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Sample records for hgps-associated lmna mutation

  1. LMNA mutations in progeroid syndromes.

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    Huang, Shurong; Kennedy, Brian K; Oshima, Junko

    2005-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are disorders in which affected individuals. present various features that suggest accelerated ageing. The two best-known examples are Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, 'Progeria of childhood') and Werner syndrome (WS, 'Progeria of the adult'). A novel, recurrent de novo mutation in the LMNA gene, responsible for the majority of HGPS cases, results in an in-frame deletion of 50 amino acids, including endoproteolytic sites required for processing of prelamin A to mature lamin A protein. Another mutation results in a 35 amino acid in-frame deletion with a milder HGPS phenotype. WRN, the gene responsible for the majority of WS cases, encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities and may participate in optimizing DNA repair/recombination. A subset of WS patients do not show mutations at the WRN locus (atypical WS), but show heterozygous amino acid substitutions in the heptad repeat region of lamin A. Structural analysis suggests that mutations in atypical WS may interfere with protein-protein interactions. When compared to WRN-mutant WS, LMNA-mutant atypical WS patients appear to show earlier onset and possibly more severe ageing-related symptoms.

  2. Clinical disease presentation and ECG characteristics of LMNA mutation carriers

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    Ollila, Laura; Nikus, Kjell; Holmström, Miia; Jalanko, Mikko; Jurkko, Raija; Kaartinen, Maija; Koskenvuo, Juha; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Palojoki, Eeva; Reissell, Eeva; Piirilä, Päivi; Heliö, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C of the nuclear lamina are a frequent cause of cardiomyopathy accounting for 5–8% of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Our aim was to study disease onset, presentation and progression among LMNA mutation carriers. Methods Clinical follow-up data from 27 LMNA mutation carriers and 78 patients with idiopathic DCM without an LMNA mutation were collected. In addition, ECG data were collected and analysed systematically from 20 healthy controls. Results Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed no difference in event-free survival (death, heart transplant, resuscitation and appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy included as events) between LMNA mutation carriers and DCM controls (p=0.5). LMNA mutation carriers presented with atrial fibrillation at a younger age than the DCM controls (47 vs 57 years, p=0.003). Male LMNA mutation carriers presented with clinical manifestations roughly a decade earlier than females. In close follow-up non-sustained ventricular tachycardia was detected in 78% of LMNA mutation carriers. ECG signs of septal remodelling were present in 81% of the LMNA mutation carriers, 21% of the DCM controls and none of the healthy controls giving a high sensitivity and specificity for the standard ECG in distinguishing LMNA mutation carriers from patients with DCM and healthy controls. Conclusions Male LMNA mutation carriers present clinical manifestations at a younger age than females. ECG septal remodelling appears to distinguish LMNA mutation carriers from healthy controls and patients with DCM without LMNA mutations. PMID:28123761

  3. Novel LMNA mutations in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and functional characterization of four LMNA mutations

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    Scharner, Juergen; Brown, Charlotte A; Bower, Matthew; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Khatri, Ismail A.; Escolar, Diana; Gordon, Erynn; Felice, Kevin; Crowe, Carol A; Grosmann, Carla; Meriggioli, Matthew N.; Asamoah, Alexander; Gordon, Ora; Gnocchi, Viola F.; Ellis, Juliet A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in LMNA cause a variety of diseases affecting striated muscle including autosomal-Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B). Here, we describe novel and recurrent LMNA mutations identified in 50 patients from the USA and Canada, which is the first report of the distribution of LMNA mutations from a large cohort outside Europe. This augments the number of LMNA...

  4. Novel LMNA mutations in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and functional characterization of four LMNA mutations.

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    Scharner, Juergen; Brown, Charlotte A; Bower, Matthew; Iannaccone, Susan T; Khatri, Ismail A; Escolar, Diana; Gordon, Erynn; Felice, Kevin; Crowe, Carol A; Grosmann, Carla; Meriggioli, Matthew N; Asamoah, Alexander; Gordon, Ora; Gnocchi, Viola F; Ellis, Juliet A; Mendell, Jerry R; Zammit, Peter S

    2011-02-01

    Mutations in LMNA cause a variety of diseases affecting striated muscle including autosomal Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD), and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B). Here, we describe novel and recurrent LMNA mutations identified in 50 patients from the United States and Canada, which is the first report of the distribution of LMNA mutations from a large cohort outside Europe. This augments the number of LMNA mutations known to cause EDMD by 16.5%, equating to an increase of 5.9% in the total known LMNA mutations. Eight patients presented with either p.R249W/Q or p.E358K mutations and an early onset EDMD phenotype: two mutations recently associated with L-CMD. Importantly, 15 mutations are novel and include eight missense mutations (p.R189P, p.F206L, p.S268P, p.S295P, p.E361K, p.G449D, p.L454P, and p.W467R), three splice site mutations (c.IVS4 + 1G>A, c.IVS6 - 2A>G, and c.IVS8 + 1G>A), one duplication/in frame insertion (p.R190dup), one deletion (p.Q355del), and two silent mutations (p.R119R and p.K270K). Analysis of 4 of our lamin A mutations showed that some caused nuclear deformations and lamin B redistribution in a mutation specific manner. Together, this study significantly augments the number of EDMD patients on the database and describes 15 novel mutations that underlie EDMD, which will contribute to establishing genotype-phenotype correlations.

  5. An inherited LMNA gene mutation in atypical Progeria syndrome.

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    Doubaj, Yassamine; De Sandre-Giovannoli, Annachiara; Vera, Esteves-Vieira; Navarro, Claire Laure; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Tajir, Mariam; Lévy, Nicolas; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by several clinical features that begin in early childhood, recalling an accelerated aging process. The diagnosis of HGPS is based on the recognition of common clinical features and detection of the recurrent heterozygous c.1824C>T (p.Gly608Gly) mutation within exon 11 in the Lamin A/C encoding gene (LMNA). Besides "typical HGPS," several "atypical progeria" syndromes (APS) have been described, in a clinical spectrum ranging from mandibuloacral dysplasia to atypical Werner syndrome. These patients's clinical features include progeroid manifestations, such as short stature, prominent nose, premature graying of hair, partial alopecia, skin atrophy, lipodystrophy, skeletal anomalies, such as mandibular hypoplasia and acroosteolyses, and in some cases severe atherosclerosis with metabolic complications. APS are due in several cases to de novo heterozygous LMNA mutations other than the p.Gly608Gly, or due to homozygous BAFN1 mutations in Nestor-Guillermo Progeria syndrome (NGPS). We report here and discuss the observation of a non-consanguineous Moroccan patient presenting with atypical progeria. The molecular studies showed the heterozygous mutation c.412G>A (p.Glu138Lys) of the LMNA gene. This mutation, previously reported as a de novo mutation, was inherited from the apparently healthy father who showed a somatic cell mosaicism.

  6. Mandibuloacral Dysplasia Caused by LMNA Mutations and Uniparental Disomy

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    Shaochun Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies, skeletal malformations, and mottled cutaneous pigmentation. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS is characterized by the clinical features of accelerated aging in childhood. Both MAD and HGPS can be caused by mutations in the LMNA gene. In this study, we describe a 2-year-old boy with overlapping features of MAD and HGPS. Mutation analysis of the LMNA gene revealed a homozygous missense change, p.M540T, while only the mother carries the mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD analysis for chromosome 1 showed the presence of maternal UPD. Markers in the 1q21.3–q22 region flanking the LMNA locus were isodisomic, while markers in the short arm and distal 1q region were heterodisomic. These results suggest that nondisjunction in maternal meiosis followed by loss of the paternal chromosome 1 during trisomy rescue might result in the UPD1 and homozygosity for the p.M540T mutation observed in this patient.

  7. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  8. Compound heterozygosity for mutations in LMNA causes a progeria syndrome without prelamin A accumulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, V.L.; Broers, J.L.; Steensel, M.A.M. van; Zinn-Justin, S.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Steijlen, P.M.; Kamps, M.; Kuijpers, H.J.; Merckx, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Wijngaard, A. van de

    2006-01-01

    LMNA-associated progeroid syndromes have been reported with both recessive and dominant inheritance. We report a 2-year-old boy with an apparently typical Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) due to compound heterozygous missense mutations (p.T528M and p.M540T) in LMNA. Both mutations affect

  9. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

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    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  10. New intronic splicing mutation in the LMNA gene causing progressive cardiac conduction defects and variable myopathy.

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    Rogozhina, Y; Mironovich, S; Shestak, A; Adyan, T; Polyakov, A; Podolyak, D; Bakulina, A; Dzemeshkevich, S; Zaklyazminskaya, E

    2016-12-31

    Most of mutations in the LMNA gene are unique and have been found in only a few unrelated families. The clinical interpretation of new genetic variants, especially beyond the coding area and canonical splice sites, is proving to be difficult and requires advanced investigation. This study included patients with progressive cardiac conduction defects with neuromuscular involvement. The clinical evaluation included medical history and 24-h Holter monitoring. The genetic evaluation included mutation screening in the LMNA gene by the Sanger sequence. Sanger sequencing was followed by RT-PCR of the target fragment of cDNA. In silico modeling was performed with CCBulder and Modeller software. The diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) was established. The new intronic variant c.513+45T>G was found in the LMNA gene in the proband and affected daughter. The insertion of 45bp was confirmed in the proband's cDNA. The structural and possible functional effects of the aberrant protein were predicted. Variant c.513+45T>G in the LMNA gene likely translates into the longer lamin A/C proteins with additional 15 amino acids. This variant is thought to be pathogenic. Intronic variants in the LMNA gene located beside canonic splice sites may be responsible for some genotype-negative cases with clinical phenotype of laminopathies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. p.Pro4Arg mutation in LMNA gene: a new atypical progeria phenotype without metabolism abnormalities.

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    Guo, Hong; Luo, Na; Hao, Fei; Bai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a typical presenile disorder, with mutation in the LMNA gene. Besides HGPS, mutations in LMNA gene have also been reported in atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). The objective of the study was to investigate the phenotype and molecular basis of APS in a Chinese family. LMNA gene mutations were also reviewed to identify the phenotypic and pathogenic differences among APS. Two siblings in a non-consanguineous Chinese family with atypical progeria were reported. The clinical features were observed, including presenile manifestations such as bird-like facial appearance, generalized lipodystrophy involving the extremities and mottled hyperpigmentation on the trunk and extremities. A heterozygous mutation c.11C>G (p.Pro4Arg) of the LMNA gene was detected in the two patients. 28 different variants of the LMNA gene have been reported in APS families, spreading over almost all the 12 exons of the LMNA gene with some hot-spot regions. This is the first detailed description of an APS family without metabolism abnormalities. APS patients share most of the clinical features, but there may be some distinct features in different ethnic groups.

  12. Increased progerin expression associated with unusual LMNA mutations causes severe progeroid syndromes.

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    Moulson, Casey L; Fong, Loren G; Gardner, Jennifer M; Farber, Emily A; Go, Gloriosa; Passariello, Annalisa; Grange, Dorothy K; Young, Stephen G; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2007-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare precocious aging syndrome caused by mutations in LMNA that lead to synthesis of a mutant form of prelamin A, generally called progerin, that cannot be processed to mature lamin A. Most HGPS patients have a recurrent heterozygous de novo mutation in exon 11 of LMNA, c.1824C>T/p.G608G; this synonymous mutation activates a nearby cryptic splice donor site, resulting in synthesis of the mutant prelamin A, progerin, which lacks 50 amino acids within the carboxyl-terminal domain. Abnormal splicing is incomplete, so the mutant allele produces some normally-spliced transcripts. Nevertheless, the synthesis of progerin is sufficient to cause misshapen nuclei in cultured cells and severe disease phenotypes in affected patients. Here we present two patients with extraordinarily severe forms of progeria caused by unusual mutations in LMNA. One had a splice site mutation (c.1968+1G>A; or IVS11+1G>A), and the other had a novel synonymous coding region mutation (c.1821G>A/p.V607V). Both mutations caused very frequent use of the same exon 11 splice donor site that is activated in typical HGPS patients. As a consequence, the ratios of progerin mRNA and protein to wild-type were higher than in typical HGPS patients. Fibroblasts from both patients exhibited nuclear shape abnormalities typical of HGPS, and cells treated with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor exhibited fewer misshapen nuclei. Thus, farnesyltransferase inhibitors may prove to be useful even when progerin expression levels are higher than those in typical HGPS patients.

  13. Mandibuloacral dysplasia and LMNA A529V mutation in Turkish patients with severe skeletal changes and absent breast development.

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    Ozer, Leyla; Unsal, Evrim; Aktuna, Suleyman; Baltaci, Volkan; Celikkol, Pelin; Akyigit, Fatma; Sen, Askin; Ayvaz, Ozge; Balci, Sevim

    2016-07-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by acroosteolysis (resorption of terminal phalanges), skin changes (hyperpigmentation), clavicular hypoplasia, craniofascial anomalies, a hook nose and prominent eyes, delayed closures of the cranial sutures, lipodystrophy, alopecia, and skeletal anomalies. MAD patients are classified according to lipodystrophy patterns: type A and type B. The vast majority of MAD cases are caused by LMNA gene mutations. MAD patients with type A lipodystrophy (MADA) have been reported to have LMNA R527H, A529V, or A529T mutations. In this report, we describe two MADA patients with progressive skeletal changes, absent breast development, and cataract in addition to the classical MAD phenotype. Both patients were found to be homozygous for the Ala529Val mutation of the LMNA gene. Our female patient is the oldest MADA patient (59 years old) who has ever been reported with the LMNA mutation and also the LMNA Ala529Val mutation. This study is the second report on MADA patients with a homozygous Ala529Val mutation.

  14. Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, a spontaneous mouse Lmna mutation modeling human laminopathies.

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    Paul R Odgren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations of naturally-occurring mutations in animal models provide important insights and valuable disease models. Lamins A and C, along with lamin B, are type V intermediate filament proteins which constitute the proteinaceous boundary of the nucleus. LMNA mutations in humans cause a wide range of phenotypes, collectively termed laminopathies. To identify the mutation and investigate the phenotype of a spontaneous, semi-dominant mutation that we have named Disheveled hair and ear (Dhe, which causes a sparse coat and small external ears in heterozygotes and lethality in homozygotes by postnatal day 10. FINDINGS: Genetic mapping identified a point mutation in the Lmna gene, causing a single amino acid change, L52R, in the coiled coil rod domain of lamin A and C proteins. Cranial sutures in Dhe/+ mice failed to close. Gene expression for collagen types I and III in sutures was deficient. Skulls were small and disproportionate. Skeletons of Dhe/+ mice were hypomineralized and total body fat was deficient in males. In homozygotes, skin and oral mucosae were dysplastic and ulcerated. Nuclear morphometry of cultured cells revealed gene dose-dependent blebbing and wrinkling. CONCLUSION: Dhe mice should provide a useful new model for investigations of the pathogenesis of laminopathies.

  15. An Indian family with an Emery-Dreifuss myopathy and familial dilated cardiomyopathy due to a novel LMNA mutation

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    Khushal B Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss myopathy can be associated with a cardiomyopathy and cardiac dysrhythmias. The inheritance pattern of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is X linked, whereas EDMD2 is autosomal dominant. EDMD2 is caused by lamin A/C gene (LMNA mutations that produce alterations in the lamin proteins that are integral to nuclear and cell integrity. A 53-year-old man was brought to us with a right internal carotid artery dissection. Detailed work-up of the patient and family members revealed some unusual features, and genetic sequencing of the LMNA gene was undertaken. A novel mutation was identified in two of the samples sent for analysis. We present the first Indian family of EDMD2 with familial dilated cardiomyopathy and cardiac dysrhythmias in whom LMNA gene sequencing was performed. A novel mutation was identified and additional unusual clinical features were described.

  16. Cardiac effects of the c.1583 C→G LMNA mutation in two families with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

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    Zhang, Li; Shen, Hongrui; Zhao, Zhe; Bing, Qi; Hu, Jing

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine and analyze cardiac involvement in two Emery‑Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) pedigrees caused by the c.1583 C→G mutation of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). The clinical and genetic characteristics of members of two families with EDMD were evaluated by performing neurological examinations, skeletal muscle biopsies, cardiac evaluations, including electrocardiography, 24 h Holter, ultrasound cardiography and 99TcM‑MIBI‑gated myocardiac perfusion imaging, and genomic DNA sequencing. Family history investigations revealed an autosomal dominant transmission pattern of the disease in Family 1 and a sporadic case in Family 2. The three affected patients exhibited typical clinical features of EDMD, including joint contractures, muscle weakness and cardiac involvement. Muscle histopathological investigation revealed dystrophic features. In addition, each affected individual exhibited either cardiac arrhythmia, which was evident as sinus tachycardia, atrial flutter or complete atrioventricular inhibition. Cardiac imaging revealed dilated cardiomyopathy in two of the individuals, one of whom was presented with heart failure. The second patient presented with no significant abnormalities in cardiac structure or function. The three affected individuals exhibited a heterozygous missense mutation in the LMNA gene (c.1583 C→G), which caused a T528R amino acid change in the LMNA protein. In conclusion, the present study identified three patients with EDMD, exhibiting the same dominant LMNA mutation and presenting with a spectrum of severe cardiac abnormalities, including cardiac conduction system defects, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. As LMNA mutations have been associated with at least six clinical disorders, including EDMD, the results of the present study provide additional mutational and functional data, which may assist in further establishing LMNA mutational variation and disease pathogenesis.

  17. First Japanese case of atypical progeroid syndrome/atypical Werner syndrome with heterozygous LMNA mutation.

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    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yokoyama, Yoko; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ogino, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Yamada, Kazuya; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Goto, Makoto; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Atypical progeroid syndrome (APS), including atypical Werner syndrome (AWS), is a progeroid syndrome involving heterozygous mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear protein lamin A/C. We report the first Japanese case of APS/AWS with a LMNA mutation (p.D300N). A 53-year-old Japanese man had a history of recurrent severe cardiovascular diseases as well as brain infarction and hemorrhages. Although our APS/AWS patient had overlapping features with Werner syndrome (WS), such as high-pitched voice, scleroderma, lipoatrophy and atherosclerosis, several cardinal features of WS, including short stature, premature graying/alopecia, cataract, bird-like face, flat feet, hyperkeratosis on the soles and diabetes mellitus, were absent. In immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses of the patient's cultured fibroblasts, abnormal nuclear morphology, an increase in small aggregation of heterochromatin and a decrease in interchromatin granules in nuclei of fibroblasts were observed, suggesting that abnormal nuclear morphology and chromatin disorganization may be associated with the pathogenesis of APS/AWS.

  18. Novel LMNA Mutation in a Taiwanese Family with Autosomal Dominant Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy

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    Wen-Chen Liang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, and muscle wasting in humeroperoneal muscles, and adult-onset cardiomyopathy with conduction block. We analyzed blood samples from an EDMD family, including a mother and two daughters, and found a novel mutation in codon 520 in exon 9 of the lamin A/C (LMNA gene, resulting in a substitution of tryptophan (W by glycine (G in all three patients. The mother died after a stroke-like episode at the age of 43. The elder sister received pacemaker implantation, which improved symptoms of exercise intolerance and dizziness. These cases illustrate the necessity of correct diagnosis, evaluation, and follow-up of cardiac problems due to the wide clinical spectrum and high prevalence of cardiac conduction block in patients with autosomal dominant EDMD. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2 Suppl:S27-S31

  19. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome with G608G LMNA Mutation

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    Kim, Hui Kwon; Lee, Jong Yoon; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Phil Soo; Park, Won Il; Lee, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Il

    2011-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare condition originally described by Hutchinson in 1886. Death result from cardiac complications in the majority of cases and usually occurs at average age of thirteen years. A 4-yr old boy had typical clinical findings such as short stature, craniofacial disproportion, alopecia, prominent scalp veins and sclerodermatous skin. This abnormal appearance began at age of 1 yr. On serological and hormonal evaluation, all values are within normal range. He was neurologically intact with motor and mental development. An echocardiogram showed calcification of aortic and mitral valves. Hypertrophy of internal layer at internal carotid artery suggesting atherosclerosis was found by carotid doppler sonography. He is on low dose aspirin to prevent thromboembolic episodes and on regular follow up. Gene study showed typical G608G (GGC- > GGT) point mutation at exon 11 in LMNA gene. This is a rare case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis in Korea. PMID:22148005

  20. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome caused by an LMNA mutation: a case report.

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    Chu, Yan; Xu, Zi-Gang; Xu, Zhe; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by premature aging of the skin, bones, heart, and blood vessels. We report a 6-year-old boy who was born at full term but presented with scleroderma-like appearance at 1 month of age and gradually developed clinical manifestations of progeria. He had characteristic facial features of prominent eyes, scalp, and leg veins; loss of scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; stunted growth; scleroderma-like changes of the skin; and a premature aged appearance. Metabolic investigations showed transient methylmalonic aciduria, and genetic testing of the peripheral blood identified the c.1824C>T heterozygous LMNA mutation. The present case is reported because of its rarity.

  1. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with G608G LMNA mutation.

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    Kim, Hui Kwon; Lee, Jong Yoon; Bae, Eun Ju; Oh, Phil Soo; Park, Won Il; Lee, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Il; Lee, Hong Jin

    2011-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare condition originally described by Hutchinson in 1886. Death result from cardiac complications in the majority of cases and usually occurs at average age of thirteen years. A 4-yr old boy had typical clinical findings such as short stature, craniofacial disproportion, alopecia, prominent scalp veins and sclerodermatous skin. This abnormal appearance began at age of 1 yr. On serological and hormonal evaluation, all values are within normal range. He was neurologically intact with motor and mental development. An echocardiogram showed calcification of aortic and mitral valves. Hypertrophy of internal layer at internal carotid artery suggesting atherosclerosis was found by carotid doppler sonography. He is on low dose aspirin to prevent thromboembolic episodes and on regular follow up. Gene study showed typical G608G (GGC- > GGT) point mutation at exon 11 in LMNA gene. This is a rare case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome confirmed by genetic analysis in Korea.

  2. R25G mutation in exon 1 of LMNA gene is associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1B

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    YUAN Wo-liang; HUANG Wei-jun; HUANG Chun-yan; WANG Jing-feng; XIE Shuang-lun; NIE Ru-qiong; LIU Ying-mei; LIU Pin-ming; ZHOU Shu-xian; CHEN Su-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations of the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy. Here we report a family with a mutation of the LMNA gene to identify the relationship between genotype and phenotype.Methods All 30 members of the family underwent clinical and genetic evaluation. A mutation analysis of the LMNA gene was performed. All of the 12 exons of LMNA gene were extended with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were screened for gene mutation by direct sequencing.Results Ten members of the family had limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and 6 are still alive. Two patients suffered from DCM. Cardiac arrhythmias included atrioventricular block and atrial fibrillation; sudden death occurred in 2 patients. The pattern of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Mutation c.73C>G (R25G) in exon 1 encoding the globular domains was confirmed in all of the affected members, resulting in the conversion of arginine (Arg) to glycine (Gly). Conclusions The mutation R25G in exon 1 of LMNA gene we reported here in a Chinese family had a phenotype of malignant arrhythmia and mild LGMD, suggesting that patients with familial DCM, conduction system defects and skeletal muscle dystrophy should be screened by genetic testing for the LMNA gene.

  3. The R439C mutation in LMNA causes lamin oligomerization and susceptibility to oxidative stress

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    Verstraeten, Valerie LRM; Caputo, Sandrine; Van Steensel, Maurice AM; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma JH; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J; Briedé, Jacob J; Le Dour, Caroline; Marcelis, Carlo LM; Van Geel, Michel; Steijlen, Peter M; Van Den Wijngaard, Arthur; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Broers, Jos LV

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a laminopathy characterized by an aberrant fat distribution and a metabolic syndrome for which oxidative stress has recently been suggested as one of the disease-causing mechanisms. In a family affected with FPLD, we identified a heterozygous missense mutation c.1315C>T in the LMNA gene leading to the p.R439C substitution. Cultured patient fibroblasts do not show any prelamin A accumulation and reveal honeycomb-like lamin A/C formations in a significant percentage of nuclei. The mutation affects a region in the C-terminal globular domain of lamins A and C, different from the FPLD-related hot spot. Here, the introduction of an extra cysteine allows for the formation of disulphide-mediated lamin A/C oligomers. This oligomerization affects the interaction properties of the C-terminal domain with DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and causes a DNA-interaction pattern that is distinct from the classical R482W FPLD mutant. Particularly, whereas the R482W mutation decreases the binding efficiency of the C-terminal domain to DNA, the R439C mutation increases it. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies show significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon induction of oxidative stress in R439C patient fibroblasts compared to healthy controls. This increased sensitivity to oxidative stress seems independent of the oligomerization and enhanced DNA binding typical for R439C, as both the R439C and R482W mutants show a similar and significant increase in ROS upon induction of oxidative stress by H2O2. PMID:19220582

  4. The R527H mutation in LMNA gene causes an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation.

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    di Masi, Alessandra; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Ricordy, Ruggero; Tanzarella, Caterina; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia type A (MADA; OMIM # 248370) is a premature ageing disease caused by the homozygous R527H mutation in the LMNA gene. At the cellular level, MADA is characterized by unprocessed prelamin A accumulation, nuclear architecture alterations, chromatin defects and increased incidence of apoptosis. In some progeroid laminopathies (e.g., HGPS) it has been demonstrated that such biochemical and morphological alterations are strongly linked with genomic instability. To test this also in MADA fibroblasts, their response to the ionising radiation-induced damage was analysed. We observed that their ability to repair the damage was significantly impaired, as demonstrated by the increased chromosome damage and the higher percentage of residual gamma-H2AX foci, corresponding to unrepaired DNA-damage sites. Moreover, MADA fibroblasts showed a markedly reduced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15(S15) and a lower induction of p53 and CDKN1A proteins after irradiation, compared to the control cell line. Upon irradiation, we also detected differences in the expression of some p53 downstream target genes. In addition, MADA cells showed partial defects in the checkpoint response, particularly in G(1)/S transition. Our results indicate that accumulation of the lamin A precursor protein determines a defect in DNA damage response after X-ray exposure, supporting a crucial role of lamin A in regulating DNA repair process and cell cycle control.

  5. No mutation was detected in the LMNA gene among sporadic Charcot-Marie-Tooth patients%在散发型腓骨肌萎缩症患者中未检测出LMNA基因突变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋书娟; 章远志; 陈彪; 王曼捷; 王越英; 张远锦; 闫明; Nanbert ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To intensively investigate sporadic CMT patients, we have analyzed the LMNA gene in this study in a series of 32 unrelated CMT patients. Methods: Twelve exons of the LMNA gene were amplified from genetomic DNA. PCR products of each exon were analyzed by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP). Results: No abnormal SSCP pattern, suggesting no mutation in our CMT patients, was detected. Conclusion: The CMT diseases resulted from the mutations of LMNA gene were rare.

  6. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Rasmussen, Torsten B. [Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Palmfeldt, Johan [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nissen, Peter H. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Beqqali, Abdelaziz [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hansen, Jakob [Department of Forensic Medicine, Bioanalytical Unit, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Pinto, Yigal M. [Heart Failure Research Center, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boesen, Thomas [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Mogensen, Jens [Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Bross, Peter, E-mail: peter.bross@ki.au.dk [Research Unit for Molecular Medicine, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representative LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose that

  7. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha; Rasmussen, Torsten Bloch; Palmfeldt, Johan

    2013-01-01

    degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography....... The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms....../mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type...

  8. Proteomic identification of putative biomarkers for early detection of sudden cardiac death in a family with a LMNA gene mutation causing dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Irene; Rosa, Isaac; Bravo, Susana Belén; Guitián, Esteban; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Campuzano, Oscar; Brugada, Ramon; Mangas, Alipio; García, Ángel; Toro, Rocio

    2016-10-04

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a severe heart disease characterized by progressive ventricular dilation and impaired systolic function of the left ventricle. We recently identified a novel pathogenic mutation in the LMNA gene in a family affected by DCM showing sudden death background. We now aimed to identify potential biomarkers of disease status, as well as sudden death predictors, in members of this family. We analysed plasma samples from 14 family members carrying the mutation, four of which (with relevant clinical symptoms) were chosen for the proteomic analysis. Plasma samples from these four patients and from four sex- and age-matched healthy controls were processed for their enrichment in low- and medium-abundance proteins (ProteoMiner™) prior to proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE and MS. 111 spots were found to be differentially regulated between mutation carriers and control groups, 83 of which were successfully identified by MS, corresponding to 41 different ORFs. Some proteins of interest were validated either by turbidimetry or western blot in family members and healthy controls. Actin, alpha-1-antytripsin, clusterin, vitamin-D binding protein and antithrombin-III showed increased levels in plasma from the diseased group. We suggest following these proteins as putative biomarkers for the evaluation of DCM status in LMNA mutation carriers. We developed a proteomic analysis of plasma samples from a family showing history of dilated cardiomyopathy caused by a LMNA mutation, which may lead to premature death or cardiac transplant. We identified a number of proteins augmented in mutation carriers that could be followed as potential biomarkers for dilated cardiomyopathy on these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy associated with the heterozygous R482W mutation in LMNA gene - case study of three women from one family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabrdalik, Katarzyna; Strózik, Agnieszka; Minkina-Pędras, Mariola; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława; Młynarski, Wojciech; Grzeszczak, Władysław; Gumprecht, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Lipodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting adipose tissue distribution. Familial partial lipodystrophy of the Dunnigantype (FPLD) is a rare autosomal, dominant disorder caused by missense mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene where selective loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue from the limbs and trunk, and accumulation of fat in the neck and face, is usually associated with a variety of metabolic disorders including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis and high blood pressure.In this report we present clinical and molecular features of three Polish women with FLPD phenotype coming from one family (a motherand her two daughters). FPLD was recognised under the circumstances of diabetes treatment, where sequencing of LMNA gene revealed heterozygous R482W mutation. In order to be able to recognise monogenic diabetes associated with lipodystrophy, it is important to bevery precise in physical examination while diagnosing diabetes and to be aware of the necessity of performing genetic testing. Diabetes appropriate differential diagnosis is essential for the treatment strategy, anticipation of the disease progression, and determination of the prognosis. It is necessary for an individual mutation carrier to look carefully at the patient's family.

  10. Dropped head congenital muscular dystrophy caused by de novo mutations in LMNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoglu, Pakize; Quizon, Nicolas; Pergande, Matthias; Wang, Haicui; Polat, Ayşe Ipek; Ersen, Ayca; Özer, Erdener; Willkomm, Lena; Hiz Kurul, Semra; Heredia, Raúl; Yis, Uluç; Selcen, Duygu; Çirak, Sebahattin

    2017-04-01

    Dropped head syndrome is an easily recognizable clinical presentation of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy. Patients usually present in the first year of life with profound neck muscle weakness, dropped head, and elevated serum creatine kinase. Two patients exhibited head drop during infancy although they were able to sit independently. Later they developed progressive axial and limb-girdle weakness. Creatine kinase levels were elevated and muscle biopsies of both patients showed severe dystrophic changes. The distinctive clinical hallmark of the dropped head led us to the diagnosis of Lamin A/C-related congenital muscular dystrophy, with a pathogenic de novo mutation p.Glu31del in the head domain of the Lamin A/C gene in both patients. Remarkably, one patient also had a central involvement with white matter changes on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Lamin A/C-related dropped-head syndrome is a rapidly progressive congenital muscular dystrophy and may lead to loss of ambulation, respiratory insufficiency, and cardiac complications. Thus, the genetic diagnosis of dropped-head syndrome as L-CMD and the implicated clinical care protocols are of vital importance for these patients. This disease may be underdiagnosed, as only a few genetically confirmed cases have been reported. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel homozygous p.Arg527Leu LMNA mutation in two unrelated Egyptian families causes overlapping mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad; Madej-Pilarczyk, Agnieszka; Kozlowski, Lukasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Yahia, Sohier; Abdel-Hadi, Dina; Shams, Amany; Ahmad, Nermin; Hamed, Sahar; Puzianowska-Kuznicka, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD) is a rare disease resulting from a mutation of LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C. The most common mutation associated with this disease is a homozygous arginine 527 replacement by histidine. Three female patients originating from two unrelated families from Northeast Egypt were examined. Their growth was retarded; they had microcephaly, widened cranial sutures, prominent eyes and cheeks, micrognathia, dental crowding, hypoplastic mandible, acro-osteolysis of distal phalanges, and joint contractures. In addition, they presented some progeroid features, such as pinched nose, premature loss of teeth, loss of hair, scleroderma-like skin atrophy, spine rigidity, and waddling gait. The clinical presentation of the disease varied between the patient originating from Family 1 and patients from Family 2, suggesting that unknown, possibly epigenetic factors, modify the course of the disease. The first symptoms of the disease appeared at the age of 2.5 (a girl from Family 1), 5, and 3 years (girls from Family 2). All patients had the same, novel homozygous c.1580G>T LMNA mutation, resulting in the replacement of arginine 527 by leucine. Computational predictions of such substitution effects suggested that it might alter protein stability and increase the tendency for protein aggregation, and as a result, might influence its interaction with other proteins. In addition, restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis performed in 178 unrelated individuals showed that up to 1.12% of inhabitants of Northeast Egypt might be heterozygous carriers of this mutation, suggesting the presence of a founder effect in this area. PMID:22549407

  12. Mutation analysis of the LMNA gene in a child with Hutchinson-Gifford progeria syndrome%Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征LMNA基因突变研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳芳; 李乾; 郑利雄; 冯思航; 房思宁; 姚勇丰

    2014-01-01

    目的 报告1例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征,并进行分子遗传学诊断.方法 提取1例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征患儿及其父母外周血DNA,对LMNA基因1 1号外显子和侧翼序列进行测序,并以150例无关系健康人作为对照.结果 患者男,12月龄.出现躯干部紧张如硬皮病样改变、脱发,头皮静脉明显9个月.身高和体重低于同龄儿童平均值2个标准差.头部皮肤菲薄,头皮静脉清晰可见.躯干皮肤紧张变硬有光泽,干燥,少许细小脱屑,皮肤有斑点状色素加深和色素减退夹杂,鹅卵石样的皮肤硬化肥厚,下肢有皮下脂肪凹陷.X线片示指骨末端吸收.患儿LMNA基因11号外显子c.1824C>T杂合点突变(dbSNP:m58596362),父母及健康人对照均未检测到该位点突变.结论 LMNA基因1 1号外显子的c.1824C>T突变为该例Hutchinson-Gilford早老综合征的发病原因.%Objective To report a case of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome,and to make a molecular genetic diagnosis.Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from a 12-month-old child with HutchinsonGilford progeria syndrome,his parents,and 150 unrelated healthy controls.DNA was extracted from these samples,and PCR was performed to amplify exon 11 of the LMNA gene and its flanking sequence followed by sequencing.Results The patient presented with scleroderma-like tight skin on the trunk,hair loss and prominent scalp veins for 9 months,whose body height and weight were two standard deviations below the mean.Physical examination showed thin skin and prominent superficial veins over the scalp.The skin over the trunk was tight,hard,shiny and dry with a small number of tiny scales,mottled pigmentation and hypopigmentation,induration and hypertrophy giving a cobblestone-like appearance.The subcutaneous fat was diminished on the lower limbs.Skeletal X-ray examination of the left hand revealed phalangeal acroosteolysis.A known heterozygous mutation c.1824C > T (dbSNP:rs58596362

  13. Cell-extrinsic defective lymphocyte development in Lmna(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Hale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes all A-type lamins, result in a variety of human diseases termed laminopathies. Lmna(-/- mice appear normal at birth but become runted as early as 2 weeks of age and develop multiple tissue defects that mimic some aspects of human laminopathies. Lmna(-/- mice also display smaller spleens and thymuses. In this study, we investigated whether altered lymphoid organ sizes are correlated with specific defects in lymphocyte development. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lmna(-/- mice displayed severe age-dependent defects in T and B cell development which coincided with runting. Lmna(-/- bone marrow reconstituted normal T and B cell development in irradiated wild-type recipients, driving generation of functional and self-MHC restricted CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Transplantation of Lmna(-/- neonatal thymus lobes into syngeneic wild-type recipients resulted in good engraftment of thymic tissue and normal thymocyte development. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these data demonstrate that the severe defects in lymphocyte development that characterize Lmna(-/- mice do not result directly from the loss of A-type lamin function in lymphocytes or thymic stroma. Instead, the immune defects in Lmna(-/- mice likely reflect indirect damage, perhaps resulting from prolonged stress due to the striated muscle dystrophies that occur in these mice.

  14. Expression and localization of nuclear proteins in autosomal-dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy with LMNA R377H mutation

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    Ewald Andrea

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autosomal dominant form of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding for the lamins A and C (LMNA. Lamins are intermediate filament proteins which form the nuclear lamina underlying the inner nuclear membrane. We have studied the expression and the localization of nuclear envelope proteins in three different cell types and muscle tissue of an AD-EDMD patient carrying a point mutation R377H in the lamin A/C gene. Results Lymphoblastoid cells, skin fibroblasts, primary myoblasts and muscle thin sections were studied by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. Cellular levels of A-type lamins were reduced compared to control cells. In contrast, the amount of emerin and lamin B appeared unaltered. Cell synchronization experiments showed that the reduction of the cellular level of A-type lamin was due to instability of lamin A. By electron microscopy, we identified a proportion of nuclei with morphological alterations in lymphoblastoid cells, fibroblasts and mature muscle fibres. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that a major population of the lamin B receptor (LBR, an inner nuclear membrane protein, was recovered in the cytoplasm in association with the ER. In addition, the intranuclear organization of the active form of RNA polymerase II was markedly different in cells of this AD-EDMD patient. This aberrant intranuclear distribution was specifically observed in muscle cells where the pathology of EDMD predominates. Conclusions From our results we conclude: Firstly, that structural alterations of the nuclei which are found only in a minor fraction of lymphoblastoid cells and mature muscle fibres are not sufficient to explain the clinical pathology of EDMD; Secondly, that wild type lamin A is required not only for the retention of LBR in the inner nuclear membrane but also for a correct localization of the transcriptionally active RNA pol II in muscle cells. We speculate that

  15. Phenotype-Genotype Analysis of Chinese Patients with Early-Onset LMNA-Related Muscular Dystrophy.

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    Dandan Tan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the correlation between the phenotype and genotype of Chinese patients with early-onset lamin A (LMNA-related muscular dystrophy (MD. The clinical and myopathological data of 21 Chinese pediatric patients with early-onset LMNA-related MD were collected and analyzed. LMNA gene mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. Sublocalization of wild-type and mutant proteins were observed by immunofluorescence using cultured fibroblasts and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293 cell. Seven patients were diagnosed with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD and 14 were diagnosed with LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD. Four biopsy specimens from the L-CMD cases exhibited inflammatory changes. Abnormal nuclear morphology was observed with both transmission electron microscopy and lamin A/C staining. We identified 10 novel and nine known LMNA gene mutations in the 21 patients. Some mutations (c.91G>A, c.94_96delAAG, c.116A>G, c.745C>T, c.746G>A, and c.1580G>C were well correlated with EDMD or L-CMD. LMNA-related MD has a common symptom triad of muscle weakness, joint contractures, and cardiac involvement, but the severity of symptoms and disease progression differ greatly. Inflammatory change in biopsied muscle is a characteristic of early-stage L-CMD. Phenotype-genotype analysis determines that some mutations are well correlated with LMNA-related MD.

