WorldWideScience

Sample records for hiaper progressive science

  1. A Wing Pod-based Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar on HIAPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Tsai, Peisang; Ellis, Scott; Loew, Eric; Lee, Wen-Chau; Emmett, Joanthan

    2014-05-01

    , occupy minimum cabin space and maximize scan coverage, a pod-based configuration was adopted. Currently, the radar system is capable of collecting observations between zenith and nadir in a fixed scanning mode. Measurements are corrected for aircraft attitude changes. The near-nadir and zenith pointing observations minimize the cross-track Doppler contamination in the radial velocity measurements. An extensive engineering monitoring mechanism is built into the recording system status such as temperature, pressure, various electronic components' status and receiver characteristics. Status parameters are used for real-time system stability estimates and correcting radar system parameters. The pod based radar system is mounted on a modified Gulfstream V aircraft, which is operated and maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) on behalf of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The aircraft is called the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) (Laursen et al., 2006). It is also instrumented with high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and an array of in situ and remote sensors for atmospheric research. As part of the instrument suite for HIAPER, the NSF funded the development of the HIAPER Cloud Radar (HCR). The HCR is an airborne, millimeter-wavelength, dual-polarization, Doppler radar that serves the atmospheric science community by providing cloud remote sensing capabilities for the NSF/NCAR G-V (HIAPER) aircraft. An optimal radar configuration that is capable of maximizing the accuracy of both qualitative and quantitative estimated cloud microphysical and dynamical properties is the most attractive option to the research community. The Technical specifications of cloud radar are optimized for realizing the desired scientific performance for the pod-based configuration. The radar was both ground and flight tested and preliminary measurements of Doppler and polarization measurements were collected. HCR

  2. Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-06-30

    This is a second quarter 1194 progress report on the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Included is symposium activity; staff activity; document analysis program; text retrieval program; institute activity; and goals.

  3. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1973-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 6 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the progress in surface and membrane science; the solid state chemistry of the silver halide surface; and the experimental and theoretical aspects of the double layer at the mercury-solution interface. The text also describes contact-angle hysteresis; ion binding and ion transport produced by neutral lipid-soluble molecules; and the biophysical interactions of blood proteins with polymeric and artificial surfaces. Physical chemists, biophysicists, and phys

  4. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1977-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 11 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the quantum theory of surface phenomena; some fundamental aspects of electrocrystallization; and exoelectric emission. The text also describes the surface of titanium dioxide; and the prospects for atomic resolution electron microscopy in membranology. Chemists, physicists, and people involved in the electrochemical power laboratory will find the book useful.

  5. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A; Rosenberg, M D

    1975-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 9 covers the developments in surface and membrane science. The book discusses the physical adsorption of gases and vapors in micropores; the chemisorption theory; and the role of radioisotopes in the studies of chemisorption and catalysis. The text also describes the interaction of ions with monolayers; and the isolation and characterization of mycoplasma membranes. Chemists, physical chemists, and microbiologists will find the book useful.

  6. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  7. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  8. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Mathur, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  9. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1972-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 5 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the Mössbauer effect in surface science; the surface functional groups on carbon and silica; and the wetting phenomena pertaining to adhesion. The text also describes the physical state of phospholipids and cholesterol in monolayers, bilayers, and membranes; the characteristics of heterocoagulation; and the effects of calcium on excitable membranes and neurotransmitter action. Chemists, physiologists, biophysicists, and civil engineers will find the book i

  10. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1976-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 10 covers the advances in surface and membrane science. The book discusses the selective changes of cellular particles influencing sedimentation properties; and the rotating disk and ring-disk electrodes in investigations of surface phenomena at the metal-electrolyte interface. The text also describes the membrane potential of phospholipid bilayer and biological membranes; the adsorption of surfactant monolayers at gas/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces; and the enzymes immobilized on glass. Chemists and people involved in electrochemistry will

  11. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1979-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 12 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the topographical differentiation of the cell surface; the NMR studies of model biological membrane system; and an irreversible thermodynamic approach to energy coupling in mitochondria and chloroplasts. The text also describes water at surfaces; the nature of microemulsions; and the energy principle in the stability of interfaces. Biochemists, physicists, chemical engineers, and people involved in surface and coatings research will find the book invaluable.

  12. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A; Rosenberg, M D

    1974-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 8 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the applications of statistical mechanics to physical adsorption; the impact of electron spectroscopy and cognate techniques on the study of solid surfaces; and the ellipsometric studies of thin films. The text also describes the interfacial photochemistry of bilayer lipid membranes; cell junctions and their development; and the composition and function of the inner mitochondrial membrane. The role of the cell surface in contact inhibition of cell division

  13. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Cadenhead, D A

    1981-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 14 covers the advances in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses statistical thermodynamics of monolayer adsorption from gas and liquid mixtures on homogeneous and heterogeneous solid surfaces; and the structure of the boundary layers of liquids and its influence on the mass transfer in fine pores. The text then describes the coupling of ionic and non-electrolyte fluxes in ion selective membranes; the electrocatalytic properties of matalloporphins at the interface; and the adsorption from binary gas and liquid phases. Phas

  14. Recent progress in surface science v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Riddiford, A C

    1964-01-01

    Recent Progress in Surface Science, Volume 2 is a 10-chapter text that covers the significant advances in some aspects of surface science, including in catalysis, genetic control of cell surface, and cell membrane. The opening chapter deals with the major factors affecting adsorption at the gas-solid interface. The subsequent chapters explore the advances in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis in terms of fundamental surface processes, as well as the concept of dynamic contact angles. These topics are followed by discussions on emulsions, flotation, and the extraordinary complexity of cel

  15. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1973-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 7 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses the theoretical and experimental aspects of the van der Waals forces; the electric double layer on the semiconductor-electrolyte interface; and the long-range and short-range order in adsorbed films. The text also describes the hydrodynamical theory of surface shear viscosity; the structure and properties of monolayers of synthetic polypeptides at the air-water interface; and the structure and molecular dynamics of water. The role of glycoproteins in cell

  16. Progress in photon science basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book features chapters based on lectures presented by world-leading researchers of photon science from Russia and Japan at the first “STEPS Symposium on Photon Science” held in Tokyo in March 2015. It describes recent progress in the field of photon science, covering a wide range of interest to experts in the field, including laser-plasma interaction, filamentation and its applications, laser assisted electron scattering, exotic properties of light, ultrafast imaging, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields, photochemistry and spectroscopy of novel materials, laser-assisted material synthesis, and photon technology.

  17. Progress in surface and membrane science

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Cadenhead, D A

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Surface and Membrane Science, Volume 4 covers the developments in the study of surface and membrane science. The book discusses waves at interfaces; recent investigations on the thickness of surface layers; and surface analysis by low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. The text also describes the anode electrolyte interface; the interactions of adsorbed proteins and polypeptides at interfaces; and peptide-induced ion transport in synthetic and biological membranes. The monolayer adsorption on crystalline surfaces is also considered. Chemists and metallurgi

  18. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XIII

    CERN Document Server

    III, Wendell; Paulus, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This thirteenth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field and high-order harmonics generation and their applications. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, the interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries.   .

  19. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Li, Ruxin; Chin, See Leang

    2009-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fourth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on strong field ionization of atoms; excitation, ionization and fragmentation of molecules; nonlinear intense optical phenomena and attosecond pulses; and laser - solid interactions and photoemission.

  20. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science III

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2008-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This third volume covers a diverse range of disciplines, focusing on such topics as strong field ionization of atoms, ionization and fragmentation of molecules and clusters, generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses, filamentation and laser plasma interaction, and the development of ultrashort and ultrahigh-intensity light sources.

  1. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Nisoli, Mauro; Hill, Wendell; III, III

    2012-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand. These are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This eighth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on molecules interacting with ultrashort and intense laser fields, advanced technologies for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses and their applications, laser plasma formation and laser acceleration.

  2. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  3. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XII

    CERN Document Server

    Roso, Luis; Li, Ruxin; Mathur, Deepak; Normand, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This  volume covers a broad range of topics focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field, laser induced filamentation, and laser plasma interaction and application. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. .

  4. Recent progress in surface science 3

    CERN Document Server

    Danielli, J F; Rosenberg, M D

    2013-01-01

    Recent Progress in Surface Science, Volume 3 covers topics on the structure and mechanisms of the cell membranes. The book discusses the incorporation of chemisorbed species; the recent developments in the study of epitaxy; and the ""diffusion"" or ""hydride"" component of overpotential at cathodes of the ""platinum metals"". The text also describes the mechanism of hydrogen exchange in proteins; the nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipids, lipoproteins, and cell membranes; and the monolayers of synthetic phospholipids. The formation, electrical properties, transport, and excitability cha

  5. COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — COMPLEX NETWORKS IN CLIMATE SCIENCE: PROGRESS, OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES KARSTEN STEINHAEUSER, NITESH V. CHAWLA, AND AUROOP R. GANGULY Abstract. Networks have...

  6. Environment and Medical Sciences Division Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1980-06-01

    The 1979 annual progress report of the UKAEA Environmental and Medical Sciences Division covers both radiological and non-nuclear research programmes in the environmental and toxicological fields. The specific topics were 1) 'atmospheric pollution' which included the analysis of atmospheric trace gases by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the life cycle of atmospheric sulphur compounds, photochemical pollution, studies on stratospheric reactions, stratospheric ozone and the effects of pollutants, upper air sampling and monitoring gaseous atmospheric pollutants with passive samplers; 2) miscellaneous 'environmental safety projects'; 3) 'radiation physics' projects concerning a) radioactive fallout, b) studies of stable trace elements in the atmospheric environment and studies of radioactivity in the environment, c) various aspects of dosimetry research including radiation biophysics, d) personnel dosimetry, e) applied radiation spectrometry and f) data systems; 5) 'aerosol and metabolic studies' including whole body counting studies; 6) 'inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis' studies including actinide inhalation, cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of non-radioactive dusts, asbestos and glass fibre research, a Qauntimet 720 image analysis service and radionuclide analysis in biological materials; and 7) 'analytical services' used in relation to 'environmental safety and chemical analysis' projects. (U.K.)

  7. Science Education Reform in Qatar: Progress and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Science education reform in Qatar has had limited success. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS), Qatari 4th and 8th grade students have shown progress in science achievement, but they remain significantly below the international average. Also, in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), Qatari…

  8. Progress of JAERI neutron science project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1999-01-01

    Neutron Science Project was started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute since 1996 for promoting futuristic basic science and nuclear technology utilizing neutrons. For this purpose, research and developments of intense proton accelerator and spallation neutron target were initiated. The present paper describes the current status of such research and developments. (author)

  9. Atomic and molecular science: progress and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, D.

    2000-01-01

    In the contemporary scenario, atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) science focuses on the physical and chemical properties of the common building blocks of matter - atoms, molecules and light. The main characteristic of AMO science is that it is both an intellectually stimulating fundamental science and a powerful enabling science that supports an increasing number of other important areas of science and technology. In brief, the fundamental interests in atoms, molecules and clusters (as well as their ions) include studies of their structure and properties, their optical interactions, collisional properties, including quantum state-resolved studies, and interactions with external fields, solids and surfaces. Fundamental aspects of present-day optical sciences include studies of laser spectroscopy, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, optical interactions with condensed matter, ultrafast optics and coherent light sources. The enabling aspect of AMO science derives from efforts to control atoms, molecules, clusters, charged particles and light more precisely, to accurately to determine, experimentally and theoretically, their properties, and to invent new, methods of generating light with tailor-made properties

  10. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity

  11. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity.

  12. Quantitative Reasoning in Environmental Science: A Learning Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Robert Lee; Forrester, Jennifer Harris; Christus, Jennifer Schuttlefield; Peterson, Franziska Isabel; Bonilla, Rachel; Yestness, Nissa

    2014-01-01

    The ability of middle and high school students to reason quantitatively within the context of environmental science was investigated. A quantitative reasoning (QR) learning progression was created with three progress variables: quantification act, quantitative interpretation, and quantitative modeling. An iterative research design was used as it…

  13. An Argument for Formative Assessment with Science Learning Progressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Alicia C.

    2018-01-01

    Learning progressions--particularly as defined and operationalized in science education--have significant potential to inform teachers' formative assessment practices. In this overview article, I lay out an argument for this potential, starting from definitions for "formative assessment practices" and "learning progressions"…

  14. Applied Behavior Analysis Is a Science And, Therefore, Progressive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K.; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful…

  15. Atmospheric sciences annual progress report, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, W.D.

    1975-11-01

    Activities in atmospheric sciences in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory carried out during 1974 are described. Included are contributions from the Meteorology, Atmospheric Diagnostics, Atmospheric Chemistry Research, and Atmospheric Instrumentation Groups. Programs in Meteorology reported on include diffusion from an off-shore source, plume dynamics studies, modeling of coastal effects on wind and temperature fields and pollutant distributions, effects of indoor shelter on inhalation of airborne radionuclides, chemical-dynamical interactions, techniques for determining acid-rain impact upon the ecology of the eastern U.S., and climatology. Work under Atmospheric Chemistry Research was concentrated on atmospheric aerosol studies, including formation by free radical and neutral association reactions, identification of reactive systems leading to aerosol formation, growth of sodium aerosols under atmospheric conditions and clustering reactions. Atmospheric Diagnostics presents work on field sampling and analytical technology for atmospheric pollutants, airborne sampling systems, atmospheric sulfate particulates methodology, and on a pyroturbidometric method for particulate sulfate discrimination and determination. Methodology for the use of sulfur hexafluoride in field tracer studies is discussed under Atmospheric Instrumentation. A list of publications is included

  16. Progress in the materials science of silicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko; Friedlein, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    In its freestanding, yet hypothetical form, the Si counterpart of graphene called silicene is predicted to possess massless Dirac fermions and to exhibit an experimentally accessible quantum spin Hall effect. Such interesting electronic properties are not realized in two-dimensional (2D) Si honeycomb lattices prepared recently on metallic substrates where the crystal and hybrid electronic structures of these 'epitaxial silicene' phases are strongly influenced by the substrate, and thus different from those predicted for isolated 2D structures. While the realization of such low-dimensional Si π materials has hardly been imagined previously, it is evident that the materials science behind silicene remains challenging. In this contribution, we will review our recent results that lead to an enhanced understanding of epitaxial silicene formed on diboride thin films, and discuss the remaining challenges that must be addressed in order to turn Si 2D nanostructures into technologically interesting nanoelectronic materials.

  17. Progress, decline, and the public uptake of climate science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiak-Gould, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has sought to explain public perception of climate change science in terms of individuals' "prior commitment" to such ideological stances as just-world belief, system justification, and liberalism/conservatism. One type of prior commitment that has received little formal attention in the literature is narratives of the moral trajectory of society. A theory of climate science uptake based on beliefs in societal progress or decline is more easily portable to non-Western settings; in a case study of global warming attitudes in the Marshall Islands, trajectory narratives indeed account for public belief, concern, blame, and response more aptly than existing theories, and accord well with qualitative analysis of Marshallese climate change discourse. In Western settings, progress/decline narratives may explain much of the variation in climate change attitudes previously accounted for by other ideological variables, promising a more penetrating explanation for the divergence of climate change attitudes within and between societies.

  18. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, dosimetry and employee monitoring, environmental processes of radioisotope transport, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.), and statistics of hospital procedures

  19. Research in space science and technology. Semiannual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckley, L.E.

    1977-08-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed

  20. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1982-02-01

    A progress report on the work performed during 1980 by the Environmental and Medical Sciences Division at UKAEA Harwell is given. The programmes considered were atmospheric pollution; landfill research; monitoring of radioactive fallout and other radionuclides and trace elements in the environment; radioactive and non-radioactive aerosol metabolic studies; inhalation toxicology of radioactive aerosols and other hazardous materials; chemical analytical services; and radiation physics in dosimetry research, applied radiation spectrometry and data systems. (U.K.)

  1. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science Volume V

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Ledingham, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fifth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on coherent responses of gaseous and condensed matter to ultrashort intense laser pulses, propagation of intense laser pulses, and laser-plasma interaction and its applications.

  2. Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data for the NSF/NCAR HIAPER (GV) and NSF/NCAR C-130 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies. The data collected are an important legacy of these field campaigns. A comprehensive metadata database and integrated cyber-infrastructure, along with a robust data workflow that begins during the field phase and extends to long-term archival (current aircraft data holdings go back to 1967), assures that: all data and associated software are safeguarded throughout the data handling process; community standards of practice for data stewardship and software version control are followed; simple and timely community access to collected data and associated software tools are provided; and the quality of the collected data is preserved, with the ultimate goal of supporting research and the reproducibility of published results. The components of this data system to be presented include: robust, searchable web access to data holdings; reliable, redundant data storage; web-based tools and scripts for efficient creation, maintenance and update of data holdings; access to supplemental data and documentation; storage of data in standardized data formats; comprehensive metadata collection; mature version control; human-discernable storage practices; and procedures to inform users of changes. In addition, lessons learned, shortcomings, and desired upgrades

  3. How Can Humanities Interventions Promote Progress in the Environmental Sciences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally L. Kitch

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental humanists make compelling arguments about the importance of the environmental humanities (EH for discovering new ways to conceptualize and address the urgent challenges of the environmental crisis now confronting the planet. Many environmental scientists in a variety of fields are also committed to incorporating socio-cultural analyses in their work. Despite such intentions and rhetoric, however, and some humanists’ eagerness to incorporate science into their own work, “radical interdisciplinarity [across the humanities and sciences] is ... rare ... and does not have the impact one would hope for” (Holm et al. 2013, p. 32. This article discusses reasons for the gap between transdisciplinary intentions and the work being done in the environmental sciences. The article also describes a project designed to address that gap. Entitled “From Innovation to Progress: Addressing Hazards of the Sustainability Sciences”, the project encourages humanities interventions in problem definition, before any solution or action is chosen. Progress offers strategies for promoting expanded stakeholder engagement, enhancing understanding of power struggles and inequities that underlie problems and over-determine solutions, and designing multiple future scenarios based on alternative values, cultural practices and beliefs, and perspectives on power distribution and entitlement.

  4. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are the impact of studies on cultured human fibroblasts with abnormal carcinogen sensitivity. This includes mechanisms of DNA repair and for the initiation of cancer, contribution of such genes to overall societal cancer burden, impact on risk assessment, distribution of risk, and radiation protection, application to improved treatment of cancer, screening for abnormal carcinogen sensitivity and Roberts syndrome

  5. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  6. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  7. Research Progress and Prospect of GNSS Space Environment Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAO Yibin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Troposphere and ionosphere are two important components of the near-earth space environment. They are close to the surface of the earth and have great influence on human life. The developments of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS over the past several decades provide a great opportunity for the GNSS-based space environment science. This review summarizes the research progress and prospect of the GNSS-based research of the Earth's troposphere and ionosphere. On the tropospheric perspective, modeling of the key tropospheric parameters and inversion of precipitable water vapor (PWV are dominant researching fields. On the ionospheric perspective, 2D/3D ionospheric models and regional/global ionospheric monitoring are dominant researching fields.

  8. Heavy-ion-fusion-science: summary of US progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.S.; Logan, B.G.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Briggs, R.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Coleman, J.E.; Davidson, R.C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E.P.; Grisham, L.R.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.D.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Kishek, R.A.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Olson, C.L.; Qin, H.; Roy, P.K.; Sefkow, A.; Seidl, P.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Vay, J-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two years noteworthy experimental and theoretical progress has been made towards the top-level scientific question for the US programme on heavy-ion-fusion-science and high energy density physics: 'How can heavy-ion beams be compressed to the high intensity required to create high energy density matter and fusion conditions?' New results in transverse and longitudinal beam compression, high-brightness transport and beam acceleration will be reported. Central to this campaign is final beam compression. With a neutralizing plasma, we demonstrated transverse beam compression by an areal factor of over 100 and longitudinal compression by a factor of > 50. We also report on the first demonstration of simultaneous transverse and longitudinal beam compression in plasma. High beam brightness is key to high intensity on target, and detailed experimental and theoretical studies on the effect of secondary electrons on beam brightness degradation are reported. A new accelerator concept for near-term low-cost target heating experiments was invented, and the predicted beam dynamics validated experimentally. We show how these scientific campaigns have created new opportunities for interesting target experiments in the warm dense matter regime. Finally, we summarize progress towards heavy-ion fusion, including the demonstration of a compact driver-size high-brightness ion injector. For all components of our high intensity campaign, the new results have been obtained via tightly coupled efforts in experiments, simulations and theory

  9. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes (e.g., Strontium 85, Strontium 90, Tritium), environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. ground water) dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  10. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section - 1986 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This progress report contains a summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate chapters are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical Biophysics. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, environmental processes of radioisotope transport (e.g. atmospheric, ground water), dosimetry and employee monitoring, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.)

  11. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Progress for the period ending September 30, 1979 by the Environmental Sciences Division is reported. Sections reporting include terrestrial ecoloy; earth sciences; environmental resources; aquatic ecology; synthetic fuels; nuclear program; environmental impacts program; ecosystem studies; and burial ground technology

  12. Progressive statistics for studies in sports medicine and exercise science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William G; Marshall, Stephen W; Batterham, Alan M; Hanin, Juri

    2009-01-01

    Statistical guidelines and expert statements are now available to assist in the analysis and reporting of studies in some biomedical disciplines. We present here a more progressive resource for sample-based studies, meta-analyses, and case studies in sports medicine and exercise science. We offer forthright advice on the following controversial or novel issues: using precision of estimation for inferences about population effects in preference to null-hypothesis testing, which is inadequate for assessing clinical or practical importance; justifying sample size via acceptable precision or confidence for clinical decisions rather than via adequate power for statistical significance; showing SD rather than SEM, to better communicate the magnitude of differences in means and nonuniformity of error; avoiding purely nonparametric analyses, which cannot provide inferences about magnitude and are unnecessary; using regression statistics in validity studies, in preference to the impractical and biased limits of agreement; making greater use of qualitative methods to enrich sample-based quantitative projects; and seeking ethics approval for public access to the depersonalized raw data of a study, to address the need for more scrutiny of research and better meta-analyses. Advice on less contentious issues includes the following: using covariates in linear models to adjust for confounders, to account for individual differences, and to identify potential mechanisms of an effect; using log transformation to deal with nonuniformity of effects and error; identifying and deleting outliers; presenting descriptive, effect, and inferential statistics in appropriate formats; and contending with bias arising from problems with sampling, assignment, blinding, measurement error, and researchers' prejudices. This article should advance the field by stimulating debate, promoting innovative approaches, and serving as a useful checklist for authors, reviewers, and editors.

  13. Progress of Cometary Science in the Past 100 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1999-01-01

    Enormous strides made by cometary science during the 20th century defy any meaningful comparison of its state 100 years ago and now. The great majority of the subfields enjoying much attention nowadays did not exist in the year 1900. Dramatic developments, especially in the past 30-50 years, have equally affected observational and theoretical studies of comets. The profound diversification of observing techniques has been documented by the ever widening limits on the electromagnetic spectrum covered. While the time around 1900 marked an early period of slow and painful experimentation with photographic methods in cometary studies, observations of comets from the x-ray region to the radio waves have by now become routine. Many of the new techniques, and all those involved with the wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, were made possible by another major breakthrough of this century - observing from space. Experiments on dedicated Earth-orbiting satellites as well as several deep-space probes have provided fascinating new information on the nature and makeup of comets. In broader terms, much of the progress has been achieved thanks to fundamental discoveries and major advances in electronics, whose applications resulted in qualitatively new instruments (e.g. radiotelescopes) and sensors or detectors (e.g. CCD arrays). The most universal effect on the entire cometary science, from observing to data handling to quantitative interpretations, has been, as in any other branch of science, due to the introduction of electronic computers, with their processing capabilities not only unheard of, but literally unimaginable, in the age of classical desk calculators. As if all this should not be enough, the today's generations of comet scientists have, in addition, been blessed with nature's highly appreciated cooperation. Indeed, in the span of a dozen years, between 1985 and 1997, we were privileged to witness four remarkable cometary events: (i) a return of Halley

  14. Progress report Physics and Health Sciences. Health Sciences section. 1987 July 01-December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report covers the fourth semi-annual period since the Research Company was reorganized. We now have eight research fellows on staff, six fully funded by Physics and Health Sciences (P and HS). The first section of this report contains an excellent topical review of the program in Health Sciences on tritium toxicity which involves scientists from all three of the Chalk River branches of Health Sciences. Their work on cancer proneness is expanding data on apparently normal people and has been extended to include cancer patients. All tests are now blind. The work was the subject of two very fine TV presentations, one each shown on the French and English networks of the CBC. Investigation also continues on the complex influence of hyperthermia on cancer induction and promotion. The potency of natural killer cells in human blood which have the ability to recognize and destroy cancerous cells have been shown to be very sensitive to temperature. A method may have been found for extending the life of T-lymphocytes grown in culture beyond the present 30 to 60-day limit. Activities in environmental research are moving in the direction of studies of a more fundamental nature so that the results will have a certain portability. Model studies form a large part of this new emphasis and notable among those is the Twin Lakes tracer study. Work is in progress to follow the plume the full 240 metres to the discharge zone with considerable success in the mathematical modelling. Members of the Health Sciences unit at CRNL were active as resource people for the Hare Commission on Ontario Nuclear Safety Review during the late fall. At Partnerships for Profit, which brought 85 senior executives of Canadian business in contact with the Research Company's capabilities, Physics and Health Sciences manned four booths on cancer screening, environmental protection, ANDI and nuclear physics instrumentation. Discussions with MOSST and other government departments were initiated on the

  15. "WALLS": Providing a Firm Foundation for Progression in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jo

    1997-01-01

    Describes a means for determining student knowledge in science. Written in student-level language, WALLS contains statements about science knowledge within bricks on a worksheet. Students shade in bricks they know or activities they have done and part-shade any they are unsure about, giving a differentiated starting point that allows them to plan…

  16. Nuclear Science and Technology in Human Progress. Inaugural Lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mshelia, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    The paper is a general discourse on the significance and development of nuclear science and technology and the potential peaceful uses to which it may be put. In particular nuclear science and technology and their applications in Nigeria are well discussed

  17. Science as a Common Language in a Globalised World - Scientific Collaboration Promoting Progress, Building Bridges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2003-01-01

    International scientific collaboration and co-operation can accelerate the progress of science, help build bridges between diverse societies, and foster the development of science and technology in non-industrialised countries. This is possible because science is a common language (although the progress of science is often influenced by non-scientific factors). I shall describe examples of the role that scientific collaboration can play in bridge building and in conflict resolution. I shall then present a proposal for "Bridge Building Fellowships" which would contribute to strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries by helping to stem the brain drain and providing a basis for collaborations with scientists in industrialised countries.

  18. Progress on research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Isao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application in Takasaki Establishment was reviewed. Especially, the recent progresses of research on semiconductors in space, creation of new functional materials and topics in biotechnology were reported. (author)

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  20. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  1. Cyclotron based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1985-March 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, D.H.

    1986-08-01

    Progress report for cyclotron based nuclear science cyclotron facility are summarized. Research is described under the headings heavy ion reactions, nuclear theory, atomic studies and activation analysis, superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation. Publications are listed

  2. Progress report Physical and Environmental Sciences TASCC Division 1994 July 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The TASCC division of the Physics and Environmental Sciences releases this progress report to overview the research and instrumentation and facility development. The accelerator operation was smooth for the Tandem and rather difficult for the cyclotron. Progress has been made on all major development projects. A listing is included of all publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. 14 tabs., 28 figs.

  3. Progress report Physical and Environmental Sciences TASCC Division 1994 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The TASCC division of the Physics and Environmental Sciences releases this progress report to overview the research and instrumentation and facility development. The accelerator operation was smooth for the Tandem and rather difficult for the cyclotron. Progress has been made on all major development projects. A listing is included of all publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. 14 tabs., 28 figs

  4. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  5. Progress in the Utilization of High-Fidelity Simulation in Basic Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helyer, Richard; Dickens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-fidelity patient simulators are mainly used to teach clinical skills and remain underutilized in teaching basic sciences. This article summarizes our current views on the use of simulation in basic science education and identifies pitfalls and opportunities for progress.

  6. In praise of science: curiosity, understanding, and progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this engaging, lyrical book, physicist Sander Bais shows how science can liberate us from our cultural straitjacket of prejudice and intolerance. We're living in a time in which technology is taken for granted, yet belief in such standard scientific facts as evolution is actually decreasing. How

  7. In praise of science: curiosity, understanding, and progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this book, author and physicist Sander Bais shows how science can liberate us from our cultural straitjacket of prejudice and intolerance. We're living in a time in which technology is taken for granted, yet belief in such standard scientific facts as evolution is actually decreasing. How is it

  8. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  9. Science, democracy and emerging threats to scientific progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Stephan M

    2012-08-23

    Can trustworthy science flourish in countries suffering from dictatorship? This is an increasingly relevant question. Many commercial publishers want to maximise their profits (as is to be expected in a capitalistic system) and are pushing into non-democratic countries with rapid economic growth like China. But how much can we trust the papers coming from countries with dictatorial regimes?

  10. Science, democracy and emerging threats to scientific progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Can trustworthy science flourish in countries suffering from dictatorship? This is an increasingly relevant question. Many commercial publishers want to maximise their profits (as is to be expected in a capitalistic system) and are pushing into non-democratic countries with rapid economic growth like China. But how much can we trust the papers coming from countries with dictatorial regimes? PMID:22916710

  11. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.E.

    1976-07-01

    The activities of the AERE Environmental and Medical Sciences Division for January to December 1975 are reported under sections entitled: introduction; inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics; environmental analysis, atmospheric pollution; medical; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  12. Science, democracy and emerging threats to scientific progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feller Stephan M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Can trustworthy science flourish in countries suffering from dictatorship? This is an increasingly relevant question. Many commercial publishers want to maximise their profits (as is to be expected in a capitalistic system and are pushing into non-democratic countries with rapid economic growth like China. But how much can we trust the papers coming from countries with dictatorial regimes?

  13. On the path of the progress of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloviznin, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    Basic measures aimed at the progress of growth and more intensive production in the field of devising the NPP equipment are considered. A conclusion is drawn that the solution to the problems considered is related to further improvement of the system of planning, financing and material stimulation of works on new technology as well as to expansion of rights of research and industrial centers and institutes

  14. Environmental Sciences semiannual progress report, July-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, J.D.; Hunt, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Four major areas of research effort are reported: dust transport, distribution of transuranics in sediments, evaluation of critical ecological pathways for radionuclides, and terrestrial ecosystem compartmentalization of transuranics. Progress also is described in programs dealing with Rocky Flats Plant land management, a differential alpha emitter analysis project, quality control procedures, the effects of chlorine addition on biological oxygen measurements, and evaluation of Plant-related incident response involving wounded wildlife. In the dust transport project, data continued to be collected on transuranic airborne concentrations and surface-soil activity levels for a field known to have above-back-ground levels of transuranics. The data show principal airborne activity resides on nonrespirable (> 3-μm aerodynamic diameter) particles. Progress in the sediment sampling program included fitting and modification of the sampling platform; taking of preliminary cores, dredges, and pond-side samples from Lindsay Pond (a near background water body); and acquisition of required sample preparation and storage facilities. The critical pathways project continued, and data were obtained on transuranic levels in garden vegetables grown in soil (with excess transuranic levels) within and outside a greenhouse. Progress in studies of terrestrial ecological distributions of transuranics included collection for radionuclide analysis of approximately 70 rodents on two study plots east of the Plant's security fence

  15. Introduction. Progress in Earth science and climate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J Michael T

    2008-12-28

    In this introductory paper, I review the 'visions of the future' articles prepared by top young scientists for the second of the two Christmas 2008 Triennial Issues of Phil. Trans. R. Soc.A, devoted respectively to astronomy and Earth science. Topics covered in the Earth science issue include: trace gases in the atmosphere; dynamics of the Antarctic circumpolar current; a study of the boundary between the Earth's rocky mantle and its iron core; and two studies of volcanoes and their plumes. A final section devoted to ecology and climate covers: the mathematical modelling of plant-soil interactions; the effects of the boreal forests on the Earth's climate; the role of the past palaeoclimate in testing and calibrating today's numerical climate models; and the evaluation of these models including the quantification of their uncertainties.

