contrast to previous studies on hibernators, that showed an immediate recovery of all leukocyte subtypes upon emergence, our study revealed that hibernation results in depleted phagocyte (neutrophils and monocytes) stores that recovered only slowly. As the phenomenon of low phagocyte counts was even more pronounced at the beginning of a low food year and primarily immature neutrophils were present in the blood upon emergence, preparatory mechanisms seem to determine the regeneration of phagocytes before hibernation is terminated. Surprisingly, the recovery of phagocytes thereafter took several weeks, presumably due to energetic restrictions. This impaired first line of defense coincides with lowest survival probabilities during the annual cycle of our study species. Reduced survival could furthermore be linked to drastic increases in the P/L ratio (phagocytes/lymphocytes), an indicator of physiological stress, during reproduction. On the other hand, moderate augmentations in the P/L ratio occurred during periods of low food availability and were associated with increased

  2. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  3. 达乌尔黄鼠冬眠期间体温的变化和冬眠模式%Hibernation patterns and changes of body temperature in Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus) during hibernation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明; 邢昕; 管淑君; 赵岩; 王子英; 王德华

    2011-01-01

    用植入式半导体温度记录元件iButton记录了达乌尔黄鼠冬眠季节及其前后的体温,分析了其冬眠模式和体温调节特点.结果显示:1)实验室条件下,达乌尔黄鼠冬眠季节长短的个体差异较大,可以分成深冬眠型、少冬眠型和不冬眠型三种类型;2)达乌尔黄鼠在冬季表现出深冬眠阵(最低体温Tbmin< 20℃,冬眠阵的持续时间BD>24 h)、短冬眠阵(Tbmin<20℃,BD≤24h)和日眠阵(Tbmin≥20℃,BD≤24 h)3种类型,最低体温分别为2.54℃ ±0.35℃、10.05℃±1.97℃和23.09℃±0.40℃,彼此之间差异显著.日眠阵阵间产热阶段的最高体温为38.09℃±0.17℃,高于深冬眠阵(37.31℃±0.15℃)和短冬眠阵(37.22℃±0.31℃);3)深冬眠阵和日眠阵中最低体温均与环境温度显著相关,冬眠过程中的最低体温为-2.43℃;4)深冬眠过程中,多数个体可以短时(≤3h)耐受-2℃~0℃的低温,激醒或继续维持深冬眠,无致死效应,但长时间(15 h)或过度低温(-5℃以下)的条件下,深冬眠的达乌尔黄鼠被激醒(70%)或死亡(30%),不能持续冬眠;5)入眠前10 d的体温日波动幅度显著增加,高于出眠后的日体温波动,且多数个体入眠前出现体温的“试降”.表明,冬眠前入眠的准备阶段,动物的体温调节已开始发生变化;冬季日眠的调节机制可能与冬眠不同;短时-2℃~0℃的低体温对深冬眠的达乌尔黄鼠无致死效应.%In order to understand the patterns of body temperature changes and hibernation, we used iButtons to monitor body temperatures (Tb) in a typical hibernator, the Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus) , before, during, and after their hibernation period. Hibernation patterns and thermoregulation characteristics were analyzed. In the laboratory, there were great individual differences in the length of the hibernation time. Three types of torpor were distinguished, deep hibernation, short hibernation, and no

  4. Sympathetic-induced changes in discharge rate and spike-triggered average twitch torque of low-threshold motor units in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Farina, Dario

    2008-11-15

    Animal and in vitro studies have shown that the sympathetic nervous system modulates the contractility of skeletal muscle fibres, which may require adjustments in the motor drive to the muscle in voluntary contractions. In this study, these mechanisms were investigated in the tibialis anterior muscle of humans during sympathetic activation induced by the cold pressor test (CPT; left hand immersed in water at 4 degrees C). In the first experiment, 11 healthy men performed 20 s isometric contractions at 10% of the maximal torque, before, during and after the CPT. In the second experiment, 12 healthy men activated a target motor unit at the minimum stable discharge rate for 5 min in the same conditions as in experiment 1. Intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) signals and torque were recorded and used to assess the motor unit discharge characteristics (experiment 1) and spike-triggered average twitch torque (experiment 2). CPT increased the diastolic blood pressure and heart rate by (mean +/- S.D.) 18 +/- 9 mmHg and 4.7 +/- 6.5 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01), respectively. In experiment 1, motor unit discharge rate increased from 10.4 +/- 1.0 pulses s(-1) before to 11.1 +/- 1.4 pulses s(-1) (P < 0.05) during the CPT. In experiment 2, the twitch half-relaxation time decreased by 15.8 +/- 9.3% (P < 0.05) during the CPT with respect to baseline. These results provide the first evidence of an adrenergic modulation of contractility of muscle fibres in individual motor units in humans, under physiological sympathetic activation.

  5. Mammals Hibernate and Its Influencing Factors%哺乳动物的冬眠及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖雷

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the phenomenon of mammals hibernate in winter and its influence factors, make the mammals hibernate process in the behavior, the changes of physiological aspects can be better state, the definition,behavior and physical performance during the period of winter hibernation and influence factors of hibernation were expounded according to the research results of the hibernate both at home and abroad. The result showed that the behavior of mammals hibernate in winter was a combined action by behavior,physiology,genetic factors and so on. The'main factors that affecting mammals hibernate were environment temperature, temperature changes of themselves, nutrition factors and their own physical condition. Moreover, the significance of awakening during hibernate and the effect of hibernate on organs and gland of animals were elaborated.%为了明确哺乳动物冬眠的现象和导致其发生冬眠的影响因素,使哺乳动物在冬眠过程中的行为和生理等方面发生的变化能得以更好地阐述。结合国内外关于冬眠的研究成果,着重阐述了冬眠的定义、冬眠期间的行为和生理表现以及影响冬眠的因素。结果表明:哺乳动物的冬眠是行为、生理和遗传等多因素共同作用的结果,环境温度、自身体温变化、营养因素和自身生理调节是影响哺乳动物冬眠的主要因素。并阐述了冬眠间觉醒的意义以及冬眠对动物器官和腺体的影响。

  6. Asthma triggers (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... things make your asthma worse. These are called asthma "triggers". Avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. The most common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors ...

  7. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Asthma Contact Us Share Asthma Triggers: Gain Control Breathing Freely: Controlling Asthma Triggers This video features ... Air Quality: Biological Pollutants Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma Top of Page Molds About Molds ...

  8. Repeated functional convergent effects of NaV1.7 on acid insensitivity in hibernating mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tong-Zuo; Li, Gong-Hua; He, Kai; Huang, Jing-Fei; Jiang, Xue-Long; Murphy, Robert W; Shi, Peng

    2014-02-07

    Hibernating mammals need to be insensitive to acid in order to cope with conditions of high CO2; however, the molecular basis of acid tolerance remains largely unknown. The African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) and hibernating mammals share similar environments and physiological features. In the naked mole-rat, acid insensitivity has been shown to be conferred by the functional motif of the sodium ion channel NaV1.7. There is now an opportunity to evaluate acid insensitivity in other taxa. In this study, we tested for functional convergence of NaV1.7 in 71 species of mammals, including 22 species that hibernate. Our analyses revealed a functional convergence of amino acid sequences, which occurred at least six times independently in mammals that hibernate. Evolutionary analyses determined that the convergence results from both parallel and divergent evolution of residues in the functional motif. Our findings not only identify the functional molecules responsible for acid insensitivity in hibernating mammals, but also open new avenues to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of acid insensitivity in mammals.

  9. The KLOE trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, E.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B. E-mail: barbara.sciascia@romal.infn.it; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    A double-level trigger system has been developed for the KLOE experiment. Custom electronics asserts a trigger in a 2 {mu}s decision time. The decision is based on the combined information of the electromagnetic calorimeter and the drift chamber. The entire trigger system is continuously monitored, and data flowing from the trigger system have allowed both an efficient online monitoring of the detector and an online luminosity measurement.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu; Jensen, Frank B; Thiel, Bonnie; Evans, Alina L; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Stuehr, Dennis J; Kevil, Christopher G; Fago, Angela

    2014-08-01

    During winter hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) lie in dens for half a year without eating while their basal metabolism is largely suppressed. To understand the underlying mechanisms of metabolic depression in hibernation, we measured type and content of blood metabolites of two ubiquitous inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood cells of hibernating bears. In contrast, circulating nitrite and erythrocytic S-nitrosation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, taken as markers of NO metabolism, did not change appreciably. Our findings reveal that remodeling of H2S metabolism and enhanced intracellular GSH levels are hallmarks of the aerobic metabolic suppression of hibernating bears.

  11. Thermoregulation and energetics in hibernating black bears: metabolic rate and the mystery of multi-day body temperature cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Barnes, Brian M

    2015-05-01

    Black bears overwintering in outdoor hibernacula in Alaska decrease metabolism to as low as 25 % basal rates, while core body temperature (T(b)) decreases from 37 to 38 °C to a mid-hibernation average of 33 °C. T b develops cycles of 1.6-7.3 days length within a 30-36 °C range, with no circadian component. We do not know the mechanism or function underlying behind the T(b) cycles, although bears avoid T(b) of thermoregulation. More intense shivering in the rising phase of cycles may contribute to the prevention of muscle disuse atrophy. Bears hibernating in cold conditions use more energy during hibernation than in warmer conditions. At T den below lower critical temperature, no extra energy expenditure results from T b cycling compared to keeping a stable T(b.)

  12. Database Middleware Based on Web Services and Hibernate%基于 Web Services 和 Hibernate 技术的数据库中间件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚福影; 卫文学

    2015-01-01

    For the management of some heterogeneous databases in different network is more flexible and convenient, the paper studies and analyzes the common database middleware, Hibernate framework and Web Service technology.Then aiming at the shortcomings of database middleware, the paper puts forward a new database middleware that was designed with Web Service technology and Hibernate framework.This scheme can transparently access databases without changing the original data storage method, ensure data integrity, consistency and security, and has higher development efficiency.%为了能够使不同网络中异构数据库的分布式数据管理更加灵活和简便,本文研究和分析常用的数据库中间件技术以及目前流行的开源ORM框架Hibernate和Web Service技术。针对目前数据库中间件不足之处,提出利用Web Service技术和Hibernate框架设计一种新的数据库访问中间件。该方案能在不改变原始数据的存储和管理方式下,较好地实现不同网络中异构数据源统一透明访问,保证数据完整性、一致性和安全性,具有较高的开发效率。

  13. Selective mobilization of saturated fatty acids in isolated adipocytes of hibernating 13-lined ground squirrels Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Armstrong, Christopher; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Staples, James F

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acids are not mobilized from adipocyte triacylglycerols uniformly but rather some are preferentially mobilized while others are preferentially retained. In many vertebrate species, the pattern of differential mobilization is determined by the physical and chemical properties of each fatty acid. Fatty acids with shorter chains and more double bonds tend to be more readily mobilized than others, a pattern observed both in whole-animal studies and in isolated adipocytes. Several hibernating species seem to break this pattern, however, and retain 18:2ω6 (linoleic acid) while mobilizing saturated fatty acids such as 18:0. We sought to confirm this pattern in adipocytes of a hibernator, the 13-lined ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, and to investigate mobilization patterns for the first time at hibernation temperature. We isolated adipocytes from summer active and winter torpid squirrels and incubated them with 1 μM norepinephrine at 4°C (7 h) and 37°C (90 min). We measured the proportion of each fatty acid in the adipose tissue and in the buffer at the end of incubation. Patterns of mobilization were similar in both seasons and incubation temperatures. Saturated fatty acids (18:0 and 16:0) were highly mobilized relative to the average, while some unsaturated fatty acids (notably, 18:1ω9 and 18:2ω6) were retained. We conclude that hibernators have unique mechanisms at the level of adipose tissue that preferentially mobilize saturated fatty acids. Additionally, we found that adipocytes from hibernating squirrels produced more glycerol than those from summer squirrels (regardless of temperature), indicating a higher lipolytic capacity in hibernating squirrels.

  14. Membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition regulates cardiac SERCA activity in a hibernator, the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Giroud

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA have strong effects on hibernation and daily torpor. Increased dietary uptake of PUFA of the n-6 class, particularly of Linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6 lengthens torpor bout duration and enables animals to reach lower body temperatures (T(b and metabolic rates. As previously hypothesized, this well-known influence of PUFA may be mediated via effects of the membrane fatty acid composition on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA in the heart of hibernators. We tested the hypotheses that high proportions of n-6 PUFA in general, or specifically high proportions of LA (C18:2 n-6 in SR phospholipids (PL should be associated with increased cardiac SERCA activity, and should allow animals to reach lower minimum T(b in torpor. We measured activity of SERCA from hearts of hibernating and non-hibernating Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus in vitro at 35 °C. Further, we determined the PL fatty acid composition of the SR membrane of these hearts. We found that SERCA activity strongly increased as the proportion of LA in SR PL increased but was negatively affected by the content of Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3. SR PL from hibernating hamsters were characterized by high proportions of LA and low proportions of DHA. As a result, SERCA activity was significantly higher during entrance into torpor and in torpor compared to inter-bout arousal. Also, animals with increased SERCA activity reached lower T(b during torpor. Interestingly, a subgroup of hamsters which never entered torpor but remained euthermic throughout winter displayed a phenotype similar to animals in summer. This was characterized by lower proportions of LA and increased proportions of DHA in SR membranes, which is apparently incompatible with torpor. We conclude that the PUFA composition of SR membranes affects cardiac function via modulating SERCA activity, and hence determines the minimum T(b tolerated by hibernators.

  15. Water-fat MRI in a hibernator reveals seasonal growth of white and brown adipose tissue without cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCannell, Amanda; Sinclair, Kevin; Friesen-Waldner, Lannette; McKenzie, Charles A; Staples, James F

    2017-03-21

    Obligate hibernators, such as ground squirrels, display circannual patterns which persist even under constant laboratory conditions, suggesting that they are regulated by endogenous rhythms. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is important for thermogenesis during periodic arousals from hibernation when core body temperature rises spontaneously from 5 to 37 °C. In most small eutherians BAT growth requires several weeks of cold exposure. We hypothesized that in the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), a hibernator, BAT growth is regulated, in part, by an endogenous rhythm and we predicted that this growth would precede the hibernation season without cold exposure. We tested this prediction using repeated water-fat magnetic resonance imaging over a year, including the hibernation season. Thoracic BAT depots increased in volume from spring through autumn even though animals were housed at ~22 °C. Subsequent cold exposure (5 °C) enlarged the thoracic BAT further. The fat fraction of this tissue fell significantly during the period of peak growth, indicating relative increases in non-triglyceride components, perhaps mitochondria or vasculature. We also found that the proportion of the body consisting of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased steadily from spring through autumn, and fell throughout hibernation, mirroring changes in body mass. Unlike BAT, WAT fat fractions remained constant (near 90%) throughout the year. Future studies will evaluate the significance of photoperiod and cold exposure on the growth of these tissues. We also found tissue with a fat fraction characteristic of BAT in the head near the eyes, a potentially novel discovery that requires further confirmation.

  16. Effects of Multiple Routes of Cadmium Exposure on the Hibernation Success of the American Toad (Bufo americanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S.M.; Little, E.E.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of multiple routes of cadmium exposure on juvenile American toads (Bufo americanus) were evaluated using environmentally relevant concentrations. During or after exposure, toads were individually hibernated for 172 days at approximately 4??C. The following experiments were conducted: (1) dermal exposure (hibernation in soil contaminated with up to 120 ??g Cd/ g (dry weight)); (2) injection exposure (single injection with cadmium to achieve a maximum whole-body nominal concentration of 3 ??g Cd/g (wet weight) 12 days before hibernation in uncontaminated soil); and, (3) oral exposure (feeding with mealworms containing ???16 ??g Cd/g (dry weight) for 50 days before hibernation in uncontaminated soil)., We hypothesized that sublethal levels of cadmium would become lethal during hibernation because of combined chemical and cold stress. No prehibernation mortality occurred in the injection and oral exposure studies. There was a significant treatment effect on whole-body cadmium concentration in toads orally or dermally exposed and on percent of cadmium retention in toads orally exposed. There was also a trend of increased time-to-burrowing and more toads partially buried with greater cadmium concentration in the dermal study, which indicated avoidance. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were found among cadmium treatments in hibernation survival, percent of mass loss, or locomotor performance. However, toads fed mealworms averaging 4.7 ??g Cd/g (dry weight) had only 56% survival compared with 100% survival for controls. Although our results suggest that environmentally relevant levels of cadmium do not pose a great risk to American toads, factors such as soil type or prey species may increase cadmium bioavailability, and other amphibian species may be more sensitive to cadmium than B. americanus.

  17. Stress-induced comenditic trachyte effusion triggered by trachybasalt intrusion: multidisciplinary study of the AD 1761 eruption at Terceira Island (Azores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, A.; Zanon, V.; de Groot, L. V.; Hipólito, A.; Di Chiara, A.; Self, S.