  16. Investigation of age-related changes in LMNA splicing and expression of progerin in human skeletal muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Johnsen, Russell D; Fabian, Victoria A; Fletcher, Sue; Mastaglia, Frank L.; Steve D Wilton

    2013-01-01

    Age-related changes in splice-forms of LMNA, which encodes the nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C, have not been investigated in skeletal muscle. In the rare premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), de novo point mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11, resulting in a 150 base deletion in LMNA mRNA and accumulation of a truncated protein isoform, progerin. The LMNA Δ150 progerin transcript has also been found in trace quantities in tissues of h...

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10 with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85% located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51% variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  19. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jonathan T; Muchir, Antoine; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells), cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  20. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  1. Mitotic defects lead to pervasive aneuploidy and accompany loss of RB1 activity in mouse LmnaDhe dermal fibroblasts.

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    C Herbert Pratt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamin A (LMNA is a component of the nuclear lamina and is mutated in several human diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD; OMIM ID# 181350 and the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS; OMIM ID# 176670. Cells from progeria patients exhibit cell cycle defects in both interphase and mitosis. Mouse models with loss of LMNA function have reduced Retinoblastoma protein (RB1 activity, leading to aberrant cell cycle control in interphase, but how mitosis is affected by LMNA is not well understood. RESULTS: We examined the cell cycle and structural phenotypes of cells from mice with the Lmna allele, Disheveled hair and ears (Lmna(Dhe. We found that dermal fibroblasts from heterozygous Lmna(Dhe (Lmna(Dhe/+ mice exhibit many phenotypes of human laminopathy cells. These include severe perturbations to the nuclear shape and lamina, increased DNA damage, and slow growth rates due to mitotic delay. Interestingly, Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts also had reduced levels of hypophosphorylated RB1 and the non-SMC condensin II-subunit D3 (NCAP-D3, a mitosis specific centromere condensin subunit that depends on RB1 activity. Mitotic check point control by mitotic arrest deficient-like 1 (MAD2L1 also was perturbed in Lmna(Dhe/+ cells. Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts were consistently aneuploid and had higher levels of micronuclei and anaphase bridges than normal fibroblasts, consistent with chromosome segregation defects. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that RB1 may be a key regulator of cellular phenotype in laminopathy-related cells, and suggest that the effects of LMNA on RB1 include both interphase and mitotic cell cycle control.

  2. Investigation of age-related changes in LMNA splicing and expression of progerin in human skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Johnsen, Russell D; Fabian, Victoria A; Fletcher, Sue; Mastaglia, Frank L; Wilton, Steve D

    2013-01-01

    Age-related changes in splice-forms of LMNA, which encodes the nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C, have not been investigated in skeletal muscle. In the rare premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), de novo point mutations in LMNA activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11, resulting in a 150 base deletion in LMNA mRNA and accumulation of a truncated protein isoform, progerin. The LMNA Δ150 progerin transcript has also been found in trace quantities in tissues of healthy people and its implication in 'natural' ageing has been proposed. We therefore investigated the expression of progerin and lamin A/C in normal human and mouse skeletal muscles of different ages. LMNA Δ150 was detected in most muscle samples from healthy individuals aged 16-71 years, but was not present in any mouse muscle samples up to the age of 18 months. Real time qPCR of human muscle samples showed that there was an age-related increase in both the full length lamin A and LMNA Δ150 transcripts, whereas their protein levels did not change significantly with age. These findings indicate that there is a basal level of mis-splicing during LMNA expression that does not change with ageing in human muscle, but at levels that do not result in increased aberrant protein. The significance of these findings in the pathophysiology of muscle ageing is uncertain and warrants further investigation.

  3. LMNA-Associated Cardiocutaneous Progeria: a Novel Autosomal Dominant Premature Aging Syndrome with Late Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Megan S.; Lindsay, Mark E.; Judge, Daniel P.; Barrowman, Jemima; Rhys, Colette Ap; Simonson, Lisa; Dietz, Harry C.; Michaelis, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a well-characterized premature aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding the nuclear scaffold proteins lamin A and C. In HGPS and related progerias, processing of prelamin A is blocked at a critical step mediated by the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24. Emerging evidence indicates that LMNA-linked progerias can be grouped into two classes: 1) the processing-deficient, early onset “typical” progerias (e.g. HGPS), and 2) the processing-proficient “atypical” progeria syndromes (APS) that are later in onset. Here we describe a novel progeria syndrome with prominent cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations belonging to the second class. We suggest the name LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria syndrome (LCPS) for this disorder. Affected patients are normal at birth but undergo progressive cutaneous changes in childhood and die in middle age of cardiovascular complications, including accelerated atherosclerosis, calcific valve disease, and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the proband demonstrated cancer susceptibility, a phenotype rarely described for LMNA-based progeria disorders. The LMNA mutation that causes LCPS is a heterozygous missense mutation resulting in an amino acid substitution (D300G) in the coiled-coil domain of lamin A/C. In skin fibroblasts isolated from the proband, the processing and levels of lamin A and C are normal. However, nuclear morphology is aberrant and rescued by treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs), as is also the case for HGPS and other laminopathies. Our findings advance knowledge of human LMNA progeria syndromes, and raise the possibility that typical and atypical progerias may converge upon a common mechanism to cause premature aging disease. PMID:23666920

  4. LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria: an inherited autosomal dominant premature aging syndrome with late onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Megan S; Lindsay, Mark E; Judge, Daniel P; Barrowman, Jemima; Ap Rhys, Colette; Simonson, Lisa; Dietz, Harry C; Michaelis, Susan

    2013-07-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA, which encodes the nuclear scaffold proteins lamin A and C. In HGPS and related progerias, processing of prelamin A is blocked at a critical step mediated by the zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24. LMNA-linked progerias can be grouped into two classes: (1) the processing-deficient, early onset "typical" progerias (e.g., HGPS), and (2) the processing-proficient "atypical" progeria syndromes (APS) that are later in onset. Here we describe a previously unrecognized progeria syndrome with prominent cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations belonging to the second class. We suggest the name LMNA-associated cardiocutaneous progeria syndrome (LCPS) for this disorder. Affected patients are normal at birth but undergo progressive cutaneous changes in childhood and die in middle age of cardiovascular complications, including accelerated atherosclerosis, calcific valve disease, and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the proband demonstrated cancer susceptibility, a phenotype rarely described for LMNA-based progeria disorders. The LMNA mutation that caused LCPS in this family is a heterozygous c.899A>G (p.D300G) mutation predicted to alter the coiled-coil domain of lamin A/C. In skin fibroblasts isolated from the proband, the processing and levels of lamin A and C are normal. However, nuclear morphology is aberrant and rescued by treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors, as is also the case for HGPS and other laminopathies. Our findings advance knowledge of human LMNA progeria syndromes, and raise the possibility that typical and atypical progerias may converge upon a common mechanism to cause premature aging disease.

  5. A ceRNA analysis on LMNA gene focusing on the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a rare dominant human disease of genetic origin. The average life expectancy is about 20 years, patients’ life quality is still very poor and no efficient therapy has yet been developed. It is caused by mutation of the LMNA gene, which results in accumulation in the nuclear membrane of a particular splicing form of Lamin-A called progerin. The mechanism by which progerin perturbs cellular homeostasis and leads to the symptoms is still under debate. Micro-RNAs are able to negatively regulate transcription by coupling with the 3’ UnTranslated Region of messenger RNAs. Several Micro-RNAs recognize the same 3’ UnTranslated Region and each Micro-RNA can recognize multiple 3’ UnTranslated Regions of different messenger RNAs. When different messenger RNAs are co-regulated via a similar panel of micro-RNAs, these messengers are called Competing Endogenous RNAs, or ceRNAs. The 3’ UnTranslated Region of the longest LMNA transcript was analysed looking for its ceRNAs. The aim of this study was to search for candidate genes and gene ontology functions possibly influenced by LMNA mutations that may exert a role in progeria development. Results 11 miRNAs were isolated as potential LMNA regulators. By computational analysis, the miRNAs pointed to 17 putative LMNA ceRNAs. Gene ontology analysis of isolated ceRNAs showed an enrichment in RNA interference and control of cell cycle functions. Conclusion This study isolated novel genes and functions potentially involved in LMNA network of regulation that could be involved in laminopathies such as the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. PMID:23317481

  6. Low and high expressing alleles of the LMNA gene: implications for laminopathy disease development.

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    Sofía Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Today, there are at least a dozen different genetic disorders caused by mutations within the LMNA gene, and collectively, they are named laminopathies. Interestingly, the same mutation can cause phenotypes with different severities or even different disorders and might, in some cases, be asymptomatic. We hypothesized that one possible contributing mechanism for this phenotypic variability could be the existence of high and low expressing alleles in the LMNA locus. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed an allele-specific absolute quantification method for lamin A and lamin C transcripts using the polymorphic rs4641(C/TLMNA coding SNP. The contribution of each allele to the total transcript level was investigated in nine informative human primary dermal fibroblast cultures from Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS and unaffected controls. Our results show differential expression of the two alleles. The C allele is more frequently expressed and accounts for ∼70% of the lamin A and lamin C transcripts. Analysis of samples from six patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome showed that the c.1824C>T, p.G608G mutation is located in both the C and the T allele, which might account for the variability in phenotype seen among HGPS patients. Our method should be useful for further studies of human samples with mutations in the LMNA gene and to increase the understanding of the link between genotype and phenotype in laminopathies.

  7. Cardioembolic stroke prompting diagnosis of LMNA-associated Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

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    Redondo-Vergé, Luis; Yaou, Rabah Ben; Fernández-Recio, María; Dinca, Luminita; Richard, Pascale; Bonne, Gisèle

    2011-10-01

    The diagnosis of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is suggested by the combination of musculoskeletal weakness and wasting, joint contractures, and cardiac disease. Herein we report a patient in whom an ischemic stroke prompted the diagnosis of EDMD. A mutation in the LMNA gene (c.266G>T, p.Arg89Leu) was found. It had been reported previously exclusively with isolated cardiac disease, thus reinforcing the high phenotypic heterogeneity of laminopathies.

  8. New Lmna knock-in mice provide a molecular mechanism for the 'segmental aging' in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hea-Jin; Tu, Yiping; Yang, Shao H; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Wu, Daniel; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2014-03-15

    Lamins A and C (products of the LMNA gene) are found in roughly equal amounts in peripheral tissues, but the brain produces mainly lamin C and little lamin A. In HeLa cells and fibroblasts, the expression of prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A) can be reduced by miR-9, but the relevance of those cell culture studies to lamin A regulation in the brain was unclear. To address this issue, we created two new Lmna knock-in alleles, one (Lmna(PLAO-5NT)) with a 5-bp mutation in a predicted miR-9 binding site in prelamin A's 3' UTR, and a second (Lmna(PLAO-UTR)) in which prelamin A's 3' UTR was replaced with lamin C's 3' UTR. Neither allele had significant effects on lamin A levels in peripheral tissues; however, both substantially increased prelamin A transcript levels and lamin A protein levels in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. The increase in lamin A expression in the brain was more pronounced with the Lmna(PLAO-UTR) allele than with the Lmna(PLAO-5NT) allele. With both alleles, the increased expression of prelamin A transcripts and lamin A protein was greater in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. Our studies demonstrate the in vivo importance of prelamin A's 3' UTR and its miR-9 binding site in regulating lamin A expression in the brain. The reduced expression of prelamin A in the brain likely explains why children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (a progeroid syndrome caused by a mutant form of prelamin A) are spared from neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Uncoordinated transcription and compromised muscle function in the lmna-null mouse model of Emery- Emery-Dreyfuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnocchi, Viola F; Scharner, Juergen; Huang, Zhe; Brady, Ken; Lee, Jaclyn S; White, Robert B; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sun, Yin-Biao; Ellis, Juliet A; Zammit, Peter S

    2011-02-22

    LMNA encodes both lamin A and C: major components of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in LMNA underlie a range of tissue-specific degenerative diseases, including those that affect skeletal muscle, such as autosomal-Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (A-EDMD) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1B. Here, we examine the morphology and transcriptional activity of myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction and the muscle contraction dynamics in the lmna-null mouse model of A-EDMD. We found that there were fewer myonuclei in lmna-null mice, of which ∼50% had morphological abnormalities. Assaying transcriptional activity by examining acetylated histone H3 and PABPN1 levels indicated that there was a lack of coordinated transcription between myonuclei lacking lamin A/C. Myonuclei with abnormal morphology and transcriptional activity were distributed along the length of the myofibre, but accumulated at the myotendinous junction. Indeed, in addition to the presence of abnormal myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction was perturbed, with disorganised sarcomeres and reduced interdigitation with the tendon, together with lipid and collagen deposition. Functionally, muscle contraction became severely affected within weeks of birth, with specific force generation dropping as low as ∼65% and ∼27% of control values in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles respectively. These observations illustrate the importance of lamin A/C for correct myonuclear function, which likely acts synergistically with myotendinous junction disorganisation in the development of A-EDMD, and the consequential reduction in force generation and muscle wasting.

  10. Clinical and genetic study of lipodystrophic syndrome caused by LMNA mutation%LMNA基因突变所致先天性家族性部分脂肪萎缩综合征2型的临床遗传学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于淼; 林泽明; 王彤; 齐翠娟; 张茜; 肖新华

    2016-01-01

    目的通过1例脂肪萎缩综合征患者的临床特点和遗传信息来探索脂肪萎缩综合征的发病机制。方法收集2015年12月北京协和医院内分泌科收治的1例脂肪萎缩综合征患者的临床资料,并对患者进行弥散加权成像脂肪定量、瘦素和脂联素水平测定及脂肪萎缩综合征相关基因测序。结果弥散加权成像提示患者全身多处皮下脂肪萎缩;瘦素水平为0,脂联素水平为3 mg/L;基因检测提示患者存在LMNA基因突变,突变位点为c.1045C>T(p.349R>W)。结论患者病程中出现特征性脂肪萎缩面貌、胰岛素抵抗和脂代谢紊乱等典型脂肪萎缩综合征临床特点。患者同时存在LMNA基因突变及瘦素和脂联素水平显著低下,这些因素可能在疾病的发生发展中起着重要作用。%Objective To explore the underlying pathogenic mechanism of lipodystrophic syndrome by analyzing the clinical manifestation and genetic information of a patient with lipodystrophy. Methods Clinical and laboratory data of a patient with lipodystrophy admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital in December 2015 were investigated. The quantification of adipose tissue was achieved by diffuse weight imaging. The levels of leptin and adiponectin were determined. Gene mutations related to congenital lipodystrophy were tested by Sanger sequencing. Results Diffuse weight imaging showed atrophy of subcutaneous adipose tissue in multiple sites of the body. The levels of leptin and adiponectin were 0 and 3 mg/L respectively. Sanger sequencing result elicited LMNA mutation with c.1045C>T(p.349R>W). Conclusions The patient presents with classic lipodystrophic manifestation, including characteristic lipoatrophic appearance, insulin resistance and disorder of lipid metabolism and extremely low levels of leptin and adiponectin. The LMNA mutation and the low levels of leptin and adiponectin may contribute to the pathogenesis of lipodystrophic syndrome.

  11. Cardiomyocyte-specific expression of lamin a improves cardiac function in Lmna-/- mice.

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    Richard L Frock

    Full Text Available Lmna(-/- mice display multiple tissue defects and die by 6-8 weeks of age reportedly from dilated cardiomyopathy with associated conduction defects. We sought to determine whether restoration of lamin A in cardiomyocytes improves cardiac function and extends the survival of Lmna(-/- mice. We observed increased total desmin protein levels and disorganization of the cytoplasmic desmin network in ~20% of Lmna(-/- ventricular myocytes, rescued in a cell-autonomous manner in Lmna(-/- mice expressing a cardiac-specific lamin A transgene (Lmna(-/-; Tg. Lmna(-/-; Tg mice displayed significantly increased contractility and preservation of myocardial performance compared to Lmna(-/- mice. Lmna(-/-; Tg mice attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation relative to Lmna(-/- mice, potentially underlying the improved localization of connexin43 to the intercalated disc. Electrocardiographic recordings from Lmna(-/- mice revealed arrhythmic events and increased frequency of PR interval prolongation, which is partially rescued in Lmna(-/-; Tg mice. These findings support our observation that Lmna(-/-; Tg mice have a 12% median extension in lifespan compared to Lmna(-/- mice. While significant, Lmna(-/-; Tg mice only have modest improvement in cardiac function and survival likely stemming from the observation that only 40% of Lmna(-/-; Tg cardiomyocytes have detectable lamin A expression. Cardiomyocyte-specific restoration of lamin A in Lmna(-/- mice improves heart-specific pathology and extends lifespan, demonstrating that the cardiac pathology of Lmna(-/- mice limits survival. The expression of lamin A is sufficient to rescue certain cellular defects associated with loss of A-type lamins in cardiomyocytes in a cell-autonomous fashion.

  12. New Lmna knock-in mice provide a molecular mechanism for the ‘segmental aging’ in Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hea-Jin; Tu, Yiping; Yang, Shao H.; Tatar, Angelica; Nobumori, Chika; Wu, Daniel; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.

    2014-01-01

    Lamins A and C (products of the LMNA gene) are found in roughly equal amounts in peripheral tissues, but the brain produces mainly lamin C and little lamin A. In HeLa cells and fibroblasts, the expression of prelamin A (the precursor to lamin A) can be reduced by miR-9, but the relevance of those cell culture studies to lamin A regulation in the brain was unclear. To address this issue, we created two new Lmna knock-in alleles, one (LmnaPLAO-5NT) with a 5-bp mutation in a predicted miR-9 binding site in prelamin A's 3′ UTR, and a second (LmnaPLAO-UTR) in which prelamin A's 3′ UTR was replaced with lamin C's 3′ UTR. Neither allele had significant effects on lamin A levels in peripheral tissues; however, both substantially increased prelamin A transcript levels and lamin A protein levels in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. The increase in lamin A expression in the brain was more pronounced with the LmnaPLAO-UTR allele than with the LmnaPLAO-5NT allele. With both alleles, the increased expression of prelamin A transcripts and lamin A protein was greater in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum. Our studies demonstrate the in vivo importance of prelamin A's 3′ UTR and its miR-9 binding site in regulating lamin A expression in the brain. The reduced expression of prelamin A in the brain likely explains why children with Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (a progeroid syndrome caused by a mutant form of prelamin A) are spared from neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24203701

  13. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  14. Altered chromosomal positioning, compaction, and gene expression with a lamin A/C gene mutation.

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    Stephanie K Mewborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. METHODS/FINDINGS: To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. CONCLUSIONS: These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered.

  15. Uncoordinated transcription and compromised muscle function in the lmna-null mouse model of Emery- Emery-Dreyfuss muscular dystrophy.

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    Viola F Gnocchi

    Full Text Available LMNA encodes both lamin A and C: major components of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in LMNA underlie a range of tissue-specific degenerative diseases, including those that affect skeletal muscle, such as autosomal-Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (A-EDMD and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 1B. Here, we examine the morphology and transcriptional activity of myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction and the muscle contraction dynamics in the lmna-null mouse model of A-EDMD. We found that there were fewer myonuclei in lmna-null mice, of which ∼50% had morphological abnormalities. Assaying transcriptional activity by examining acetylated histone H3 and PABPN1 levels indicated that there was a lack of coordinated transcription between myonuclei lacking lamin A/C. Myonuclei with abnormal morphology and transcriptional activity were distributed along the length of the myofibre, but accumulated at the myotendinous junction. Indeed, in addition to the presence of abnormal myonuclei, the structure of the myotendinous junction was perturbed, with disorganised sarcomeres and reduced interdigitation with the tendon, together with lipid and collagen deposition. Functionally, muscle contraction became severely affected within weeks of birth, with specific force generation dropping as low as ∼65% and ∼27% of control values in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles respectively. These observations illustrate the importance of lamin A/C for correct myonuclear function, which likely acts synergistically with myotendinous junction disorganisation in the development of A-EDMD, and the consequential reduction in force generation and muscle wasting.

  16. LMNA Sequences of 60,706 Unrelated Individuals Reveal 132 Novel Missense Variants in A-Type Lamins and Suggest a Link between Variant p.G602S and Type 2 Diabetes

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    Alyssa Florwick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LMNA, encoding nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A and C, cause multiple diseases (‘laminopathies’ including muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD2, insulin resistance syndrome and progeria. To assess the prevalence of LMNA missense mutations (‘variants’ in a broad, ethnically diverse population, we compared missense alleles found among 60,706 unrelated individuals in the ExAC cohort to those identified in 1,404 individuals in the laminopathy database (UMD-LMNA. We identified 169 variants in the ExAC cohort, of which 37 (∼22% are disease-associated including p.I299V (allele frequency 0.0402%, p.G602S (allele frequency 0.0262% and p.R644C (allele frequency 0.124%, suggesting certain LMNA mutations are more common than previously recognized. Independent analysis of LMNA variants via the type 2 diabetes (T2D Knowledge Portal showed that variant p.G602S associated significantly with type 2 diabetes (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 4.58, and was more frequent in African Americans (allele frequency 0.297%. The FPLD2-associated variant I299V was most prevalent in Latinos (allele frequency 0.347%. The ExAC cohort also revealed 132 novel LMNA missense variants including p.K108E (limited to individuals with psychiatric disease; predicted to perturb coil-1B, p.R397C and p.R427C (predicted to perturb filament biogenesis, p.G638R and p.N660D (predicted to perturb prelamin A processing, and numerous Ig-fold variants predicted to perturb phenotypically characteristic protein–protein interactions. Overall, this two-pronged strategy— mining a large database for missense variants in a single gene (LMNA, coupled to knowledge about the structure, biogenesis and functions of A-type lamins— revealed an unexpected number of LMNA variants, including novel variants predicted to perturb lamin assembly or function. Interestingly, this study also correlated novel variant p.K108E with psychiatric

  17. Clinical and functional characterization of a novel mutation in lamin a/c gene in a multigenerational family with arrhythmogenic cardiac laminopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forleo, Cinzia; Carmosino, Monica; Resta, Nicoletta; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Valecce, Rosanna; Sorrentino, Sandro; Iacoviello, Massimo; Pisani, Francesco; Procino, Giuseppe; Gerbino, Andrea; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Simone, Cristiano; Calore, Martina; Torretta, Silvia; Svelto, Maria; Favale, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) were associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and, recently, were related to severe forms of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Both genetic and phenotypic overlap between DCM and ARVC was observed; molecular pathomechanisms leading to the cardiac phenotypes caused by LMNA mutations are not yet fully elucidated. This study involved a large Italian family, spanning 4 generations, with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy of different phenotypes, including ARVC, DCM, system conduction defects, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Mutation screening of LMNA and ARVC-related genes PKP2, DSP, DSG2, DSC2, JUP, and CTNNA3 was performed. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation (c.418_438dup) in LMNA gene exon 2, occurring in a highly conserved protein domain across several species. This newly identified variant was not found in 250 ethnically-matched control subjects. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies suggested a co-segregation of the LMNA mutation with the disease phenotype and an incomplete and age-related penetrance. Based on clinical, pedigree, and molecular genetic data, this mutation was considered likely disease-causing. To clarify its potential pathophysiologic impact, functional characterization of this LMNA mutant was performed in cultured cardiomyocytes expressing EGFP-tagged wild-type and mutated LMNA constructs, and indicated an increased nuclear envelope fragility, leading to stress-induced apoptosis as the main pathogenetic mechanism. This study further expands the role of the LMNA gene in the pathogenesis of cardiac laminopathies, suggesting that LMNA should be included in mutation screening of patients with suspected arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, particularly when they have ECG evidence for conduction defects. The combination of clinical, genetic, and functional data contribute insights into the pathogenesis of this form of life-threatening arrhythmogenic cardiac laminopathy.

  18. Clinical and functional characterization of a novel mutation in lamin a/c gene in a multigenerational family with arrhythmogenic cardiac laminopathy.

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    Cinzia Forleo

    Full Text Available Mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA were associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and, recently, were related to severe forms of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. Both genetic and phenotypic overlap between DCM and ARVC was observed; molecular pathomechanisms leading to the cardiac phenotypes caused by LMNA mutations are not yet fully elucidated. This study involved a large Italian family, spanning 4 generations, with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy of different phenotypes, including ARVC, DCM, system conduction defects, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Mutation screening of LMNA and ARVC-related genes PKP2, DSP, DSG2, DSC2, JUP, and CTNNA3 was performed. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation (c.418_438dup in LMNA gene exon 2, occurring in a highly conserved protein domain across several species. This newly identified variant was not found in 250 ethnically-matched control subjects. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies suggested a co-segregation of the LMNA mutation with the disease phenotype and an incomplete and age-related penetrance. Based on clinical, pedigree, and molecular genetic data, this mutation was considered likely disease-causing. To clarify its potential pathophysiologic impact, functional characterization of this LMNA mutant was performed in cultured cardiomyocytes expressing EGFP-tagged wild-type and mutated LMNA constructs, and indicated an increased nuclear envelope fragility, leading to stress-induced apoptosis as the main pathogenetic mechanism. This study further expands the role of the LMNA gene in the pathogenesis of cardiac laminopathies, suggesting that LMNA should be included in mutation screening of patients with suspected arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, particularly when they have ECG evidence for conduction defects. The combination of clinical, genetic, and functional data contribute insights into the pathogenesis of this form of life-threatening arrhythmogenic

  19. Lamin A/C mutation affecting primarily the right side of the heart

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    Laura Ollila

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available LMNA mutations are amongst the most important causes of familial dilated cardiomyopathy. The most important cause of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is desmosomal pathology. The aim of the study was to elucidate the role of LMNA mutations among Finnish cardiomyopathy patients. We screened 135 unrelated cardiomyopathy patients for LMNA mutations. Because of unusual phenotype, two patients were screened for the known Finnish ARVC-related mutations of desmosomal genes, and their Plakophilin-2b gene was sequenced. Myocardial samples from two patients were examined by immunohistochemical plakoglobin staining and in one case by electron microscopy. We found a new LMNA mutation Phe237Ser in a family of five affected members with a cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart. The phenotype resembles ARVC but does not fulfill the Task Force Criteria. The main clinical manifestations of the mutation were severe tricuspid insufficiency, right ventricular enlargement and failure. Three of the affected patients died of the heart disease, and the two living patients received heart transplants at ages 44 and 47. Electron microscopy showed nuclear blebbing compatible with laminopathy. Immunohisto - chemical analysis did not suggest desmosomal pathology. No desmosomal mutations were found. The Phe237Ser LMNA mutation causes a phenotype different from traditional cardiolaminopathy. Our findings suggest that cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart is not always caused by desmosomal pathology. Our observations highlight the challenges in classifying cardiomyopathies, as there often is significant overlap between the traditional categories.

  20. LMNA knock-down affects differentiation and progression of human neuroblastoma cells.

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    Giovanna Maresca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB is one of the most aggressive tumors that occur in childhood. Although genes, such as MYCN, have been shown to be involved in the aggressiveness of the disease, the identification of new biological markers is still desirable. The induction of differentiation is one of the strategies used in the treatment of neuroblastoma. A-type lamins are components of the nuclear lamina and are involved in differentiation. We studied the role of Lamin A/C in the differentiation and progression of neuroblastoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Knock-down of Lamin A/C (LMNA-KD in neuroblastoma cells blocked retinoic acid-induced differentiation, preventing neurites outgrowth and the expression of neural markers. The genome-wide gene-expression profile and the proteomic analysis of LMNA-KD cells confirmed the inhibition of differentiation and demonstrated an increase of aggressiveness-related genes and molecules resulting in augmented migration/invasion, and increasing the drug resistance of the cells. The more aggressive phenotype acquired by LMNA-KD cells was also maintained in vivo after injection into nude mice. A preliminary immunohistochemistry analysis of Lamin A/C expression in nine primary stages human NB indicated that this protein is poorly expressed in most of these cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time in neuroblastoma cells that Lamin A/C plays a central role in the differentiation, and that the loss of this protein gave rise to a more aggressive tumor phenotype.

  1. Investigation of splicing changes and post-translational processing of LMNA in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yue-Bei; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; Johnsen, Russell; Fabian, Vicki; Needham, Merrilee; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2013-01-01

    Some features of sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM) suggest that there is acceleration of the normal ageing process in muscle tissue. LMNA encodes the nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C through alternative splicing, and aberrant splicing of exon 11 leads to the premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Progerin, the pathogenic isoform expressed in HGPS tissues, has also been detected at low levels in tissues of normal individuals with aging. We therefore investigated the alternative splicing of LMNA gene transcripts, and the post-translational processing of prelamin A, in s-IBM and control muscle samples. Age-related low level expression of the progerin transcript was detected in both s-IBM and control muscles, but was not increased in s-IBM and there was no increase in progerin protein or demonstrable accumulation of intermediate prelamin isoforms in the s-IBM muscles. However, an age-related shift in the balance of splicing towards lamin A-related transcripts, which was present in normal muscles, was not found in s-IBM. Our findings indicate that while there are changes in the patterns of LMNA splicing in s-IBM muscle which are probably secondary to the underlying pathological process, it is unlikely that aberrant splicing of exon 11 or defective post-translational processing of prelamin A are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  2. Novel and recurrent mutations in lamin A/C in patients with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C A; Lanning, R W; McKinney, K Q; Salvino, A R; Cherniske, E; Crowe, C A; Darras, B T; Gominak, S; Greenberg, C R; Grosmann, C; Heydemann, P; Mendell, J R; Pober, B R; Sasaki, T; Shapiro, F; Simpson, D A; Suchowersky, O; Spence, J E

    2001-09-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by slowly progressive muscle wasting and weakness; early contractures of the elbows, Achilles tendons, and spine; and cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac conduction defects. Clinically indistinguishable X-linked and autosomal forms of EDMD have been described. Mutations in the STA gene, encoding the nuclear envelope protein emerin, are responsible for X-linked EDMD, while mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamins A and C by alternative splicing have been found in patients with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and sporadic forms of EDMD. We report mutations in LMNA found in four familial and seven sporadic cases of EDMD, including seven novel mutations. Nine missense mutations and two small in-frame deletions were detected distributed throughout the gene. Most mutations (7/11) were detected within the LMNA exons encoding the central rod domain common to both lamins A/C. All of these missense mutations alter residues in the lamin A/C proteins conserved throughout evolution, implying an essential structural and/or functional role of these residues. One severely affected patient possesed two mutations, one specific to lamin A that may modify the phenotype of this patient. Mutations in LMNA were frequently identified among patients with sporadic and familial forms of EDMD. Further studies are needed to identify the factors modifying disease phenotype among patients harboring mutations within lamin A/C and to determine the effect of various mutations on lamin A/C structure and function.

  3. Complex phenotype linked to a mutation in exon 11 of the lamin A/C gene: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Rita G; Santos Gonçalves, Inês; Veiga, Fátima; Mendes Pedro, Mónica; Pinto, Fausto J; Brito, Dulce

    2017-09-01

    The lamin A/C (LMNA) gene encodes lamins A and C, which have an important role in nuclear cohesion and chromatin organization. Mutations in this gene usually lead to the so-called laminopathies, the primary cardiac manifestations of which are dilated cardiomyopathy and intracardiac conduction defects. Some mutations, associated with lipodystrophy but not cardiomyopathy, have been linked to metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and severe dyslipidemia. Herein we describe a new phenotype associated with a mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes. A 64-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1718C>T, Ser573Leu) presented with severe symptomatic ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. She underwent septal alcohol ablation, followed by Morrow myectomy. The patient was also diagnosed with severe dyslipidemia, diabetes and obesity, and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. No other characteristics of LMNA mutation-related phenotypes were identified. The development of type III atrioventricular block with no apparent cause, and mildly depressed systolic function, prompted referral for cardiac resynchronization therapy. In conclusion, the association between LMNA mutations and different phenotypes is complex and not fully understood, and can present with a broad spectrum of severity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and molecular genetic spectrum of autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy due to mutations of the lamin A/C gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, G; Mercuri, E; Muchir, A; Urtizberea, A; Bécane, H M; Recan, D; Merlini, L; Wehnert, M; Boor, R; Reuner, U; Vorgerd, M; Wicklein, E M; Eymard, B; Duboc, D; Penisson-Besnier, I; Cuisset, J M; Ferrer, X; Desguerre, I; Lacombe, D; Bushby, K; Pollitt, C; Toniolo, D; Fardeau, M; Schwartz, K; Muntoni, F

    2000-08-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by early contractures of the elbows and Achilles tendons, slowly progressive muscle wasting and weakness, and life-threatening cardiomyopathy with conduction blocks. We recently identified LMNA encoding two nuclear envelope proteins, lamins A and C, to be implicated in the autosomal dominant form of EDMD. Here, we report on the variability of the phenotype and spectrum of LMNA mutations in 53 autosomal dominant EDMD patients (36 members of 6 families and 17 sporadic cases). Twelve of the 53 patients showed cardiac involvement exclusively, although the remaining 41 all showed muscle weakness and contractures. We were able to identify a common phenotype among the patients with skeletal muscle involvement, consisting of humeroperoneal wasting and weakness, scapular winging, rigidity of the spine, and elbow and Achilles tendon contractures. The disease course was generally slow, but we observed either a milder phenotype characterized by late onset and a mild degree of weakness and contractures or a more severe phenotype with early presentation and a rapidly progressive course in a few cases. Mutation analysis identified 18 mutations in LMNA (i.e., 1 nonsense mutation, 2 deletions of a codon, and 15 missense mutations). All the mutations were distributed between exons 1 and 9 in the region of LMNA that is common to lamins A and C. LMNA mutations arose de novo in 76% of the cases; 2 of these de novo mutations were typical hot spots, and 2 others were identified in 2 unrelated cases. There was no clear correlation between the phenotype and type or localization of the mutations within the gene. Moreover, a marked inter- and intra-familial variability in the clinical expression of LMNA mutations exists, ranging from patients expressing the full clinical picture of EDMD to those characterized only by cardiac involvement, which points toward a significant role of possible modifier genes in the course of this disease

  5. Heterozygous Lmna(delK32) mice develop dilated cardiomyopathy through a combined pathomechanism of haploinsufficiency and peptide toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattin, M. E.; Bertrand, A. T.; Schlossarek, S.

    2013-01-01

    itself has a clear deleterious effect on engineered heart tissues force of contraction, it also leads to the nuclear aggregation of viral-mediated expression of K32-lamin. In conclusion, Het mice are the first knock-in Lmna model with cardiac-specific phenotype at the heterozygous state. Altogether, our...

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  7. Identification of a New Lamin A/C Mutation in a Chinese Family Affected with Atrioventricular Block as the Prominent Phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小艳; 王擎; 桂乐; 刘木根; 张贤钦; 金润铭; 李伟; 闫露; 杜戎; 王秋芬; 祝建芳; 杨钧国

    2010-01-01

    Even though mutations in LMNA have been reported in patients with typical dilated cardio-myopathy(DCM)and atrioventricular block(AVB)previously,the purpose of this study was to disclose this novel genetic abnormality in one Chinese family with the atypical phenotype of progressive AVB followed by DCM with normal QRS interval.Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the AVB gene in this family to a marker at chromosome 1q21.2,where the LMNA gene was located.Direct DNA sequence analysis revealed a heterozygous G t...

  8. Abberent expression analysis of LMNA gene in hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Afifa; Khan, Mohammad Haroon; Rashid, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by de novo dominant point mutations of the genes encoding nuclear lamina proteins, leading towards premature aging. A protein sequence is subjected to mutations in nature which can affect the function and folding pattern of the protein by different ways. Mutations involved in HGPS were identified and were substituted in the seed sequence retrieved from the UniProt database to get the mutated versions. Tertiary structure of the Lamin A protein was previously unpredicted so was performed for all the mutated as well as for the seed protein to analyze the effects of mutations on the protein structure, folding and interactions. All the predicted models were refined and validated through multiple servers for multiple parameters. The validated 3D structure of seed protein was then successfully submitted to the Protein Model Database and was assigned with the PMDB ID PM0077829. All the predicted structures were superimposed with a root mean square deviation value of 7.0 Å and a high Dali Z-score of 1.9. It was observed that mutations affected physiochemical properties as well as instability index and thus is affecting the domains in specific and the whole structure in general. It was further analyzed that HGPS is the result of affected Lamin a protein interactions with other integral and binding proteins in the inner nuclear membrane affecting the link in between the nuclear membrane and the network of the lamina. PMID:22493523

  9. POLD1 Germline Mutations in Patients Initially Diagnosed with Werner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Davor; Hisama, Fuki M; Szakszon, Katalin; Saha, Bidisha; Sanjuanelo, Alexander Barrios; Salbert, Bonnie A; Steele, Pamela D; Baldwin, Jennifer; Brown, W Ted; Piussan, Charles; Plauchu, Henri; Szilvássy, Judit; Horkay, Edit; Högel, Josef; Martin, George M; Herr, Alan J; Oshima, Junko; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are rare, heterogeneous disorders characterized by signs of premature aging affecting more than one tissue or organ. A prototypic example is the Werner syndrome (WS), caused by biallelic germline mutations in the Werner helicase gene (WRN). While heterozygous lamin A/C (LMNA) mutations are found in a few nonclassical cases of WS, another 10%-15% of patients initially diagnosed with WS do not have mutations in WRN or LMNA. Germline POLD1 mutations were recently reported in five patients with another segmental progeroid disorder: mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features syndrome. Here, we describe eight additional patients with heterozygous POLD1 mutations, thereby substantially expanding the characterization of this new example of segmental progeroid disorders. First, we identified POLD1 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with WS. Second, we describe POLD1 mutation carriers without clinically relevant hearing impairment or mandibular underdevelopment, both previously thought to represent obligate diagnostic features. These patients also exhibit a lower incidence of metabolic abnormalities and joint contractures. Third, we document postnatal short stature and premature greying/loss of hair in POLD1 mutation carriers. We conclude that POLD1 germline mutations can result in a variably expressed and probably underdiagnosed segmental progeroid syndrome.