  16. A Center for Excellence in Mathematical Sciences Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-18

    concentration are a Groebner Basis Project and a Symbolic Methods in AI and Computer Science project, with simultaneous development of other needed areas. The... Groebner construction algorithm. Develop an algebraic theory of piece wise polynomial approximation based on the Bezier- Bernstein algebra. Address...questions surrounding polytopes, splines, and complexity of Groebner basis computations. In topology determine the homotopy type of subdivision lattice of a

  17. ESIP Earth Sciences Data Analytics (ESDA) Cluster - Work in Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this poster is to promote a common understanding of the usefulness of, and activities that pertain to, Data Analytics and more broadly, the Data Scientist; Facilitate collaborations to better understand the cross usage of heterogeneous datasets and to provide accommodating data analytics expertise, now and as the needs evolve into the future; Identify gaps that, once filled, will further collaborative activities. Objectives Provide a forum for Academic discussions that provides ESIP members a better understanding of the various aspects of Earth Science Data Analytics Bring in guest speakers to describe external efforts, and further teach us about the broader use of Data Analytics. Perform activities that:- Compile use cases generated from specific community needs to cross analyze heterogeneous data- Compile sources of analytics tools, in particular, to satisfy the needs of the above data users- Examine gaps between needs and sources- Examine gaps between needs and community expertise- Document specific data analytics expertise needed to perform Earth science data analytics Seek graduate data analytics Data Science student internship opportunities.

  18. From scientific progress to economic growth the economics and the economy of science

    CERN Document Server

    Witte, Frank

    2017-01-01

    he past few centuries have seen an enormous increase in living standards in many parts of the world and these economies have become more complex than ever before. At the same time, progress in science and technology has reached unprecedented heights, taking us far beyond the wildest dreams of a few generations ago. Questions as to how science, technology and the economy interact are pertinent and important ones, whose partial answers require a view "from across the fence" between disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the vast and varied field of the economics of science. It is a unique blend of an economic perspective on the way science works, what makes scientists tick, and a study of the impact of scientific and technological progress on economies and their growth. Whether it is about the speculative market of ideas or science and technology as engines of the economy, there is something here for economists, engineers and scientists alike.

  19. Process and progress: John Hughlings Jackson's philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacyna, L Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Some scepticism has been voiced over whether the work of John Hughlings Jackson possesses any significant philosophical orientation. This article argues that Hughlings Jackson was acquainted with the work of a wide range of philosophers. In particular, certain aspects of the writings of John Stuart Mill are reflected in Hughlings Jackson's own work. From early in his career, Hughlings Jackson adopted a critical stance in his neurological papers, seeking to expose shortcomings in the conventional practices of his peers and urging greater methodological rigour and sophistication in order to advance their science. This critical and 'procedurist' bias endows Hughlings Jackson's writings with a characteristically modern character.

  20. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy

  1. UK Nuclear Science Forum. Progress report: Data studies during 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2001-06-01

    The UK Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) now meets once per year to discuss issues of direct relevance to forum members, and to review nuclear data for application in the UK nuclear industry. Links are also maintained through the year, mainly through e-mail and the normal postal system. Work of immediate interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g., half-lives and gamma-ray emission probabilities), fission yields and thermal neutron cross sections; all known UK studies in 2000 are summarised in this document. Specific applications and international links of relevance in the field of nuclear data are also described

  2. Progress report, Physics and Health Sciences: Physics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report reviews the research and operational activities of the TASCC Division, the Physics Division, and the Fusion Office of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Commissioning of the TASCC facilities continues; the cyclotron's 17 beams are routinely used in experiments. The MP tandem accelerator has operated at 15 MV. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry group has shown that it is able to measure internal strain and temperature in engineering components. Work is continuing on a cold source to be installed in NRU at the same time as the third reactor vessel. Assembly of the DUALSPEC spectrometer has begun. Progress in understanding and developing the theory of quantum groups resulted in the discovery of a new structure, the twisted quantum group

  3. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology

  4. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  5. Materials Science Division progress report 1986-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Vasumathi, D.; Chandra Sekhar, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report on the various Research and Developmental (R and D) activities carried out in the Materials Science Division during the period 1986-88. Most contributions have been presented in the form of abstracts and wherever possible results of several contributions on a related problem have been consolidated into one. The R and D activities covered the following areas: (1) quasicrystalline phase, (2) high temperature superconducting behaviour in metal oxides, (3) physics of colloidal suspensions, (4) behaviour of materials under high pressure, (5) radiation effects in complex alloy systems, (6) inert gas behaviour in metals, and production of crystals, particularly of volatile semiconducting compounds. The lists of publications by the members of the Division and seminars held during 1986-88 are given at the end of the report. (a uthor)

  6. Progress Towards AIRS Science Team Version-7 at SRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Kouvaris, Louis

    2016-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version-6 retrieval algorithm is currently producing level-3 Climate Data Records (CDRs) from AIRS that have been proven useful to scientists in understanding climate processes. CDRs are gridded level-3 products which include all cases passing AIRS Climate QC. SRT has made significant further improvements to AIRS Version-6. At the last Science Team Meeting, we described results using SRT AIRS Version-6.22. SRT Version-6.22 is now an official build at JPL called 6.2.4. Version-6.22 results are significantly improved compared to Version-6, especially with regard to water vapor and ozone profiles. We have adapted AIRS Version-6.22 to run with CrIS/ATMS, at the Sounder SIPS which processed CrIS/ATMS data for August 2014. JPL AIRS Version-6.22 uses the Version-6 AIRS tuning coefficients. AIRS Version-6.22 has at least two limitations which must be improved before finalization of Version-7: Version-6.22 total O3 has spurious high values in the presence of Saharan dust over the ocean; and Version-6.22 retrieved upper stratospheric temperatures are very poor in polar winter. SRT Version-6.28 addresses the first concern. John Blaisdell ran the analog of AIRS Version-6.28 in his own sandbox at JPL for the 14th and 15th of every month in 2014 and all of July and October for 2014. AIRS Version-6.28a is hot off the presses and addresses the second concern.

  7. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 July - 30 September, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of the dose index and dose-equivalent index for fields of monoenergetic neutrons from thermal energies to 14.7 MeV are in progress. The evaluation of MgB 4 O 7 :Dy as thermoluminescent dosimeters is continuing. Some factors that limit the accuracy of TLD readings have been investigated. Prototypes of a new portable personal tritium monitor have been evaluated at various nuclear power stations and at CRNL. Various methods of correcting Geiger counter rates for large dead-time losses are under investigation. An area has been selected as the site for a large-scale tracer injection test where groundwater flow behaviour in an area of predominantly vertical movement will be studied and modelled. The project 'Bedrock-groundwater/Lake-connection' is underway. A new method for counting carbon-14 at low levels has been tested. The release of approximately 130 TBq (3500 curies) of tritiated water from the NPD site over a 7-day period in August has provided an opportunity to study dispersion in the Ottawa River. Work in the Radiation Biology Branch has dealt with both the nature of DNA damage by radiation and the response of cells as they attempt to repair this injury

  8. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoel, Agatha A.; Counce, Deborah Melinda; Ekkebus, Allen E.; Horak, Charlie M.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Kszos, Lynn A.

    2011-01-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  9. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Counce, Deborah M [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Horak, Charlie M [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron

  10. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 April - 30 June, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Calculations of absorbed doses and dose equivalents at various depths in a cylindrical tissue equivalent phantom by monoenergetic neutrons and calculations of quality factors for monoenergetic neutrons in tissue have been extended to neutron energies up to 14.7 MeV. Irradiations of human lymphocytes with low doses of 60 Co gamma rays and 14.6 MeV neutrons show a lower initial incidence of DNA strand breaks produced by neutrons than by gamma radiation. Tests are in progress on the relative thermal neutron sensitivities of various commonly used types of TLD phosphor. Studies on soil columns contaminated with radioactive cesium have demonstrated the release of a small portion of the cesium present on the column on filterable particles. Work on the bioavailability of 60 Co present in groundwater has indicated that complexed 60 Co is less available to plants than added free cobalt. A liquid scintillation method has been successfully used to measure radon-222 in bedrock groundwater. Radiation Biology research activities have been concerned mainly with effects of radiation and tumor promoters on the DNA in blood lymphocytes, a new method of preparing plasmid DNA, relation of oxygen and various free radicals to radiation-induced lethality and genetic changes in yeast, the functions of different DNA repair systems in yeast, induction of DNA damage by ultraviolet light, relationship of radiation sensitivity to hereditary deficiencies in DNA repair systems in cultured human cells, relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta-radiation for induction of breast cancer in rats and the follow-up of past CRNL employees. Metabolic studies were also conducted

  11. Progress report on neutron science. April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Masayasu; Ohhara, Takashi; Moriai, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    There are 13 research groups in neutron science and technology in the Quantum Beam Science Directorate (QuBS) and Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) of Japan Atomic Research Agency (JAEA). A wide variety of research is performed by these group: neutron scattering (condensed matter physics, polymer science, biology, and residual stress analysis), prompt gamma-ray analysis, neutron radiography, neutron optics, and development of a neutron spectrometer, neutron beam handling device and neutron detector. This issue summarizes research progress in neutron science and technology including activities of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate of JAEA, and of the COMMON USE PROGRAM of JAEA utilizing the research reactor JRR-3 during the period between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2007. This report contains highlights of research by these 13 neutron research groups of QuBS and ASRC, introducing 68 experimental reports. (author)

  12. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations

  14. Progress report on neutron science. April 1, 2003 - March 31, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masaaki; Kurihara, Kazuo; Moriai, Atsushi

    2005-03-01

    This issue summarizes research progress in neutron science at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) by utilizing the research reactor JRR-3 during the period between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004. This report contains highlights in research from 10 neutron research groups at JAERI and summary reports of 82 papers. (author)

  15. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 July 01 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are health and safety aspects of tritium. This includes instrumentation, environmental studies, metabolism, dosimetry and health effects

  16. Progress report on neutron science. April 1, 2004 - March 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kazuo; Moriai, Atsushi; Matsuda, Masaaki

    2005-09-01

    This issue summarizes research progress in neutron science at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) by utilizing the research reactor JRR-3 during the period between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005. This report contains highlights in research by 13 neutron research groups at JAERI and 91 summary articles. (author)

  17. Progress report on neutron science. April 1, 2005 - March 31, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriai, Atsushi; Takeda, Masayasu; Kurihara, Kazuo

    2007-03-01

    This issue summarizes research progress in neutron science at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by utilizing the research reactor JRR-3 during the period between April 1, 2005 and March 31, 2006. This report contains highlights in research by 13 neutron research groups at JAEA and 89 summary articles. (author)

  18. Progress report. Physics and Health sciences, Physics Section (1988 January 01-June 30)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    A report on the progress made in the Physics and Health Sciences Physics Section between January 01 and June 30 1988 was compiled. This document contains an overview of operations and research carried out by the nuclear physics branch, the TASCC operations branch, and the cyclotron group. In addition, a general discussion of the tandem and cyclotron operations for this period was presented

  19. A tale of three theories: Feyerabend and Popper on progress and the aim of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambolo, Luca

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, three theories of progress and the aim of science are discussed: (i) the theory of progress as increasing explanatory power, advocated by Popper in The logic of scientific discovery (1935/1959); (ii) the theory of progress as approximation to the truth, introduced by Popper in Conjectures and refutations (1963); (iii) the theory of progress as a steady increase of competing alternatives, which Feyerabend put forward in the essay "Reply to criticism. Comments on Smart, Sellars and Putnam" (1965) and defended as late as the last edition of Against method (1993). It is argued that, contrary to what Feyerabend scholars have predominantly assumed, Feyerabend's changing attitude towards falsificationism-which he often advocated at the beginning of his career, and vociferously attacked in the 1970s and 1980s-must be explained by taking into account not only Feyerabend's very peculiar view of the aim of science, but also Popper's changing account of progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. Progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.A.; Doob, L.W.; Gould, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This is a progress report of activities in the fourth year of the Yale Institution for Social and Policy Studies Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. The Mapping Project evaluates past and present social and behavioral science energy studies, assesses the potential for social and behavioral science contributions to a resolution of the energy problems in the future, and diffuses social and behavioral science information and perspectives to policymakers and others concerned with US or world energy developments. Activities in FY 1979 included meetings, workshops, collecting bibliographic material, publications, evaluating DOE programs in buildings and transportation, performing a special study of potential social impacts of 4 coal technologies, and developing plans for 10 specific research studies on energy.

  1. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  2. HS and E Environmental Sciences semiannual progress report for 1982, January-July

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.C.; Campbell, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes research and evaluation activities for the Environmental Sciences Branch from January 1, 1982 to July 1, 1982. Progress in five primary areas of effort is reported: (1) dust transport, (2) environmental health, (3) quality assurance of measurement techniques, (4) beryllium levels in regional soils, and (5) evaluation of actual and hypothetical Plantsite incidents. Progress is also described in programs dealing with (1) Plant land management, (2) distribution of transuranium (TRU) elements in sediments, and (3) alpha-emitter composition of Plantsite pond waters. 25 references, 18 figures, 14 tables

  3. Integration of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Into the Science Learning Progression Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Cyntra

    This study integrated elements of culturally relevant pedagogy into a science learning progression framework, with the goal of enhancing teachers' cultural knowledge and thereby creating better teaching practices in an urban public high school science classroom. The study was conducted using teachers, an administrator, a science coach, and students involved in science courses in public high school. Through a qualitative intrinsic case study, data were collected and analyzed using traditional methods. Data from primary participants (educators) were analyzed through identification of big ideas, open coding, and themes. Through this process, patterns and emergent ideas were reported. Outcomes of this study demonstrated that educators lack knowledge about research-based academic frameworks and multicultural education strategies, but benefit through institutionally-based professional development. Students from diverse cultures responded positively to culturally-based instruction. Their progress was further manifested in better communication and discourse with their teacher and peers, and increased academic outcomes. This study has postulated and provided an exemplar for science teachers to expand and improve multicultural knowledge, ultimately transferring these skills to their pedagogical practice.

  4. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are research goals, radiation levels, biological end points, assessment of carcinogenic and genetic hazards, research on radiation effects. Practical applications of research are highlighted

  5. Global Chance and nuclear energy. Ecology, environment and media. Science, progress and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A first set of contributions discusses the outcomes of the French electronuclear programme and the place of Superphenix in the plutonium management. The second set of contributions proposes comments and critics on three books about the environment (more particularly about the new ecological order, about the greenhouse effect as a world manipulation, and about the limits of scientific expertise on climate). The last article proposes a synthesis of a meeting about the relationship between science, progress and development

  6. Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.; Benner, W.H.; DePaolo, D.J.; Faybishenko, B.; Majer, E.L.; Pallavicini, M.; Russo, R.E.; Shultz, P.G.; Wan, J.

    1997-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was awarded eight Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report summarizes the progress of each grant in addressing significant DOE site cleanup issues after completion of the first year of research. The technical progress made to date in each of the research projects is described in greater detail in individual progress reports. The focus of the research projects covers a diversity of areas relevant to site cleanup, including bioremediation, health effects, characterization, and mixed waste. Some of the projects cut across a number of focus areas. Three of the projects are directed toward characterization and monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, as a test case for application to other sites

  7. Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, A. [ed.; Benner, W.H.; DePaolo, D.J.; Faybishenko, B.; Majer, E.L.; Pallavicini, M.; Russo, R.E.; Shultz, P.G.; Wan, J.

    1997-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was awarded eight Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report summarizes the progress of each grant in addressing significant DOE site cleanup issues after completion of the first year of research. The technical progress made to date in each of the research projects is described in greater detail in individual progress reports. The focus of the research projects covers a diversity of areas relevant to site cleanup, including bioremediation, health effects, characterization, and mixed waste. Some of the projects cut across a number of focus areas. Three of the projects are directed toward characterization and monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, as a test case for application to other sites.

  8. Health information technology and implementation science: partners in progress in the VHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M; Whittier, Erika R; Owens, Arika

    2013-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) has demonstrated how implementation science can enhance the quality of health care. During this time an increasing number of implementation research projects have developed or utilized health information technology (HIT) innovations to leverage the VA's electronic health record and information systems. To describe the HIT approaches used and to characterize the facilitators and barriers to progress within implementation research projects in the VA QUERI program. Nine case studies were selected from among 88 projects and represented 8 of 14 HIT categories identified. Each case study included key informants whose roles on the project were principal investigator, implementation science and informatics development. We conducted documentation analysis and semistructured in-person interviews with key informants for each of the 9 case studies. We used qualitative analysis software to identify and thematically code information and interview responses. : Thematic analyses revealed 3 domains or pathways critical to progression through the QUERI steps. These pathways addressed: (1) compliance and collaboration with information technology policies and procedures; (2) operating within organizational policies and building collaborations with end users, clinicians, and administrators; and (3) obtaining and maintaining research resources and approvals. Sustained efforts in HIT innovation and in implementation science in the Veterans Health Administration demonstrates the interdependencies of these initiatives and the critical pathways that can contribute to progress. Other health care quality improvement efforts that rely on HIT can learn from the Veterans Health Administration experience.

  9. Recent progress and modern challenges in applied mathematics, modeling and computational science

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, Roman; Belair, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    This volume is an excellent resource for professionals in various areas of applications of mathematics, modeling, and computational science. It focuses on recent progress and modern challenges in these areas. The volume provides a balance between fundamental theoretical and applied developments, emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of modern trends and detailing state-of-the-art achievements in Applied Mathematics, Modeling, and Computational Science.  The chapters have been authored by international experts in their respective fields, making this book ideal for researchers in academia, practitioners, and graduate students. It can also serve as a reference in the diverse selected areas of applied mathematics, modelling, and computational sciences, and is ideal for interdisciplinary collaborations.

  10. Progress report. Physics and health sciences. Health sciences section. 1988 January 01-June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    Work of the Health Sciences section in the first half of 1988 covered the areas of radiation risks; neutron, thermoluminescence and beta dosimetry; tritium, stack and effluent monitoring; radiochemical analysis; atmospheric, lake and river processes; groundwater and streamflow interactions; flow and contaminant transport in groundwater; environmental assessment criteria, techniques and implementation; environmental monitoring; radiation sensitivity and mutagenesis; and radiobiology. Members of the section were closely involved with the international re-evaluation of risk estimates taking into account the new data on dose for Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors

  11. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Health Sciences Section 1987 January 1 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report covers the third semi-annual period since the Reserach Company was reorganized. A highlight of the period was the first peer review of all the activities in Physics and Health Sciences by external examiners. The review was conducted in April by three separate Technical Review Committees (TRC) one for each of the three main areas: health sciences, nuclear physics and condensed matter physics. In all cases the TRCs gave strong support to our programs having a mandate to assess research programs with respect to (a) their quality and (b) their relevance to Canada. The principal programs reviewed were: DNA damage and repair mechanisms; synergistic effects of chemicals and radiation; the tritium RBE study; radiosensitivity of human bone marrow cells; radioprotective enzymes; radiation biochemistry; chemistry of oxazolinones, benzofuroxanes and cyclodextrins; myeloid leukemia in mice; tritium monitoring, and quality factors; metabolic modeling; neutron dosimetry; groundwater/contaminant modeling; sediment exchange and speciation; and atmospheric dispersion. Very considerable effort was spent on preparing a proposal for a centre of excellence in toxicology for presentation in March to the Premier's Council in the Province of Ontario. Although the proposal was not one of the 7 (out of 28) successful proposals, much useful preparatory work was done towards the establishing of a centre for health and environmental research on toxic agents

  12. Applying Item Response Theory methods to design a learning progression-based science assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    Learning progressions are used to describe how students' understanding of a topic progresses over time and to classify the progress of students into steps or levels. This study applies Item Response Theory (IRT) based methods to investigate how to design learning progression-based science assessments. The research questions of this study are: (1) how to use items in different formats to classify students into levels on the learning progression, (2) how to design a test to give good information about students' progress through the learning progression of a particular construct and (3) what characteristics of test items support their use for assessing students' levels. Data used for this study were collected from 1500 elementary and secondary school students during 2009--2010. The written assessment was developed in several formats such as the Constructed Response (CR) items, Ordered Multiple Choice (OMC) and Multiple True or False (MTF) items. The followings are the main findings from this study. The OMC, MTF and CR items might measure different components of the construct. A single construct explained most of the variance in students' performances. However, additional dimensions in terms of item format can explain certain amount of the variance in student performance. So additional dimensions need to be considered when we want to capture the differences in students' performances on different types of items targeting the understanding of the same underlying progression. Items in each item format need to be improved in certain ways to classify students more accurately into the learning progression levels. This study establishes some general steps that can be followed to design other learning progression-based tests as well. For example, first, the boundaries between levels on the IRT scale can be defined by using the means of the item thresholds across a set of good items. Second, items in multiple formats can be selected to achieve the information criterion at all

  13. progressive problemshifts between different research programs in science education: A lakatosian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor

    Given the importance of epistemology and philosophy of science, the Lakatos (1970) methodology is particularly suited to evaluate competing research programs in science education. This article has two objectives: (a) to evaluate critically the interpretations of Gilbert and Swift (1985) and Rowell and Dawson (1989), and (b) to postulate a progressive problemshift between Piaget's epistemic subject and Pascual-Leone's metasubject. Regarding the Gilbert and Swift interpretation, it is concluded that the alternative conceptions movement at its present stage of development cannot explain the previous success of its rival (Piagetian school) nor supersede it by a further display of heuristic power as required by Lakatos. If we accept the Rowell and Dawson thesis it would amount to the postulation of Piagetian and integrated (Piagetian and schema) theories as rival research programs. It appears that the Rowell and Dawson approach would enrich Piagetian theory with descriptive content rather than explanatory constructs, and thus would not lead to a progressive problemshift. It is concluded that Pascual-Leone's theory extends Piaget's negative heuristic by introducing antecedent variables, and at the same time enriches the positive heuristic by introducing metasubjective task analysis, which leads to a progressive problemshift.

  14. Information literacy progression within the Environmental science program at Linköping University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajsa Gustafsson Åman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the Environmental Science program at Linköping University started 1998 the author has been liaison librarian. The program is a three-year candidate program with approximately 60 students enrolled per year. Information literacy is of vital importance for the teachers and the students. Collaboration between the liaison librarian, the teachers and the administrator is the fundament. During the years a curriculum for Information literacy has evolved. The initiative for the evolvement comes from both librarian and teachers. The program consists today of fifteen different parts with education in information literacy with a progression during the three-year program. Special concern is given to progression, learning design, learning environments and quality development. An important part is appendixes in connection to the student essay. The appendixes consist of reflections on the search of information for the essay in order to make the students more conscious about their Information Literacy processes.

  15. Progress of research on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Chang-Chun; Zhou, Zhang-Jian; Song, Shu-Xiang; Du, Juan; Zhong, Zhi-Hong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report some new progress on plasma facing materials in University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), China. They include fabrication of tungsten coating with ultra-fine grain size by atmosphere plasma spraying; fabrication of tungsten with ultra-fine grain size by a newly developed method named as resistance sintering under ultra-high pressure; using the concept of functionally graded materials to join tungsten to copper based heat sink; joining silicon doped carbon to copper by brazing using a Ti based amorphous filler and direct casting

  16. Convergence of advances in genomics, team science, and repositories as drivers of progress in psychiatric genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Thomas; Senthil, Geetha; Addington, Anjené M

    2015-01-01

    After many years of unfilled promise, psychiatric genetics has seen an unprecedented number of successes in recent years. We hypothesize that the field has reached an inflection point through a confluence of four key developments: advances in genomics; the orientation of the scientific community around large collaborative team science projects; the development of sample and data repositories; and a policy framework for sharing and accessing these resources. We discuss these domains and their effect on scientific progress and provide a perspective on why we think this is only the beginning of a new era in scientific discovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. "What we need is a crop ecologist": ecology and agricultural science in Progressive-era America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    Though they are often seen as foils for each other, ecology and agricultural science co-evolved. With shared roots in late nineteenth-century botany, ecologists and agronomists fostered important connections during the Progressive era that have been largely overlooked despite a number of finely nuanced studies of ecology's origins. But if 'applied ecology' once effectively meant agriculture, over the course of the first decades of the twentieth century the relationship between ecology and scientific agriculture grew strained. Agriculturists narrowed their focus to increasing yields, and ecologists sought to establish their discipline as a distant theoretical science and so distanced themselves from its agricultural applications. By the end of World War I, the process of disciplinary specialization was well underway. In time, the two disciplines diverged so completely that the once vital connections between them were obscured and forgotten.

  18. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned

  19. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B.M. (ed.)

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned.

  20. Progress report. Physics and Health Sciences, Health Sciences Section (1987 July 01 - December 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This report covers the fourth semi-annual period since the Research Company was reorganized. During this period the new research fellow program reached its first goal: we now have eight research fellows on staff, six fully funded by Physics and Health Sciences (P and HS), who are invigorating all our programs. The planned expansion of the program will depend critically on government funding of the Research Company in 1988/1989. The National Fusion Program is rapidly taking shape. The Tokamak de Varennes is operating in a highly satisfactory manner and the agreement with CCFM (Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique) is ready for signing early in 1988. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project has energetically and successfully promoted Canadian expertise and products abroad. A western Canada proposal for an inertial confinement program based on a KrF laser is currently seeking appropriate funding. In condensed matter physics, major improvements were made in data taking and analysis with the introduction of two multidetector arrays, and computer programs that facilitate texture analysis from Bragg scattering data. The availability of the NRU spectrometers continues to be high, but Dualspec has fallen behind schedule because of difficulties in obtaining the necessary design effort. Eric Svensson has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society; appropriately, a topical review of the work that brought him that honour appears in Section 6.2. Numerous technical problems have made the production of new beams from the superconducting cyclotron difficult. Nevertheless university participation is continuing to increase, now being at 57%. The tandem availability was excellent, 95% of scheduled time. Much of this time was put to good use by the 8-pi spectrometer and the ISOL. The 8-pi program has concentrated on studies of super-deformation and has found some evidence for a super-elongated state (axis ratio 3 to 1) in 184 Pt. ISOL studies are tending to a new round

  1. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998[Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R and D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R and D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  2. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  3. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  4. Progress report, physics and health sciences, physics section, 1986 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    The two progress reports PR-PHS-P-1 (AECL-9262) and PR-PHS-HS-1 (AECL-9263) are continuations of the former series in Physics, PR-P-142, (AECL-9103) and in Health Sciences, PH-HS-20 (AECL-9102). The new series have been initiated to take into account the reorganization of the Research Company effective 1986 February 1. It is intended to issue the reports semi-annually on June 30 and December 31 covering the previous six months. The new series cover the same areas as before except that the Accelerator Physics Branch and the Mathematics and Computation Branch activities are no longer included in Physics, and the activities of the Medical Biophysics Branch at Whiteshell are now included in Health Sciences. The latest progress report on the Medical Biophysics work appeared in the WNRE report PR-WHS-73. This report (AECL-9262) covers the research, business and commercial activities of Nuclear Physics, TASCC Operations, Neutron and Solid State Physics, Theoretical Physics and the Fusion Office

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  7. Progress report - Physical Sciences, Physical Division 1993 July 1 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1994-05-01

    The progress report on the Physical Sciences, Physics Division, is split into Accelerator Physics and Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch. The Accelerator Physics Group in collaboration with Fuel Channel Components Branch has undertaken a unique series of experiments to prove the feasibility of using high energy electron beams for out-reactor irradiation of bulk samples of pressure-tube materials. The Neutron and Condensed Matter Branch, has among other topics, been involved with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. It is part of an international collaboration including Canada, United States, and the United Kingdom. The project involves the use of heavy water to detect particles called neutrinos that are emitted from the centre of the sun and from exploding stars. Results from the Molecular Physics program include a study of the differing structures of ice grown in an electric field. Atomic Ordering in the new intermetallics Al 3 Ti-X was extensively investigated in the Materials Science program. In the theory program a code to calculate the multiphonon expansion of the incoherent scattering function was written and it was applied in the analysis of phonon density of states for amorphous and crystalline ice. Further calculations were made to develop improved understanding of superconductivity and a theory for the conductivity of vortex cores was proposed. 3 tabs., 15 figs

  8. Progress report - Physical Sciences, Physical Division 1993 July 1 -December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M

    1994-05-01

    The progress report on the Physical Sciences, Physics Division, is split into Accelerator Physics and Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch. The Accelerator Physics Group in collaboration with Fuel Channel Components Branch has undertaken a unique series of experiments to prove the feasibility of using high energy electron beams for out-reactor irradiation of bulk samples of pressure-tube materials. The Neutron and Condensed Matter Branch, has among other topics, been involved with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. It is part of an international collaboration including Canada, United States, and the United Kingdom. The project involves the use of heavy water to detect particles called neutrinos that are emitted from the centre of the sun and from exploding stars. Results from the Molecular Physics program include a study of the differing structures of ice grown in an electric field. Atomic Ordering in the new intermetallics Al{sub 3} Ti-X was extensively investigated in the Materials Science program. In the theory program a code to calculate the multiphonon expansion of the incoherent scattering function was written and it was applied in the analysis of phonon density of states for amorphous and crystalline ice. Further calculations were made to develop improved understanding of superconductivity and a theory for the conductivity of vortex cores was proposed. 3 tabs., 15 figs.

  9. Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC). Technical progress report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WMF)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also were developed for a study on neutron science, however, further activity is pending. A proposed study on ultrasmall devices has been expanded and absorbed into a broader context; the BPA, with SSSC participation, is preparing to hold a program initiation meeting to evaluate the need for a study on information technology and hardware

  10. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M. (ed.)

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31.

  11. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31

  12. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focused on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non-destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  13. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focussed on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  14. Technical progress report to the Department of Energy on the Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WNM)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also have been developed for studies on neutron scattering science, on ultrasmall devices, and on molecular routes to materials

  15. Construction Progress and Science Planning for the New Research Vessel R/V Sikuliaq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    2011-12-01

    The research vessel R/V Sikuliaq (pronounced [see-KOO-lee-auk]) is currently being constructed on behalf of the NSF to support future scientific studies in high latitude waters. The 261 foot global class vessel will be capable of breaking 2.5 foot thick ice at 2 knots with an endurance of 45 days at sea and cruising at 11 knots. The R/V Sikuliaq will have a beam of 52 feet and a draft of 18.9 feet that will carry 26 scientists and a crew of 20. Berthing accommodations are a combination of single/double rooms with one stateroom and the common areas of the vessel are designed for ADA access and accommodations. The total laboratory space (main, analytical, electronics, wet, upper, and Baltic room will be 2100 square feet. The 4360 square foot working deck that is approximately 70 feet in length will accommodate 2-4 vans and multiple science operations. The vessel design strives to have the lowest possible environmental impact, including a low underwater-radiated noise signature. The science systems are prescribed to be state-of-the-art for bottom mapping, over-the-side "hands free" gear handling, broad band communications and scientific walk-in freezer and environmental chamber. More details and photos of the construction progress are available on the website at www.sfos.uaf.edu/arrv. The tentative shipyard schedule has a launch date of June 2012 and delivery to the University of Alaska Fairbanks in June 2013. Scientific operations following trials and testing is planned to start in January 2014. A Sikuliaq science planning workshop has been arranged for 18-19 February 2012 in Salt Lake City, UT just prior to the 2012 Ocean Sciences meeting. Interested participants should contact Terry Whitledge (terry@ims.uaf.edu).