    2016-03-01

    The AD 1761 eruption on Terceira was the only historical subaerial event on the island and one of the last recorded in the Azores. The eruption occurred along the fissure zone that crosses the island and produced a trachybasalt lava flow and scoria cones. Small comenditic trachyte lava domes (known as Mistérios Negros) were also thought by some to have formed simultaneously on the eastern flank of Santa Bárbara Volcano. Following a multidisciplinary approach, we combined geological mapping, paleomagnetic, petrographic, mineral and whole-rock geochemical and structural analyses to study this eruption. The paleomagnetic dating method compared geomagnetic vectors (directions and intensities) recorded by both the AD 1761 lava flow and Mistérios Negros domes and revealed that the two events were indeed coeval. Based on new data and interpretation of historical records, we have accordingly reconstructed the AD 1761 eruptive dynamics and distinguished three phases: (1) a precursory phase characterized by decreased degassing in the fumarolic field of Pico Alto Volcano and a gradual increase of seismic activity, which marked the intrusion of trachybasalt magma; (2) a first eruptive phase that started with phreatic explosions on the eastern flank of Santa Bárbara Volcano, followed by the inconspicuous effusion of comenditic trachyte (66 wt% SiO2), forming a WNW-ESE-oriented chain of lava domes; and (3) a second eruptive phase on the central part of the fissure zone, where a Hawaiian to Strombolian-style eruption formed small scoria cones (E-W to ENE-WSW-oriented) and a trachybasalt lava flow (50 wt% SiO2) which buried 27 houses in Biscoitos village. Petrological analyses show that the two batches of magma were emitted independently without evidence of interaction. We envisage that the dome-forming event was triggered by local stress changes induced by intrusion of the trachybasalt dyke along the fissure zone, which created tensile stress conditions that promoted ascent

  18. Miocárdio hibernante: uma realidade clínica Hibernant myocardium: a clinical reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Marin-Neto

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available O conceito da hibernação miocárdica implica a ocorrência de disfunção ventricular crônica, potencialmente reversível, causada por dissinergia regional, dependente de isquemia prolongada. Não tem fisiopatologia elucidada, em parte porque não existem modelos experimentais satisfatórios para seu estudo. Diversos métodos são capazes de demonstrar viabilidade miocárdica nas regiões que não exibem capacidade contrátil basal. O desmascaramento da hibernação nesses territórios pode ser feito mediante demonstração de reserva contrátil, de funcionamento normal da membrana celular, ou de metabolismo preservado. A correta identificação de miocárdio hibernante reveste-se de especial significado clínico, por suas implicações prognósticas quanto a intervenções de revascularização miocárdica, destinadas a reabilitar a função ventricular em muitos pacientes coronariopatas crônicos.Myocardial hibernation is believed to occur in ventricular dyssynergic regions chronically deprived of coronary flow enough to warrant the preservation of contractile function. Pathophysiology of this condition remains largely unclear, mainly because good experimental models for its study are still lacking. Various methods can be clinically employed to detect hibernation in patients with chronic ventricular dysfunction. These methods use the principle of unmasking contractile reserve, or are based on the demonstration of preserved membrane function or myocardium metabolism in the dyssynergic regions. The correct identification of viable hibernating myocardium is crucial in the process of deciding which coronary disease patients would potentially benefit from revascularization procedures.

  19. The histaminergic system in the brain: structural characteristics and changes in hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panula, P; Karlstedt, K; Sallmen, T; Peitsaro, N; Kaslin, J; Michelsen, K A; Anichtchik, O; Kukko-Lukjanov, T; Lintunen, M

    2000-02-01

    Histaminergic neurons in adult vertebrate brain are confined to the posterior hypothalamic area, where they are comprised of scattered groups of neurons referred to as the tuberomammillary nucleus. Histamine regulates hormonal functions, sleep, food intake, thermoregulation and locomotor activity, for example. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, histamine was detected only in the brain, where also the histamine synthesizing enzyme L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) was expressed. It is possible that histamine has first evolved as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We established sensitive quantitative in situ hybridization methods for histamine H(1) and H(2) receptors and HDC, to study the modulation of brain histaminergic system under pathophysiological conditions. A transient increase in H(1) receptor expression was seen in the dentate gyrus and striatum after a single injection of kainic acid, a glutamate analog. H(1) antagonists are known to increase duration of convulsions, and increased brain histamine is associated with reduced convulsions in animal models of epilepsy. No HDC mRNA was detected in brain vessels by in situ hybridization, which suggests lack of histamine synthesis by brain endothelial cells. This was verified by lack of HDC mRNA in a rat brain endothelial cell line, RBE4 cells. Both H(1) and H(2) receptor mRNA was found in this cell line, and the expression of both receptors was downregulated by dexamethasone. The findings are in agreement with the concept that histamine regulates blood-brain barrier permeability through H(1) and H(2) receptor mediated mechanisms. Hibernation is characterized by a drastic reduction of central functions. The activity of most transmitter systems is maintained at a very low level. Surprisingly, histamine levels and turnover were clearly elevated in hibernating ground squirrels, and the density of histamine-containing fibers was higher than in euthermic animals. It is possible that histamine actively

  20. Pre-hibernation performances of the OSIRIS cameras onboard the Rosetta spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, S.; La Forgia, F.; Da Deppo, V.; Lazzarin, M.; Bertini, I.; Ferri, F.; Pajola, M.; Barbieri, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, C.; Tubiana, C.; Küppers, M.; Fornasier, S.; Jorda, L.; Sierks, H.

    2015-02-01

    Context. The ESA cometary mission Rosetta was launched in 2004. In the past years and until the spacecraft hibernation in June 2011, the two cameras of the OSIRIS imaging system (Narrow Angle and Wide Angle Camera, NAC and WAC) observed many different sources. On 20 January 2014 the spacecraft successfully exited hibernation to start observing the primary scientific target of the mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Aims: A study of the past performances of the cameras is now mandatory to be able to determine whether the system has been stable through the time and to derive, if necessary, additional analysis methods for the future precise calibration of the cometary data. Methods: The instrumental responses and filter passbands were used to estimate the efficiency of the system. A comparison with acquired images of specific calibration stars was made, and a refined photometric calibration was computed, both for the absolute flux and for the reflectivity of small bodies of the solar system. Results: We found a stability of the instrumental performances within ±1.5% from 2007 to 2010, with no evidence of an aging effect on the optics or detectors. The efficiency of the instrumentation is found to be as expected in the visible range, but lower than expected in the UV and IR range. A photometric calibration implementation was discussed for the two cameras. Conclusions: The calibration derived from pre-hibernation phases of the mission will be checked as soon as possible after the awakening of OSIRIS and will be continuously monitored until the end of the mission in December 2015. A list of additional calibration sources has been determined that are to be observed during the forthcoming phases of the mission to ensure a better coverage across the wavelength range of the cameras and to study the possible dust contamination of the optics.

  1. Leptin regulates energy intake but fails to facilitate hibernation in fattening Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xin; Tang, Gang-Bin; Sun, Ming-Yue; Yu, Chao; Song, Shi-Yi; Liu, Xin-Yu; Yang, Ming; Wang, De-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Body fat storage before hibernation affects the timing of immergence in Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus). Leptin is an adipose signal and plays vital role in energy homeostasis mainly by action in brain. To test the hypothesis that leptin plays a role in facilitating the process of hibernation, squirrels were administrated with recombinant murine leptin (1μg/day) through intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection for 12 days during fattening. From day 7 to 12, animals were moved into a cold room (5±1°C) with constant darkness which functioned as hibernaculum. Energy intake, body mass and core body temperature (Tb) were continuously monitored throughout the course of experiment. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured under both warm and cold conditions. At the end of leptin administration, we measured the serum concentration of hormones related to energy regulation, mRNA expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Our results showed that during leptin administration, the cumulative food intake and increase of body mass were suppressed while Tb and RMR were unaltered. The proportion of torpid squirrels was not different between two groups. At the end of leptin administration, the expressions of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and agouti gene-related protein were suppressed. There were no differences in UCP1 mRNA expression or protein content in BAT between groups. Our data suggest that leptin can affect energy intake via hypothalamic neuropeptides, but is not involved in the initiation of hibernation in fattening Daurian ground squirrels.

  2. Database Entity Persistence with Hibernate for the Network Connectivity Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    program using the Hibernate Object-Relational Mapping ( ORM ) framework . When instantiated, a Java class annotated as an Entity may be persisted via...other future technology or ORM framework if the need arises. The child DAOs concretely define the generic T type and generic Serialable ID type, which...8217 . (o .... -i\\j Po AJI NCAM Ettm~s HiOOm~te ORM lnlerr&ee ’ Re~d only L:l 1 ReadCnly NolseModel !.-:. .. .. ... ... se-e next ligu(e 1 for

  3. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo; Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification, triggered pain is an essential criterion for the diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia but no study to date has been designed to address this issue directly. In this study, we set out to determine, in patients with trigeminal neuralgia, how frequently triggers are present, which manoeuvres activate them and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136 of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all patients and supports the use of triggers as an essential diagnostic feature of trigeminal neuralgia.

  4. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the signals induced by the NACHT-LRR (NLR) pattern recognition receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Azam, T.; Ferwerda, G.; Girardin, S.E.; Kim, S.H.; Dinarello, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a member of a new family of myeloid receptors, encoded by a gene cluster linked to the MHC. Engagement of TREM-1 stimulates intracellular signals, resulting in activation of phagocytosis, neutrophil degranulation, and amplification of cyto

  5. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gradinaru

    Full Text Available α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs. α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant, different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  6. Induced Systemic Resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Bacillus cereus AR156 through a JA/ET- and NPR1-Dependent Signaling Pathway and Activates PAMP-Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Pingping; Li, Xia; Wang, Shune; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei; Niu, Dongdong

    2017-01-01

    Induced resistance response is a potent and cost effective plant defense against pathogen attack. The effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of the suppressive ability by Bacillus cereus AR156 to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis has been investigated previously; however, the strength of induced systemic resistance (ISR) activity against Botrytis cinerea remains unknown. Here, we show that root-drench application of AR156 significantly reduces disease incidence through activation of ISR. This protection is accompanied with multilayered ISR defense response activated via enhanced accumulation of PR1 protein expression in a timely manner, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and callose deposition, which is significantly more intense in plants with both AR156 pretreatment and B. cinerea inoculation than that in plants with pathogen inoculation only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger ISR in sid2-2 and NahG mutants, but not in jar1, ein2 and npr1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced ISR depends on JA/ET-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not SA. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1/WRKY53 gene expression, both of which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). The results indicate that AR156 can induce ISR by the JA/ET-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components.

  7. Induced Systemic Resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Bacillus cereus AR156 through a JA/ET- and NPR1-Dependent Signaling Pathway and Activates PAMP-Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Pingping; Li, Xia; Wang, Shune; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei; Niu, Dongdong

    2017-01-01

    Induced resistance response is a potent and cost effective plant defense against pathogen attack. The effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of the suppressive ability by Bacillus cereus AR156 to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis has been investigated previously; however, the strength of induced systemic resistance (ISR) activity against Botrytis cinerea remains unknown. Here, we show that root-drench application of AR156 significantly reduces disease incidence through activation of ISR. This protection is accompanied with multilayered ISR defense response activated via enhanced accumulation of PR1 protein expression in a timely manner, hydrogen peroxide accumulation and callose deposition, which is significantly more intense in plants with both AR156 pretreatment and B. cinerea inoculation than that in plants with pathogen inoculation only. Moreover, AR156 can trigger ISR in sid2-2 and NahG mutants, but not in jar1, ein2 and npr1 mutant plants. Our results indicate that AR156-induced ISR depends on JA/ET-signaling pathway and NPR1, but not SA. Also, AR156-treated plants are able to rapidly activate MAPK signaling and FRK1/WRKY53 gene expression, both of which are involved in pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). The results indicate that AR156 can induce ISR by the JA/ET-signaling pathways in an NPR1-dependent manner and involves multiple PTI components. PMID:28293243

  8. Recovery of Syrian hamster hippocampal signaling following its depression during oxygen-glucose deprivation is enhanced by cold temperatures and by hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailova, Alexandra; Mack, Jacob; Vitagliano, Nicholas; Hamilton, Jock S; Horowitz, John M; Horwitz, Barbara A

    2016-05-16

    Signal transmission over a hippocampal network of CA3 and CA1 neurons in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), facultative hibernators, has not been fully characterized in response to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We hypothesized that during OGD, hippocampal signal transmission fails first at the synapse between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons and that recovery of signal processing following OGD is more robust in hippocampal slices at cold temperature, from hamsters vs. rats, and from hibernating vs. non-hibernating hamsters. To test these hypotheses, we recorded fEPSPs and population spikes of CA1 neurons at 25°C, 30°C, and 35°C in 400μm slices over a 15min control period with the slice in oxygenated aCSF containing glucose (control solution), a 10min treatment period (OGD insult) where oxygen was replaced by nitrogen in aCSF lacking glucose, and a 30min recovery period with the slice in the control solution. The initial site of transmission failure during OGD occurred at the CA3-CA1 synapse, and recovery of signal transmission was at least, if not more (depending on temperature), complete in slices from hibernating vs. non-hibernating hamsters, and from non-hibernating hamsters vs. rats. Thus, hamster neuroprotective mechanisms supporting functional recovery were enhanced by cold temperatures and by hibernation.

  9. Immunoreactivities of IL-1β and IL-1R in oviduct of Chinese brown frog (Rana dybowskii) during pre-hibernation and the breeding period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruiqi; Liu, Yuning; Deng, Yu; Ma, Sihui; Sheng, Xia; Weng, Qiang; Xu, Meiyu

    2016-03-01

    The Chinese brown frog (Rana dybowskii) has one special physiological phenomenon, which is that its oviduct goes through expansion prior to hibernation instead of during the breeding period. In this study, we investigated the localization and expression level of interleukin-1 (IL-1β) and its functional membrane receptor type I (IL1R1) proteins in the oviduct of R. dybowskii during pre-hibernation and the breeding period. There were significant differences in both oviductal weight and pipe diameter, with values markedly higher in pre-hibernation than in the breeding period. Histologically, epithelium cells, glandular cells and tubule lumen were identified in the oviduct during pre-hibernation and the breeding period, while sizes of both cell types are larger in the pre-hibernation than those of the breeding period. IL-1β was immunolocalized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and glandular cells in both periods, whereas IL-1R1 was observed in the membrane of epithelial and glandular cells in the breeding period, whereas only in epithelial cells during pre-hibernation. Consistently, the protein levels of IL-1β and IL-1R1 were higher in pre-hibernation as compared to the breeding period. These results suggested that IL-1β may play an important autocrine or paracrine role in oviductal cell proliferation and differentiation of R. dybowskii.

  10. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis.

  11. White-nose syndrome fungus: a generalist pathogen of hibernating bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zukal

    Full Text Available Host traits and phylogeny can determine infection risk by driving pathogen transmission and its ability to infect new hosts. Predicting such risks is critical when designing disease mitigation strategies, and especially as regards wildlife, where intensive management is often advocated or prevented by economic and/or practical reasons. We investigated Pseudogymnoascus [Geomyces] destructans infection, the cause of white-nose syndrome (WNS, in relation to chiropteran ecology, behaviour and phylogenetics. While this fungus has caused devastating declines in North American bat populations, there have been no apparent population changes attributable to the disease in Europe. We screened 276 bats of 15 species from hibernacula in the Czech Republic over 2012 and 2013, and provided histopathological evidence for 11 European species positive for WNS. With the exception of Myotis myotis, the other ten species are all new reports for WNS in Europe. Of these, M. emarginatus, Eptesicus nilssonii, Rhinolophus hipposideros, Barbastella barbastellus and Plecotus auritus are new to the list of P. destructans-infected bat species. While the infected species are all statistically phylogenetically related, WNS affects bats from two suborders. These are ecologically diverse and adopt a wide range of hibernating strategies. Occurrence of WNS in distantly related bat species with diverse ecology suggests that the pathogen may be a generalist and that all bats hibernating within the distribution range of P. destructans may be at risk of infection.

  12. Disassembly of the Staphylococcus aureus hibernating 100S ribosome by an evolutionarily conserved GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2017-09-11

    The bacterial hibernating 100S ribosome is a poorly understood form of the dimeric 70S particle that has been linked to pathogenesis, translational repression, starvation responses, and ribosome turnover. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and most other bacteria, hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) homodimerizes the 70S ribosomes to form a translationally silent 100S complex. Conversely, the 100S ribosomes dissociate into subunits and are presumably recycled for new rounds of translation. The regulation and disassembly of the 100S ribosome are largely unknown because the temporal abundance of the 100S ribosome varies considerably among different bacterial phyla. Here, we identify a universally conserved GTPase (HflX) as a bona fide dissociation factor of the S. aureus 100S ribosome. The expression levels hpf and hflX are coregulated by general stress and stringent responses in a temperature-dependent manner. While all tested guanosine analogs stimulate the splitting activity of HflX on the 70S ribosome, only GTP can completely dissociate the 100S ribosome. Our results reveal the antagonistic relationship of HPF and HflX and uncover the key regulators of 70S and 100S ribosome homeostasis that are intimately associated with bacterial survival.

  13. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Scott T; Richters, Karl E; Melin, Travis E; Liu, Zhi-jian; Hordyk, Peter J; Benrud, Ryan R; Geiser, Lauren R; Cash, Steve E; Simon Shelley, C; Howard, David R; Ereth, Mark H; Sola-Visner, Martha C

    2012-05-15

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4-8°C and 3-5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4-8°C were released back into the blood within 2 h of arousal in the spring with a body temperature of 37°C but were not rapidly cleared from circulation. These released platelets were capable of forming stable clots and remained in circulation for at least 2 days before newly synthesized platelets were detected. Transfusion of autologous platelets stored at 4°C or 37°C showed the same clearance rates in ground squirrels, whereas rat platelets stored in the cold had a 140-fold increase in clearance rate. Our results demonstrate that ground squirrel platelets appear to be resistant to the platelet cold storage lesions observed in other mammals, allowing prolonged storage in cold stasis and preventing rapid clearance upon spring arousal. Elucidating these adaptations could lead to the development of methods to store human platelets in the cold, extending their shelf life.

  14. [Spatial structure of the community of bats (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) hibernating in artificial caves of Samarskaya Luka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, D G; Vekhnik, V P; Kurmaeva, N M; Shepelev, A A; Il'in, V Iu

    2008-01-01

    Specific features of the spatial distribution and localization of bats have been studied during their hibernation in artificial caves of Samarskaya Luka. The proportion of cave area occupied by bats varies from 70 to 93% in large caves (> 60000 m2), decreasing to 50% in medium-sized caves (10000-60000 m2) and to less than 30% in small caves (bats choose sites near cave openings, up to 25% prefer central parts, but most bats (about 66%) concentrate in the deepest parts of caves. Among wintering species, higher rates of occurrence and shelter occupancy are characteristic of Plecotus auritus. Myotis daubentonii, and M. mystacinus, whereas M. dasycneme and M. brandtii show the highest degree of aggregation. The optimal temperature range for the wintering of all bat species is 2-4 degrees C. Myotis brandtii, Eptesicus nilssonii, and M. daubentonii prefer to hibernate in open spaces of cave ceilings; M. mystacinus. E. serotinus, and Pl. auritus usually occupy the middle and upper parts of walls; while M. dasycneme and M. nattereri occur mainly in hollows on ceilings.