  10. Study on the lmna gene knockdown in zebrafish embryo with morpholino oligonucleotides%利用吗啉代寡核苷酸技术下调早期斑马鱼胚胎lmna 基因的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丰; 黄慧敏; 王志华; 吴西军; 何志旭; 舒莉萍

    2016-01-01

    目的:利用吗啉代寡核苷酸技术建立下调斑马鱼 lmna 基因的技术方法。方法在斑马鱼 lmna 基因序列中选择靶点,设计针对斑马鱼 lmna 基因的吗啉代寡核苷酸序列(lmna-MO),构建能特异指示 lmna 基因表达的 lmna-EGFP-pCS2+重组质粒,并通过显微注射方式将二者共注射入斑马鱼胚胎中,通过观察胚胎中绿色荧光表达量反应 lmna 基因表达量,并通过蛋白质印迹法检测胚胎中 lamin 蛋白表达量。结果蛋白质印迹法检测斑马鱼体内 lamin 蛋白的表达,分别有大小为69 KD 和62 KD 两种蛋白表达。设计并构建了 lmna-MO 和重组质粒 lmna-EGFP-pCS2+,单独注射 lmna-EGFP-pCS2+质粒后观察到从6 hpf 到96 hpf 胚胎均有绿色荧光蛋白表达;二者共注射后观察到,与对照组相比,实验组从6 hpf 至30 hpf 胚胎中绿色荧光蛋白表达量均不同程度下降或消失;蛋白质印迹实验结果显示实验组胚胎内 lamin 蛋白表达量明显下降。表明已成功下调了斑马鱼胚胎 lmna 基因表达。结论可通过 lmna-MO 和重组质粒 lmna-EGFP-pCS2+共注射方法下调斑马鱼 lmna 基因表达,并通过绿色荧光蛋白表达量反映下调效果。该方法可为深入研究人核纤层病提供良好的动物模型。%Objective Lamins are the major components of nuclear lamina underneath the inner nuclear membrane (INM).Lamins express in most cells and are involved in the whole process of growth, also play a major role in cell stability and embryonic development.Mutant in human LMNA gene may lead to a series of disorders, which are similar to progeria or other aging-associate syndrome.In this study, we report a new lmna knockdown animal model generated in our laboratory in order to provide a useful tool for studying laminopathies.Methods Two plasmids tagged to zebrafish lmna gene were designed based on morpholino oligonucleotides technology

  11. Nesprin-1 mutations in human and murine cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric J.; Kim, Gene; DeWitt, Megan M.; Zhang, Yuan; Earley, Judy U.; Depreux, Frederic F.S.; Holaska, James; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding the nuclear membrane proteins, lamins A and C, produce cardiac and muscle disease. In the heart, these autosomal dominant LMNA mutations lead to cardiomyopathy frequently associated with cardiac conduction system disease. Herein, we describe a patient with the R374H missense variant in nesprin-1α, a protein that binds lamin A/C. This individual developed dilated cardiomyopathy requiring cardiac transplantation. Fibroblasts from this individual had increased expression of nesprin-1α and lamins A and C, indicating changes in the nuclear membrane complex. We characterized mice lacking the carboxy-terminus of nesprin-1 since this model expresses nesprin-1 without its carboxy-terminal KASH domain. These Δ/Δ KASH mice have a normally assembled but dysfunctional nuclear membrane complex and provide a model for nesprin-1 mutations. We found that Δ/Δ KASH mice develop cardiomyopathy with associated cardiac conduction system disease. Older mutant animals were found to have elongated P wave duration, elevated atrial and ventricular effective refractory periods indicating conduction defects in the myocardium, and reduced fractional shortening. Cardiomyocyte nuclei were found to be elongated with reduced heterochromatin in the Δ/Δ KASH hearts. These findings mirror what has been described from lamin A/C gene mutations and reinforce the importance of an intact nuclear membrane complex for a normally functioning heart. PMID:19944109

  12. Body fat distribution in women with familial partial lipodystrophy caused by mutation in the lamin A/C gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Z Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD, Dunnigan variety, is an autosomal dominant disorder caused due to missense mutations in the lamin A/C (LMNA gene encoding nuclear lamina proteins. Patients with FPLD are predisposed to metabolic complications of insulin resistance such as diabetes. We sought to evaluate and compare body fat distribution with dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry in women with and without FPLD and identify densitometric, clinical and metabolic features.

  13. [Mutation screening for the causative gene in a four-generation Chinese pedigree with progressive cardiac conduction defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X J; Huang, H; He, F; Zhu, L; Li, H; Jiang, Y S; Li, H; Huang, X H; Sun, Z S; Li, Z H

    2016-05-24

    To define the potential causative gene mutation in a Chinese pedigree with progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD). Sanger sequencing was performed to define potential causative gene mutation in a four-generation family with 68 members including seven PCCD patients (5 male) from 2010 to 2015.No causative gene was detected by screening known candidate genes related to PCCD including SCN5A, NKX2.5 and LMNA.High-throughput sequencing technology on exon-enriched DNA was then used to search the causative genes in 2 patients and one normal family member. Eight new non-synonymous single nucleotide variants including AQP7 gene (exon5: c.T343C: p.Y115H), CACNA1B gene (NM_001243812: exon19: c.A2986G: p.T996A), CATSPERB gene (exon27: c.C3254G: p.P1085R), CLCA2 gene (exon11: c.G1725T: p.W575C), CLCA3P gene (ncRNA_intronic), MYLK-AS1 gene (ncRNA_intronic), TTN gene (ncRNA_UTR3), LMNA gene (LMNA: NM_170708: exon5: c.C922T: p.Q308X) were identified by comparing and filtering the results with known public databases.Then, more detailed biological analysis on these 8 genes was conducted.Traditional Sanger sequencing validated the exome sequencing results, and found that the mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 segregated with the phenotype of this PCCD pedigree.The mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 was thus be considered as the causative PCCD gene in this pedigree from the perspective of genetics and genomics. The heterozygote mutation c. 1725G﹥T in gene CLCA2 might be causative gene in this PCCD pedigree.This finding adds new gene mutation variant responsible for PCCD.

  14. Clinical and radiographic features of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniel Berretta; Silva, Juliana Melo; Menezes, Tatiany Oliveira; Cavaleiro, Rosely Santos; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Coletta, Ricardo Della

    2014-03-16

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare dysmorphic syndrome characterized by several features of premature aging with clinical involvement of the skin, bones, and cardiovascular system. HGPS has an estimated incidence of one in four million to one in eight million births. The main clinical features of HGPS include short stature, craniofacial dimorphism, alopecia, bone fragility, and cardiovascular disorders. The most frequent cause of death is myocardial infarction at a mean age of 13 years old. Dental manifestations include delayed development and eruption of teeth, discoloration, crowding and rotation of teeth, and displaced teeth. Cone beam computed tomography images revealed the absence of the sphenoid, frontal, and maxillary sinus, flattening of the condyles and glenoid fossa, and bilateral hypoplasia of the mandibular condyles. The disease is caused by mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA). Here, we present a case report of an 11-year-old boy with classical features of HGPS, which was caused by a de novo germ-line mutation (C1824T, G608G) in exon 11 of the LMNA gene. Some uncommon HGPS-associated features in our patient, such as alterations in the facial sinuses and hypoplasia of the condyles, contributed to the expansion of the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome from a dentomaxillofacial perspective.

  15. Dermal fibroblasts in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome with the lamin A G608G mutation have dysmorphic nuclei and are hypersensitive to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worman Howard J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670 is a rare sporadic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 per 8 million live births. The phenotypic appearance consists of short stature, sculptured nose, alopecia, prominent scalp veins, small face, loss of subcutaneous fat, faint mid-facial cyanosis, and dystrophic nails. HGPS is caused by mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes nuclear lamins A and C. The most common mutation in subjects with HGPS is a de novo single-base pair substitution, G608G (GGC>GGT, within exon 11 of LMNA. This creates an abnormal splice donor site, leading to expression of a truncated protein. Results We studied a new case of a 5 year-old girl with HGPS and found a heterozygous point mutation, G608G, in LMNA. Complementary DNA sequencing of RNA showed that this mutation resulted in the deletion of 50 amino acids in the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of prelamin A. We characterized a primary dermal fibroblast cell line derived from the subject's skin. These cells expressed the mutant protein and exhibited a normal growth rate at early passage in primary culture but showed alterations in nuclear morphology. Expression levels and overall distributions of nuclear lamins and emerin, an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, were not dramatically altered. Ultrastructural analysis of the nuclear envelope using electron microscopy showed that chromatin is in close association to the nuclear lamina, even in areas with abnormal nuclear envelope morphology. The fibroblasts were hypersensitive to heat shock, and demonstrated a delayed response to heat stress. Conclusion Dermal fibroblasts from a subject with HGPS expressing a mutant truncated lamin A have dysmorphic nuclei, hypersensitivity to heat shock, and delayed response to heat stress. This suggests that the mutant protein, even when expressed at low levels, causes defective cell stability, which may be responsible for phenotypic

  16. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Galant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD, Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD. We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient.

  17. Insulin resistance syndromes of monogenic mutations%单基因突变所致的胰岛素抵抗综合征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江珊; 贾伟平

    2009-01-01

    Several insulin resistance syndromes, such as severe insulin resistance syndrome caused by mutations of insulin receptor gene and lipodystrophy caused by mutations of lamin gene, have been characterized clinically. The gene mutations, pathogenesis and clinical features of these monogenie diseases were reviewed in this article.%临床上存在多种由单基因突变所导致的胰岛素抵抗综合征,如胰岛素受体基因突变造成的严重胰岛素抵抗综合征,核纤层蛋白(LMNA)基因突变导致的脂肪营养不良综合征等,以下将对这些疾病的临床特点、突变基因及发病机制作一综述.

  18. Subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size, a predictor of type 2 diabetes, is linked to chromosome 1q21--q23 and is associated with a common polymorphism in LMNA in Pima Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, C; Wolford, J K; Hanson, R L; Foley, J E; Tataranni, P A; Bogardus, C; Pratley, R E

    2001-03-01

    Large subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size (s.c. abd. AS) is associated with insulin resistance and predicts type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. Because type 2 diabetes is familial, we aimed to determine whether mean s.c. abd. AS is also familial and if so, to identify chromosomal regions linked to this measure. Body composition (hydrodensitometry) and mean s.c. abd. AS (fat biopsy) were measured in 295 Pima Indians (179 with normal, 80 with impaired, and 36 with diabetic glucose tolerance) representing 164 nuclear families. Mean s.c. abd. AS, adjusted for age, sex, and percentage body fat was a familial trait (heritability h(2) = 0.48, P T substitution) in exon 10 of LMNA (GenBank X03444) was associated with reduced age-, sex- and percentage body fat-adjusted mean s.c. abd. AS [0.80 +/- 0.17 (CC), 0.76 +/- 0.15 (CT), 0.73 +/- 0.16 (TT) microg lipid/cell, P < 0.05 for CC vs TT]. These findings indicate that approximately half of the variance in mean s.c. abd. AS can be attributed to familial factors and that genetic variation in LMNA might not only underlie rare cases of FPLD, but may also contribute to variation in adipocyte size in the general population. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7...... weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose...

  20. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  1. A novel mutation in lamin a/c causing familial dilated cardiomyopathy associated with sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Toro, Rocío; Campuzano, Oscar; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Berne, Paola; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a cardiac heterogeneous pathology characterized by left ventricular or biventricular dilatation, is a leading cause of heart failure and heart transplantation. The genetic origin of DCM remains unknown in most cases, but >50 genes have been associated with DCM. We sought to identify the genetic implication and perform a genetic analysis in a Spanish family affected by DCM and sudden cardiac death. Clinical assessment and genetic screening were performed in the index case as well as family members. Of all relatives clinically assessed, nine patients showed clinical symptoms related to the pathology. Genetic screening identified 20 family members who carried a novel mutation in LMNA (c.871 G>A, p.E291K). Family segregation analysis indicated that all clinically affected patients carried this novel mutation. Clinical assessment of genetic carriers showed that electrical dysfunction was present previous to mechanical and structural abnormalities. Our results report a novel pathogenic mutation associated with DCM, supporting the benefits of comprehensive genetic studies of families affected by this pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutation Analysis; CFTR Mutation Analysis Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation ... an elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) or positive sweat chloride test , to confirm the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. ...

  3. Clinical classification and gene mutation of Chinese probands with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Analysis of 57 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruxu Zhang; Xiaobo Li; Xiaohong Zi; Shunxiang Huang; Fufeng Zhang; Kun Xia; Qian Pan; Beisha Tang

    2011-01-01

    Charcot-Mafie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder.CMT is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. To date, 27 genes associated with the disease have been cloned. The present study carried out clinical classification according to clinical,electrophysiological and pathological features, conducted inheritance classification according to inheritance patterns, and performed mutation analysis of 13 CMT disease genes (PMP22, CX32,HSPB1, MNF2, MPZ, HSPB8, GDAP1, NFL, EGR2, SIMPLE, RAB7, LMNA, MTMR2) in 57 Chinese probands with CMT. Five cases of AD-CMT1 and 13 cases of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMT1A; five cases of X-CMT1, one case of X-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT1 were diagnosed as CMTX1; four cases of AD-CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2F; one case of AD-CMT2 and one case of sporadic CMT2 were diagnosed as CMT2A2; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2L; one case of AD-CMT2 was diagnosed as CMT2J; one case of AR-CMT1 was diagnosed as CMT4A. Among the 57 CMT probands, seven genotypes were determined among 34 patients, with a detection rate of 59.6%. The results indicated that the clinical classification and inheritance classification are indispensable for selecting potential disease genes for mutation detection, and for efficient molecular diagnosis.

  4. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  5. Maize Mutator transposon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun WANG; Mingliang XU; Dexiang DENG; Yunlong BIAN

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements are widely distributed in eukaryotes. Due to its high copy numbers, high forward mutation rate and preferential insertion into low-copy DNA sequences, among others, the Mutator system has been widely used as a mutagen in genomic research. The discovery, classification, transposition specificity and epige-netic regulation of Mutator transposons were described. The application of Mutator tagging in plant genomic research was also presented. The role of Mu-like elements in genome evolution was briefly depicted. Moreover, the direction of Mutator transposon research in the future was discussed.

  6. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  7. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Mutation during Osteoblast Development Results in Loss of Osteocytes, Irregular Mineralization, and Poor Biomechanical Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process. PMID:22893709

  8. Expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria mutation during osteoblast development results in loss of osteocytes, irregular mineralization, and poor biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eva; Nilsson, Ola; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2012-09-28

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a very rare genetic disorder that is characterized by multiple features of premature aging and largely affects tissues of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we describe the development of a tissue-specific mouse model that overexpresses the most common HGPS mutation (LMNA, c.1824C>T, p.G608G) in osteoblasts. Already at the age of 5 weeks, HGPS mutant mice show growth retardation, imbalanced gait and spontaneous fractures. Histopathological examination revealed an irregular bone structure, characterized by widespread loss of osteocytes, defects in mineralization, and a hypocellular red bone marrow. Computerized tomography analysis demonstrated impaired skeletal geometry and altered bone structure. The skeletal defects, which resemble the clinical features reported for bone disease in HGPS patients, was associated with an abnormal osteoblast differentiation. The osteoblast-specific expression of the HGPS mutation increased DNA damage and affected Wnt signaling. In the teeth, irregular dentin formation, as was previously demonstrated in human progeria cases, caused severe dental abnormalities affecting the incisors. The observed phenotype also shows similarities to reported bone abnormalities in aging mice and may therefore help to uncover general principles of the aging process.

  9. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.

  10. Three kinds of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Thomas, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    For a finite dimensional hereditary algebra, we consider: exceptional sequences in the category of finite dimensional modules, silting objects in the bounded derived category, and m-cluster tilting objects in the m-cluster category. There are mutation operations on both the set of m-cluster tilting objects and the set of exceptional sequences. It is also possible to define a mutation operation for silting objects. We compare these three different notions of mutation.

  11. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  12. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  13. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  14. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  15. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  17. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  18. Subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic

    CERN Document Server

    Warkentin, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Quiver mutation plays a crucial role in the definition of cluster algebras by Fomin and Zelevinsky. It induces an equivalence relation on the set of all quivers without loops and two-cycles. A quiver is called mutation-acyclic if it is mutation-equivalent to an acyclic quiver. The aim of this note is to show that full subquivers of mutation-acyclic quivers are mutation-acyclic.

  19. Expression of the myodystrophic R453W mutation of lamin A in C2C12 myoblasts causes promoter-specific and global epigenetic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkelien, Anne-Mari; Delbarre, Erwan; Gaustad, Kristine G; Buendia, Brigitte; Collas, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    Autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by muscle wasting and is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type lamins. Overexpression of the EDMD lamin A R453W mutation in C2C12 myoblasts impairs myogenic differentiation. We show here the influence of stable expression of the R453W and of the Dunnigan-type partial lipodystrophy R482W mutation of lamin A in C2C12 cells on transcription and epigenetic regulation of the myogenin (Myog) gene and on global chromatin organization. Expression of R453W-, but not R482W-lamin A, impairs activation of Myog and maintains a repressive chromatin state on the Myog promoter upon induction of differentiation, marked by H3 lysine (K) 9 dimethylation and failure to hypertrimethylate H3K4. Cells expressing WT-LaA also fail to hypertrimethylate H3K4. No defect occurs at the level of Myog promoter DNA methylation in any of the clones. Expression of R453W-lamin A and to a lesser extent R482W-lamin A in undifferentiated C2C12 cells redistributes H3K9me3 from pericentric heterochromatin. R453W-lamin A also elicits a redistribution of H3K27me3 from inactive X (Xi) and partial decondensation of Xi, but maintains Xist expression and coating of Xi, indicating that Xi remains inactivated. Our results argue that gene-specific and genome-wide chromatin rearrangements may constitute a molecular basis for laminopathies.

  20. Marfan syndrome with neonatal progeroid syndrome-like lipodystrophy associated with a novel frameshift mutation at the 3' terminus of the FBN1-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Kienitz, Tina; Robinson, Peter N; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Karow, Benjamin; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Fahsold, Raimund; Schmidt, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Katrin; Passarge, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    We report on a 25-year-old woman with pronounced generalized lipodystrophy and a progeroid aspect since birth, who also had Marfan syndrome (MFS; fulfilling the Ghent criteria) with mild skeletal features, dilated aortic bulb, dural ectasia, bilateral subluxation of the lens, and severe myopia in addition to the severe generalized lipodystrophy. She lacked insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatic steatosis, and diabetes. Mutation analysis in the gene encoding fibrillin 1 (FBN1) revealed a novel de novo heterozygous deletion, c.8155_8156del2 in exon 64. The severe generalized lipodystrophy in this patient with progeroid features has not previously been described in other patients with MFS and FBN1 mutations. We did not find a mutation in genes known to be associated with congenital lipodystrophy (APGAT2, BSCL2, CAV1, PTRF-CAVIN, PPARG, LMNB2) or with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (ZMPSTE24, LMNA/C). Other progeria syndromes were considered unlikely because premature greying, hypogonadism, and scleroderma-like skin disease were not present. Our patient shows striking similarity to two patients who have been published in this journal by O'Neill et al. [O'Neill et al. (2007); Am J Med Genet Part A 143A:1421-1430] with the diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndrome (NPS). This condition also known as Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by accelerated aging and lipodystrophy from birth, poor postnatal weight gain, and characteristic facial features. The course is usually progressive with early lethality. However this entity seems heterogeneous. We suggest that our patient and the two similar cases described before represent a new entity, a subgroup of MFS with overlapping features to NPS syndrome.

  1. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  2. Silting mutation in triangulated categories

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, Takuma

    2010-01-01

    In representation theory of algebras the notion of `mutation' often plays important roles, and two cases are well known, i.e. `cluster tilting mutation' and `exceptional mutation'. In this paper we focus on `tilting mutation', which has a disadvantage that it is often impossible, i.e. some of summands of a tilting object can not be replaced to get a new tilting object. The aim of this paper is to take away this disadvantage by introducing `silting mutation' for silting objects as a generalization of `tilting mutation'. We shall develope a basic theory of silting mutation. In particular, we introduce a partial order on the set of silting objects and establish the relationship with `silting mutation' by generalizing the theory of Riedmann-Schofield and Happel-Unger. We show that iterated silting mutation act transitively on the set of silting objects for local, hereditary or canonical algebras. Finally we give a bijection between silting subcategories and certain t-structures.

  3. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  4. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  5. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  6. Msx1 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  7. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  8. Evolutionary Stability Against Multiple Mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Anirban; Shaiju, A J

    2012-01-01

    It is known (see e.g. Weibull (1995)) that ESS is not robust against multiple mutations. In this article, we introduce robustness against multiple mutations and study some equivalent formulations and consequences.

  9. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate incidence, clinicopathological features and prognosis of BRAF-mutated conjunctival melanoma in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine BRAF mutations in paired premalignant lesions and evaluate immunohistochemical BRAF V600E oncoprotein detection. Methods: Data from 139 patients...

  10. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social conflict, in the form of intraspecific selfish "cheating" has been observed in a number of natural systems. However, a formal, evolutionary genetic theory of social cheating that provides an explanatory, predictive framework for these observations is lacking. Here we derive the kin...... selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...... lineages are transient and do not invade. Instead, cheating lineages are eliminated by kin selection but are constantly reintroduced by mutation, maintaining a stable equilibrium frequency of cheaters. The presence of cheaters at equilibrium creates a "cheater load" that selects for mechanisms of cheater...

  11. Mutation of Auslander generators

    CERN Document Server

    Lada, Magdalini

    2009-01-01

    Let $\\Lambda$ be an artin algebra with representation dimension equal to three and $M$ an Auslander generator of $\\Lambda$. We show how, under certain assumptions, we can mutate $M$ to get a new Auslander generator whose endomorphism ring is derived equivalent to the endomorphism ring of $M$. We apply our results to selfinjective algebras with radical cube zero of infinite representation type, where we construct an infinite set of Auslander generators.

  12. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  13. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  15. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  16. Filaggrin mutations and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  17. Muller's ratchet with compensatory mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaffelhuber, Peter; Wakolbinger, Anton

    2011-01-01

    We consider an infinite dimensional system of stochastic differential equations which describes the evolution of type frequencies in a large population. Random reproduction is modeled by a Wright-Fisher noise whose inverse diffusion coefficient $N$ corresponds to the total population size. The type of an individual is the number $k$ of deleterious mutations it carries. We assume that fitness of individuals carrying $k$ mutations is decreased by $\\alpha k$ for some $\\alpha >0$. Along the individual lines of descent, (new) mutations accumulate at rate $\\lambda$ per generation, and each of these mutations has a small probability $\\gamma$ per generation to disappear. While the case $\\gamma =0 $ is known as (the Fleming-Viot version of) {\\em Muller's ratchet}, the case $\\gamma > 0$ is referred to as that of {\\em compensatory mutations} in the biological literature. In the former case ($\\gamma=0$), an ever increasing number of mutations is accumulated over time, while in the latter ($\\gamma > 0$) this is prevented ...

  18. Filaggrin mutations and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Dipankar; Handa, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  19. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  20. LITAF、RAB7、LMNA和MTMR2基因在中国人腓骨肌萎缩症患者的突变分析%Mutation analysis of LITAF,RAB7,LMNA and MTMR2 genes in Chinese Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张如旭; 唐北沙; 郭鹏; 任志军; 赵国华; 刘三妹; 刘婷; 资晓宏; 胡正茂; 夏昆

    2010-01-01

    为了分析LITAF、RAB7、LMNA和MTMR2基因在中国人腓骨肌萎缩症(Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease,CMT)的突变特点,文章分别应用PCR结合DNA序列分析方法和PCR-单链构象多态性(PCR-SSCP)结合DNA序列分析方法对6个常染色体显性遗传家系先证者和27个散发病例进行LITAF和RAB7基因突变分析;应用PCR-SSCP结合DNA序列分析方法对14个常染色体遗传的CMT家系先证者和27个散发患者进行LMNA和MTMR2基因突变分析.结果发现:LITAF基因c.269G→A、c.274A→G序列变异和LMNA基因c.1243G→A、c.1910C→T序列变异.未发现RAB7和MTMR2基因的序列变异.其中LITAF基因c.269G→A,LMNA基因c.1243G→A和c.1910C→T为新发现的单核苷酸多态;LITAF基因c.274A→G为已知多态.说明LITAF、RAB7、LMNA和MTMR2基因突变在中国人CMT患者中罕见.

  1. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet cDNA...

  2. Lamin A/C is a risk biomarker in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Naomi D; Cox, Thomas Robert; Rahman-Casañs, Syed F;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A-type lamins are type V intermediate filament proteins encoded by the gene LMNA. Mutations in LMNA give rise to diverse degenerative diseases related to premature ageing. A-type lamins also influence the activity of the Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and oncogenes such a beta-catenin. ...

  3. Post-natal myogenic and adipogenic developmental:Defects and metabolic impairment upon loss of a-type lamins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kubben (Nard); J.W. Voncken (Jan Willem); G.A. Koning (Gerben); M. van Weeghel (Michel); M.M.G. van den Hoogenhof (Maarten ); M. Gijbels (Marion); A. van Erk (Arie); K. Schoonderwoerd (Kees); B. van den Bosch (Bianca); V. Dahlmans (Vivian); C. Calis (Chantal); S.M. Houten (Sander M.); T. Misteli (Tom); Y.M. Pinto (Yigal)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA-type lamins are a major component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes the A-type lamins A and C, cause a set of phenotypically diverse diseases collectively called laminopathies. While adult LMNA null mice show various symptoms typically associated with

  4. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  5. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  6. ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 mutations cause autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecchiani, Celeste; Pedace, Lucia; Lo Giudice, Temistocle; Casella, Antonella; Mearini, Marzia; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Pedroso, José L; Terracciano, Chiara; Caltagirone, Carlo; Massa, Roberto; St George-Hyslop, Peter H; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Orlacchio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of hereditary peripheral neuropathies that share clinical characteristics of progressive distal muscle weakness and atrophy, foot deformities, distal sensory loss, as well as diminished tendon reflexes. Hundreds of causative DNA changes have been found, but much of the genetic basis of the disease is still unexplained. Mutations in the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene are a frequent cause of autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and peripheral axonal neuropathy, and account for ∼ 40% of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The overlap of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with both diseases, as well as the common autosomal recessive inheritance pattern of thin corpus callosum and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in three related patients, prompted us to analyse the ALS5/SPG11/KIAA1840 gene in affected individuals with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. We investigated 28 unrelated families with autosomal recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease defined by clinical, electrophysiological, as well as pathological evaluation. Besides, we screened for all the known genes related to axonal autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2A2/HMSN2A2/MFN2, CMT2B1/LMNA, CMT2B2/MED25, CMT2B5/NEFL, ARCMT2F/dHMN2B/HSPB1, CMT2K/GDAP1, CMT2P/LRSAM1, CMT2R/TRIM2, CMT2S/IGHMBP2, CMT2T/HSJ1, CMTRID/COX6A1, ARAN-NM/HINT and GAN/GAN), for the genes related to autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia with thin corpus callosum and axonal peripheral neuropathy (SPG7/PGN, SPG15/ZFYVE26, SPG21/ACP33, SPG35/FA2H, SPG46/GBA2, SPG55/C12orf65 and SPG56/CYP2U1), as well as for the causative gene of peripheral neuropathy with or without agenesis of the corpus callosum (SLC12A6). Mitochondrial disorders related to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 were also excluded by sequencing POLG and TYMP genes. An additional locus for autosomal recessive Charcot

  7. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  8. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  9. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  10. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  11. Markov models for accumulating mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Dynamical Mutation of Dark Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Abramo, L R; Liberato, L; Rosenfeld, R

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the intriguing possibility that dark energy may change its equation of state in situations where large dark energy fluctuations are present. We show indications of this dynamical mutation in some generic models of dark energy.

  13. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  14. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  15. Distrofias musculares congénitas e LMNA

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    As distrofias musculares congénitas (CMD) são doenças com início no primeiro ano de vida, sendo os grupos mais comuns as merosinopatias, as doenças do colagénio e as distroglicanopatias. O diagnóstico etiológico passa pela caraterização clinica e investigação com estudo bioquímico (Ck), imagem cerebral e pela histologia do músculo. Após uma avaliação global, na maioria dos casos, é possível uma orientação concreta para estudo genética molecular. Apresentamos um caso dum doente com uma forma ...

  16. Distrofias musculares congénitas e LMNA

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    As distrofias musculares congénitas (CMD) são doenças com início no primeiro ano de vida, sendo os grupos mais comuns as merosinopatias, as doenças do colagénio e as distroglicanopatias. O diagnóstico etiológico passa pela caraterização clinica e investigação com estudo bioquímico (Ck), imagem cerebral e pela histologia do músculo. Após uma avaliação global, na maioria dos casos, é possível uma orientação concreta para estudo genética molecular. Apresentamos um caso dum doente com uma forma ...

  17. Absence of progeria-like disease phenotypes in knock-in mice expressing a non-farnesylated version of progerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutant prelamin A, progerin, that terminates with a farnesylcysteine. HGPS knock-in mice (Lmna(HG/+)) develop severe progeria-like disease phenotypes. These phenotypes can be ameliorated with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), suggesting that progerin's farnesyl lipid is important for disease pathogenesis and raising the possibility that FTIs could be useful for treating humans with HGPS. Subsequent studies showed that mice expressing non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(nHG/+) mice, in which progerin's carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -SSIM) also develop severe progeria, raising doubts about whether any treatment targeting protein prenylation would be particularly effective. We suspected that those doubts might be premature and hypothesized that the persistent disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice could be an unanticipated consequence of the cysteine-to-serine substitution that was used to eliminate farnesylation. To test this hypothesis, we generated a second knock-in allele yielding non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(csmHG)) in which the carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -CSM. We then compared disease phenotypes in mice harboring the Lmna(nHG) or Lmna(csmHG) allele. As expected, Lmna(nHG/+) and Lmna(nHG/nHG) mice developed severe progeria-like disease phenotypes, including osteolytic lesions and rib fractures, osteoporosis, slow growth and reduced survival. In contrast, Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) mice exhibited no bone disease and displayed entirely normal body weights and survival. The frequencies of misshapen cell nuclei were lower in Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) fibroblasts. These studies show that the ability of non-farnesylated progerin to elicit disease depends on the carboxyl-terminal mutation used to eliminate protein prenylation.

  18. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Ideally, familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is diagnosed by testing for mutations that decrease the catabolism of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; however, genetic testing is not universally available. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and predictors of FH....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria...

  19. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  20. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments.

  1. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  2. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2016-12-23

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design.

  3. Serum lipidomics meets cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: profiling of subjects at risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysi-Aho, Marko; Koikkalainen, Juha; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Kaartinen, Maija; Kuusisto, Johanna; Peuhkurinen, Keijo; Kärkkäinen, Satu; Antila, Margareta; Lauerma, Kirsi; Reissell, Eeva; Jurkko, Raija; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Heliö, Tiina; Orešič, Matej

    2011-01-20

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction, constitutes a significant cause for heart failure, sudden cardiac death or need for heart transplantation. Lamin A/C gene (LMNA) on chromosome 1p12 is the most significant disease gene causing DCM and has been reported to cause 7-9% of DCM leading to cardiac transplantation. We have previously performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to LMNA carriers to describe the early phenotype. Clinically, early recognition of subjects at risk of developing DCM would be important but is often difficult. Thus we have earlier used the MRI findings of these LMNA carriers for creating a model by which LMNA carriers could be identified from the controls at an asymptomatic stage. Some LMNA mutations may cause lipodystrophy. To characterize possible effects of LMNA mutations on lipid profile, we set out to apply global serum lipidomics using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the same LMNA carriers, DCM patients without LMNA mutation and controls. All DCM patients, with or without LMNA mutation, differed from controls in regard to distinct serum lipidomic profile dominated by diminished odd-chain triglycerides and lipid ratios related to desaturation. Furthermore, we introduce a novel approach to identify associations between the molecular lipids from serum and the MR images from the LMNA carriers. The association analysis using dependency network and regression approaches also helped us to obtain novel insights into how the affected lipids might relate to cardiac shape and volume changes. Our study provides a framework for linking serum derived molecular markers not only with clinical endpoints, but also with the more subtle intermediate phenotypes, as derived from medical imaging, of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  4. Serum lipidomics meets cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: profiling of subjects at risk of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Sysi-Aho

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction, constitutes a significant cause for heart failure, sudden cardiac death or need for heart transplantation. Lamin A/C gene (LMNA on chromosome 1p12 is the most significant disease gene causing DCM and has been reported to cause 7-9% of DCM leading to cardiac transplantation. We have previously performed cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to LMNA carriers to describe the early phenotype. Clinically, early recognition of subjects at risk of developing DCM would be important but is often difficult. Thus we have earlier used the MRI findings of these LMNA carriers for creating a model by which LMNA carriers could be identified from the controls at an asymptomatic stage. Some LMNA mutations may cause lipodystrophy. To characterize possible effects of LMNA mutations on lipid profile, we set out to apply global serum lipidomics using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in the same LMNA carriers, DCM patients without LMNA mutation and controls. All DCM patients, with or without LMNA mutation, differed from controls in regard to distinct serum lipidomic profile dominated by diminished odd-chain triglycerides and lipid ratios related to desaturation. Furthermore, we introduce a novel approach to identify associations between the molecular lipids from serum and the MR images from the LMNA carriers. The association analysis using dependency network and regression approaches also helped us to obtain novel insights into how the affected lipids might relate to cardiac shape and volume changes. Our study provides a framework for linking serum derived molecular markers not only with clinical endpoints, but also with the more subtle intermediate phenotypes, as derived from medical imaging, of potential pathophysiological relevance.

  5. Rapid generation of hypomorphic mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Laura L.; Chung, Joyce J.; Jankirama, Preetam; Keefer, Kathryn M.; Kolotilin, Igor; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Chalker, Douglas L.; Grbic, Vojislava; Green, Rachel; Menassa, Rima; True, Heather L.; Skeath, James B.; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2017-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations are a valuable tool for both genetic analysis of gene function and for synthetic biology applications. However, current methods to generate hypomorphic mutations are limited to a specific organism, change gene expression unpredictably, or depend on changes in spatial-temporal expression of the targeted gene. Here we present a simple and predictable method to generate hypomorphic mutations in model organisms by targeting translation elongation. Adding consecutive adenosine nucleotides, so-called polyA tracks, to the gene coding sequence of interest will decrease translation elongation efficiency, and in all tested cell cultures and model organisms, this decreases mRNA stability and protein expression. We show that protein expression is adjustable independent of promoter strength and can be further modulated by changing sequence features of the polyA tracks. These characteristics make this method highly predictable and tractable for generation of programmable allelic series with a range of expression levels. PMID:28106166

  6. Neutral Evolution of Mutational Robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Van Nimwegen, E; Huynen, M; Nimwegen, Erik van; Crutchfield, James P.; Huynen, Martijn

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population's limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network's adjacency matrix. Moreover, the average number of neutral mutant neighbors per individual is given by the matrix spectral radius. This quantifies the extent to which populations evolve mutational robustness: the insensitivity of the phenotype to mutations. Since the average neutrality is independent of evolutionary parameters---such as, mutation rate, population size, and selective advantage---one can infer global statistics of neutral network topology using simple population data available from {\\it in vitro} or {\\it in vivo} evolution. Populations evolving on neutral networks of RNA secondary structures show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  7. Mutations in ANKH cause chondrocalcinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Adrian; Johnson, Michelle D; Hughes, Anne; Gurley, Kyle A; Ho, Andrew M; Doherty, Michael; Dixey, Josh; Gillet, Pierre; Loeuille, Damien; McGrath, Rodney; Reginato, Antonio; Shiang, Rita; Wright, Gary; Netter, Patrick; Williams, Charlene; Kingsley, David M

    2002-10-01

    Chondrocalcinosis (CC) is a common cause of joint pain and arthritis that is caused by the deposition of calcium-containing crystals within articular cartilage. Although most cases are sporadic, rare familial forms have been linked to human chromosomes 8 (CCAL1) or 5p (CCAL2) (Baldwin et al. 1995; Hughes et al. 1995; Andrew et al. 1999). Here, we show that two previously described families with CCAL2 have mutations in the human homolog of the mouse progressive ankylosis gene (ANKH). One of the human mutations results in the substitution of a highly conserved amino acid residue within a predicted transmembrane segment. The other creates a new ATG start site that adds four additional residues to the ANKH protein. Both mutations segregate completely with disease status and are not found in control subjects. In addition, 1 of 95 U.K. patients with sporadic CC showed a deletion of a single codon in the ANKH gene. The same change was found in a sister who had bilateral knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Each of the three human mutations was reconstructed in a full-length ANK expression construct previously shown to regulate pyrophosphate levels in cultured cells in vitro. All three of the human mutations showed significantly more activity than a previously described nonsense mutation that causes severe hydroxyapatite mineral deposition and widespread joint ankylosis in mice. These results suggest that small sequence changes in ANKH are one cause of CC and joint disease in humans. Increased ANK activity may explain the different types of crystals commonly deposited in human CCAL2 families and mutant mice and may provide a useful pharmacological target for treating some forms of human CC.

  8. Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, V N

    1966-12-01

    Iyer, V. N. (Microbiology Research Institute, Canada Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Canada). Mutations determining mitomycin resistance in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1663-1669. 1966.-The pattern of development of genetic resistance in Bacillus subtilis to mitomycin C was studied, and spontaneous single and multistep mutants were obtained. The transmission and expression of these mutations in sensitive strains proved possible by means of genetic transformation. The mutations were genetically studied in relation to a chromosomal mutation, mac-1, which confers resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin and which has been previously localized in the early-replicating segment of the B. subtilis chromosome. The results indicate that all of three primary mutations studied in this manner, as well as a secondary and tertiary mutation derived from one of the primary mutations, are clustered in this early-replicating segment. It appears that the secondary and tertiary mutations enhance the resistance conferred by the primary mutation, apparently without themselves conferring any resistance.

  9. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S; Diplas, Bill H; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg(132) of IDH1 and Arg(172) of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy.