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  17. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October to 31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This is the second quarterly progress report of the Health Sciences Division. Developments in health physics include construction of a simple monitor for measurement of tritium concentration at or above the maximum permissible level and measurements on the behaviour of Geiger counters at high temperature for monitoring activity in reactor cooling circuits. Environmental Research Branch continues to monitor groundwater in the vicinity of the glass blocks containing fission products. Work in radiation biology deals with the effects of radiation on a variety of living organisms. Emphasis continued on the study of damage to DNA and its repair. Research into certain human diseases which are believed to be caused by a deficient DNA repair mechanism is also summarized. (OT)

  18. Annual progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1990 January 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for the Dosimetric Research Branch and the Radiation Biology Branch. The major topics discussed in this report include: neutron dosimetry, photon dosimetry, beta ray dosimetry, tritium measurement and dosimetry, internal dosimetry, biological dosimetry, instrumentation and measurement techniques, bioassay and in vivo counting development, dosimetry services, external activities, dose estimation by electron spin resonance, molecular and physical approaches to the structure and genetic function of DNA that determine cellular radioresponse, carcinogenic risks of radiation, stress induced changes in DNA structure and in cell biology, assessment of variation in the responses of individuals to ionizing radiation, cytotoxicity of beryllium, RBE of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than myeloid leukemia in male CBA/H mice, animal facility operations, and the Chalk River follow-up study

  19. Contributions of Behavioral Systems Science to Leadership for a New Progressive Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattaini, Mark A; Aspholm, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    We argue in this paper that we are in the midst of a period in which fundamental global change will be required if societies and many species, perhaps even our own, are to survive. The realities are inescapable, and the potential implications are likely to affect nearly every dimension of human life in the USA and globally. Current trends are discouraging and will be extraordinarily difficult to shift, given global structural realities. It is hard to imagine a time when effective leadership is more necessary or will be more challenging. Our thesis here is that behavioral systems science can contribute in meaningful ways to shaping and sustaining such leadership, leadership required to advance a new progressive movement.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report

  2. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report

  3. Progress report. Physics and Health Sciences, Physics Section (1987 January 01-June 30)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report covers the third semi-annual period since the Research Company was reorganized. A highlight of the period was the first peer review of all the activities in Physics and Health Sciences by external examiners. The review was conducted in April by three separate Technical Review Committees (TRC) one for each of the three main areas: health sciences, nuclear physics and condensed matter physics. In all cases the TRCs gave strong support to our programs under the following mandate. To assess research programs with respect to (a) their quality, and (b) their relevance to Canada. The programs by the Nuclear Physics TRC reviewed were: heavy ion reaction studies; gamma-ray studies of high spin states; exotic nuclei and weak interactions; neutron and neutrino physics; TASCC operation and development; and theoretical physics. The programs reviewed by the Condensed Matter TRC were: liquid helium; amorphous ice; orientationally disordered solids; structural phase transitions; low dimensional systems; actinide magnetism and heavy fermion superconductors; molecular biophysics; applied neutron diffraction (ANDI); and theoretical solid state physics. A mechanism for the evaluation of the strategy for the National Fusion Program has been developed and the process is under way. The successful completion of the 8-pi spectrometer by Chalk River and the Universities of Montreal and McMaster, plus the vigorous and highly successful experimental program in progress on it were the outstanding achievement of the period. Good progress is being made in the detailing of a program in heavy ion nuclear reactions, and the specification of equipment for that program have been made. Some difficulties with the new Vivirad resistors for the MP tandem were encountered, however the manufacturer now seems to have solved the problem

  4. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the TASCC Division. During the period covered by this report, the operation of the superconducting cyclotron has matured considerably, with over 30 accelerated ion beams more-or-less routinely available for a wide variety of nuclear physics experiments. The TASCC team, together with all the engineers, trades-people and other staff members who contributed to the design, constructed and commissioning of the Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron facility, are to be heartily congratulated on bringing it to its present highly successful state in an unusually short period of time. In conjunction with our many outside collaborators, we are now engaged on exciting experiments in several areas of nuclear physics research, as reported in the following pages. We are well on the way to the establishment of a truly National Centre for Nuclear Physics research in Canada

  5. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the Physics Division. Of special note within the period covered by this report was the successful acceleration of over 75 mA of protons to 600 keV in RFQ1 making it the highest current RFQ in the world. Our electron accelerator expertise has been recognized by the award of one of the R and D 100 awards for the IMPELA (10 MeV 50 kW) machine. Considerable activity was associated with bringing the new dual beam neutron spectrometer DUALSPEC to completion. This instrument has been jointly funded by AECL and NSERC through McMaster University and will be a central component of the national neutron scattering facility at NRU in the 1990's. A major effort was made with the writing of a Project Definition Document for installation of a cold neutron source at the most opportune time

  6. Understanding the nature of science and scientific progress: A theory-building approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chuy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1993 Carey and Smith conjectured that the most promising way to boost students’ understanding of the nature of science is a “theory-building approach to teaching about inquiry.” The research reported here tested this conjecture by comparing results from two Grade 4 classrooms that differed in their emphasis on and technological support for creating and improving theories. One class followed a Knowledge Building approach and used Knowledge Forum®, which together emphasize theory improvement and sustained creative work with ideas. The other class followed an inquiry approach mediated through collaborative project-based activities. Apart from this, the two classes were demographically similar and both fell within the broad category of constructivist, inquiry-based approaches and employed a range of modes and media for investigative research and reports. An augmented version of Carey and Smith’s Nature of Science Interview showed that the Knowledge Building approach resulted in deeper understanding of the nature of theoretical progress, the connections between theories and facts, and the role of ideas in scientific inquiry.

  7. Gender differences in national assessment of educational progress science items: What does i don't know really mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Marcia C.; de Benedictis, Tina; Delucchi, Kevin; Harris, Abigail; Stage, Elizabeth

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress Science Assessment has consistently revealed small gender differences on science content items but not on science inquiry items. This assessment differs from others in that respondents can choose I don't know rather than guessing. This paper examines explanations for the gender differences including (a) differential prior instruction, (b) differential response to uncertainty and use of the I don't know response, (c) differential response to figurally presented items, and (d) different attitudes towards science. Of these possible explanations, the first two received support. Females are more likely to use the I don't know response, especially for items with physical science content or masculine themes such as football. To ameliorate this situation we need more effective science instruction and more gender-neutral assessment items.

  8. The Use of Organising Purposes in Science Instruction as a Scaffolding Mechanism to Support Progressions: A Study of Talk in Two Primary Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Annie-Maj; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines how different purposes can support teachers in their work with progressions as a part of a teaching sequences in science in primary school. Design/Method: The study was carried out in two classes working with inquiry and the events that took place in the classroom were filmed. In the study, we have chosen to use the…

  9. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program

  10. Progress report 1979 July 01 to September 30, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    In September 1979, the Biology and Health Physics Division and the Medical Division were amalgamated to form the Health Sciences Division. This is the first progress report of the new division. A new TLD reader for semi-automatic handling of individual TLD chips has been commissioned. As high range radiation detectors for spent fuel monitoring, optical photo-diodes show performance similar to that of silicon rectifiers. Studies continue on the use of water-permeable plastic membranes in tritium monitoring, particularly where it is important to distinguish between 3 H in elemental form and combined as water. The first of a series of radionuclide injection experiments was made in the sand aquifer near Perch Lake. These experiments are to develop methods for studying radionuclide transport in fractured rock. Investigations of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of waste management areas have shown that tritium is the only radionuclide present in significant quantities. Radiation damage to DNA and subsequent repair is being studied by observing both somatic and genetic effcts. Rare hereditary human diseases that present clinical or laboratory features indicative of defects in the DNA repair mechanism are being studied. Work on various metabolic models that describe retention and distribution of radionuclides in humans has continued with emphasis on tritium as HT, carbon as CO2, and compounds of the alkaline earth and actinide elements. Committed effective dose equivalent conversion factors for infants and adults have been calculated for 380 classes of compounds of radionuclide and intake routes, for 65 elements. (OT)

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  12. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in the new series of reports for the Physics Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. This report has been subdivided into three self-contained sections covering the activities in the branches for Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Solid State Physics and Theoretical Physics. It is noteworthy that the RFQ1 program with the original vanes has come to a successful conclusion having accelerated 79 mA of protons to 600 keV. The new vanes to achieve a high energy of 1.2 MeV have now been installed and will form the basis for the low energy end of high current proton accelerator development. The progress in the neutron scattering program has been hampered by the NRU reactor being down for repairs since January 1991. Nevertheless a very successful opening ceremony was held to mark the completion of the new DUALSPEC spectrometers and several workshops have been held to promote the understanding of neutron scattering

  13. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997, mid-year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects

  14. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects

  15. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 mid-year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas--Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  16. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects.

  17. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards-Fiscal Year 1999 Mid-Year Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.

    1999-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, and eight in fiscal year 1998. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in five areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Clean Up, and Health Effects

  18. Science to support DOE site cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1998 mid-year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996 and six (6) in Fiscal Year 1997. This section summarizes how each grant addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.

  19. Cyclotron based nuclear science: Progress report, April 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains descriptions of research programs at the Institute, progress on construction of the K500 cyclotron, and descriptions of new experimental devices being built to take advantage of new beams that will be available. Several milestones were reached in construction of the new cyclotron during the period. In early summer, 1986, the magnet was completed with all trim coils and shimming iron in place. During July and August, the final field maps were made, which will be used for calculations of run parameters. In the spring, one rf amplifier was completed and tested over the full frequency and power range. Also in the spring, the computer control system successfully operated positioning controls and trim coil power supplies. Final assembly of the rf system including the dees, resonators and other 2 rf amplifiers is now underway. Initial attempts at getting beam are expected in September. The design of the ECR source was completed in the fall. A beam line configuration has been designed for the K500 cyclotron which will result initially in 3 lines, with a fourth to be added in 1988. With the eminent completion of the K500, there has been considerable instrumentation development. A 4π neutron calorimeter is under construction for heavy ion reaction studies, construction is beginning on a proton spectrometer for studies of Gamow-Teller matrix elements with the (d, 2 He) reaction, and several detector systems are being developed. During the year, the 88 inch cyclotron operated 4845 hours for research and beam development. Research programs in nuclear science scheduled 57% of the time. Atomic physics programs used 19% of the time, and a program in trace analysis scheduled 6%. An industrial testing laboratory used 18 hours. The remainder of the time was used for beam development, primarily for increasing the energy and/or intensity of heavy ion beams

  20. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research

  1. Research in progress at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1987 through October 1, 1987.

  2. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  3. Teaching Chemistry in a Spiral Progression Approach: Lessons from Science Teachers in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbe, Joymie R.; Espinosa, Allen A.; Datukan, Janir T.

    2018-01-01

    As the Philippines moves towards implementing the K-12 curriculum, there has been a mismatch in teacher preparation in science. The present teacher education curriculum prepares science teachers to specialise in a specific field (e.g. integrated science, biology, chemistry, and physics). However, in the K-12 curriculum, they are required to teach…

  4. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). Technical progress report ampersand continuation proposal, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the CAMOS to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of CAMOS activities from February 1, 1993 to January 31, 1994. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier progress reports. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the CAMOS study on the field that is being conducted by the Panel on the Future of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (FAMOS). During the above period, CAMOS has continued to track and participate in, when requested, discussions on the health of the field. Much of the perspective of CAMOS has been presented in the recently-published report Research Briefing on Selected Opportunities in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences. That report has served as the basis for briefings to representatives of the federal government as well as the community-at-large. In keeping with its charge to monitor the health of the field, CAMOS launched a study designed to highlight future directions of the field

  5. Plasma Science Committee. Final progress report, July 15, 1994 - December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Organized in 1988 as a standing activity of the National Research Council (NRC), the PLSC [Plasma Science Committee] is charged with monitoring the continuing health and development of plasma science in the United States. Its goals are to identify the needs of the plasma science community, make recommendations about those needs, and provide guidance about existing research programs in plasma science. Its operating guidelines include the following tasks: (1) to provide a continuing forum for the discussion of problems in the field of plasma science; (2) to initiate, develop, and oversee special studies focused on high-priority topics; (3) to maintain a broad and unified definition of plasma science as a field; (4) to maintain a clear and comprehensive formulation of current plasma science policy issues and give guidance to decisionmakers in universities, nonprofit research centers, and government agencies; (5) to promote coordination among institutions involved in plasma science; (6) to make recommendations aimed at plasma science education; (7) to monitor the plasma-related industrial technological base; and (8) to sponsor workshops and symposia as a means of communication among different branches of the field. During this reporting period, the PLSC was involved with two major projects: a decadal assessment of the field as a whole, conducted by the Panel on Opportunities in Plasma Science and Technology (OPST), and a study of data needs in the modeling and simulation of plasma processing of materials, conducted by the Panel on Database Needs in Plasma Processing

  6. Information on research in progress in Japan publication of 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan-Oral Presentation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Keizo; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Yokoo, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    The new journal, 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan-Oral Presentation', which was entirely revised from the previous abstract journal called 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan' was introduced. This is to be published quaterly in principle and compiled information by oral presentation presented at main conferences, symposia and other kind of formal meetings in the field of nuclear science and technology in Japan. Not all of the oral presentation is always contributed later to a proceeding or a journal as a full paper in Japan. In some cases, the pre-conference paper might be a only publication of the oral presentation. In this meaning, this journal could be used as a search tool for the subjects and the projects of nuclear research and development in progress. (author)

  7. Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science progress report summary of selected research and development topics, FY97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains summaries of research performed in the Chemistry and Materials Science division. Topics include Metals and Ceramics, High Explosives, Organic Synthesis, Instrument Development, and other topics.

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  9. Student science enrichment training program: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1989-04-21

    This is a status report on a Student Science Enrichment Training Program held at the campus of Claflin College, Orangeburg, SC. The topics of the report include the objectives of the project, participation experienced, financial incentives and support for the program, curriculum description, and estimated success of the program in stimulating an occupational interest in science and research fields by the students.

  10. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup

  11. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Clark D.; Bennett, Sheila Q.

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998 and seven in fiscal year 1999.(a) All of the fiscal year 1996 awards have been completed and the Principal Investigators are writing final reports, so their summaries will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  12. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards - Fiscal Year 2000 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CD Carlson; SQ Bennett

    2000-07-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, eight in fiscal year 1998, and seven in fiscal year 1999. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have been completed and will publish final reports, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the currently funded grants addresses significant US Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research performed at PNNL is focused primarily in four areas: Tank Waste Remediation; Decontamination and Decommissioning; Spent Nuclear Fuel and Nuclear Materials; and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  13. Nature of Science Progression in School Year 1-9: a Case Study of Teachers' Suggestions and Rationales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leden, Lotta; Hansson, Lena

    2017-07-01

    The inclusion of nature of science (NOS) in science education has for a long time been regarded as crucial. There is, however, a lack of research on appropriate NOS aspects for different educational levels. An even more neglected area of research is that focusing on teachers' perspectives on NOS teaching at different levels. The aim of this article is to examine NOS progression in the light of teachers' suggestions and rationales. In order to obtain teachers' informed perspectives, we chose to involve six teachers (teaching grades 1-9) in a 3-year research project. They took part in focus group discussions about NOS and NOS teaching as well as implemented jointly planned NOS teaching sessions. Data that this article builds on was collected at the end of the project. The teachers' suggestions for NOS progression often relied on adding more NOS issues at every stage, thereby creating the foundations of a broader but not necessarily deeper understanding of NOS. Five rationales, for if/when specific NOS issues are appropriate to introduce, emerged from the analysis of the teacher discussions. Some of these rationales, including practice makes perfect and increasing levels of depth can potentially accommodate room for many NOS issues in the science classroom, while maturity and experience instead has a restricting effect on NOS teaching. Also, choice of context and teaching approaches play an important role in teachers' rationales for whether specific NOS issues should be included or not at different stages. The article discusses the implications for teacher education and professional development.

  14. Research progress and prospects of Saudi Arabia in global medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, S A; Hassan, A; Usmani, A M

    2013-12-01

    Since last decade, Saudi Arabia has been swiftly moving ahead to promote an education and research in the country. This study aimed to investigate the research outcome of Saudi Arabia in medical sciences during the period 1996-2012. In this study, the research papers published in various global science journals during the period 1996-2012 were accessed. We recorded the total number of research documents having an affiliation with Saudi Arabia. The main source for information was Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, Thomson Reuters and SCI-mago/Scopus. In global science data base, Saudi Arabia contributed 103804 documents in all science and social sciences. In medicine the total number of research papers from Saudi Arabia are 16196, citable documents 14732, total citations 102827, citations per documents 6.36 and Hirsch index (h-index) is 92. However, in combined medical and allied health sciences the total number of research papers are 27246, citable documents 25416, total citations 181999, mean citations per documents 7.07 and mean h-index is 41.44. Furthermore, Saudi Arabia contributed 40797 research documents in ISI indexed journals only and also 151 research documents in highly reputable and towering science journals. Saudi Arabia's research performance in global medical sciences has markedly increased during the period 2006-2012. The research publications are continuously on mounting path; however, the number of citations has decreased. The country improved its regional as well as international research rankings and graded 45 in the world in year 2012.

  15. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  16. Research in progress and other activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics and computer science during the period April 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustic and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  17. An Unprecedented Revolution in Medicinal Chemistry Driven by the Progress of Biological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2017-01-01

    The eternal or ultimate goal of medicinal chemistry is to find most effective ways to treat various diseases and extend human beings' life as long as possible. Human being is a biological entity. To realize such an ultimate goal, the inputs or breakthroughs from the advances in biological science are no doubt most important that may even drive medicinal science into a revolution. In this review article, we are to address this from several different angles. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Progress report - physics and health sciences - physics section 1990 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1990-10-01

    This is the ninth semi-annual report on the Physics section of Physics and Health Sciences. Major areas of discussion include: nuclear physics, accelerator physics, general physics, neutron's solid state physics, theoretical physics and fusion

  19. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

  20. Progress report: Physical Sciences - Physics Division, 1992 July 01 -December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ungrin, J; Kim, S M; Sears, V F [eds.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes operations and research activities in the Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Condensed Matter Science and Theoretical Physics branches at Chalk River Laboratories during the last half of 1992. 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Progress report: Physical Sciences - Physics Division, 1992 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungrin, J.; Kim, S.M.; Sears, V.F.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes operations and research activities in the Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Condensed Matter Science and Theoretical Physics branches at Chalk River Laboratories during the last half of 1992. 21 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Strengthening programs in science, engineering and mathematics. Third annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1997-09-30

    The Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Claflin College consists of the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Physics, Engineering and Mathematics. It offers a variety of major and minor academic programs designed to meet the mission and objectives of the college. The division`s pursuit to achieve excellence in science education is adversely impacted by the poor academic preparation of entering students and the lack of equipment, facilities and research participation, required to impart adequate academic training and laboratory skills to the students. Funds were received from the US Department of Energy to improve the divisional facilities and laboratory equipment and establish mechanism at pre-college and college levels to increase (1) the pool of high school students who will enroll in Science and Mathematics courses (2) the pool of well qualified college freshmen who will seek careers in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (3) the graduation rate in Science,engineering and Mathematics at the undergraduate level and (4) the pool of well-qualified students who can successfully compete to enter the graduate schools of their choice in the fields of science, engineering, and mathematics. The strategies that were used to achieve the mentioned objectives include: (1) Improved Mentoring and Advisement, (2) Summer Science Camp for 7th and 8th graders, (3) Summer Research Internships for Claflin SEM Seniors, (4) Summer Internships for Rising High School Seniors, (5) Development of Mathematical Skills at Pre-college/Post-secondary Levels, (6) Expansion of Undergraduate Seminars, (7) Exposure of Undergraduates to Guest Speakers/Roll Models, (8) Visitations by Undergraduate Students to Graduate Schools, and (9) Expanded Academic Program in Environmental Chemistry.

  3. Student science enrichment training program. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1992-04-21

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities wing of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) provided funds to Claflin College, Orangeburg, S.C. To conduct a student Science Enrichment Training Program for a period of six weeks during 1991 summer. Thirty participants were selected from a pool of applicants, generated by the High School Seniors and Juniors and the Freshmen class of 1990-1991 at Claflin College. The program primarily focused on high ability students, with potential for Science, Mathematics and Engineering Careers. The major objectives of the program were W to increase the pool of well qualified college entering minority students who will elect to go in Physical Sciences and Engineering and (II) to increase the enrollment in Chemistry and Preprofessional-Pre-Med, Pre-Dent, etc.-majors at Claflin College by including the Claflin students to participate in summer academic program. The summer academic program consisted of Chemistry and Computer Science training. The program placed emphasis upon laboratory experience and research. Visits to Scientific and Industrial laboratories were arranged. Guest speakers which were drawn from academia, industry and several federal agencies, addressed the participants on the future role of Science in the industrial growth of United States of America. The guest speakers also acted as role models for the participants. Several videos and films, emphasizing the role of Science in human life, were also screened.

  4. Monitoring progression of clinical reasoning skills during health sciences education using the case method - a qualitative observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Kristina; Ekelin, Maria; Edgren, Gudrun; Sandgren, Olof; Hovbrandt, Pia; Persson, Eva K

    2017-09-11

    Outcome- or competency-based education is well established in medical and health sciences education. Curricula are based on courses where students develop their competences and assessment is also usually course-based. Clinical reasoning is an important competence, and the aim of this study was to monitor and describe students' progression in professional clinical reasoning skills during health sciences education using observations of group discussions following the case method. In this qualitative study students from three different health education programmes were observed while discussing clinical cases in a modified Harvard case method session. A rubric with four dimensions - problem-solving process, disciplinary knowledge, character of discussion and communication - was used as an observational tool to identify clinical reasoning. A deductive content analysis was performed. The results revealed the students' transition over time from reasoning based strictly on theoretical knowledge to reasoning ability characterized by clinical considerations and experiences. Students who were approaching the end of their education immediately identified the most important problem and then focused on this in their discussion. Practice knowledge increased over time, which was seen as progression in the use of professional language, concepts, terms and the use of prior clinical experience. The character of the discussion evolved from theoretical considerations early in the education to clinical reasoning in later years. Communication within the groups was supportive and conducted with a professional tone. Our observations revealed progression in several aspects of students' clinical reasoning skills on a group level in their discussions of clinical cases. We suggest that the case method can be a useful tool in assessing quality in health sciences education.

  5. In search of the kingdom: the social gospel, settlement sociology, and the science of reform in America's progressive era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joyce E; Maclean, Vicky M

    2012-01-01

    This critical narrative history examines the development of sociology in the United States during what has come to be labeled as the Progressive Era, roughly the years from the 1890s to World War I. Despite the label, this era was defined as much by social problems associated with industrialization, urbanization, and immigration as by the growth of its cities and the wealth of its capitalists. We explore the roots of American sociology in the transition of protestant theology from Calvinism to its reformation in the social gospel, the simultaneous development of settlement houses, and the "creation" of sociology as the science of reform. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.; b.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems

  7. Metals and ceramics division materials science program. Aunnual progress report for period ending June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1979-10-01

    Progress is reported concerning theoretical studies of metals and alloys, deformation and mechanical properties, physical properties and transport phenomena, radiation effects, and engineering materials. During this period emphasis was shifted from support of nuclear technologies to support of nonnuclear energy systems. (FS)

  8. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 July 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, J C [ed.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. The TASCC staff is also detailed. 8 tabs.,16 figs.

  9. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. The TASCC staff is also detailed. 8 tabs.,16 figs

  10. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports. lectures and conference contributions. 15 tabs. 19 figs

  11. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 January 1 to June 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports. lectures and conference contributions. 15 tabs. 19 figs.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  13. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a new series of reports of the work of the TASCC Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. Physical Sciences comprises four main sectors, namely the TASCC, Physics and Chemistry Divisions, and the National Fusion Program Management Office. Physics Division is responsible for research and development in the areas of condensed matter physics, neutron and neutrino physics, and accelerator physics, while TASCC Division deals with research performed with the Tandem and Superconducting Cyclotron accelerators, primarily in the field of Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics

  14. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report

  15. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section

  17. Using the SOLO Taxonomy to Analyze Competence Progression of University Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabrand, Claus; Dahl, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    During 2007 all Danish university curricula were reformulated to explicitly state course objectives due to the adoption of a new Danish national grading scale which stipulated that grades were to be given based on how well students meet explicit course objectives. The Faculties of Science at University of Aarhus and University of Southern Denmark…

  18. Science and Biology Assessment in Hong Kong--Progress and Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, May Hung; Cheung, Wing Ming Francis

    2005-01-01

    A paper was published in JBE in 2001 which examined the background of the education reform launched in 2000 in Hong Kong, and reviewed existing practices as well as beliefs in science and biology assessment among secondary teachers in Hong Kong. The direction of the reform was to take the emphasis away from public examinations as the sole…

  19. Understanding the Nature of Science and Scientific Progress: A Theory-Building Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuy, Maria; Scardamalia, Marlene; Bereiter, Carl; Prinsen, Fleur; Resendes, Monica; Messina, Richard; Hunsburger, Winifred; Teplovs, Chris; Chow, Angela

    2010-01-01

    In 1993 Carey and Smith conjectured that the most promising way to boost students' understanding of the nature of science is a "theory-building approach to teaching about inquiry." The research reported here tested this conjecture by comparing results from two Grade 4 classrooms that differed in their emphasis on and technological…

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program.

  1. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M [ed.

    1995-09-01

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author).

  2. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1995-09-01

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author)

  3. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  4. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program

  5. Cyclotron based nuclear science: Progress report, April 1, 1987-March 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This report discusses experiment run on the K500 cyclotron and 88 in cyclotron at Texas AandM University. The main topics of these experiments are: Heavy ion reactions; Nuclear structure and fundamental interactions; Atomic and material science; Nuclear theory; and Superconducting cyclotron and instrumentation

  6. DinoViz: Exploring the History and Nature of Science through the Progression of Dinosaur Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2011-01-01

    Dinosaurs in the middle school classroom can be exciting. These extinct reptiles are both an exotic subject and familiar to our students. Because students are inherently interested, dinosaurs can serve as an effective portal for the integration of biology, geology, ecology, and the history and nature of science. The field of dinosaur study is…

  7. Acceptance and commitment therapy and contextual behavioral science: examining the progress of a distinctive model of behavioral and cognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Steven C; Levin, Michael E; Plumb-Vilardaga, Jennifer; Villatte, Jennifer L; Pistorello, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    A number of recent authors have compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present article describes ACT as a distinct and unified model of behavior change, linked to a specific strategy of scientific development, which we term "contextual behavioral science." We outline the empirical progress of ACT and describe its distinctive development strategy. A contextual behavioral science approach is an inductive attempt to build more adequate psychological systems based on philosophical clarity; the development of basic principles and theories; the development of applied theories linked to basic ones; techniques and components linked to these processes and principles; measurement of theoretically key processes; an emphasis on mediation and moderation in the analysis of applied impact; an interest in effectiveness, dissemination, and training; empirical testing of the research program across a broad range of areas and levels of analysis; and the creation of a more effective scientific and clinical community. We argue that this is a reasonable approach, focused on long-term progress, and that in broad terms it seems to be working. ACT is not hostile to traditional CBT, and is not directly buoyed by whatever weaknesses traditional CBT may have. ACT should be measured at least in part against its own goals as specified by its own developmental strategy. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Progress report - Physics and Health Sciences - Physics Section - 1986 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This progress report of the Physics section of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories highlights work on major equipment: 1) Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC), 2) Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL), 3) Spectrometer Array for Particles Produced in Heavy Ion Reactions (SAPPHIRE), and 4) The Double Neutron Spectrometer for neutron scattering (DUALSPEC). Theoretical physics work includes fractal theory, non-topological soliton model of the nucleons, meson currents in relativistic shell model theories and supergravity. Progress of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and the National Fusion Program (NFP) is discussed. Two commercial aspects are included; the formation of Shar-Buc Enterprises, the first spin-off business of the Research Company and the Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (ANDI), a major commercial activity

  9. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Progress report, April 1-August 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.

    1986-09-01

    This report covers progress made during the first reporting period since the redirection of the project. In radiochemistry, achievements in fluorine-18 tracer studies including purification and reaction kinetics of 2-fluorodeoxyglucose and production of 6-fluoroDOPA. Radiopharmaceuticals have been prepared and tested for studies on CNS dopaminergic systems. By use of dynamic positron emission tomography the cerebral transport and metabolism of glucose continues to be studied. 6 figs

  10. Progressing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in North Dakota with near-space ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marissa Elizabeth

    The United States must provide quality science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in order to maintain a leading role in the global economy. Numerous initiatives have been established across the United States that promote and encourage STEM education within the middle school curriculum. Integrating active learning pedagogy into instructors' lesson plans will prepare the students to think critically - a necessary skill for the twenty first century. This study integrated a three-week long Near Space Balloon project into six eighth grade Earth Science classes from Valley Middle School in Grand Forks, North Dakota. It was hypothesized that after the students designed, constructed, launched, and analyzed their payload experiments, they would have an increased affinity for high school science and math classes. A pre- and post-survey was distributed to the students (n=124), before and after the project to analyze how effective this engineering and space mission was regarding high school STEM interests. The surveys were statistically analyzed, comparing means by the Student's t-Test, specifically the Welch-Satterthwaite test. Female students displayed a 57.1% increase in math and a 63.6% increase in science; male students displayed a 46.6% increase in science and 0% increase in math. Most Likert-scale survey questions experienced no statistically significant change, supporting the null hypothesis. The only survey question that supported the hypothesis was, "I Think Engineers Work Alone," which experienced a 0.24% decrease in student understanding. The results suggest that integrating a three-week long Near Space Balloon project into middle school curricula will not directly influence the students' excitement to pursue STEM subjects and careers. An extensive, yearlong ballooning mission is recommended so that it can be integrated with multiple core subjects. Using such an innovative pedagogy method as with this balloon launch will help students master the

  11. Towards a cyberinfrastructure for the biological sciences: progress, visions and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Lincoln D

    2008-09-01

    Biology is an information-driven science. Large-scale data sets from genomics, physiology, population genetics and imaging are driving research at a dizzying rate. Simultaneously, interdisciplinary collaborations among experimental biologists, theorists, statisticians and computer scientists have become the key to making effective use of these data sets. However, too many biologists have trouble accessing and using these electronic data sets and tools effectively. A 'cyberinfrastructure' is a combination of databases, network protocols and computational services that brings people, information and computational tools together to perform science in this information-driven world. This article reviews the components of a biological cyberinfrastructure, discusses current and pending implementations, and notes the many challenges that lie ahead.