  15. Cardiomyocyte Remodeling in Atrial Fibrillation and Hibernating Myocardium: Shared Pathophysiologic Traits Identify Novel Treatment Strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Weil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia and is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. However, there are limited treatment strategies for prevention of disease onset and progression. Development of novel therapies for primary and secondary prevention of AF is critical and requires improved understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the AF disease process. Translational and clinical studies conducted over the past twenty years have revealed that atrial remodeling in AF shares several important pathophysiologic traits with the remodeling processes exhibited by hibernating myocardium that develop in response to chronic ischemia. These shared features, which include an array of structural, metabolic, and electrophysiologic changes, appear to represent a conserved adaptive myocyte response to chronic stress that involves dedifferentiation towards a fetal phenotype to promote survival. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of AF, summarize studies supporting a common remodeling program in AF and hibernating myocardium, and propose future therapeutic implications of this emerging paradigm. Ultimately, better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of atrial myocyte remodeling during the onset of AF and the transition from paroxysmal to persistent stages of the disease may facilitate discovery of new therapeutic targets.

  16. Does functional recovery of hibernating myocardium coincide with improvement in perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Tonooka, Ichiro; Chiba, Junya; Abe, Shinya; Tsuiki, Kai; Tomoike, Hitonobu (Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Yasui, Shoji

    1992-03-01

    To determine how much recovery of hibernating myocardium coincide with perfusion improvement, 49 patients underwent radionuclide left ventriculography and exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy (Ex-Tl) before and one month after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The left ventricle was divided into 6 segments for the assessment of wall motion and Tl-201 uptake. One month after CABG, wall motion improvement was found in a total of 74 segments (seg A), and was also associated with perfusion improvement in 66 segments (89%). Although 8 segments showed wall motion improvement at follow-up examinations (seg B), 7 (88%) had been improved for perfusion one month after CABG. Preoperative akinesis or dyskinesis was more frequently observed for seg B (75%) than seg A (34%). Similarly, seg B was associated with lower %Tl-201 uptake as compared with seg A (74{+-}9% vs 83{+-}8%). In conclusion, perfusion recovery preceded recovery of hibernating myocardium in some segments, suggesting the involvement of stunned myocardium. These segments were associated with severe wall motion abnormality before CABG and lower Tl-201 uptake. (N.K.).

  17. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo) family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG) are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24) and serine-319 (Ser-319) residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively) during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser(319) and Thr(24), as well as p-Foxo3a Thr(32) decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  18. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichi Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mammalian hibernation in thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus is characterized by dramatic changes on a physiological and molecular level. During hibernation, mammalian hearts show a propensity to hypertrophy due to the need for increasing contractility to pump colder and more viscous blood. While cardiac hypertrophy is quite often a process characterized by decompensation, the ground squirrel studied is an excellent model of cardiac plasticity and cardioprotection under conditions of hypothermia and ischemia. The forkhead box O (Foxo family of proteins and myogenin (MyoG are transcription factors that control protein degradation and muscle atrophy by regulating the expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, MAFbx and MuRF1. These ligases are part of the ubiquitin proteasome system by transferring ubiquitin to proteins and targeting these proteins for degradation. Regulation of Foxo1 and 3a occurs through phosphorylation at different residues. The threonine-24 (Thr-24 and serine-319 (Ser-319 residues on Foxo1, and the Thr-32 residue on Foxo3a are phosphorylated by Akt, leading to cytoplasmic localization of Foxo. We propose that the described mechanism contributes to the changes taking place in cardiac muscle throughout hibernation. Methods. Total and phosphorylated protein levels of Foxo1 and Foxo3a, as well as total protein levels of MyoG, MAFbx, and MuRF1, were studied using immunoblotting. Results. Immunoblotting results demonstrated upregulations in Foxo1 and Foxo3a total protein levels (1.3- and 4.5-fold increases relative to euthermic control, for Foxo1 and 3a respectively during late torpor, and protein levels remained elevated throughout the rest of torpor and at interbout arousal. We also observed decreases in inactive, phosphorylated Foxo1 and 3a proteins during throughout torpor, where levels of p-Foxo1 Ser319 and Thr24, as well as p-Foxo3a Thr32 decreased by at least 45% throughout torpor. MyoG was

  19. Selection of high temperatures for hibernation by the pocket mouse, Perognathus longimembris: ecological advantages and energetic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, A.R.

    Daily metabolism was calculated from food consumption in pocket mice, Perognathus longimembris, at 8/sup 0/C, 18/sup 0/C, and 31/sup 0/C. At temperatures below thermal neutrality for this species, daily metabolism was related to the amount of time the mice spent in torpor. Ambient temperature has no net effect on the minimum energy expenditure during a typical 5-mo hibernation season. Once an animal has accumulated a food store of approximately 130 g of millet seeds, it has the minimum energy necessary to hibernate at any environmental temperature. Such temperature compensation results from the complex effects of temperature on (1) the ratio of time of euthermy to time of torpor, (2) the energetic cost per hour of torpor, (3) the energetic cost per hour of euthermy, and (4) the energetic cost of arousal from torpor. The amount of time spent in torpor was inversely dependent on the food supply, indicating that euthermia is preferred even during the hibernation season. Mice also maximize the time of euthermia by selecting high environmental temperatures at all times of the year. Torpor probably occurs naturally only during the winter when the highest temperatures available to the mice are below thermal neutrality. The maximization of the time of euthermia reduces the chances of freezing during hibernation and enhances the animal's ability to excape from predators.

  20. Low cardiac output as physiological phenomenon in hibernating, free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos) - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Godsk; Arnemo, Jon; Swenson, Jon E

    2014-01-01

    . CONCLUSION: Free-ranging brown bears demonstrate hemodynamics comparable to humans during active state, whereas during hibernation, we documented extremely low-flow hemodynamics. Understanding these physiological changes in bears may help to gain insight into the mechanisms of cardiogenic shock and heart...

  1. AMY trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshihide [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  2. THE LIPID COMPOSITION OF TISSUE OF SCALY CARP (CYPRINUS CARPIO L. IN THE CONDITIONS OF ARTIFICIAL CARBON HIBERNATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sysolyatin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Establish and compare the content of the total lipids in the liver, skeletal muscle, gill and brain pond carp active life condition and under artificial hibernation carbon. Methodology. The experiments were conducted on the Ukrainian scaly carp breed (Cyprinus caprio L. weighing 250–270 g. To conduct research to form two groups (control — 5 copies of the fish and an experimental — each point hypobiosis exposure to 5 copies of the fish. Introduction of fish hypobiotically state conducted for the use of a patented model artificial hibernation. The selection of material performed by opening the first and second fish group on the 3, 6 and 24 hours of exposure, then it is frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen. Lipid extraction after homogenization of brain tissue, liver, skeletal muscle and gills was performed according to Folch. The content of the total lipids (from the weight of the dry residue after extraction was determined using the gravimetric method. The separation into individual lipid fractions were determined thin layer chromatography by plates "Silufol". Quantitative determination of total phospholipids — hydroxamate method; cholesterol — colorimetric method with three ferric chlorides. All the results are treated variation-statistical method using the Student's t-tests. Findings. These results suggest that the content of total lipids, phospholipids and cholesterol in the tissues of the carp pond in the active state of life is significantly different. The content of the total lipids in the liver, skeletal muscle, gill and brain in a carp pond introducing carbon dioxide into a state of artificial hibernation (hypercapnic hypoxia-medium is reduced in comparison with the control. Under these conditions, noted a slight increase in tissue phospholipids, as well as a significant increase in cholesterol and the coefficient (CL/PL, especially in the liver, indicating that the use of lipids in energy and adaptation processes

  3. Identification of qRT-PCR reference genes for analysis of opioid gene expression in a hibernator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otis, Jessica P; Ackermann, Laynez W; Denning, Gerene M; Carey, Hannah V

    2010-04-01

    Previous work has suggested that central and peripheral opioid signaling are involved in regulating torpor behavior and tissue protection associated with the hibernation phenotype. We used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to measure mRNA levels of opioid peptide precursors and receptors in the brain and heart of summer ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) and winter hibernating squirrels in the torpid or interbout arousal states. The use of appropriate reference genes for normalization of qRT-PCR gene expression data can have profound effects on the analysis and interpretation of results. This may be particularly important when experimental subjects, such as hibernating animals, undergo significant morphological and/or functional changes during the study. Therefore, an additional goal of this study was to identify stable reference genes for use in qRT-PCR studies of the 13-lined ground squirrel. Expression levels of 10 potential reference genes were measured in the small intestine, liver, brain, and heart, and the optimal combinations of the most stable reference genes were identified by the GeNorm Excel applet. Based on this analysis, we provide recommendations for reference genes to use in each tissue that would be suitable for comparative studies among different activity states. When appropriate normalization of mRNA levels was used, there were no changes in opioid-related genes in heart among the three activity states; in brain, DOR expression was highest during torpor, lowest in interbout arousal and intermediate in summer. The results support the idea that changes in DOR expression may regulate the level of neuronal activity in brain during the annual hibernation cycle and may contribute to hibernation-associated tissue protection.

  4. Research on seismic stress triggering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万永革; 吴忠良; 周公威; 黄静; 秦立新

    2002-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews basic theory of seismic stress triggering. Recent development on seismic stress triggering has been reviewed in the views of seismic static and dynamic stress triggering, application of viscoelastic model in seismic stress triggering, the relation between earthquake triggering and volcanic eruption or explosion, other explanation of earthquake triggering, etc. And some suggestions for further study on seismic stress triggering in near future are given.

  5. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  6. Targeting Mcl-1 for multiple myeloma (MM) therapy: drug-induced generation of Mcl-1 fragment Mcl-1(128-350) triggers MM cell death via c-Jun upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fengjuan; Tonon, Giovanni; Bashari, Muhammad Hasan; Vallet, Sonia; Antonini, Elena; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Opferman, Joseph T; Sattler, Martin; Anderson, Kenneth C; Jäger, Dirk; Podar, Klaus

    2014-02-28

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1, HGNC: 6943), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family, plays a crucial role in Multiple Myeloma (MM) pathogenesis and drug resistance, thus representing a promising therapeutic target in MM. A novel strategy to inhibit Mcl-1 activity is the induction of ubiquitin-independent Mcl-1 degradation. Our own and other previous studies have demonstrated caspase-dependent generation of a 28kDa Mcl-1 fragment, Mcl-1(128-350), which inhibits MM cell proliferation and survival. Here, we show that similar to bortezomib, the novel proteasome inhibitors carfilzomib and ixazomib, as well as staurosporine and adaphostin, induce the generation of Mcl-1(128-350) in MM cells. Next, the molecular sequelae downstream of Mcl-1(128-350), which mediate its pro-apoptotic activity, were delineated. Surprisingly, we observed nuclear accumulation of drug-induced or exogenously overexpressed Mcl-1(128-350), followed by elevated mRNA and protein levels of c-Jun, as well as enhanced AP-1 reporter activity. Moreover, drug-induced AP-1 activity was blocked after introducing a point mutation into the highly conserved Mcl-1 caspase-cleavage site Asp127, but not Asp157. Consequently, drug-triggered cell death was significantly decreased in MM cells transfected with Mcl-1 D127A, but not with Mcl-1 D157A. Consistent with these data, treatment with bortezomib triggered c-Jun upregulation followed by apoptosis in Mcl-1(wt/wt), but not Mcl-1(Δ/null) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Transfection of a plasmid carrying Mcl-1(wt) into Mcl-1(Δ/null) MEFs restored bortezomib-induced Mcl-1 fragmentation, c-Jun upregulation and AP-1 reporter activity. Finally, our data indicate that drug-induced generation of a pro-apoptotic Mcl-1 fragment followed by c-Jun upregulation may also be a novel therapeutic approach in other tumor entities.

  7. Similarities in acute phase protein response during hibernation in black bears and major depression in humans: A response to underlying metabolic depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, V.P.S.; Sheikh, A.M.; Chauhan, A.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hibernation with mild hypothermia and the stress of captivity on levels of six acute-phase proteins (APPs) in serial samples of serum from 11 wild and 6 captive black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas, 1780) during active and hibernating states. We hypothesize that during hibernation with mild hypothermia, bears would show an APP response similar to that observed in major depression. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was used to measure alpha2-macroglobulin and C-reactive protein, and a nephelometer to measure alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin. Levels of all other proteins except ceruloplasmin were significantly elevated during hibernation in both wild and captive bears at the p neurobiology of depression.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma...... differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate...... Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood...

  9. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  10. Aspartame-Triggered Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    Two patients with known aspartame-triggered and rizatriptan-responsive migraine had their headaches worsened following use of an aspartame-containing formulation of rizatriptan (Maxalt-MLT), in a report from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

  11. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Alexandre, G; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bee, C; Behera, P; Bell, P; Bendel, M; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I, P; Brelier, B; Brooks, W; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Casadei, D; Casado, P; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; De Santo, A; Degenhardt, J; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Diaz, M; Djilkibaev, R; Dobson, E; Dova, M, T; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Faulkner, P J W; Ferland, J; Flacher, H; Fleckner, J E; Flowerdew, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Fratina, S; Fhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Gallacher, M P; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gee, C N P; George, S; Gillman, A R; Goncalo, R; Grabowska-Bold, I; Groll, M; Gringer, C; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hauser, R; Hellman, S; Hidvgi, A; Hillier, S J; Hryn'ova, T; Idarraga, J; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Kalinowski, A; Khoriauli, G; Kirk, J; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Koeneke, K; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kwee, R; Landon, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit, F; Lei, X; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Losada, M; Maettig, S; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maltrana, D; Marino, C; Masik, J; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Mincer, A; Moa, T; Monticelli, F; Moreno, D; Morris, J D; Mller, F; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nemethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Oltmann, B; Olvito, D; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Parodi, F; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Perez Reale, V; Petersen, B; Pinzon, G; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Prokishin, F; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reinsch, A; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Rodriguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Rhr, F; Saavedra, A; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Schiavi, C; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schfer, U; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S; Sivoklokov, S; Sjlin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strom, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Torrence, E; Tripiana, M; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Vachon, B; Vercesi, V; Vorwerk, V; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Weidberg, T; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Whiteson, D; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wildt, M; Winklmeier, F; Wu, X; Xella, S; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; de Seixas, J M; dos Anjos, A; Asman, B; Özcan, E

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 105 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  12. Smart Cu(II)-aptamer complexes based gold nanoplatform for tumor micro-environment triggered programmable intracellular prodrug release, photodynamic treatment and aggregation induced photothermal therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Zheng, Aixian; Li, Juan; Wu, Ming; Wu, Lingjie; Wei, Zuwu; Liao, Naishun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Cai, Zhixiong; Yang, Huanghao; Liu, Gang; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2017-01-01

    This study describes smart Cu(II)-aptamer complexes based gold nanoplatform for tumor micro-environment triggered programmable prodrug release, in demand photodynamic therapy and aggregation induced photothermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanoplatform is consist of monodispersed gold nanoparticle (GNP) that is binding to HCC cell specific targeting aptamers (TLS11a) through Au-S bond; the aptamer is labeled with Ce6 at the 5'end and coordinated with Cu(II) through (GA)10 repeating bases to load AQ4N at the 3' end. In normal physiological conditions, the fluorescence and ROS generation ability of Ce6 are quenched by GNPs via RET; but in cancerous cells, the fluorescence and the ROS generation of Ce6 could be recovered by cleavage of Au-S bond through high level of intracellular GSH for real-time imaging and in demand PDT. Meanwhile, the prodrug AQ4N release could be triggered by acid-cleavage of coordination bonds, then accompanied by a release of Cu(II) that would induce the electrostatic aggregation of GNPs for photo-thermal ablation; furthermore, the significantly enhanced chemotherapy efficiency could be achieved by PDT produced hypoxia to convert AQ4N into AQ4. In summary, here described nanoplatform with tumor cell specific responsive properties and programmable PDT/PTT/chemotherapy functions, might be an interesting synergistic strategy for HCC treatment. PMID:28042325

  13. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  14. Sperm influences female hibernation success, survival and fitness in the bumble-bee Bombus terrestris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence that in the absence of the transfer of male gland compounds in the ejaculate as well as of behavioural male traits, such as mate guarding or harming of females, sperm itself affects female life-history traits such as hibernation success, female longevity and female fitness...... a lower performance as compared to singly inseminated queens. Apart from these main effects, sire groups (in situations of multiple insemination) affected queen longevity and fitness not independently of each other, i.e. certain sire group combinations were more harmful to queens than others. So far......, the cause(s) of these effects remain(s) elusive. Harmful male traits as detected here are not necessarily expected to evolve in social insects because males depend on females for a successful completion of a colony cycle and thus have strong convergent interests with their mates....

  15. Molecular mechanisms regulating oxygen transport and consumption in high altitude and hibernating mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Inge Grønvall

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to broaden the knowledge of molecular mechanisms of adjustment in oxygen (O2) uptake, conduction, delivery and consumption in mammals adapted to extreme conditions. For this end, I have worked with animals living at high altitude as an example of environmental hypoxia......, and hibernating mammals, as an example of closely balanced internal low O2. Studies have had two main focus points. Firstly, I have investigated variations in hemolysate and hemoglobin (Hb) O2 affinity, working to pinpoint whether and how functional changes in intrinsic affinity or cofactor sensitivity of the Hb...... molecule compares to amino acid substitutions in the molecule, i.e., can be characterized as evolved genetic adaptation. Phenotypic acclimatization in Hb- O2 affinity responses involves changes in cofactor to Hb tetramer ratio. Secondly, I have worked with (in a cardiovascular perspective) fine...