  10. Mutations in RARS cause hypomyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Nicole I.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Schieving, Jolanda H.; Derks, Terry G. J.; Fock, Johanna M.; Rump, Patrick; van Beek, Daphne M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Waisfisz, Quinten

    2014-01-01

    Hypomyelinating disorders of the central nervous system are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without genetic diagnosis. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition and whole exome sequencing, we could ascertain compound heterozygous mutations in RARS in 4 patients

  11. Mutations in RARS cause hypomyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, Nicole I.; Salomons, Gajja S.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Schieving, Jolanda H.; Derks, Terry G. J.; Fock, Johanna M.; Rump, Patrick; van Beek, Daphne M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Waisfisz, Quinten

    Hypomyelinating disorders of the central nervous system are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without genetic diagnosis. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition and whole exome sequencing, we could ascertain compound heterozygous mutations in RARS in 4 patients

  12. Mutations in RARS cause hypomyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Salomons, G.S.; Rodenburg, R.J.; Pouwels, P.J.; Schieving, J.H.; Derks, T.G.; Fock, J.M.; Rump, P.; Beek, D.M. van; Knaap, M.S. van der; Waisfisz, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Hypomyelinating disorders of the central nervous system are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without genetic diagnosis. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition and whole exome sequencing, we could ascertain compound heterozygous mutations in RARS in 4 patients

  13. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  14. Tilting mutation of Brauer tree algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, T

    2010-01-01

    We define tilting mutations of symmetric algebras as the endomorphism algebras of Okuyama-Rickard complexes. For Brauer tree algebras, we give an explicit description of the change of Brauer trees under mutation.

  15. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  16. Inactivating CUX1 mutations promote tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for cancer genetics is to determine which low frequency somatic mutations are drivers of tumorigenesis. Here we interrogate the genomes of 7,651 diverse human cancers to identify novel drivers and find inactivating mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor CUX1 (cut-like homeobox 1) in ~1-5% of tumors. Meta-analysis of CUX1 mutational status in 2,519 cases of myeloid malignancies reveals disruptive mutations associated with poor survival, highlighting the clinical si...

  17. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA.

  18. Biological evolution model with conditional mutation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Ghazaryan, Makar; Bratus, Alexander; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2017-05-01

    We consider an evolution model, in which the mutation rates depend on the structure of population: the mutation rates from lower populated sequences to higher populated sequences are reduced. We have applied the Hamilton-Jacobi equation method to solve the model and calculate the mean fitness. We have found that the modulated mutation rates, directed to increase the mean fitness.

  19. Clinical trial of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor in children with Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leslie B. Gordon; Monica E. Kleinman; David T. Miller; Donna S. Neuberg; Anita Giobbie-Hurder; Marie Gerhard-Herman; Leslie B. Smoot; Catherine M. Gordon; Robert Cleveland; Brian D. Snyder; Brian Fligor; W. Robert Bishop; Paul Statkevich; Amy Regen; Andrew Sonis; Susan Riley; Christine Ploski; Annette Correia; Nicolle Quinn; Nicole J. Ullrich; Ara Nazarian; Marilyn G. Liang; Susanna Y. Huh; Armin Schwartzman; Mark W. Kieran

    2012-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare, fatal, segmental premature aging syndrome caused by a mutation in LMNA that produces the farnesylated aberrant lamin A protein, progerin...

  20. TCOF1 mutation database: novel mutation in the alternatively spliced exon 6A and update in mutation nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendore, Alessandra; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Masotti, Cibele; Morganti, Lucas S C; Passos-Bueno, M Rita

    2005-05-01

    Recently, a novel exon was described in TCOF1 that, although alternatively spliced, is included in the major protein isoform. In addition, most published mutations in this gene do not conform to current mutation nomenclature guidelines. Given these observations, we developed an online database of TCOF1 mutations in which all the reported mutations are renamed according to standard recommendations and in reference to the genomic and novel cDNA reference sequences (www.genoma.ib.usp.br/TCOF1_database). We also report in this work: 1) results of the first screening for large deletions in TCOF1 by Southern blot in patients without mutation detected by direct sequencing; 2) the identification of the first pathogenic mutation in the newly described exon 6A; and 3) statistical analysis of pathogenic mutations and polymorphism distribution throughout the gene.

  1. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  2. PAX6 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Isabel M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PAX6 protein is a highly conserved transcriptional regulator that is important for normal ocular and neural development. In humans, heterozygous mutations of the PAX6 gene cause aniridia (absence of the iris and related developmental eye diseases. PAX6 mutations are archived in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database, which currently contains 309 records, 286 of which are mutations in patients with eye malformations. Results We examined the records in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database and documented the frequency of different mutation types, the phenotypes associated with different mutation types, the contribution of CpG transitions to the PAX6 mutation spectrum, and the distribution of chain-terminating mutations in the open reading frame. Mutations that introduce a premature termination codon into the open reading frame are predominantly associated with aniridia; in contrast, non-aniridia phenotypes are typically associated with missense mutations. Four CpG dinucleotides in exons 8, 9, 10 and 11 are major mutation hotspots, and transitions at these CpG's account for over half of all nonsense mutations in the database. Truncating mutations are distributed throughout the PAX6 coding region, except for the last half of exon 12 and the coding part of exon 13, where they are completely absent. The absence of truncating mutations in the 3' part of the coding region is statistically significant and is consistent with the idea that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles. Conclusion The PAX6 Allelic Variant Database is a valuable resource for studying genotype-phenotype correlations. The consistent association of truncating mutations with the aniridia phenotype, and the distribution of truncating mutations in the PAX6 open reading frame, suggests that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles.

  3. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  4. Tailoring the metabolism against mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Motter, Adilson E.; Almaas, Eivind; Barabasi, Albert Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, organisms can be modelled at the whole-cell level in silico via steady state methods to describe their metabolic capabilities. We use two such methods, Flux Balance Analysis and Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment to explore the behavior of cells (of E. coli and S. cerevisiae) after severe mutations. We propose experimentally feasible ways of modifying the underlying biochemical reaction network of a mutant cell such that cell functionality, in particular growth rate, is significantly improved.

  5. Pathogenic mutations in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng-King; Skipper, Lisa M

    2007-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD; Parkinson's) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies. Increasing evidence suggests that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) dysfunction may represent the principal molecular pathways that commonly underlie the pathogenesis. The relative role of genetic and environmental factors has been the focus of research and debate. The recent discovery of a number of disease-causing genes (SNCA, Parkin/PARK2, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ1/PARK7, and LRRK2) in familial and sporadic forms of PD has provided considerable insights into the pathophysiology of this complex disorder. The frequency of these gene mutations may vary according to ethnicity and to the specific gene. A gene dosage effect is observed in some cases, and the phenotype of some of the mutation carriers closely resembles typical PD. Penetrance of some of the recurrent mutations is incomplete and may vary with age. Further research to unravel the etiopathology could identify biochemical or genetic markers for potential neuroprotective trials. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  7. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  8. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  9. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1/SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Maria K. Vartiainen; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). 1 The majority of LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and disturbed interaction of mutant lami...

  10. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  11. [TP53 mutations and molecular epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kazunori; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by a variety of cellular stresses through several pathways and transactivates its downstream genes, including regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. The loss of p53 function by TP53 gene mutations therefore fails to activate these genes and is thought to be a critical cause of carcinogenesis and/or tumor progression. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. TP53 mutations are found in about 50% of human cancers, although the frequency of TP53 mutations differs among tumor types. However, the degree of functional disorder of mutant p53 varies according to the type of TP53 mutation. And the effects of p53 on cancer formation and/or progression are influenced by the degree of p53 dysfunction. So it is important to analyze the effects of TP53 mutations carefully according to the oncogenicity of each mutation from the molecular epidemiological point of view. Here, together with some cautions needed for analyzing and interpreting the significance of TP53 gene mutations, we present some examples of the identified specific mutation spectrum and the correlation between the prognosis and TP53 mutation in some cancers.

  12. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  13. Lattices, graphs, and Conway mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Greene, Joshua Evan

    2011-01-01

    The d-invariant of an integral, positive definite lattice L records the minimal norm of a characteristic covector in each equivalence class mod 2L. We prove that the 2-isomorphism type of a connected graph is determined by the d-invariant of its lattice of integral cuts (or flows). As an application, we prove that a reduced, alternating link diagram is determined up to mutation by the Heegaard Floer homology of the link's branched double-cover. Thus, alternating links with homeomorphic branched double-covers are mutants.

  14. Mutation, Witten Index, and Quiver Invariant

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Heeyeon; Yi, Piljin

    2015-01-01

    We explore Seiberg-like dualities, or mutations, for ${\\cal N}=4$ quiver quantum mechanics in the context of wall-crossing. In contrast to higher dimensions, the 1d Seiberg-duality must be performed with much care. With fixed Fayet-Iliopoulos constants, at most two nodes can be mutated, one left and the other right, mapping a chamber of a quiver into a chamber of a mutated quiver. We delineate this complex pattern for triangle quivers and show how the Witten indices are preserved under such finely chosen mutations. On the other hand, the quiver invariants, or wall-crossing-safe part of supersymmetric spectra, mutate more straightforwardly, whereby a quiver is mapped to a quiver. The mutation rule that preserves the quiver invariant is different from the usual one, however, which we explore and confirm numerically.

  15. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes.

  16. Identification of six new Gaucher disease mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutler, E.; Gelbart, T.; West, C. (Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The four most common mutations account for 97% of the Gaucher disease-producing alleles in Jewish patients and 75% of the alleles in non-Jewish patients. Although at least 15 other mutations and some examples of gene conversion and/or fusion genes have been described, a number of mutations remain unidentified. We have now identified six new mutations, a deletion of a C at the 72 position of the cDNA, a 481C[yields]T mutation (122p[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 751T [yields] C (212 [sup Tyr[yields]His]), a 1549G [yields] A (478[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 1604G [yields] A (496 [sup Arg[yields]His]), and a 55-bp deletion. All but one of these were found in single families. The 1604A mutation, however, was observed in four unrelated individuals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. How mutation affects evolutionary games on graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Traulsen, Arne; Tarnita, Corina E; Nowak, Martin A

    2012-04-21

    Evolutionary dynamics are affected by population structure, mutation rates and update rules. Spatial or network structure facilitates the clustering of strategies, which represents a mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Mutation dilutes this effect. Here we analyze how mutation influences evolutionary clustering on graphs. We introduce new mathematical methods to evolutionary game theory, specifically the analysis of coalescing random walks via generating functions. These techniques allow us to derive exact identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities, which characterize spatial assortment on lattices and Cayley trees. From these IBD probabilities we obtain exact conditions for the evolution of cooperation and other game strategies, showing the dual effects of graph topology and mutation rate. High mutation rates diminish the clustering of cooperators, hindering their evolutionary success. Our model can represent either genetic evolution with mutation, or social imitation processes with random strategy exploration.

  18. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  19. Mutational analysis of Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-01-01

    DNA helicases are biomolecular motors that convert the chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphate (usually ATP) into mechanical energy to unwind double-stranded DNA. The unwinding of double-stranded DNA is an essential process for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. Mutations in human RecQ helicases result in inherent human disease including Bloom's syndrome, Werner's syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a strong predisposition to a wide range of cancers commonly affecting the general population. In order to understand the molecular basis of BS pathology and the mechanism underlying the function of Bloom helicase, we have analyzed BS-causing missense mutations by a combination of structural modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and biochemical and biophysical approaches. Here, we describe the methods and protocols for measuring ATPase, ATP and DNA binding, DNA strand annealing, and DNA unwinding activities of Bloom protein and its mutant variants. These approaches should be applicable and useful for studying other helicases.

  20. Definition of mutations in polyautoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Angad; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Patel, Hardip R; Mantilla, Ruben D; Velez, Jorge I; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Mastronardi, Claudio; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Familial autoimmunity and polyautoimmunity represent extreme phenotypes ideal for identifying major genomic variants contributing to autoimmunity. Whole exome sequencing (WES) and linkage analysis are well suited for this purpose due to its strong resolution upon familial segregation patterns of functional protein coding and splice variants. The primary objective of this study was to identify potentially autoimmune causative variants using WES data from extreme pedigrees segregating polyautoimmunity phenotypes. DNA of 47 individuals across 10 extreme pedigrees, ascertained from probands affected with polyautoimmunity and familial autoimmunity, were selected for WES. Variant calls were obtained through Genome Analysis Toolkit. Filtration and prioritization framework to identify mutation(s) were applied, and later implemented for genetic linkage analysis. Sanger sequencing corroborated variants with significant linkage. Novel and mostly rare variants harbored in SRA1, MLL4, ABCB8, DHX34 and PLAUR showed significant linkage (LOD scores are >3.0). The strongest signal was in SRA1, with a LOD score of 5.48. Network analyses indicated that SRA1, PLAUR and ABCB8 contribute to regulation of apoptotic processes. Novel and rare variants in genetic linkage with polyautoimmunity were identified throughout WES. Genes harboring these variants might be major players of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutation detection using Surveyor nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Peter; Shandilya, Harini; D'Alessio, James M; O'Connor, Kevin; Durocher, Jeffrey; Gerard, Gary F

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a simple and flexible mutation detection technology for the discovery and mapping of both known and unknown mutations. This technology is based on a new mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease from celery, Surveyor nuclease, which is a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases. Surveyor nuclease cleaves with high specificity at the 3' side of any mismatch site in both DNA strands, including all base substitutions and insertion/deletions up to at least 12 nucleotides. Surveyor nuclease technology involves four steps: (i) PCR to amplify target DNA from both mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (ii) hybridization to form heteroduplexes between mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (iii) treatment of annealed DNA with Surveyor nuclease to cleave heteroduplexes; and (iv) analysis of digested DNA products using the detection/separation platform of choice. The technology is highly sensitive, detecting rare mutants present at as low as 1 in 32 copies. Unlabeled Surveyor nuclease digestion products can be analyzed using conventional gel electrophoresis or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while end labeled digestion products are suitable for analysis by automated gel or capillary electrophoresis. The entire protocol can be performed in less than a day and is suitable for automated and high-throughput procedures.

  2. Activating GNAS mutations in parosteal osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jodi M; Inwards, Carrie Y; Jin, Long; Evers, Barbara; Wenger, Doris E; Oliveira, Andre M; Fritchie, Karen J

    2014-03-01

    Parosteal osteosarcoma is a surface-based osteosarcoma that often exhibits deceptively bland cytologic features, hindering diagnosis in small biopsies or when correlative radiologic imaging is not readily available. A number of benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions, including fibrous dysplasia (FD) and low-grade central osteosarcoma, fall within the morphologic differential diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma. Somatic mutations in GNAS, encoding the α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex (Gsα), occur in FD and McCune-Albright syndrome but have not been reported in parosteal osteosarcoma. We evaluated GNAS mutational status in parosteal osteosarcoma and several of its histologic mimics to determine its utility in differentiating these entities. Eleven of 14 (79%) FD cases had GNAS mutations within codon 201 (5 R201C and 6 R201H mutations). GNAS mutations were not detected in any cases of adamantinoma or osteofibrous dysplasia. Direct sequencing of 9 parosteal osteosarcomas, including 3 of low grade and 6 with dedifferentiation, revealed activating GNAS mutations in 5 cases (55%), distributed as 4 R201C-mutated tumors and 1 tumor with an R201H mutation. GNAS codon 227 mutations were not detected in any of the cases. There was no association between GNAS mutational status and patient demographics, histologic dedifferentiation, or clinical outcome. To our knowledge, we report the first series of parosteal osteosarcomas harboring activating GNAS mutations. Our data suggest that GNAS mutational status may have limited utility as an ancillary technique in differentiating benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions of the bone.

  3. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrone, John T.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    A virus’ mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16) than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24), and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects. PMID:27571422

  4. The inheritance of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Cree, L.M.; Samuels, D.C.; Chinnery, P F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial DNA mutations cause disease in >1 in 5000 of the population, and ~1 in 200 of the population are asymptomatic carriers of a pathogenic mtDNA mutation. Many patients with these pathogenic mtDNA mutations present with a progressive, disabling neurological syndrome that leads to major disability and premature death. There is currently no effective treatment for mitochondrial disorders, placing great emphasis on preventing the transmission of these diseases. An e...

  5. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Visher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16 than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24, and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects.

  6. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, s...

  7. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  8. Computational Analysis of PTEN Gene Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew-Kien Mah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-genomic data can be efficiently analyzed using computational tools. It has the advantage over the biochemical and biophysical methods in term of higher coverage. In this research, we adopted a computational analysis on PTEN gene mutation.  Mutation in PTEN is responsible for many human diseases. The results of this research provide insights into the protein domains of PTEN and the distribution of mutation.

  9. Methods for detection of ataxia telangiectasia mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatti, Richard A.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening large, complex, polyexonic eukaryotic genes such as the ATM gene for mutations and polymorphisms by an improved version of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis that allows electrophoresis of two or three amplified segments in a single lane. The present invention also is directed to new mutations and polymorphisms in the ATM gene that are useful in performing more accurate screening of human DNA samples for mutations and in distinguishing mutations from polymorphisms, thereby improving the efficiency of automated screening methods.

  10. Mutation rate analysis at 19 autosomal microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Cai-Yong; Ji, Qiang; Li, Kai; Fan, Han-Ting; Yu, Yan-Fang; Bu, Fan-Li; Hu, Ling-Li; Wang, Jian-Wen; Mu, Hao-Fang; Haigh, Steven; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a large sample size is needed to reliably estimate population- and locus-specific microsatellite mutation rates. Therefore, we conducted a long-term collaboration study and performed a comprehensive analysis on the mutation characteristics of 19 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci. The STR loci located on 15 of 22 autosomal chromosomes were analyzed in a total of 21,106 samples (11,468 parent-child meioses) in a Chinese population. This provided 217,892 allele transfers at 19 STR loci. An overall mutation rate of 1.20 × 10(-3) (95% CI, 1.06-1.36 × 10(-3) ) was observed in the populations across 18 of 19 STR loci, except for the TH01 locus with no mutation found. Most STR mutations (97.7%) were single-step mutations, and only a few mutations (2.30%) comprised two and multiple steps. Interestingly, approximately 93% of mutation events occur in the male germline. The mutation ratios increased with the paternal age at child birth (r = 0.99, ptesting, kinship analysis, and population genetics.

  11. The mutational spectrum in Waardenburg syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, A.P.; Tassabehji, M.; Liu, X.Z. [and others

    1994-09-01

    101 individuals or families with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) or related abnormalities have been screened for mutations in the PAX3 gene. PAX3 mutations were seen in 19 of 35 individuals or families with features of Type I Waardenburg syndrome. None of the 47 Type 2 WS families showed any PAX3 mutation, nor did any of 19 individuals with other neural crest syndromes or pigmentary disturbances. PAX3 mutations included substitutions of highly conserved amino acids, splice site mutations, nonsense mutations and frameshifting deletions or insertions. One patient (with Type 1 WS, mental retardation and growth retardation) had a chromosomal deletion of 7-8 Mb encompassing the PAX3 gene. Mutations were seen in each of exons 2-6, with a concentration in the 5{prime} part of the paired box (exon 2) and the 3{prime} part of the homeobox (exon 6). There was no evident relation between the molecular change and the clinical manifestations in mutation carriers. We conclude that PAX3 dosage effects very specifically produce dystopia canthorum, the distinguishing feature of Type 1 WS, and variably produce the other features of Type 1 WS depending on genetic background or chance events. Two of the Type 2 families showed linkage to markers from 3p14, the location of the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-zipper protein which is the homologue of the mouse microphthalmia gene product. It is likely that mutations in MITF cause some but not all Type 2 WS.

  12. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  13. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M; Eyman, Daniel K; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J; Kets, Carolien M; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P F; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-07-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere.

  14. Lamin A/C and emerin regulate MKL1-SRF activity by modulating actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Yee; Jaalouk, Diana E; Vartiainen, Maria K; Lammerding, Jan

    2013-05-23

    Laminopathies, caused by mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, represent a diverse group of diseases that include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, and Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome. Most LMNA mutations affect skeletal and cardiac muscle by mechanisms that remain incompletely understood. Loss of structural function and altered interaction of mutant lamins with (tissue-specific) transcription factors have been proposed to explain the tissue-specific phenotypes. Here we report in mice that lamin-A/C-deficient (Lmna(-/-)) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells have impaired nuclear translocation and downstream signalling of the mechanosensitive transcription factor megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 (MKL1), a myocardin family member that is pivotal in cardiac development and function. Altered nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of MKL1 was caused by altered actin dynamics in Lmna(-/-) and Lmna(N195K/N195K) mutant cells. Ectopic expression of the nuclear envelope protein emerin, which is mislocalized in Lmna mutant cells and also linked to EDMD and DCM, restored MKL1 nuclear translocation and rescued actin dynamics in mutant cells. These findings present a novel mechanism that could provide insight into the disease aetiology for the cardiac phenotype in many laminopathies, whereby lamin A/C and emerin regulate gene expression through modulation of nuclear and cytoskeletal actin polymerization.

  15. A frequent splicing mutation and novel missense mutations color the updated mutational spectrum of classic galactosemia in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Ramos, Ruben; Gaspar, Ana; Costa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Anabela; Diogo, Luísa; Garcia, Paula; Paiva, Sandra; Martins, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa Leão; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Cardoso, M Teresa; Ferreira, Elena; Sequeira, Sílvia; Leite, Margarida; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity. Patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period, which can be ameliorated by dietary restriction of galactose. Many patients develop long-term complications, with a broad range of clinical symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. The high allelic heterogeneity of GALT gene that characterizes this disorder is thought to play a determinant role in biochemical and clinical phenotypes. We aimed to characterize the mutational spectrum of GALT deficiency in Portugal and to assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations. Direct sequencing of the GALT gene and in silico analyses were employed to evaluate the impact of uncharacterized mutations upon GALT functionality. Molecular characterization of 42 galactosemic Portuguese patients revealed a mutational spectrum comprising 14 nucleotide substitutions: ten missense, two nonsense and two putative splicing mutations. Sixteen different genotypic combinations were detected, half of the patients being p.Q188R homozygotes. Notably, the second most frequent variation is a splicing mutation. In silico predictions complemented by a close-up on the mutations in the protein structure suggest that uncharacterized missense mutations have cumulative point effects on protein stability, oligomeric state, or substrate binding. One splicing mutation is predicted to cause an alternative splicing event. This study reinforces the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classic galactosemia, a monogenic disease whose complex pathogenesis and clinical features emphasize the need to expand the knowledge on this "cloudy" disorder.

  16. Mutation specific functions of EGFR result in a mutation-specific downstream pathway activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Eraslan-Erdem (Lale); Y. Gao; N.K. Kloosterhof (Nanne); Y. Atlasi (Yaser); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently mutated in various types of cancer. Although all oncogenic mutations are considered activating, different tumour types have different mutation spectra. It is possible that functional differences underlie this tumour-ty

  17. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

  18. Finite mutation classes of coloured quivers

    CERN Document Server

    Torkildsen, Hermund André

    2010-01-01

    We consider the general notion of coloured quiver mutation and show that the mutation class of a coloured quiver $Q$, arising from an $m$-cluster tilting object associated with $H$, is finite if and only if $H$ is of finite or tame representation type, or it has at most 2 simples. This generalizes a result known for 1-cluster categories.

  19. Silting mutation for self-injective algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Aihara, Takuma

    2010-01-01

    We study `silting mutaion' for self-injective algebras. In particular we focus on `tilting mutation' and show that iterated irreducible `silting mutation' transitively act on the set of silting objects for representation-finite symmetric algebras. Moreover we give some sufficient conditions for `Bongartz-type Lemma' on silting objects.

  20. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...

  1. Inverse PCR for Point Mutation Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diogo; Santos, Gustavo; Barroca, Mário; Collins, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Inverse PCR is a powerful tool for the rapid introduction of desired mutations at desired positions in a circular double-stranded DNA sequence. Here, custom-designed mutant primers oriented in the inverse direction are used to amplify the entire circular template with incorporation of the required mutation(s). By careful primer design it can be used to perform such diverse modifications as the introduction of point mutations and multiple mutations, the insertion of new sequences, and even sequence deletions. Three primer formats are commonly used; nonoverlapping, partially overlapping and fully overlapping primers, and here we describe the use of nonoverlapping primers for introduction of a point mutation. Use of such a primer setup in the PCR reaction, with one of the primers containing the desired mismatch mutation, results in the amplification of a linear, double-stranded, mutated product. Methylated template DNA is removed from the nonmethylated PCR product by DpnI digestion and the PCR product is then phosphorylated by polynucleotide kinase treatment before being recircularized by ligation, and transformed to E. coli. This relatively simple site-directed mutagenesis procedure is of major importance in biology and biotechnology today where it is commonly employed for the study and engineering of DNA, RNA, and proteins.

  2. KRAS and BRAF mutations in anal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Høgdall, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    the frequency and the prognostic value of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a large cohort of patients with anal cancer. One hundred and ninety-three patients with T1-4N0-3M0-1 anal carcinoma were included in the study. Patients were treated with curative (92%) or palliative intent (8%) between January 2000...... and January 2010. KRAS mutations were detected using Therascreen(®)KRAS real-time PCR assay (Qiagen) and V600E or V600D/K BRAF mutations were uncovered using Pyrosequencing. The frequency of KRAS and BRAF mutations was low; KRAS mutations were detected in 1.6% and BRAF mutations in 4.7% of the biopsies....... No impact of KRAS or BRAF status on survival was found. In conclusion, both KRAS and BRAF mutations are rare in anal cancer. The low frequency of KRAS mutations support protocols exploring EGFR-targeted therapy in patients with metastatic anal cancer, while treatment with BRAF inhibitors might be relevant...

  3. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Tan; Xiang Du

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers,and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years.The most frequent mutations in this gene,point substitutions in codons 12 and 13,were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies.Therefore,determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers.Currently,a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however,several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing,including the selection of tumor samples,tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods.Moreover,new testing strategies,in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF,PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists,should be promoted.In addition,we recommend that microsatellite instability,a prognostic factor,be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis.This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing.This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing.

  4. Mutational analysis of TARDBP in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitterswijk, M. van; Es, M.A. van; Verbaan, D.; Hilten, J.J. van; Scheffer, H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Veldink, J.H.; Berg, L.H. van den

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein (TARDBP) are associated with heterogenic phenotypes, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, and Parkinson's disease. In this study, we investigated the presence of TARDBP mutations in a cohort of 429 Dutch patients with Parkinson's dise

  5. Abetalipoproteinemia: A novel mutation of microsomal triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hager Barakizou

    2016-01-25

    Jan 25, 2016 ... molecular genetics in a Tunisian child having a novel mutation of MTP gene. 2. ... ABL is caused by MTP gene frameshift, non-sense and splice site mutations which ... and its variations could be associated with central obesity, ele- vated liver enzymes, and alcoholic fatty liver disease [5]. It has recently been ...

  6. Analyzing effects of naturally occurring missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Miteva, Maria A; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Single-point mutation in genome, for example, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or rare genetic mutation, is the change of a single nucleotide for another in the genome sequence. Some of them will produce an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein sequence (missense mutations); others will not. This paper focuses on genetic mutations resulting in a change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein and how to assess their effects on protein wild-type characteristics. The existing methods and approaches for predicting the effects of mutation on protein stability, structure, and dynamics are outlined and discussed with respect to their underlying principles. Available resources, either as stand-alone applications or webservers, are pointed out as well. It is emphasized that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind these effects due to these missense mutations is of critical importance for detecting disease-causing mutations. The paper provides several examples of the application of 3D structure-based methods to model the effects of protein stability and protein-protein interactions caused by missense mutations as well.

  7. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  8. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the PORCN gene were first identified in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome patients in 2007. Since then, several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects resulting in the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, and mutations or deletions were also reported in angioma serpiginosum,...

  9. 一个常染色体显性遗传Emery-Dreifuss型肌营养不良家系的基因突变分析%Mutation analysis of a Chinese family with autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁军辉; 胡静; 赵哲; 沈宏锐; 李娜; 邴琪

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics in a family with autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (AD-EDMD). Methods Clinical data and skeletal muscle specimens were collected from two patients (the proband and her daughter) for pathological analysis. DNA samples of the proband and her family members (7 persons from 3 generations) were obtained for PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. Haplotype analysis was performed after the identification of mutation. Results The proband had typical clinical manifestation of EDMD: joint contracture, progressive muscle weakness and atrophy and cardiac conduction dysfunction. Muscular pathology revealed myopathic changes combined with slight neuropathic changes. A heterozygous missense mutation 1583 (C→G) (T528R) was identified in exon 9 of the LMNA gene in the two patients, but not in other family members. Haplotype analysis indicated that the proband and her daughter shared the same causative haplotype. Conclusion This is the first report of the phenotype and genotype of AD-EDMD in Chinese.%目的 探讨一个常染色体显性遗传Emery-Dreifuss型肌营养不良(Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy,EDMD)家系的临床、病理及遗传学特点.方法 收集家系中2例患者(先证者及女儿)的临床资料及骨骼肌标本,行组织化学染色病理分析;收集先证者及家系成员(3代7人)血液DNA标本,采用聚合酶链反应和DNA直接测序方法 对LMNA基因进行突变检测;明确基因变异位点后对家系行单倍型分析.结果 先证者具有典型的EDMD临床表现:关节挛缩、进行性加重的肌无力和肌萎缩、心脏传导异常;骨骼肌活检病理示肌源性合并轻度神经源性改变;2例患者LMNA基因第9外显子发现杂合错义突变1583(C→G)(T528R),表型正常的其他家系成员未发现该突变;单倍型分析显示先证者及女儿具有相同的致病单倍型.结论

  10. Mutations in the human TWIST gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, K W; Zackai, E H; Stolle, C A

    2000-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a relatively common craniosynostosis disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in the TWIST gene have been identified in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The TWIST gene product is a transcription factor with DNA binding and helix-loop-helix domains. Numerous missense and nonsense mutations cluster in the functional domains, without any apparent mutational hot spot. Two novel point mutations and one novel polymorphism are included in this review. Large deletions including the TWIST gene have been identified in some patients with learning disabilities or mental retardation, which are not typically part of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Comprehensive studies in patients with the clinical diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have demonstrated a TWIST gene abnormality in about 80%, up to 37% of which may be large deletions [Johnson et al., 1998]. The gene deletions and numerous nonsense mutations are suggestive of haploinsufficiency as the disease-causing mechanism. No genotype phenotype correlation was apparent.

  11. Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy due to HSPD1 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schioldan Kusk, Maria; Damgaard, Bodil; Risom, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    The hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) encompass the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by PLP1 mutations and known as the classical form of HML as well as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD) (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 608804 and OMIM 260600) due to GJC2...... mutations. In addition, mutations in at least 10 other genes are known to cause HMLs. In 2008, an Israeli family with clinical and neuroimaging findings similar to those found in PMD was reported. The patients were found to have a homozygous missense mutation in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat......-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), and the disorder was defined as the autosomal recessive mitochondrial Hsp60 chaperonopathy (MitCHAP-60) disease. We here report the first case of this severe neurodegenerative disease since it was first described. Given the fact that the families carried the same mutation our patient...

  12. Mutation studies in ascidians: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetta, Fabio; Marino, Rita; Cirino, Paola; Macina, Alberto; Staiano, Leopoldo; Esposito, Rosaria; Pezzotti, Maria Rosa; Racioppi, Claudia; Toscano, Francesco; De Felice, Elena; Locascio, Annamaria; Ristoratore, Filomena; Spagnuolo, Antonietta; Zanetti, Laura; Branno, Margherita; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Historically, mutations have had a significant impact on the study of developmental processes and phenotypic evolution. Lesions in DNA are created by artificial methods or detected by natural genetic variation. Random mutations are then ascribed to genetic change by direct sequencing or positional cloning. Tunicate species of the ascidian genus Ciona represent nearly fully realized model systems in which gene function can be investigated in depth. Additionally, tunicates are valuable organisms for the study of naturally occurring mutations due to the capability to exploit genetic variation down to the molecular level. Here, we summarize the available information about how mutations are studied in ascidians with examples of insights that have resulted from these applications. We also describe notions and methodologies that might be useful for the implementation of easy and tight procedures for mutations studies in Ciona.

  13. Mutations affecting gyrase in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, J.K.; Cabrera-Juarez, E.; Albritton, W.L.; Spikes, D.; Mutschler, A.

    1985-11-01

    Mutants separately resistant to novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid contained gyrase activity as measured in vitro that was resistant to the antibiotics, indicating that the mutations represented structural alterations of the enzyme. One Novr mutant contained an altered B subunit of the enzyme, as judged by the ability of a plasmid, pNov1, containing the mutation to complement a temperature-sensitive gyrase B mutation in Escherichia coli and to cause novobiocin resistance in that strain. Three other Novr mutations did not confer antibiotic resistance to the gyrase but appeared to increase the amount of active enzyme in the cell. One of these, novB1, could only act in cis, whereas a new mutation, novC, could act in trans. An RNA polymerase mutation partially substituted for the novB1 mutation, suggesting that novB1 may be a mutation in a promoter region for the B subunit gene. Growth responses of strains containing various combinations of mutations on plasmids or on the chromosome indicated that low-level resistance to novobiocin or coumermycin may have resulted from multiple copies of wild-type genes coding for the gyrase B subunit, whereas high-level resistance required a structural change in the gyrase B gene and was also dependent on alteration in a regulatory region. When there was mismatch at the novB locus, with the novB1 mutation either on a plasmid or the chromosome, and the corresponding wild-type gene present in trans, chromosome to plasmid recombination during transformation was much higher than when the genes matched, probably because plasmid to chromosome recombination, eliminating the plasmid, was inhibited by the mismatch.

  14. Science Letters: Screen p53 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma by FASAY: A novel splicing mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-mo; FU Jing-geng; GE Wang-zhong; ZHU Jiang-yan; WANG Jun-yong; ZHANG Wei; QIAN Wei; HUO Ke-ke

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish a routine procedure for the detection of p53 mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)surgical resections using the FASAY (functional analysis of separated alleles of p53 on yeast) procedure. Methods: p53 status was analyzed by FASAY and cDNA sequencing in 50 cases of HCC. After the extraction of RNA from the frozen tumor and corresponding normal tissues, reverse transcription RT-PCR was carried out using these samples. The assay can detect mutations of p53mRNA between codons 67 and 347 by the DNA-binding activity of the protein and reveal them as red colonies. Results: Of the 50specimens, 29 (58%) were positive (mutant) by FASAY. Sequencing analysis confirmed that all 29 FASAY positive tumors harbored mutations, and that no mutations were detectable in any FASAY negative tumors. In 29 p53 mutations, 22 mutations were point missense mutation, 5 were deletions and 2 were splicing mutations. A novel splice mutation on splice donor of intron 6was reported, which could produce two different mRNAs, respectively using the nearest upstream and downstream recessive splice donor sites. Conclusion: FASAY is a sensitive method for detecting the various types of p53 mutations in HCC, suggesting that the yeast functional assay for the detection of p53 mutations may be essential for elucidating their clinical significance.

  15. MutationFinder: a high-performance system for extracting point mutation mentions from text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, J Gregory; Baumgartner, William A; Randolph, David A; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hunter, Lawrence

    2007-07-15

    Discussion of point mutations is ubiquitous in biomedical literature, and manually compiling databases or literature on mutations in specific genes or proteins is tedious. We present an open-source, rule-based system, MutationFinder, for extracting point mutation mentions from text. On blind test data, it achieves nearly perfect precision and a markedly improved recall over a baseline. MutationFinder, along with a high-quality gold standard data set, and a scoring script for mutation extraction systems have been made publicly available. Implementations, source code and unit tests are available in Python, Perl and Java. MutationFinder can be used as a stand-alone script, or imported by other applications. http://bionlp.sourceforge.net.

  16. Software Mutational Robustness: Bridging The Gap Between Mutation Testing and Evolutionary Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Eric; Fast, Ethan; Forrest, Stephanie; Weimer, Westley

    2012-01-01

    In the mutation testing paradigm, test suite quality is measured by its ability to detect variant programs generated through application of random changes to an original program. In evolutionary biology however, neutral mutations that leave fitness unchanged are considered to be beneficial---improving the system's robustness and ability to discover evolutionary improvements. In this paper, we generate a population of variant programs from an original program by applying lightweight random mutations. We adopt biological terminology and refer to undetected variants as neutral, and the percentage of all variants that are neutral as mutational robustness. Although they are related to equivalent mutants in mutation testing, which are viewed as problematic, we show positive properties of neutral variants which are easily generated and can be used to protect software against unknown defects. Even when mutations are restricted to statements executed by the test suit, we find that mutational robustness is high: 36.75%...

  17. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  18. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  19. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  20. New mutations in CMT 1 and HNPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenberghe, A.; Boucherat, M. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Lyon (France); Bonnebouche, C. [Hopital de l`Antiquaille, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The majority of mutations in CMT 1 (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1) are due to a duplication of a 1.5 Mb fragment from chromosome 17 containing the PMP22 myelin gene. In addition, micromutations are found in the genes for PMP22 and myelin Po. We collected data from over one hundred families with a duplication in 17p11.2. In about 10% of these families, a de novo mutation was observed. All parents were clinically examined as normal and correct paternity was confirmed. Some families were informative for polymorphic probes located in the duplicated region, and we could deduce a majority of new mutations to be from paternal origin. HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies) is believed to be the reciprocal product of an unequal crossing over underlying the CMT 1 mutation and is due to a deletion of the 1.5 Mb fragment. One new HNPP mutation was found among 7 deleted HNPP families. This mutation is of paternal origin. Clinically assigned CMT 1 patients without a duplication are screened for micromutations applying the SSCP technique. In one family, a de novo mutation was found in the gene for Po.

  1. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  2. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Wei Lu; Xiao-Yan Wu; Sachio Morimoto

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Associated with Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Min-Xin

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial 12S rRNA has been shown to be the hot spot for mutations associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss. Of all the mutations, the homoplasmic A1555G and C1494T mutations at a highly conserved decoding region in the 12S rRNA have been associated with aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss in many families worldwide. The A1555G or C1494T mutation is expected to form novel 1494C-G1555 or 1494U-A1555 base-pair at the highly conserved A-site of 12S rRNA. These transitions make the secondary structure of this RNA more closely resemble the corresponding region of bacterial 16S rRNA. Thus, the new U - A or G-C pair in 12S rRNA created by the C1494T or A1555G transition facilitates the binding of aminoglycosides, thereby accounting for the fact that the exposure to aminoglycosides can induce or worsen hearing loss in individuals carrying these mutations. Furthermore, the growth defect and impairment of mitochondrial translation were observed in cell lines carrying the A1555G or C1494T mutation in the presence of high concentration of aminoglycosides. In addition, nuclear modifier genes and mitochondrial haplotypes modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the A1555G and C1494T mutations. These observations provide the direct genetic and biochemical evidences that the A1555G or C1494T mutation is a pathogenic mtDNA mutation associated with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Therefore, these data have been providing valuable information and technology to predict which individuals are at risk for ototoxicity, to improve the safety of aminoglycoside antibiotic therapy, and eventually to decrease the incidence of deafness.

  4. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter.