  12. [Research Progress on the Detection Method of DNA Methylation and Its Application in Forensic Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Y C; Yu, L J; Guan, H; Zhao, Y; Rong, H B; Jiang, B W; Zhang, T

    2017-06-01

    As an important part of epigenetic marker, DNA methylation involves in the gene regulation and attracts a wide spread attention in biological auxology, geratology and oncology fields. In forensic science, because of the relative stable, heritable, abundant, and age-related characteristics, DNA methylation is considered to be a useful complement to the classic genetic markers for age-prediction, tissue-identification, and monozygotic twins' discrimination. Various methods for DNA methylation detection have been validated based on methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease, bisulfite modification and methylation-CpG binding protein. In recent years, it is reported that the third generation sequencing method can be used to detect DNA methylation. This paper aims to make a review on the detection method of DNA methylation and its applications in forensic science. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  14. MIT Laboratory for Computer Science Progress Report No. 23, July 1985-June 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    34An Expert System for Diagnosing Gait in Cerebral Palsy Patients," S.M. thesis, MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Cambridge...barriers to program interoperability. Within our community, we perceive serious problems in building on the work of others, because the different...unmatched tokens. Of course, the name of the game is representation and access to the various data structures, and this has worked out very nicely. GITA

  15. Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century: Progress and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzek, M.; Johnson, D. R.; Wake, C.; Aron, J.

    2005-12-01

    Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century (ESSE 21) is a collaborative undergraduate/graduate Earth system science education program sponsored by NASA offering small grants to colleges and universities with special emphasis on including minority institutions to engage faculty and scientists in the development of Earth system science courses, curricula, degree programs and shared learning resources. The annual ESSE 21 meeting in Fairbanks in August, 2005 provided an opportunity for 70 undergraduate educators and scientists to share their best classroom learning resources through a series of short presentations, posters and skills workshops. This poster will highlight meeting results, advances in the development of ESS learning modules, and describe a community-led proposal to develop in the coming year a Design Guide for Undergraduate Earth system Science Education to be based upon the experience of the 63 NASA-supported ESSE teams over the past 15 years. As a living document on the Web, the Design Guide would utilize and share ESSE experiences that: - Advance understanding of the Earth as a system - Apply ESS to the Vision for Space Exploration - Create environments appropriate for teaching and learning ESS - Improve STEM literacy and broaden career paths - Transform institutional priorities and approaches to ESS - Embrace ESS within Minority Serving Institutions - Build collaborative interdisciplinary partnerships - Develop ESS learning resources and modules The Design Guide aims to be a synthesis of just how ESS has been and is being implemented in the college and university environment, listing items essential for undergraduate Earth system education that reflect the collective wisdom of the ESS education community. The Design Guide will focus the vision for ESS in the coming decades, define the challenges, and explore collaborative processes that utilize the next generation of information and communication technology.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    The energy crisis and creation of ERDA were dominant factors affecting the activities of the Environmental Sciences Division during the past year. Efforts primarily centered on coal conversion effluents, aquatic effects from power plants, terrestrial modeling of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste transport, mineral cycling, forest management, and information handling codes and techniques. A bibliography of publications, presentation, these, and other professional activities is included. (PCS)

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  18. Science, History, Progress: Myth as a Story about Time Caught between Eternity and Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Pintarič

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of myth, just like that of science, is to achieve a uniform picture of the world in the human mind. Myth, however, is based on supposed truth, not reality. Rather than a beginning, it is the end of any possible discussion. The article, based on French mediaeval and renaissance literature, introduces a view on how Western consciousness wrestled itself out of myth and into history.

  19. Atomic and molecular sciences. Progress report No. 8, April 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, G.K.; Lane, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic and molecular physics program at Rice University addresses fundamental problems in structure, radiation-induced gas- and condensed-phase reaction kinetics and dynamics, and the mutual interactions of radiation, atoms, molecules, electrons and ions, particularly in highly unusual or exotic environments. The program emphasizes fundamental studies relating to new sources of energy, with close interaction between experimental and theoretical aspects of the research. Progress in the experimental program is reported in two principal areas, A) time resolved spectroscopy, and B) reactions in a flowing helium afterglow

  20. Learning progressions from a sociocultural perspective: response to "co-constructing cultural landscapes for disciplinary learning in and out of school: the next generation science standards and learning progressions in action"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytler, Russell

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses a case for a different, socio-cultural way of looking at learning progressions as treated in the next generation science standards (NGSS) as described by Ralph Cordova and Phyllis Balcerzak's paper "Co-constructing cultural landscapes for disciplinary learning in and out of school: the next generation science standards and learning progressions in action". The paper is interesting for a number of reasons, and in this response I will identify different aspects of the paper and link the points made to my own research, and that of colleagues, as complementary perspectives. First, the way that the science curriculum is conceived as an expanding experience that moves from the classroom into the community, across subjects, and across time, links to theoretical positions on disciplinary literacies and notions of learning as apprenticeship into the discursive tools, or `habits of mind' as the authors put it, that underpin disciplinary practice. Second, the formulation of progression through widening communities of practice is a strong feature of the paper, and shows how children take on the role of scientists through this expanding exposure. I will link this approach to some of our own work with school—community science partnerships, drawing on the construct of boundary crossing to tease out relations between school science and professional practice. Third, the demonstration of the expansion of the children's view of what scientists do is well documented in the paper, illustrated by Figure 13 for instance. However I will, in this response, try to draw out and respond to what the paper is saying about the nature of progression; what the progression consists of, over what temporal or spatial dimensions it progresses, and how it can productively frame curriculum processes.

  1. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, N.P. (ed.) [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  2. Science for Today's Energy Challenges: Accelerating Progress for a Sustainable Energy Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    With a growing population and energy demand in the world, there is a pressing need for research to create secure and accessible energy options with greatly reduced emissions of greenhouse gases. While we work to deploy the clean and efficient technologies that we already have--which will be urgent for the coming decades--we must also work to develop the science for the technologies of the future. This brochure gives examples of some of the most promising developments, and it provides 'snapshots' of cutting edge work of scientists in the field. The areas of greatest promise include biochemistry, nanotechnology, supraconductivity, electrophysics and computing. There are many others.

  3. Progress report 1980/81 of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    From the numerous institutes and divisions of the Austrian Academy of Sciences presented in this report the Commission for Arteriosclerosis and Thrombosis Research (application of radioimmunoassay) and the Institute for X-ray Microstructure Research (investigation of biological substances by X-ray and neutron small angle scattering) are partly within the scope of INIS. Fully in scope are short project discriptions of the Institute for Radium Research and Nulear Physics: the Commission for the SIN-project and the Institute for High Energy Physics, completed by publication lists. (G.Q.)

  4. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, N.P.

    2010-02-01

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  5. Science to Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards -- Fiscal Year 2002 Mid-Year Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredt, Paul R.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Brockman, Fred J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Egorov, Oleg B.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Grate, Jay W.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mattigod, Shas V.; McGrail, B. Peter; Meyer, Philip D.; Murray, Christopher J.; Panetta, Paul D.; Pfund, David M.; Rai, Dhanpat; Su, Yali; Sundaram, S. K.; Weber, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2002-06-11

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been awarded a total of 80 Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants since the inception of the program in 1996. The Laboratory has collaborated on an additional 14 EMSP awards with funding received through other institution. This report describes how each of the projects awarded in 1999, 2000, and 2001 addresses significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in the individual project reports included in this document. Projects are under way in three main areas: Tank Waste Remediation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  6. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described

  7. Science of materials. Progress report, July 1, 1977--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    Progress is reported in research which includes studies of the deformation, stress corrosion and fracture of alloys and geologic materials with emphasis on hydrogen embrittlement of metals; the mechanism of heat transfer across interfaces; catalytic properties of surfaces; and erosion of surfaces by fluid suspended particles. The structure of liquids, polymers and disordered solids is under investigation with emphasis on ionic conduction, phase transitions and radiation damage. Ferro- and pyroelectric materials with potential for solar energy applications are under development. The study of optical properties includes the mechanism of luminescence and new semiconductor materials for photovoltaic devices. The electronic properties of crystals are the subject of a continued effort to resolve current problems of magnetic behavior and photon-solid interactions. Specific quantum properties of matter are explored with emphasis on superconductivity, diffusion of hydrogen in metals and the properties of solid helium.

  8. [Progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to surface microanalysis in material science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-hai; Chen, Ji-wen; Shen, Xue-jing; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Leiz; Li, Dong-ling; Hang, Peng-cheng; Zhao, Zhen; Fan, Wan-lun; Wang, Hai-zhou

    2014-08-01

    In the present paper, apparatus and theory of surface analysis is introduced, and the progress in the application of laser ablation ICP-MS to microanalysis in ferrous, nonferrous and semiconductor field is reviewed in detail. Compared with traditional surface analytical tools, such as SEM/EDS (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrum), EPMA (electron probe microanalysis analysis), AES (auger energy spectrum), etc. the advantage is little or no sample preparation, adjustable spatial resolution according to analytical demand, multi-element analysis and high sensitivity. It is now a powerful complementary method to traditional surface analytical tool. With the development of LA-ICP-MS technology maturing, more and more analytical workers will use this powerful tool in the future, and LA-ICP-MS will be a super star in elemental analysis field just like LIBS (Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy).

  9. Progress on VESPA, a community-driven Virtual Observatory in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erard, S.; Cecconi, B.; Le Sidaner, P.; Rossi, A. P.; Capria, M. T.; Schmitt, B.; Genot, V. N.; André, N.; Vandaele, A. C.; Scherf, M.; Hueso, R.; Maattanen, A. E.; Carry, B.; Achilleos, N.; Marmo, C.; Santolik, O.; Benson, K.; Fernique, P.

    2017-12-01

    The Europlanet H2020 program started on 1/9/2015 for 4 years. It includes an activity to adapt Virtual Observatory (VO) techniques to Planetary Science data called VESPA. The objective is to facilitate searches in big archives as well as sparse databases, to provide simple data access and on-line visualization, and to allow small data providers to make their data available in an interoperable environment with minimum effort. The VESPA system, based on a prototype developed in a previous program [1], has been hugely improved during the first two years of Europlanet H2020: the infrastructure has been upgraded to describe data in many fields more accurately; the main user search interface (http://vespa.obspm.fr) has been redesigned to provide more flexibility; alternative ways to access Planetary Science data services from VO tools have been implemented; VO tools are being improved to handle specificities of Solar System data, e.g. measurements in reflected light, coordinate systems, etc. Current steps include the development of a connection between the VO world and GIS tools, and integration of Heliophysics, planetary plasmas, and mineral spectroscopy data to support of the analysis of observations. Existing data services have been updated, and new ones have been designed. The global objective is already overstepped, with 34 services open and 20 more being finalized. A procedure to install data services has been documented, and hands-on sessions are organized twice a year at EGU and EPSC; this is intended to favour the installation of services by individual research teams, e.g. to distribute derived data related to a published study. In complement, regular discussions are held with big data providers, starting with space agencies (IPDA). Common projects with ESA and NASA's PDS have been engaged, with the goal to connect PDS4 and EPN-TAP. In parallel, a Solar System Interest Group has just been started in IVOA; the goal is here to adapt existing astronomy standards to

  10. Science as an early driver of policy: child labor reform in the early Progressive Era, 1870-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica

    2014-10-01

    Scientific evidence is an increasingly important driver of social and environmental policy concerning child health. This trend began earlier than generally recognized. The child labor reform movement of the Gilded Age and early Progressive Era reflected not only moral and economic forces but also the dramatic advances during the later decades of the 19th century in scientific knowledge concerning children's biological and psychological vulnerability to environmental and psychosocial stressors. The growing importance of scientific information in shaping policy concerning children's health between 1870 and 1900 is illustrated by the events leading up to and following the New York State Child Labor Law of 1886. Child labor reform during this period was a critical step in the development of a science-based as well as a value-driven movement to protect children's environmental health and well-being that continues today.

  11. Science as an Early Driver of Policy: Child Labor Reform in the Early Progressive Era, 1870–1900

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Scientific evidence is an increasingly important driver of social and environmental policy concerning child health. This trend began earlier than generally recognized. The child labor reform movement of the Gilded Age and early Progressive Era reflected not only moral and economic forces but also the dramatic advances during the later decades of the 19th century in scientific knowledge concerning children’s biological and psychological vulnerability to environmental and psychosocial stressors. The growing importance of scientific information in shaping policy concerning children’s health between 1870 and 1900 is illustrated by the events leading up to and following the New York State Child Labor Law of 1886. Child labor reform during this period was a critical step in the development of a science-based as well as a value-driven movement to protect children’s environmental health and well-being that continues today. PMID:25121809

  12. Separation Science and Technology. Semiannual progress report, April 1993--September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

    1996-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April-September 1993. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process, (2) treatment schemes for liquid wastes stored or being generated at Argonne, (3) a process based on sorbing modified TRUEX solvent on magnetic beads to be used for separation of contaminants from radioactive and hazardous waste streams, and (4) a process that uses low-enriched uranium targets for production of 99 Mo for nuclear medicine uses

  13. Separations Science and Technology, Semiannual progress report, October 1991--March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Betts, S.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1991--March 1992. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Two other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) a membrane-assisted solvent extraction method for treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds and (2) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process

  14. Separation science and technology. Semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Betts, S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April-September 1992. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Two other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) a membrane-assisted solvent extraction method for treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds and (2) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process

  15. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division - 1993 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    After significant organizational change for the Physics Division, there are now two groups: Neutron and Condensed Matter Science, and Nuclear Physics. Theoretical Physics Branch was disbanded. A topical review of work on high power proton linacs describes the historical development of high power ion linacs and the ion source development program from initiation to its completion in 1993. RFQ1 became the first particle accelerator to be driven by a klystrode-based rf system. The accelerator operated at 1.25 MeV and accelerated more than 50 mA of high quality beam. The equipment has been sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be recommissioned as the Chalk River Injection Test Stand (CRITS). The laser plasma beatwave accelerator generating accelerating field gradients of up to 1.8 GeV/m and acceleration of an injected electron beam to at least 30 meV over a 1 cm distance. The high power CO 2 laser beam was used to irradiate Zr-N6 pressure tube samples. The aim was to assess surface modifications particularly from shock hardening. Application of radiofrequency waves were used to investigate the properties of relevant materials, notably industrial ferrites. Chalk River participated in an international collaboration on measurement of dielectric properties of materials at high temperatures. A second topical review on neutron scattering and mineral physics deals with phase transitions in carbonate and in silicates. Dualspec is operating successfully. Modifications have been made to improve safety, reproducibility, angle control, calibration and sample analysis. Reviews from six programs: physics, molecular physics, material science, condensed matter theory, neutrino physics, and molecular dating and modelling are given. 1 tab., 17 figs

  16. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division - 1993 January 01 - June 30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    After significant organizational change for the Physics Division, there are now two groups: Neutron and Condensed Matter Science, and Nuclear Physics. Theoretical Physics Branch was disbanded. A topical review of work on high power proton linacs describes the historical development of high power ion linacs and the ion source development program from initiation to its completion in 1993. RFQ1 became the first particle accelerator to be driven by a klystrode-based rf system. The accelerator operated at 1.25 MeV and accelerated more than 50 mA of high quality beam. The equipment has been sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be recommissioned as the Chalk River Injection Test Stand (CRITS). The laser plasma beatwave accelerator generating accelerating field gradients of up to 1.8 GeV/m and acceleration of an injected electron beam to at least 30 meV over a 1 cm distance. The high power CO{sub 2} laser beam was used to irradiate Zr-N6 pressure tube samples. The aim was to assess surface modifications particularly from shock hardening. Application of radiofrequency waves were used to investigate the properties of relevant materials, notably industrial ferrites. Chalk River participated in an international collaboration on measurement of dielectric properties of materials at high temperatures. A second topical review on neutron scattering and mineral physics deals with phase transitions in carbonate and in silicates. Dualspec is operating successfully. Modifications have been made to improve safety, reproducibility, angle control, calibration and sample analysis. Reviews from six programs: physics, molecular physics, material science, condensed matter theory, neutrino physics, and molecular dating and modelling are given. 1 tab., 17 figs.

  17. Cyclortron-based nuclear science. Progress in research, April 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, D.H.

    1983-07-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of the research programs at the Institute and the progress on construction of the new cyclotron facility over the past year. A wide variety of both experimental and theoretical programs were underway and brief descriptions of recent progress in some areas of current interest are given. The first measurement of parity violation in the H(p,p) reaction has been completed at Ep = 47 MeV. Measurements of the vector and tensor analyzing powers A/sub y/(18 0 ), A/sub yy/18 0 ), and Z/sub zz/(0 0 ) for the 2 H(d,n) 3 He, 2 H(d,n)X and 1 H(d,n)2p reactions at E/sub d/ = 46 MeV have been performed. The giant monopole resonance has been identified in 28 Si at E/sub x/ = 55/A sup 1/3/ MeV by small angle inelastic alpha scattering measurements. Further evidence for the proton character of levels causing second backbending in the Yb region has been obtained through the use of in-beam spectroscopy combined with a total multiplicity filter. Measurements of the energy spectra of H and He isotopes from the fragmentation of 320 MeV 10 B projectiles in the system 10 B + 181 Ta lead to low momentum widths sigma/ 0 = 54 MeV/c) suggesting a rapid transition in momentum width between 32 and 43 MeV/nucleon. Evidence for enhanced fragment spins and shell effects in heavy-ion induced fission have been obtained. High resolution fluorine x-ray spectra of ionic solids excited by 80 MeV Ar ions have provided evidence of rapid electron transfer from the outer levels of surrounding atoms to energy matched high n states of highly ionized fluorine target atoms. In theoretical efforts, the transition from fusion and deep inelastic reactions at low energies to spectator/participant and fireball pictures at high energies has been clarified in relation to nuclear matter properties, with predictions of a multifragmentation region in between

  18. Progress report. Physics and Health Sciences. Physics section. 1988 July 01-December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, J.C.D.

    1989-04-01

    Progress in overcoming the difficulties encountered in commissioning the superconducting cyclotron, particularly those associated with the π-mode and beam extraction, has been greatly accelerated, largely as a result of the establishment of a TASCC Beam Commissioning Group to give focus and coordination to the work. The '8π spectrometer', which is jointly owned and operated at TASCC by AECL and the Universities of Montreal and McMaster, was relocated during the shutdown and has been producing exciting information on a new type of nucleus-one that has approximately the shape of a football, and is called 'superdeformed'. The physicists working at Chalk River have found the key to making superdeformed nuclei and have already discovered two of their own: 149 Gd and 153 Dy. A very fine Recoil Doppler apparatus has been constructed and used inside the gamma ball, and a CsI(Tl) miniball is being constructed to do particle measurements with large solid angle, also inside the large ball. In cooperation with scientists from Reactor Development, a new way to identify and measure hydrogen diffusion in Zr(2.5% Nb), the alloy used in CANDU pressure tubes, has been identified and is being developed. It makes use of the superconductivity of zirconium-niobium alloys in the beta phase

  19. The history of science as the progress of the human spirit: The historiography of astronomy in the eighteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špelda, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, the historiography of astronomy was part of a wider discussion concerning the history of the human spirit. The concept of the human spirit was very popular among Enlightenment authors because it gave the history of human knowledge continuity, unity and meaning. Using this concept, scientists and historians of science such as Montucla, Lalande, Bailly and Laplace could present the history of astronomy in terms of a progress towards contemporary science that was slow and could be interrupted at times, but was still constant, regular, and necessary. In my paper I intend to explain how the originally philosophical concept of the human spirit was transferred to the history of astronomy. I also introduce the basic principles to which the development of the spirit is subject in astronomy, according to historians of astronomy. The third part of the paper describes how historians of astronomy took into account the effect of social and natural factors on the history of astronomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Separation Science and Technology. Semiannual progress report, April 1993--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C. [and others

    1996-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April-September 1993. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process, (2) treatment schemes for liquid wastes stored or being generated at Argonne, (3) a process based on sorbing modified TRUEX solvent on magnetic beads to be used for separation of contaminants from radioactive and hazardous waste streams, and (4) a process that uses low-enriched uranium targets for production of {sup 99}Mo for nuclear medicine uses.

  1. Surface and interface sciences of Li-ion batteries. -Research progress in electrode-electrolyte interface-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The application potential of Li-ion batteries is growing as demand increases in different fields at various stages in energy systems, in addition to their conventional role as power sources for portable devices. In particular, applications in electric vehicles and renewable energy storage are increasing for Li-ion batteries. For these applications, improvements in battery performance are necessary. The Li-ion battery produces and stores electric power from the electrochemical redox reactions between the electrode materials. The interface between the electrodes and electrolyte strongly affects the battery performance because the charge transfer causing the electrode redox reaction begins at this interface. Understanding of the surface structure, electronic structure, and chemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface is necessary to improve battery performance. However, the interface is located between the electrode and electrolyte materials, hindering the experimental analysis of the interface; thus, the physical properties and chemical processes have remained poorly understood until recently. Investigations of the physical properties and chemical processes at the interface have been performed using advanced surface science techniques. In this review, current knowledge and future research prospects regarding the electrode-electrolyte interface are described for the further development of Li-ion batteries.

  2. Progress towards materials science above 1000 GPa (10 Mbar) on the NIF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remington, B.A.; Park, H.; Prisbrey, S.T.; Pollaine, S.M.; Cavallo, R.M.; Rudd, R.E.; Lorenz, K.T.; Becker, R.; Bernier, J.; Barton, N.; Arsenlis, T.; Glendinning, S.G.; Hamza, A.; Swift, D.; Jankowski, A.; Meyers, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Solid state dynamics experiments at extreme pressures, P > 1000 GPa (10 Mbar), and ultrahigh strain rates (1.e6-1.e8 1/s) are being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. These experiments will open up exploration of new regimes of materials science at an order of magnitude higher pressures than have been possible to date. Such extreme, solid state conditions can be accessed with a ramped pressure drive. The experimental, computational, and theoretical techniques are being developed and tested on the Omega laser. Velocity interferometer measurements (VISAR) establish the high pressure conditions generated by the ramped drive. Constitutive models for solid state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid state samples of vanadium. Radiography techniques using synchronized bursts of x-rays have been developed to diagnose this perturbation growth. Experiments on Omega demonstrating these techniques at peak pressures of ∼1 Mbar will be discussed. The time resolved observation of foil cracking and void formation show the need for tamped samples and a planar drive

  3. Separation science and technology. Semiannual progress report, October 1993 - March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Aase, S.B.; Buchholz, B.

    1997-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Separations Science and Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in the period October 1993-March 1994. This effort is mainly concerned with developing the TRUEX process for removing and concentrating actinides from acidic waste streams contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements. The objectives of TRUEX processing are to recover valuable TRU elements and to lower disposal costs for the nonTRU waste product of the process. Other projects are underway with the objective of developing (1) evaporation technology for concentrating radioactive waste and product streams such as those generated by the TRUEX process, (2) treatment schemes for liquid wastes stored are being generated at ANL, (3) a process based on sorbing modified TRUEX solvent on magnetic beads to be used for separation of contaminants from radioactive and hazardous waste streams, and (4) a process that uses low-enriched uranium targets for production of 99 Mo for nuclear medicine uses

  4. COPDESS (Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth & Space Sciences): An Update on Progress and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks; Sallans, Andrew; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (http://www.copdess.org/) formed in October 2014 to provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals. Since inception, it has worked to develop and promote adoption of data citation standards (e.g. FORCE11 Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles), integrate community tools and services for greater discovery and adoption (e.g. COPDESS Directory of Repositories, https://copdessdirectory.osf.io/), and connect with related community efforts for greater transparency in research community (e.g. the Transparency and Openness Promotion Guidelines, http://cos.io/top). Following a second COPDESS workshop in Fall 2015, COPDESS is undertaking several concrete steps to increase participation and integration of efforts more deeply into the publishing and data facility workflows and to expand international participation. This talk will focus on details of specific initiatives, collection of feedback, and a call for new members. Specifically, we will present progress on the development of guidelines that aim to standardize publishers' recommended best practices by establishing "Best practices for best practices" that will allow a journal or data facility to tailor these practices to the sub-disciplines that they serve. COPDESS will further work to advance implementation of these best practices through increased outreach to and education of editors and authors. COPDESS plans to offer a Town Hall meeting at the EGU General Assembly as a forum for further information and discussion.

  5. Using political science to progress public health nutrition: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullerton, Katherine; Donnet, Timothy; Lee, Amanda; Gallegos, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    Poor dietary intake is the most important behavioural risk factor affecting health globally. Despite this, there has been little investment in public health nutrition policy actions. Policy process theories from the field of political science can aid understanding why policy decisions have occurred and identify how to influence ongoing or future initiatives. The present review aims to examine public health nutrition policy literature and identify whether a policy process theory has been used to analyse the process. Electronic databases were searched systematically for studies examining policy making in public health nutrition in high-income, democratic countries. International, national, state and local government jurisdictions within high-income, democratic countries. Individuals and organisations involved in the nutrition policy-making process. Sixty-three studies met the eligibility criteria, most were conducted in the USA and a majority focused on obesity. The analysis demonstrates an accelerating trend in the number of nutrition policy papers published annually and an increase in the diversity of nutrition topics examined. The use of policy process theory was observed from 2003; however, it was utilised by only 14 % of the reviewed papers. There is limited research into the nutrition policy process in high-income countries. While there has been a small increase in the use of policy process theory from 2003, an opportunity to expand its use is evident. We suggest that nutrition policy making would benefit from a pragmatic approach that ensures those trying to influence or understand the policy-making process are equipped with basic knowledge around these theories.

  6. Progress report physical sciences - TASCC division - 1991 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The past six-month period saw completion of our program of cyclotron commissioning, with the extraction on 1992 October 14 of a 3.0 MeV/u beam of 238 U. In three years were developed the cyclotron and its subsystems to demonstrate the full range of operating parameters, and they converted what was, in effect, a prototype accelerator into a fully engineered, reliable facility. The number of available beams was increased from two, to forty-two. Currently, we are adding one or two new beams per month. In spite of the commissioning activity during the reporting period, the number of cyclotron-based experiments has increased . Reaction studies and atomic-physics experiments dominated. Perhaps the outcome of broadest interest was the production and detection of secondary (radioactive beams downstream from a gold target bombarded by 40 MeV/u 12 C from the cyclotron. . Including beam development, the cyclotron operated for 967 hours, or 32% of the total facility beam time, about the same percentage as in the previous six-month period. Between July and the end of the year, Tandem beams were used, either for experiments or development purposes, for a total of 3117 hours. This beam time was 86% of the scheduled operating time and 71% of the the total time available - a rather lower value than usual owing to an unexpected materials failure in the conductive-rim chain pulleys of the charging system. Viewed as a whole, the facility operated for 83% of its scheduled time, or 67% of the total time. Most of our eexperiments are collaborative efforts. This period, the former contributed 40% of the total laboratory research efforts and figure prominently in all nine scientific publications. The numbers and diversity of our user community continue to increase, particularly in non-nuclear areas: accelerator mass spectrometry, single event upset and materials science, etc

  7. [Geometry, analysis, and computation in mathematics and applied science]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.

    1994-02-01

    The principal investigators` work on a variety of pure and applied problems in Differential Geometry, Calculus of Variations and Mathematical Physics has been done in a computational laboratory and been based on interactive scientific computer graphics and high speed computation created by the principal investigators to study geometric interface problems in the physical sciences. We have developed software to simulate various physical phenomena from constrained plasma flow to the electron microscope imaging of the microstructure of compound materials, techniques for the visualization of geometric structures that has been used to make significant breakthroughs in the global theory of minimal surfaces, and graphics tools to study evolution processes, such as flow by mean curvature, while simultaneously developing the mathematical foundation of the subject. An increasingly important activity of the laboratory is to extend this environment in order to support and enhance scientific collaboration with researchers at other locations. Toward this end, the Center developed the GANGVideo distributed video software system and software methods for running lab-developed programs simultaneously on remote and local machines. Further, the Center operates a broadcast video network, running in parallel with the Center`s data networks, over which researchers can access stored video materials or view ongoing computations. The graphical front-end to GANGVideo can be used to make ``multi-media mail`` from both ``live`` computing sessions and stored materials without video editing. Currently, videotape is used as the delivery medium, but GANGVideo is compatible with future ``all-digital`` distribution systems. Thus as a byproduct of mathematical research, we are developing methods for scientific communication. But, most important, our research focuses on important scientific problems; the parallel development of computational and graphical tools is driven by scientific needs.

  8. Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG), Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Steering Committee progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Center (JCPRG) was approved as an organisation of Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University and established on April 1, 2007. In addition to nuclear data activities carried out by JCPRG (Japan-Charged Particle Nuclear Reaction Data Group), the centre is concerned with the evaluation of nuclear reaction data in nucleosynthesis in the universe. In order efficiently to compile reaction data obtained by using radioactive ion beam, the centre signed a research contract with RIKEN Nishina Center. We are scanning 16 journals for Japanese charged-particle and photo-nuclear nuclear reaction data compilation. From April 2006 to March 2007, CPND and PhND in 45 references (453 records, 1.83 MB) have been newly compiled for NRDF. Usually new data are released at the JCPRG web site several months prior to EXFOR. Since the 2006 NRDC meeting, we have made 104 new entries and have revised or deleted 142 old entries. Intensive numerical data compilations have been done. These data were shown in tabular form in dissertations which are (partially) published in Journals. About 30 new entries were compiled from these data. We have prepared CINDA batches for CPND published in Japan every half year. Each batch covers 6 issues of each of 4 Japanese journals JPJ, PTP, NST and JNRS. Bibliographies for neutron induced reaction data have been compiled by JAEA Nuclear Data Center as before. A new web-based NRDF search and plot system on MySQL was released in July, 2007. New compilation, which has been finalized for NRDF, but not for EXFOR, can be obtained from this site. DARPE (another NRDF search and plot system written in Perl) is also available at http://www.jcprg.org/darpe/. EXFOR/ENDF (http://www.jcprg.org/exfor/) search and plot system is available. We have also developed following utilities: PENDL (http://www.jcprg.org/endf/) and RENORM (http://www.jcprg.org/renorm). We are developing a new search system of CINDA. This is an extension of EXFOR/ENDF search

  9. [Research progresses of the completed pediatrics projects funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China from 2002 to 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Hao, Jie; Deng, Min; Xu, Yan-ying

    2009-05-01

    To understand the projects completion and research progresses in pediatrics which were funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), and evaluate the accomplishment objectively and justly. The completion status of projects in pediatrics funded by department of clinical medicine II from 2002 to 2006 was analysed retrospectively, and important research achievement and outstanding development in some projects were reported. During the period between 2002 and 2006, 420 articles were published, and the average was 8.1 papers per project, which included 56 papers that were published in journals indexed by SCI (the average was 1.1 papers per project). The completion of general project was better than that of "the Young Researchers Fund" and small grant project. Ten post-doctors, 102 doctors and 109 masters were trained. Two projects were awarded with the first grade prize and another 2 with the second grade prize at the provincial and ministerial level, 4 items applied for patent and 1 was granted. These completed projects, which were mainly related to 7 of 12 subspecialties in the field of pediatrics, such as the respiratory disease, nephrology, neurology, cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, neonatology, are the major portion of the application projects and subsidized projects funded by NSFC, and achieved great research progresses. During the period between 2002 and 2006, the 52 completed projects in pediatrics showed difference in the distribution and quality of accomplishment among subspecialties and among types of supported projects; there are some gaps between pediatrics and some other clinical basic subspecialties II, this situation released the research status and problems in development of pediatrics in China. The general projects completion was good, and many projects obtained research achievements, which reflect the leading function of NSFC in pediatric research.

  10. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.7--nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear electronics, nuclear detecting technology, pulse power technology, nuclear fusion and plasma

  11. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.7--pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear electronics, nuclear detecting technology, pulse power technology, nuclear fusion and plasma

  12. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fifth one, the content is about radiation protection and nuclear chemical industry.

  13. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.4--nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally.This is the fourth one, the content is about nuclear materials, isotope separation, nuclear chemistry and radiological chemistry.