  16. Kronisk iskaemisk hjerteinsufficiens. Revaskularisering bedrer overlevelsen blandt patienter med hibernating myocardium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdgaard, Paw Chr; Nielsen, Søren Steen; Wiggers, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with ischemic heart failure and reversible dysfunctional myocardium (Hibernating myocardium, HIB) can benefit from revascularization. These patients can be selected with nuclear methods. The purpose of this study was to describe the results of the imaging procedures...... imaging was performed with 99mTc-sestamibi and glucose metabolism was visualized with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) gamma camera PET. Medical records and death certificate were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: 50 patients were included. We found an increased survival among patients with HIB who...... in patients tested for HIB and relate the results to the choice of treatment and cause of death. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a 2-year period 51 patients were referred to determine the amount of HIB. This can be determined with blood flow and metabolic imaging of the heart. Resting-myocardial perfusion...

  17. Suspension of mitotic activity in dentate gyrus of the hibernating ground squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor V; Ignat'ev, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4-6°C) permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX) and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  18. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Document Server

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  19. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  20. Aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in BV-2 microglial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Shi-Ying

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglial activation plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases through production of nitric oxide (NO and several pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lipoxins (LXs and aspirin-triggered LXs (ATLs are considered to act as 'braking signals' in inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of aspirin-triggered LXA4 (ATL on infiammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS in murine microglial BV-2 cells. Methods BV-2 cells were treated with ATL prior to LPS exposure, and the effects of such treatment production of nitric oxide (NO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were analysed by Griess reaction, ELISA, western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Moreover, we investigated the effects of ATL on LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and activator protein-1 (AP-1 activation. Results ATL inhibited LPS-induced production of NO, IL-1β and TNF-α in a concentration-dependent manner. mRNA expressions for iNOS, IL-1β and TNF-α in response to LPS were also decreased by ATL. These effects were inhibited by Boc-2 (a LXA4 receptor antagonist. ATL significantly reduced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, degradation of the inhibitor IκB-α, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 MAPK in BV-2 cells activated with LPS. Furthermore, the DNA binding activity of NF-κB and AP-1 was blocked by ATL. Conclusions This study indicates that ATL inhibits NO and pro-inflammatory cytokine production at least in part via NF-κB, ERK, p38 MAPK and AP-1 signaling pathways in LPS-activated microglia. Therefore, ATL may have therapeutic potential for various neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Deep sequencing the transcriptome reveals seasonal adaptive mechanisms in a hibernating mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Hampton

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation is a complex phenotype involving metabolic rate reduction, bradycardia, profound hypothermia, and a reliance on stored fat that allows the animal to survive for months without food in a state of suspended animation. To determine the genes responsible for this phenotype in the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus we used the Roche 454 platform to sequence mRNA isolated at six points throughout the year from three key tissues: heart, skeletal muscle, and white adipose tissue (WAT. Deep sequencing generated approximately 3.7 million cDNA reads from 18 samples (6 time points ×3 tissues with a mean read length of 335 bases. Of these, 3,125,337 reads were assembled into 140,703 contigs. Approximately 90% of all sequences were matched to proteins in the human UniProt database. The total number of distinct human proteins matched by ground squirrel transcripts was 13,637 for heart, 12,496 for skeletal muscle, and 14,351 for WAT. Extensive mitochondrial RNA sequences enabled a novel approach of using the transcriptome to construct the complete mitochondrial genome for I. tridecemlineatus. Seasonal and activity-specific changes in mRNA levels that met our stringent false discovery rate cutoff (1.0 × 10(-11 were used to identify patterns of gene expression involving various aspects of the hibernation phenotype. Among these patterns are differentially expressed genes encoding heart proteins AT1A1, NAC1 and RYR2 controlling ion transport required for contraction and relaxation at low body temperatures. Abundant RNAs in skeletal muscle coding ubiquitin pathway proteins ASB2, UBC and DDB1 peak in October, suggesting an increase in muscle proteolysis. Finally, genes in WAT that encode proteins involved in lipogenesis (ACOD, FABP4 are highly expressed in August, but gradually decline in expression during the seasonal transition to lipolysis.

  2. Can hibernators sense and evade fires? Olfactory acuity and locomotor performance during deep torpor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Julia; Delesalle, Marine; Stawski, Clare; Geiser, Fritz

    2016-10-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation, global warming and other human activities have caused a rise in the frequency of wildfires worldwide. To reduce the risks of uncontrollable fires, prescribed burns are generally conducted during the colder months of the year, a time when in many mammals torpor is expressed regularly. Torpor is crucial for energy conservation, but the low body temperatures ( T b) are associated with a decreased responsiveness and torpid animals might therefore face an increased mortality risk during fires. We tested whether hibernators in deep torpor (a) can respond to the smell of smoke and (b) can climb to avoid fires at T bs below normothermic levels. Our data show that torpid eastern pygmy-possums ( Cercartetus nanus) are able to detect smoke and also can climb. All males aroused from torpor when the smoke stimulus was presented at an ambient temperature ( T a) of 15 °C ( T b ˜18 °C), whereas females only raised their heads. The responses were less pronounced at T a 10 °C. The first coordinated movement of possums along a branch was observed at a mean T b of 15.6 °C, and animals were even able to climb their prehensile tail when they reached a mean T b of 24.4 °C. Our study shows that hibernators can sense smoke and move at low T b. However, our data also illustrate that at T b ≤13 °C, C. nanus show decreased responsiveness and locomotor performance and highlight that prescribed burns during winter should be avoided on very cold days to allow torpid animals enough time to respond.

  3. Electromagnetic calorimeter trigger at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, B G; Lee, S H; Won, E; Park, I C; Hur, T W; Park, C S; Kim, S K; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Chu, T H; Usov, Y V; Aulchenko, V M; Kuzmin, A S; Bondar, A E; Shwartz, B A; Eidelman, S; Krokovnyi, P P; Hayashii, H; Sagawa, H; Fukushima, M

    2002-01-01

    The performance of CsI(Tl) electromagnetic calorimeter trigger system in the Belle experiment is described. Two kinds of trigger schemes have been taken into account, namely a total energy trigger and a cluster counting trigger which are complementary to each other. In addition, the system has provided the online/offline luminosity information using the Bhabha event trigger scheme. An upgrade of the trigger is discussed.

  4. Apigenin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human lung cancer A549 cells through Bax- and Bcl-2-triggered mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chie, Yu-Jie; Yang, Ming-Sung; Lee, Ching-Sung; Fu, Jene-John; Yang, Jai-Sing; Tan, Tzu-Wei; Wu, Shin-Hwar; Ma, Yi-Shih; Ip, Siu-Wan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-06-01

    The molecular mechanism and possible signaling pathway of apigenin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human lung cancer cells has not been reported. We investigated the role of ROS, Ca2+, caspases and Bax proteins and mitochondria membrane potential in apigenin-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Cells were incubated with different concentrations of apigenin then cell morphological changes, DNA damage, cell viability and apoptosis were determined by Comet assay, and flow cytometric analysis. Sub-G1 phase was also examined. Western blot analysis was used to determined the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 and apoptosis associated proteins, and confocal laser microscope for examining the translocation of associated protein after exposed to apigenin. The results indicated that apigenin induced morphological changes, decreased percentage of viable cells and induced apoptosis dose- and time-dependently. DAPI staining and Comet assay also confirmed that apigenin-induced DNA condensation and damage. The levels of caspase-3, -8 and -9 involved in apigenin-induced apoptosis indicating caspase-dependent pathway was induced by apigenin. Western blotting showed that apigenin promoted cytochrome c levels and also induced dysfunction of mitochondria leading to the release of cytochrome c, AIF and Endo G, causing the activation of caspase-9 and -3, then apoptosis in A549 cells.

  5. Signal transduction triggered by iron to induce the nuclear importation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hong-Ming; Lee, Yu; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chou, Ya-Wen; Chen, Yet-Ran; Chen, Shu-Hui; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2014-10-17

    Iron was previously shown to induce rapid nuclear translocation of a Myb3 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite, Trichomonas vaginalis. In the present study, iron was found to induce a transient increase in cellular cAMP, followed by the nuclear influx of Myb3, whereas the latter was also induced by 8-bromo-cyclic AMP. Iron-inducible cAMP production and nuclear influx of Myb3 were inhibited by suramin and SQ22536, respective inhibitors of the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins and adenylyl cyclases. In contrast, the nuclear influx of Myb3 induced by iron or 8-bromo-cAMP was delayed or inhibited, respectively, by H89, the inhibitor of protein kinase A. Using liquid chromatography-coupled tandem mass spectrometry, Thr(156) and Lys(143) in Myb3 were found to be phosphorylated and ubiquitinated, respectively. These modifications were induced by iron and inhibited by H89, as shown by immunoprecipitation-coupled Western blotting. Iron-inducible ubiquitination and nuclear influx were aborted in T156A and K143R, but T156D was constitutively ubiquitinated and persistently localized to the nucleus. Myb3 was phosphorylated in vitro by the catalytic subunit of a T. vaginalis protein kinase A, TvPKAc. A transient interaction between TvPKAc and Myb3 and the phosphorylation of both proteins were induced in the parasite shortly after iron or 8-bromo-cAMP treatment. Together, these observations suggest that iron may induce production of cAMP and activation of TvPKAc, which then induces the phosphorylation of Myb3 and subsequent ubiquitination for accelerated nuclear influx. It is conceivable that iron probably exerts a much broader impact on the physiology of the parasite than previously thought to encounter environmental changes.

  6. Toll-like receptor (TLR-1/2 triggering of multiple myeloma cells modulates their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells and enhances bortezomib-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangir Abdi

    Full Text Available In multiple myeloma (MM, the malignant plasma cells usually localize to the bone marrow where they develop drug resistance due to adhesion to stromal cells and various environmental signals. Hence, modulation of this interaction is expected to influence drug sensitivity of MM cells. Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands have displayed heterogeneous effects on B-cell malignancies and also on MM cells in a few recent studies, but effects on adhesion and drug sensitivity of myeloma cells in the context of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs have never been investigated. In the present study, we explored the modulatory effects of TLR1/2 ligand (Pam3CSK4 on adhesion of human myeloma cells to BMSCs. It is shown that TLR1/2 triggering has opposite effects in different HMCLs on their adhesion to BMSCs. Fravel, L363, UM-6, UM-9 and U266 showed increased adhesion to BMSC in parallel with an increased surface expression of integrin molecules α4 and αVβ3. OPM-1, OPM-2 and NCI-H929 showed a dose-dependent decrease in adhesion upon TLR activation following a downregulation of β7 integrin expression. Importantly, TLR1/2 triggering increased cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of bortezomib in myeloma cells independent of the effect on stromal cell adhesion. Moreover, the apoptosis-enhancing effect of Pam3CSK4 paralleled induction of cleaved caspase-3 protein in FACS analysis suggesting a caspase-dependent mechanism. Our findings uncover a novel role of TLR activation in MM cells in the context of bone marrow microenvironment. Stimulation of TLR1/2 bypasses the protective shield of BMSCs and may be an interesting strategy to enhance drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma cells.

  7. The CMS trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-09-08

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  8. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  9. Cygnus Trigger System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  10. UV-Induced Triggering of a Biomechanical Initiation Switch Within Collagen Promotes Development of a Melanoma-Permissive Microenvironment in the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    our studies indicate that the UV-irradiation of triple helical collagen in vitro, in the absence of proteolytic enzymes can induced changes in the...indicate that the UV-irradiation of triple helical collagen in vitro, in the absence of proteolytic enzymes can induced changes in the structure of...HU177 cryptic epitope in collagen type-I may be a result of time and/or temperature dependent refolding of the triple helical confirmation of the

  11. Potential Applications of Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aslami; M.J. Schultz; N.P. Juffermans

    2009-01-01

    A suspended animation-like state has been induced in rodents with the use of hydrogen sulfide, resulting in hypothermia with a concomitant reduction in metabolic rate. Also oxygen demand was reduced, thereby protecting against hypoxia. Several therapeutic applications of induction of a hibernation-l

  12. Increase in cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) alpha protein isoform in hibernating ground squirrels, with echocardiographic visualization of ventricular wall hypertrophy and prolonged contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Rourke, Bryan C

    2013-12-15

    Deep hibernators such as golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis) have multiple challenges to cardiac function during low temperature torpor and subsequent arousals. As heart rates fall from over 300 beats min(-1) to less than 10, chamber dilation and reduced cardiac output could lead to congestive myopathy. We performed echocardiography on a cohort of individuals prior to and after several months of hibernation. The left ventricular chamber exhibited eccentric and concentric hypertrophy during hibernation and thus calculated ventricular mass was ~30% greater. Ventricular ejection fraction was mildly reduced during hibernation but stroke volumes were greater due to the eccentric hypertrophy and dramatically increased diastolic filling volumes. Globally, the systolic phase in hibernation was ~9.5 times longer, and the diastolic phase was 28× longer. Left atrial ejection generally was not observed during hibernation. Atrial ejection returned weakly during early arousal. Strain echocardiography assessed the velocity and total movement distance of contraction and relaxation for regional ventricular segments in active and early arousal states. Myocardial systolic strain during early arousal was significantly greater than the active state, indicating greater total contractile movement. This mirrored the increased ventricular ejection fraction noted with early arousal. However, strain rates were slower during early arousal than during the active period, particularly systolic strain, which was 33% of active, compared with the rate of diastolic strain, which was 67% of active. As heart rate rose during the arousal period, myocardial velocities and strain rates also increased; this was matched closely by cardiac output. Curiously, though heart rates were only 26% of active heart rates during early arousal, the cardiac output was nearly 40% of the active state, suggesting an efficient pumping system. We further analyzed proportions of cardiac myosin

  13. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  14. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  15. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Lanaspa

    Full Text Available Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2 (summer and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK (winter. Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2, as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation. Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A, rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  16. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson G Hindle

    Full Text Available 13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins

  17. Biochemical assessment of the hibernator skeletal muscle properties in search of a potential countermeasure against muscle atrophy in space microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Park, J. Y.; Gwag, T.; Yoo, W.; Choi, I.

    Mammalian skeletal muscle undergoes significant loss of mass and tension capacity during spaceflight or hindlimb suspension This is contrasted by observed features of hibernators in that muscle mass and contractility remain fairly unchanged during a prolonged period of dormancy In an effort of finding potential countermeasure against muscle atrophy in space microgravity we thereby investigated the biochemical properties of the pectoral muscle in a winter-hibernating bat Murina leucogaster Two-dimensional electrophoresis on overall muscle proteins and western blot analysis on heat shock proteins HSP 60 kD 70 kD and 90 kD were conducted to compare levels of myofiber proteins and the stress responsive chaperone molecules in winter-hibernation WH versus summer-active bats SA No seasonal difference was found in the ratio of muscle mass to body mass for the pectoral muscles confirming similar results in previous reports Among more than thirty proteins identified only 14 of the proteins showed significant reduction in the level for WH compared to SA The level of HSP60 and HSP90 in WH were 63 and 71 that in SA respectively P quad 0 05 whereas that of HSP70 was not different between the two groups However when the WH were forced to arouse for 40 min from hibernation the level of HSP70 increased 1 4-fold and 1 51-fold that of WH and SA respectively while the level of HSP90 increased 1 57-fold that of WH These results suggest that the levels of many key contractile and regulatory proteins were retained during

  18. The investigation of minoxidil-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises and non-Ca(2+)-triggered cell death in PC3 human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Shu; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liu, Yuan-Yuarn; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Chen, Fu-An; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2017-02-01

    Minoxidil is clinically used to prevent hair loss. However, its effect on Ca(2+) homeostasis in prostate cancer cells is unclear. This study explored the effect of minoxidil on cytosolic-free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) and cell viability in PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Minoxidil at concentrations between 200 and 800 μM evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises in a concentration-dependent manner. This Ca(2+) signal was inhibited by 60% by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). Minoxidil-induced Ca(2+) influx was confirmed by Mn(2+)-induced quench of fura-2 fluorescence. Pre-treatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X, PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA), nifedipine and SKF96365 inhibited minoxidil-induced Ca(2+) signal in Ca(2+) containing medium by 60%. Treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor 2,5-ditert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) in Ca(2+)-free medium abolished minoxidil-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Conversely, treatment with minoxidil abolished BHQ-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U73122 abolished minoxidil-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises. Overnight treatment with minoxidil killed cells at concentrations of 200-600 μM in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM) did not prevent minoxidil's cytotoxicity. Together, in PC3 cells, minoxidil induced [Ca(2+)]i rises that involved Ca(2+) entry through PKC-regulated store-operated Ca(2+) channels and PLC-dependent Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Minoxidil-induced cytotoxicity in a Ca(2+)-independent manner.

  19. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  20. Remote Dynamic Earthquake Triggering in Shale Gas Basins in Canada and Implications for Triggering Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yajing; Wang, Bei; Kao, Honn; Yu, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Here we investigate the occurrence of remote dynamic triggering in three sedimentary basins in Canada where recent fluid injection activity is correlated with increasing numbers of earthquakes. In efforts to count as many small, local earthquakes as possible for the statistical test of triggering, we apply a multi-station matched-filter detection method to continuous waveforms to detect uncataloged local earthquakes in 10-day time windows surrounding triggering mainshocks occurring between 2013-2015 with an estimated local peak ground velocity exceeding 0.01 cm/s. We count the number of earthquakes in 24-hour bins and use a statistical p-value test to determine if the changes in seismicity levels after the mainshock waves have passed are statistically significant. The p-value tests show occurrences of triggering following transient stress perturbations of production history is longer. The observations combined with new modeling results suggest that the poroelastic response of the medium may be the dominant factor influencing instantaneous triggering, particularly in low-permeability tight shales. At sites where production history is longer and permeabilities have been increased, both pore pressure diffusion and the poroelastic response of the medium may work together to promote both instantaneous and delayed triggering. Not only does the interplay of the poroelastic response of the medium and pore pressure diffusion have implications for triggering induced earthquakes near injection sites, but it may be a plausible explanation for observations of instantaneous and delayed earthquake triggering in general.