  5. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  6. Melanoma: from mutations to medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Hensin; Chin, Lynda; Garraway, Levi A.; Fisher, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is often considered one of the most aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancers. It is a disease that, due to the presence of melanin pigment, was accurately diagnosed earlier than most other malignancies and that has been subjected to countless therapeutic strategies. Aside from early surgical resection, no therapeutic modality has been found to afford a high likelihood of curative outcome. However, discoveries reported in recent years have revealed a near avalanche of breakthroughs in the melanoma field—breakthroughs that span fundamental understanding of the molecular basis of the disease all the way to new therapeutic strategies that produce unquestionable clinical benefit. These discoveries have been born from the successful fruits of numerous researchers working in many—sometimes-related, although also distinct—biomedical disciplines. Discoveries of frequent mutations involving BRAF(V600E), developmental and oncogenic roles for the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) pathway, clinical efficacy of BRAF-targeted small molecules, and emerging mechanisms underlying resistance to targeted therapeutics represent just a sample of the findings that have created a striking inflection in the quest for clinically meaningful progress in the melanoma field. PMID:22661227

  7. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  8. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  9. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Particle Swarm Optimization with Adaptive Mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhen-su; HOU Zhi-rong; DU Juan

    2006-01-01

    A new adaptive mutation particle swarm optimizer,which is based on the variance of the population's fitness,is presented in this paper.During the rtmning time,the mutation probability for the current best particle is determined by two factors:the variance of the population's fitness and the current optimal solution.The ability of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to break away from the local optimum is greatly improved by the mutation.The experimental results show that the new algorithm not only has great advantage of convergence property over genetic algorithm and PSO,but can also avoid the premature convergence problem effectively.

  11. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation: t...... of the disease in question and determination of the carrier frequency in the general population may help in elucidating the penetrance of the genotype. This is exemplified in disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation....

  12. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  13. Spontaneous mutation parameters for Arabidopsis thaliana measured in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew T; Shaw, Frank H; Fenster, Charles B

    2010-06-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic diversity and their contributions to evolutionary process depend critically on their rate and their effects on traits, notably fitness. Mutation rate and mutation effect can be measured simultaneously through the use of mutation accumulation lines, and previous mutation accumulation studies measuring these parameters have been performed in laboratory conditions. However, estimation of mutation parameters for fitness in wild populations requires assays in environments where mutations are exposed to natural selection and natural environmental variation. Here we quantify mutation parameters in both the wild and greenhouse environments using 100 25th generation Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines. We found significantly greater mutational variance and a higher mutation rate for fitness under field conditions relative to greenhouse conditions. However, our field estimates were low when scaled to natural environmental variation. Many of the mutation accumulation lines have increased fitness, counter to the expectation that nearly all mutations decrease fitness. A high mutation rate and a low mutational contribution to phenotypic variation may explain observed levels of natural genetic variation. Our findings indicate that mutation parameters are not fixed, but are variables whose values may reflect the specific environment in which mutations are tested.

  14. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [

  15. Mutation screening in Rett syndrome patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiang, F; Buervenich, S; Nicolao, P; Bailey, M E; Zhang, Z; Anvret, M

    2000-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) was first described in 1966. Its biological and genetic foundations were not clear until recently when Amir et al reported that mutations in the MECP2 gene were detected in around 50% of RTT patients...

  16. Recorded Step Directional Mutation for Faster Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Two meta-evolutionary optimization strategies described in this paper accelerate the convergence of evolutionary programming algorithms while still retaining much of their ability to deal with multi-modal problems. The strategies, called directional mutation and recorded step in this paper, can operate independently but together they greatly enhance the ability of evolutionary programming algorithms to deal with fitness landscapes characterized by long narrow valleys. The directional mutation aspect of this combined method uses correlated meta-mutation but does not introduce a full covariance matrix. These new methods are thus much more economical in terms of storage for problems with high dimensionality. Additionally, directional mutation is rotationally invariant which is a substantial advantage over self-adaptive methods which use a single variance per coordinate for problems where the natural orientation of the problem is not oriented along the axes.

  17. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  18. Rb1 GENE MUTATIONS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Ji-bin; SONG Yue; WANG Yi; SHI Yu-yuan

    1999-01-01

    @@ Genetic alternations, such as mutations caused inactivities of tumor suppressor gene, have been identified in a wide variety of tumors, including osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in the extremities of young adolescents in most cases. Because of the high frequent occurrence of this type of tumor in hereditary retinoblastoma patients, involvement of the Rb1 gene mutations was suspected in the development of osteosarcoma, and a few reports have shown alternations of the Rb1 gene in osteosarcoma. We studied Rb1 gene mutations in 9 osteosarcoma samples and one cell line (OS 732) to explore the types and mechanism of Rb1 gene mutations in osteosarcoma.

  19. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  20. Mutation analysis of Australasian Gaucher disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.V.; Carey, W.F.; Morris, C.P.; Lewis, B.D. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    1995-09-25

    We have previously reported phenotype and genotype analyses in 28 Australasian Gaucher patients who were screened for several of the common Gaucher mutations: N370S, L444P, 84GG, and R463C. Horowitz and Zimran have reported that the complex alleles recNciI and recTL, which contain several point mutations including L444P, are relatively common, especially in non-Jewish Gaucher patients. Zimran and Horowitz have also stated that these recombinant alleles could easily be missed by laboratories testing only for the common Gaucher point mutations. Failure to correctly identify these mutations would influence any attempt to correlate genotype with phenotype. We have therefore retested our Gaucher patients for recNciI (L444P, A456P, and V46OV) and recTL (D409H, L444P, A456P, and V46OV) by PCR amplification, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides. 4 refs.

  1. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian R; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA have enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in a large number of tumour samples. In this Review, we describe recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep-sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates and spectra, as well as the roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches that are used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses, as well as the future challenges of translating these genomic data into clinical impacts.

  2. Febrile Episodic Ataxia with Novel Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2 kindred with ataxic spells induced by fever or high environmental temperature and a novel CACNA1A mutation were identified and reported from the Universities of Mississippi and Minnesota.

  3. Mutational analysis of yeast profilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarer, B K; Petzold, A S; Brown, S S

    1993-12-01

    We have mutated two regions within the yeast profilin gene in an effort to functionally dissect the roles of actin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding in profilin function. A series of truncations was carried out at the C terminus of profilin, a region that has been implicated in actin binding. Removal of the last three amino acids nearly eliminated the ability of profilin to bind polyproline in vitro but had no dramatic in vivo effects. Thus, the extreme C terminus is implicated in polyproline binding, but the physiological relevance of this interaction is called into question. More extensive truncation, of up to eight amino acids, had in vivo effects of increasing severity and resulted in changes in conformation and expression level of the mutant profilins. However, the ability of these mutants to bind actin in vitro was not eliminated, suggesting that this region cannot be solely responsible for actin binding. We also mutagenized a region of profilin that we hypothesized might be involved in PIP2 binding. Alteration of basic amino acids in this region produced mutant profilins that functioned well in vivo. Many of these mutants, however, were unable to suppress the loss of adenylate cyclase-associated protein (Cap/Srv2p [A. Vojtek, B. Haarer, J. Field, J. Gerst, T. D. Pollard, S. S. Brown, and M. Wigler, Cell 66:497-505, 1991]), indicating that a defect could be demonstrated in vivo. In vitro assays demonstrated that the inability to suppress loss of Cap/Srv2p correlated with a defect in the interaction with actin, independently of whether PIP2 binding was reduced. Since our earlier studies of Acanthamoeba profilins suggested the importance of PIP2 binding for suppression, we conclude that both activities are implicated and that an interplay between PIP2 binding and actin binding may be important for profilin function.

  4. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    associated with epilepsy and autism . The generation of two new model systems permits more in-depth analysis of the developmental pathogenesis of TSC and...disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure known as tubers in over 80% of TSC patients. Loss of...that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain structure

  5. Noise-mean relationship in mutated promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Gil; Bar-Ziv, Raz; Rosin, Dalia; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko; Tawfik, Dan S; Oren, Moshe; Barkai, Naama

    2012-12-01

    Gene expression depends on the frequency of transcription events (burst frequency) and on the number of mRNA molecules made per event (burst size). Both processes are encoded in promoter sequence, yet their dependence on mutations is poorly understood. Theory suggests that burst size and frequency can be distinguished by monitoring the stochastic variation (noise) in gene expression: Increasing burst size will increase mean expression without changing noise, while increasing burst frequency will increase mean expression and decrease noise. To reveal principles by which promoter sequence regulates burst size and frequency, we randomly mutated 22 yeast promoters chosen to span a range of expression and noise levels, generating libraries of hundreds of sequence variants. In each library, mean expression (m) and noise (coefficient of variation, η) varied together, defining a scaling curve: η(2) = b/m + η(ext)(2). This relation is expected if sequence mutations modulate burst frequency primarily. The estimated burst size (b) differed between promoters, being higher in promoter containing a TATA box and lacking a nucleosome-free region. The rare variants that significantly decreased b were explained by mutations in TATA, or by an insertion of an out-of-frame translation start site. The decrease in burst size due to mutations in TATA was promoter-dependent, but independent of other mutations. These TATA box mutations also modulated the responsiveness of gene expression to changing conditions. Our results suggest that burst size is a promoter-specific property that is relatively robust to sequence mutations but is strongly dependent on the interaction between the TATA box and promoter nucleosomes.

  6. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  7. Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMarini, D.M. [EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis of complex environmental mixtures has indicated that much of the genotoxic activity of mixtures is due to the presence of one or a few classes or chemicals within the mixture. We have extended this observation to the molecular level by using colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis to determine the mutation spectra of {approximately}8,000 revertants induced by a variety of complex mixtures and their chemical fractions in TA100 and TA98 of Salmonella. For urban air, >80% of mutagenic activity was due to a base/neutral fraction that contained primarily PAHs. The mutation spectrum induced by unfractionated urban air was not significantly different from that produced by a model PAH, B(a)P. The mutation spectrum induced by organic extracts of chlorinated drinking water were similar to those produced by the chlorinated furanone MX, which accounted for {approximately}20% of the mutagenic activity of the samples. The base/neutral fraction of municipal waste incinerator emissions accounted for the primary class of mutations induced by the emissions, and a polar neutral fraction accounted for the secondary class of mutations induced by the emissions. The primary class of mutations induced by cigarette smoke condensate in TA100 (GC {yields} TA) is also the primary class of mutations in the p53 gene of lung tumors of cigarette smokers. These results confirm at the molecular level that the mutations induced by a complex mixture reflect the dominance of one or a few classes of chemicals within the mixture.

  8. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Dawn B; Howell, Brian W

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis.

  9. RELN mutations in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn B. Lammert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia, accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD. RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein, and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis.

  10. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  11. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  12. Frequent MAGE mutations in human melanoma.

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    Otavia L Caballero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer/testis (CT genes are expressed only in the germ line and certain tumors and are most frequently located on the X-chromosome (the CT-X genes. Amongst the best studied CT-X genes are those encoding several MAGE protein families. The function of MAGE proteins is not well understood, but several have been shown to potentially influence the tumorigenic phenotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook a mutational analysis of coding regions of four CT-X MAGE genes, MAGEA1, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, MAGEC2 and the ubiquitously expressed MAGEE1 in human melanoma samples. We first examined cell lines established from tumors and matching blood samples from 27 melanoma patients. We found that melanoma cell lines from 37% of patients contained at least one mutated MAGE gene. The frequency of mutations in the coding regions of individual MAGE genes varied from 3.7% for MAGEA1 and MAGEA4 to 14.8% for MAGEC2. We also examined 111 fresh melanoma samples collected from 86 patients. In this case, samples from 32% of the patients exhibited mutations in one or more MAGE genes with the frequency of mutations in individual MAGE genes ranging from 6% in MAGEA1 to 16% in MAGEC1. SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate for the first time that the MAGE gene family is frequently mutated in melanoma.

  13. A DSPP mutation causing dentinogenesis imperfecta and characterization of the mutational effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Song, Su Jeong; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L) in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  14. A DSPP Mutation Causing Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Characterization of the Mutational Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  15. Dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations in mice induced by radiation or ethylnitrosourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehling, U.H.; Favor, J.; Kratochvilova, J.; Neuhaeuser-Klaus, A. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik)

    1982-01-01

    In a combined experiment, dominant cataract mutations and specific-locus mutations were scored in the same offspring. In radiation experiments, a total of 15 dominant cataract and 38 specific-locus mutations was scored in 29396 offspring. In experiments with ethylnitrosourea (ENU), a total of 12 dominant cataracts and 54 specific-locus mutations was observed in 12712 offspring. The control frequency for dominant cataracts was 0 in 9954 offspring and for specific-locus mutations 11 in 169955 offspring. The two characteristic features of radiation-induced specific-locus mutations - the augmenting effect of dose fractionation and the quantitative differences in the mutation rates between spermatogonial and post-spermatogonial stages - can also be demonstrated for the induction of dominant cataracts. The dominant cataract mutations recovered can be categorized into 7 phenotypic classes. The only noteworthy difference observed between the radiation- and ENU-induced mutations recovered was that, of the 2 radiation-induced total lens opacities, both were associated with an iris anomaly and microphthalmia whereas the ENU-induced total opacities were not.

  16. On the mutation rate of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John W; Hwang, Charles B C

    2005-06-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  17. Cluster algebras of finite mutation type via unfoldings

    CERN Document Server

    Felikson, Anna; Tumarkin, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    We complete classification of mutation-finite cluster algebras by extending the technique derived by Fomin, Shapiro, and Thurston to skew-symmetrizable case. We show that every mutation-finite skew-symmetrizable matrix admits an unfolding which embeds the mutation class of mutation-finite skew-symmetrizable matrix to the mutation class of some mutation-finite skew-symmetric matrix. In particular, this establishes a correspondence between almost all skew-symmetrizable mutation-finite cluster algebras and triangulated marked bordered surfaces.

  18. The three faces of riboviral spontaneous mutation: spectrum, mode of genome replication, and mutation rate.

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    Libertad García-Villada

    Full Text Available Riboviruses (RNA viruses without DNA replication intermediates are the most abundant pathogens infecting animals and plants. Only a few riboviral infections can be controlled with antiviral drugs, mainly because of the rapid appearance of resistance mutations. Little reliable information is available concerning i kinds and relative frequencies of mutations (the mutational spectrum, ii mode of genome replication and mutation accumulation, and iii rates of spontaneous mutation. To illuminate these issues, we developed a model in vivo system based on phage Qß infecting its natural host, Escherichia coli. The Qß RT gene encoding the Read-Through protein was used as a mutation reporter. To reduce uncertainties in mutation frequencies due to selection, the experimental Qß populations were established after a single cycle of infection and selection against RT(- mutants during phage growth was ameliorated by plasmid-based RT complementation in trans. The dynamics of Qß genome replication were confirmed to reflect the linear process of iterative copying (the stamping-machine mode. A total of 32 RT mutants were detected among 7,517 Qß isolates. Sequencing analysis of 45 RT mutations revealed a spectrum dominated by 39 transitions, plus 4 transversions and 2 indels. A clear template•primer mismatch bias was observed: A•C>C•A>U•G>G•U> transversion mismatches. The average mutation rate per base replication was ≈9.1×10(-6 for base substitutions and ≈2.3×10(-7 for indels. The estimated mutation rate per genome replication, μ(g, was ≈0.04 (or, per phage generation, ≈0.08, although secondary RT mutations arose during the growth of some RT mutants at a rate about 7-fold higher, signaling the possible impact of transitory bouts of hypermutation. These results are contrasted with those previously reported for other riboviruses to depict the current state of the art in riboviral mutagenesis.

  19. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  20. Purging deleterious mutations under self fertilization: paradoxical recovery in fitness with increasing mutation rate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Levi T Morran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of deleterious mutations can drastically reduce population mean fitness. Self-fertilization is thought to be an effective means of purging deleterious mutations. However, widespread linkage disequilibrium generated and maintained by self-fertilization is predicted to reduce the efficacy of purging when mutations are present at multiple loci. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the ability of self-fertilizing populations to purge deleterious mutations at multiple loci by exposing obligately self-fertilizing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans to a range of elevated mutation rates and found that mutations accumulated, as evidenced by a reduction in mean fitness, in each population. Therefore, purging in obligate selfing populations is overwhelmed by an increase in mutation rate. Surprisingly, we also found that obligate and predominantly self-fertilizing populations exposed to very high mutation rates exhibited consistently greater fitness than those subject to lesser increases in mutation rate, which contradicts the assumption that increases in mutation rate are negatively correlated with fitness. The high levels of genetic linkage inherent in self-fertilization could drive this fitness increase. CONCLUSIONS: Compensatory mutations can be more frequent under high mutation rates and may alleviate a portion of the fitness lost due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations through epistatic interactions with deleterious mutations. The prolonged maintenance of tightly linked compensatory and deleterious mutations facilitated by self-fertilization may be responsible for the fitness increase as linkage disequilibrium between the compensatory and deleterious mutations preserves their epistatic interaction.

  1. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  2. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Nieminen; L. Papagiannoulis-Lascarides; J. Waltimo-Siren; P. Ollila; S. Karjalainen; S. Arte; J. Veerkamp; V. Tallon Walton; E. Chimenos Küstner; T. Siltanen; H. Holappa; P.L. Lukinmaa; S. Alaluusua

    2011-01-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic fea

  3. Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of EXT1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with multiple osteochondromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; HU Ya-li; YANG Ying; WU Xing; ZHU Rui-fang; ZHU Xiang-yu; DUAN Hong-lei; ZHANG Ying; ZHOU Jin-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple osteochondromas (MO), an inherited autosomal dominant disorder, is characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses on the long bones. MO is caused by mutations in the EXT1 or EXT2 genes which encode glycosyltransferases implicated in heparin sulfate biosynthesis.Methods In this study, efforts were made to identify the underlying disease-causing mutations in patients from two MO families in China.Results Two novel EXT1 gene mutations were identified and no mutation was found in EXT2 gene. The mutation c.497T>A in exon 1 of the EXT1 gene was cosegregated with the disease phenotype in family 1 and formed a stop codon at amino acid site 166. The fetus of the proband was diagnosed negative. In family 2, the mutation c. 1430-1431delCC in exon 6 of the EXT1 gene would cause frameshift and introduce a premature stop codon after the reading frame being open for 42 amino acids. The fetus of this family inherited this mutation from the father.Conclusions Mutation analysis of two MO families in this study demonstrates its further application in MO genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  4. Volatility of Mutator Phenotypes at Single Cell Resolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Kennedy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutator phenotypes accelerate the evolutionary process of neoplastic transformation. Historically, the measurement of mutation rates has relied on scoring the occurrence of rare mutations in target genes in large populations of cells. Averaging mutation rates over large cell populations assumes that new mutations arise at a constant rate during each cell division. If the mutation rate is not constant, an expanding mutator population may contain subclones with widely divergent rates of evolution. Here, we report mutation rate measurements of individual cell divisions of mutator yeast deficient in DNA polymerase ε proofreading and base-base mismatch repair. Our data are best fit by a model in which cells can assume one of two distinct mutator states, with mutation rates that differ by an order of magnitude. In error-prone cell divisions, mutations occurred on the same chromosome more frequently than expected by chance, often in DNA with similar predicted replication timing, consistent with a spatiotemporal dimension to the hypermutator state. Mapping of mutations onto predicted replicons revealed that mutations were enriched in the first half of the replicon as well as near termination zones. Taken together, our findings show that individual genome replication events exhibit an unexpected volatility that may deepen our understanding of the evolution of mutator-driven malignancies.

  5. PIK3CA mutations frequently coexist with RAS and BRAF mutations in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Janku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oncogenic mutations of PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF have been identified in various malignancies, and activate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/RAF/MEK pathways, respectively. Both pathways are critical drivers of tumorigenesis. METHODS: Tumor tissues from 504 patients with diverse cancers referred to the Clinical Center for Targeted Therapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center starting in October 2008 were analyzed for PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations using polymerase chain reaction-based DNA sequencing. RESULTS: PIK3CA mutations were found in 54 (11% of 504 patients tested; KRAS in 69 (19% of 367; NRAS in 19 (8% of 225; and BRAF in 31 (9% of 361 patients. PIK3CA mutations were most frequent in squamous cervical (5/14, 36%, uterine (7/28, 25%, breast (6/29, 21%, and colorectal cancers (18/105, 17%; KRAS in pancreatic (5/9, 56%, colorectal (49/97, 51%, and uterine cancers (3/20, 15%; NRAS in melanoma (12/40, 30%, and uterine cancer (2/11, 18%; BRAF in melanoma (23/52, 44%, and colorectal cancer (5/88, 6%. Regardless of histology, KRAS mutations were found in 38% of patients with PIK3CA mutations compared to 16% of patients with wild-type (wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. In total, RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations were found in 47% of patients with PIK3CA mutations vs. 24% of patients wtPIK3CA (p = 0.001. PIK3CA mutations were found in 28% of patients with KRAS mutations compared to 10% with wtKRAS (p = 0.001 and in 20% of patients with RAS (KRAS, NRAS or BRAF mutations compared to 8% with wtRAS (KRAS, NRAS or wtBRAF (p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: PIK3CA, RAS (KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are frequent in diverse tumors. In a wide variety of tumors, PIK3CA mutations coexist with RAS (KRAS, NRAS and BRAF mutations.

  6. Novel progranulin mutation: screening for PGRN mutations in a Portuguese series of FTD/CBS cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Rita Joao; Santana, Isabel; Bras, Jose Miguel; Revesz, Tamas; Rebelo, Olinda; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Santiago, Beatriz; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2008-07-15

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene were recently described as the cause of ubiquitin positive frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in many families. Different frequencies of these genetic changes have been reported in diverse populations leading us to determine if these mutations were a major cause of FTD in the Portuguese population. The entire coding sequence plus exon 0 of PGRN were sequenced in a consecutive series of 46 FTD/CBS Portuguese patients. Two mutations were found: a novel pathogenic insertion (p.Gln300GlnfsX61) and a previously described point variant (p.T182M) of unclear pathogenicity. Pathogenic mutations in the PGRN gene were found in one of the 36 probands studied (3% of the probands in our series) who had a corticobasal syndrome presentation, indicating that in the Portuguese population, mutations in this gene are not a major cause of FTD.

  7. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA...... repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results: The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous...... ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated...

  8. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  9. BRCA1 mutations in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Javert Lourenço

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 mutations are known to be responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers in women with early onset and a family history of the disease. In this paper we present a mutational survey conducted in 47 Brazilian patients with breast/ovarian cancer, selected based on age at diagnosis, family history, tumor laterality, and presence of breast cancer in male patients. All 22 coding exons and intron-exon junctions were sequenced. Constitutional mutations were found in seven families, consisting of one insertion (insC5382 in exon 20 (four patients, one four base-pair deletion (3450-3453delCAAG in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon (one patient, one transition (IVS17+2T> C in intron 17 affecting a mRNA splicing site (one patient, and a C> T transition resulting in a stop-codon (Q1135X in exon 11 (one patient. The identification of these mutations which are associated to hereditary breast and ovarian cancers will contribute to the characterization of the mutational spectrum of BRCA1 and to the improvement of genetic counseling for familial breast/ovarian cancer patients in Brazil.

  10. Urinary Tract Effects of HPSE2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Helen M.; Roberts, Neil A.; Hilton, Emma N.; McKenzie, Edward A.; Daly, Sarah B.; Hadfield, Kristen D.; Rahal, Jeffery S.; Gardiner, Natalie J.; Tanley, Simon W.; Lewis, Malcolm A.; Sites, Emily; Angle, Brad; Alves, Cláudia; Lourenço, Teresa; Rodrigues, Márcia; Calado, Angelina; Amado, Marta; Guerreiro, Nancy; Serras, Inês; Beetz, Christian; Varga, Rita-Eva; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Darlow, John M.; Dobson, Mark G.; Barton, David E.; Hunziker, Manuela; Puri, Prem; Feather, Sally A.; Goodship, Judith A.; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Lambert, Heather J.; Cordell, Heather J.; Saggar, Anand; Kinali, Maria; Lorenz, Christian; Moeller, Kristina; Schaefer, Franz; Bayazit, Aysun K.; Weber, Stefanie; Newman, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Urofacial syndrome (UFS) is an autosomal recessive congenital disease featuring grimacing and incomplete bladder emptying. Mutations of HPSE2, encoding heparanase 2, a heparanase 1 inhibitor, occur in UFS, but knowledge about the HPSE2 mutation spectrum is limited. Here, seven UFS kindreds with HPSE2 mutations are presented, including one with deleted asparagine 254, suggesting a role for this amino acid, which is conserved in vertebrate orthologs. HPSE2 mutations were absent in 23 non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder probands and, of 439 families with nonsyndromic vesicoureteric reflux, only one carried a putative pathogenic HPSE2 variant. Homozygous Hpse2 mutant mouse bladders contained urine more often than did wild-type organs, phenocopying human UFS. Pelvic ganglia neural cell bodies contained heparanase 1, heparanase 2, and leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains-2 (LRIG2), which is mutated in certain UFS families. In conclusion, heparanase 2 is an autonomic neural protein implicated in bladder emptying, but HPSE2 variants are uncommon in urinary diseases resembling UFS. PMID:25145936

  11. Clinical Outcomes and Co-Occurring Mutations in Patients with RUNX1-Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maliha; Cortes, Jorge; Kadia, Tapan; Naqvi, Kiran; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Patel, Keyur P; Borthakur, Gautam; Ravandi, Farhad; Konopleva, Marina; Kornblau, Steven; Kantarjian, Hagop; Bhalla, Kapil; DiNardo, Courtney D

    2017-07-26

    (1) Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are often associated with worse prognosis. We assessed co-occurring mutations, response to therapy, and clinical outcomes in patients with and without mutant RUNX1 (mRUNX1); (2) We analyzed 328 AML patients, including 177 patients younger than 65 years who received intensive chemotherapy and 151 patients >65 years who received hypomethylating agents. RUNX1 and co-existing mutations were identified using next-generation sequencing; (3) RUNX1 mutations were identified in 5.1% of younger patients and 15.9% of older patients, and were significantly associated with increasing age (p = 0.01) as well as intermediate-risk cytogenetics including normal karyotype (p = 0.02) in the elderly cohort, and with lower lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; p = 0.02) and higher platelet count (p = 0.012) overall. Identified co-occurring mutations were primarily ASXL1 mutations in older patients and RAS mutations in younger patients; FLT3-ITD and IDH1/2 co-mutations were also frequent. Younger mRUNX1 AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy experienced inferior treatment outcomes. In older patients with AML treated with hypomethylating agent (HMA) therapy, response and survival was independent of RUNX1 status. Older mRUNX1 patients with prior myelodysplastic syndrome or myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) had particularly dismal outcome. Future studies should focus on the prognostic implications of RUNX1 mutations relative to other co-occurring mutations, and the potential role of hypomethylating agents for this molecularly-defined group.

  12. Reverse mutations in the fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.T.; Houck, G.E. Jr.; Ding, Xiaohua [New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, NY (United States)

    1996-08-09

    Three females were identified who have apparent reversal of fragile X premutations. Based on haplotype analysis of nearby markers, they were found to have inherited a fragile X chromosome from their premutation carrier mothers, and yet had normal size FMR1 repeat alleles. The changes in repeat sizes from mother to daughter was 95 to 35 in the first, 145 to 43 in the second, and 82 to 33 in the third. In the first family, mutations of the nearby microsatellites FRAXAC2 and DXS548 were also observed. In the other two, only mutations involving the FMR1 repeats were found. We suggest differing mutational mechanisms such as gene conversion versus DNA replication slippage may underlie such reversions. We estimate that such revertants may occur among 1% or less of premutation carrier offspring. Our results indicate that women identified to be carriers by linkage should be retested by direct DNA analysis. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The entropy characters of point mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA GuoJi; LIANG LiJing; FAN YanHui; WANG WenJuan; DAI JiaQing; YUAN ZhiFa

    2008-01-01

    The biological diversity, which depends on the genetic material DNA, is the foundation for a species to survive and evolve. The entropy is the best measurement of biological diversity. Based on the sin-gle-parameter and the two-parameter models, here we established some differential equations about the point mutation of a DNA sequence with finite length, as well as some functions describing the processes of the variation in quantities of 4 kinds of bases (A, T, G and C) in the DNA sequence. At the molecular level, we discussed the entropy characteristics of point mutation. The results proved that a species maintained its entropy and evolved in the direction of the increasing biological diversity. In order to testify the theoretical results, we did a series of computer simulations of random point muta-tion in Matlab environment. The results were well consistent with the theoretical researches.

  14. Radiation induced dynamic mutations and transgenerational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that radiation can induce genomic instability in whole body systems. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying induced genomic instability are not known at present, this interesting phenomenon could be the manifestation of a cellular fail-safe system in which fidelity of repair and replication is down-regulated to tolerate DNA damage. Two features of genomic instability namely, delayed mutation and untargeted mutation, require two mechanisms of ;damage memory' and ;damage sensing, signal transduction and execution' to induce mutations at a non damaged-site. In this report, the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability and possible mechanisms are discussed using mouse data collected in our laboratory as the main bases.

  15. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  16. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  17. Selection-Mutation Dynamics of Signaling Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Hofbauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of the rest points of signaling games and their dynamic behavior under selection-mutation dynamics by taking the case of three signals as our canonical example. Many rest points of the replicator dynamics of signaling games are not isolated and, therefore, not robust under perturbations. However, some of them attract open sets of initial conditions. We prove the existence of certain rest points of the selection-mutation dynamics close to Nash equilibria of the signaling game and show that all but the perturbed rest points close to strict Nash equilibria are dynamically unstable. This is an important result for the evolution of signaling behavior, since it shows that the second-order forces that are governed by mutation can increase the chances of successful signaling.

  18. Constraints on mutational pathways of hemoglobin evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Amit; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    When an evolutionary transition in protein function involves multiple mutational steps, a number of important questions can be addressed by experimentally examining the full set of possible intermediate genotypes that connect the ancestral starting point and the evolved endpoint. For example......, if the functional effects of mutations depend on the sequential order in which they occur, then evolution may be more likely to follow some pathways (those involving onotonic increases in fitness) rather than others (those involving low-fitness intermediates). Here we report an experimental analysis of multiple...... nightjar Hb, we used a combinatorial protein engineering approach to synthesize genotypes representing each of the 16 possible multi-site combinations.We discovered that all possible mutational pathways connecting the high-affinity ancestor and the low-affinity, wild-type Hb may not be equally accessible...

  19. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  20. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  1. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley,Alexander,A; Turner, David,R

    2004-10-31

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  2. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula

    2010-01-01

    %) frameshift or nonsense mutations, and 36 (23%) intronic or silent mutations. In coding region, the most common base change detected was C-->T transition (43/125; 34% of base changes in the coding region). G-->T transversions occurred at a frequency of 10% (12/125), which is less than reported in mutation...... not been reported before as frequently mutated in head and neck cancer or human cancer in general. About half of all tumours with TP53 mutations carried more than one mutation. Interestingly, 86% (19/22) of the silent mutations detected had occurred in tumours with multiple mutations.......Genetic alterations underlying the development of the cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer, SNC), a rare cancer that can be included in the group of head and neck cancers, are still largely unknown. We recently reported that TP53 mutations are a common feature of SNC...

  3. THE ANALYSIS OF NF2 GENE MUTATION IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞留贯; 孙青芳; 沈建康; 赵卫国; 罗其中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mutation of NF2 gene (exon 2,4,6 and 13) in schwannomas. Methods The NF2 gene mutation in 36 schwannomas were observed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequence. The proliferative index of schwannoma was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results We found 13 mutations in 36 schwannomas, including 6 deletion or insertion resulting in a frameshift, 2 nonsense mutations, 2 missense mutations, and 3 alterations affecting acceptor or donor of splicing sites in E4,E6,E13. The proliferative index of schwannomas with mutation were significantly higher than those without mutation (P< 0.05). Conclusion NF2 gene mutation is the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of schwannomas, and there is some correlation between the mutation and clinical behavior(tumor proliferation).

  4. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  5. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR, to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence. All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50, none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  6. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  7. The study of human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1992-01-01

    We will describe recent developments regarding the question of induced mutations in the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As part of that work we, describe some developments with respect to the Amerindian blood samples collected under DoE sponsorship between 1964 and 1982. Then developments regarding the application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) to the study of genetic variation and mutation affecting protein characteristics. In particular, we will report on the identification and isolation of genes of especial interest as reflected in the behavior of the proteins which they encode.

  8. Suppressors of Recb Mutations in Salmonella Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, N. R.; Roth, J.

    1994-01-01

    Using a screen that directly assesses transductional proficiency, we have isolated suppressors of recB mutations in Salmonella typhimurium. The alleles of sbcB reported here are phenotypically distinct from those isolated in Escherichia coli in that they restore recombination proficiency (Rec(+)), resistance to ultraviolet light (UV(R)), and mitomycin C resistance (MC(R)) in the absence of an accompanying sbcCD mutation. In addition the sbcB alleles reported here are co-dominant to sbcB(+). W...

  9. Confirmation of the mitochondrial ND1 gene mutation G3635A as a primary LHON mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Tong, Yi; Chen, Lu; Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Dinggou; Qiu, Wentong; Zhuang, Shuliu; Ma, Xu

    2009-08-14

    We report the clinical and genetic characterization of two Chinese LHON families who do not carry the primary LHON-mutations. Mitochondrial genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of a homoplasmic ND1 G3635A mutation in both families. In Family LHON-001, 31 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup R11a were identified and in Family LHON-019, 37 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup D4g were determined. The ND1 G3635A mutation changes the conversed serine110 residue to asparagine. This mutation has been previously described in a single Russian LHON family and has been suggested to contribute to increased LHON expressivity. In addition, a mutation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit II at C7868T (COII/L95F) may act in synergy with G3635A, increasing LHON expressivity in Family LHON-001, which had a higher level of LHON penetrance than Family LHON-019. In summary, the G3635A mutation is confirmed as a rare primary pathogenic mutation for LHON.

  10. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  11. High-throughput oncogene mutation profiling shows demographic differences in BRAF mutation rates among melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hurk, Karin; Balint, Balazs; Toomey, Sinead; O'Leary, Patrick C; Unwin, Louise; Sheahan, Kieran; McDermott, Enda W; Murphy, Ian; van den Oord, Joost J; Rafferty, Mairin; FitzGerald, Dara M; Moran, Julie; Cummins, Robert; MacEneaney, Owen; Kay, Elaine W; O'Brien, Cathal P; Finn, Stephen P; Heffron, Cynthia C B B; Murphy, Michelle; Yela, Ruben; Power, Derek G; Regan, Padraic J; McDermott, Clodagh M; O'Keeffe, Allan; Orosz, Zsolt; Donnellan, Paul P; Crown, John P; Hennessy, Bryan T; Gallagher, William M

    2015-06-01

    Because of advances in targeted therapies, the clinical evaluation of cutaneous melanoma is increasingly based on a combination of traditional histopathology and molecular pathology. Therefore, it is necessary to expand our knowledge of the molecular events that accompany the development and progression of melanoma to optimize clinical management. The central objective of this study was to increase our knowledge of the mutational events that complement melanoma progression. High-throughput genotyping was adapted to query 159 known single nucleotide mutations in 33 cancer-related genes across two melanoma cohorts from Ireland (n=94) and Belgium (n=60). Results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 23 mutations in 12 genes were identified, that is--BRAF, NRAS, MET, PHLPP2, PIK3R1, IDH1, KIT, STK11, CTNNB1, JAK2, ALK, and GNAS. Unexpectedly, we discovered significant differences in BRAF, MET, and PIK3R1 mutations between the cohorts. That is, cases from Ireland showed significantly lower (PBRAF(V600E) mutation rates (19%) compared with the mutation frequency observed in Belgian patients (43%). Moreover, MET mutations were detected in 12% of Irish cases, whereas none of the Belgian patients harbored these mutations, and Irish patients significantly more often (P=0.027) had PIK3R1-mutant (33%) melanoma versus 17% of Belgian cases. The low incidence of BRAF(V600E)(-) mutant melanoma among Irish patients was confirmed in five independent Irish cohorts, and in total, only 165 of 689 (24%) Irish cases carried mutant BRAF(V600E). Together, our data show that melanoma-driving mutations vary by demographic area, which has important implications for the clinical management of this disease.

  12. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  13. Benchmarking mutation effect prediction algorithms using functionally validated cancer-related missense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelotto, Luciano G; Ng, Charlotte Ky; De Filippo, Maria R; Zhang, Yan; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Lim, Raymond S; Shen, Ronglai; Norton, Larry; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2014-10-28

    Massively parallel sequencing studies have led to the identification of a large number of mutations present in a minority of cancers of a given site. Hence, methods to identify the likely pathogenic mutations that are worth exploring experimentally and clinically are required. We sought to compare the performance of 15 mutation effect prediction algorithms and their agreement. As a hypothesis-generating aim, we sought to define whether combinations of prediction algorithms would improve the functional effect predictions of specific mutations. Literature and database mining of single nucleotide variants (SNVs) affecting 15 cancer genes was performed to identify mutations supported by functional evidence or hereditary disease association to be classified either as non-neutral (n = 849) or neutral (n = 140) with respect to their impact on protein function. These SNVs were employed to test the performance of 15 mutation effect prediction algorithms. The accuracy of the prediction algorithms varies considerably. Although all algorithms perform consistently well in terms of positive predictive value, their negative predictive value varies substantially. Cancer-specific mutation effect predictors display no-to-almost perfect agreement in their predictions of these SNVs, whereas the non-cancer-specific predictors showed no-to-moderate agreement. Combinations of predictors modestly improve accuracy and significantly improve negative predictive values. The information provided by mutation effect predictors is not equivalent. No algorithm is able to predict sufficiently accurately SNVs that should be taken forward for experimental or clinical testing. Combining algorithms aggregates orthogonal information and may result in improvements in the negative predictive value of mutation effect predictions.

  14. Germline met mutations in mice reveal mutation- and background-associated differences in tumor profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie R Graveel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The receptor tyrosine kinase Met is involved in the progression and metastasis of numerous human cancers. Although overexpression and autocrine activation of the Met signaling pathway are commonly found in human cancers, mutational activation of Met has been observed in small cell and non-small cell lung cancers, lung adenocarcinomas, renal carcinomas, and mesotheliomas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the influence of mutationally activated Met in tumorigenesis, we utilized a novel mouse model. Previously, we observed that various Met mutations developed unique mutation-specific tumor spectra on a C57BL/6 background. Here, we assessed the effect of genetic background on the tumorigenic potential of mutationally activated Met. For this purpose, we created congenic knock-in lines of the Met mutations D1226N, M1248T, and Y1228C on the FVB/N background. Consistent with the mutation-specific tumor spectra, several of the mutations were associated with the same tumor types as observed on C57BL/6 background. However, on the FVB/N background most developed a high incidence of mammary carcinomas with diverse histopathologies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that on two distinct mouse backgrounds, Met is able to initiate tumorigenesis in multiple cell types, including epithelial, hematopoietic, and endothelial. Furthermore, these observations emphasize that even a modest increase in Met activation can initiate tumorigenesis with both the Met mutational spectra and host background having profound influence on the type of tumor generated. Greater insight into the interaction of genetic modifiers and Met signaling will significantly enhance our ability to tailor combination therapies for Met-driven cancers.