  14. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.6--nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about nuclear physics, computational physics and particle accelerator

  15. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  16. The Rise and Fall of the Social Science Curriculum Project in Iceland, 1974-1984: Reflections on Reason and Power in Educational Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Wolfgang

    1987-01-01

    Examines the demise of the Icelandic Social Science Curriculum Project (SSCP) as an example of progressive educational reform thwarted by neofundamentalist ideologies. States that the paper goes beyond Jerome Bruner's 1984 account of the rise and fall of "Man: A Course of Study" to provide a deeper analysis of the politics of…

  17. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--nuclear agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  18. Progress report for 94/95; Institut des Sciences Nucleaires - Rapport d`activite 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    We find here the progress report for the two years 1994 and 1995 for institute of nuclear sciences at Grenoble. In the field of quarks and leptons, three teams are invested in CERN programmes: A.T.L.A.S. near the L.H.C., D.E.L.P.H.I; the neutrino team has achieved the building of the detector in the M.U.N.U. collaboration. In the theme Hadrons physics we have G.R.A.A.L. at E.S.R.F., C.E.B.A.F. and W.A.89. Physicists are implied in the project E.L.F.E at D.E.S.Y. The study of superdeformed states go on with E.U.R.O.G.R.A.M. New techniques have been used near the programme S.A.R.A. The programme P.I.A.F.E. saw the resolution of the difficult problem of the transformation 1+ gives N+ ions of 30 KeV and their transport on long distances. The team of hybrid reactors have shown that it was possible to amplify energy by a sub critical accelerator-reactor hybrid system, experience initiated by C. Rubbia at C.E.R.N. (N.C.).

  19. Progress report for 94/95; Institut des Sciences Nucleaires - Rapport d`activite 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    We find here the progress report for the two years 1994 and 1995 for institute of nuclear sciences at Grenoble. In the field of quarks and leptons, three teams are invested in CERN programmes: A.T.L.A.S. near the L.H.C., D.E.L.P.H.I; the neutrino team has achieved the building of the detector in the M.U.N.U. collaboration. In the theme Hadrons physics we have G.R.A.A.L. at E.S.R.F., C.E.B.A.F. and W.A.89. Physicists are implied in the project E.L.F.E at D.E.S.Y. The study of superdeformed states go on with E.U.R.O.G.R.A.M. New techniques have been used near the programme S.A.R.A. The programme P.I.A.F.E. saw the resolution of the difficult problem of the transformation 1+ gives N+ ions of 30 KeV and their transport on long distances. The team of hybrid reactors have shown that it was possible to amplify energy by a sub critical accelerator-reactor hybrid system, experience initiated by C. Rubbia at C.E.R.N. (N.C.).

  20. Research exemption/experimental use in the European Union: patents do not block the progress of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenichen, Hans-Rainer; Pitz, Johann

    2014-11-06

    In the public debate about patents, specifically in the area of biotechnology, the position has been taken that patents block the progress of science. As we demonstrate in this review, this is not the case in the European Union (EU). The national patent acts of the EU member states define research and experimental use exemptions from patent infringement that allow sufficient room for research activities to promote innovation. This review provides a comparative overview of the legal requirements and the extent and limitations of experimental use exemptions, including the so-called Bolar provision, in Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Spain, Italy, and The Netherlands. The legal framework in the respective countries is illustrated with reference to practical examples concerning tests on patent-protected genetic targets and antibodies. Specific questions concerning the use of patent-protected research tools, the outsourcing of research activities, and the use of preparatory and supplying acts for experimental purposes that are necessary for conducting experiments are covered. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Critical assessment of progress of medical sciences in Iran and Turkey: the way developing countries with limited resources should make effective contributions to the production of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarrat, Sadegh; Kolahdoozan, Shadi

    2011-11-01

    Scientific progress is an important indicator for the social and economic developments of any country. According to various reports, worldwide, Iran has the most growth in the field of science due to a high increase in the numbers of publications during the past decade. The aim of this study is to assess not only the quantity, but also the quality of publications of indexed Iranian journals and compare them to Turkey, as an Islamic neighboring country, in addition to the contributions of these two countries to our knowledge. A number of international journals with high impact factors were selected to assess the contributions of scientists from Iran and Turkey to the medical sciences. English medical journals from Iran and Turkey indexed by the ISI Web of Sciences with known impact factors (IF) announced at the beginning of 2010 were included for evaluation. We calculated the number of all articles published from the beginning of 2007 until the October 2010, the number of total citations, and citations from authors outside both countries for each journal. In addition, we selected all articles cited at least six times by authors outside of both countries and discussed their content with regard to originality and novelty, as well as their contributions to current knowledge. Furthermore, 60 international journals in basic or clinical research with IF greater than 6 were selected for the magnitude of contributions of both countries to our scientific knowledge. In 2010, out of a total of 21 Iranian journals indexed in ISI since 2007, only 12 have a known IF with a mean of 0.39 (range: 0.07-0.97), whereas out of 28 Turkish medical journals indexed in ISI, 15 have a known IF (mean: 0.35, range: 0.05-0.82). The total number of articles published since 2007 from Iran, total citations and total citations by authors from outside Iran were 2080, 1218, and 463, respectively. The same data related to Turkish journals were 4876, 2036, and 1331, respectively. Indeed, the mean

  2. The Climate Change Crisis as an International Civil Rights Issue: Forging an Alliance Between Science, Activism, and Progressive Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, B. J.; Driver, S.

    2011-12-01

    If our scientific community wants to make real progress on the climate change and environmental crisis we must be willing to side with and fight for the oppressed. The national and international communities most ready to act - those hit hardest by the real impact of climate change in their day-to-day lives - need the political leadership of and a living, organic connection with scientists who are prepared to tell the truth and act on the truth of our science. A new generation of scientist-activist leaders and this strategic and mutually beneficial alliance with the oppressed will be necessary to wage an international, intransigent fight to enact and implement the social, political, and economic policies needed to mitigate the damage already done and prevent future environmental and human catastrophe. In the statement BAMN distributed to last year's Fall AGU conference we said, "there will be no shortage of mass struggle in the next period of history." This spring we saw the absolutely awe-inspiring social upheavals in North Africa and the Middle East in the form of waves of mass demonstrations in country after country. Many of those struggles, with demands for real democracy, for jobs and economic opportunities, for improved living conditions, continue to this day. In virtually every instance, these popular and progressive social movements have been led by youth: middle school, high school and college students. In the US and Europe we have seen the spread of student-led struggle around the defense of K-12 public education and on college campuses in defense of various programs, opportunities, and the character of the educational experience. The most dynamic force in these struggles has been the Latina/o, black, other underrepresented minority and immigrant youth who refuse to accept permanent second-class citizenship and a future devoid of hope and opportunity. We will discuss our experience as a youth-led civil rights organization presenting the issues of climate

  3. The IUPAC International Congresses of Pesticide Chemistry (1963-2014) and Pest Management Science: a half-century of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Gerald T

    2014-08-01

    As we approach the 2014 San Francisco IUPAC Pesticide Chemistry Congress, we reflect on the 51 years of such congresses every 4 years since 1963. Meanwhile, our journal, Pesticide Science/Pest Management Science, has in parallel continually published relevant science for nearly as long (44 years from 1970). © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Impact of Scientific and Technological Progress on Economic Development - the Views of Some Nobel Laureates of the Economic Science

    OpenAIRE

    Florentina Xhelili KRASNIQI; Nexhmie Berisha VOKSHI

    2017-01-01

    There are different authors' opinions and numerous theories according to which scientific technological progress is a determining factor of the economic development. The paper aims to present the contributions of some Nobel laureates to the impact of scientific and technological progress on economic development such as Arrow, Debreu, Hicks, Solow, Kuznets, Kantorovich and Stiglitz. The research results of their contributions show that scientific technological progress is considered as a sour...

  5. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents progress in the areas of cardiac nuclear medicine, other imaging studies, investigations with biomolecules, and assessment of risks associated with the clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals

  6. Decadal Assessment and Outlook Report on Atomic Molecular and Optical Science. Final Progress Report to the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald Shapero; Michael Moloney

    2006-01-01

    The committee was charged to produce a comprehensive report on the status of AMO Science. The committee was charged to produce a report that: 1. Reviewed the field of AMO science, emphasize recent accomplishments, and identify new opportunities and compelling scientific questions; 2. Identified the impact of AMO science on other scientific fields, emerging technologies, and national needs; 3. Identified future workforce, societal and educational needs for AMO science; and 4. Made recommendations on how the US research enterprise might realize the full potential of AMO science. The committee also produced an intermediate report addressing key research issues and themes facing the research community

  7. Information on research in progress in Japan publication of 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan-Oral Presentation'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itabashi, Keizo; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Yokoo, Hiroshi

    1988-03-01

    The new journal, 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan-Oral Presentation', which was entirely revised from the previous abstract journal called 'Nuclear Science Information of Japan' was introduced. This is to be published quaterly in principle and compiled information by oral presentation presented at main conferences, symposia and other kind of formal meetings in the field of nuclear science and technology in Japan. Not all of the oral presentation is always contributed later to a proceeding or a journal as a full paper in Japan. In some cases, the pre-conference paper might be a only publication of the oral presentation. In this meaning, this journal could be used as a search tool for the subjects and the projects of nuclear research and development in progress.

  8. Impact of Scientific and Technological Progress on Economic Development - the Views of Some Nobel Laureates of the Economic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Xhelili KRASNIQI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There are different authors' opinions and numerous theories according to which scientific technological progress is a determining factor of the economic development. The paper aims to present the contributions of some Nobel laureates to the impact of scientific and technological progress on economic development such as Arrow, Debreu, Hicks, Solow, Kuznets, Kantorovich and Stiglitz. The research results of their contributions show that scientific technological progress is considered as a source of economic development but this advanced technology to be widely and effectively used should be accompanied by such ideological and institutional adjustments that guarantee the reasonable use of innovations produced by the huge improvements of human knowledge.

  9. CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System) Science: Progress thus far and the next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallamraju, D.; Kozyra, J.; Basu, S.

    Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System CAWSES is the current program of Scientific Committee for Solar Terrestrial Physics SCOSTEP for 2004 - 2008 The main aim of CAWSES is to bring together scientists from various nations to address the coupled and global nature of the Sun-Earth System phenomena Towards that end CAWSES provides a platform for international cooperation in observations data analysis theory and modeling There has been active international participation thus far with endorsement of the national CAWSES programs in some countries and many scientists around the globe actively volunteering their time in this effort The CAWSES Science Steering Group has organized the CAWSES program into five Themes for better execution of its science Solar Influence on Climate Space Weather Science and Applications Atmospheric Coupling Processes Space Climatology and Capacity Building and Education CAWSES will cooperate with International programs that focus on the Sun-Earth system science and at the same time compliment the work of programs whose scope is beyond the realm of CAWSES This talk will briefly review the science goals of CAWSES provide salient results from different Themes with emphasis on those from the Space Weather Theme This talk will also indicate the next steps that are being planned in this program and solicit inputs from the community for the science efforts to be carried out in the future

  10. Factors related to progression and graduation rates for RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing programs: searching for realistic benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sue; Canary, Cheryl Westlake; Orr, Marsha; Herberg, Paula; Rutledge, Dana N

    2010-03-01

    Measurement and analysis of progression and graduation rates is a well-established activity in schools of nursing. Such rates are indices of program effectiveness and student success. The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (2008), in its recently revised Standards for Accreditation of Baccalaureate and Graduate Degree Nursing Programs, specifically dictated that graduation rates (including discussion of entry points, timeframes) be calculated for each degree program. This context affects what is considered timely progression to graduation. If progression and graduation rates are critical outcomes, then schools must fully understand their measurement as well as interpretation of results. Because no national benchmarks for nursing student progression/graduation rates exist, schools try to set expectations that are realistic yet academically sound. RN-to-bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students are a unique cohort of baccalaureate learners who need to be understood within their own learning context. The purposes of this study were to explore issues and processes of measuring progression and graduation rates in an RN-to-BSN population and to identify factors that facilitate/hinder their successful progression to work toward establishing benchmarks for success. Using data collected from 14 California schools of nursing with RN-to-BSN programs, RN-to-BSN students were identified as generally older, married, and going to school part-time while working and juggling family responsibilities. The study found much program variation in definition of terms and measures used to report progression and graduation rates. A literature review supported the use of terms such as attrition, retention, persistence, graduation, completion, and success rates, in an overlapping and sometimes synonymous fashion. Conceptual clarity and standardization of measurements are needed to allow comparisons and setting of realistic benchmarks. One of the most important factors identified

  11. Progress Monitoring Change in Children's Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Functioning: Advancing the State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Julie Sarno; Evans, Steven W.

    2018-01-01

    The studies in this special series examine the effectiveness of direct behavior ratings (DBRs) for use as a progress monitoring tool. In this article, we comment on the findings of the studies in the context of the broader school-based assessment movement and discuss areas for future inquiry within this line of research.

  12. Maximising Students' Progress and Engagement in Science through the Use of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) 5E Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The Biological Sciences Curriculum Studies (BSCS) 5E Instructional Model (often referred to as the 5Es) consists of five phases. Each phase has a specific function and contributes both to teachers' coherent instruction and to students' formulation of a better understanding of scientific knowledge, attitudes and skills. Evidence indicates that the…

  13. Technology and Communications Coursework: Facilitating the Progression of Students with Learning Disabilities through High School Science and Math Coursework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara; Callahan, Rebecca

    2010-09-01

    Students identified with learning disabilities experience markedly lower levels of science and mathematics achievement than students who are not identified with a learning disability. Seemingly compounding their disadvantage, students with learning disabilities also complete more credits in non-core coursework-traditionally considered non-academic coursework-than students who are not identified with a learning disability. The Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, a large national dataset with both regular and special education high school students, is utilized to determine whether credit accumulation in certain types of non-core coursework, such as Technology and Communications courses, is associated with improved science and math course-taking outcomes for students with learning disabilities. Results show that credit accumulation in Technology and Communications coursework uniquely benefits the science course-taking, and comparably benefits the math course-taking, of students identified with learning disabilities in contrast to students who are not identified with a learning disability.

  14. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1983-June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    This comprehensive report outlines the progress made during the past three years in the areas described below. In all instances, initial studies have been carried out and the technical feasibility of carrying through each study has been demonstrated. The studies described include development of cesium-130 and bromine-75 radioisotope generators, the feasibility of using rubidium-82 as a myocardial imaging agent, and radiochemical preparation of C-11 deoxyglucose. 28 refs. (DT)

  15. Experiments in progress: The geography of science in the Atomic Energy Commission's peaceful uses of nuclear explosives program, 1956-1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Scott Lawrence

    From 1957 to 1973, the United States Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) actively pursued the "peaceful uses of nuclear explosives" through Project Plowshare. Nuclear excavation, the detonation of shallowly buried hydrogen bombs for massive earthmoving projects like harbors and canals, was considered the most promising of the Plowshare applications, and for a time, the most economically and technically "feasible." With a basis in and contributing to theory in critical human geography and science studies, the purpose of this dissertation is to examine the collisions of science, ideology, and politics which kept Plowshare designs alive--but only as "experiments in progress." That is, this research asks how the experimental program persisted in places like the national weapons laboratory in Livermore, California, and how its ideas were tested at the nuclear test site in Nevada, yet Plowshare was kept out of those spaces beyond AEC control. Primary research focuses on AEC-related archival materials collected from the Department of Energy Coordination and Information Center, Las Vegas, Nevada, and from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as well as the public discourse through which support for and opposition to Plowshare projects was voiced. Through critical analysis of Plowshare's grandiose "geographical engineering" schemes, I thus examine the complex relations between the social construction of science and technology, on one hand, and the social production of space, on the other.

  16. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes three studies aimed at using radiolabeled pharmaceuticals to explore brain function and anatomy. The first section describes the chemical preparation of [F18]fluorinated benzamides (dopamine D-2 receptor tracers), [F18]fluorinated benzazepines (dopamine D-1 receptor tracers), and tissue distribution of [F18]-fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake site tracer). The second section relates pharmacological and behavioral studies of amphetamines. The third section reports on progress made with processing of brain images from CT, MRI and PET/SPECT with regards to brain metabolism of glucose during mental tasks.

  17. INCOMPETENCE IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY - IT IS A BRAKE OF PROGRESS OR RAIDING IN THE FIELD OF RESEARCH SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Myamlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The analysis of the prerequisite appearing of the unfair competition in the market of research services to prevent raiding in science. Methodology. During the conducting of this study methods of scientific analysis and synthesis, the benchmarking method, the method of expert estimations were used. Findings. Possible methods of uncompetitive struggle during the performing of scientific research were examined. The urgency of this problem was proved. Therefore, the problem of the prerequisite appearing for incompetence on the market of research services and the task of its prevention and minimization of adverse effects for the development of science and technique is relevant, especially in the period of formation and the reform of the leading branches of the Ukrainian economy. The prerequisite appearing and conditions for the existence of incompetence in scientific activity were analyzed. The classification of the main ways of raiding was proposed and its justification was proved. Originality. The investigation of the phenomenon of unfair competition in the field of research services was pro-posed. The methods and means of competition between scientific organizations and individual scientists in some fields of knowledge were analyzed. The concept of "raiding" was introduced for the first time in the intellectual sphere. Practical value. The research results can be used to analyze the activity of scientific and engineering organizations, which carry out various studies to assess the validity and legitimacy of the obtained results, and to prevent raiding in science. The results of the study have practical value for public and private organizations in the determination of the competent performers to conduct research and development services, including expertise, and especially related to the evaluation of material losses or lost earnings when the impartiality and independence of this assessment is the guarantee of obtaining the reliable and

  18. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1982-06-01

    This 3-y report cites progress in the following areas of radiopharmaceutical research: cyclotron operations; 51 Mn for myocardial localization; 82 Rb for heart imaging; 15 O-labelled H 2 O and molecular oxygen; studies on 11 C-2-deoxyglucose localization; 13 NH 3 measurements of myocardial perfusion; 130 Cs myocardial imaging; heart motion studies; labelled amino acids for pancreatic imaging; 11 C-hexamethonium for cartilage imaging; 11 C-cholic acid pharmacology; blood element labelling with /sup 115m/In; 75 Br studies; extrapolation of animal data to humans; in vivo quantification of radioactivity; fetal and neonatal radiation effects from radiopharmaceuticals administered to pregnant and lactating mice; and verification of MIRD absorbed dose calculations for some organ-incorporated radionuclides

  19. Nuclear medicine and quantitative imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science): Comprehensive progress report, April 1, 1986-December 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1988-06-01

    This document describes several years research to improve PET imaging and diagnostic techniques in man. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. The reports in the study were processed separately for the data bases

  20. The Social Democrats of Scholarship: Austrian Imperial Peripheries and the Making of a Progressive Science of Nationality, 1885–1903

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Prendergast

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To what extent and in what ways did the intellectual climate of Austria’s often ethnolinguistically heterogeneous borderlands contribute to the formation, institutionalization and diffusion of emerging social scientific discourses during the final decades of the 19th century? Investigating the intellectual exchange between two early proponents of folklore studies (Volkskunde—the Slavonian-German-Jewish Friedrich Salomon Krauss (1859–1938 and Bukovinian-German Raimund Friedrich Kaindl (1866–1930—this paper argues that imperial peripheries, while traditionally overlooked as sites of knowledge production, in fact played a pivotal role in the development of an important brand of “progressive” social scientific research, one defined by a critical stance toward the prevailing historicist paradigms of the time. These self-described “social democrats of scholarship” collaborated, both formally and informally, on a number of related theoretical projects aimed at disrupting the exclusionary narratives of the academic establishment and re-focusing scholarly attention on the sociological, rather than historical, character of ethnonational difference. In this way, the nationalities question spurred, both in the center and at the margins of the monarchy, the development of new sciences of nationality intended to sustain Austria’s imperial structure.

  1. Gaining Rights to Citizenship: The Presence of Social Sciences in Agricultural Research and the Global Progress of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMIR KASSAM

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article first presents reflections on the joint work carried out by Michael Cernea and this paper's author over 8-9 years for gaining "room, recognition and resources" within the CGIAR for sociological and socio-anthropological research on farmers, their practices and needs. The status of social research inside the CGIAR has gone through ups and downs in the uphill battle for expanding social research within this organization. Social scientists have constantly worked to feed their findings into the Centers' biophysical research. The paper documents the contribution of Michael Cernea, the first sociologist who acceded to CGIAR's top science and policy bodies, to strengthening the presence and influence of sociological and anthropological knowledge within CGIAR's institutional architecture and scientific products.The second part of this study presents the high promise of Conservation Agriculture (CA - a new paradigm for non-tillage agricultural production that offers improved productivity and environmental protection. CA principles are universally applicable. The author offers global data on the impressive advances and distribution of CA, which covers already some 125 million ha distributed across all continents and agro-ecologies. CA is a farmer-driven socio-cultural phenomenon which has expanded at a yearly rate of 7 mil. ha during the past decade.

  2. Progress in 11th Five Year and the geneal idea for 12th Five Year of uranium exploration and geological science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jindai; Jian Xiaofei; Li Youliang; Du Jiannong; Guo Qinggen; Zhang Qiuying

    2011-01-01

    Since the 11th-Five Year, uranium exploration in China has retrieved obviously and some new resources have been identified. More detailed uranium exploration has been carried out in about 1 000 000 km 2 , exploration in large uranium resource bases, old orefields and focusing prospect areas has achieved important progress, several middle-large and extral-large deposits have been discovered, and one super-large deposit was submitted for the first time in China. In the science and technology of uranium exploration, the capability and platform of research has been reinforced, a number of key projects have been carried out such as national uranium potential evaluation, study of 'four types of uranium deposit', research for the enlargement of uranium resource bases, research of application foundation of uranium geology, research on exploratin techniques and method and technological standard. All these projects have obtained fruitful result and significantly raised the creative level in uranium science and technology. In the coming 12th Five Year, uranium exploration will follow the strategy of 'foundation research first with focus on resource base,systematical exploration and integral evaluation second' under the guideline of 'domestic foothold and oversea development' and set up large uranium resource bases, four major geological preosecting programs will be commence in the exploration for large uranium resource base, national uranium survey, regional evaluation of potential uranium resource and science and technology innovation of uranium geology, Ideas of 'Great uranium exploration system' should be set up to widely unite the localized prospecting teams and cooperate with the geologic research organization such as domestic and foreign university and college so as to make corespondent contribution to raise the supporting capability of uranium resources in China. (authors)

  3. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  4. Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center. Twenty-first progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, J.; Petesch, J.E.; Rogers, R.D.; Sandel, P.; Stasny, G.S.

    1985-03-01

    The Nuclear Science Center is operated by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station as a service to the Texas A and M University System and the State of Texas. The facility is available to the University, other educational institutions, governmental agencies, and private organizations and individuals. Reactor utilization decreased from 1983 as indicated by a slightly smaller number of samples irradiated and of total irradiations. Core VIII, established in December 1982, was used throughout 1984. Several major facility projects modifications, and improvements were completed during the past year. Experimentally the Beam Port No. 4 reflector and shutter was improved, the pulsing instrumentation is being expanded, and the pneumatic system controller developed for Lab No. 4 is now in use in the Center for Trace Characterization (CTC) and Shell Development labs. Several operational problems occurred in 1984 but did not result in a significant loss of reactor operating time. During this reporting period there were no changes made to the site area; however, there has been made a proposal to extend the runway at nearby Easterwood Airport such tha larger aircraft can be accommodated. This extension should occur in 1985 and should have no affect on the air traffic patterns relative to the NSC. Administratively during 1984 efforts have been made to stabilize the reactor operations staff following the mid year resignations of both a Reactor Supervisor and Manager of Reactor Operations. A long term replacement has been hired to fill the vacated Reactor Supervisor position; however, the manager position has not yet been filled and those duties have been assumed by the Assistant Director

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 18 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

  6. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.6--computational physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 13 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about computational physics sub-volume

  7. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--pulse power technology and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 18 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about pulse power technology and its application sub-volume

  8. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 57 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology sub-volume

  9. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.7--nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 22 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about nuclear fusion and plasma physics sub-volume

  10. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization

  11. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.10--Nuclear Information sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 28 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about Nuclear Information sub-volume

  12. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.9--nuclear technology applied in industry sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 35 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the ninth one, the content is about nuclear technology applied in industry sub-volume

  13. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.7--Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about Nuclear electronics and nuclear detection technology

  14. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.2--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about nuclear power (Pt.1)

  15. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--nuclear agriculture sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 10 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about nuclear agriculture sub-volume

  16. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.2--uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 48 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

  17. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.3--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 86 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the third one, the content is about nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.2)

  18. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--isotope separation sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 37 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about isotope separation sub-volume

  19. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.8--radiation research and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 12 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation research and its application sub-volume

  20. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.2--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining, uranium metallurgy and nuclear power.

  1. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear Information sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear Information and computer applications

  2. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.7--pulse power technology and its application sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-10-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the seventh one, the content is about Nuclear electronics and pulse power technology and its application

  3. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--radiation research and radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  4. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.2--uranium mining and metallurgy sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about uranium mining, uranium metallurgy and nuclear power.

  5. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.3). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2013, No.4--Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 3) includes 24 articles which are communicated on the third national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about Nuclear chemistry and radiation chemistry sub-volume

  6. Aspects of marine geoscience: a review and thoughts on potential for observing active processes and progress through collaboration between the ocean sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Neil C

    2012-12-13

    Much progress has been made in the UK in characterizing the internal structures of major physiographic features in the oceans and in developing understanding of the geological processes that have created or shaped them. UK researchers have authored articles of high impact in all areas described here. In contrast to terrestrial geoscience, however, there have been few instrumented observations made of active processes by UK scientists. This is an area that could be developed over the next decades in the UK. Research on active processes has the potential ability to engage the wider public: Some active processes present significant geo-hazards to populations and offshore infrastructure that require monitoring and there could be commercial applications of technological developments needed for science. Some of the suggestions could involve studies in shallow coastal waters where ship costs are much reduced, addressing tighter funding constraints over the near term. The possibilities of measuring aspects of volcanic eruptions, flowing lava, turbidity currents and mass movements (landslides) are discussed. A further area of potential development is in greater collaboration between the ocean sciences. For example, it is well known in terrestrial geomorphology that biological agents are important in modulating erosion and the transport of sediments, ultimately affecting the shape of the Earth's surface in various ways. The analogous effect of biology on large-scale geomorphology in the oceans is also known but remains poorly quantified. Physical oceanographic models are becoming increasingly accurate and could be used to study further the patterns of erosion, particle transport and deposition in the oceans. Marine geological and geophysical data could in turn be useful for further verification of such models. Adapting them to conditions of past oceans could address the shorter-period movements, such as due to internal waves and tides, which have been barely addressed in

  7. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    A re-designed automatic TLD reader has been constructed. The thermoluminescent material MgB 4 O 7 :Dy appears to be attractive for environmental gamma monitoring. The field prototype of a simple, light weight tritium monitor is being built, and field-tests of a pocket warning dosimeter have been completed. A computer program for the calculation of beta doses from point and plane sources has been used to calculate distributions for 90 nuclides. Research into the adsorption of 134 Cs, 60 Co and 90 Sr onto soil particles and processes associated with the release of these nuclides is continuing. Studies are being carried out into the culture of algae in municipal wastewater, heat and solute transfer in lakes, and groundwater seepage flow into lakes. Radiation biology work continues to deal with radiation damage of DNA and cellular repair mechanisms. A metabolic model for the tellurium-iodine decay chain has been completed. (LL)

  8. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In Health Physics Branch, work is continuing on development of neutron dosimetry techniques, new thermoluminescent dosimeters, and portable tritium-in-air monitoring instruments. Development of beneficial uses of waste heat has continued in the Environmental Research Branch. Other work includes studies in meteorology, biogeochemistry of nuclear waste management areas, and soil and groundwater studies. Research activity in the Radiation Biology Branch is dealing with the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms. Both genetic and mutagenic effects of damage to DNA are being studied as well as repair mechanisms and human diseases caused by repair mechanism deficiencies. In the Biomedical Research Branch, a collaborative study is being undertaken into the retention and excretion of uranium in fuel fabrication workers. (O.T.)

  9. Progress of fossil fuel science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, M.F.

    2007-07-01

    Coal is the most abundant and widely distributed fossil fuel. More than 45% of the world's electricity is generated from coal, and it is the major fuel for generating electricity worldwide. The known coal reserves in the world are enough for more than 215 years of consumption, while the known oil reserves are only about 39 times of the world's consumption and the known natural gas reserves are about 63 times of the world's consumption level in 1998. In recent years, there have been effective scientific investigations on Turkish fossil fuels, which are considerable focused on coal resources. Coal is a major fossil fuel source for Turkey. Turkish coal consumption has been stable over the past decade and currently accounts for about 24% of the country's total energy consumption. Lignite coal has had the biggest share in total fossil fuel production, at 43%, in Turkey. Turkish researchers may investigate ten broad pathways of coal species upgrading, such as desulfurization and oxydesulfurization, pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis, liquefaction and hydroliquefaction, extraction and supercritical fluid extraction, gasification, oxidation, briquetting, flotation, and structure identification.

  10. Starting a learning progression for agricultural literacy: A qualitative study of urban elementary student understandings of agricultural and science education benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Alexander Jay

    Science and agriculture professional organizations have argued for agricultural literacy as a goal for K-12 public education. Due to the complexity of our modern agri-food system, with social, economic, and environmental concerns embedded, an agriculturally literate society is needed for informed decision making, democratic participation, and system reform. While grade-span specific benchmarks for gauging agri-food system literacy have been developed, little attention has been paid to existing ideas individuals hold about the agri-food system, how these existing ideas relate to benchmarks, how experience shapes such ideas, or how ideas change overtime. Developing a body of knowledge on students' agri-food system understandings as they develop across K-12 grades can ground efforts seeking to promote a learning progression toward agricultural literacy. This study compares existing perceptions held by 18 upper elementary students from a large urban center in California to agri-food system literacy benchmarks and examines the perceptions against student background and experiences. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Constructivist theoretical perspectives framed the study. No student had ever grown their own food, raised a plant, or cared for an animal. Participation in school fieldtrips to farms or visits to a relative's garden were agricultural experiences most frequently mentioned. Students were able to identify common food items, but could not elaborate on their origins, especially those that were highly processed. Students' understanding of post-production activities (i.e. food processing, manufacturing, or food marketing) was not apparent. Students' understanding of farms reflected a 1900's subsistence farming operation commonly found in a literature written for the primary grades. Students were unaware that plants and animals were selected for production based on desired genetic traits. Obtaining

  11. 全球核科学和核技术发展现状及趋势%Progress and Developing Trend of Global Nuclear Science and Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈欣媛

    2015-01-01

    国际原子能机构(International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA)认为,2014年全球核技术发展主要集中在动力应用、原子数据和核数据、加速器和研究堆应用以及非动力应用这四大领域.本文从上述四个方面,对2014年以来全球在核科学与技术方面所取得的主要进展进行概括与阐述.认为全球核能发展暂时仍未能脱离调整阶段,我国科技界和管理部门可重点关注核技术的非动力应用.%Nuclear technology refers to a modern high technology, based on nuclear properties, nuclear reactions, nuclear effects and nuclear spectroscopy, using reactors, accelerators, radiation and nuclear radiation detectors as tools. As a clean energy source, nuclear energy has many advantages such as low-emission, high fuel energy density, and low cost etc. Many countries regarded nuclear power as an effective way to meet electricity demand growth, energy security, as well as to deal with climate change. On the other hand, as another major application ifeld of nuclear technology, non-power applications of nuclear technology is also very active in the ifelds of isotope hydrology, cancer prevention and control, climate change, and marine environment. International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) indicates that since 2014, the major developments of the world's nuclear technology focused on the areas of power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerator and research reactor, and non-power applications. This paper elaborates the world's major progress in nuclear science and technology from the four aspects mentioned above.