  1. How maize monoculture and increasing winter rainfall have brought the hibernating European hamster to the verge of extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissier, Mathilde L.; Handrich, Yves; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Weitten, Mathieu; Pevet, Paul; Kourkgy, Charlotte; Habold, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decades, climate change and agricultural intensification have been identified as two major phenomena negatively affecting biodiversity. However, little is known about their effects on the life-history traits of hibernating species living in agro-ecosystems. The European hamster (Cricetus cricetus), once a common rodent on agricultural land, is now on the verge of extinction in France. Despite the implemented measures for its protection, populations are still in sharp decline but the reasons for it remain unclear. To investigate how environmental change has affected this hibernating rodent, we used a data set based on 1468 recordings of hamster body mass at emergence from hibernation from 1937 to 2014. We reveal the adverse effects of increasing winter rainfall and maize monoculture intensification on the body mass of wild hamsters. Given the links that exist between body mass, reproductive success and population dynamics in mammals, these results are of particular importance to understand the decline of this species. In view of the rates of maize monoculture intensification and the predicted increase in winter rainfall, it is of the utmost importance to improve land management in Western Europe to avoid the extinction of this species.

  2. Sugar Treatments Can Induce AcLEAFY COTYLEDON1 Expression and Trigger the Accumulation of Storage Products during Prothallus Development of Adiantum capillus-veneris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nong Bai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A seed is an intricate structure. Of the two development processes involved in seed formation, seed maturation, or seed program includes accumulation of storage products, acquisition of desiccation tolerance, and induction of dormancy. Little is known about how these processes were originated and integrated into the life cycle of seed plants. While previous investigation on seed origin was almost exclusively through fossil comparison in paleobotany, a wealth of information about the key role of LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1 in seed formation of spermatophyte inspired a new approach to investigating the seed origin mystery. Here, we examined the expression pattern of AcLEC1 during the entire life cycle of Adiantum capillus-veneris, a non-seed plant, confirmed no AcLEC1 gene expression detectable in prothalli, demonstrated inductive expressed by both sucrose and glucose in prothalli. As expected, we found that sugar treatments delayed prothallus development, promoted differentiation of reproductive organs, and triggered accumulation of storage products. These findings demonstrated links between the sugar treatments and the induction of AcLEC1 expression, as well as the sugar treatments and the events such as accumulation of storage products, which is similar to those considered as seed maturation process in seed plants. These links support a modified hypothesis that inductive expression of LEC1 homologs during embryogenesis might be a key innovation for the origin of the seed program.

  3. Hyperosmotic stress induces Rho/Rho kinase/LIM kinase-mediated cofilin phosphorylation in tubular cells: key role in the osmotically triggered F-actin response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirone, Ana C P; Speight, Pam; Zulys, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress induces cytoskeleton reorganization and a net increase in cellular F-actin, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. While de novo F-actin polymerization likely contributes to the actin response, the role of F-actin severing is unknown. To address this proble...... in the hyperosmotic stress-induced F-actin increase. Key words: cytoskeleton, hypertonicity, cell volume, small GTPases.......Hyperosmotic stress induces cytoskeleton reorganization and a net increase in cellular F-actin, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. While de novo F-actin polymerization likely contributes to the actin response, the role of F-actin severing is unknown. To address this problem...... we investigated whether hyperosmolarity regulates cofilin, a key actin-severing protein, whose activity is inhibited by phosphorylation. Since the small GTPases Rho and Rac are sensitive to cell volume changes, and can regulate cofilin phosphorylation, we also asked if they might link osmostress...

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Joakim; Benouda, Leila; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Labombarda, Fabien

    2011-07-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a reversible cardiomyopathy frequently precipitated by a sudden emotional or physical stress. The exact physiopathology is still debated and may involve catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning. Alcohol withdrawal is associated with an hyperadrenergic state and may be a period at risk of cardiac events. We report a 56-year-old man with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

  5. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  6. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... irritants include perfumes and aerosol (say: AIR-uh-sol) sprays, such as hair spray and cleaners. Other irritants include wood and tobacco smoke, the smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ...

  7. The ALFA Trigger Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Dziedzic B

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents basic information about ALFA detectors used in the ATLAS experiment, and the structure of currently developed device used to test a new ALFA trigger interface. It discusses the block diagram of the device, principle of its operation, implementation details and future plans for developing the Simulator.

  8. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Wilke, Diego V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (Laboratório LP4), Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Pessoa, Claudia, E-mail: c_pessoa@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

  9. IFNβ/TNFα synergism induces a non-canonical STAT2/IRF9-dependent pathway triggering a novel DUOX2 NADPH Oxidase-mediated airway antiviral response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karin Fink; Lydie Martin; Esperance Mukawera; Stéfany Chartier; Xavier De Deken; Emmanuelle Brochiero; Fran(c)oise Miot

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells are key initial innate immune responders in the fight against respiratory viruses,primarily via the secretion of antiviral and proinflammatory cytokines that act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to trigger the establishment of an antiviral state.It is currently thought that the early antiviral state in airway epithelial cells primarily relies on IFNβ secretion and the subsequent activation of the interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor complex,composed of STAT1,STAT2 and IRF9,which regulates the expression of a panoply of interferon-stimulated genes encoding proteins with antiviral activities.However,the specific pathways engaged by the synergistic action of different cytokines during viral infections,and the resulting physiological outcomes are still ill-defined.Here,we unveil a novel delayed antiviral response in the airways,which is initiated by the synergistic autocrine/paracrine action of IFNβ and TNFα,and signals through a non-canonical STAT2-and IRF9-dependent,but STAT1-independent cascade.This pathway ultimately leads to the late induction of the DUOX2 NADPH oxidase expression.Importantly,our study uncovers that the development of the antiviral state relies on DUOX2-dependent H2O2 production.Key antiviral pathways are often targeted by evasion strategies evolved by various pathogenic viruses.In this regard,the importance of the novel DUOX2-dependent antiviral pathway is further underlined by the observation that the human respiratory syncytial virus is able to subvert DUOX2 induction.

  10. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate kinetics differentiate normal, stunned, hibernating, and nonviable myocardium in a perfused rat heart model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, David R. [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Liu, Zhonglin [University of Arizona School of Medicine, Tucson, AZ (United States); Johnson, Gerald; Okada, Robert D. [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma, OK (United States); University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK (United States); Beju, Delia [Oklahoma State University School of Medicine, Tulsa, OK (United States); Khaw, Ban An [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-10-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate is an infarct-avid imaging agent. However, patients may have mixtures of normal, irreversibly injured, stunned, and hibernating myocardium. The purposes were to determine {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate uptake and clearance kinetics in these four conditions, and its ability to determine the extent of injury. Twenty-two perfused rat hearts were studied: controls (n = 5), stunned (n = 5; 20-min no-flow followed by 5-min reflow), hibernating (n = 6; 120-min low flow at 4 ml/min), and ischemic-reperfused (n = 6; 120-min no-flow followed by reflow). {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate was then infused. Tracer activity was monitored using a NaI scintillation detector and a multichannel analyzer. Creatine kinase, electron microscopy, and triphenyltetrazolium chloride determined viability. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate 10-min myocardial uptake was significantly greater in ischemic-reperfused (2.50 {+-} 0.09) (cpm, SEM) than in control (1.74 {+-} 0.07), stunned (1.68 {+-} 0.11), and hibernating (1.59 {+-} 0.11) (p < 0.05). Tracer retention curves for ischemic-reperfused were elevated at all time points as compared with the other groups. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate 60-min myocardial uptake was significantly greater in ischemic-reperfused (7.60 {+-} 0.63) than in control (1.98 {+-} 0.15), stunned (1.79 {+-} 0.08), and hibernating (2.33 {+-} 0.15) (p < 0.05). The 60-min well-counted tracer activity ratio of ischemic-reperfused to control was 9:1 and corroborated the NaI detector results. Creatine kinase, triphenyltetrazolium chloride, and electron microscopy all demonstrated significantly greater injury in ischemic-reperfused compared to the other groups. An excellent correlation was observed between viability markers and tracer activity (r = 0.99 triphenyltetrazolium chloride; r = 0.90 creatine kinase). {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate activity continually and progressively increased in irreversibly injured myocardium. {sup 99m}Tc-glucarate uptake was strongly correlated with myocardial necrosis as

  11. Anti-apoptotic signaling as a cytoprotective mechanism in mammalian hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N. Rouble

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of normal cell turnover, apoptosis is a natural phenomenon involved in making essential life and death decisions. Apoptotic pathways balance signals which promote cell death (pro-apoptotic pathways or counteract these signals (anti-apoptotic pathways. We proposed that changes in anti-apoptotic proteins would occur during mammalian hibernation to aid cell preservation during prolonged torpor under cellular conditions that are highly injurious to most mammals (e.g. low body temperatures, ischemia. Immunoblotting was used to analyze the expression of proteins associated with pro-survival in six tissues of thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The brain showed a concerted response to torpor with significant increases in the levels of all anti-apoptotic targets analyzed (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BI-1, Mcl-1, cIAP1/2, xIAP as well as enhanced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S70 and T56. Heart responded similarly with most anti-apoptotic proteins elevated significantly during torpor except for Bcl-xL and xIAP that decreased and Mcl-1 that was unaltered. In liver, BI-1 increased whereas cIAP1/2 decreased. In kidney, there was an increase in BI-1, cIAP and xIAP but decreases in Bcl-xL and p-Bcl-2(T56 content. In brown adipose tissue, protein levels of BI-1, cIAP1/2, and xIAP decreased significantly during torpor (compared with euthermia whereas Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 were unaltered; however, Bcl-2 showed enhanced phosphorylation at Thr56 but not at Ser70. In skeletal muscle, only xIAP levels changed significantly during torpor (an increase. The data show that anti-apoptotic pathways have organ-specific responses in hibernators with a prominent potential role in heart and brain where coordinated enhancement of anti-apoptotic proteins occurred in response to torpor.

  12. The Planning of Lander Science Observations after ROSETTA Deep Space Hibernation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Maud; Ulamec, Stephan; Gaudon, Philippe; Biele, Jens; Pätz, Brigitte; Ashman, Mike

    2014-05-01

    After 10 years of its interplanetary journey, Rosetta has woken up from hibernation to meet Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet in the second term of 2014. The Rosetta spacecraft is composed of an Orbiter and a Lander part. The spacecraft will deliver the Lander, named Philae, to land on the surface of the comet in November 2014. During the Cruise Phase, the Lander, attached to the Orbiter, participated in several commissioning and payload checkout observations. In April 2014, after almost 3 years of hibernation, the Lander and the Orbiter will enter a commissioning phase to check the health of all instruments. Then, from May to November, Prelanding science activities can be planned, although the priority will go to those observations that help to select the landing site. The Lander project has, in much the same way as the Orbiter, its own ground segment: the Rosetta Lander Ground Segment (RLGS). The RLGS is composed of the Science Operations and Navigation Center - SONC - at CNES in Toulouse and the Lander Control Center - LCC - at DLR in Cologne. There are 10 instruments on board of Philae trying to conduct science observations during the life of the Lander. As the comet travels closer to the sun the temperature will eventually become too hot for Philae. The Orbiter, however, is planned to operate for much longer, until end of 2015, passing perihelion. Each of the 10 instruments is represented by a principal investigator. The Lander project also has Lead Scientists, who make sure that the science objectives of the Lander are fulfilled and are on hand to solve any eventual conflicts in this regard. To plan their observations, the Lander team listed their science objectives and ranked them. From these objectives, Specific On-Comet Operation Plan (SOCOP) documents are written by LCC describing the proposed observations. Then, at SONC, the MOST (Mission Operation Scheduling Tool) is used to generate a science experiment plan. This plan is confirmed by the PIs and the Lead

  13. Instrumental shaking thresholds for seismically induced landslides and preliminary report on landslides triggered by the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta, California earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of seismically induced landslide depends on the characteristics of shaking as well as mechanical properties of geologic materials. A very important parameter in the study of seismically induced landslide is the intensity based on a strong-motion accelerogram: it is defined as Arias intensity and is proportional to the duration of the shaking record as well as the amplitude. Having a theoretical relationship between Arias intensity, magnitude and distance it is possible to predict how far away from the seismic source landslides are likely to occur for a given magnitude earthquake. Field investigations have established that the threshold level of Arias intensity depends also on site effects, particularly the fracture characteristics of the outcrops present. -from Author

  14. Novel molecular triggers underlie valproate-induced liver injury and its alleviation by the omega-3 fatty acid DHA: role of inflammation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla M. El-Mowafy

    2016-07-01

    Results and conclusion: VPA promoted hepatic oxidative stress as evidenced by enhancing activity/expression of NADPH-oxidase and its subunits, a ROS-generator, and by accumulation of lipid-peroxides. Moreover, VPA enhanced hepatic phosphorylation/activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2, as proinflammatory signals. Besides, VPA promoted hepatocellular apoptosis, as attested by enhanced expression of cleaved caspase-9 and increased number of TUNEL-positive hepatocytes. Lastly, VPA upregulated levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1-alpha (HIF-1α, a multifaceted modulator of hepatocytic biology, and activity of its downstream antioxidant enzyme heme-oxygenase-1(HO-1. These changes were significantly blunted by co-administration of DHA. Our findings demonstrate that VPA activated NADPH-oxidase and HIF-1α to induce oxidative-stress and hypoxia as initiators of hepatic injury. These changes were further aggravated by up-regulation of inflammatory (MAPK and COX-2 and apoptotic cascades, but could be partly lessened by HO-1 activation. Concurrent administration of DHA mitigated all VPA-induced anomalies.

  15. hCG-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers apoptosis and reduces steroidogenic enzyme expression through activating transcription factor 6 in Leydig cells of the testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Ji; Kim, Tae-Shin; Park, Choon-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Lee, In-kyu; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lawson, Mark A; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress generally occurs in secretory cell types. It has been reported that Leydig cells, which produce testosterone in response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), express key steroidogenic enzymes for the regulation of testosterone synthesis. In this study, we analyzed whether hCG induces ER stress via three unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways in mouse Leydig tumor (mLTC-1) cells and the testis. Treatment with hCG induced ER stress in mLTC-1 cells via the ATF6, IRE1a/XBP1, and eIF2α/GADD34/ATF4 UPR pathways, and transient expression of 50 kDa protein activating transcription factor 6 (p50ATF6) reduced the expression level of steroidogenic 3β-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase Δ5-Δ4-isomerase (3β-HSD) enzyme. In an in vivo model, high-level hCG treatment induced expression of p50ATF6 while that of steroidogenic enzymes, especially 3β-HSD, 17α-hydroxylase/C17–20 lyase (CYP17), and 17β-hydrozysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD), was reduced. Expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes were restored by the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA). Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated transient expression of p50ATF6 reduced the expression level of 3β-HSD in the testis. Protein expression levels of phospho-JNK, CHOP, and cleaved caspases-12 and -3 as markers of ER stress-mediated apoptosis markedly increased in response to high-level hCG treatment in mLTC-1 cells and the testis. Based on transmission electron microscopy and H&E staining of the testis, it was shown that abnormal ER morphology and destruction of testicular histology induced by high-level hCG treatment were reversed by the addition of TUDCA. These findings suggest that hCG-induced ER stress plays important roles in steroidogenic enzyme expression via modulation of the ATF6 pathway as well as ER stress-mediated apoptosis in Leydig cells. PMID:23256993

  16. TGF-beta induces serous borderline ovarian tumor cell invasion by activating EMT but triggers apoptosis in low-grade serous ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Chien Cheng

    Full Text Available Apoptosis in ovarian surface epithelial (OSE cells is induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β. However, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGC are refractory to the inhibitory functions of TGF-β; their invasiveness is up-regulated by TGF-β through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT activation. Serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOT have been recognized as distinct entities that give rise to invasive low-grade serous carcinomas (LGC, which have a relatively poor prognosis and are unrelated to HGC. While it is not fully understood how TGF-β plays disparate roles in OSE cells and its malignant derivative HGC, its role in SBOT and LGC remains unknown. Here we demonstrate the effects of TGF-β on cultured SBOT3.1 and LGC-derived MPSC1 cells, which express TGF-β type I and type II receptors. TGF-β treatment induced the invasiveness of SBOT3.1 cells but reduced the invasiveness of MPSC1 cells. The analysis of apoptosis, which was assessed by cleaved caspase-3 and trypan blue exclusion assay, revealed TGF-β-induced apoptosis in MPSC1, but not SBOT3.1 cells. The pro-apoptotic effect of TGF-β on LGC cells was confirmed in another immortalized LGC cell line ILGC. TGF-β treatment led to the activation of Smad3 but not Smad2. The specific TβRI inhibitor SB431542 and TβRI siRNA abolished the SBOT3.1 invasion induced by TGF-β, and it prevented TGF-β-induced apoptosis in MPSC1 cells. In SBOT3.1 cells, TGF-β down-regulated E-cadherin and concurrently up-regulated N-cadherin. TGF-β up-regulated the expression of the transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, Snail, Slug, Twist and ZEB1. In contrast, co-treatment with SB431542 and TβRI depletion by siRNA abolished the effects of TGF-β on the relative cadherin expression levels and that of Snail, Slug, Twist and ZEB1 as well. This study demonstrates dual TGF-β functions: the induction of SBOT cell invasion by EMT activation and apoptosis promotion in LGC cells.

  17. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101).

  18. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  19. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  20. Luffa echinata Roxb. Induces Human Colon Cancer Cell (HT-29 Death by Triggering the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The antiproliferative properties and cell death mechanism induced by the extract of the fruits of Luffa echinata Roxb. (LER were investigated. The methanolic extract of LER inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 in both dose-dependent and time-dependent manners and caused a significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells. In addition, obvious shrinkage and destruction of the monolayer were observed in LER-treated cells, but not in untreated cells. Analysis of the cell cycle after treatment of HT-29 cells with various concentrations indicated that LER extracts inhibited the cellular proliferation of HT-29 cells via G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle. The Reactive oxygen species (ROS level determination revealed that LER extracts induced apoptotic cell death via ROS generation. In addition, LER treatment led to a rapid drop in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP as a decrease in fluorescence. The transcripts of several apoptosis-related genes were investigated by RT-PCR analysis. The caspase-3 transcripts of HT-29 cells significantly accumulated and the level of Bcl-XL mRNA was decreased after treatment with LER extract. Furthermore, the ratio of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis genes (Bax and Bcl-2 was sharply increased from 1.6 to 54.1. These experiments suggest that LER has anticancer properties via inducing the apoptosis in colon cancer cells, which provided the impetus for further studies on the therapeutic potential of LER against human colon carcinoma.