  15. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  16. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  17. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  18. Mutations in Escherichia coli that relieve catabolite repression of tryptophanase synthesis. Tryptophanase promoter-like mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D F; Yudkin, M D

    1976-01-01

    From a strain lacking adenyl cyclase and the catabolite-sensitive gene activator protein, two mutants were isolated that can synthesize tryptophanase. Each mutation is extremely closely linked to the tryptophanase structural gene. The mutations differ from one another in the rate of synthesis of tryptophanase that they permit in the genetic background in which they were isolated; they differ from one another and also from the wild type in the maximum rate of synthesis of tryptophanase that they permit in a genetic background with intact adenyl cyclase and catabolite-sensitive gene activator protein. Both mutations appear to lie in the tryptophanase promoter.

  19. Asymptotics of steady states of a selection–mutation equation for small mutation rate

    KAUST Repository

    Calsina, Àngel

    2013-12-01

    We consider a selection-mutation equation for the density of individuals with respect to a continuous phenotypic evolutionary trait. We assume that the competition term for an individual with a given trait depends on the traits of all the other individuals, therefore giving an infinite-dimensional nonlinearity. Mutations are modelled by means of an integral operator. We prove existence of steady states and show that, when the mutation rate goes to zero, the asymptotic profile of the population is a Cauchy distribution. © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2013.

  20. Novel ATM mutations with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Tian; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Luan, Xing-Hua; Shen, Jun-Yi; Chen, Sheng-Di; Cao, Li

    2016-01-12

    Ataxia telangiectasia is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia with onset in childhood, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, immunodeficiency, chromosomal instability, and radiation hypersensitivity. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) is one of the known genes to be associated with ataxia telangiectasia. We reported the clinical and genetic findings of three early-onset Chinese patients who demonstrated ataxia, oculomotor apraxia, choreoathetosis, myoclonus and telangiectasia of eyes. Sequence analysis of ATM revealed two known nonsense mutations c.8287C>T and c.9139C>T in the siblings. Though the siblings carried the same mutations, they showed different clinical features involving strephenopodia, exotropia, torsion dystonia, myoclonus and extrapyramidal impairments. The other patient was compound heterozygotes for ATM: c.8911C>T and c.7141_7151delAATGGAAAAAT, both of which were not reported previously and not found in 200 control chromosomes. This study widens the spectrum of mutations and phenotypes in ataxia telangiectasia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C;

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and allele burden in various cells and tissues are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT...

  2. Caveolin-3 Mutations in Rippling Muscle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Two unrelated patients with novel homozygous missense mutations (L86P and A92T in caveolin-3 gene (CAV3, presenting with a severe form of rippling muscle disease (RMD, are reported from the University of Bonn, and other centers in Germany.

  3. New mutation type in pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rebollo, Eduardo; Barrio, Raquel; Pérez-Nanclares, Gustavo; Carcavilla, Atilano; Garin, Intza; Castaño, Luis; de Nanclares, Guiomar Pérez

    2008-11-01

    The GNAS gene encodes the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory G proteins, which play a crucial role in intracellular signal transduction of peptide and neurotransmitter receptors. Heterozygous inactivating maternally inherited mutations of GNAS (including translation initiation mutations, amino acid substitutions, nonsense mutations, splice site mutations and small insertions or deletions) lead to a phenotype in which Albright hereditary osteodystrophy is associated with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia. We sought to identify the molecular defect in a patient who was thought to have PHP-Ia. The GNAS gene of a 5-year-old boy with brachydactily, mental retardation, pseudohypoparathyroidism and congenital hypothyroidism was investigated. We found a heterozygous inversion of exon 2 and part of intron 1 of de novo origin. Molecular studies of cDNA from blood RNA demonstrated that both the normal and the mutant variants were stable and that new splice-sites were generated. This report demonstrates the first evidence for an inversion at the GNAS gene responsible of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia.

  4. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    Danish paternity cases in the period 1999 to 2005 were investigated regarding mutation rates in STR loci. STR-typing was performed by the Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Profiler Plus kit in the period 1999 to early 2005, hereafter named the PP9, and by Applied Biosystems AmplfStr Identifier kit...

  5. Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China, BGI, the largest genomics organization in the world, and Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, published online in Nature Geneticsics that the study on frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of thebladder on August 8th, 2011. Their study provides a valuable genetic basis for future studies on TCC,

  6. Mutations in connexin genes and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfenniger, Anna; Wohlwend, Annelise; Kwak, Brenda R

    2011-01-01

    Connexins are a family of transmembrane proteins that are widely expressed in the human body. Connexins play an important role in cell-cell communication and homeostasis in various tissues by forming gap junction channels, which enable a direct passage of ions or metabolites from one cell to another. Twenty-one different connexins are expressed in humans, each having distinct expression patterns and regulation properties. Knowledge on this family of proteins can be gained by making an inventory of mutations and associated diseases in human. PubMed and other relevant databases were searched. In addition, key review articles were screened for relevant original publications. Sections of representative organs were photographed and annotated. The crucial role of connexins is highlighted by the discovery of mutations in connexin genes which cause a variety of disorders such as myelin-related diseases, skin disorders, hearing loss, congenital cataract, or more complex syndromes such as the oculodendrodigital dysplasia. This review systematically addresses current knowledge on mutations in connexin genes and disease, focusing on the correlation between genetic defects, cellular phenotypes and clinical manifestations. The review of diseases caused by mutations in connexin genes highlights the essential nature of connexin function and intercellular communication in tissue homeostasis. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  7. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...

  8. Seven functional classes of Barth syndrome mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Kevin; Baile, Matthew G.; Currier, Pamela; Claypool, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Barth syndrome (BTHS), a rare X-linked disease, suffer from skeletal and cardiomyopathy and bouts of cyclic neutropenia. The causative gene encodes tafazzin, a transacylase, which is the major determinant of the final acyl chain composition of the mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, CL. In addition to numerous frame shift and splice-site mutations, 36 missense mutations have been associated with BTHS. Previously, we established a BTHS-mutant panel in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that successfully models 18/21 conserved pathogenic missense mutations and defined the loss-of-function mechanism associated with a subset of the mutant tafazzins. Here, we report the biochemical and cell biological characterization of the rest of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel and in so doing identify three additional modes of tafazzin dysfunction. The largest group of mutant tafazzins is catalytically null, two mutants encode hypomorphic alleles, and another two mutants are temperature sensitive. Additionally, we have expanded the defects associated with previously characterized matrix-mislocalized-mutant tafazzins to include the rapid degradation of aggregation-prone polypeptides that correctly localize to the mitochondrial IMS. In sum, our in-depth characterization of the yeast BTHS-mutant panel has identified seven functional classes of BTHS mutation. PMID:23100323

  9. Mutational profiling of kinases in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Bleeker (Fonnet); S. Lamba (Simona); C. Zanon (Carlo); R.J. Molenaar (Remco J.); T. Hulsebos (Theo); D. Troost (Dirk); A.A.G. van Tilborg (Angela); W.P. Vandertop (Peter); S. Leenstra (Sieger); C.J.F. van Noorden (Cornelis); A. Bardelli (Alberto)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Glioblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumor for which no cure is available. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed a mutation analysis of kinase genes in glioblastoma.Methods: Database mining and a literature search identified 76 kinases that have been found to

  10. Targeted gene mutation in Phytophthora spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamour, K.H.; Finley, L.; Hurtado-Gonzales, O.; Gobena, D.; Tierney, M.; Meijer, H.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Phytophthora belongs to the oomycetes and is composed of plant pathogens. Currently, there are no strategies to mutate specific genes for members of this genus. Whole genome sequences are available or being prepared for Phytophthora sojae, P. ramorum, P. infestans, and P. capsici and the d

  11. The mutational landscape of adenoid cystic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, A.S.; Kannan, K.; Roy, D.M.; Morris, L.G.T.; Ganly, I.; Katabi, N.; Ramaswami, D.; Walsh, L.A.; Eng, S.; Huse, J.T.; Zhang, J.; Dolgalev, I.; Huberman, K.; Heguy, A.; Viale, A.; Drobnjak, M.; Leversha, M.A.; Rice, C.E.; Singh, B.; Iyer, N.G.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; Ferris, R.L.; Seethala, R.R.; Gross, B.E.; Liang, Y.; Sinha, R.; Peng, L.; Raphael, B.J.; Turcan, S.; Gong, Y.; Schultz, N.; Kim, S.; Chiosea, S.; Shah, J.P.; Sander, C.; Lee, W.; Chan, T.A.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) are among the most enigmatic of human malignancies. These aggressive salivary gland cancers frequently recur and metastasize despite definitive treatment, with no known effective chemotherapy regimen. Here we determined the ACC mutational landscape and report the exo

  12. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  13. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R. Z.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slave; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Erich; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack M.; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renee A.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown(1). Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115)

  14. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  15. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  16. Reverse mutation in fragile X syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antinolo, G.; Borrego, S.; Cabeza, J.C. [Hospital Universitario, Sevilla (Spain)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of familial mental retardation, with an incidence of {approximately}1/1,500 in males and 1/2,500 in females. The clinical expression includes moderate to severe mental retardation, macroorchidism, dysmorphic facial features and behavior disturbances. In 1991, the FMR-1 gene was isolated from the region of the fragile X site. The fragile X phenotype has been found, in most cases, to be characterized at the molecular level by expansion of a (CGG){sub n} repeat and hypermethylation of a CpG island identified in the 5{prime}-UTR of the FMR-1 gene. It has been proposed, and some evidence has been shown, that germ cells carry only premutation alleles and that expansion occurs at a postzygotic stage. A few cases of reduction of the (CGG){sub n} repeat in fragile X syndrome have been reported. These reductions were from a larger premutation to a smaller premutation, in female-to-male transmission, from full mutation to a mosaic pattern, reduction from mosaic full-mutation/premutation females or regression from premutation to normal. We present here the novel observation of a phenotypically normal female carrying a nonmosaic full-mutation allele in somatic cells who transmits a premutation allele to her daughter. This daughter has three mosaic offspring with the full mutation and the premutation. Two of them are monozygotic (MZ) twins sharing a concordant mutation pattern. They are monoamniotic monochorionic, which indicates a late form of twinning. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Walshe, J.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  18. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients

  19. AChR deficiency due to ε-subunit mutations: Two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Faber (Carin); P.C. Molenaar (Peter); J.S.H. Vles (Johannes); D.M. Bonifati (Domenic); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.M. Kuks (Jan); J.H.J. Wokke (John); D. Beeson (David); M.H. de Baets (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCongenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine

  20. AChR deficiency due to ε-subunit mutations: Two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Faber (Carin); P.C. Molenaar (Peter); J.S.H. Vles (Johannes); D.M. Bonifati (Domenic); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.M. Kuks (Jan); J.H.J. Wokke (John); D. Beeson (David); M.H. de Baets (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCongenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patie

  1. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients (s

  2. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients (s

  3. Association of TERT Promoter Mutation, But Not BRAF Mutation, With Increased Mortality in PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jonathan R; Henderson, Ying C; Williams, Michelle D; Roberts, Dianna B; Hei, Hu; Lai, Stephen Y; Clayman, Gary L

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) carrying the BRAF mutation has been reported to be associated with high recurrence and potentially increased mortality. PTC carrying the TERT promoter mutation has been associated with older age, recurrence, and aggressive disease. The objective of this study was to determine the association of BRAF and TERT promoter gene alterations with recurrence and survival in a high-risk population. Genomic DNA was analyzed for the BRAF mutation from 256 persistent/recurrent PTC (p/rPTC; 202 new, 54 previously reported) and for the TERT promoter mutation and polymorphism (242 p/rPTC). Two-tailed Fisher exact tests or the Pearson χ(2) test were performed for the associations between mutations and other variables. Overall and disease-free survivals were compared by log rank tests on Kaplan-Meier plots and by Cox regression analysis. TERT promoter constructs were tested in PTC cell lines to determine their activities in these cells. BRAF V600E mutation was identified in 235 of 256 (91.8%), TERT promoter mutation at -124 was detected in 77 of 242 (31.8%), and TERT promoter polymorphism at -245 was found in 113 of 242 (46.7%) p/rPTC patients. A significant difference in survival was found in p/rPTC patients with the TERT promoter mutation, which also displayed increased activity in vitro as compared to the nonmutated promoter sequence. No association was noted between the BRAF mutation or TERT promoter polymorphism and recurrence or survival. A drawback of our study could be the limited number of patients with nonmutated BRAF (21 of 256 [8.2%]). Mutation in the TERT promoter, but not in BRAF, was associated with decreased survival in 19 (24.7%) p/rPTC patients who died of disease and in 38 (49.4%) p/rPTC patients who died at last contact. The presence or absence of the BRAF mutation and TERT promoter polymorphism, however, was not significantly correlated with survival.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  5. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eEmperador

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative.Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal.In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, these species also carry a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA.

  6. Illness perceptions, risk perception and worry in SDH mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Kaptein, A.A.; Louisse, A.; Biermasz, N.R.; Smit, J.W.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) mutation carriers are predisposed for developing paragangliomas. This study aimed to explore illness perceptions, risk perception and disease-related worry in these individuals. All consecutive SDHB and SDHD mutation carriers followed at the Department of Endocrinology

  7. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  8. Ebola Virus Mutated to Become More Infectious, Scientists Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161849.html Ebola Virus Mutated to Become More Infectious, Scientists Say Virologists ... 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the Ebola virus boosted its ability to infect people during the ...

  9. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... Key words: Rare thalassemia mutations, beta globin gene, Qazvin, direct sequencing. INTRODUCTION ... Degree of incidence of various mutations in beta thalassemia major patients of ..... prevention and treatment. Leiden ...

  10. Modelling mutational landscapes of human cancers in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Magali; Weninger, Annette; Ardin, Maude; Huskova, Hana; Castells, Xavier; Vallée, Maxime P.; McKay, James; Nedelko, Tatiana; Muehlbauer, Karl-Rudolf; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Alexander, John; Hazelwood, Lee; Byrnes, Graham; Hollstein, Monica; Zavadil, Jiri

    2014-03-01

    Experimental models that recapitulate mutational landscapes of human cancers are needed to decipher the rapidly expanding data on human somatic mutations. We demonstrate that mutation patterns in immortalised cell lines derived from primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exposed in vitro to carcinogens recapitulate key features of mutational signatures observed in human cancers. In experiments with several cancer-causing agents we obtained high genome-wide concordance between human tumour mutation data and in vitro data with respect to predominant substitution types, strand bias and sequence context. Moreover, we found signature mutations in well-studied human cancer driver genes. To explore endogenous mutagenesis, we used MEFs ectopically expressing activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and observed an excess of AID signature mutations in immortalised cell lines compared to their non-transgenic counterparts. MEF immortalisation is thus a simple and powerful strategy for modelling cancer mutation landscapes that facilitates the interpretation of human tumour genome-wide sequencing data.

  11. MAX mutations cause hereditary and sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burnichon, N.; Cascon, A.; Schiavi, F.; Morales, N.P.; Comino-Mendez, I.; Abermil, N.; Inglada-Perez, L.; Cubas, A.A. de; Amar, L.; Barontini, M.; Quiros, S.B. de; Bertherat, J.; Bignon, Y.J.; Blok, M.J.; Bobisse, S.; Borrego, S.; Castellano, M.; Chanson, P.; Chiara, M.D.; Corssmit, E.P.; Giacche, M.; Krijger, R.R. de; Ercolino, T.; Girerd, X.; Gomez-Garcia, E.B.; Gomez-Grana, A.; Guilhem, I.; Hes, F.J.; Honrado, E.; Korpershoek, E.; Lenders, J.W.; Leton, R.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Merlo, A.; Mori, L.; Murat, A.; Pierre, P.; Plouin, P.F.; Prodanov, T.; Quesada-Charneco, M.; Qin, N.; Rapizzi, E.; Raymond, V.; Reisch, N.; Roncador, G.; Ruiz-Ferrer, M.; Schillo, F.; Stegmann, A.P.; Suarez, C.; Taschin, E.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Tops, C.M.; Urioste, M.; Beuschlein, F.; Pacak, K.; Mannelli, M.; Dahia, P.L.; Opocher, G.; Eisenhofer, G.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.; Robledo, M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. Recently we identified germline mutations in a new tumor suppressor susceptibility gene, MAX (MYC-associated factor X), which predisposes carriers to PCC. How MAX mutations

  12. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  13. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential ...

  14. TERT promoter mutations are highly recurrent in SHH subgroup medulloblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Remke (Marc); E.A. Ramaswamy; M. Peacock (Munro); D.J.H. Shih (David J.); C. Koelsche (Christian); P.A. Northcott (Paul A.); N. Hill (Nadia); S. Cavalli (Silvia); M. Kool (Marcel); X. Wang (Xin); S. Mack (Stephen); M. Barszczyk (Mark); A.S. Morrissy (A. Sorana); X. Wu (Xiaochong); S. Agnihotri (Sameer); P. Luu (Phan); D. Jones (David); L. Garzia (Livia); A.M. Dubuc (Adrian); N. Zhukova (Nataliya); R. Vanner (Robert); J.M. Kros (Johan); P.J. French (Pim); E.G. van Meir (Erwin); R. Vibhakar (Rajeev); K. Zitterbart (Karel); J.A. Chan (Jennifer); L. Bognár (László); A. Klekner (Almos); B. Lach (Boleslaw); S. Jung (Shin); F. Saad (Fred); L.M. Liau (Linda); S. Albrecht (Steffen); M. Zollo (Maurizio); M.K. Cooper (Michael); R.C. Thompson (Reid); O. Delattre (Olivier); F. Bourdeaut (Franck); F.F. Doz (François); M. Garami (Miklós); P. Hauser (Peter); C.G. Carlotti (Carlos); T.E. Van Meter (Timothy); L. Massimi (Luca); D. Fults (Daniel); L.W. Pomeroy (Laura); T. Kumabe (Toshiro); Y.S. Ra (Young Shin); J.R. Leonard (Jeffrey); S.K. Elbabaa (Samer); J. Mora (Jaume); J.B. Rubin (Joshua); Y.-J. Cho (Yoon-Jae); R.E. McLendon (Roger); D.D. Bigner (Darell); C.G. Eberhart (Charles); M. Fouladi (Maryam); R.J. Wechsler-Reya (Robert); R. Faria (Rui); S.E. Croul (Sidney); A. Huang (Anding); E. Bouffet (Eric); C.E. Hawkins (Cynthia); M. Dirks (Maaike); W.A. Weiss (William); U. Schüller (Ulrich); A. Pollack (Aaron); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); D. Meyronet (David); A. Jouvet (Anne); M. Fèvre-Montange (Michelle); N. Jabado (Nada); M. Perek-Polnik (Marta); W.A. Grajkowska (Wieslawa); S.-K. Kim (Seung-Ki); J.T. Rutka (James); E. Malkin (Elissa); U. Tabori (Uri); S.M. Pfister (Stefan); A. Korshunov (Andrey); A. von Deimling (Andreas); M.D. Taylor (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTelomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations were recently shown to drive telomerase activity in various cancer types, including medulloblastoma. However, the clinical and biological implications of TERT mutations in medulloblastoma have not been described. Hence, we sought

  15. Filaggrin compound heterozygous patients carry mutations in trans position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2013-01-01

    ; however, this has not been scientifically investigated. Two different FLG null mutations in the same individual may be in trans position, meaning that each mutation locates to a different allele functionally equivalent to homozygosity, or may be in cis position, meaning that both mutations locate...... to the same allele functionally equivalent to heterozygosity. To experimentally investigate allelic in cis versus in trans configuration of the two most common filaggrin (FLG) mutations (R501X and 2282del4) in compound heterozygous individuals. Testing for in cis or in trans allele configuration was performed...... compound heterozygous individuals were found to carry the two mutations in trans position. FLG null mutation compound heterozygous individuals can be considered functionally equivalent to FLG null mutation homozygosity for any of the two mutations....

  16. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  17. A systematic study of gene mutations in urothelial carcinoma; inactivating mutations in TSC2 and PIK3R1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfrid Sjödahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial carcinoma (UC is characterized by frequent gene mutations of which activating mutations in FGFR3 are the most frequent. Several downstream targets of FGFR3 are also mutated in UC, e.g., PIK3CA, AKT1, and RAS. Most mutation studies of UCs have been focused on single or a few genes at the time or been performed on small sample series. This has limited the possibility to investigate co-occurrence of mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed mutation analyses of 16 genes, FGFR3, PIK3CA, PIK3R1 PTEN, AKT1, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, ARAF, RAF1, TSC1, TSC2, APC, CTNNB1, and TP53, in 145 cases of UC. We show that FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations are positively associated. In addition, we identified PIK3R1 as a target for mutations. We demonstrate a negative association at borderline significance between FGFR3 and RAS mutations, and show that these mutations are not strictly mutually exclusive. We show that mutations in BRAF, ARAF, RAF1 rarely occurs in UC. Our data emphasize the possible importance of APC signaling as 6% of the investigated tumors either showed inactivating APC or activating CTNNB1 mutations. TSC1, as well as TSC2, that constitute the mTOR regulatory tuberous sclerosis complex were found to be mutated at a combined frequency of 15%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a significant association between FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations in UC. Moreover, the identification of mutations in PIK3R1 further emphasizes the importance of the PI3-kinase pathway in UC. The presence of TSC2 mutations, in addition to TSC1 mutations, underlines the involvement of mTOR signaling in UC.

  18. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  19. Was the C282Y mutation an Irish Gaelic mutation that the Vikings help disseminate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, C A

    2006-01-01

    The C282Y mutation is held to have arisen in either a Celtic or a Viking ancestor some 60 generations ago. While the Scandinavians have a high frequency of C282Y, the Irish have the highest frequency of the C282Y mutation in the world. However testing of the Irish people for C282Y has been patchy. The true frequency of the C282Y mutation in Ireland and specifically in the relatively isolated western province of Connaught is unknown. Establishment of the C282Y frequency in the Irish male population of Connaught with traditional Irish surnames, a group which has a virtual fixation for Y chromosome R1b3, could help establish C282Y as an Irish mutation. Elucidation of greater C282Y haplotype diversity for the Irish as opposed to the Scandinavians would indicate the Irish as the likely source population for C282Y. Taken together, linking of C282Y to the Irish Gaelic male population of Connaught and establishment of an Irish origin of the C282Y mutation would point to dissemination of the C282Y mutation by Viking raiders and colonizers.

  20. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 st of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  1. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Mutation trend of hemagglutinin of influenza A virus: a review from a computational mutation viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang WU; Shao-min YAN

    2006-01-01

    Since 1999 we have developed two computational mutation approaches to analyze the protein primary structure whose methodology and implications were reviewed in 2002.Our first approach is the calculation of predictable and unpredictable portions of amino-acid pairs in a protein, and the second iS the calculation of amino-acid distribution rank in a protein. Both approaches provide quantitative measures to present a protein, which we have used to study a number of proteins with numerous mutations such as p53 proteins. More recently, we focussed our efforts on analyzing the proteins mutating frequently over time such as hemagglutinins of influenza A viruses. In this review we summarise our findings and their implications for hemagglutinin mutations in combination with some newly available data. Our approaches throw light on the true nature of genetic heterogeneity of influenza virus hemagglutinins; that is, the protein variability is highly relevant to its amino-acid construction. Using these approaches, we can monitor new mutations from influenza virus hemaggtutinins and may predict their mutations in the future.

  3. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  4. Fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines whose spontaneous mutations are known.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Matthew T; Roles, Angela; Conner, Jeffrey K; Shaw, Ruth G; Shaw, Frank H; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Ossowski, Stephan; Weigel, Detlef; Fenster, Charles B

    2012-07-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of mutation to the evolutionary process, we have little knowledge of the direct consequences of specific spontaneous mutations to the fitness of the organism. Combining results of whole-genome sequencing with repeated field assays of survival and reproduction, we quantify the combined effects on fitness of spontaneous mutations identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the effects are beneficial, deleterious, or neutral depending on the environmental context. Some lines, bearing mutations disrupting known loci, differ strongly in fitness from the founder or premutation genotype. Those effects vary across environments, for example, a line with a major deletion spanning a transcription factor gene expressed lower fitness than the founder under most conditions but exceeded the founder's fitness in one environment. The large contribution of genotype by environment interaction (G × E) to mutation effects on fitness implies spatial and/or temporal variation in selection on new mutations and could contribute to the maintenance of standing genetic variation. © 2012 The Author(s).

  5. Novel KRAS gene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M Naser

    Full Text Available In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province.Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling.KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%. Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%. They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature.Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Fundus albipunctatus associated with compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations.......To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations....

  7. Identification of recurrent SMO and BRAF mutations in ameloblastomas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of oncogenic mutations in the Hedgehog and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in over 80% of ameloblastomas, locally destructive odontogenic tumors of the jaw, by genomic analysis of archival material. Mutations in SMO (encoding Smoothened, SMO) are common in ameloblastomas of the maxilla, whereas BRAF mutations are predominant in tumors of the mandible. We show that a frequently occurring SMO alteration encoding p.Leu412Phe is an activating mutation...

  8. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  9. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buery, Rosario Rivera; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Gunduz, Mehmet; Lefeuvre, Mathieu; Fujii, Masae; Inoue, Masahisa; Setsu, Kojun; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in other melanoma subtypes. The purpose of this study was to determine RAS protein expression and NRAS and BRAF mutation in 18 primary OMM cases using immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. Results showed that RAS is intensely expressed in both in situ and invasive OMMs. However, NRAS mutation was only observed in 2/15 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified cases both of which were silent mutations. On the other hand, BRAF missense mutations were observed only in 1/15 cases with PCR amplification. NRAS and BRAF mutations were independent from previously reported c-kit mutations. The classical V600E BRAF mutation was not found; instead a novel V600L was observed suggesting that the oncogenic event in OMM is different from that in skin melanoma. The low frequency of NRAS and BRAF mutations indicate that these genes are not common, but probable events in OMM pathogenesis, most likely independent of c-kit mutation.

  10. Adaptive synonymous mutations in an experimentally evolved Pseudomonas fluorescens population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Susan; Hinz, Aaron; Kassen, Rees

    2014-01-01

    in an experimentally evolved population of Pseudomonas fluorescens. We show experimentally that these mutations increase fitness by an amount comparable to non-synonymous mutations and that the fitness increases stem from increased gene expression. These results provide unequivocal evidence that synonymous mutations...

  11. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control st

  12. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control st

  13. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  14. Germline fumarate hydratase mutations in patients with ovarian mucinous cystadenoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylisaukko-oja, Sanna K.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lehtonen, Rainer;

    2006-01-01

    analyzed for somatic FH mutations. Two patients diagnosed with ovarian mucinous cystadenoma (two out of 33, 6%) were found to be FH germline mutation carriers. One of the changes was a novel mutation (Ala231Thr) and the other one (435insAAA) was previously described in FH deficiency families. These results...

  15. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing reveals previously unidentified and mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Nellist (Mark); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); C. Kockx (Christel); M. van Veghel-Plandsoen (Monique); C.J. Withagen-Hermans (C.); L. Prins-Bakker (Lida); M. Hoogeveen-Westerveld (Marianne); A. Mrsic (Alan); M.M.P. van den Berg (Mike M P); A.E. Koopmans (Anna); M.C.Y. de Wit (Marie Claire); F.H. Jansen (Flip); A.A. Maat-Kievit (Anneke); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); A. de Klein (Annelies); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in and . Conventional DNA diagnostic screens identify a or mutation in 75 - 90% of individuals categorised with definite TSC. The remaining individuals either have a mutation that is undete

  16. Capability Analysis of Chaotic Mutation and Its Self-Adaption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li-Jiang; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2002-01-01

    Through studying several kinds of chaotic mappings' distributions of orbital points, we analyze the capabilityof the chaotic mutations based on these mappings. Nunerical experiments support our conclusions very well. Thecapability analysis also led to a self-adaptive mechanism of chaotic mutation. The introducing of the self-adaptivechaotic mutation can improve the performance of genetic algorithm very prominently.

  17. Grass inflorescence mutations and their role in speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald Kosina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several examples of natural mutants in the grass family were presented. All appeared as changes in inflorescence structure. In mutated plants chasmogamy was restricted due to anomalous lodicules or compactness of ears. A rare glumeless mutation in Agropyron pectiniforme reduced the level of assimilation in the ear. All mutations appear as unfavorable in natural populations.

  18. Risks of lynch syndrome cancers for msh6 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Baglietto (Laura); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J.G. Dowty (James); D.M. White (Darren); A. Wagner (Anja); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); N.R. Cartwright (Nicola); R.A. Barnetson (Rebecca); S.M. Farrington (Susan); A. Tenesa (Albert); H. Hampel (Heather); D. Buchanan (Daniel); S. Arnold (Sven); J. Young (Joanne); M.D. Walsh (Michael); J. Jass (Jeremy); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); Y. Antill (Yoland); I.M. Winship (Ingrid); G.G. Giles (Graham); J. Goldblatt (Jack); S. Parry (Susan); G. Suthers (Graeme); B. Leggett (Barbara); M. Butz (Malinda); M. Aronson (Melyssa); J.N. Poynter (Jenny); J.A. Baron (John); L. Le Marchand (Loic); R. Haile (Robert); S. Gallinger (Steve); J.L. Hopper (John); J. Potter (John); A. de La Chapelle (Albert); H. Vasen (Hans); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.A. Jenkins (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Germline mutations in MSH6 account for 10%-20% of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers caused by hereditary DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Because there have been only a few studies of mutation carriers, their cancer risks are uncertain. Methods: We identified 113 families

  19. Mutational dynamics of murine angiogenin duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Mario A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiogenin (Ang is a protein involved in angiogenesis by inducing the formation of blood vessels. The biomedical importance of this protein has come from findings linking mutations in Ang to cancer progression and neurodegenerative diseases. These findings highlight the evolutionary constrain on Ang amino acid sequence. However, previous studies comparing human Angiogenin with homologs from other phylogenetically related organisms have led to the conclusion that Ang presents a striking variability. Whether this variability has an adaptive value per se remains elusive. Understanding why many functional Ang paralogs have been preserved in mouse and rat and identifying functional divergence mutations at these copies may explain the relationship between mutations and function. In spite of the importance of testing this hypothesis from the evolutionarily and biomedical perspectives, this remains yet unaccomplished. Here we test the main mutational dynamics driving the evolution and function of Ang paralogs in mammals. Results We analysed the phylogenetic asymmetries between the different Ang gene copies in mouse and rat in the context of vertebrate Ang phylogeny. This analysis shows strong evidence in support of accelerated evolution in some Ang murine copies (mAng. This acceleration is not due to non-functionalisation because constraints on amino acid replacements remain strong. We identify many of the amino acid sites involved in signal localization and nucleotide binding by Ang to have evolved under diversifying selection. Compensatory effects of many of the mutations at these paralogs and their key structural location in or nearby important functional regions support a possible functional shift (functional divergence in many Ang copies. Similarities between 3D-structural models for mAng copies suggest that their divergence is mainly functional. Conclusions We identify the main evolutionary dynamics shaping the variability of

  20. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  1. Recurrent mutations refine prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliakas, P; Hadzidimitriou, A; Sutton, L-A; Rossi, D; Minga, E; Villamor, N; Larrayoz, M; Kminkova, J; Agathangelidis, A; Davis, Z; Tausch, E; Stalika, E; Kantorova, B; Mansouri, L; Scarfò, L; Cortese, D; Navrkalova, V; Rose-Zerilli, M J J; Smedby, K E; Juliusson, G; Anagnostopoulos, A; Makris, A M; Navarro, A; Delgado, J; Oscier, D; Belessi, C; Stilgenbauer, S; Ghia, P; Pospisilova, S; Gaidano, G; Campo, E; Strefford, J C; Stamatopoulos, K; Rosenquist, R

    2015-02-01

    Through the European Research Initiative on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ERIC), we screened 3490 patients with CLL for mutations within the NOTCH1 (n=3334), SF3B1 (n=2322), TP53 (n=2309), MYD88 (n=1080) and BIRC3 (n=919) genes, mainly at diagnosis (75%) and before treatment (>90%). BIRC3 mutations (2.5%) were associated with unmutated IGHV genes (U-CLL), del(11q) and trisomy 12, whereas MYD88 mutations (2.2%) were exclusively found among M-CLL. NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53 exhibited variable frequencies and were mostly enriched within clinically aggressive cases. Interestingly, as the timespan between diagnosis and mutational screening increased, so too did the incidence of SF3B1 mutations; no such increase was observed for NOTCH1 mutations. Regarding the clinical impact, NOTCH1 mutations, SF3B1 mutations and TP53 aberrations (deletion/mutation, TP53ab) correlated with shorter time-to-first-treatment (P<0.0001) in 889 treatment-naive Binet stage A cases. In multivariate analysis (n=774), SF3B1 mutations and TP53ab along with del(11q) and U-CLL, but not NOTCH1 mutations, retained independent significance. Importantly, TP53ab and SF3B1 mutations had an adverse impact even in U-CLL. In conclusion, we support the clinical relevance of novel recurrent mutations in CLL, highlighting the adverse impact of SF3B1 and TP53 mutations, even independent of IGHV mutational status, thus underscoring the need for urgent standardization/harmonization of the detection methods.

  2. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller AP

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1 Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2 Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. Results A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. Conclusion We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously

  3. Mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Juby; Jagadeesh, Sujatha M; Bhat, Meenakshi; Udhaya Kumar, S; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; Srinivasan, Sudha

    2015-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase B gene (ARSB) and consequent deficient activity of ARSB, a lysosomal enzyme. We present here the results of a study undertaken to identify the mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India. Around 160 ARSB mutations, of which just 4 are from India, have been reported in the literature. Our study covered nine MPS VI patients from eight families. Both familial mutations were found in seven families, and only one mutation was found in one family. Seven mutations were found - four novel (p.G38_G40del3, p.C91R, p.L98R and p.R315P), two previously reported from India (p.D53N and p.W450C), and one reported from outside India (p.R160Q). One mutation, p.W450C, was present in two families, and the other six mutations were present in one family each. Analysis of the molecular structure of the enzyme revealed that most of these mutations either cause loss of an active site residue or destabilize the structure of the enzyme. The only previous study on mutations in ARSB in Indian MPS VI patients, by Kantaputra et al. 2014 [1], reported four novel mutations of which two (p.D53N and p.W450C) were found in our study as well. Till date, nine mutations have been reported from India, through our study and the Kantaputra study. Eight out of these nine mutations have been found only in India. This suggests that the population studied by us might have its own typical set of mutations, with other populations equally likely to have their own set of mutations.

  4. Differential expression of GNAS and KRAS mutations in pancreatic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda S; Doyle, Leona A; Houghton, Jeffrey; Sah, Sachin; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Szafranska-Schwarzbach, Anna E; Conner, James R; Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah L; Banks, Peter A; Andruss, Bernard F; Conwell, Darwin L

    2014-11-28

    KRAS mutations play an important role in pancreatic cancer. GNAS mutations were discovered in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Our aim was to identify the frequency of KRAS and GNAS mutations in pancreatic cystic neoplasms and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Sixty-eight surgically resected formalin fixed, paraffin embedded pancreatic specimens were analyzed, including: 1) benign (20 serous cystadenoma (SCA)), 2) pre-malignant (10 mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), 10 branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN), 9 main duct IPMN (MD-IPMN)), 3) malignant (19 PDAC). Total nucleic acid extraction was performed. KRAS codon 12/13 and GNAS codon 201 mutations were interrogated via targeted sequencing using the Ion Torrent's Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Mean age of 68 patients was 61.9±8.4 with 72% female. KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN. KRAS mutations predominated in PDAC compared to pancreatic cysts (16/19, 84% versus 10/49, 20%; P<0.001). GNAS mutations were more common in IPMN compared to non-IPMN lesions (8/19, 42% versus 2/49, 4%; P=0.0003). No GNAS mutations were detected in PDAC and MCN while 2 SCA carried GNAS mutations. Double mutations with KRAS and GNAS were only present in IPMN (5/19 versus 0/30 SCA and MCN, P=0.006). KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN with KRAS mutations primarily in PDAC and GNAS mutations more frequent in IPMN. No GNAS mutations occurred in MCN and double mutations were only present in IPMN.

  5. Avoiding dangerous missense: thermophiles display especially low mutation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Drake

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rates of spontaneous mutation have been estimated under optimal growth conditions for a variety of DNA-based microbes, including viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes. When expressed as genomic mutation rates, most of the values were in the vicinity of 0.003-0.004 with a range of less than two-fold. Because the genome sizes varied by roughly 10(4-fold, the mutation rates per average base pair varied inversely by a similar factor. Even though the commonality of the observed genomic rates remains unexplained, it implies that mutation rates in unstressed microbes reach values that can be finely tuned by evolution. An insight originating in the 1920s and maturing in the 1960s proposed that the genomic mutation rate would reflect a balance between the deleterious effect of the average mutation and the cost of further reducing the mutation rate. If this view is correct, then increasing the deleterious impact of the average mutation should be countered by reducing the genomic mutation rate. It is a common observation that many neutral or nearly neutral mutations become strongly deleterious at higher temperatures, in which case they are called temperature-sensitive mutations. Recently, the kinds and rates of spontaneous mutations were described for two microbial thermophiles, a bacterium and an archaeon. Using an updated method to extrapolate from mutation-reporter genes to whole genomes reveals that the rate of base substitutions is substantially lower in these two thermophiles than in mesophiles. This result provides the first experimental support for the concept of an evolved balance between the total genomic impact of mutations and the cost of further reducing the basal mutation rate.

  6. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  8. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Natural rubber latex (NRL) contains over 200 proteins of which 13 have been identified as allergens and the cause of type I latex allergy. Health care workers share a high occupational risk for developing latex allergy. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk of type I sensitization...... in the cases in this study may not have occurred through direct skin contact but through the respiratory organs via latex proteins that are absorbed in glove powder and aerosolized......Objectives Natural rubber latex (NRL) contains over 200 proteins of which 13 have been identified as allergens and the cause of type I latex allergy. Health care workers share a high occupational risk for developing latex allergy. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk of type I sensitizations...