  12. Twenty five years of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine - progress and priorities for future of radiation medicine and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D

    2017-12-01

    After the creation of the Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine in 1993 the Research Center for Radiation Medicine was among the first institutions to join the Academy (fig. 1). Estab lishing the Academy was among the first steps of the independent Ukrainian government and aimed to provide a high level health care for population. It was extremely needed for the minimization of Chornobyl medical consequences. This choice was related to a growing recognition of the scientific research in fulfilling the Сenter's mission - study of the effects of low dose radiation on human body and radiation protection of the exposed population.The Center entered the Academy as a potent insti tution. Director General Dr. Anatoly Romanenko and his first deputy prof. Oles Pyatak were lucky to concentrate in three institutes of the Center a talent ed workforce including director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology prof Volodymyr Bebeshko, director of the Institute of Epidemiology and Prophylaxis of radiation Injuries prof. Volodymyr Buzunov, director of the Institute of Experimental Radiology prof. Mikhail Rudnev. Drs. T. Azaren kova, S. Galkina, V. Boer, T. Treskunova were appointed as scientific secretaries. Dosimetry divi sion was headed by brilliant prof Ilya Likhtarev and his staff Drs. I. Los, V. Korzun, V. Repin, O. Pere voznikov, O. Bondarenko, V. Chumak and others.The Center met creation of the Academy with expe rienced research and clinical staff encountering 1587 members, including 272 research staff, 28 doctors of science and 98 PhDs, modern diagnostic and labo ratory equipment, 300 beds in clinical departments and construction of hospital and out patient hospi tal in Svyatoshin. Scientific staff included experi enced prof. I. Khomaziuk, prof. B. Prevarsky, prof. V. Zamostian, prof. P. Chayalo, prof. M. Omelya nets, prof. A. Prysyazhnyuk. Dr. A. Niagu, Dr. E. Stepanova, Dr. A.Chumak, Dr. V. Klymenko, Dr. D. Komarenko, M. Pilinska, L.Ovsiannikova, O. Pi rogova. were among

  13. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with technical and research work done at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Work done in the following research divisions is reported: Applied Maths and Computing, Chemical Technology, Engineering Research, Environmental Science, Instrumentation and Control, Isotope, Materials and Physics

  14. Progress report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Studsvik Science Research Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1978. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. Projects within the following fields are presented: neutron physics, neutron absorption and scattering, radiation chemistry, radiation damage studies, radioactivity and theoretical studies of condensed matter. (E.R.)

  15. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  16. Life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs

  17. Missouri local technical assistance program at Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly University of Missouri--Rolla) : annual progress report January-December 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This annual report is a summary of the activities during 2007 for the Missouri Local Technical Assistance Program (Missouri LTAP), which is located at Missouri University of Science and Technology. The report highlights Missouri LTAPs performance ...

  18. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  19. Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-16

    This report summarizes the annual progress of EPA’s Clean Air Markets Programs such as the Acid Rain Program (ARP) and the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR). EPA systematically collects data on emissions, compliance, and environmental effects, these data are highlighted in our Progress Reports.

  20. 55th electric science promotion prize (progress prize). Demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW first in the world; Dai 55 kai denki gakujutsu shinkosho (shinposho) jusho. Seiaihatsu no OPGW ni okeru hikari soriton denso no jissho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-10

    Electric science promotion prize (progress prize) is given to `Person who newly proposed a new concept, theory, material, device, system and method on electrical science and technology, or demonstrated these proposals` by the commendation committee of Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan every year. Eight promotion prizes including that for Kansai Electric Power`s `Demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW first in the world` were given. This research succeeded in development of the transmission/ receiving device suitable for optical soliton transmission, and the prediction method of an optimum transmission condition by computer simulation. In addition, this research succeeded in 10Gbit transmission of 784km and 40Gbit transmission (4-wave multiplex) of 392km by applying the above research result to Okurobe trunk line OPGW (98.2km). This demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW is first in the world. (NEDO)

  1. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Dirninger, G.

    1982-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1981. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  2. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupka, A.; Wild, E.; Dirninger, G.

    1983-01-01

    The progress report describes the scientific work and research results of the institute for radium research and nuclear physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences for the period of 1982. The progress report covers the subject areas of nuclear theory, nuclear model calculations, experimental nuclear physics and neutron involved reactions, medium energy physics, instrumentation and detectors, evaluation of nuclear data and numerical data processing, dating, applications in medicine, dosimetry and environmental studies. A list of publications of this institute is given. (A.N.)

  3. An Exploration of Students' Science Learning Interest Related to Their Cognitive Anxiety, Cognitive Load, Self-Confidence and Learning Progress Using Inquiry-Based Learning With an iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2017-12-01

    Based on the cognitive-affective theory, the present study designed a science inquiry learning model, predict-observe-explain (POE), and implemented it in an app called "WhyWhy" to examine the effectiveness of students' science inquiry learning practice. To understand how POE can affect the cognitive-affective learning process, as well as the learning progress, a pretest and a posttest were given to 152 grade 5 elementary school students. The students practiced WhyWhy during six sessions over 6 weeks, and data related to interest in learning science (ILS), cognitive anxiety (CA), and extraneous cognitive load (ECL) were collected and analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis with structure equation modeling. The results showed that students with high ILS have low CA and ECL. In addition, the results also indicated that students with a high level of self-confidence enhancement showed significant improvement in the posttest. The implications of this study suggest that by using technology-enhanced science learning, the POE model is a practical approach to motivate students to learn.

  4. Observations of fine-scale transport structure in the upper troposphere from the High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Pan, Laura L.; Campos, Teresa; Gao, Rushan

    2007-09-01

    The Progressive Science Mission in December 2005 was the first research use of the new NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) aircraft. The Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport (START) component of the mission was designed to investigate the dynamical and chemical structure of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Flight 5 of the Progressive Science mission was a START flight that sampled near the tropopause in an area between the main jet stream and a large, quasi-stationary, cutoff low. The large-scale flow in this region was characterized by a hyperbolic (saddle) point. In this study the in situ measurements by HIAPER are combined with flow analyses and satellite data to investigate the quasi-isentropic stirring of trace species in the upper troposphere. As expected from theoretical considerations, strong stretching and folding deformation of the flow near the hyperbolic point resulted in rapid filamentation of air masses and sharp gradients of constituents. Calculations of the stirring using operational meteorological analyses from the NCEP Global Forecast System model produced excellent agreement with HIAPER and satellite observations of trace species. Back trajectories indicate that elevated ozone levels in some filaments likely came from a large stratospheric intrusion that occurred upstream in the jet over the north Pacific Ocean. The methods presented here can be used with operational forecasts for future flight planning.

  5. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    1977-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  6. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2006-01-01

    In the thirty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. At the time of inception of this series, the first lasers were only just becoming operational, holography was in its infancy, subjects such as fiber optics, integrated optics and optoelectronics did not exist and quantum optics was the domain of only a few physicists. The term photonics had not yet been coined. Today these fields are flourishing and have become areas of specialisation for many science and engineering students and n

  7. Using HIPPO Data for Formal and Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, A.; Hatheway, B.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) field project recently concluded its mission to map greenhouse gases and black carbon from the Arctic to the Antarctic using the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream V. HIPPO resulted in visually-rich and easy-to-understand altitude/latitude curtain plots of several trace gases and black carbon, from five seasons during 2009-2011. The data and curtain plots are available for both formal and informal science education to support the instruction of atmospheric science and Earth systems. Middle and high school activities have been developed using these data and curtain plots, and an undergraduate course based on HIPPO data - Global Air Pollution - is offered at Princeton University. The visually stimulating curtain plots are unique in that a wide range of people can comprehend them because they provide an easy-to-understand picture of the global distribution of chemical species for non-scientists or beginning users, while also displaying valuable detailed information for the advanced viewer. The plots are a powerful graphical tool that can be used to communicate climate science because they illustrate the concepts of how trace gas distributions are linked to the large-scale dynamics of the Earth; show seasonal changes in distribution and concentrations; and use the same display format for each tracer. In order to connect people to the data, a multi-faceted and engaging public information program and supporting educational materials for HIPPO were developed. These provided a unique look into global field research and included social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter; a range of videos from simple motion graphics to detailed narratives; both printed and online written materials; and mass-media publications.

  8. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  9. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2009-01-01

    In the fourty-seven years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Backscattering and Anderson localization of light- Advances in oliton manipulation in optical lattices- Fundamental quantum noise in optical amplification- Invisibility cloaks

  10. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2008-01-01

    In the fourty-six years that have gone by since the first volume of Progress in Optics was published, optics has become one of the most dynamic fields of science. The volumes in this series which have appeared up to now contain more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments.- Metamaterials- Polarization Techniques- Linear Baisotropic Mediums- Ultrafast Optical Pulses- Quantum Imaging- Point-Spread Funcions- Discrete Wigner Functions

  11. Progressive Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian O.

    2016-01-01

    Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015.......Guest Post to the Society for U.S. Intellectual History Blog. Brief introduction to the book Progressive Business: An Intellectual History of the Role of Business in American Society, Oxford U.P., 2015....

  12. Fiscal 1982 progress report of 'comprehensive research on the management of long-lived radioactive wastes' in the Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Akira; Kosako, Toshiso

    1983-01-01

    In the Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, the special research project ''Comprehensive Research on the Management of Long-lived Radioactive Wastes'' is carried out in the three-year period from fiscal 1982 to 1984. The works performed in the fiscal year 1982 are described individually, each short description on research purposes and contents, results, future plans, etc. the research works in the three fields of material science, biology and process technology are buffer materials in land disposal, canisters, corrosion of waste-container materials, thermal analysis of high-level wastes, effects of tritium on cells and marine life, biological effect of long-lived nuclides, separation of tritium wastes, actinoids and krypton-iodine, environmental migration of radionuclides, and accident analysis. (Mori, K.)

  13. Evaluation and capacity building to improve precollege science and mathematics achievement in the US: 10 CFR, Part 605. Technical progress report, June--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The National Center for Improving Science Education has undertaken activities to achieve evaluation goals for DOE`s Precollege programs: develop means to determine program quality; develop means for determining the contribution of DOE precollege programs to both teacher enhancement and student achievement; provide evaluation designs and instruments and reports of program quality and impact; and strengthen both DOE`s and the Labs` capacity to do both short- and long-term planning as well as deliver effective programs and evaluation. Appendices include evaluation/technical assistance report, profiling teacher research participation and teacher development programs, teacher surveys, impact assessment design, and teacher research participation programs anecdotes for 8 labs.

  14. Development of an x-ray beam line at the NSLS for studies in materials science using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The research programs reported span virtually the entire range of condensed matter studies involving the fields of solid state physics, chemistry, electrochemistry, materials science and biochemistry. Results are discussed for various groups. Topics reported include work on amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors, particularly photostructural changes, kinetics of structural changes and rapid quenching, bond strengths, force constants and phonons. Also reported are temperature dependent EXAFS studies of bonding in high temperature alloys, amorphous systems, disordered alloys and studies of resolve electronic structure, EXAFS and XANES studies of permanent magnet systems based on Nd 2 Fe 14 B, glancing angle EXAFS study of Nb/Al and Nb/Si interfacial systems, x-ray absorption of krypton-implanted solids and high dose implants into silicon, and x-ray absorption and EXAFS studies of superconducting oxide compounds of Cu and related magnetic systems. Work is also reported on XAFS measurements on the icosahedral phase

  15. Science, politics, and health in the brave new world of pharmaceutical carcinogenic risk assessment: technical progress or cycle of regulatory capture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Ballinger, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    The carcinogenicity (cancer-inducing potential) of pharmaceuticals is an important risk factor for health when considering whether thousands of patients on drug trials or millions/billions of consumers in the marketplace should be exposed to a new drug. Drawing on fieldwork involving over 50 interviews and documentary research spanning 2002-2010 in Europe and the US, and on regulatory capture theory, this article investigates how the techno-regulatory standards for carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals have altered since 1998. It focuses on the replacement of long-term carcinogenicity tests in rodents (especially mice) with shorter-term tests involving genetically-engineered mice (GEM). Based on evidence regarding financial/organizational control, methodological design, and interpretation of the validation and application of these new GEM tests, it is argued that regulatory agencies permitted the drug industry to shape such validation and application in ways that prioritized commercial interests over the need to protect public health. Boundary-work enabling industry scientists to define some standards of public-health policy facilitated such capture. However, as the scientific credibility of GEM tests as tools to protect public health by screening out carcinogens became inescapably problematic, a regulatory resurgence, impelled by reputational concerns, exercised more control over industry's construction and use of the tests, The extensive problems with GEM tests as public-health protective regulatory science raises the spectre that alterations to pharmaceutical carcinogenicity-testing standards since the 1990s may have been boundary-work in which the political project of decreasing the chance that companies' products are defined as carcinogenic has masqueraded as techno-science. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Climate Literacy: Progress in Climate and Global Change Undergraduate Courses in Meteorology and Earth System Science Programs at Jackson State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S. R.; Tuluri, F.; Fadavi, M.

    2017-12-01

    JSU Meteorology Program will be offering AMS Climate Studies undergraduate course under MET 210: Climatology in spring 2013. AMS Climate Studies is offered as a 3 credit hour laboratory course with 2 lectures and 1 lab sessions per week. Although this course places strong intellectual demands upon each student, the instructors' objective is to help each student to pass the course with an adequate understanding of the fundamentals and advanced and advanced courses. AMS Climate Studies is an introductory college-level course developed by the American Meteorological Society for implementation at undergraduate institutions nationwide. The course places students in a dynamic and highly motivational educational environment where they investigate Earth's climate system using real-world environmental data. The AMS Climate Studies course package consists of a textbook, investigations manual, course website, and course management system-compatible files. Instructors can use these resources in combinations that make for an exciting learning experience for their students. This is a content course in Earth Science. It introduces a new concept that views Earth as a synergistic physical system applied concepts of climatology, for him/her to understand basic atmospheric/climate processes, physical and dynamical climatology, regional climatology, past and future climates and statistical analysis using climate data and to be prepared to profit from studying more of interrelated phenomenon governed by complex processes involving the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the biosphere, and the solid Earth. The course emphasizes that the events that shape the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the Earth do not occur in isolation. Rather, there is a delicate relationship between the events that occur in the ocean, atmosphere, and the solid Earth. The course provides a multidimensional approach in solving scientific issues related to Earth-related sciences,

  17. Development of an x-ray beam line at the NSLS for studies in materials science using x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayers, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Although only in operation since May, 1985, the X-11 participation research team (PRT) at the NSLS has already demonstrated that it is one of the leading centers of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). During this time, results have been obtained and programs initiated in a number of areas, for example: interfaces, including deposited metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems, multilayers and ion implanted layers; electrochemical systems, including Pt electrode fuel cells, Ni oxide battery electrodes, conducting polymers, passivation and corrosion; catalysts, including highly-dispersed supported metal catalysts and zeolite systems; quasi-crystals, heavy fermion systems, uranium and neptunium compounds, rare gas clusters, disordered metals and semiconductors, ferroelectric transition; and, biological systems and related models, including synthetic porphyrins and a number of metalloproteins. In concert with these scientific results have been a number of developments involving the technique itself. These include implementation of unique optical systems on both the A and B lines for optical performance over their designed energy ranges, advances in experimental capability, particular in glancing angle studies, optimization of ion chambers for surface studies, the improvement of electron yield detectors, and improved software for data acquisition and analysis. This report emphasizes some of the research highlights and significant developments of our PRT which occurred during the past year. A detailed bibliography of papers and talks resulting from work done at our beamline and the progress reports for our PRT which were in the 1985 NSLS Annual Report are appended

  18. Measuring progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, sociological examinations of genetics, therapeutic cloning, neuroscience and tissue engineering have suggested that 'life itself' is currently being transformed through technique with profound implications for the ways in which we understand and govern ourselves and others...... in much the same way that mortality rates, life expectancy or morbidity rates can. By analysing the concrete ways in which human progress has been globally measured and taxonomised in the past two centuries or so, I will show how global stratifications of countries according to their states...

  19. Progressivity Enhanced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Hren

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rather than a scientific text, the author contributes a concise memorandum from the originator of the idea who has managed the campaign for the conversion of the military barracks into a creative cluster between 1988 and 2002, when he parted ways with Metelkova due to conflicting views on the center’s future. His views shed light on a distant period of time from a perspective of a participant–observer. The information is abundantly supported by primary sources, also available online. However, some of the presented hypotheses are heavily influenced by his personal experiences of xenophobia, elitism, and predatorial behavior, which were already then discernible on the so-called alternative scene as well – so much so that they obstructed the implementation of progressive programs. The author claims that, in spite of the substantially different reality today, the myths and prejudices concerning Metelkova must be done away with in order to enhance its progressive nature. Above all, the paper calls for an objective view on internal antagonisms, mainly originating in deep class divisions between the users. These make a clear distinction between truly marginal ndividuals and the overambitious beau-bourgeois, as the author labels the large part of users of Metelkova of »his« time. On these grounds, he argues for a robust approach to ban all forms of xenophobia and self-ghettoization.

  20. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    Progress Report, covering the period up to the end of 1979 year, was sent to the IAEA according to the research agreement No. 1971 /CF. This work covered the following fields: preparation and dummy irradiation experiments with a new experimental capsule of ''CHOUCA-M'' type; measurement of temperature fields and design of specimen holders; measurement of neutron energy spectrum in the irradiation place in our experimental reactor of VVR-S type (Nuclear Research Institute) using a set of activation detectors; unification and calibration of the measurement of neutron fluence with the use of Fe, Cu, Mn-Mg and Co-Al monitors; development and improvement of the measuring apparatus and technique for the dynamic testing of pre-cracked specimens with determination of dynamic parameters of fracture mechanics; preparation and manufacture of testing specimens from the Japanese steels - forging, plate and weld metal; preparation of the irradiation capsule for assembling

  1. Scientific progress as increasing verisimilitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniluoto, Ilkka

    2014-06-01

    According to the foundationalist picture, shared by many rationalists and positivist empiricists, science makes cognitive progress by accumulating justified truths. Fallibilists, who point out that complete certainty cannot be achieved in empirical science, can still argue that even successions of false theories may progress toward the truth. This proposal was supported by Karl Popper with his notion of truthlikeness or verisimilitude. Popper's own technical definition failed, but the idea that scientific progress means increasing truthlikeness can be expressed by defining degrees of truthlikeness in terms of similarities between states of affairs. This paper defends the verisimilitude approach against Alexander Bird who argues that the "semantic" definition (in terms of truth or truthlikeness alone) is not sufficient to define progress, but the "epistemic" definition referring to justification and knowledge is more adequate. Here Bird ignores the crucial distinction between real progress and estimated progress, explicated by the difference between absolute (and usually unknown) degrees of truthlikeness and their evidence-relative expected values. Further, it is argued that Bird's idea of returning to the cumulative model of growth requires an implausible trick of transforming past false theories into true ones.

  2. On the Nature of Science

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, B. K.

    2006-01-01

    A 21st century view of the nature of science is presented. It attempts to show how a consistent description of science and scientific progress can be given. Science advances through a sequence of models with progressively greater predictive power. The philosophical and metaphysical implications of the models change in unpredictable ways as the predictive power increases. The view of science arrived at is one based on instrumentalism. Philosophical realism can only be recovered by a subtle use...

  3. Deadly progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nader, R.; Abbotts, J.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are safe, they help to get through the future bottle-neck in the field of energy, nuclear power plants provide for cheap electrical power and support economic growth - these are the sedative formulae which have been used for years to close the populations eyes towards the real problems. In this book, the American lawyer Ralph Nader and the nuclear chemist John Abbots not only oppose this myth of atomic safety, but they also defeat this theory with numerous technical, economic, and political details. Having realized the fact that the development of atomic energy can no longer be prevented by warnings of independent experts, but only by massive protests by the population - i.e. the protest by informed persons-, they give an understandable introduction to the techniques of atomic energy, construction of nuclear power plants, radioactive radiation, safety, etc. Furthermore, they inform about the social, political, and economic background of the nuclear power forcing. Nader and Abbots show the uncertainty of science, they bring secret documents about failures already occured and point out the catastrophic consequences of possible defects. The result of the thorough study: A 'technologic Vietnam' impends both USA and all other nuclear power countries, if the population won't struggle against this dead-end programme of the governments. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Progress: Its Glories and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Steven Pinker, a cognitive psychologist and linguist at Harvard and a savant of big ideas, is one of the latest to take on the idea of progress. He does it under the aegis of "enlightenment," which comes down to a kind of holy trinity of reason, science, and humanism. His new book, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress, is ambitious and cantankerous and heady with hope. On the whole, Pinker makes a good case for the benefits of progress, but with an overdose of feel-good prose. His greatest failure comes in exaggerating the threats to science and in avoiding some problems altogether. He ignores its complexity, its shadows, its creation of new problems raised by its solutions to old ones. Pinker has a particular animus against bioethics, and he misses what has been, I would argue, at the heart of bioethics from its beginning fifty or so years ago. Bioethics was prompted by a new class of medical dilemmas that require a difficult balancing of harms and benefits. Most of them are still with us, and most of them are the result of the progress of postwar medical research and fast-changing clinical practices. © 2018 The Hastings Center.

  5. A guided science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsiner, Jaan

    That sciences are guided by explicit and implicit ties to their surrounding social world is not new. Jaan Valsiner fills in the wide background of scholarship on the history of science, the recent focus on social studies of sciences, and the cultural and cognitive analyses of knowledge making....... The theoretical scheme that he uses to explain the phenomena of social guidance of science comes from his thinking about processes of development in general—his theory of bounded indeterminacy—and on the relations of human beings with their culturally organized environments. Valsiner examines reasons for the slow...... and nonlinear progress of ideas in psychology as a science at the border of natural and social sciences. Why is that intellectual progress occurs in different countries at different times? Most responses are self-serving blinders for presenting science as a given rather than understanding it as a deeply human...

  6. Progress in Brewing Science and Beer Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamforth, C W

    2017-06-07

    The brewing of beer is an ancient biotechnology, the unit processes of which have not changed in hundreds of years. Equally, scientific study within the brewing industry not only has ensured that modern beer making is highly controlled, leading to highly consistent, high-quality, healthful beverages, but also has informed many other fermentation-based industries.

  7. On Another Topic... Promoting Progress through Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Guri

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the achievements of scientists and technologists of the Soviet Union and their impact on the development of production, social consciousness, and international politics. Discusses future directions and thrusts to be pursued through extensive application of scientific ideas. (RT)

  8. Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1995-09-30

    Subjects studied include optical character recognition (OCR), text retrieval, and document analysis. This report discusses the OCR test system and the text retrieval program. Staff and institute activities are given. Appendices give the ISRI methodology for preparing ground-truth test data and the test of OCR systems using DOE documents.

  9. Truth, laws and the progress of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Dorato

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I analyze the difficult question of the truth of mature scientific theories by tackling the problem of the truth of laws. After introducing the main philosophical positions in the field of scientific realism, I discuss and then counter the two main arguments against realism, namely the pessimistic meta-induction and the abstract and idealized character of scientific laws. I conclude by defending the view that well-confirmed physical theories are true only relatively to certain values of the variables that appear in the laws.

  10. Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory Delivering science and technology to protect our nation and promote world stability Science & ; Innovation Collaboration Careers Community Environment Science & Innovation Facilities Science Pillars Research Library Science Briefs Science News Science Highlights Lab Organizations Science Programs Applied

  11. Eclipse Science Results from the Airborne Infrared Spectrometer (AIR-Spec)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, J.; Cheimets, P.; DeLuca, E.; Golub, L.; Judge, P. G.; Lussier, L.; Madsen, C. A.; Marquez, V.; Tomczyk, S.; Vira, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first science results from the commissioning flight of the Airborne Infrared Spectrometer (AIR-Spec), an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). During the eclipse, AIR-Spec will image five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 microns to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, FWHM, and Doppler shift from an altitude of over 14 km, above local weather and most of the absorbing water vapor. Instrumentation includes an image stabilization system, feed telescope, grating spectrometer, infrared camera, and visible slit-jaw imager. Results from the 2017 eclipse are presented in the context of the mission's science goals. AIR-Spec will identify line strengths as a function of position in the solar corona and search for the high frequency waves that are candidates for heating and acceleration of the solar wind. The instrument will also identify large scale flows in the corona, particularly in polar coronal holes. Three of the five lines are expected to be strong in coronal hole plasmas because they are excited in part by scattered photospheric light. Line profile analysis will probe the origins of the fast and slow solar wind. Finally, the AIR-Spec measurements will complement ground based eclipse observations to provide detailed plasma diagnostics throughout the corona. AIR-Spec will measure infrared emission of ions observed in the visible from the ground, giving insight into plasma heating and acceleration at radial distances inaccessible to existing or planned spectrometers.

  12. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  13. Progress report, Physics and Health Sciences: Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the activities of the Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, and Radiation Biology Branches of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The Reactor Stack Effluent Monitor, which is designed to cover the full range of releases for the main reactor stack at Chalk River, is the subject of a topical review. The GENMOD software has been improved to include a better method of calculating the distribution of particulates in respiratory organs. Development continues on methods of monitoring 147 Pm in urine. Attempts are being made to determine whether the saline waters discharging at 'moose licks' in the Nipigon region come from deep brines characteristic of the Precambrian shield. Trace metals and 90 Sr are being measured in mussel shells to determine whether the shells are suitable recorders of environmental changes. Work continues on the grow-back assay of lymphoblastoid cells to screen for inherited variations in response to genotoxic agents

  14. Progress report, Physics and Health Sciences: Health Sciences Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report reviews the activities of the Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, and Radiation Biology Branches of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Radiation protection and the risk of carcinogenesis is covered in a topical review. A five-year study on the relative biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays in a mammalian tumor system has just been completed. Research in hydrogeology continues, and support is growing for establishing an international facility at Chalk River. A sediment probe was demonstrated in mapping major zones of groundwater and organic solute upwelling on the bottom of Puget Sound. Evidence was found that saline springs in the Nipigon Basin originate in nearby sedimentary rocks and not from Precambrian crystalline formations. The experimental portion of a study on the carcinogenic effects of inhaled uranium ore dust will be carried out for the Atomic Energy Control Board

  15. Data-intensive science

    CERN Document Server

    Critchlow, Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data-intensive science has the potential to transform scientific research and quickly translate scientific progress into complete solutions, policies, and economic success. But this collaborative science is still lacking the effective access and exchange of knowledge among scientists, researchers, and policy makers across a range of disciplines. Bringing together leaders from multiple scientific disciplines, Data-Intensive Science shows how a comprehensive integration of various techniques and technological advances can effectively harness the vast amount of data being generated and significan

  16. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    2013-01-01

    Publication of the "Next Generation Science Standards" will be just short of two decades since publication of the "National Science Education Standards" (NRC 1996). In that time, biology and science education communities have advanced, and the new standards will reflect that progress (NRC 1999, 2007, 2009; Kress and Barrett…

  17. Geothermal progress monitor. Progress report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Progress is reported on the following: electrical uses, direct-heat uses, drilling activities, leases, geothermal loan guarantee program, general activities, and legal, institutional, and regulatory activites. (MHR)

  18. Affective Domain Progression in Single-Sex and Coeducational Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harkirat S.; Salleh, Siti-Zahrani Binti Haji Md

    2018-01-01

    Students who study science in single-sex and coeducational schools have attracted lots of attention from the education community. However, changes to students' attitudes toward science as they progress to higher grades in these schools are not clearly understood. The aim of this study was to compare the changes in attitudes toward science among…

  19. PSI-Center Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, Thomas R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shumlak, Uri [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansen, Chris [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ji, Jeong-Young [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Nelson, Brian [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-04-20

    This is the Final Progress Report of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) covering March 2014 through February 2017. The Center has accomplished a great deal during this period. The PSI-Center is organized into four groups: Edge and Dynamic Neutrals; Transport and Kinetic Effects; Equilibrium, Stability, and Kinetic Effects in 3D Topologies; and Interface for Validation. Each group has made good progress and the results from each group are given in detail.

  20. Current progress in NIF target concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Thoma, D.J.; Jacobson, L.A.; Hollis, R.V.; Barrera, J.; Mitchell, M.A.; Salazar, M.A.; Salzer, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    Target concepts for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require progress in the art and science of target fabrication. Three distinct issues are addressed: beryllium fuel capsules, foam-buffered direct drive, and high-density gas-filled hohlraums. In all cases experiments on the existing Nova laser at LLNL are either in progress or planned for the near future to test the various concepts. Consequently, target fabrication must be able to deliver targets appropriate for each

  1. Science and data science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, David M; Smyth, Padhraic

    2017-08-07

    Data science has attracted a lot of attention, promising to turn vast amounts of data into useful predictions and insights. In this article, we ask why scientists should care about data science. To answer, we discuss data science from three perspectives: statistical, computational, and human. Although each of the three is a critical component of data science, we argue that the effective combination of all three components is the essence of what data science is about.

  2. Scientific progress without increasing verisimilitude: In response to Niiniluoto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowbottom, Darrell P

    2015-06-01

    First, I argue that scientific progress is possible in the absence of increasing verisimilitude in science's theories. Second, I argue that increasing theoretical verisimilitude is not the central, or primary, dimension of scientific progress. Third, I defend my previous argument that unjustified changes in scientific belief may be progressive. Fourth, I illustrate how false beliefs can promote scientific progress in ways that cannot be explicated by appeal to verisimilitude. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An Exploration of Students' Science Learning Interest Related to Their Cognitive Anxiety, Cognitive Load, Self-Confidence and Learning Progress Using Inquiry-Based Learning with an iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2017-01-01

    Based on the cognitive-affective theory, the present study designed a science inquiry learning model, "predict-observe-explain" (POE), and implemented it in an app called "WhyWhy" to examine the effectiveness of students' science inquiry learning practice. To understand how POE can affect the cognitive-affective learning…

  4. THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Trigg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The study defines social science and its specific in contrast with history, psychology and physical sciences. Also it emphasizes the importance of the idea of a 'value-free' science for the social sciences is clear. Social scientists want to be seen to establish 'facts' about society in the same way that they think that a physicist or a chemist uncovers 'facts'. Using the theories of Hempel, Quine, Feyerabend and Kuhn, it addresses a series of questions concening scientific theories, their roles for the scientific explanation and the scientific progress.

  5. IPY Progress and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D.

    2008-12-01

    We can summarize the IPY goals as: (a) make major advances in polar knowledge and understanding; (b) leave a legacy of new or enhanced observational systems, facilities and infrastructure; (c) excite a new generation of polar scientists and engineers, and (d) elicit exceptional interest and participation from polar residents, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide. This talk reports on the progress and prospects in each of those areas from an overall international view; separate talks will describe details of future researcher and the IPY outreach efforts. To achieve major advances in knowledge, IPY has entrained the intellectual resources of thousands of scientists, many more than expected, often from 'non- polar' nations, and representing an unprecedented breadth of scientific specialties; integration of those efforts across disciplines to achieve integrated system-level understanding remains a substantial challenge. Many national and international organizations prepare plans to sustain new and improved observational systems, but clear outcomes and the necessary resources remain elusive. International outreach networks gradually build breadth and strength, largely through IPY Polar Science Days and other internationally- coordinated IPY events. A new Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) devotes talent and energy to shaping the future of polar research. These activities and networks may, with time and with continued international coordination, achieve an exceptional level of interest and participation. In all areas, much work remains.