  1. Triggering of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 by Aspergillus fumigatus conidia in immortalized human corneal epithelial cells to induce inflammatory cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jie; WU Xin-yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Cornea epithelial cells play early and crucial roles in the initiation of ocular surface responses to pathogens.Participation of toll-like receptor(TLR)2 and TLR4,which are major forms of fungi receptors,may be involved in Aspergillus fumigatus induced immune responses.The obiective of the present study was to examine whether inactive Aspergillus fumigatus conidia induce NF-κB activation and production of proinflammaory cytokines,and whether the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 were amplified by conidia in cultured immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (THCEs).This may contribute to our knowledge of the mechanism by which the host cornea can successfully defend against invasive fungi.Methods Aspergillus fumigatus conidia were used to challenge THCE cells.THCE cells were harvested after 0.5,1,2or 4 hours incubation.Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to determine the expression of TLR2,TLR4,TNF-α and IL-8.Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of NF-κB.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EUSA)was performed to determine the expression of TNF-α and IL-8.And the release of TNF-α and IL-8 in the cell supematant were also assessed by ELISA with or without pretreatment with TLR2 and TLR4 neutralizing antibodies.Results Aspergillus fumigatus conidia elicited the expression of TLR2,TLR4,TNF-α and IL-8 mRNA in THCEs.Exposure of THCE cells to Aspergillus fumigatus conidia resulted in NF-κB activation,which increased at 30 minutes (increased from 11.35±2.74 in the controls to 19.12±3.48,P<0.05)and thereafter increased steadily up to 4 hours after challenge(P<0.01).Concomitant with NF-κB acfivation,secretion of TNF-α and IL-8 in conidia-challenged cells was increased in a time-dependent manner.Incubation of THCE cells with TLR2 antibody or TLR4 antibody before conidia challenge resulted in jnhibifion of conidia-induced TNF-α and IL-8 secretion(P<0.05),TLR2 antibody and TLR4 antibody together significantly increased

  2. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The ARGUS vertex trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, N; Kolanoski, H; Siegmund, T; Bergter, J; Eckstein, P; Schubert, Klaus R; Waldi, R; Imhof, M; Ressing, D; Weiss, U; Weseler, S

    1995-01-01

    A fast second level trigger has been developed for the ARGUS experiment which recognizes tracks originating from the interaction region. The processor compares the hits in the ARGUS Micro Vertex Drift Chamber to 245760 masks stored in random access memories. The masks which are fully defined in three dimensions are able to reject tracks originating in the wall of the narrow beampipe of 10.5\\,mm radius.

  4. Ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rinky; Matsushita, Kenji; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Morrell, Craig N; Cao, Wangsen; Lowenstein, Charles J

    2004-08-06

    The sphingolipid ceramide mediates a variety of stress responses, including vascular inflammation and thrombosis. Activated endothelial cells release Weibel-Palade bodies, granules containing von Willebrand factor (vWF) and P-selectin, which induce leukocyte rolling and platelet adhesion and aggregation. We hypothesized that ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis in part by triggering Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We added ceramide to human aortic endothelial cells and assayed Weibel-Palade body exocytosis by measuring the concentration of vWF released into the media. Exogenous ceramide induces vWF release from endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Activators of endogenous ceramide production, neutral sphingomyelinase, or tumor necrosis factor-alpha also induce Weibel-Palade body exocytosis. We next studied NO effects on ceramide-induced Weibel-Palade body exocytosis because NO can inhibit vascular inflammation. The NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine decreases ceramide-induced vWF release in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester increases ceramide-induced vWF release. In summary, our findings show that endogenous ceramide triggers Weibel-Palade body exocytosis, and that endogenous NO inhibits ceramide-induced exocytosis. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which ceramide induces vascular inflammation and thrombosis.

  5. Suspension of Mitotic Activity in Dentate Gyrus of the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4–6°C permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  6. Surface Control of Cold Hibernated Elastic Memory Self-Deployable Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.; Ghaffarian, Reza

    2006-01-01

    A new class of simple, reliable, lightweight, low packaging volume and cost, self-deployable structures has been developed for use in space and commercial applications. This technology called 'cold hibernated elastic memory' (CHEM) utilizes shape memory polymers (SMP)in open cellular (foam) structure or sandwich structures made of shape memory polymer foam cores and polymeric composite skins. Some of many potential CHEM space applications require a high precision deployment and surface accuracy during operation. However, a CHEM structure could be slightly distorted by the thermo-mechanical processing as well as by thermal space environment Therefore, the sensor system is desirable to monitor and correct the potential surface imperfection. During these studies, the surface control of CHEM smart structures was demonstrated using a Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator developed by the NASA LaRC and US Army ARL. The test results indicate that the MFC actuator performed well before and after processing cycles. It reduced some residue compressive strain that in turn corrected very small shape distortion after each processing cycle. The integrated precision strain gages were detecting only a small flat shape imperfection indicating a good recoverability of original shape of the CHEM test structure.

  7. Expression profiling and structural characterization of microRNAs in adipose tissues of hibernating ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating metabolic stress. In this study, we determined the expression and structural characteristics of 20 miRNAs in brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) during torpor in thirteen-lined ground squirrels. Using a modified stem-loop technique, we found that during torpor, expression of six miRNAs including let-7a, let-7b, miR-107, miR-150, miR-222 and miR-31 was significantly downregulated in WAT (Pstructure-influenced changes in pre-miRNA processing efficiency in the squirrel. As well, the expression of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer remained unchanged in both tissues during torpor. Overall, our findings suggest that changes of miRNA expression in adipose tissues may be linked to distinct biological roles in WAT and BAT during hibernation and may involve the regulation of signaling cascades.

  8. Design of Poly(L-lactide)-Poly(ethylene glycol) Copolymer with Light-Induced Shape-Memory Effect Triggered by Pendant Anthracene Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; He, Man-jie; Deng, Xiao-Ying; Du, Lan; Fan, Cheng-Jie; Yang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2016-04-13

    A novel light-induced shape-memory material based on poly(l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer is developed successfully by dangling the photoresponsive anthracene group on the PEG soft segment selectively. For synthesis strategy, the preprepared photoresponsive monomer N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-9-anthracene-methanamine (BHEAA) is first embedded into PEG chains; then, we couple this anthracene-functionalized PEG precursor with PLA precursor to result in PLA-PEG-A copolymer. The composition of target product can be well-defined by simply adjusting the feed ratio. The chemical structures of intermediate and final products are confirmed by (1)H NMR. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of material reveals that the PEG soft segment became noncrystallizable when 4% or more BHEAA is introduced, and this feature is beneficial to the mobility of anthracene groups in polymer matrix. The static tensile tests show that the samples exhibit rubberlike mechanical properties except for the PLA-dominant one. The reversibility of [4 + 4] cycloaddition reaction between pendant anthracene groups in PLA-PEG-A film is demonstrated by UV-vis. Eventually, the light-induced shape-memory effect (LSME) is successfully realized in PLA-PEG-A. The results of cyclic photomechanical tests also reveal that the content of PLA hard segment as well as photosensitive anthracene moieties plays a crucial role in LSME.

  9. The protective effect of myo-inositol on hippocamal cell loss and structural alterations in neurons and synapses triggered by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaria, Nato; Kiladze, Maia; Zhvania, Mzia G; Japaridze, Nadezhda J; Bikashvili, Tamar; Solomonia, Revaz O; Bolkvadze, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    It is known that myo-inositol pretreatment attenuates the seizure severity and several biochemical changes provoked by experimentally induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unidentified whether such properties of myo-inositol influence the structure of epileptic brain. In the present light and electron microscopic research we elucidate if pretreatment with myo-inositol has positive effect on hippocampal cell loss, and cell and synapses damage provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with (i) saline, (ii) saline + kainic acid, (iii) myo-inositol + kainic acid. Assessment of cell loss at 2, 14, and 30 days after treatment demonstrate cytoprotective effect of myo-inositol in CA1 and CA3 areas. It was strongly expressed in pyramidal layer of CA1, radial and oriental layers of CA3 and in less degree-in other layers of both fields. Ultrastructural alterations were described in CA1, 14 days after treatment. The structure of neurons, synapses, and porosomes are well preserved in the rats pretreated with myo-inositol in comparing with rats treated with only kainic acid.

  10. The PRKAA1/AMPKα1 pathway triggers autophagy during CSF1-induced human monocyte differentiation and is a potential target in CMML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obba, Sandrine; Hizir, Zoheir; Boyer, Laurent; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Pfeifer, Anja; Michel, Gregory; Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Gonçalvès, Diogo; Cerezo, Michael; Marchetti, Sandrine; Rocchi, Stephane; Droin, Nathalie; Cluzeau, Thomas; Robert, Guillaume; Luciano, Frederic; Robaye, Bernard; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Legros, Laurence; Solary, Eric; Auberger, Patrick; Jacquel, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is induced during differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages that is mediated by CSF1/CSF-1/M-CSF (colony stimulating factor 1 [macrophage]). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that link CSF1 receptor engagement to the induction of autophagy. Here we show that the CAMKK2-PRKAA1-ULK1 pathway is required for CSF1-induced autophagy and human monocyte differentiation. We reveal that this pathway links P2RY6 to the induction of autophagy, and we decipher the signaling network that links the CSF1 receptor to P2RY6-mediated autophagy and monocyte differentiation. In addition, we show that the physiological P2RY6 ligand UDP and the specific P2RY6 agonist MRS2693 can restore normal monocyte differentiation through reinduction of autophagy in primary myeloid cells from some but not all chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patients. Collectively, our findings highlight an essential role for PRKAA1-mediated autophagy during differentiation of human monocytes and pave the way for future therapeutic interventions for CMML.

  11. The therapeutic T-cell response induced by tumor delivery of TNF and melphalan is dependent on early triggering of natural killer and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balza, Enrica; Zanellato, Silvia; Poggi, Alessandro; Reverberi, Daniele; Rubartelli, Anna; Mortara, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    The fusion protein L19mTNF (mouse TNF and human antibody fragment L19 directed to fibronectin extra domain B) selectively targets the tumor vasculature, and in combination with melphalan induces a long-lasting T-cell therapeutic response and immune memory in murine models. Increasing evidence suggests that natural killer (NK) cells act to promote effective T-cell-based antitumor responses. We have analyzed the role of NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs) on two different murine tumor models: WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma and C51 colon carcinoma, in which the combined treatment induces high and low rejection rates, respectively. In vivo NK-cell depletion strongly reduced the rejection of WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma and correlated with a decrease in mature DCs, CD4(+) , and CD8(+) T cells in the tumor-draining LNs and mature DCs and CD4(+) T cells in the tumor 40 h after initiation of the therapy. NK-cell depletion also resulted in the impairment of the stimulatory capability of DCs derived from tumor-draining LNs of WEHI-164-treated mice. Moreover, a significant reduction of M2-type infiltrating macrophages was detected in both tumors undergoing therapy. These results suggest that the efficacy of L19mTNF/melphalan therapy is strongly related to the early activation of NK cells and DCs, which are necessary for an effective T-cell response. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Whole inactivated avian Influenza H9N2 viruses induce nasal submucosal dendritic cells to sample luminal viruses via transepithelial dendrites and trigger subsequent DC maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Tao; Yin, Yinyan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Haofei; Lin, Jian; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2015-03-10

    Nasal mucosal barrier is a key impediment for the absorption of influenza whole inactivated virus (WIV) intranasal vaccine. Yet it is still unclear how WIV cross the epithelial cells (ECs) in nasal cavity. Here, in vitro, a coculture system was well established, consisting of surrogate nasal ECs (Calu-3) and dendritic cells (DCs). After adding H9N2 WIV on the apical side of ECs, we found that submucosal DCs extended their transepithelial dendrites (TEDs) and sampled luminal viruses. However, ECs were not involved in the transepithelial transport of viruses. Subsequently, the phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs were also enhanced, whereas they were attenuated after blocking of TED formation by anti-JAM1 antibody. In vivo, we confirmed that H9N2 WIV were capable of inducing nasal submucosal DCs to sample luminal viruses via TEDs in the nasal passage but not nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). CD103(+) and CD103(-) DC subsets participated in this process. Of note, chemokine CCL20, released from the H9N2 WIV-induced ECs, played a vital role in DC recruitment and TED formation. Taken together, our findings indicated that TEDs played a critical role in facilitating viral transport across the epithelial barrier, which may guide the design of novel nasal mucosal vaccine strategies.

  13. Understanding of myofascial trigger points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Xiaoqiang; Tan Shusheng; Huang Qiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) including current epidemiology,pathology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The data analyzed in this review were mainly from relevant articles without restriction on the publication date reported in PubMed,MedSci,Google scholar.The terms "myofasial trigger points" and "myofacial pain syndrome" were used for the literature search.Study selection Original articles with no limitation of research design and critical reviews containing data relevant to myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) and MPS were retrieved,reviewed,analyzed and summarized.Results Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is characterized by painful taut band,referred pain,and local response twitch with a prevalence of 85% to 95% of incidence.Several factors link to the etiology of MTrPs,such as the chronic injury and overload of muscles.Other factors,such as certain nutrient and hormone insufficiency,comorbidities,and muscle imbalance may also maintain the MTrP in an active status and induce recurrent pain.The current pathology is that an extra leakage acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction induces persistent contracture knots,relative to some hypotheses of integration,muscle spindle discharges,spinal segment sensitization,ect.MTrPs can be diagnosed and localized based on a few subjective criteria.Several approaches,including both direct and supplementary treatments,can inactivate MTrPs.Direct treatments are categorized into invasive and conservative.Conclusion This review provides a clear understanding of MTrP pain and introduces the most useful treatment approaches in China.

  14. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  15. Rapid eye movement sleep loss induces neuronal apoptosis in the rat brain by noradrenaline acting on alpha 1-adrenoceptor and by triggering mitochondrial intrinsic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu I Somarajan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative disorders are associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REMS-loss, however the mechanism was unknown. As REMS-loss elevates noradrenaline (NA level in the brain as well as induces neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, in this study we have delineated the intracellular molecular pathway involved in REMS deprivation (REMSD associated NA-induced neuronal apoptosis. Rats were REMS deprived for 6 days by the classical flower-pot method, suitable controls were conducted and the effects on apoptosis markers evaluated. Further, the role of NA was studied by one, intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of NA-ergic alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (PRZ and two, by down-regulation of NA synthesis in locus coeruleus (LC neurons by local microinjection of tyrosine hydroxylase siRNA (TH-siRNA. Immunoblot estimates showed that the expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins viz. Bcl2-associated death promoter (BAD protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1, cytochrome c, caspase9, caspase3 were elevated in the REMS-deprived rat brains, while caspase8 level remained unaffected; PRZ treatment did not allow elevation of these pro-apoptotic factors. Further, REMSD increased cytochrome c expression, which was prevented if the NA synthesis from the LC neurons was blocked by microinjection of TH-siRNA in vivo into the LC during REMSD in freely moving normal rats. Mitochondrial damage was re-confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, which showed distinctly swollen mitochondria with disintegrated cristae, chromosomal condensation and clumping along the nuclear membrane and all these changes were prevented in PRZ treated rats. Combining findings of this study along with earlier reports we propose that upon REMSD NA level increases in the brain as the LC NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons do not cease firing and TH is up-regulated in those neurons. This elevated NA acting on alpha1-adrenoceptors damages mitochondria causing release of

  16. Electric field triggering the spin reorientation and controlling the absorption and release of heat in the induced multiferroic compound EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ranke, P. J.; Gama, S.; Ribeiro, P. O.; Carvalho, A. Magnus G.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; de Sousa, V. S. R.; Lopes, P. H. O.; de Oliveira, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report remarkable results due to the coupling between the magnetization and the electric field induced polarization in EuTiO3. Using a microscopic model Hamiltonian to describe the three coupled sublattices, Eu-(spin-up), Eu-(spin-down), and Ti-(moment), the spin flop and spin reorientation phase transitions were described with and without the electric-magnetic coupling interaction. The external electric field can be used to tune the temperature of the spin reorientation phase transition TSR = TSR(E). When the TSR is tuned around the EuTiO3—Néel temperature (TN = 5.5 K), an outstanding effect emerges in which EuTiO3 releases heat under magnetic field change. The electric field controlling the spin reorientation transition and the endo-exothermic processes are discussed through the microscopic interactions model parameters.

  17. 基于Grails+Hibernate+Spring框架的水体溶解氧检测数据呈现%Data analysis of detecting dissolved oxygen in waterbased on the frame of Grails+Hibernate+Spring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦飞; 高琪娟; 赵宇; 孙力

    2009-01-01

    本文基干Grails+Hibernate+Spring组合框架,结合C8051F040微控制器、光化学及光电检测等技术,构建了水体溶解氧检测显示平台,分析了水体溶解氧含量在不同水域、不同温度下的变化情况;以AJAX异步方式准确、实时、在线的显示了水体溶解氧的含量并跟踪显示处理的结果.