  9. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  10. One third of Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with MYH7 mutations have mutations [corrected] in MYH7 rod region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, Lotte; Havndrup, Ole; Bundgaard, Henning

    2005-01-01

    -causing mutations were identified in the rod region in four probands using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism as a screening method. All mutations were novel: N1327K, R1712W, and E1753K. Two of the probands had already been shown to carry other FHC-associated mutations. In conclusion...

  11. Multiple gene mutations, not the type of mutation, are the modifier of left ventricle hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yubao; Wang, Jizheng; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yilu; Chen, Yi; Sun, Kai; Gao, Shuo; Zhang, Channa; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yin; Feng, Xinxing; Song, Ying; Wu, Yajie; Zhang, Hongju; Jia, Lei; Wang, Hu; Wang, Dong; Yan, Chaowu; Lu, Minjie; Zhou, Xianliang; Song, Lei; Hui, Rutai

    2013-06-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been challenging because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. To determine the mutation profile of Chinese patients with HCM and to correlate genotypes with phenotypes, we performed a systematic mutation screening of the eight most commonly mutated genes encoding sarcomere proteins in 200 unrelated Chinese adult patients using direct DNA sequencing. A total of 98 mutations were identified in 102 mutation carriers. The frequency of mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 was 26.0, 18.0, 4.0 and 3.5 % respectively. Among the 200 genotyped HCM patients, 83 harbored a single mutation, and 19 (9.5 %) harbored multiple mutations. The number of mutations was positively correlated with the maximum wall thickness. We found that neither particular gene nor specific mutation was correlated to clinical phenotype. In summary, the frequency of multiple mutations was greater in Chinese HCM patients than in the Caucasian population. Multiple mutations in sarcomere protein may be a risk factor for left ventricular wall thickness.

  12. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    7 pages; International audience; Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at

  13. Seiberg Duality is an Exceptional Mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, C P

    2004-01-01

    The low energy gauge theory living on D-branes probing a del Pezzo singularity of a non-compact Calabi-Yau manifold is not unique. In fact there is a large equivalence class of such gauge theories related by Seiberg duality. As a step toward characterizing this class, we show that Seiberg duality can be defined consistently as an admissible mutation of a strongly exceptional collection of coherent sheaves.

  14. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  15. Mutation studies in Cymbopogon nardus var. Confertiflorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, D.K.; Kak, S.N.; Kaul, B.L. (Regional Research Lab., Jammu (India))

    1981-09-01

    Vegetative slips of Cymbopogon nardus var, confertiflorus after irradiation with various doses of X-rays left a clone among the surviving plants that showed mutation resulting in a higher content of geranyl acetate. From its progeny, raised after selfing a fresh clone, possessing about 60% geranyl acetate in the oil without any effect on the herb yield, has been isolated. This mutant has a significant commercial importance as a new source of geranyl acetate, an important aroma chemical.

  16. Parton Branching in Color Mutation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hwa, R C

    1999-01-01

    The soft production problem in hadronic collisions as described in the eikonal color mutation branching model is improved in the way that the initial parton distribution is treated. Furry branching of the partons is considered as a means of describing the nonperturbative process of parton reproduction in soft interaction. The values of all the moments, and $C_q$, for q=2,...,5, as well as their energy dependences can be correctly determined by the use of only two parameters.

  17. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthumula Daneswari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  18. Genetic mutations in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneswari, Muthumula; Reddy, Mutjumula Swamy Ranga

    2013-07-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal at a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is mainly characterized by basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocyst and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria and gene mutation analysis. This article presents a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, its genetic predisposition, diagnosis and management.

  19. Better living with hyper-mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Myron F

    2016-07-01

    The simplest forms of mutations, base substitutions, typically have negative consequences, aside from their existential role in evolution and fitness. Hypermutations, mutations on steroids, occurring at frequencies of 10(-2) -10(-4) per base pair, straddle a domain between fitness and death, depending on the presence or absence of regulatory constraints. Two facets of hypermutation, one in Escherichia coli involving DNA polymerase V (pol V), the other in humans, involving activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) are portrayed. Pol V is induced as part of the DNA-damage-induced SOS regulon, and is responsible for generating the lion's share of mutations when catalyzing translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). Four regulatory mechanisms, temporal, internal, conformational, and spatial, activate pol V to copy damaged DNA and then deactivate it. On the flip side of the coin, SOS-induced pols V, IV, and II mutate undamaged DNA, thus providing genetic diversity heightening long-term survival and evolutionary fitness. Fitness in humans is principally the domain of a remarkably versatile immune system marked by somatic hypermutations (SHM) in immunoglobulin variable (IgV) regions that ensure antibody (Ab) diversity. AID initiates SHM by deaminating C → U, favoring hot WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs. Since there are large numbers of trinucleotide motif targets throughout IgV, AID must exercise considerable catalytic restraint to avoid attacking such sites repeatedly, which would otherwise compromise diversity. Processive, random, and inefficient AID-catalyzed dC deamination simulates salient features of SHM, yet generates B-cell lymphomas when working at the wrong time in the wrong place. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:421-434, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. ELOVL5 Mutations Cause Spinocerebellar Ataxia 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A.; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. PMID:25065913

  1. DCTN1 mutations in Perry syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farrer, Matthew J.; Hulihan, Mary M.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Dächsel, Justus; Stoessl, A. Jon; Grantier, Linda L.; Calne, Susan; Calne, Donald B.; Lechevalier, Bernard; Chapon, Francoise; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Yamada, Tatsuo; Gutmann, Ludwig; Elibol, Bülent; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2009-01-01

    Perry syndrome consists of early-onset parkinsonism, depression, severe weight loss and hypoventilation, in which brain pathology is characterized by TDP-43 immunostaining. Through genome-wide linkage analysis we have identified five disease-segregating dynactin (DCTN1) CAP-Gly domain substitutions in 8 families that diminish microtubule binding and lead to intracytoplasmic inclusions. DCTN1 mutations were previously associated with motor neuron disease but can underlie the selective vulnerab...

  2. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-07

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases.

  3. POLGI Mutations in Infantile Hepatocerebral Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine patients, 2 sibling pairs and 5 singleton cases, with POLGI mutations associated with infantile fatal encephalopathy and hepatopathy, 8 having typical Alpers’ syndrome (Alpers’ hepatopathic poliodystrophy and one a severe floppy infant syndrome with hepatic failure, are reported from the National Institute of Neurology, Milano; Meyer Children’s Hospital, Florence; University of Verona; University Hospital, Monza, Italy; and University Children’s Hospital, Hamburg, Germany.

  4. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits.

  5. Ichthyosis vulgaris: the filaggrin mutation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin-deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin barrier functions and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis.

  6. NFU1 gene mutation and mitochondrial disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin G Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chains consist of approximately 100 structural proteins. Thirteen of these structural proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, and the others by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutation in any of the mitochondrial structural-protein related genes, regardless of whether they are in the nDNA or mtDNA, might cause mitochondrial disorders. In the recent past, new nuclear genes required for assembly, maintenance, and translation of respiratory chain proteins have been found. Mutation in these genes might also cause mitochondrial disorders (MD. NFU1 gene is one of such genes and has a role in the assembly of iron–sulfur cluster (ISC. ISCs are included in a variety of metalloproteins, such as the ferredoxins, as well as in enzymatic reactions and have been first identified in the oxidation-reduction reactions of mitochondrial electron transport. It is important to be aware of NFU1 gene mutations that may cause severe mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, mitochondrial encephalomyopathies and death, early in life.

  7. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  8. ACTN1 mutations cause congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Shinji; Okuno, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sanada, Masashi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Koji; Sakai, Michio; Ohtake, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Iguchi, Akihiro; Niimi, Gen; Otsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia (CMTP) is a heterogeneous group of rare platelet disorders characterized by a congenital reduction of platelet counts and abnormally large platelets, for which CMTP-causing mutations are only found in approximately half the cases. We herein performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause CMTP, in which a dominant mode of transmission had been suspected but for which no known responsible mutations have been documented. In 13 Japanese CMTP-affected pedigrees, we identified six (46%) affected by ACTN1 variants cosegregating with CMTP. In the entire cohort, ACNT1 variants accounted for 5.5% of the dominant forms of CMTP cases and represented the fourth most common cause in Japanese individuals. Individuals with ACTN1 variants presented with moderate macrothrombocytopenia with anisocytosis but were either asymptomatic or had only a modest bleeding tendency. ACTN1 encodes α-actinin-1, a member of the actin-crosslinking protein superfamily that participates in the organization of the cytoskeleton. In vitro transfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrated that altered α-actinin-1 disrupted the normal actin-based cytoskeletal structure. Moreover, transduction of mouse fetal liver-derived megakaryocytes with disease-associated ACTN1 variants caused a disorganized actin-based cytoskeleton in megakaryocytes, resulting in the production of abnormally large proplatelet tips, which were reduced in number. Our findings provide an insight into the pathogenesis of CMTP.

  9. Collodion Baby with TGM1 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma D

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deepak Sharma,1 Basudev Gupta,2 Sweta Shastri,3 Aakash Pandita,1 Smita Pawar4 1Department of Neonatology, Fernandez Hospital, Hyderguda, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, 2Department of Pediatrics, Civil Hospital, Palwal, Haryana, 3Department of Pathology, NKP Salve Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fernandez Hospital, Hyderguda, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: Collodion baby (CB is normally diagnosed at the time of birth and refers to a newborn infant that is delivered with a lambskin-like membrane encompassing the total body surface. CB is not a specific disease entity, but is a common phenotype in conditions like harlequin ichthyosis, lamellar ichthyosis, nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, and trichothiodystrophy. We report a CB that was brought to our department and later diagnosed to have TGM1 gene c.984+1G>A mutation. However, it could not be ascertained whether the infant had lamellar ichthyosis or congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (both having the same mutation. The infant was lost to follow-up.Keywords: cellophane membrane, c.984+1G>A mutation, lamellar ichthyosis, nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, parchment membrane, TGM1 gene

  10. Dihydropyridine receptor mutations cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptacek, L.J.; Leppert, M.F. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Tawil, R. [Univ. of Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) is an autosomal dominant skeletal muscle disorder manifested by episodic weakness associated with low serum potassium. Genetic linkage analysis has localized the hypoKPP gene to chromosome 1q31-q32 near a dihydropyridine receptor (DHP) gene. This receptor functions as a voltage-gated calcium channel and is also critical for excitation-contraction coupling in a voltage-sensitive and calcium-independent manner. We have characterized patient-specific DHP receptor mutations in 11 probands of 33 independent hypoKPP kindreds that occur at one of two adjacent nucleotides within the same codon and predict substitution of a highly conserved arginine in the S4 segment of domain 4 with either histidine or glycine. In one kindred, the mutation arose de novo. Taken together, these data establish the DHP receptor as the hypoKPP gene. We are unaware of any other human diseases presently known to result from DHP receptor mutations.

  11. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  12. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  13. Lamin A deregulation in human mesenchymal stem cells promotes an impairment in their chondrogenic potential and imbalance in their response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Jesús; De la Fuente, Alexandre; Lesende-Rodriguez, Iván; Fernández-Pernas, Pablo; Arufe, María C; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of the over-expression of LMNA, or its mutant form progerin (PG), on the mesoderm differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human umbilical cord (UC) stroma using a recently described differentiation model employing spheroid formation. Accumulation of lamin A (LMNA) was previously associated with the osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocyte phenotype. Mutations of this protein are linked to laminopathies and specifically to Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), an accelerated aging disease. Some authors have proposed that a deregulation of LMNA affects the differentiation potential of stem cells. The chondrogenic potential is defective in PG-MSCs, although both PG and LMNA transduced MSCs, have an increase in hypertrophy markers during chondrogenic differentiation. Furthermore, both PG and LMNA-MSCs showed a decrease in manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSODM), an increase of mitochondrial MnSODM-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alterations in their migration capacity. Finally, defects in chondrogenesis are partially reversed by periodic incubation with ROS-scavenger agent that mimics MnSODM effect. Our results indicate that over-expression of LMNA or PG by lentiviral gene delivery leads to defects in chondrogenic differentiation potential partially due to an imbalance in oxidative stress.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotide induction of progerin in human myogenic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Bei Luo

    Full Text Available We sought to use splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides to produce a model of accelerated ageing by enhancing expression of progerin, translated from a mis-spliced lamin A gene (LMNA transcript in human myogenic cells. The progerin transcript (LMNA Δ150 lacks the last 150 bases of exon 11, and is translated into a truncated protein associated with the severe premature ageing disease, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS. HGPS arises from de novo mutations that activate a cryptic splice site in exon 11 of LMNA and result in progerin accumulation in tissues of mesodermal origin. Progerin has also been proposed to play a role in the 'natural' ageing process in tissues. We sought to test this hypothesis by producing a model of accelerated muscle ageing in human myogenic cells. A panel of splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides were designed to anneal across exon 11 of the LMNA pre-mRNA, and these compounds were transfected into primary human myogenic cells. RT-PCR showed that the majority of oligonucleotides were able to modify LMNA transcript processing. Oligonucleotides that annealed within the 150 base region of exon 11 that is missing in the progerin transcript, as well as those that targeted the normal exon 11 donor site induced the LMNA Δ150 transcript, but most oligonucleotides also generated variable levels of LMNA transcript missing the entire exon 11. Upon evaluation of different oligomer chemistries, the morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligonucleotides were found to be more efficient than the equivalent sequences prepared as oligonucleotides with 2'-O-methyl modified bases on a phosphorothioate backbone. The morpholino oligonucleotides induced nuclear localised progerin, demonstrated by immunostaining, and morphological nuclear changes typical of HGPS cells. We show that it is possible to induce progerin expression in myogenic cells using splice-switching oligonucleotides to redirect splicing of LMNA. This may offer a model

  15. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  16. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N. Murtaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  17. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  18. EGFR Mutation Status in Uighur Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SHAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a transmembrane protein, is a member of the tyrosine kinase family. Gefitinib, an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, has shown a high response rate in the treatment of lung cancer in patients with EGFR mutation. However, significant differences in EGFR mutations exist among different ethnic groups. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients by using a rapid and sensitive detection method and to analyze EGFR mutation differences compared with Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Methods We examined lung adenocarcinoma tissues from 138 patients, including 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients, for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 by using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR method. The mutation differences between Uighur and Han lung adenocarcinoma were compared by using the chi-square test method. Results EGFR mutations were detected in 43 (31.2% of the 138 lung adenocarcinoma patients. EGFR mutations were detected in 11 (16.2% of the 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and in 32 (45.7% of the 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Significant differences were observed in the EGFR mutations between Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (P<0.001. Conclusion Our results indicate that the EGFR mutation in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients (16.2% is significantly lower than that in Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (45.7%.

  19. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.; Morris, C.P. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associated only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Filaggrin Mutation in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Song-Ee; Hong, Won Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Nomura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing eczematous inflammatory skin disease. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are major predisposing factors for AD. Ethnic differences exist between Asian and European populations in the frequency and spectrum of FLG mutations. Moreover, a distinct set of FLG mutations has been reported in Asian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of FLG mutations in Koreans with AD. We also investigated the association of FLG mutations and clinical features of AD and compared the Korean FLG landscape with that of other East Asian countries. Materials and Methods Seventy Korean patients with AD were enrolled in this study. Fourteen FLG mutations previously detected in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese patients were screened by genotyping. Results Four FLG null mutations (3321delA, K4022X, S3296X, and S2889X) were identified in eleven patients (15.7%). The most commonly detected mutations in Korean patients with AD were 3321delA (n=6, 9.1%) and K4022X (n=3, 4.5%). FLG mutations were significantly associated with elevated IgE (≥200 KIU/L and/or MAST-CLA >3+, p=0.005), palmar hyperlinearity (p<0.001), and a family history of allergic disease (p=0.021). Conclusion This study expanded our understanding of the landscape of FLG mutations in Koreans and revealed an association between FLG mutations and AD phenotype. PMID:28120571

  1. Prognostic value of KTT mutation in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Liu; Chen-Guang Bai; Qiang Xie; Fei Feng; Zhi-Yun Xu; Da-Lie Ma

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the prevalence and prognostic significance of C-kit gene mutation and analysis the correlation of Ckit gene mutation and the clinicalpathologic parameters of GISTs.METHODS: Eighty-two GISTs were studied for the mutation of C-kit gene by PCR-SSCP, DNA sequence.Statistical comparison were used to analysis the correlation of C-kit gene mutation and clinicalpathology,clinical behavior, recurrence.RESULTS: (1) Mutation-positive and mutation-negative GISTs were 34 and 48,respectively; (2) Among these patients with C-kit mutation remained a significantly poor prognosis associated with 59% 3-year survival compared to those whose tumors did not; (3) Tunor size, PCNA index, mitotic cell number, presence of necrosis, microscopic invasion to adjacent tissues, recurrence and distant metastasis among mutation-positive and mutation-negative GISTs were significantly different.CONCLUSION: C-kit mutation is a undoubtedly pivotal event in GIST and may be associated with poor prognosis.Evaluation of C-kit gene mutation may have both prognosis and therapeutic significances.

  2. Germline mutations of STR-alleles include multi-step mutations as defined by sequencing of repeat and flanking regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Kratzer, Adelgunde; Neuhuber, Franz; Parson, Walther; Klintschar, Michael; Bär, Walter; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2012-05-01

    Well defined estimates of mutation rates are a prerequisite for the use of short tandem repeat (STR-) loci in relationship testing. We investigated 65 isolated genetic inconsistencies, which were observed within 50,796 allelic transfers at 23 STR-loci (ACTBP2 (SE33), CD4, CSF1PO, F13A1, F13B, FES, FGA, vWA, TH01, TPOX, D2S1338, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1132, D8S1179, D12S391, D13S317, D16S539, D17S976, D18S51, D19S433, D21S11) in Caucasoid families residing in Austria and Switzerland. Sequencing data of repeat and flanking regions and the median of all theoretically possible mutational steps showed valuable information to characterise the mutational events with regard to parental origin, change of repeat number (mutational step size) and direction of mutation (losses and gains of repeats). Apart from predominant single-step mutations including one case with a double genetic inconsistency, two double-step and two apparent four-step mutations could be identified. More losses than gains of repeats and more mutations originating from the paternal than the maternal lineage were observed (31 losses, 22 gains, 12 losses or gains and 47 paternal, 11 maternal mutations and 7 unclear of parental origin). The mutation in the paternal germline was 3.3 times higher than in the maternal germline. The results of our study show, that apart from the vast majority of single-step mutations rare multi-step mutations can be observed. Therefore, the interpretation of mutational events should not rigidly be restricted to the shortest possible mutational step, because rare but true multi-step mutations can easily be overlooked, if haplotype analysis is not possible.

  3. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  4. Costs and benefits of mutational robustness in RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Adi; Bianco, Simone; Yeh, Ming Te; Wright, Caroline; Butcher, Kristin; Tang, Chao; Nielsen, Rasmus; Andino, Raul

    2014-08-21

    The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  5. Costs and Benefits of Mutational Robustness in RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Stern

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  6. A Brief Review of Short Tandem Repeat Mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Fan; Jia-You Chu

    2007-01-01

    Short tandem repeats (STRs) are short tandemly repeated DNA sequences that involve a repetitive unit of 1-6 bp. Because of their polymorphisms and high mutation rates, STRs are widely used in biological research. Strand-slippage replication is the predominant mutation mechanism of STRs, and the stepwise mutation model is regarded as the main mutation model. STR mutation rates can be influenced by many factors. Moreover, some trinucleotide repeats are associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. In order to deepen our knowledge of these diseases and broaden STR application, it is essential to understand the STR mutation process in detail. In this review, we focus on the current known information about STR mutation.

  7. Hepatitis C virus induces a mutator phenotype: enhanced mutations of immunoglobulin and protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Keigo; Cheng, Kevin T-N; Sung, Vicky M-H; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Lindsay, Karen L; Levine, Alexandra M; Lai, Ming-Yang; Lai, Michael M C

    2004-03-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a nonretroviral oncogenic RNA virus, which is frequently associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and B cell lymphoma. We demonstrated here that acute and chronic HCV infection caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in mutation frequency in Ig heavy chain, BCL-6, p53, and beta-catenin genes of in vitro HCV-infected B cell lines and HCV-associated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymphomas, and HCCs. The nucleotide-substitution pattern of p53 and beta-catenin was different from that of Ig heavy chain in HCV-infected cells, suggesting two different mechanisms of mutation. In addition, the mutated protooncogenes were amplified in HCV-associated lymphomas and HCCs, but not in lymphomas of nonviral origin or HBV-associated HCC. HCV induced error-prone DNA polymerase zeta, polymerase iota, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, which together, contributed to the enhancement of mutation frequency, as demonstrated by the RNA interference experiments. These results indicate that HCV induces a mutator phenotype and may transform cells by a hit-and-run mechanism. This finding provides a mechanism of oncogenesis for an RNA virus.

  8. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations in Korean melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Chung, Kee Yang; Shin, Sang Joon; Rha, Sun Young; Tsao, Hensin

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the reverse transcriptase component of the telomeric complex, which synthesizes terminal DNA to protect chromosomal ends and to maintain genomic integrity. In melanoma, mutation in TERT promoter region is a common event and theses promoter variants have been shown to be associated with increased gene expression, decreased telomere length and poorer outcome. In this study, we determined the frequency of TERT promoter mutation in 88 Korean primary melanoma patients and aimed to see the association of TERT promoter mutation status to other major molecular features, such as BRAF, NRAS, KIT mutations and correlate with clinicopathological features. In our study, acral melanoma (n=46, 52.3%) was the most common type. Overall, TERT promoter mutation was observed in 15 cases (17%) with ten c. -124C>T altertions and five c. -146C>T alterations. None of our samples showed CC>TT mutation which is considered pathognomonic of UV induction. Among the 46 acral melanoma patients, 5 patients (10.9%) harbored TERT promoter mutation. Tumors with TERT promoter mutation showed significantly greater Breslow thickness compared to WT tumors (P=0.039). A combined analysis for the presence of TERT promoter and BRAF mutations showed that patients with both TERT promoter and BRAF mutation showed decreased survival compared with those with only TERT promoter mutation, only BRAF mutation, or without mutations in either TERT promoter or BRAF (P=0.035). Our data provides additional evidence that UV-induced TERT promoter mutation frequencies vary depending on melanoma subtype, but preserves its prognostic value.

  9. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  10. Differential Expression of GNAS and KRAS Mutations in Pancreatic Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context KRAS mutations play an important role in pancreatic cancer. GNAS mutations were discovered in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN. Objectives Our aim was to identify the frequency of KRAS and GNAS mutations in pancreatic cystic neoplasms and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Methods Sixty-eight surgically resected formalin fixed, paraffin embedded pancreatic specimens were analyzed, including: 1 benign [20 serous cystadenoma (SCA], 2 pre-malignant [10 mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN, 10 branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN, 9 main duct IPMN (MD-IPMN], 3 malignant [19 PDAC]. Total nucleic acid extraction was performed. KRAS codon 12/13 and GNAS codon 201 mutations were interrogated via targeted sequencing using the Ion Torrent's Personal Genome Machine (PGM. Results Mean age of 68 patients was 61.9± 8.4 with 72% female. KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN. KRAS mutations predominated in PDAC compared to pancreatic cysts (16/19, 84%versus 10/49, 20%; p0.001. GNAS mutatins were more common in IPMN compared to non-IPMN lesions (8/19, 42% versus 2/49, 4%;p=0.0003. No GNAS mutations were detected in PDAC and MCN while 2 SCA carried GNAS mutations. Double mutations with KRAS and GNAS were only present in IPMN (5/19 versus 0/30 SCA and MCN, p=0.006. Conclusions KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN with KRAS mutations primarily in PDAC and GNAS mutations more frequent in IPMN. No GNAS mutations occurred in MCN and double mutations were only present in IPMN.

  11. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another.

  12. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

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    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  13. Four familial ALS pedigrees discordant for two SOD1 mutations: Are all SOD1 mutations pathogenic?

    OpenAIRE

    Felbecker, Ansgar; Camu, William; Valdmanis, Paul; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Waibel, Stefan; Steinbach, Peter; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Andersen, Peter Munch

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background: One-hundred and fiftythree mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene have been claimed to be associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in familial and sporadic ALS in an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern with complete or reduced penetrance. We now report four ALS pedigrees from Finland, France, Germany and Sweden with either the D90A and E100K SOD1 mutations in some but not all affected members. After re-collecting of DNA...

  14. EGFR mutation -- a commonly neglected mutation in squamous cell lung carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajeev Saini; Ullas Batra; Akhil Jain; Chaturbhuj Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Advances in molecular biology have unveiled various targetable mutations with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) being most common. EGFR testing is recommended for all locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma lungs but recommendation in squamous histology is uncertain. However, just on the basis of histology, EGFR testing should not be withheld in patients diagnosed as squamous cell cancer on small biopsy, in females, never smokers and Asians. We report two cases with squamous cell lung cancer diagnosed on small biopsy, in non smoker females with EGFR mutations emphasizing the importance of testing in such population.

  15. The rich phase structure of a mutator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Yakushkina, Tatiana; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-10-01

    We propose a modification of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of biological molecular evolution to include a mutator gene that causes both an increase in the mutation rate and a change in the fitness landscape. This mutator effect relates to a wide range of biomedical problems. There are three possible phases: mutator phase, mixed phase and non-selective phase. We calculate the phase structure, the mean fitness and the fraction of the mutator allele in the population, which can be applied to describe cancer development and RNA viruses. We find that depending on the genome length, either the normal or the mutator allele dominates in the mixed phase. We analytically solve the model for a general fitness function. We conclude that the random fitness landscape is an appropriate choice for describing the observed mutator phenomenon in the case of a small fraction of mutators. It is shown that the increase in the mutation rates in the regular and the mutator parts of the genome should be set independently; only some combinations of these increases can push the complex biomedical system to the non-selective phase, potentially related to the eradication of tumors.

  16. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  17. 5'UTR mutations of ENG cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanovich, Kristy; Langa, Carmen; Blanco, Francisco J; McDonald, Jamie; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney; Stevenson, David A; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2011-12-22

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a vascular disorder characterized by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations, and telangiectases. The majority of the patients have a mutation in the coding region of the activin A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1) or Endoglin (ENG) gene. However, in approximately 15% of cases, sequencing analysis and deletion/duplication testing fail to identify mutations in the coding regions of these genes. Knowing its vital role in transcription and translation control, we were prompted to investigate the 5'untranslated region (UTR) of ENG. We sequenced the 5'UTR of ENG for 154 HHT patients without mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 coding regions. We found a mutation (c.-127C > T), which is predicted to affect translation initiation and alter the reading frame of endoglin. This mutation was found in a family with linkage to the ENG, as well as in three other patients, one of which had an affected sibling with the same mutation. In vitro expression studies showed that a construct with the c.-127C > T mutation alters the translation and decreases the level of the endoglin protein. In addition, a c.-9G > A mutation was found in three patients, one of whom was homozygous for this mutation. Expression studies showed decreased protein levels suggesting that the c.-9G > A is a hypomorphic mutation. Our results emphasize the need for the inclusion of the 5'UTR region of ENG in clinical testing for HHT.

  18. The spectrum of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, I

    2001-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is the prototype of a group of inherited inflammatory disorders. The gene (MEFV) responsible for this disease, comprises 10 exons and 781 codons. Twenty-nine mutations, most located in the last exon, have been identified so far. It is unclear whether all are true disease-causing mutations. Five founder mutations, V726A, M694V, M694I, M680I and E148Q account for 74% of FMF chromosomes from typical cases (Armenians, Arabs, Jews, and Turks). Rare mutations are preferentially found in populations not usually affected by FMF (eg Europeans not from the above ancestries). The various combinations of MEFV mutations define severe to mild genotypes. The trend is that genotypes including two mutations located within mutational 'hot-spots' (codons 680 or 694) of the gene are associated with severe phenotypes, whereas mild phenotypes are associated with some other mutations, E148Q being the mildest and least penetrant. Understanding the correlation between the FMF phenotype and genotype is further obscured by the existence of complex alleles, modifier loci, genetic heterogeneity and possible epigenetic factors. Additionally, mutations in the MEFV gene are thought to be involved in non FMF disorders. Carrier rates for FMF mutations may be as high as 1:3 in some populations, suggesting that the disease is underdiagnosed. This review update emphasises that both clinical and genetic features are to be taken into account for patient diagnosis, colchicine treatment and prognosis.

  19. HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL tRNA MUTATIONS IN MATERNALLY INHERITED DEAFNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing; GONG Sha-sha; TANG Xiao-wen; ZHU Yi; GUAN Min-xin

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes have been shown to be associated with maternally inherited syn-dromic and non-syndromic deafness. Among those, mutations such as tRNALeu(UUR) 3243A>G associated with syndromic deafness are often present in heteroplasmy, and the non-syndromic deafness-associated tRNA mu-tations including tRNASer(UCN) 7445A>G are often in homoplasmy or in high levels of heteroplasmy. These tRNA mutations are the primary factors underlying the development of hearing loss. However, other tRNA mutations such as tRNAThr 15927G>A and tRNASer(UCN) 7444G>A are insufficient to produce a deafness phe-notype, but always act in synergy with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations, and can modulate their phenotypic manifestation. These tRNA mutations may alter the structure and function of the corresponding mitochondrial tRNAs and cause failures in tRNAs metabolism. Thereby, the impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis and subsequent defects in respiration caused by these tRNA mutations, results in mitochon-drial dysfunctions and eventually leads to the development of hearing loss. Here, we summarized the deaf-ness-associated mitochondrial tRNA mutations and discussed the pathophysiology of these mitochondrial tRNA mutations, and we hope these data will provide a foundation for the early diagnosis, management, and treatment of maternally inherited deafness.

  20. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Kerr, Sarah E; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Graham, Rondell P; Zhang, Lizhi; Highsmith, W Edward; Zhang, Jun; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Halling, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are common in gliomas and help stratify patients with brain cancer into histologic and molecular subtypes. However, these mutations are considered rare in other solid tumors. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma and to assess histopathologic differences between specimens with and without an isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation. We sequenced 94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cholangiocarcinoma (67 intrahepatic and 27 extrahepatic) assessing for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (codon 132) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (codons 140 and 172) mutations. Multiple histopathologic characteristics were also evaluated and compared with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation status. Of the 94 evaluated specimens, 21 (22%) had a mutation including 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma than in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (28% versus 7%, respectively; P = .030). The 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were R132C (n = 9), R132S (n = 2), R132G (n = 2), and R132L (n = 1). The 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations were R172K (n = 5), R172M (n = 1), and R172G (n = 1). Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in tumors with clear cell change (P < .001) and poorly differentiated histology (P = .012). The results of this study show for the first time that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are mutated in cholangiocarcinoma. The results of this study are encouraging because it identifies a new potential target for genotype-directed therapeutic trials and may represent a potential biomarker for earlier detection of cholangiocarcinoma in a subset of cases.

  1. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  2. Transcranial sonography and functional imaging in glucocerebrosidase mutation Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M J; Hagenah, J; Dhawan, V; Peng, S; Stanley, K; Raymond, D; Deik, A; Gross, S J; Schreiber-Agus, N; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Ozelius, L J; Eidelberg, D; Bressman, S B; Saunders-Pullman, R

    2013-02-01

    Heterozygous glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations are the leading genetic risk factor for Parkinson disease, yet imaging correlates, particularly transcranial sonography, have not been extensively described. To determine whether GBA mutation heterozygotes with Parkinson disease demonstrate hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, transcranial sonography was performed in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson disease subjects, tested for the eight most common Gaucher disease mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, and in controls. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose or [(18)F]-fluorodopa positron emission tomography is also reported from a subset of Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations. Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations (n = 23) had a greater median maximal area of substantia nigral echogenicity compared to controls (n = 34, aSNmax = 0.30 vs. 0.18, p = 0.007). There was no difference in median maximal area of nigral echogenicity between Parkinson disease groups defined by GBA and LRRK2 genotype: GBA heterozygotes; GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.27); subjects without LRRK2 or GBA mutations (n = 32, aSNmax = 0.27); LRRK2 heterozygotes/homozygotes without GBA mutations (n = 27, aSNmax = 0.28); and GBA heterozygotes/LRRK2 heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.32, overall p = 0.63). In secondary analyses among Parkinson disease subjects with GBA mutations, maximal area of nigral echogenicity did not differ based on GBA mutation severity or mutation number. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (n = 3) and [(18)F]-fluorodopa (n = 2) positron emission tomography in Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations was consistent with findings in idiopathic Parkinson disease. Both transcranial sonography and positron emission tomography are abnormal in GBA mutation associated Parkinson disease, similar to other Parkinson disease subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Description of first germinal mosaic mutation identified in dominant skeletal mutation experiments and considerations about how to deal with this kind of spontaneous mutation in analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, Paul B.; Earhart, Vicki S.; Garrison, Edna M.; Raymer, G. Douglas

    2004-01-12

    Germinal mosaicism is a well-established mechanism by which new spontaneous mutations enter the human population, but it is only rather recently that clusters of mutations arising in that way have been acknowledged and dealt with in specific-locus experiments on male mice. This paper reports the first cluster of germinal mosaic mutations to have been identified in experiments on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations. The mutation was detected in six offspring of a control male from the radiation part of an Assessment-of-Dominant-Damage (ADD) experiment. Reasons are provided to explain why this one litter of six mutants was excluded from the analysis of induction of dominant mutations causing the more common skeletal anomalies, which is reported in another paper. The effects of excluding this litter from that analysis are fully described. There is discussion of why such clusters should be included in some analyses but omitted in others. They should certainly always be reported because, in some cases, they can have a major impact on conclusions. Details on this one cluster of FCGM mutations provide numerous examples of how a dominant skeletal mutation that causes rare effects can also cause many of the more common anomalies.

  4. Structural Consequences of Calmodulin EF Hand Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Taiakina, Valentina; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, J Guy

    2017-02-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein that serves as a control element for many enzymes. It consists of two globular domains, each containing two EF hand pairs capable of binding Ca(2+), joined by a flexible central linker region. CaM is able to bind and activate its target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+)-binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. These CaM mutant proteins are deficient in binding Ca(2+) in either the N-lobe EF hands (CaM12), C-lobe EF hands (CaM34), or all four EF hands (CaM1234). To investigate potential structural changes these mutations may cause, we performed detailed NMR studies of CaM12, CaM34, and CaM1234 including determining the solution structure of CaM1234. We then investigated if these CaM mutants affected the interaction of CaM with a target protein known to interact with apoCaM by determining the solution structure of CaM34 bound to the iNOS CaM binding domain peptide. The structures provide direct structural evidence of changes that are present in these Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants and show these mutations increase the hydrophobic exposed surface and decrease the electronegative surface potential throughout each lobe of CaM. These Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants may not be a true representation of apoCaM and may not allow for native-like interactions of apoCaM with its target proteins.

  5. TKI Resistance for T790M Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong WANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR the development of orally activesmall molecule inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC provides anew treatment plan. EGFR gene mutation in patients with activation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs therapy for the treatment of sensitive, so that a large number of clinical benefit. The first generation of reversible ATP-competitive EGFR-TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib as first-line, second-line or has the effect of maintenance therapy. Although the initial effect of these drugs have, but most patients will produce drug resistance. Within a year, 50%-60% patients had T790M housekeeping gene mutation associated with. Irreversible EGFR-TKIs recent background: afatinib and dac-omitinib covalent binding and inhibition of multiple ErbB family receptors (EGFR, HER2 and HER4. People evaluate these drugs as first-line treatment of significance, and acquired drug resistance situation significance on the first generation EGFR-TKIs. Afatinib is the first ErbB family approved blocking agent, used to treat with EGFR activatingmutations in patients with non small cell lung cancer; dacomitinib are in the later stages of clinicaldevelopment. EGFR inhibitors specifically targeting T790M resistance mutations (AZD9291, CO-1686, HM61713 are in the early stages of development. As discussed in this paper, the scope of the EGFR-TKIs kinase to target different, EGFR receptor binding was reversible and drug interaction potential is also different. For clinicians, these differences of the multi drug treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with meaning, from the innovative anticancer drug combination therapy strategy point of view, these differences are also of great significance.

  6. Environmental carcinogens and mutational pathways in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliero, A; Godschalk, R; Andreassi, M G; Curfs, D; Van Schooten, F J; Izzotti, A

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with DNA damage in both circulating and vessel-wall cells and DNA adducts derived from exposure to environmental mutagens are abundant in atherosclerotic vessels. Environmental chemical carcinogens identified as risk factor for atherosclerosis include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, beta-naphthoflavone, pyrene, 3-methylcolanthrene), arsenic, cadmium, 1,3-butadiene, cigarette smoke. Accordingly, polymorphisms of genes encoding for phase I/II metabolic reaction and DNA repair are risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, although their role is negligible as compared to other risk factors. The pathogenic relevance of mutation-related molecular damage in atherosclerosis has been demonstrated in experimental animal models involving the exposure to chemical mutagens. The relevance of mutation-related events in worsening atherosclerosis prognosis has been demonstrated in human clinical studies mainly as referred to mitochondrial DNA damage. Atherosclerosis is characterized by the occurrence of high level of oxidative damage in blood vessel resulting from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mitochondrial damage is a main endogenous source of oxidative stress whose accumulation causes activation of intrinsic apoptosis through BIRC2 inhibition and cell loss contributing to plaque development and instability. Environmental physical mutagens, including ionizing radiation, are a risk factor for atherosclerosis even at the low exposure dose occurring in case of occupational exposure or the high exposure doses occurring during radiotherapy. Conversely, the role of exciting UV radiation in atherosclerosis is still uncertain. This review summarizes the experimental and clinical evidence supporting the pathogenic role of mutation-related pathway in atherosclerosis examining the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  7. Rice mutation after flown in space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙野青; 魏力军; 李小乐; 赵海成; 辛平; 关双红

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the biological effect of space environment on growth and development of rice, four pure strains of rice seeds were placed aboard a recoverable satellite system for 15 days, and 12 new lines were selected out after recovery. And their selected progenies were examined for mutations at morphological, physiological and molecular levels, and radiation doses were measured as well. It was found that the seeds received an average dose rate of 0.177 mGy/d and an integral dose of 2.656 mGy/15 days; there were 1.5±0.5 heavy nuclear particles /cm2 of Z/Β≥50(Z≥20) and the numbers of Z≥3 heavy nuclear particles reached 29.7±0.5 particles/cm2 in the satellite cabin; in sum weight of one thousand seeds, 5 lines increased, while 7 lines decreased; in germination power, 7 lines increased, while 5 lines decreased; in germination capacity, 3 lines increased, while 9 lines decreased; in respiration rate of seedling, 6 lines increased, while 5 lines decreased, and one line remained unchanged; in content of chlorophyll, only 1 line increased while 10 lines decreased, and one line remained unchanged. In order to understand better mutagenesis of 971-5 at molecular level, RAPD analysis was conducted with 60 random primers, of which 11.6% were able to generate polymorphic bands between mutated and control plants. It is therefore concluded from the present data that potential uses of crop improvement of rice can be highly mutagenic and can effectively induce some mutations.