  6. Paul Feyerabend: Science and the Anarchist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Presents comments on the arguments of Paul Feyerabend toward progression science. The positions held by this philosopher of science are given with accompanying remarks from other philosophers and historians. (SA)

  7. Rural Alaska Science and Mathematics Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brunk, Blanche R

    2005-01-01

    ... and progress in math and science education. The goal of this project was to develop and deliver, both on-site and through distance learning, a comprehensive program of developmental and college preparatory math and science courses at minority...

  8. 1995-1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This progress report is mainly devoted to the scientific activity of the LLB or carried out in collaboration with external laboratories. The activity of the LLB is split in several chapters dealing with: magnetism, superconductivity, structures (including lattice dynamics), phase transitions, C 60 , quasi-crystal systems, disordered systems (amorphous, liquids, crystal solid solutions), biology, soft matter (polymers and colloids), physical metallurgy and materials science. Neutron scattering is the main tool used in all these topics but other techniques are also used such as: polarized neutron reflectivity, cold neutrons diffraction, NMR, synchrotron radiation etc. (J.S.)

  9. Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  10. Science Education: A Case for Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzel, Donat G.

    1971-01-01

    Describes astronomy course used as a medium to provide an understanding of how science progresses and how it relates to society. Illustrations are given of how scientific judgment, importance of basic science, humanistic aspects of science, and the priorities among science are presented. (DS)

  11. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  12. Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cause different symptoms. Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include these difficulties: Comprehending spoken or written ... word meanings Naming objects Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia Symptoms include: Having difficulty retrieving words Frequently pausing ...

  13. The progressive tax

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the argumentative structure of Hayek on the relationship between power to tax and the progressive tax. It is observed throughout its work giving special attention to two works: The Constitution of Liberty (1959) and Law, Legislation and Liberty, vol3; The Political Order of Free People, 1979) Hayek describes one of the arguments most complete information bout SFP progressive tax systems (progressive tax). According to the author the history of the tax progressive system...

  14. Formative science and indicial science: epistemological proposal for information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliany Alvarenga de Araújo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Epistemological reflections on the Information Science as scientific field that if structure in the context of modern science, in theoretical and methodological terms and technologies of the information in applied terms. Such configuration made possible the sprouting of this science; however we consider that the same one will not guarantee to this science the full development as field of consistent and modern knowledge. Modern Science, while scientific practical vision and meets depleted and the information technologies are only auto-regulated mechanisms that function according to principles of automatisms. To leave of these considerations we propols the concept of Formative Science (Bachelard, 1996 and the Indiciario Paradigm (1991 with epistemological basis for the Information Science. The concept of formative science if a base on the principles of tree states of the scientific spirit and the psychological condition of the scientific progress and the indiciario paradigm it considers the intuição (empirical and rational as methodological base to make it scientific.

  15. Using technology to scaffold progressive teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2018-01-01

    An encouraging consensus has arisen in recent decades among researchers and policy organizations in favor of more progressive teaching practices like Inquiry Based Science Education (B. Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2010; Rocard et al., 2007) and Project Based Learning (Krajcik & Shin, 2014; OECD Pub...

  16. Neutron scattering (progress report) January - December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehrer, W.; Fischer, P.; Furrer, A.

    1992-02-01

    Progress made by the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology during the year 1991 in the fields of high-T c superconductors, materials science, magnetism, structural research, lattice dynamics, phase transitions, instrumental and support activities is reported. figs., tabs., refs

  17. Strange science takes time

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The late astronomer Carl Sagan popularized the saying that "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence," in reference to reports of alien visitations. Generating low-cost commercial fusion power, isolating antimatter and tracing reverse-time causality aren't as far out there as UFOs, but a similar rule might well apply: Extraordinary science requires extraordinary effort. With that in mind, here's a progress report on three extraordinary science projects that have popped up in the news...

  18. The Thermochronologist's Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    We owe our current understanding of thermochronology less to a series of revolutionary insights than to a somewhat uneven intellectual pilgrimage that over fifty years has progressed in fits and starts. Though hampered at times by overenthusiasm, oversimplification, and misunderstandings, on balance the field advanced thanks to a blend of curiosity-driven research, tool-building motivated by new ideas about Earth science, and improvements in technology. But now that we've exploited most radiogenic systems and the major minerals that host them, and now that our models can devour CPU time along with the best of them, are we done? Have we reached peak thermochron? The answer of course is no, and papers in this session will demonstrate what new technologies and techniques might have to offer in the coming years. However, I will argue that the discipline as a whole has matured to a point where if thermochronology is to remain a mainstream tool as opposed to a weekend sport, we need to get serious about several challenges. The most fundamental challenge is that current geodynamic models (and even more complex models we can envision coding) have outpaced our meagre stockpile of kinetic calibrations, our understanding of detailed isotope systematics, and our ability to generate data with sufficient throughput. These issues will not be addressed adequately through the business-as-usual approach that brought us to our current knowledge, and some community effort will probably be needed to coordinate the hard work that will be required. But any serious attempt to answer important questions with accurate thermal histories that have low and well-defined uncertainties will require that we actually know the kinetics for the specific samples we are analyzing, that we fully understand scatter in the data, that we work with the large sample numbers that are required for some problems like landscape evolution, and that inversion tools fully explore the important aspects of both the

  19. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB

  20. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB. (ACR)

  1. Information Science: Science or Social Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal; Paul P.K.,; Bhuimali A.

    2017-01-01

    Collection, selection, processing, management, and dissemination of information are the main and ultimate role of Information Science and similar studies such as Information Studies, Information Management, Library Science, and Communication Science and so on. However, Information Science deals with some different characteristics than these subjects. Information Science is most interdisciplinary Science combines with so many knowledge clusters and domains. Information Science is a broad disci...

  2. Nuclear technology: katulong sa pag-unlad ng masa [support for the progress of the masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The topics discussed during the convention is the usefulness of nuclear science and technology in national development and to promote the beneficial uses of nuclear science and technology to support for the progress of the masses

  3. Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Venable, John; Baskerville, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    This workshop is an applied tutorial, aimed at novice and experienced researchers who wish to learn more about Design Science Research (DSR) and/or to develop and progress their own DSR work. During the workshop, attendees will be introduced to various DSR concepts and current trends, to create...

  4. Measurement Science and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunderson, C. Victor

    The need for training and retraining is a central element in current discussions about the economy of the United States. This paper is designed to introduce training practitioners to some new concepts about how measurement science can provide a new framework for assessing progress and can add new discipline to the development, implementation, and…

  5. Between Faith and Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carney, Stephen; Rappleye, Jeremy; Silova, Iveta

    2012-01-01

    World culture theory seeks to explain an apparent convergence of education through a neoinstitutionalist lens, seeing global rationalization in education as driven by the logic of science and the myth of progress. While critics have challenged these assumptions by focusing on local manifestations...

  6. Pakistan strong industrial base urged for economic progress

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A conference organized by Pakistan Nuclear Society urged that Pakistan should develop a strong industrial base and capability to export equipment for economic progress. The chairmen of PAEC pointed out that Pakistan is already showing remarkable progress in export of science-related equipment to CERN. He also asked scientists to wage a war against Pakistans inability to acquire indigenous technology (1 page).

  7. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a disease of the white matter of the brain, caused by a virus infection ...

  8. Indian Academy of Sciences: Home

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Founded in 1934 by Sir C V Raman the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore was registered as a Society on 27 April 1934 with the main objective of promoting the progress and upholding the cause of science. The Academy began functioning with 65 Founding Fellows and the formal inauguration took place at the ...

  9. The Behavioral and Social Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews some recent technical progress in the social sciences and three frontier areas including evolutionary theory as related to sociobiology, the theory of human rational choice, and cognitive science. These areas offer explanations for broad areas of human behavior. (Author/SA)

  10. "Eureka, Eureka!" Discoveries in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pankaj

    2011-01-01

    Accidental discoveries have been of significant value in the progress of science. Although accidental discoveries are more common in pharmacology and chemistry, other branches of science have also benefited from such discoveries. While most discoveries are the result of persistent research, famous accidental discoveries provide a fascinating…

  11. Science of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Santo; Bergstrom, Carl T; Börner, Katy; Evans, James A; Helbing, Dirk; Milojević, Staša; Petersen, Alexander M; Radicchi, Filippo; Sinatra, Roberta; Uzzi, Brian; Vespignani, Alessandro; Waltman, Ludo; Wang, Dashun; Barabási, Albert-László

    2018-03-02

    Identifying fundamental drivers of science and developing predictive models to capture its evolution are instrumental for the design of policies that can improve the scientific enterprise-for example, through enhanced career paths for scientists, better performance evaluation for organizations hosting research, discovery of novel effective funding vehicles, and even identification of promising regions along the scientific frontier. The science of science uses large-scale data on the production of science to search for universal and domain-specific patterns. Here, we review recent developments in this transdisciplinary field. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Scientific progress despite irreproducibility: A seeming paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffrin, Richard M; Börner, Katy; Stigler, Stephen M

    2018-03-13

    It appears paradoxical that science is producing outstanding new results and theories at a rapid rate at the same time that researchers are identifying serious problems in the practice of science that cause many reports to be irreproducible and invalid. Certainly, the practice of science needs to be improved, and scientists are now pursuing this goal. However, in this perspective, we argue that this seeming paradox is not new, has always been part of the way science works, and likely will remain so. We first introduce the paradox. We then review a wide range of challenges that appear to make scientific success difficult. Next, we describe the factors that make science work-in the past, present, and presumably also in the future. We then suggest that remedies for the present practice of science need to be applied selectively so as not to slow progress and illustrate with a few examples. We conclude with arguments that communication of science needs to emphasize not just problems but the enormous successes and benefits that science has brought and is now bringing to all elements of modern society.

  13. Progress in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is now the biggest challenge before atomic science, not only because of the exceedingly difficult nature of the problem but also because of the virtually limitless benefit that, it is expected, will eventually flow from its solution. It might be pointed out that if some of the early optimism is now inevitably moderated, that is only because there is now a better understanding of the difficulties and, consequently, of the basic scientific and technical problems. The basic problem, as is now widely known, is to heat heavy hydrogen gas to a temperature at which the nuclei will fuse by moving so fast as to overcome their mutual electrical repulsion, and simultaneously to keep the gas in a state of extreme density so that the nuclei may collide against each other, fuse, release-energy in the form of heat, and thus set in a kind of thermal chain reaction. The temperature required is of a fantastically high order, but the scientists are confident that it can be obtained by fantastically powerful electrical discharges. More difficult seems to be the task of making the superheated gas, or the plasma as it is called when completely ionized, to behave obligingly. It must remain in a state of extreme density even when it is heated to a temperature of many millions of degrees. As a matter of fact, it must be contained, so to speak, by itself; it must not touch the walls of its material container and thereby lose some of its heat and, on top of that, evaporate the container. The pinch effect produces a kind of magnetic bottle for containing the plasma, but the trouble seems to be that it is difficult to make the bottle stable and leak-proof. The next task will be to ensure that the output of energy from this fusion is greater than the input of energy to heat the plasma. Intensive research and experiment on these problems have been going on in several countries, notably in the UK, the USA, and the USSR. In all the countries most advanced in

  14. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; de Berg, M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; ten Brink, Alex P.; Buchin, K.A.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  15. Progressive geometric algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alewijnse, S.P.A.; Bagautdinov, T.M.; Berg, de M.T.; Bouts, Q.W.; Brink, ten A.P.; Buchin, K.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive algorithms are algorithms that, on the way to computing a complete solution to the problem at hand, output intermediate solutions that approximate the complete solution increasingly well. We present a framework for analyzing such algorithms, and develop efficient progressive algorithms

  16. Science Smiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Science Smiles. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 4 April 1996 pp 4-4 Science Smiles. Chief Editor's column / Science Smiles · R K Laxman · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 3-3 Science Smiles.

  17. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    10 cohorts. To assess the relative contribution of genetic factors to progression of WML, we compared in 7 cohorts risk models including demographics, vascular risk factors plus single-nucleotide polymorphisms that have been shown to be associated cross-sectionally with WML in the current......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants...... associated with WML progression in elderly participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium. METHODS: Heritability of WML progression was calculated in the Framingham Heart Study. The genome-wide association study included 7773 elderly participants from...

  18. Science or Science Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefsrud, Lianne M.; Meyer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the framings and identity work associated with professionals’ discursive construction of climate change science, their legitimation of themselves as experts on ‘the truth’, and their attitudes towards regulatory measures. Drawing from survey responses of 1077 professional......, legitimation strategies, and use of emotionality and metaphor. By linking notions of the science or science fiction of climate change to the assessment of the adequacy of global and local policies and of potential organizational responses, we contribute to the understanding of ‘defensive institutional work...

  19. World progress toward fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1989-09-01

    This paper will describe the progress in fusion science and technology from a world perspective. The paper will cover the current technical status, including the understanding of fusion's economic, environmental, and safety characteristics. Fusion experiments are approaching the energy breakeven condition. An energy gain (Q) of 30 percent has been achieved in magnetic confinement experiments. In addition, temperatures required for an ignited plasma (Ti = 32 KeV) and energy confinements about 75 percent of that required for ignition have been achieved in separate experiments. Two major facilities have started the experimental campaign to extend these results and achieve or exceed Q = 1 plasma conditions by 1990. Inertial confinement fusion experiments are also approaching thermonuclear conditions and have achieved a compression factor 100-200 times liquid D-T. Because of this progress, the emphasis in fusion research is turning toward questions of engineering feasibility. Leaders of the major fusion R and D programs in the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have agreed on the major steps that are needed to reach the point at which a practical fusion system can be designed. The United States is preparing for an experiment to address the last unexplored scientific issue, the physics of an ignited plasma, during the late 1990's. The EC, Japan, U.S.S.R., and the United States have joined together under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to jointly design and prepare the validating R and D for an international facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to address all the remaining scientific issues and to explore the engineering technology of fusion around the turn of the century. In addition, a network of international agreements have been concluded between these major parties and a number of smaller fusion programs, to cooperate on resolving a complete spectrum of fusion science and

  20. Progress test utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vleuten, Cees; Freeman, Adrian; Collares, Carlos Fernando

    2018-04-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of progress testing. A utopia is described where medical schools would work together to develop and administer progress testing. This would lead to a significant reduction of cost, an increase in the quality of measurement and phenomenal feedback to learner and school. Progress testing would also provide more freedom and resources for more creative in-school assessment. It would be an educationally attractive alternative for the creation of cognitive licensing exams. A utopia is always far away in the future, but by formulating a vision for that future we may engage in discussions on how to get there.

  1. Waste management progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    During the Cold War era, when DOE and its predecessor agencies produced nuclear weapons and components, and conducted nuclear research, a variety of wastes were generated (both radioactive and hazardous). DOE now has the task of managing these wastes so that they are not a threat to human health and the environment. This document is the Waste Management Progress Report for the U.S. Department of Energy dated June 1997. This progress report contains a radioactive and hazardous waste inventory and waste management program mission, a section describing progress toward mission completion, mid-year 1997 accomplishments, and the future outlook for waste management

  2. Progress in high gain inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingwen

    2001-01-01

    The author reviews the progress in laboratory high gain inertial confinement fusion (ICF), including ICF capsule physics, high-energy-density science, inertial fusion energy, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its design of ignition targets and the peta watt laser breakthrough. High power laser, particle beam, and pulsed power facilities around the world have established the new laboratory field of high-energy- density plasma physics and have furthered development of inertial fusion. New capabilities such as those provided by high-brightness peta watt lasers have enabled the study of matter feasible in conditions previously unachievable on earth. Science and technology developed in inertial fusion research have found near-term commercial use and have enabled steady progress toward the goal of fusion ignition and high gain in the laboratory, and have opened up new fields of study for the 21 st century

  3. Progressive Finland sees progress with nuclear projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The Finnish Hanhikivi-1 reactor project is firmly on track and a licence has been granted for construction of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel - the first final repository in the world to enter the construction phase. Significant progress has been made with plans for Finland to build its sixth nuclear reactor unit at Hanhikivi. Fennovoima's licensing manager Janne Liuko said the company expects to receive the construction licence for the Generation III+ Hanhikivi-1 plant in late 2017. The application was submitted to the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy in June 2015.

  4. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now The Progression of Liver ...

  5. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  6. Progress report for '89

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podest, M.

    1990-08-01

    The 1989 Progress Report presents the most important scientific and technical achievements of the Nuclear Research Institute's research work. Some specialized products prepared at or fabricated by the NRI are mentioned as well. (author). 24 figs., 8 tabs., 101 refs

  7. Progress report, Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    This report reviews events and progress in the following areas: development of the TASCC facility; experimental and theoretical nuclear physics research; radionuclide standardization; condensed matter research; applied mathematics; and computer facility operation

  8. Progress for the Paralyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contents Latest Advances Help People Regain Function and Independence Founded in 2000, the National Institute for Biomedical ... More "NIBIB Robotics" Articles Progress for the Paralyzed / College Athlete Stands Again…On His Own! / Coffee to ...

  9. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress report on the meetings and working groups of DAF in 1979, e.g. engineering and industry, public and press, law and administration, business and industry, international cooperation in Europe and with the USA. (GL) [de

  10. Progress report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This progress report of the nuclear physics institute includes five basic subjects: theoretical physics, high energy and intermediate energy physics, nuclear physics, combined research physics and instrumentation (microelectronics, imaging, multidetectors, scintillators,...) [fr

  11. Science and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    2001-10-01

    Science and art diverge in that art usually represents a single individual's conception and viewpoint, even when many others are involved in bringing a work to fruition, whereas science progresses by extending consensus among those knowledgeable in a field. Art usually communicates at an emotional level. It values individual expression and impact on the emotions at the expense of objectivity. Science, especially in its archival record, values objectivity and reproducibility and does not express the imagination and joy of discovery inherent in its practice. This is too bad, because it does not give a realistic picture of how science is really done and because individuality and emotion are inherently more interesting than consensus. Leaving out the personal, emotional side can make science seem boring and pedestrian, when exactly the opposite is true. In teaching science we need to remember that communication always benefits from imagination and esthetic sense. If we present science artistically and imaginatively, as well as objectively and precisely, students will develop a more complete understanding of what science and scientists are about--one that is likely to capture their imaginations, emotions, and best efforts.

  12. Evolutionary Game Theory Analysis of Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory applied to two interacting cell populations can yield quantitative prediction of the future densities of the two cell populations based on the initial interaction terms. We will discuss how in a complex ecology that evolutionary game theory successfully predicts the future densities of strains of stromal and cancer cells (multiple myeloma), and discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

  13. Modeling Progress in AI

    OpenAIRE

    Brundage, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Participants in recent discussions of AI-related issues ranging from intelligence explosion to technological unemployment have made diverse claims about the nature, pace, and drivers of progress in AI. However, these theories are rarely specified in enough detail to enable systematic evaluation of their assumptions or to extrapolate progress quantitatively, as is often done with some success in other technological domains. After reviewing relevant literatures and justifying the need for more ...

  14. [Progressive visual agnosia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Futamura, Akinori; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-10-01

    Progressive visual agnosia was discovered in the 20th century following the discovery of classical non-progressive visual agnosia. In contrast to the classical type, which is caused by cerebral vascular disease or traumatic injury, progressive visual agnosia is a symptom of neurological degeneration. The condition of progressive visual loss, including visual agnosia, and posterior cerebral atrophy was named posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) by Benson et al. (1988). Progressive visual agnosia is also observed in semantic dementia (SD) and other degenerative diseases, but there is a difference in the subtype of visual agnosia associated with these diseases. Lissauer (1890) classified visual agnosia into apperceptive and associative types, and it in most cases, PCA is associated with the apperceptive type. However, SD patients exhibit symptoms of associative visual agnosia before changing to those of semantic memory disorder. Insights into progressive visual agnosia have helped us understand the visual system and discover how we "perceive" the outer world neuronally, with regard to consciousness. Although PCA is a type of atypical dementia, its diagnosis is important to enable patients to live better lives with appropriate functional support.

  15. Progress and prospects for indirect drive ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindl, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    During the past few years, a great deal of progress has been made toward demonstrating the requirements for ignition and high gain ICF targets. Because of this progress, the 1990 National Academy of Science (NAS) and Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC) reviews recommended that the US National ICF Program focus on the physics of ignition. Subject to successful completion of a series of experiments to be carried out on the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), these reviews advocated construction of a 1 to 2 MJ glass laser, whose purpose would be demonstration of ignition and modest-gain ICF targets within about a decade. The LLNL proposal for this National Ignition Facility, which was endorsed by the NAS and FPAC as the most timely and cost effective path to this goal, is referred to as the ''Nova Upgrade.'' This paper reviews recent progress on the Nova laser and the performance expected with the Nova Upgrade

  16. Scientific instruments, scientific progress and the cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, David; Faust, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Philosophers speak of science in terms of theory and experiment, yet when they speak of the progress of scientific knowledge they speak in terms of theory alone. In this article it is claimed that scientific knowledge consists of, among other things, scientific instruments and instrumental techniques and not simply of some kind of justified beliefs. It is argued that one aspect of scientific progress can be characterized relatively straightforwardly - the accumulation of new scientific instruments. The development of the cyclotron is taken to illustrate this point. Eight different activities which promoted the successful completion of the cyclotron are recognised. The importance is in the machine rather than the experiments which could be run on it and the focus is on how the cyclotron came into being, not how it was subsequently used. The completed instrument is seen as a useful unit of scientific progress in its own right. (UK)

  17. Let s make progress together!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriana, Mazare; Liliana, Gheorghian

    2015-04-01

    Let's make progress together! The "Theodor Balan" Secondary School in the urban area of Suceava County in northeastern Romania is involved in several different projects. In order to extend previous successful projects with the students, parents, teachers, businesses and local government representatives in science symposiums for civic projects within the concept of sustainable development, the school is continuing to develop various successful programs. "The battle" continues both in nature and in the classrooms, in order to preserve the environment and to discover new resources. To raise awareness about the importance of existing resources even at the level of individuals there is a constant concern for keeping up to date on what already exists and is well known, but at the same time to remove "barriers" and discover new horizons and resources. Scientific activities held in our school are an effective way to educate students and the community to which they belong. In our community, we discovered sources of drinking water polluted by nitrites from fertilizers used in agriculture. In order to inform and educate people in the area, our teachers have organized several educational activities. Its purpose was: -Knowledge of the importance of water for the environment and human health. -Reducing water pollution. Students have informed their families' about sustainable development acquired at school. In this way, the school manages to educate and change people's ideas. The ways and methods of adults' learning were practiced within a Grundtvig training course "It's never too late learning to learn" in February 2014, in Florence, Italy. The GIFT 2014 was a great occasion for the teachers and students, the county's educational department and the participants at the National Colloquia of Physics to discover new materials provided at the Conference and the latest news and topics in the world of science. The theme trips at the physics laboratories of "Alexandru Ioan Cuza

  18. Primary Science Interview: Science Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In this "Primary Science" interview, Lynne Bianchi talks with Emma Vanstone about "Science Sparks," which is a website full of creative, fun, and exciting science activity ideas for children of primary-school age. "Science Sparks" started with the aim of inspiring more parents to do science at home with their…

  19. Progress at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelakker, K.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses project experiments done at Lampf under the following topics: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects; radioisotope production; and theory

  20. Progress at LAMPF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelakker, K.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses project experiments done at Lampf under the following topics: nuclear and particle physics; astrophysics; atomic and molecular physics; materials science; nuclear chemistry; radiation effects; radioisotope production; and theory.

  1. Science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chorafas, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to explore science and technology from the viewpoint of creating new knowledge, as opposed to the reinterpretation of existing knowledge in ever greater but uncertain detail. Scientists and technologists make progress by distinguishing between what they regard as meaningful and what they consider as secondary or unimportant. The meaningful is dynamic; typically, the less important is static. Science and technology have made a major contribution to the culture and to the standard of living of our society. From antiquity to the present day, the most distinguished scientis

  2. Communicating Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas

    2009-10-01

    Introduction: what this book is about and why you might want to read it; Prologue: three orphans share a common paternity: professional science communication, popular journalism, and literary fiction are not as separate as they seem; Part I. Professional Science Communication: 1. Spreading the word: the endless struggle to publish professional science; 2. Walk like an Egyptian: the alien feeling of professional science writing; 3. The future's bright? Professional science communication in the age of the internet; 4. Counting the horse's teeth: professional standards in science's barter economy; 5. Separating the wheat from the chaff: peer review on trial; Part II. Science for the Public: What Science Do People Need and How Might They Get It?: 6. The Public Understanding of Science (PUS) movement and its problems; 7. Public engagement with science and technology (PEST): fine principle, difficult practice; 8. Citizen scientists? Democratic input into science policy; 9. Teaching and learning science in schools: implications for popular science communication; Part III. Popular Science Communication: The Press and Broadcasting: 10. What every scientist should know about mass media; 11. What every scientist should know about journalists; 12. The influence of new media; 13. How the media represents science; 14. How should science journalists behave?; Part IV. The Origins of Science in Cultural Context: Five Historic Dramas: 15. A terrible storm in Wittenberg: natural knowledge through sorcery and evil; 16. A terrible storm in the Mediterranean: controlling nature with white magic and religion; 17. Thieving magpies: the subtle art of false projecting; 18. Foolish virtuosi: natural philosophy emerges as a distinct discipline but many cannot take it seriously; 19. Is scientific knowledge 'true' or should it just be 'truthfully' deployed?; Part V. Science in Literature: 20. Science and the Gothic: the three big nineteenth-century monster stories; 21. Science fiction: serious

  3. Advanced in Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Neil; Park, James; CSA 2013

    2014-01-01

    The theme of CSA is focused on the various aspects of computer science and its applications for advances in computer science and its applications and provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of computer science and its applications. Therefore this book will be include the various theories and practical applications in computer science and its applications.

  4. Value of Fundamental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Alexey

    Fundamental science is a hard, long-term human adventure that has required high devotion and social support, especially significant in our epoch of Mega-science. The measure of this devotion and this support expresses the real value of the fundamental science in public opinion. Why does fundamental science have value? What determines its strength and what endangers it? The dominant answer is that the value of science arises out of curiosity and is supported by the technological progress. Is this really a good, astute answer? When trying to attract public support, we talk about the ``mystery of the universe''. Why do these words sound so attractive? What is implied by and what is incompatible with them? More than two centuries ago, Immanuel Kant asserted an inseparable entanglement between ethics and metaphysics. Thus, we may ask: which metaphysics supports the value of scientific cognition, and which does not? Should we continue to neglect the dependence of value of pure science on metaphysics? If not, how can this issue be addressed in the public outreach? Is the public alienated by one or another message coming from the face of science? What does it mean to be politically correct in this sort of discussion?

  5. Physicians’ Progress Notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bansler, Jørgen; Havn, Erling C.; Mønsted, Troels

    2013-01-01

    in patient care, they have not dealt specifically with the role, structure, and content of the progress notes. As a consequence, CSCW research has not yet taken fully into account the fact that progress notes are coordinative artifacts of a rather special kind, an open-ended chain of prose texts, written...... sequentially by cooperating physicians for their own use as well as for that of their colleagues. We argue that progress notes are the core of the medical record, in that they marshal and summarize the overwhelming amount of data that is available in the modern hospital environment, and that their narrative...... format is uniquely adequate for the pivotal epistemic aspect of cooperative clinical work: the narrative format enables physicians to not only record ‘facts’ but also—by filtering, interpreting, organizing, and qualifying information—to make sense and act concertedly under conditions of uncertainty...

  6. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  7. Progress in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hempelmann, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of recent ""Review Articles"" published in the ""Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie"". The second volume of Progress in Physical Chemistry is a collection of thematically closely related minireview articles written by the members of the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 277 of the German Research Foundation (DFG). These articles are based on twelve years of intense coordinated research efforts. Central topics are the synthesis and the characterization of interface-dominated, i.e. nanostructured materials, mainly in the solid state but also as

  8. Annual progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a brief description of the progress made in each section of the Institut. Research activities of the Protection department include, radiation effects on man, radioecology and environment radioprotection techniques. Research activities of the Nuclear Safety department include, reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities safety analysis, safety research programs. The third section deals with nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport and monitoring of nuclear material management [fr

  9. 1985. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This annual progress report of the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut outlines a description of the progress made in each sections of the Institut Research activities of the different departments include: reactor safety analysis, fuel cycle facilities analysis; and associated safety research programs (criticality, sites, transport ...), radioecology and environmental radioprotection techniques; data acquisition on radioactive waste storage sites; radiation effects on man, studies on radioprotection techniques; nuclear material security including security of facilities, security of nuclear material transport, and monitoring of nuclear material management; nuclear facility decommissioning; and finally the public information [fr

  10. Mundos utópicos y distópicos: el progreso y la ciencia como síntomas modernos en el cine mexicano de ciencias ficción / Utopian and Dystopian Worlds: Science and Progress as Modern Symptoms in Mexican Sci-Fi Films (2002-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro González Garza

    2016-08-01

    of proposing possible worlds – in the future or as a possible parallel life – is the key to analyze the dangers and desires that the Mexican society in particular foresees about its own historical future. Through the characterization of the stories, we extract a typology that distinguishes two different kinds of science fiction: hardcore and softcore stories. The text focuses on the hardcore films, which develop a whole narrative world linked to science, progress, or a better future as the main argument of the movie, and by doing so, we trace the prints of modernity and of universal discourses still present in Mexican national project, visible in its filmography. These stories are efforts to suture the crisis of progress in the contemporary era. This approach sets the possibility to interpret the Mexican postmodernity as a modern reinvention, integrated, conciliatory with the past. This paper is an analysis based in three axis: the social and historical context of Mexican modernity; the relation between the sci-fi genre and reality; and, finally, the themes that films recover to reveal us what are our worries and concerns.Keywords: science fiction, Mexican cinema, modernity, postmodernity, futuristic story, myth, progress, science, hardcore sci-fi, film genre

  11. MAP Science for Use with Next Generation Science Standards. NWEA External FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) Science for use with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) assessments are available for the 2016-17 school year. These new assessments measure student growth toward understanding of the multidimensional NGSS performance expectations. This report presents MAP Science for use with NGSS by presenting and…

  12. New concepts of science and medicine in science and technology studies and their relevance to science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Yun Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Science education often adopts a narrow view of science that assumes the lay public is ignorant, which seemingly justifies a science education limited to a promotional narrative of progress in the form of scientific knowledge void of meaningful social context. We propose that to prepare students as future concerned citizens of a technoscientific society, science education should be informed by science, technology, and society (STS perspectives. An STS-informed science education, in our view, will include the following curricular elements: science controversy education, gender issues, historical perspective, and a move away from a Eurocentric view by looking into the distinctive patterns of other regional (in this case of Taiwan, East Asian approaches to science, technology, and medicine. This article outlines the significance of some major STS studies as a means of illustrating the ways in which STS perspectives can, if incorporated into science education, enhance our understanding of science and technology and their relationships with society.

  13. Evaluation Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2018-01-01

    Culturally and politically science is under attack. The core consequence of perceiving and asserting evaluation as science is that it enhances our credibility and effectiveness in supporting the importance of science in our world and brings us together with other scientists to make common cause in supporting and advocating for science. Other…

  14. Science/s.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Tricoire

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Un forum a été organisé en mars par la Commission européenne. Il s’appelait « Science in Society ». Depuis 2000 la Commission a mis en place un Plan d’Action élaboré pour que soit promue « la science » au sein du public, afin que les citoyens prennent de bonnes décisions, des décisions informées. Il s’agit donc de développer la réflexivité au sein de la société, pour que cette dernière agisse avec discernement dans un monde qu’elle travaille à rendre durable. ...