  18. Pollen Morphology and Boron Concentration in Floral Tissues as Factors Triggering Natural and GA-Induced Parthenocarpic Fruit Development in Grapevine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, Ricardo; Yáñez, Mónica; Tapia, Jaime; Moreno, Yerko

    2015-01-01

    Parthenocarpic fruit development (PFD) reduces fruit yield and quality in grapevine. Parthenocarpic seedless berries arise from fruit set without effective fertilization due to defective pollen germination. PFD has been associated to micronutrient deficiency but the relation of this phenomenon with pollen polymorphism has not been reported before. In this work, six grapevine cultivars with different tendency for PFD and grown under micronutrient-sufficient conditions were analyzed to determine pollen structure and germination capability as well as PFD rates. Wide variation in non-germinative abnormal pollen was detected either among cultivars as well as for the same cultivar in different growing seasons. A straight correlation with PFD rates was found (R2 = 0.9896), suggesting that natural parthenocarpy is related to defective pollen development. Such relation was not observed when PFD was analyzed in grapevine plants exposed to exogenous gibberellin (GA) or abscissic acid (ABA) applications at pre-anthesis. Increase (GA treatment) or reduction (ABA treatment) in PFD rates without significative changes in abnormal pollen was determined. Although these plants were maintained at sufficient boron (B) condition, a down-regulation of the floral genes VvBOR3 and VvBOR4 together with a reduction of floral B content in GA-treated plants was established. These results suggest that impairment in B mobility to reproductive tissues and restriction of pollen tube growth could be involved in the GA-induced parthenocarpy. PMID:26440413

  19. Electric field triggering the spin reorientation and controlling the absorption and release of heat in the induced multiferroic compound EuTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranke, P. J. von, E-mail: von.ranke@uol.com.br; Ribeiro, P. O.; Alho, B. P.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Nobrega, E. P.; Caldas, A.; Sousa, V. S. R. de; Lopes, P. H. O.; Oliveira, N. A. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro–UERJ, Rua São, Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janerio (Brazil); Gama, S. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema, 09971-270 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carvalho, A. Magnus G. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, CNPEM, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-12-28

    We report remarkable results due to the coupling between the magnetization and the electric field induced polarization in EuTiO{sub 3}. Using a microscopic model Hamiltonian to describe the three coupled sublattices, Eu-(spin-up), Eu-(spin-down), and Ti-(moment), the spin flop and spin reorientation phase transitions were described with and without the electric-magnetic coupling interaction. The external electric field can be used to tune the temperature of the spin reorientation phase transition T{sub SR} = T{sub SR}(E). When the T{sub SR} is tuned around the EuTiO{sub 3}—Néel temperature (T{sub N} = 5.5 K), an outstanding effect emerges in which EuTiO{sub 3} releases heat under magnetic field change. The electric field controlling the spin reorientation transition and the endo-exothermic processes are discussed through the microscopic interactions model parameters.

  20. Threshold Dose of Three Types of Quantum Dots (QDs Induces Oxidative Stress Triggers DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Mouse Fibroblast L929 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been reported that fluorescent quantum dots (QDs have obvious acute toxic effects in vitro, their toxic effects at low doses or threshold doses are still unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the biological histocompatibility and in vitro toxicity of three types of QDs at threshold doses. Also, we compared the toxic effects of QDs with different raw chemical compositions and sizes. The results showed that low concentrations of QDs (≤7 μg/mL had no obvious effect on cell viability and cell membrane damage, oxidative damage, cell apoptosis or DNA damage. However, QD exposure led to a significant cytotoxicity at higher doses (≥14 μg/mL and induced abnormal cellular morphology. In addition, when comparing the three types of QDs, 2.2 nm CdTe QDs exposure showed a significantly increased proportion of apoptotic cells and significant DNA damage, suggesting that size and composition contribute to the toxic effects of QDs. Based on these discussions, it was concluded that the concentration (7 μg/mL may serve as a threshold level for these three types of QDs only in L929 fibroblasts, whereas high concentrations (above 14 μg/mL may be toxic, resulting in inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis and DNA damage in L929 fibroblasts.

  1. IAA-producing Penicillium sp. NICS01 triggers plant growth and suppresses Fusarium sp.-induced oxidative stress in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Shim, Kang-Bo; Lee, Byeong-Won; Hwang, Chung-Dong; Pae, Suk-Bok; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Up; Lee, Choon-Ki; Baek, In-Youl

    2013-06-28

    Application of rhizospheric fungi is an effective and environmentally friendly method of improving plant growth and controlling many plant diseases. The current study was aimed to identify phytohormone-producing fungi from soil, to understand their roles in sesame plant growth, and to control Fusarium disease. Three predominant fungi (PNF1, PNF2, and PNF3) isolated from the rhizospheric soil of peanut plants were screened for their growth-promoting efficiency on sesame seedlings. Among these isolates, PNF2 significantly increased the shoot length and fresh weight of seedlings compared with controls. Analysis of the fungal culture filtrate showed a higher concentration of indole acetic acid in PNF2 than in the other isolates. PNF2 was identified as Penicillium sp. on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequence similarity. The in vitro biocontrol activity of Penicillium sp. against Fusarium sp. was exhibited by a 49% inhibition of mycelial growth in a dual culture bioassay and by hyphal injuries as observed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, greenhouse experiments revealed that Fusarium inhibited growth in sesame plants by damaging lipid membranes and reducing protein content. Co-cultivation with Penicillium sp. mitigated Fusarium-induced oxidative stress in sesame plants by limiting membrane lipid peroxidation, and by increasing the protein concentration, levels of antioxidants such as total polyphenols, and peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities. Thus, our findings suggest that Penicillium sp. is a potent plant growthpromoting fungus that has the ability to ameliorate damage caused by Fusarium infection in sesame cultivation.

  2. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 inhibits TGF-β1-induced EMT through the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by reducing the expression of PKM2 and is closely linked to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yuan, Xiaolong; Li, Wenhui; Cao, Qianqian; Shu, Yusheng

    2016-10-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a potent stimulator of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is a key event in the initiation of tumor cell metastasis. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) is known to be involved in the resolution of inflammation; however, whether AT-RvD1 exerts effects on TGF-β1-induced EMT remains unclear. Thus, we first explored the effects of AT-RvD1 on the EMT of lung cancer cells. Treatment with TGF-β1 increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). The expression of E-cadherin in A549 lung cancer cells was reduced, and the expression of vimentin was enhanced. AT-RvD1 enhanced the expression of E-cadherin in a concentration‑dependent manner and suppressed the expression of Nrf2 and vimentin. AT-RvD1 did not affect the proliferation of A549 lung cancer cells whereas it suppressed the TGF-β1‑induced migration and invasion of A549 cells. The expression of pyruvate kinase M2 (Pkm2), which is associated with TGF-β-induced factor homeobox 2 (TGIF2), was significantly increased during the TGF-β1-induced EMT of A549 lung cancer cells. The mTOR pathway is known to regulate the expression of various glycolytic enzymes including Pkm2. We examined the involvement of the mTOR pathway in the suppressive effects of AT-RvD1 on Pkm2 expression in A549 cells. The mTOR activator restored the expression of Pkm2 and partially downregulated the expression of E-cadherin. However, the mTOR activator had no clear effect on the TGF-β1-induced EMT. These results suggest that AT-RvD1 is closely linked to oxidative stress and partially inhibits TGF-β1-induced EMT through the inhibition of the mTOR pathway by reducing the expression of Pkm2.

  3. Bufalin induces G0/G1 phase arrest through inhibiting the levels of cyclin D, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, and triggers apoptosis via mitochondrial signaling pathway in T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Wen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Pai, Shu-Jen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Fan, Ming-Jen; Chiou, Shang-Ming; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Chen, Po-Yuan; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-04-01

    Most of the chemotherapy treatments for bladder cancer aim to kill the cancer cells, but a high recurrence rate after medical treatments is still occurred. Bufalin from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad has been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in many types of cancer cell lines. However, there is no report addressing that bufalin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells. The purpose of this study was investigated the mechanisms of bufalin-induced apoptosis in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). We demonstrated the effects of bufalin on the cell growth and apoptosis in T24 cells by using DAPI/TUNEL double staining, a PI exclusion and flow cytometric analysis. The effects of bufalin on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and DNA content including sub-G1 (apoptosis) in T24 cells were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of G(0)/G(1) phase-regulated and apoptosis-associated protein levels in bufalin-treated T24 cells. The results indicated that bufalin significantly decreased the percentage of viability, induced the G(0)/G(1) phase arrest and triggered apoptosis in T24 cells. The down-regulation of the protein levels for cyclin D, CDK4, cyclin E, CDK2, phospho-Rb, phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with the simultaneous up-regulation of the cytochrome c, Apaf-1, AIF, caspase-3, -7 and -9 and Bax protein expressions and caspase activities were observed in T24 cells after bufalin treatment. Based on our results, bufalin induces apoptotic cell death in T24 cells through suppressing AKT activity and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein as well as inducing pro-apoptotic Bax protein. The levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9 are also mediated apoptosis in bufalin-treated T24 cells. Therefore, bufalin might be used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  4. Hibernation alters the diversity and composition of mucosa-associated bacteria while enhancing antimicrobial defence in the gut of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Neil, Katie L; Zeng, Austin; Sprenger, Ryan J; Kurtz, Courtney C; Suen, Garret; Carey, Hannah V

    2014-09-01

    The gut microbiota plays important roles in animal nutrition and health. This relationship is particularly dynamic in hibernating mammals where fasting drives the gut community to rely on host-derived nutrients instead of exogenous substrates. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and caecal tissue protein analysis to investigate the effects of hibernation on the mucosa-associated bacterial microbiota and host responses in 13-lined ground squirrels. The mucosal microbiota was less diverse in winter hibernators than in actively feeding spring and summer squirrels. UniFrac analysis revealed distinct summer and late winter microbiota clusters, while spring and early winter clusters overlapped slightly, consistent with their transitional structures. Communities in all seasons were dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, with lesser contributions from Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Tenericutes and Actinobacteria. Hibernators had lower relative abundances of Firmicutes, which include genera that prefer plant polysaccharides, and higher abundances of Bacteroidetes and Verrucomicrobia, some of which can survive solely on host-derived mucins. A core mucosal assemblage of nine operational taxonomic units shared among all individuals was identified with an average total sequence abundance of 60.2%. This core community, together with moderate shifts in specific taxa, indicates that the mucosal microbiota remains relatively stable over the annual cycle yet responds to substrate changes while potentially serving as a pool for 'seeding' the microbiota once exogenous substrates return in spring. Relative to summer, hibernation reduced caecal crypt length and increased MUC2 expression in early winter and spring. Hibernation also decreased caecal TLR4 and increased TLR5 expression, suggesting a protective response that minimizes inflammation.

  5. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  6. Beta-lactams interfering with PBP1 induce Panton-Valentine leukocidin expression by triggering sarA and rot global regulators of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-07-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression.

  7. Blue Light-excited Light-Oxygen-Voltage-sensing Domain 2 (LOV2) Triggers a Rearrangement of the Kinase Domain to Induce Phosphorylation Activity in Arabidopsis Phototropin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oide, Mao; Okajima, Koji; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-09-16

    Phototropin1 is a blue light (BL) receptor in plants and shows BL-dependent kinase activation. The BL-excited light-oxygen-voltage-sensing domain 2 (LOV2) is primarily responsible for the activation of the kinase domain; however, the molecular mechanism by which conformational changes in LOV2 are transmitted to the kinase domain remains unclear. Here, we investigated BL-induced structural changes of a minimum functional fragment of Arabidopsis phototropin1 composed of LOV2, the kinase domain, and a linker connecting the two domains using small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The fragment existed as a dimer and displayed photoreversible SAXS changes reflected in the radii of gyration of 42.9 Å in the dark and 48.8 Å under BL irradiation. In the dark, the molecular shape reconstructed from the SAXS profiles appeared as two bean-shaped lobes in a twisted arrangement that was 170 Å long, 80 Å wide, and 50 Å thick. The molecular shape under BL became slightly elongated from that in the dark. By fitting the crystal structure of the LOV2 dimer and a homology model of the kinase domain to their inferred shapes, the BL-dependent change could be interpreted as the positional shift in the kinase domain relative to that of the LOV2 dimer. In addition, we found that lysine 475, a functionally important residue, in the N-terminal region of LOV2 plays a critical role in transmitting the structural changes in LOV2 to the kinase domain. The interface between the domains is critical for signaling, suitably changing the structure to activate the kinase in response to conformational changes in the adjoining LOV2.

  8. β-Lactams Interfering with PBP1 Induce Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Expression by Triggering sarA and rot Global Regulators of Staphylococcus aureus ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression. PMID:21502633

  9. Dyslipidemic Diet-Induced Monocyte “Priming” and Dysfunction in Non-Human Primates Is Triggered by Elevated Plasma Cholesterol and Accompanied by Altered Histone Acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Short

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and the recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages into sites of inflammation play a key role in atherogenesis and other chronic inflammatory diseases linked to cardiometabolic syndrome and obesity. Previous studies from our group have shown that metabolic stress promotes monocyte priming, i.e., enhanced adhesion and accelerated chemotaxis of monocytes in response to chemokines, both in vitro and in dyslipidemic LDLR−/− mice. We also showed that metabolic stress-induced monocyte dysfunction is, at least to a large extent caused by the S-glutathionylation, inactivation, and subsequent degradation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1. Here, we analyzed the effects of a Western-style, dyslipidemic diet (DD, which was composed of high levels of saturated fat, cholesterol, and simple sugars, on monocyte (dysfunction in non-human primates (NHPs. We found that similar to mice, a DD enhances monocyte chemotaxis in NHP within 4 weeks, occurring concordantly with the onset of hypercholesterolemia but prior to changes in triglycerides, blood glucose, monocytosis, or changes in monocyte subset composition. In addition, we identified transitory decreases in the acetylation of histone H3 at the lysine residues 18 and 23 in metabolically primed monocytes, and we found that monocyte priming was correlated with the acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 after an 8-week DD regimen. Our data show that metabolic stress promotes monocyte priming and hyper-chemotactic responses in NHP. The histone modifications accompanying monocyte priming in primates suggest a reprogramming of the epigenetic landscape, which may lead to dysregulated responses and functionalities in macrophages derived from primed monocytes that are recruited to sites of inflammation.

  10. Cathelicidin LL-37 induces time-resolved release of LTB4 and TXA2 by human macrophages and triggers eicosanoid generation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Min; Soehnlein, Oliver; Tang, Xiao; van der Does, Anne M; Smedler, Erik; Uhlén, Per; Lindbom, Lennart; Agerberth, Birgitta; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2014-08-01

    In humans, LL-37 and eicosanoids are important mediators of inflammation and immune responses. Here we report that LL-37 promotes leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) generation by human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). LL-37 evokes calcium mobilization apparently via the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs, as well as cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and 5-lipoxygenase in HMDMs, leading to an early (1 h) release of LTB4. Similarly, TXA2 production at an early time involved the same signaling sequence along an LL-37-P2X7R-cPLA2-cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) axis. However, at later (6-8 h) time points, internalized LL-37 up-regulates COX-2 expression, promoting TXA2 production. Furthermore, intraperitoneal injection of mice with murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP) induces significantly higher levels of LTB4 and TXA2 in mouse ascites rich in macrophages. Conversely, cathelicidin-deficient (Cnlp(-/-)) mice produce much less LTB4 and TXB2 in vivo in response to TNF-α compared with control mice. We conclude that LL-37 elicits a biphasic release of eicosanoids in macrophages with early, Ca(2+)-dependent formation of LTB4 and TXA2 followed by a late peak of TXA2, generated via induction of COX-2 by internalized LL-37, thus allowing eicosanoid production in a temporally controlled manner. Moreover, our findings provide evidence that LL-37 is an endogenous regulator of eicosanoid-dependent inflammatory responses in vivo.

  11. Variation in phenology of hibernation and reproduction in the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Frey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hibernation is a key life history feature that can impact many other crucial aspects of a species’ biology, such as its survival and reproduction. I examined the timing of hibernation and reproduction in the federally endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus, which occurs across a broad range of latitudes and elevations in the American Southwest. Data from museum specimens and field studies supported predictions for later emergence and shorter active intervals in montane populations relative to lower elevation valley populations. A low-elevation population located at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR in the Rio Grande valley was most similar to other subspecies of Z. hudsonius: the first emergence date was in mid-May and there was an active interval of 162 days. In montane populations of Z. h. luteus, the date of first emergence was delayed until mid-June and the active interval was reduced to ca 124–135 days, similar to some populations of the western jumping mouse (Z. princeps. Last date of immergence into hibernation occurred at about the same time in all populations (mid to late October. In montane populations pregnant females are known from July to late August and evidence suggests that they have a single litter per year. At BANWR two peaks in reproduction were expected based on similarity of active season to Z. h. preblei. However, only one peak was clearly evident, possibly due to later first reproduction and possible torpor during late summer. At BANWR pregnant females are known from June and July. Due to the short activity season and geographic variation in phenology of key life history events of Z. h. luteus, recommendations are made for the appropriate timing for surveys for this endangered species.

  12. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses of hibernating bats in Virginia and Indiana, winters 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, David T.S.; Cryan, Paul; Fricker, Paul D.; Dannemiller, Nicholas G.