  8. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  9. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  10. Studies on mutation breeding of hibiscus syriacuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Sub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Hibiscus has been known as a national flower of Korea. Hibiscus has ahch a characteristic of self-incompatibility that all the plants exist as natural hybrids and have heterogeneous genes. Thirth two domestic varieties were propagated. Radiosensitivity of H. syriacus irradiated with gamma ray was investigated in plant cuttings. The plant height was reduced by 45 percent in 5 kR irradiated group compared to control group. The radiation dose of 5 kR could be rrecommended for mutation breeding of Hibiscus cuttings. Promising mutant lines were selected form the varieties of Hwarang Wolsan 176, I1pyondansim and Emille. 6 tabs., 2 figs., 13 refs., 4 ills. (Author).

  11. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  12. Beta thalassaemia mutations in Turkish Cypriots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozuoz, A; Berkalp, A; Figus, A; Loi, A; Pirastu, M; Cao, A

    1988-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide hybridisation or restriction endonuclease analysis, we have characterised the molecular defect in 94 patients with thalassaemia major and four with thalassaemia intermedia of Turkish Cypriot descent. We found that four mutations, namely beta+ IVS-1 nt 110, beta zero IVS-1 nt, beta+ IVS-1 nt 6, and beta+ IVS-2 nt 745 were prevalent, accounting for 69.9%, 11.7%, 8.7%, and 5.6% respectively of the beta thalassaemia chromosomes. This information may help in the organisation of a large scale prevention programme based on fetal diagnosis of beta thalassaemia by DNA analysis in the Turkish population. PMID:3236356

  13. GJB2 (Cx26) gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness and a report of one novel mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖自安; 谢鼎华

    2004-01-01

    Background Mutations in GJB2 gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital hearing loss and the cause in some rare cases of the autosomal dominant form. The purpose of This study was to investigate the frequency and the features of GJB2 mutations in the Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness. Methods Using PCR amplifying the entire coding region of GJB2 gene and direct DNA sequencing to analyze mutations in this gene among unrelated 69 cases with autosomal recessive congenital nonsyndromic deafness and 27 cases of dominant congenital deafness and 35 sporadic cases. We also detected mutations in GJB2 in 100 control subjects with normal hearing.Results 17.4% (12/69) of the probands in the autosomal recessive, 7.4% (2/27) of dominant families and 5.7% (2/35) of the sporadic congenital deafness patients had deafness-causing mutations in GJB2, respectively. Nine types of the mutations in GJB2 were detected in the recessive and sporadic group. They consisted of five types of polymorphism, and four types of deafness-causing mutation with homozygous 35delG in 1 sporadic (1/35), and 235delC frameshift mutation in 1 sporadic (homozygotes) and 10 recessive patients (2 heterozygotes and 8 homozygotes), and homozygous 442G→A missense mutation and homozygous 465T→A nonsense mutation in 1 different recessive proband, respectively. The 465T→A that related to recessive deafness was a novel mutation found by this study. The homozygous (10/69, 14.5%) and the heterozygous (2/69, 2.9%) GJB2 mutation in the recessive patients (12/69, 17.4%) and the homozygotes in the sporadic patient (2/35, 5.7%) all had congenital severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. 511G→A missense mutation and 299-300delAT frameshift mutation were found in two autosomal dominant congenital deafness families (2/27, 7.4%). The total mutation frequency of GJB2 was 12.2% (16/131) in the Chinese patients with congenital sensorineural deafness and 235delC was the most common

  14. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Rockah-Shmuel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  15. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  16. The impact of point mutations in the human androgen receptor: classification of mutations on the basis of transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin W Hay

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor mediated signaling drives prostate cancer cell growth and survival. Mutations within the receptor occur infrequently in prostate cancer prior to hormonal therapy but become prevalent in incurable androgen independent and metastatic tumors. Despite the determining role played by the androgen receptor in all stages of prostate cancer progression, there is a conspicuous dearth of comparable data on the consequences of mutations. In order to remedy this omission, we have combined an expansive study of forty five mutations which are predominantly associated with high Gleason scores and metastatic tumors, and span the entire length of the receptor, with a literature review of the mutations under investigation. We report the discovery of a novel prevalent class of androgen receptor mutation that possesses loss of function at low levels of androgen yet transforms to a gain of function at physiological levels. Importantly, mutations introducing constitutive gain of function are uncommon, with the majority of mutations leading to either loss of function or no significant change from wild-type activity. Therefore, the widely accepted supposition that androgen receptor mutations in prostate cancer result in gain of function is appealing, but mistaken. In addition, the transcriptional outcome of some mutations is dependent upon the androgen receptor responsive element. We discuss the consequences of these findings and the role of androgen receptor mutations for prostate cancer progression and current treatment options.

  17. The two-faced progeria gene and its implications in aging and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Houtkooper, Riekelt H

    2014-05-01

    Premature aging syndromes have gained much attention, not only because of their devastating symptoms but also because they might hold a key to some of the mechanisms underlying aging. The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation in the LMNA gene, which normally produces lamins A and C through alternative splicing. Due to this mutation, HGPS patients express an incompletely processed form of lamin A called progerin. In this issue of EMBO Reports, the Tazi group demonstrates how mice expressing different LMNA isoforms present opposite phenotypes in longevity, fat storage and mitochondrial function.

  18. Recherche des mécanismes impliqués dans les dérégulations de l'épissage alternatif à l'origine de la progéria et étude du rôle de l'étape d'épissage dans les changements globaux d'expression des gènes en réaction au choc thermique

    OpenAIRE

    Vautrot, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, also called progeria, is a rare genetic disease, characterized by symptoms that can be assimilated to accelerated natural ageing. Mutations that cause progeria affect the LMNA gene, which codes the lamin A that plays a major role in the shaping, maintenance and resistance of the nucleus. These mutations lead to the activation of alternative or cryptic 5' splice sites located within the exon 11 of LMNA pre-mRNA upstream from the normal 5' splice site. Our work ...

  19. Mutation@A Glance : an integrative web application for analysing mutations from human genetic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijikata, A.; Raju, R.; Keerthikumar, S.; Ramabadran, S.; Balakrishnan, L.; Ramadoss, S.K.; Pandey, A.; Mohan, S.; Ohara, O.

    2010-01-01

    Although mutation analysis serves as a key part in making a definitive diagnosis about a genetic disease, it still remains a time-consuming step to interpret their biological implications through integration of various lines of archived information about genes in question. To expedite this evaluatio

  20. Fitness effects of beneficial mutations: the mutational landscape model in experimental evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betancourt, Andrea J.; Bollback, Jonathan Paul

    2006-01-01

    of beneficial mutations should be roughly exponentially distributed. The prediction appears to be borne out by most of these studies, at least qualitatively. Another study showed that a modified version of the model was able to predict, with reasonable accuracy, which of a ranked set of beneficial alleles...

  1. Mutations in Hirschsprung disease : When does a mutation contribute to the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, RMW; Osinga, J; Buys, CHCM

    1997-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease is a congenital disorder clinically characterized by the absence of colonic ganglia and genetically by extensive heterogeneity. Genes involved include RET, GDNF, EDNRB and EDN3. Mutations of these genes may give dominant, recessive, or polygenic patterns of inheritance. In parti

  2. Was the C282Y mutation an Irish Gaelic mutation that the Vikings helped disseminate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Karl Sigvard; Konar, Jan; Dufva, Inge Hoegh;

    2011-01-01

    The HLA-related hemochromatosis mutation C282Y is thought to have originated in Ireland in a person with HLA-A3-B14 and was spread by Vikings. Irish people with two HLA-A3 alleles had a high risk of hemochromatosis. In this study, from west Sweden, we wanted to test these hypotheses....

  3. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, K.; Lee, L.; Leistritz, D.F.; Nurnberg, G.; Saha, B.; Hisama, F.M.; Eyman, D.K.; Lessel, D.; Nurnberg, P.; Li, C.; Garcia-F-Villalta, M.J.; Kets, C.M.; Schmidtke, J.; Cruz, V.T.; Akker, P.C. van den; Boak, J.; Peter, D.; Compoginis, G.; Cefle, K.; Ozturk, S.; Lopez, N.; Wessel, T. van; Poot, M.; Ippel, P.F.; Groff-Kellermann, B.; Hoehn, H.; Martin, G.M.; Kubisch, C.; Oshima, J.

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  4. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients : genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nuernberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nuernberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, Maria J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vitor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; Lopez, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2010-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 11

  5. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  6. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunxia; XU Guowang; SHI Xianzhe; MA Jianmei; ZHANG Yan; L(U) Shen; YANG Qing

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of mutation detection, such as single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), tandem SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and SNaPshot analysis were developed using homemade kit on ABI 310 genetic analyzer, and were successfully applied to mutation detection of 31 colorectal tumor samples. The sieving capability of homemade kit and commercial kit were compared, results demonstrate that homemade kit has higher resolution and shorter analysis time. In clinical tumor samples, 26% K-ras (exon 1) and 24% p53 (exons 7-8) were found to have mutations, and all mutations were single point variations. A majority of mutations occurred in one gene, only 1 tumor contained alterations in the two genes, which indicates that development of colorectal cancer lies on alternate pathways, and may correlate with different gene mutations.

  7. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  8. Mutations affecting the chemosensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starich, T.A.; Herman, R.K.; Kari, C.K. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filling defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. 58 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Novel strategies for comprehensive mutation screening of the APC gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmannova, L; Mego, M; Stevurkova, V; Zajac, V; Ciernikova, S

    2017-03-03

    Colorectal cancer is the 4th most common cause of cancer related deaths worldwide and new possibilities in accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment are highly required. Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene play a pivotal role in adenoma-carcinoma pathway of colorectal tumorigenesis. The quarter century from its´ first cloning, APC became one of the most frequently mutated, known driver genes in colorectal cancer. Intensive routine molecular testing of APC has brought the benefits for patients with family history of polyposis or colorectal cancer. Nevertheless, multiple mutational disease-causing mechanisms make the genetic testing still challenging. This minireview is focused on implementation of novel APC mutation screening diagnostic strategies for polyposis families according to the current findings. A further understanding and improved algorithms may help to increase the mutation detection rate. APC germline mutations achieve close to 100% penetrance, so more comprehensive approach followed by preventive and therapeutic strategies might reflect in decrease in burden of colorectal cancer.

  10. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  11. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated...... whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family....... Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare...

  12. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  13. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  14. Immune clonal selection optimization method with combining mutation strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In artificial immune optimization algorithm, the mutation of immune cells has been considered as the key operator that determines the algorithm performance. Traditional immune optimization algorithms have used a single mutation operator, typically a Gaussian. Using a variety of mutation operators that can be combined during evolution to generate different probability density function could hold the potential for producing better solutions with less computational effort. In view of this, a linear combination mutation operator of Gaussian and Cauchy mutation is presented in this paper, and a novel clonal selection optimization method based on clonal selection principle is proposed also. The simulation results show the combining mutation strategy can obtain the same performance as the best of pure strategies or even better in some cases.

  15. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  16. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Screening of Mutation in Amelogenin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veronese Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to report the clinical findings and the screening of mutations of amelogenin gene of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI. The genomic DNA was extracted from saliva of patient and his family, followed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The c.261C>T mutation was found in samples of mother, father, and brother, but the mutation was not found in the sequence of the patient. This mutation is a silent mutation and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2106416. Thus, it is suggested that the mutation found was not related to the clinical presence of AI. Further research is necessary to examine larger number of patients and genes related to AI.

  17. The origins, determinants, and consequences of human mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendure, Jay; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-09-25

    Germline mutations are the principal cause of heritable disease and the ultimate source of evolutionary change. Similarly, somatic mutations are the primary cause of cancer and may contribute to the burden of human disease more broadly than previously appreciated. Here, we review recent insights into the rates, spectrum, and determinants of genomic mutations and how these parameters inform our understanding of both Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also consider models for conceptualizing mutational consequences and outline several key areas for future research, including the development of new technologies to access and quantify the full spectrum of mutations, as well as to better interpret the consequences of mutations with respect to molecular functionality, evolutionary fitness, and disease pathogenicity.

  18. The Evolutionary Potential of Phenotypic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Hayato; Gispan, Ariel; Kadouri, Noam; Rozen, Shelly; Sharon, Michal; Barkai, Naama; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Errors in protein synthesis, so-called phenotypic mutations, are orders-of-magnitude more frequent than genetic mutations. Here, we provide direct evidence that alternative protein forms and phenotypic variability derived from translational errors paved the path to genetic, evolutionary adaptations via gene duplication. We explored the evolutionary origins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IDP3 - an NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase mediating fatty acids ß-oxidation in the peroxisome. Following the yeast whole genome duplication, IDP3 diverged from a cytosolic ancestral gene by acquisition of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal. We discovered that the pre-duplicated cytosolic IDPs are partially localized to the peroxisome owing to +1 translational frameshifts that bypass the stop codon and unveil cryptic peroxisomal targeting signals within the 3'-UTR. Exploring putative cryptic signals in all 3'-UTRs of yeast genomes, we found that other enzymes related to NADPH production such as pyruvate carboxylase 1 (PYC1) might be prone to peroxisomal localization via cryptic signals. Using laboratory evolution we found that these translational frameshifts are rapidly imprinted via genetic single base deletions occurring within the very same gene location. Further, as exemplified here, the sequences that promote translational frameshifts are also more prone to genetic deletions. Thus, genotypes conferring higher phenotypic variability not only meet immediate challenges by unveiling cryptic 3'-UTR sequences, but also boost the potential for future genetic adaptations.

  19. Molecular variants and mutations in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Schroeder, Sri GururanganPediatric Clinical Services, Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Medulloblastoma is the commonest malignant brain tumor in children. Treatment with surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy has improved outcomes in recent years, but patients are frequently left with devastating neurocognitive and other sequelae following such therapy. While the prognosis has traditionally been based on conventional histopathology and clinical staging (based on age, extent of resection, and presence or absence of metastasis, it has become apparent in recent years that the inherent biology of the tumor plays a significant part in predicting survival and sometimes supersedes clinical or pathologic risk factors. The advent of deep sequencing gene technology has provided invaluable clues to the molecular makeup of this tumor and allowed neuro-oncologists to understand that medulloblastoma is an amalgamation of several distinct disease entities with unique clinical associations and behavior. This review is a concise summary of the pathology, genetic syndromes, recent advances in molecular subgrouping, and the associated gene mutations and copy number variations in medulloblastoma. The association of molecular alterations with patient prognosis is also discussed, but it should be remembered that further validation is required in prospective clinical trials utilizing uniform treatment approaches.Keywords: medulloblastoma, children, adults, molecular subgroups, mutations

  20. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  1. Consistent mutational paths predict eukaryotic thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Noort Vera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomes of thermophilic prokaryotes have been instrumental in structural biology and successfully exploited in biotechnology, however many proteins required for eukaryotic cell function are absent from bacteria or archaea. With Chaetomium thermophilum, Thielavia terrestris and Thielavia heterothallica three genome sequences of thermophilic eukaryotes have been published. Results Studying the genomes and proteomes of these thermophilic fungi, we found common strategies of thermal adaptation across the different kingdoms of Life, including amino acid biases and a reduced genome size. A phylogenetics-guided comparison of thermophilic proteomes with those of other, mesophilic Sordariomycetes revealed consistent amino acid substitutions associated to thermophily that were also present in an independent lineage of thermophilic fungi. The most consistent pattern is the substitution of lysine by arginine, which we could find in almost all lineages but has not been extensively used in protein stability engineering. By exploiting mutational paths towards the thermophiles, we could predict particular amino acid residues in individual proteins that contribute to thermostability and validated some of them experimentally. By determining the three-dimensional structure of an exemplar protein from C. thermophilum (Arx1, we could also characterise the molecular consequences of some of these mutations. Conclusions The comparative analysis of these three genomes not only enhances our understanding of the evolution of thermophily, but also provides new ways to engineer protein stability.

  2. Disease causing mutations of calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Nancy M; Beam, Kurt G

    2008-01-01

    Calcium ions play an important role in the electrical excitability of nerve and muscle, as well as serving as a critical second messenger for diverse cellular functions. As a result, mutations of genes encoding calcium channels may have subtle affects on channel function yet strongly perturb cellular behavior. This review discusses the effects of calcium channel mutations on channel function, the pathological consequences for cellular physiology, and possible links between altered channel function and disease. Many cellular functions are directly or indirectly regulated by the free cytosolic calcium concentration. Thus, calcium levels must be very tightly regulated in time and space. Intracellular calcium ions are essential second messengers and play a role in many functions including, action potential generation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, calcium-dependent gene expression, synaptic plasticity and cell death. Calcium ions that control cell activity can be supplied to the cell cytosol from two major sources: the extracellular space or intracellular stores. Voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels are the primary way in which Ca(2+) ions enter from the extracellular space. The sarcoplasm reticulum (SR) in muscle and the endoplasmic reticulum in non-muscle cells are the main intracellular Ca(2+) stores: the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and inositol-triphosphate receptor channels are the major contributors of calcium release from internal stores.

  3. FRAXE mutation analysis in three Spanish families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, P.; Lopez, I.; Gabarron, J. [Centro de Bioquimica y Genetica Clinica, Murcia (Spain)] [and others

    1996-08-09

    Very little is known about the phenotype of FRAXE-positive individuals and the relation between the genotype/phenotype and genotype/cytogenetic expression. We describe three families with normal and mildly affected individuals and a severely retarded male expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus or presenting different expansions at the CGG FRAXE triplet. In addition, we analyze the FRAXE mutation in sperm DNA from a retarded male carrier with a handicapped daughter expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus. Mental status in FRAXE individuals is highly variable and, although mild mental retardation is observed in most cases, several carrier males are apparently normal. It seems that methylation is not as strictly associated with size of CGG triplets in the FRAXE locus as in FRAXA, and it is possible that normal carrier individuals with fully methylated increments in lymphocytes have a certain proportion of unmethylated alleles in the critical (i.e., neural) tissues. FRAXE mutation is apparently similar to FRAXA in that males with somatic large methylated increments are carriers of small unmethylated ones in germinal cells. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  5. [ Spectrum of oncogene mutations is different in melanoma subtypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, N N; Tsyganova, I V; Lushnikova, A A; Ponkratova, D A; Anurova, O A; Cheremushkin, E A; Mikhailova, I N; Demidov, L V

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most lethal malignancy of skin, which is comprised of clinically relevant molecular subsets defined by specific "driver" mutations in BRAF, NRAS, and KIT genes. Recently, the better results in melanoma treatment were obtained with the mutation-specific inhibitors that have been developed for clinical use and target only patients with particular tumor genotypes. The aim of the study was to characterize the spectrum of "driver" mutations in melanoma subtypes from 137 patients with skin melanoma and 14 patients with mucosal melanoma. In total 151 melanoma cases, the frequency of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, PDGFRA, and KRAS mutations was 55.0, 10.6, 4.0, 0.7, and 0.7%, respectively. BRAF mutations were found in 69% of cutaneous melanoma without UV exposure and in 43% of cutaneous melanoma with chronic UV exposure (p=0.045), rarely in acral and mucosal melanomas. Most of melanomas containing BRAF mutations, V600E (92%) and V600K (6.0%) were potentially sensitive to inhibitors vemurafenib and dabrafenib. NRAS mutations were more common in cutaneous melanoma with chronic UV exposure (26.0%), in acral and mucosal melanomas; the dominant mutations being Q61R/K/L (87.5%). KIT mutations were found in cutaneous melanoma with chronic UV exposure (8.7%) and mucosal one (28.6%), but not in acral melanoma. Most of KIT mutations were identified in exon 11; these tumors being sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This is the first monitoring of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, PDGFRA, and KRAS hotspot mutations in different subtypes of melanoma for Russian population. On the base of data obtained, one can suppose that at the molecular level melanomas are heterogeneous tumors that should be tested for "driver" mutations in the each case for evaluation of the potential sensitivity to target therapy. The obtained results were used for treatment of melanoma patients.

  6. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient.

  7. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matche...

  8. GENE MUTATIONS, GENETIC DISEASE AND PHARMACOGENETIC GENES DISORDER

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell mutation is able to create genetic variance in a cell population and can induce cancer and tumor when gene mutations took place at repressor gene in controlling cell cycles such as p53 gene. Whereas germline cell mutation can cause genetic disease such as sickle cell anemia, breast cancer, thalassemia, parkinson’s as well as defect of biochemical pathway that influence drug-receptor interaction, which has negative effect and lead to hospitalized of patient. Most of reports mentio...

  9. Mutational Analysis of Cell Types in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Comorbid neuropsychological disorders such as autism , mental retardation (MR), pervasive developmental disorder, attention deficit disorder (ADD...from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to...or TSC2 genes that is associated with epilepsy, cognitive disability, and autism . TSC1/TSC2 gene mutations lead to developmental alterations in brain

  10. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  11. Skin prick test reactivity to aeroallergens by filaggrin mutation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, M G; Johansen, J D; Linneberg, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations are positively associated with sensitization to aero allergens. We hypothesized that FLG mutations would also have an effect on the mean size of positive skin prick test (SPT) reactions as well as the number of positive reactions...... mutations alone are insufficient to cause secondary sensitization to allergens. The positive association seen in patients must be explained by a combination of further barrier abnormality caused by dermatitis as well as increased allergen exposure....

  12. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in etiopathogenesis of male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monis Bilal Shamsi

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: In the context of male infertility, mt mutations, generation of reactive oxygen species and lowered antioxidant capacity are interlinked and constitute a unified pathogenic molecular mechanism. In the era of assisted reproduction technique (ART, it is very important to distinguish between mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in sperm, as mtDNA mutations are better diagnostic and prognostic markers in infertile men opting for ART.

  13. Pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Zhu; Xuerui Peng; Min-Xin Guan; Qingfeng Yan

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinical phenotypes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which can be caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear genes. In this review, we summarized the pathogenic mutations of nuclear genes associated with mitochondrial disorders. These nuclear genes encode, components of mitochondrial translational machinery and structural subunits and assembly factors of the oxidative phosphorylation, that complex. The molecular mechanisms, that nuclear modifier genes modulate the phenotypic expression of mtDNA mutations, are discussed in detail.

  14. Capability Analysis of Chaotic Mutation and Its Self-Adaption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGLi-Jiang; CHENTian-Lun

    2002-01-01

    Through studying several kinds of chaotic mappings distributions of orbital points,we analyze the capabuility of the chaotic mutations based on these mappings,Numerical experiments support our conclusions very well.The capability analysis also led to a self-adaptive mechanism of chaotic mutation.The introducing of the self-adaptive chaotic mutation can improve the performance of genetic algorithm very prominently.

  15. Immune clonal selection optimization method with combining mutation strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In artificial immune optimization algorithm, the mutation of immune cells has been considered as the key operator that determines the algorithm performance. Traditional immune optimization algorithms have used a single mutation operator, typically a Gaussian. Using a variety of mutation operators that can be combined during evolution to generate different probability density function could hold the potential for producing better solutions with less computational effort. In view of this, a linear combination...

  16. Hepatitis E Virus Mutations: Functional and Clinical Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang van Tong; Nghiem Xuan Hoan; Bo Wang; Heiner Wedemeyer; C.-Thomas Bock; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • HEV causes acute hepatitis and recently comes into focus because of persistent infection in immunocompromised patients. • HEV variability can be associated with clinical pathogenesis and transmission dynamics. • Mutations in the HEV genome can influence HEV physiology and virus-host interaction. • HEV mutations and variability are likely associated with fulminant hepatic failure and chronic hepatitis E. • The Y1320H and G1634R/K mutations in the RdRp domain contribute to antivira...

  17. Mutation supply and the repeatability of selection for antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Thomas; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Zwart, Mark P.

    2017-10-01

    Whether evolution can be predicted is a key question in evolutionary biology. Here we set out to better understand the repeatability of evolution, which is a necessary condition for predictability. We explored experimentally the effect of mutation supply and the strength of selective pressure on the repeatability of selection from standing genetic variation. Different sizes of mutant libraries of antibiotic resistance gene TEM-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli, generated by error-prone PCR, were subjected to different antibiotic concentrations. We determined whether populations went extinct or survived, and sequenced the TEM gene of the surviving populations. The distribution of mutations per allele in our mutant libraries followed a Poisson distribution. Extinction patterns could be explained by a simple stochastic model that assumed the sampling of beneficial mutations was key for survival. In most surviving populations, alleles containing at least one known large-effect beneficial mutation were present. These genotype data also support a model which only invokes sampling effects to describe the occurrence of alleles containing large-effect driver mutations. Hence, evolution is largely predictable given cursory knowledge of mutational fitness effects, the mutation rate and population size. There were no clear trends in the repeatability of selected mutants when we considered all mutations present. However, when only known large-effect mutations were considered, the outcome of selection is less repeatable for large libraries, in contrast to expectations. We show experimentally that alleles carrying multiple mutations selected from large libraries confer higher resistance levels relative to alleles with only a known large-effect mutation, suggesting that the scarcity of high-resistance alleles carrying multiple mutations may contribute to the decrease in repeatability at large library sizes.

  18. Cooperating gene mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukemia with special reference on mutations of ASXL1, TET2, IDH1, IDH2, and DNMT3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Der-Cherng; Liu, Hsi-Che; Yang, Chao-Ping; Jaing, Tang-Her; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hou, Jen-Yin; Huang, Ying-Jung; Shih, Yu-Shu; Huang, Yu-Hui; Lin, Tung-Huei; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2013-04-11

    Gene mutations involving epigenetic regulators recently have been described in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Similar studies are limited in children. We analyzed gene mutations and cooperation in pediatric AML with special reference on mutated epigenetic regulators. Nineteen gene mutations, including 8 class I genes, 4 class II genes, WT1 and TP53 (class III), and 5 epigenetic regulator genes (class IV), were analyzed in 206 children with de novo AML. Mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction-based assay followed by direct sequencing. One hundred seventeen of 206 patients (56.8%) had at least one mutation: 51% class I, 13% class II, 6.8% class III, and 5.6% class IV. FLT3-internal tandem duplication was most frequent, and 29% of patients had more than one gene mutation. Two patients carried ASXL1 mutations, both with t(8;21), 2 had DNMT3A mutations, 2 had IDH1 mutations, 1 had IDH2 mutation, and 3 had TET2 mutations. Both patients with IDH1 mutations had AML-M0 subtype and MLL-partial tandem duplication. Cooperating mutations with mutated epigenetic regulators were observed in 8 of 10 patients. We conclude that mutated epigenetic regulators were much less than those in adult AML but with frequent cooperating mutations. ASXL1, TET2, and IDH1 mutations were associated with specific genetic subtypes.

  19. Twelve novel Atm mutations identified in Chinese ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Lu; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Ying; Xia, Rongjun; Yuan, Xianhou; Yan, Mingshan

    2013-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized mainly by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. This disease is caused by mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene. More than 500 Atm mutations that are responsible for A-T have been identified so far. However, there have been very few A-T cases reported in China, and only two Chinese A-T patients have undergone Atm gene analysis. In order to systemically investigate A-T in China and map their Atm mutation spectrum, we recruited eight Chinese A-T patients from six unrelated families nationwide. Using direct sequencing of genomic DNA and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified twelve pathogenic Atm mutations, including one missense, four nonsense, five frameshift, one splicing, and one large genomic deletion. All the Atm mutations we identified were novel, and no homozygous mutation and founder-effect mutation were found. These results suggest that Atm mutations in Chinese populations are diverse and distinct largely from those in other ethnic areas.

  20. Identification of trunk mutations in gastric carcinoma: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhan; Wu, Shanshan; Lai, Jun; Shi, Yuan; Qiu, Chixiao; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Xun; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Shuqing

    2017-07-17

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) poses an urgent challenge for cancer precision medicine because it can cause drug resistance against cancer target therapy and immunotherapy. The search for trunk mutations that are present in all cancer cells is therefore critical for each patient. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficiency of multiregional sequencing for the identification of trunk mutations present in all regions of a tumor as a case study. We applied multiregional whole-exome sequencing (WES) to investigate the genetic heterogeneity and homogeneity of a case of gastric carcinoma. Approximately 83% of common missense mutations present in two samples and approximately 89% of common missense mutations present in three samples were trunk mutations. Notably, trunk mutations appeared to have higher variant allele frequencies (VAFs) than non-trunk mutations. Our results indicate that small-scale multiregional sampling and subsequent screening of low VAF somatic mutations might be a cost-effective strategy for identifying the majority of trunk mutations in gastric carcinoma.

  1. The structure of mutations and the evolution of cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián García

    Full Text Available Evolutionary game dynamics in finite populations assumes that all mutations are equally likely, i.e., if there are n strategies a single mutation can result in any strategy with probability 1/n. However, in biological systems it seems natural that not all mutations can arise from a given state. Certain mutations may be far away, or even be unreachable given the current composition of an evolving population. These distances between strategies (or genotypes define a topology of mutations that so far has been neglected in evolutionary game theory. In this paper we re-evaluate classic results in the evolution of cooperation departing from the assumption of uniform mutations. We examine two cases: the evolution of reciprocal strategies in a repeated prisoner's dilemma, and the evolution of altruistic punishment in a public goods game. In both cases, alternative but reasonable mutation kernels shift known results in the direction of less cooperation. We therefore show that assuming uniform mutations has a substantial impact on the fate of an evolving population. Our results call for a reassessment of the "model-less" approach to mutations in evolutionary dynamics.

  2. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D. [Univ. of Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition at position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.

  3. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  4. Splice site mutations in the ATP7A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Skjørringe

    Full Text Available Menkes disease (MD is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype.

  5. CDH1 germline mutations and hereditary lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Giovanni; Intra, Mattia; Trentin, Chiara; Veronesi, Paolo; Galimberti, Viviana

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disease associated of CDH1 germline mutations (that encodes for the E-cadherin protein), and lobular breast cancer is the second most frequent type of neoplasia. Recently, novel E-cadherin constitutional alterations have been identified in pedigree clustering only for lobular breast carcinoma without evidence of diffuse gastric tumors and in absence of BRCA1/2 mutations. This first evidence opens novel questions about the inherited correlation between diffuse gastric and lobular breast cancers. In this brief review we revise the literature data about the CDH1 mutation frequency affecting exclusively lobular breast cancer, providing clinical recommendation for asymptomatic mutation carriers.

  6. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations.

  7. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Bangham, J W; Russell, W L; Shelby, M D

    1989-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to date in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with approximately 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germ-line mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice. Images PMID:2726748

  8. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Bangham, J.W.; Russell, W.L.; Shelby, M.D. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1989-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to data in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with {approx} 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germline mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice.

  9. Frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, A M; Johannsen, P; Holm, I;

    2011-01-01

    CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The best studied example is frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 3 (FTD-3) which occurs in a large Danish family, with a further CHMP2B mutation identified in an unrelated Belgian familial FTD patient. ...... features of FTD caused by CHMP2B truncation mutations as well as new brain imaging and neuropathological findings. Finally, we collate the current data on CHMP2B missense mutations, which have been reported in FTD and motor neuron disease....

  10. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  11. Mutation analysis in Turkish patients with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, A; Kalkanoğlu, H S; Coşkun, T; Tokatli, A; Bittner, R; Koçak, N; Yüce, A; Ozalp, I; Boehme, H J

    2001-10-01

    Thirteen Turkish patients with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) were screened for the three common mutations, A149P, A174D and N334K, in the aldolase B gene that have been detected frequently in European population. We found that nine of the patients carry the A149P mutation in both alleles, which corresponds to a frequency of about 55%. Single-strand conformation analysis of all coding exons of the gene was also performed to detect unknown mutations in four patients not carrying the three common mutations. No aberrant migration patterns were observed in these patients.

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia with DNMT3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2014-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of blood cancer, is characterized by an increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow, frequently causing hematopoietic insufficiency. It is a heterogeneous disease featuring cytogenetic aberrations, recurrent somatic mutations and alterations in gene expression. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) is closely associated with epigenetic modifications in mammalian development and disease. More recent studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in DNMT3A in AML, most of which are heterozygous. The DNMT3A R882 codon is a mutational hotspot. The frequency of DNMT3A mutations varies among different countries, but mutations have been found to be associated with cytogenetics, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prognosis and response of patients to chemotherapy. The normal function of DNMT3A can be disrupted by these mutations, which subsequently results in an abnormality of epigenetic modification. These data suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene represent a novel class of mutations in AML with distinct biological and clinical features. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact molecular mechanism and function of DNMT3A mutations in leukemogenesis.

  13. Gene mutations of acute myeloid leukemia in the genome era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ten years ago, gene mutations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were conceptually grouped into class I mutation, which causes constitutive activation of intracellular signals that contribute to the growth and survival, and class II mutation, which blocks differentiation and/or enhance self-renewal by altered transcription factors. A cooperative model between two classes of mutations has been suggested by murine experiments and partly supported by epidemiological findings. In the last 5 years, comprehensive genomic analysis proceeded to find new gene mutations, which are found in the epigenome-associated enzymes and the molecules never noticed so far. These new mutations apparently increase the complexity and heterogeneity of AML. Although a long list of gene mutations might have been compiled, the entire picture of molecular pathogenesis in AML remains to be elucidated because gene rearrangement, gene copy number, DNA methylation and expression profiles are not fully studied in conjunction with gene mutations. Comprehensive genome research will deepen the understanding of AML to promote the development of new classification and treatment. This review focuses on gene mutations that were recently discovered by genome sequencing.

  14. Arteriovenous malformation within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The co-occurrence of intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs and cerebral neoplasms is exceedingly rare but may harbor implications pertaining to the molecular medicine of brain cancer pathogenesis. Case Description: Here, we present a case of de novo AVM within an isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutated anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO Grade III and review the potential contribution of this mutation to aberrant angiogenesis as an interesting case study in molecular medicine. Conclusion: The co-occurrence of an IDH1 mutated neoplasm and AVM supports the hypothesis that IDH1 mutations may contribute to aberrant angiogenesis and vascular malformation.

  15. Artificial Bee Colony with Different Mutation Schemes: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad Abu Doush

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Bee Colony (ABC is a swarm-based metaheuristic for continuous optimization. Recent work hybridized this algorithm with other metaheuristics in order to improve performance. The work in this paper, experimentally evaluates the use of different mutation operators with the ABC algorithm. The introduced operator is activated according to a determined probability called mutation rate (MR. The results on standard benchmark function suggest that the use of this operator improves performance in terms of convergence speed and quality of final obtained solution. It shows that Power and Polynomial mutations give best results. The fastest convergence was for the mutation rate value (MR=0.2.

  16. Mutation study of Spanish patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Francisco J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant and age-dependent vascular disorder characterised mainly by mutations in the Endoglin (ENG or activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1, ACVRL1 genes. Methods Here, we have identified 22 ALK1 mutations and 15 ENG mutations, many of which had not previously been reported, in independent Spanish families afflicted with HHT. Results We identified mutations in thirty-seven unrelated families. A detailed analysis of clinical symptoms was recorded for each patient analyzed, with a higher significant presence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM in HHT1 patients over HHT2. Twenty-two mutations in ALK1 and fifteen in ENG genes were identified. Many of them, almost half, represented new mutations in ALK1 and in ENG. Missense mutations in ENG and ALK1 were localized in a tridimensional protein structure model. Conclusion Overall, ALK1 mutations (HHT2 were predominant over ENG mutations (HHT1 in our Spanish population, in agreement with previous data from our country and other Mediterranean countries (France, Italy, but different to Northern Europe or North America. There was a significant increase of PAVM associated with HHT1 over HHT2 in these families.

  17. The functional importance of disease-associated mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Teri E

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many years, scientists believed that point mutations in genes are the genetic switches for somatic and inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, phenylketonuria and cancer. Some of these mutations likely alter a protein's function in a manner that is deleterious, and they should occur in functionally important regions of the protein products of genes. Here we show that disease-associated mutations occur in regions of genes that are conserved, and can identify likely disease-causing mutations. Results To show this, we have determined conservation patterns for 6185 non-synonymous and heritable disease-associated mutations in 231 genes. We define a parameter, the conservation ratio, as the ratio of average negative entropy of analyzable positions with reported mutations to that of every analyzable position in the gene sequence. We found that 84.0% of the 231 genes have conservation ratios less than one. 139 genes had eleven or more analyzable mutations and 88.0% of those had conservation ratios less than one. Conclusions These results indicate that phylogenetic information is a powerful tool for the study of disease-associated mutations. Our alignments and analysis has been made available as part of the database at http://cancer.stanford.edu/mut-paper/. Within this dataset, each position is annotated with the analysis, so the most likely disease-causing mutations can be identified.

  18. [Current topics in mutations in the cancer genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Takeshi; Mimori, Koshi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2012-03-01

    Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are involved in the multistep process of carcinogenesis in many cancer types. Recently, global mutational analyses have revealed that the cancer genome has far greater numbers of mutations than previously thought. Furthermore, the next-generation sequencing method, which has a different principle from conventional Sanger sequencing, has provided more information on the cancer genome such as new cancer-related genes and the existence of many rearrangements in solid cancers. Somatic mutations occurring in cancer cells are divided into "driver" and "passenger" mutations. Driver mutations confer a growth advantage upon the neoplastic clone and are crucial for carcinogenesis. The remaining large majority of mutations are passengers, which, by definition, do not confer a growth advantage. Driver genes with low-frequency mutation rates (less than 10%) are also involved in carcinogenesis along with well-known drivers with high-frequency mutations. There are now several celebrated examples of anticancer drugs of which the efficacy in cancer patients can be predicted based on the genotype of several driver genes, such as EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF on the EGFR signaling pathway. The complete catalogs of somatic mutations provided by the sequencing of the cancer genome are expected to prompt new approaches to diagnosis, therapy, and potentially prevention.

  19. Braf V600E mutation in melanoma: translational current scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadarrama-Orozco, J A; Ortega-Gómez, A; Ruiz-García, E B; Astudillo-de la Vega, H; Meneses-García, A; Lopez-Camarillo, C

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma was one of the translational cancer examples in clinic, including target therapy related to specific biomarkers impacting in the outcome of melanoma patients. Melanomagenesis involved a wide variety of mutations during his evolution; many of these mutated proteins have a kinase activity. One of the most cited proteins in melanoma is BRAF (about 50-60 % of melanomas harbors activating BRAF mutations), for these the most common is a substitution of valine to glutamic acid at codon 600 (p.V600E). Therefore, the precise identification of this underlying somatic mutation is essential; knowing the translational implications has opened a wide view of melanoma biology and therapy.

  20. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.