  15. BARC progress report - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  16. BARC progress report - 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1999-04-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  17. Internationalisering og progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne; Tange, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    means that programs can attract students from outside Denmark, and these students often come from different academic backgrounds. To investigate how these changes are affecting the way professors who teach on interdisciplinary international masters programs conceive student progress, we carried out semi...

  18. Progress report of CJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the progress report of the Russian Nuclear Data Center at F.E.I., Obninsk. Evaluations have been made for dosimetry reactions and neutron reactions. Analysis of the spectra and the production cross sections were made. (a.n.)

  19. Progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, H.

    1983-01-01

    This progress report describes the scientific work and research results done by the institute for experimental physics, atom and nuclear physics of the Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet Linz in the period of 1982. The covered subject areas are ionization by cations, investigations of surface areas by light ions, measurement of stopping power in solids, data acquisition and aerosol physics. (A.N.)

  20. Recent progress in Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bemski, G.

    1980-03-01

    Recent progress in biophysics is reviewed, and three examples of the use of physical techniques and ideas in biological research are given. The first one deals with the oxygen transporting protein-hemoglobin, the second one with photosynthesis, and the third one with image formation, using nuclear magnetic resonance. (Author) [pt

  1. MCNP Progress & Performance Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bull, Jeffrey S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rising, Michael Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Twenty-eight slides give information about the work of the US DOE/NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program on MCNP6 under the following headings: MCNP6.1.1 Release, with ENDF/B-VII.1; Verification/Validation; User Support & Training; Performance Improvements; and Work in Progress. Whisper methodology will be incorporated into the code, and run speed should be increased.

  2. Scales of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Lee Ann

    2018-01-01

    What is Goal Attainment Scaling? In this article, Lee Ann Jung defines it as a way to measure a student's progress toward an individualized goal. Instead of measuring a skill at a set time (for instance, on a test or other assignment), Goal Attainment Scaling tracks the steps a student takes over the course of a year in a targeted skill. Together,…

  3. Progressive Retirement Programme

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Following the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 2 December 2008, please note that the Progressive Retirement Programme has been extended by one year, i.e. until 31 March 2010. Further information is available on : https://hr-services.web.cern.ch/hr-services/services-Ben/prp/prp.asp HR Department, tel. 73903

  4. Progress Report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document is the 1994 annual progress report of the CEA-Direction of Waste Management (DGD). It comprises four chapters. The first chapter is a general presentation of radioactive wastes, of the management of liquid effluents, solid wastes, sealed sources, of the relations with the ANDRA (The French Agency for the Management of Radioactive Wastes), and of the research and development studies in progress for the improvement of waste management. The second chapter concerns the spent fuels and their reprocessing, in particular AGR and PWR type reactor fuels, the ''Caramel'' fuel from Osiris reactor and the cover elements from the Rapsodie reactor core. The long time storage of ancient fuels is also discussed. The third chapter concerns the dismantling of decommissioned installations, the actions in progress and the planning of dismantling actions up to the year 2000. Chapter four is devoted to the management of wastes from the Direction of Military Applications (DAM), the actions in progress in the different DAM centers and the cleansing projects at Marcoule plant. (J.S.). 5 figs., 28 tabs., 21 photos., 3 appendix

  5. Progress in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Emil

    2015-01-01

    The Progress in Optics series contains more than 300 review articles by distinguished research workers, which have become permanent records for many important developments, helping optical scientists and optical engineers stay abreast of their fields. Comprehensive, in-depth reviewsEdited by the leading authority in the field

  6. Progress in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.; Storm, E.

    1985-10-01

    The requirements for high gain in inertial confinement are given in terms of target implosion requirements. Results of experimental studies of the laser/target interaction and of the dynamics of laser implosion. A report of the progress of advanced laser development is also presented. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Progress report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving a brief description of operations of an improvements to the University of Alberta nuclear physics facilities, this report summarizes the principal research programs. These include work on neutron scattering, thorium 232 fission, iodine 123 production. Progress towards the construction of MARIA, the Medical Accelerator Research Institute in Alberta, is described, and research on relativistic heavy ions is summarized

  8. BARC progress report - 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyane, V L [comp.; Library and Information Services Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author) figs., tabs.

  9. BARC progress report - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, V.L.

    1998-07-01

    This report is a compilation of the progress in various major activities and Research and Development programmes of the different Divisions of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai. The list of publications and papers presented at the various conferences, symposia, workshops and papers published in journal by the staff members of the Divisions are also given. (author)

  10. Response: Progress Takes Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rist, Marilee C.

    1984-01-01

    Although declining enrollment and administrative seniority have hampered efforts to eliminate sex discrimination in employment practices in three Long Island, New York, school systems (Commack, Smithtown, and Bay Shore), progress is being made. Because of the Reagan administration's lack of support for affirmative action, however, litigation…

  11. Progressive Web applications

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Progressive Web Applications are native-like applications running inside of a browser context. In my presentation I would like describe their characteristics, benchmarks and building process using a quick and simple case study example with focus on Service Workers api.

  12. "Paideia," Progress, Puzzlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrachovec, Herbert

    2018-01-01

    Platonic "paideia" is a mainstream concept in traditional philosophy and humanistic circles generally. It is closely connected with social progress brought about by the dynamics of enlightenment and self-fulfillment, symbolized by the allegory of the cave. The main contention of this paper is that the philosophical grammar of this simile…

  13. Are Forecast Updates Progressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMacro-economic forecasts typically involve both a model component, which is replicable, as well as intuition, which is non-replicable. Intuition is expert knowledge possessed by a forecaster. If forecast updates are progressive, forecast updates should become more accurate, on average,

  14. Progress report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This progress report deals with service oriented work performed at the AAEC Research Establishment in the twelve month period ending September 30, 1979. Services provided by the Engineering Services Division, the Safety Department, Site Information Services Department and Commercial Applications are described

  15. Progression og underviserkompetencer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Tortzen Bager

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available På baggrund af en kvalitativ interviewundersøgelse af undervisere ved Aarhus Universitet lavet i 2012, tematiserer artiklen, hvordan undervisere udvikler deres faglige og pædagogiske kompetencer i forhold til at kunne skabe progression inden for innovation og entreprenørskab forstået enten som didaktik, arbejdsformer i faglige forløb eller som fag på universitetet. I arbejdet med progression er det en udfordring at integrere de nye faglige dimensioner i det kernefaglige felt. Den seneste model for progression inden for innovation og entreprenør-skab siger, at det er den lærendes generelle erfaringsniveau, der er den afgørende progressionsskabende faktor (Progressionsmodellen, Fonden for Entreprenørskab, 2013b. Samtidig skelner international forskning inden for studiekompetenceområdet mellem niveauer, hvor indlejret viden er det mest avancerede kompetenceniveau (Barrie, 2002.Ifølge progressionsmodellen og den nævnte kompetenceforskning er erfaring og dybt integreret læring altså centrale dimensioner i progression. Men hvad er underviserens rolle heri? Underviserens professionelle udviklingsarbejde forekommer at være underbelyst i forhold til, at underviseren er den legitime garant for integrationen af nye faglige dimensioner og for den studerendes kompetenceniveau. Interviewundersøgelsen forholder sig til spørgsmålet om progression gennem de deltagende underviseres beskrivelse af betydningslag i entreprenørskabsbegrebet koblet til de praksisformer i undervisningen, der knytter sig hertil samt et indblik i undervisernes refleksioner over deres kompetenceudviklingsprocesser. Artiklens bidrag til progression er at se underviserens motivation og kompetenceudvikling som forudsætninger herfor.     Based on a qualitative study of five teachers in the Faculty of Arts at Aarhus University that took place during 2012, the article thematizes how teachers develop their professional and educational qualifications in innovation and

  16. Progress in nanotechnology for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, V; Vittorio, O; Riggio, C; Cuschieri, A

    2010-06-01

    This review based on the Wickham lecture given by AC at the 2009 SMIT meeting in Sinaia outlines the progress made in nano-technology for healthcare. It describes in brief the nature of nano-materials and their unique properties which accounts for the significant research both in scientific institutions and industry for translation into new therapies embodied in the emerging field of nano-medicine. It stresses that the potential of nano-medicine to make significant inroads for more effective therapies both for life-threatening and life-disabling disorders will only be achieved by high-quality life science research. The first generation of passive nano-diagnostics based on nanoparticle contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging is well established in clinical practice and new such contrast agents are undergoing early clinical evaluation. Likewise active (second generation) nano-therapies, exemplified by targeted control drug release systems are undergoing early clinical evaluation. The situation concerning other nano-materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is less advanced although considerable progress has been made on their coating for aqueous dispersion and functionalisation to enable carriage of drugs, genes and fluorescent markers. The main problem related to the clinical use of these nanotubes is that there is no consent among scientists on the fate of such nano-materials following injection or implantation in humans. Provided carbon nanotubes are manufactured to certain medical criteria (length around 1 mum, purity of 97-99% and low Fe content) they exhibit no cytotoxicity on cell cultures and demonstrate full bio-compatibility on in vivo animal studies. The results of recent experimental studies have demonstrated the potential of technologies based on CNTs for low voltage wireless electro-chemotherapy of tumours and for electro-stimulation therapies for cardiac, neurodegenerative and skeletal and visceral muscle

  17. Progress Report 2004-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) as a part of University of Zagreb, has its roots in the Technical Faculty Zagreb, founded in 1919, which evolved into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1956 and was upgraded into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing in 1994. Due to the increasing progress and advances in electrical and electronic engineering as well as in computer science and information technologies, the Faculty has become the largest technical faculty and the leading educational and R and D institution in the fields of electrical engineering and computing in Croatia. More than 13000 graduate students, more than 1900 postgraduate students who received the Master degree and more than 540 students with PhD degree, are today's total numbers, which highlights our highly spirited activities in teaching. Additional to this number are also 3800 undergraduate students as well as about 500 graduates each year. Organised in 11 departments, the present educational staff comprises 130 professors and 200 teaching assistants and researchers operating in more than 60 laboratories and area of more than 35000 m{sup 2}. Education and research is the crucial factor determining the economic and social progress and equality of opportunity in our societies. It becomes even more so in the digital age in order to ensure life-long-learning and the emergence of new generations of creators, researchers and entrepreneurs and to empower playing an active role in the knowledge society. The experiences at the university level should be transferred to the others. We can help to do that, as a chain the global challenge. The Faculty offers a broad spectrum of services to business and industry, from research and consultancy to conference facilities, training and postgraduate recruitment. The Faculty is a leading research-led institution and undertakes research at the highest levels of international standing. The Faculty is an integral part of the

  18. Progress Report 2004-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) as a part of University of Zagreb, has its roots in the Technical Faculty Zagreb, founded in 1919, which evolved into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in 1956 and was upgraded into the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing in 1994. Due to the increasing progress and advances in electrical and electronic engineering as well as in computer science and information technologies, the Faculty has become the largest technical faculty and the leading educational and R and D institution in the fields of electrical engineering and computing in Croatia. More than 13000 graduate students, more than 1900 postgraduate students who received the Master degree and more than 540 students with PhD degree, are today's total numbers, which highlights our highly spirited activities in teaching. Additional to this number are also 3800 undergraduate students as well as about 500 graduates each year. Organised in 11 departments, the present educational staff comprises 130 professors and 200 teaching assistants and researchers operating in more than 60 laboratories and area of more than 35000 m 2 . Education and research is the crucial factor determining the economic and social progress and equality of opportunity in our societies. It becomes even more so in the digital age in order to ensure life-long-learning and the emergence of new generations of creators, researchers and entrepreneurs and to empower playing an active role in the knowledge society. The experiences at the university level should be transferred to the others. We can help to do that, as a chain the global challenge. The Faculty offers a broad spectrum of services to business and industry, from research and consultancy to conference facilities, training and postgraduate recruitment. The Faculty is a leading research-led institution and undertakes research at the highest levels of international standing. The Faculty is an integral part of the community

  19. Evaluation of keratoconus progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajari, Mehdi; Steinwender, Gernot; Herrmann, Kim; Kubiak, Kate Barbara; Pavlovic, Ivana; Plawetzki, Elena; Schmack, Ingo; Kohnen, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    To define variables for the evaluation of keratoconus progression and to determine cut-off values. In this retrospective cohort study (2010-2016), 265 eyes of 165 patients diagnosed with keratoconus underwent two Scheimpflug measurements (Pentacam) that took place 1 year apart ±3 months. Variables used for keratoconus detection were evaluated for progression and a correlation analysis was performed. By logistic regression analysis, a keratoconus progression index (KPI) was defined. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed and Youden Index calculated to determine cut-off values. Variables used for keratoconus detection showed a weak correlation with each other (eg, correlation r=0.245 between RPImin and Kmax, pKPI). KPI was defined by logistic regression and consisted of a Pachymin coefficient of -0.78 (p=0.001), a maximum elevation of back surface coefficient of 0.27 and coefficient of corneal curvature at the zone 3 mm away from the thinnest point on the posterior corneal surface of -12.44 (both pKPI: D-index had a cut-off of 0.4175 (70.6% sensitivity) and Youden Index of 0.606. Cut-off for KPI was -0.78196 (84.7% sensitivity) and a Youden Index of 0.747; both 90% specificity. Keratoconus progression should be defined by evaluating parameters that consider several corneal changes; we suggest D-index and KPI to detect progression. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Approaches to translational plant science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin; Christensen, Brian; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    is lessened. In our opinion, implementation of translational plant science is a necessity in order to solve the agricultural challenges of producing food and materials in the future. We suggest an approach to translational plant science forcing scientists to think beyond their own area and to consider higher......Translational science deals with the dilemma between basic research and the practical application of scientific results. In translational plant science, focus is on the relationship between agricultural crop production and basic science in various research fields, but primarily in the basic plant...... science. Scientific and technological developments have allowed great progress in our understanding of plant genetics and molecular physiology, with potentials for improving agricultural production. However, this development has led to a separation of the laboratory-based research from the crop production...

  1. Science team participation in the ARM program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cess, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    This progress report discusses the Science Team participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program for the period of October 31, 1992 to November 1, 1993. This report summarized the research accomplishments of six papers

  2. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  3. Modern Romanian Library Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Tîrziman

    2015-01-01

    Library and Information Science celebrates 25 years of modern existence. An analysis of this period shows a permanent modernisation of this subject and its synchronisation with European realities at both teaching and research levels. The evolution of this subject is determined by the dynamics of the field, the quick evolution of the information and documenting trades in close relationship with science progress and information technologies. This major ensures academic training (Bachelor, Maste...

  4. Progress of scientific researches and project of CSR in IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Genming

    2004-01-01

    The article reviews the recent progress of the scientific researches including synthesis of new nuclides, investigations of the isospin effects in heavy ion collisions, studies of the nuclear structure in high spin states and the applications of heavy ion beams to other scientific researches, such as biology and material science. It also gives a brief introduction of the development of the design and progress of the new project of heavy ion cooling storage ring (CSR) of Lanzhou. (author)

  5. Quarterly Progress Report (April 1 to June 30, 1950)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    1950-07-01

    This is the second of a series of Quarterly Progress Reports. While most of the departments have summarized their work or used a form comparable to abstracts, the Chemistry Department has given both abstracts and complete reports on its work. The major part of the progress in the Reactor Science and Engineering Department is being presented simultaneously in a separate classified report. There are reports from the following departments: (1) physics department; (2) instrumentation and health physics department; (3) accelerator project; (4) chemistry department; (5) reactor science and engineering department; (6) biology department; and (7) medical department.

  6. Nanomaterials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Rohrer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale.The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information

  7. Annual progress report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of the Nuclear Sciences Institute at Grenoble gives a general survey of the scientific and technical work done in 1975. The research areas are: nuclear reactions, gamma spectroscopy, polarized neutrons, intermediate energy physics, theoretical physics, accelerators and technical means [fr

  8. Annual progress report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of the Nuclear Sciences Institute at Grenoble gives a general survey of the scientific and technical work done in 1976. The research areas are: nuclear reactions, gamma spectrometry, polarized neutrons, intermediate energy physics, theoretical physics, accelerators and technical means, the experimental physics at the cyclotron being essentially concerned with three fields: γ spectrometry, giant resonances, mechanisms of heavy ion induced reactions [fr

  9. Scientific progress report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the results in research and technology concerning neutron scattering, radiation defects in solids, reactor chemistry, the study of trace elements in biomedical science, geochemistry, and reactor operation. Furthermore, a list of publications and speeches is given. (HSI) [de

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  11. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  12. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  13. ISABELLE: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed.

  14. ISABELLE: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the ISABELLE project, which has the objective of constructing a high-energy proton colliding beam facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The major technical features of the intersecting storage accelerators with their projected performance are described. Application of over 1000 superconducting magnets in the two rings represents the salient characteristic of the machine. The status of the entire project, the technical progress made so far, and difficulties encountered are reviewed

  15. Recent progress in microcalorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, E; Skinner, H A

    2013-01-01

    Recent Progress in Microcalorimetry focuses on the methodologies, processes, and approaches involved in microcalorimetry, as well as heat flow, temperature constancy, and chemistry of alumina and cements.The selection first offers information on the different types of calorimeters; measurement of the heat flow between the calorimeter and jacket boundaries by means of a thermoelectric pile; and constructional details of the microcalorimeter. Discussions focus on classification of calorimeters, use of thermoelectric piles as thermometers, correct measurement of heat flow from a calorimeter conta

  16. Clean Energy Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    For the past several years, the IEA and others have been calling for a clean energy revolution to achieve global energy security, economic growth and climate change goals. This report analyses for the first time progress in global clean energy technology deployment against the pathways that are needed to achieve these goals. It provides an overview of technology deployment status, key policy developments and public spending on RDD&D of clean energy technologies.

  17. Progress in nanophotonics 1

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent progress in nanophotonics technology to be used to develop novel nano-optical devices, fabrication technology, and security systems. It begins with a review of the concept of dressed photons and applications to devices, fabrication, and systems; principles and applications. Further topics include: DNA process for quantum dot chain, photon enhanced emission microscopy, near field spectroscopy of metallic nanostructure, self-organized fabrication of composite semiconductor quantum dots, formation of metallic nanostructure, and nanophotonic information systems with

  18. Three year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: x-ray and uv effects in photosynthetic organisms; effects of alcohols and oxygen concentration on transforming DNA; free radical studies; sensitization by metal ions; role of the solvated electron in radiation damage to cells; effectiveness of organic and inorganic compounds in sensitizing bacterial spores to high energy radiation; oxygen effects; radiosensitivity of enzyme systems in Chlorella; and effects of pre-irradiation of solutions on spores

  19. Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mampaey, S.; De Schepper, A.; Vanhoenacker, F.; Boven, K.; Hul, W. van

    2000-01-01

    A rare case of progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) in a 9-year-old girl is presented. Clinically, chronic painless swollen joints, accompanied by progressive motion restriction and progressive walking difficulties, were found. Radiologically, there was enlargement of the epimetaphyseal portions of the large joints, metacarpal heads, and phalanges, and generalized platyspondyly with irregular delineation of the endplates of the vertebral bodies. The radioclinical features at the peripheral joints were originally misdiagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and the structural spinal abnormalities were neglected and interpreted as Scheuermann's disease. However, the absence of active inflammatory parameters argues against JRA, whereas the low age of onset of the irregularities at the vertebral endplates is an argument against the diagnosis of Scheuermann's disease. The combination of the dysplastic abnormalities of the spine, with platyspondyly and Scheuermann-like lesions at an unusually low age of onset, and radiological features mimicking JRA of the peripheral joints, is the clue to the diagnosis of this rare autosomal-recessive disease. This case is the first to document the MRI features of PPD of the spine. (orig.)

  20. Progress, Wealth, and Mathematics Achievement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    I am interested in discussing the historical conditions that make it possible to formulate the idea that the mathematical qualifications of citizens in modern states is connected to the progress and economic development of nations. I interconnect apparently unrelated areas in an attempt to shed l......, H. (1899). Préface. L' Enseignement Mathématique, 1(1), 1-5. Popkewitz, T. S. (2008). Cosmopolitanism and the age of school reform: Science, education, and making society by making the child. New York: Routledge....... to the end of the 19th century. During the second half of the 19th century, mathematics teachers in different countries struggled to make mathematics part of the classic school curricula. During the second industrialization, the justification for the need for mathematics education was formulated in the first...... as a result, among others, of the growing series of comparative information on educational achievement and development. Such reports can be seen as performances of the comparative logic of Modernity that operates differential positioning, not only among individuals but also among nations, with respect to what...

  1. FOREWORD Nanomaterials science Nanomaterials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Heinrich

    2010-10-01

    The nanometer regime covers the transition from condensed matter behavior to atomic and molecular properties and thus is a very rich but also very demanding area in materials science. Close to the condensed matter side, properties and functions might still very well be scalable, whereas close to the atomic and molecular side, the scalability is mostly lost. Properties and functions change qualitatively or quantitatively by orders of magnitude when the dimensions become smaller than a critical size in the nanometer range. Examples are the ballistic regime for electron or spin transport at dimensions below the mean free path, near-field effects in scanning near-field optical microscopy and quantum wells when the dimensions are below an appropriate wavelength, novel electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties when the number of bulk atoms becomes smaller than that of surface atoms, quantum conduction, and Coulomb blockade. Thus, by going below a certain size, an abundance of novel properties and functions are at one's disposal, or, in other words, we can functionalize materials simply by reducing their size to the nanoscale. The key to the future lies in the functions that we give to materials, not just in finding 'novel functional materials'. This catch expression in many materials science programs and initiatives of the past two decades sounds great, but it is not what really counts. All materials are functional in one way or another and, therefore, all new materials are 'novel functional materials'. Certainly, finding new materials is always an important part of progress, but we should also focus on the much larger domain of novel functions that we can give to existing or modified materials. A good example is semiconductors: they are fifty or more years old and their properties are very well known, but they were not of widespread interest and use until the transistor changed their destiny into being the central material in the information technology revolution

  2. Research progress on osteoarthritis treatment mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yun-Tao; Chen, Jian; Meng, Zhu-Long; Ge, Wan-Yu; Bian, Yang-Yang; Cheng, Shao-Wen; Xing, Chen-Kun; Yao, Jiang-Ling; Fu, Jian; Peng, Lei

    2017-09-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease and is frequently encountered in the older population; the incidence rises sharply with age. It is estimated that more than 360 million people suffer from OA. However, the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis remains unclear, and we cannot effectively prevent the progression of OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signaling pathways that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. We searched, using the key words osteoarthritis, chondrocyte apoptosis, autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, molecular targets, and biomarkers, in PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from 1994 to 2017. We also reviewed the signaling pathways and molecular markers associated with chondrocyte apoptosis and approaches aimed at inhibiting the apoptosis-inducing mechanism to at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. This article provides an overview of targeted therapies and the related signaling pathways in OA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhro, W.E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  4. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 3. Volume 117, Issue 3. May 2005, pages 207-282. Recent Advances in Bio-Inorganic Chemistry. pp 207-218. Underpotential deposition of metals - Progress and prospects in modelling · V Sudha M V Sangaranarayanan · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  5. Sciences & Nature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... Sciences & Nature, the Scientific Journal edited by the University of ... Subjects covered include agronomy, sciences of the earth, environment, biological, ...

  6. Marine Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims and scope: The Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science provides an avenue for the wide dissem- ination of high ..... circulation patterns include the nutrient-rich Somali ...... matical Structures in Computer Science 24: e240311.

  7. Progression in nuclear classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuying

    1999-01-01

    In this book, summarize the author's achievements of nuclear classification by new method in latest 30 years, new foundational law of nuclear layer in matter world is found. It is explained with a hypothesis of a nucleus which it is made up of two nucleon's clusters with deuteron and triton. Its concrete content is: to advance a new method which analyze data of nuclei with natural abundance using relationship between the numbers of proton and neutron. The relationship of each nucleus increases to 4 sets: S+H=Z H+Z=N Z+N=A and S-H=K. To expand the similarity between proton and neutron to the similarity among p,n, deuteron, triton, and He-5 clusters. According to the distribution law of same kind of nuclei, it obtains that the upper limits of stable region both should be '44s'. New foundational law of nuclear system is 1,2,4,8,16,8,4,2,1. In order to explain new law, a hypothesis which nucleus is made up of deuteron and triton is developing and nuclear field of whole number is built up. And it relates that unity of matter motion, which is the most foundational form atomic nuclear systematic is similar to the most first-class form chromosome numbers of mankind. These achievements will shake the foundations of traditional nuclear science. These achievements will supply new tasks in developing nuclear theory. And shake the ground of which magic number is the basic of nuclear science. It opens up a new field on foundational research. The book will supply new knowledge for researcher, teachers and students in universities and polytechnic schools. Scientific workers read in works of research and technical exploit. It can be stored up for library and laboratory of society and universities. In nowadays of prosperity our nation by science and education, the book is readable for workers of scientific technology and amateurs of natural science

  8. Scientific progress report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The R + D-projects in this field and the infrastructural tasks mentioned are handled in seven working- and two project groups: Computer systems, Numerical and applied mathematics, Software development, Process calculation systems- hardware, Nuclear electronics, measuring- and automatic control technique, Research of component parts and irradiation tests, Central data processing, Processing of process data in the science of medicine, Co-operation in the BERNET-project in the 'Wissenschaftliches Rechenzentrum Berlin (WRB)' (scientific computer center in Berlin). (orig./WB)

  9. Progress report 1996 - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document reviews all the activities of the ISN (nuclear sciences institute in Grenoble) for 2 years. ISN's teams contribute to many international programs like ATLAS, DELPHI, GRAAL... 43 topics or important results are presented gathered into 6 themes: 1) quarks and leptons - astro-particles, 2) hadron physics, 3) nuclear matter and innovative concepts for nuclear energy, 4) theoretical physics, 5) technology transfer and valorization, and 6) instrumentation

  10. Sound Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickel, Aaron J.; Lee, Michele H.; Pareja, Enrique M.

    2010-01-01

    How can a teacher simultaneously teach science concepts through inquiry while helping students learn about the nature of science? After pondering this question in their own teaching, the authors developed a 5E learning cycle lesson (Bybee et al. 2006) that concurrently embeds opportunities for fourth-grade students to (a) learn a science concept,…

  11. Metaheuristics progress in complex systems optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Doerner, Karl F; Greistorfer, Peter; Gutjahr, Walter; Hartl, Richard F; Reimann, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The aim of ""Metaheuristics: Progress in Complex Systems Optimization"" is to provide several different kinds of information: a delineation of general metaheuristics methods, a number of state-of-the-art articles from a variety of well-known classical application areas as well as an outlook to modern computational methods in promising new areas. Therefore, this book may equally serve as a textbook in graduate courses for students, as a reference book for people interested in engineering or social sciences, and as a collection of new and promising avenues for researchers working in this field.

  12. Progress in automation, robotics and measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Zieliński, Cezary; Kaliczyńska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent progresses in control, automation, robotics, and measuring techniques. It includes contributions of top experts in the fields, focused on both theory and industrial practice. The particular chapters present a deep analysis of a specific technical problem which is in general followed by a numerical analysis and simulation, and results of an implementation for the solution of a real world problem. The presented theoretical results, practical solutions and guidelines will be useful for both researchers working in the area of engineering sciences and for practitioners solving industrial problems.    .

  13. Progress in Preparation of Monodisperse Polymer Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyan

    2017-12-01

    The monodisperse crosslinked polymer microspheres have attracted much attention because of their superior thermal and solvent resistance, mechanical strength, surface activity and adsorption properties. They are of wide prospects for using in many fields such as biomedicine, electronic science, information technology, analytical chemistry, standard measurement and environment protection etc. Functional polymer microspheres prepared by different methods have the outstanding surface property, quantum size effect and good potential future in applications with its designable structure, controlled size and large ratio of surface to volume. Scholars of all over the world have focused on this hot topic. The preparation method and research progress in functional polymer microspheres are addressed in the paper.

  14. Progress in reforming chemical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankat, Phillip C

    2013-01-01

    Three successful historical reforms of chemical engineering education were the triumph of chemical engineering over industrial chemistry, the engineering science revolution, and Engineering Criteria 2000. Current attempts to change teaching methods have relied heavily on dissemination of the results of engineering-education research that show superior student learning with active learning methods. Although slow dissemination of education research results is probably a contributing cause to the slowness of reform, two other causes are likely much more significant. First, teaching is the primary interest of only approximately one-half of engineering faculty. Second, the vast majority of engineering faculty have no training in teaching, but trained professors are on average better teachers. Significant progress in reform will occur if organizations with leverage-National Science Foundation, through CAREER grants, and the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET-use that leverage to require faculty to be trained in pedagogy.

  15. ARGUS progress report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darden, C.W. III.

    1982-01-01

    On September 7th, 1982, following four years of planning and construction, the magnetic solenoid detector ARGUS was moved into one of the two interaction regions of the electron-positron storage ring DORIS. A month later the ring started delivering luminosity for physics research, specifically, the study of the formation and decay of members of the Upsilon family of mesons. These mesons are bound states, b anti b, of the heaviest of the five known quarks and therefore of considerable interest. This report describes the progress made during the year from March 1982 to March 1983 with emphasis on the experience gained during the first running period

  16. HSX progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Brief statements on the progress of the design and construction of the HSX experiment are reported. Topics covered include the modular and auxiliary coil systems, the coil support structure, vacuum vessel, the ECH system, the magnet power supply and site. The proposed budget for Year 2 (August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1995) is presented. The effects of a flat funding profile (based on Year 2 budget level of $1137K) on out-years and the HSX project schedule are discussed. The stretching out of the program to accommodate the reduced funding profile should result in only a slight delay in HSX operations

  17. [Research progress on fascioliasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Cheng, Na; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Xue-Nian

    2013-06-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonosis caused by Fasciola spp. It can cause pathological damages to human liver and gallbladder, as well as economic loss in animal husbandry. Fascioliasis can be easily misdiagnosed with other hepatobiliary diseases. The appearance of resistance to triclabendazole is an issue problem for fascioliasis control. Therefore, research for better diagnostic methods, effective drugs and vaccines become to the focus of fascioliasis control. This article summarizes the progress on epidemiological status, diagnostic method, therapy, drug resistance, vaccine and omics of fascioliasis.

  18. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, B. Utkin

    2011-10-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type.

  19. Mathieu Progressive Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of exact solutions to the wave equation representing relatively undistorted progressive waves is constructed using separation of variables in the elliptic cylindrical coordinates and one of the Bateman transforms. The general form of this Bateman transform in an orthogonal curvilinear cylindrical coordinate system is discussed and a specific problem of physical feasibility of the obtained solutions, connected with their dependence on the cyclic coordinate, is addressed. The limiting case of zero eccentricity, in which the elliptic cylindrical coordinates turn into their circular cylindrical counterparts, is shown to correspond to the focused wave modes of the Bessel-Gauss type. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. TASCC Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    The TASCC (Tandem Accelerator-Superconducting Cyclotron) facility is devoted to developing and providing beams for an experimental program of basic nuclear research. Beam was on target for 2901 hours during the period of interest. The cyclotron provided beam for 524 hours, and tandem beams were used for a total of 3940 hours. The most exciting experimental result was the first evidence of a rotational band with the characteristics of hyperdeformation: a ridge-valley structure in 152 Dy. This progress report details experimental results and instrumentation and facility development over the period. (L.L.) (refs., tabs., figs.)