    2017-01-01

    This data release includes video files and image-processing results used to conduct the analyses of hibernation patterns in groups of bats reported by Hayman et al. (2017), "Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats.”  Thermal-imaging surveillance video cameras were used to observe little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in a cave in Virginia and Indiana bats (M. sodalis) in a cave in Indiana during three winters between 2011 and 2014.  There are 740 video files used for analysis (‘Analysis videos’), organized into 7 folders by state/site and winter.  Total size of the video data set is 14.1 gigabytes.  Each video file in this analysis set represents one 24-hour period of observation, time-lapsed at a rate of one frame per 30 seconds of real time (video plays at 30 frames per second).  A folder of illustrative videos is also included, which shows all of the analysis days for one winter of monitoring merged into a single video clip, time-lapsed at a rate of one frame per two hours of real time.  The associated image-processing results are included in 7 data files, each representing computer derived values of mean pixel intensity in every 10th frame of the 740 time-lapsed video files, concatenated by site and winter of observation.  Details on the format of these data, as well as how they were processed and derived are included in Hayman et al. (2017) and with the project metadata on Science Base.Hayman, DTS, Cryan PM, Fricker PD, Dannemiller NG. 2017. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats. Methods Ecol Evol. 2017;00:1-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12823

  13. Variation in phenology of hibernation and reproduction in the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jennifer K

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation is a key life history feature that can impact many other crucial aspects of a species' biology, such as its survival and reproduction. I examined the timing of hibernation and reproduction in the federally endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus), which occurs across a broad range of latitudes and elevations in the American Southwest. Data from museum specimens and field studies supported predictions for later emergence and shorter active intervals in montane populations relative to lower elevation valley populations. A low-elevation population located at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR) in the Rio Grande valley was most similar to other subspecies of Z. hudsonius: the first emergence date was in mid-May and there was an active interval of 162 days. In montane populations of Z. h. luteus, the date of first emergence was delayed until mid-June and the active interval was reduced to ca 124-135 days, similar to some populations of the western jumping mouse (Z. princeps). Last date of immergence into hibernation occurred at about the same time in all populations (mid to late October). In montane populations pregnant females are known from July to late August and evidence suggests that they have a single litter per year. At BANWR two peaks in reproduction were expected based on similarity of active season to Z. h. preblei. However, only one peak was clearly evident, possibly due to later first reproduction and possible torpor during late summer. At BANWR pregnant females are known from June and July. Due to the short activity season and geographic variation in phenology of key life history events of Z. h. luteus, recommendations are made for the appropriate timing for surveys for this endangered species.

  14. The NA48 trigger supervisor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, R; Berotto, F; Bertolino, F; Govi, G; Menichetti, E; Sozzi, M

    2000-01-01

    The NA48 experiment aims to measure direct CP violation in the K/sub L//sup 0/ decays system with an accuracy of 2*10/sup -4/. High performances are required to the trigger and acquisition systems. This paper describes the NA48 Trigger Supervisor, a 40 MHz pipelined hardware system which correlates and processes trigger informations from local trigger sources, searching for interesting patterns. The trigger packet include a timestamp information used by the readout systems to retrieve detector data. The design architecture and functionality during 98 data taking are described. (5 refs).

  15. Growth promotion in pigs by oxytetracycline coincides with down regulation of serum inflammatory parameters and of hibernation-associated protein HP-27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soler, Laura; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The growth promoting effect of supplementing animal feed with antibiotics like tetracycline has traditionally been attributed to their antibiotic character. However, more evidence has been accumulated on their direct anti-inflammatory effect during the last two decades. Here we used a pig model...... and lipid metabolism, confirming the anti-inflammatory mechanism of OTC. Interestingly, apart from the classic acute phase reactants also down regulation was seen of a hibernation associated plasma protein (HP-27), which is to our knowledge the first description in pigs. Although the exact function in non-hibernators...

  16. Pronounced expression of the lipolytic inhibitor G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2) in adipose tissue from brown bears (Ursus arctos) prior to hibernation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Niels; Nielsen, Thomas S; Vendelbo, Mikkel H

    2016-01-01

    Prior to hibernation, the brown bear (Ursus arctos) exhibits unparalleled weight gain. Unlike humans, weight gain in bears is associated with lower levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFA) and increased insulin sensitivity. Understanding how free-ranging brown bears suppress lipolysis when...... gaining weight may therefore provide novel insight toward the development of human therapies. Blood and subcutaneous adipose tissue were collected from immobilized free-ranging brown bears (fitted with GPS-collars) during hibernation in winter and from the same bears during the active period in summer...

  17. Realization of FTTH MIS based on Hibernate framework%利用Hibernate框架实现FTTH接入区域MIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小明

    2013-01-01

      地区级电信FTTH接入区域管理信息系统开发需要简化数据持久层的操作,提高系统与数据库的交互效率,利用Hibernate ORM(Object/Relation Mapping)框架技术建立面向对象的域模块和关系数据库模型之间的映射是有效的解决手段。Hibernate框架作为连接Java应用程序和关系数据库的中间件,将Hibernate框架用于开发FTTH接入区域信息管理系统,实际应用结果表明,Hibernate框架方法能够明显简化了数据库访问和数据持久化操作,提高了系统开发效率,满足了业务应用的要求,并且使系统功能结构清晰,后期易于维护和扩展。%The development of management information system for regional telecom FTTH access area needs to simplify the operation of the data persistence layer and improve the efficiency of the system interaction with the database. It is an effective means to establish a mapping between the object-oriented domain module and the relational database model by utilizing Hiber-nate ORM framework techniques. Hibernate is a midware between Java application program and relational database. Hibernate framework was used in the development of FTTH access regional information management system. The practical application re-sult shows that the framework can obviously simplify the operation of the database access and data persistence,improve the effi-ciency of system development,and meet the business need. It can make the system structure clear,and easy to maintain and extend.

  18. The ATLAS tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuno, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS tau trigger has three levels: the first one (L1) is hardware based and uses FPGAs, while the second (L2) and third levels (EF -Event Filter-) are software based and use commodity computers (2 x Intel Harpertown quad-core 2.5 GHz), running scientific linux 4. In this contribution we discuss both the physics characteristics of tau leptons and the technical solutions to quick data access and fast algorithms. We show that L1 selects narrow jets in the calorimeter with an overall rejection against QCD jets of 300, whilst L2 and EF (referred together as High Level Trigger -HLT-) use all the detectors with full granularity and apply a typical rejection of 15 within the stringent timing requirements of the LHC. In the HLT there are two complementary approaches: specialized, fast algorithms are used at L2, while more refined and sophisticated algorithms, imported from the offline, are utilized in the EF.

  19. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  20. Streptococcus pyogenes-induced cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive T cell-dependent epidermal cell activation triggers TH17 responses in patients with guttate psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Romeu, Ester; Ferran, Marta; Sagristà, Marc; Gómez, Julià; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Herszenyi, Krisztina; Hóllo, Péter; Celada, Antonio; Pujol, Ramon; Santamaria-Babí, Luis F

    2016-08-01

    Guttate psoriasis (GP) is characterized by acute onset of small, rounded psoriatic lesions. Although this particular phenotype of psoriasis is usually associated with streptococcal throat infections and mainly occurs in HLA-Cw6(+) patients, the specific immunologic response to this innate stimulus that causes these skin lesions is poorly understood. This study aims to elucidate how key cellular elements of patients with GP respond to Streptococcus pyogenes and whether this initial immune response is favored by the genetic and environmental background of these patients. Circulating memory T cells and autologous epidermal cells from samples from either patients with GP (n = 14) or healthy control subjects (n = 6) were cocultured ex vivo in the presence of an S pyogenes extract. Levels of the psoriasis-associated cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined. The expression of several genes with increased (DEFB4, S100A7, LCN2, IL36G, IL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) or decreased (FLG and LOR) transcripts in psoriatic lesions was examined in keratinocytes treated with coculture supernatants. When skin-homing effector memory cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive T cells were used in cocultures, a TH17-dominant response was observed, as reflected by the higher amounts of IL-17A and IL-17F than IFN-γ. Moreover, a higher TH17 response was observed in cells isolated from patients with flares associated with a streptococcal tonsillitis and with the HLA-Cw6 allele (cohort 1). In addition, in normal keratinocytes the supernatants from these cocultures induced an increase in IL-17-associated genes, such as DEFB4, S100A7, LCN2, IL36G, and IL8 but a decrease in FLG and LOR, thereby confirming the role of activated TH17 cells. This study reveals a dominant TH17 response of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive T cells activated by epidermal cells and S pyogenes in patients with GP. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  1. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces G1 cell cycle arrest, triggers apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Qiu-Shuang; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xiuping; Lin, Li-Gen; Chen, Ping; Qiang, Wen-An; Wang, Yi-Tao; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-12-01

    Panacis Japonici Rhizoma (PJR) is one of the most famous Chinese medical herbs that is known for exhibiting potential anti-cancer effects. This study aims to isolate and investigate the anti-cancer potential of saponins from PJR in ovarian cancer cells. The compounds were separated by comprehensive chromatographic methods. By comparison of the 1H- and 13C NMR data, as well as the HR-ESI-MS data, with the corresponding references, the structures of compounds were determined. MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell viability, along with flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. JC-1 staining, Annexin V-PI double staining as well as Hoechst 33; 342 staining were used for detecting cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis was conducted to determine the relative protein level. Transwell assays were performed to investigate the effect of the saponin on cell migration and invasion and zymography experiments were used to detect the enzymatic activities. Eleven saponins were isolated from PJR and their anti-proliferative effects were evaluated in human ovarian cancer cells. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (1) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative potential among these isolates with the IC50 values at less than 10 µM in both ovarian cancer A2780 and HEY cell lines. Compound 1 induced G1 cell cycle arrest accompanied with an S phase decrease, and down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6. Further study showed that compound 1 effectively decreased the cell mitochondrial membrane potential, increased the annexin V positive cells and nuclear chromatin condensation, as well as enhanced the expression of cleaved PARP, Bax and cleaved-caspase 3 while decreasing that of Bcl-2. Moreover, compound 1 suppressed the migration and invasion of HEY and A2780 cells, down-regulated the expression of Cdc42, Rac, RohA, MMP2 and MMP9, and decreased the enzymatic activities of MMP2 and MMP9. These results provide a comprehensive evaluation of compound 1 as a potential agent

  2. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  3. Effects of white-nose syndrome on regional population patterns of 3 hibernating bat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Thomas E; Sewall, Brent J; Amelon, Sybill K

    2016-10-01

    Hibernating bats have undergone severe recent declines across the eastern United States, but the cause of these regional-scale declines has not been systematically evaluated. We assessed the influence of white-nose syndrome (an emerging bat disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, formerly Geomyces destructans) on large-scale, long-term population patterns in the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis), and the tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus). We modeled population trajectories for each species on the basis of an extensive data set of winter hibernacula counts of more than 1 million individual bats from a 4-state region over 13 years and with data on locations of hibernacula and first detections of white-nose syndrome at each hibernaculum. We used generalized additive mixed models to determine population change relative to expectations, that is, how population trajectories differed with a colony's infection status, how trajectories differed with distance from the point of introduction of white-nose syndrome, and whether declines were concordant with first local observation of the disease. Population trajectories in all species met at least one of the 3 expectations, but none met all 3. Our results suggest, therefore, that white-nose syndrome has affected regional populations differently than was previously understood and has not been the sole cause of declines. Specifically, our results suggest that in some areas and species, threats other than white-nose syndrome are also contributing to population declines, declines linked to white-nose syndrome have spread across large geographic areas with unexpected speed, and the disease or other threats led to declines in bat populations for years prior to disease detection. Effective conservation will require further research to mitigate impacts of white-nose syndrome, renewed attention to other threats to bats, and improved surveillance efforts to ensure

  4. Pre- and post-synaptic sympathetic function in human hibernating myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, Anna S.; Pepper, John R.; Dreyfus, Gilles D.; Pennell, Dudley J. [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Mongillo, Marco; Khan, Muhammad T. [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Depre, Christophe [University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine, New Jersey, NJ (United States); University of Medicine and Dentistry New Jersey, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, New Jersey, NJ (United States); Rimoldi, Ornella E. [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); New York Medical College, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Valhalla, NY (United States); Camici, Paolo G. [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Medical Research Council Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Impaired pre-synaptic noradrenaline uptake-1 mechanism has been reported in a swine model of hibernating myocardium (HM). To ascertain whether adrenergic neuroeffector abnormalities are present in human HM, we combined functional measurements in vivo using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) to assess pre- and post-synaptic sympathetic function. Twelve patients with coronary artery disease and chronic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction underwent CMR at baseline and 6 months after bypass for assessment of regional and global LV function and identification of segments with reversible dysfunction. Before surgery, myocardial noradrenaline uptake-1 ([{sup 11}C]meta-hydroxy-ephedrine; HED) and {beta}-adrenoceptor ({beta}-AR) density ([{sup 11}C]CGP-12177) were measured with PET. Patient PET data were compared with those in 18 healthy controls. The volume of distribution (V{sub d}) of HED in HM (47.95{+-}28.05 ml/g) and infarcted myocardium (42.69{+-}25.76 ml/g) was significantly reduced compared with controls (66.09{+-}14.48 ml/g). The V{sub d} of HED in normal myocardium (49.93{+-}20.48 ml/g) of patients was also lower than that in controls and the difference was close to statistical significance (p=0.06). Myocardial {beta}-AR density was significantly lower in HM (5.49{+-}2.35 pmol/g), infarcted (4.82{+-}2.61 pmol/g) and normal (5.86{+-}1.81 pmol/g) segments of patients compared with healthy controls (8.61{+-}1.32 pmol/g). Noradrenaline uptake-1 mechanism and {beta}-AR density are reduced in the myocardium of patients with chronic LV dysfunction and evidence of HM. The increased sympathetic activity to the heart in these patients is a generalised rather than regional phenomenon which is likely to contribute to the remodelling process of the whole LV rather than playing a causative role in HM. (orig.)

  5. A Prototype Automatic Solar Panel Controller (ASPC with Night-time Hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salihu O. Aliyu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells, as an alternate means of electricity supply, is rapidly advancing. Generally, output of solar cells depends largely on intensity of sun and angle of incidence on the cells. This means that to get maximum efficiency from these cells, they must remain directly pointed at the sun from sun rise to sun set. However, the position of sun‟s highest intensity with respect to a given spot changes with time of the day. It is therefore necessary to automatically control position of solar cells to always align with the highest intensity of sun. In this paper, we present a prototype automatic solar panel controller, with night time hibernation. The proposed system consists of both software and hardware parts, and it automatically provides best alignment of solar panel with sun to get maximum intensity. The solar panel controller system detects the presence of sun rays using light dependent resistors (LDR. At the heart of the control mechanism is an AT89C52 microcontroller. It is programmed to constantly monitor the output of an LDR, actuate a stepper motor to reposition the solar panel to a direction with the highest intensity. The proposed system also has an option of manual control of the panel via a computer interface or a keypad unit for easy of user interactivity during maintenance. Testing the proposed system, results shows that it can successfully track the sun and enter idle mode in the absence of sun rays, hence, conserving over 50% of energy required to operate the system.

  6. Disaster triggers disaster: Earthquake triggering by tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowinski, S.; Tsukanov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Three recent devastating earthquakes, the 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi (Taiwan), 2010 M=7.0 Leogane (Haiti), 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung (Taiwan), and additional three moderate size earthquakes (6cyclones (hurricane or typhoon) hit the very same area. The most familiar example is Haiti, which was hit during the late summer of 2008 by two hurricanes and two tropical storms (Fay, Gustav, Hanna and Ike) within 25 days. A year an a half after this very wet hurricane season, the 2010 Leogane earthquake occurred in the mountainous Haiti's southern peninsula and caused the death of more than 300,000 people. The other cases are from Taiwan, which is characterized by a high seismicity level and frequent typhoon landfall. The three wettest typhoons in Taiwan's past 50 years were Morakot (in 2009, with 2885 mm or rain), Flossie (1969, 2162 mm) and Herb (1996, 1987 mm)[Lin et al., 2010]. Each of this three very wet storms was followed by one or two main-shock M>6 earthquake that occurred in the central mountainous area of Taiwan within three years after the typhoon. The 2009 Morakot typhoon was followed by 2009 M=6.2 Nantou and 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes; the 1969 Flossie typhoon was followed by an M=6.3 earthquake in 1972; and the 1996 Herb typhoon by the 1998 M=6.2 Rueyli and 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. The earthquake catalog of Taiwan lists only two other M>6 main-shocks that occurred in Taiwan's central mountainous belt, one of them was in 1964 only four months after the wet Typhoon Gloria poured heavy rain in the same area. We suggest that the close proximity in time and space between wet tropical cyclones and earthquakes reflects a physical link between the two hazard types in which these earthquakes were triggered by rapid erosion induced by tropical cyclone's heavy rain. Based on remote sensing observations, meshfree finite element modeling, and Coulomb failure stress analysis, we show that the erosion induced by very wet cyclones increased the failure stresses at the

  7. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  8. The Study of TVS Trigger Geometry and Triggered Vacuum Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Wung-Hoa; Son, Yoon-Kyoo; Frank, Klaus; Lee, Byung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the optimization of the trigger unit of a six-rod TVS. The different configurations of the trigger pin and of the trigger electrode have been considered to study the electric field distribution at the triple points of the unit embedded in the cathode. To optimize the field enhancement, electric field simulations with a planar and a circular heads of the trigger pin in combinations with a convex and a concave shaped trigger electrodes have been done. The simulations were done with an applied trigger pulse voltage of Utrigger = 5 kV and with a discharge voltage the main switch of Uswitch = 20 kV. The experimental values had been Utrigger = 40 kV and Uswitch = 5 kV. The simulation results show that the combination of a circular trigger pin head and a concave trigger electrode yields the highest electric field of 9.6 .106 V/m at the triple point. In-parallel experiments have been performed with those four trigger configurations. The results of the experiments however cannot yet clearl...

  9. Pre-hibernation energy reserves in a temperate anuran, Rana chensinensis, along a relatively fine elevational gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; Li, B.; Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Fellers, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Temperate anurans have energy substrates in the liver, fat bodies, carcass and gonads; these stores provide support for metabolism and egg production during hibernation, and for breeding activities in spring. This paper compares the energy budget shortly before hibernation among Rana chensinensis populations at elevations of 1400, 1700 and 2000 m along a river in northern China. The larger frogs, regardless of elevation, had relatively heavy storage organs and the masses of nearly all these organs were positively correlated with each other. After controlling for the effect of body size, we found no significant difference in energetic organ mass among different age classes for each of the three populations. There were sexual differences in energy strategy. Males in all populations accumulated greater reserves in liver, fat bodies and carcass than did females. In contrast, females put more energy into their ovaries and oviducts. Frogs from higher elevations tended to have heavier organs than those from lower elevations; however, the pattern did not vary systematically along fine environmental gradients. Mid-elevation R. chensinensis built up significantly more reserves than low-elevation individuals, but were similar to their highland conspecifics. Males from higher elevations tended to have heavier liver and fat bodies; females were similar in liver and ovary mass across all elevations, but formed heavier fat bodies, oviducts and somatic tissue at higher elevation sites.